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Sample records for state-dependent presynaptic inhibition

  1. Biophysical constraints of optogenetic inhibition at presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Mahn, Mathias; Prigge, Matthias; Ron, Shiri; Levy, Rivka; Yizhar, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of optogenetic inhibition at presynaptic terminals using halorhodopsin, archaerhodopsin and chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins. Precisely timed activation of both archaerhodopsin and halorhodpsin at presynaptic terminals attenuated evoked release. However, sustained archaerhodopsin activation was paradoxically associated with increased spontaneous release. Activation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins triggered neurotransmitter release upon light onset. Our results indicate that the biophysical properties of presynaptic terminals dictate unique boundary conditions for optogenetic manipulation. PMID:26950004

  2. Presynaptic inhibition: an intramural mechanism regulating cardiac afferentation

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.A.; Bilibin, D.P.; Shevelev, O.A.

    1986-09-01

    The authors attempt to show the existence of extracardiac and intracardiac influences able to limit the conductivity of afferent channels belonging to the spinal afferent system of the heart. The data presented serve as the basis for the hypothesis that total or partial afferent blockade of this kind is affected through activation of a mechanism of presynaptic inhibition, acting at the intramural level. The results described were obtained in several series of acute experiments on 20 mature cats anesthetized with chloralose and curarized. Ultrathin sections of the heart were cut on the ultramicrotome, stained with lead hydroxide and uranyl acetate, and examined with an electron microscope. It is shown that presynaptic inhibition is evidently the principal intramural physiological mechanism restricting conductivity of the spinal afferent channel of the heart.

  3. Relationships between presynaptic inhibition and static postural sway in subjects with and without diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jihyun; Hong, Junggi

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can often lead to balance impairment. The spinal reflex is a mechanism that is reportedly important for balance, but it has not been investigated in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Moreover, inhibitory or facilitatory behavior of the spinal reflex-known as presynaptic inhibition-is essential for controlling postural sway. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in as presynaptic inhibition and balance in subjects with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy to determine the influence of presynaptic inhibition on balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. [Subjects and Methods] Presynaptic inhibition and postural sway were tested in eight patients (mean age, 58±6 years) and eight normal subjects (mean age, 59±7 years). The mean percent difference in conditioned reflex amplitude relative to the unconditioned reflex amplitude was assessed to calculate as presynaptic inhibition. The single-leg balance index was measured using a computerized balance-measuring device. [Results] The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group showed lower presynaptic inhibition (47±30% vs. 75±22%) and decreased balance (0.65±0.24 vs. 0.38±0.06) as compared with the normal group. No significant correlation was found between as presynaptic inhibition and balance score (R=0.37). [Conclusion] Although the decreased as presynaptic inhibition observed in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients may suggest central nervous system involvement, further research is necessary to explore the role of presynaptic inhibition in decreased balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients.

  4. Inhibition of presynaptic neurotoxins in taipan venom by suramin.

    PubMed

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2014-04-01

    Taipans are amongst the most venomous snakes in the world, and neurotoxicity is a major life-threatening symptom of envenoming by these snakes. Three species of taipans exist, and the venom from each species contains a presynaptic neurotoxin which accounts for much of the neurotoxicity observed following human envenoming. The high cost of antivenom used to treat neurotoxicity has resulted in the need to develop alternative but effective therapies. Therefore, in this study, we examined the ability of the P2Y receptor antagonist suramin to prevent the in vitro neurotoxic effects of the three presynaptic neurotoxins in taipan venoms: taipoxin, paradoxin and cannitoxin. Toxins were purchased from commercial sources or purified in house, using multiple steps of gel filtration chromatography. All three toxins (11 nM) inhibited nerve-mediated twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation within 300 min. The presence of suramin (0.3 mM) completely blocked the taipoxin and cannitoxin-mediated inhibition of nerve-mediated twitches within the course of the experiment (P < 0.0001). However, paradoxin induced a 32 % decrease in twitch height even in the presence of suramin within 360 min. This was significantly different compared to toxin alone (P < 0.0001). We also examined the effect of suramin on the neurotoxic effects of textilotoxin and the products of phospholipase A2 action. Each toxin alone or in the presence of suramin failed to inhibit the responses to exogenous agonists ACh, CCh or KCl. Our results warrant clinical studies aimed determining the efficacy of suramin in preventing the onset of neurotoxicity following taipan envenoming.

  5. Tick holocyclotoxins trigger host paralysis by presynaptic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Kirat K.; Lee, Kah Meng; Lavidis, Nickolas A.; Rodriguez-Valle, Manuel; Ijaz, Hina; Koehbach, Johannes; Clark, Richard J.; Lew-Tabor, Ala; Noakes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are important vectors of pathogens and secreted neurotoxins with approximately 69 out of 692 tick species having the ability to induce severe toxicoses in their hosts. The Australian paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is known to be one of the most virulent tick species producing a flaccid paralysis and fatalities caused by a family of neurotoxins known as holocyclotoxins (HTs). The paralysis mechanism of these toxins is temperature dependent and is thought to involve inhibition of acetylcholine levels at the neuromuscular junction. However, the target and mechanism of this inhibition remain uncharacterised. Here, we report that three members of the holocyclotoxin family; HT-1 (GenBank AY766147), HT-3 (GenBank KP096303) and HT-12 (GenBank KP963967) induce muscle paralysis by inhibiting the dependence of transmitter release on extracellular calcium. Previous study was conducted using extracts from tick salivary glands, while the present study is the first to use pure toxins from I. holocyclus. Our findings provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which these toxins act to induce paralysis. PMID:27389875

  6. Spinal reflex adaptation in dancers changes with body orientation and role of pre-synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Rachel; Kitano, Koichi; Koceja, David M

    2010-01-01

    Dancers undergo specific activity-dependent neuromuscular adaptations following long-term training that allow them to develop the refined motor skills required for success in dance. The spinal stretch reflex circuit has demonstrated specific adaptations following prolonged dance training. Adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex can be studied using H-reflex methodology, first described by Paul Hoffmann in 1910. This article discusses H-reflex methodology and presents data that examine the neural mechanisms that contribute to adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex with dance training. Two groups of subjects, modern dancers (N = 5) and untrained controls (N = 5), were tested. On one-half of the trials common peronal nerve (CPN) conditioning of the soleus H-reflex was used to assess one spinal mechanism, pre-synaptic inhibition; the other half tested the soleus H-reflex only (unconditioned). The dependent variables were the H(max)/M(max) ratios, unconditioned and with CPN conditioning, expressed as percent values. The results revealed three main findings: 1. Modern dancers had smaller H(max)/M(max) ratios than control subjects; 2. The H(max)/M(max) ratio was smaller in standing posture than in prone among both dancers and controls; and 3. Pre-synaptic inhibition was not different between dancers and controls in standing. In conclusion, modern dancers have smaller H-reflexes than untrained controls, but pre-synaptic inhibition does not appear to explain this difference. PMID:21703086

  7. Retrograde release of endocannabinoids inhibits presynaptic GABA release to second-order baroreceptive neurons in NTS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2010-12-01

    In prior studies, we found that activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) prolonged baroreflex-induced sympathoinhibition in rats. In many regions of the central nervous system, activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors presynaptically inhibits γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, disinhibiting postsynaptic neurons. To determine if cannabinoid-1 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release occurs in the NTS, we recorded miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in anatomically identified second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin. The cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists, WIN 55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) and methanandamide (3 μM) decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251, 5 μM). Importantly, depolarization of second-order baroreceptive neurons decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; an effect which was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist. The data indicate that depolarization of second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons induces endocannabinoid release from the neurons, leading to activation of presynaptic cannabinoid-1 receptors, inhibition of GABA release and subsequent enhanced baroreflex signaling in the NTS. The data suggest that endocannabinoid signaling in the NTS regulates short-term synaptic plasticity and provide a mechanism for endocannabinoid modulation of central baroreflex control.

  8. State-Dependent Inhibition of Sodium Channels by Local Anesthetics: A 40-Year Evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-K; Strichartz, G R

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge about the mechanism of impulse blockade by local anesthetics has evolved over the past four decades, from the realization that Na(+) channels were inhibited to affect the impulse blockade to an identification of the amino acid residues within the Na(+) channel that bind the local anesthetic molecule. Within this period appreciation has grown of the state-dependent nature of channel inhibition, with rapid binding and unbinding at relatively high affinity to the open state, and weaker binding to the closed resting state. Slow binding of high affinity for the inactivated state accounts for the salutary therapeutic as well as the toxic actions of diverse class I anti-arrhythmic agents, but may have little importance for impulse blockade, which requires concentrations high enough to block the resting state. At the molecular level, residues on the S6 transmembrane segments in three of the homologous domains of the channel appear to contribute to the binding of local anesthetics, with some contribution also from parts of the selectivity filter. Binding to the inactivated state, and perhaps the open state, involves some residues that are not identical to those that bind these drugs in the resting state, suggesting spatial flexibility in the "binding site". Questions remaining include the mechanism that links local anesthetic binding with the inhibition of gating charge movements, and the molecular nature of the theoretical "hydrophobic pathway" that may be critical for determining the recovery rates from blockade of closed channels, and thus account for both therapeutic and cardiotoxic actions. PMID:23710324

  9. Mechanisms underlying cannabinoid inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx at parallel fibre synapses of the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Daniel, H; Rancillac, A; Crepel, F

    2004-05-15

    Activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the cerebellum acutely depresses excitatory synaptic transmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses by decreasing the probability of glutamate release. This depression involves the activation of presynaptic 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels by CB1 receptors, which in turn inhibits presynaptic Ca(2+) influx controlling glutamate release at these synapses. Using rat cerebellar frontal slices and fluorometric measures of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx evoked by stimulation of parallel fibres with the fluorescent dye fluo-4FF, we tested whether the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of this influx also involves a direct inhibition of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels. Since various physiological effects of CB1 receptors appear to be mediated through the activation of PTX-sensitive proteins, including inhibition of adenylate cyclases, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and activation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels, we also studied the potential involvement of these intracellular signal transduction pathways in the cannabinoid-mediated depression of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx. The present study demonstrates that the molecular mechanisms underlying the CB1 inhibitory effect involve the activation of the PTX-sensitive G(i)/G(o) subclass of G proteins, independently of any direct effect on presynaptic Ca(2+) channels (N, P/Q and R (SNX-482-sensitive) types) or on adenylate cyclase or MAPK activity, but do require the activation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying (Ba(2+)- and tertiapin Q-sensitive) K(+) channels, in addition to 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels.

  10. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  11. Effect of cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation on soleus Ia presynaptic and reciprocal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Mori, Nobuhiko; Uehara, Shintaro; Kamata, Noriyuki; Oku, Kosuke; Okada, Yohei; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Mukai, Kouichi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-02-11

    Previously, we reported that cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation (C-TMS) facilitates spinal motoneuronal excitability in resting humans. In this study, we aimed to characterize the descending pathway that is responsible for the C-TMS-associated cerebellar spinal facilitation. We evaluated the effect of C-TMS on ipsilateral soleus Ia presynaptic inhibition (PSI) and reciprocal inhibition (RI) because the vestibulospinal and reticulospinal tracts project from the cerebellum to mediate spinal motoneurons via interneurons associated with PSI. PSI and RI were measured with a soleus H-reflex test following operant conditioning using electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve. C-TMS was delivered before test tibial nerve stimulation with conditioning-test interstimulus intervals of 110 ms. C-TMS did not generate motor-evoked potentials, and it did not increase electromyography activity in the ipsilateral soleus muscle, indicating that C-TMS does not directly activate the corticospinal tract and motoneurons. However, C-TMS facilitated the ipsilateral soleus H-reflex and reduced the amount of soleus Ia PSI, but not RI. These findings indicate that C-TMS may facilitate the excitability of the spinal motoneuron pool via the vestibulospinal or reticulospinal tracts associated with PSI. Cerebellar spinal facilitation may be useful for assessing the functional connectivity of the cerebellum and vestibular nuclei or reticular formation. PMID:25569794

  12. Tachykinin-related peptide and GABA-mediated presynaptic inhibition of crayfish photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Glantz, R M; Miller, C S; Nässel, D R

    2000-03-01

    Off-axis illumination elicits lateral inhibition at the primary visual synapse in crustacea and insects. The evidence suggests that the inhibitory action is presynaptic (i.e., on the photoreceptor terminal) and that the amacrine neurons of the lamina ganglionaris (the first synaptic layer) may be part of the inhibitory pathway. The neurotransmitters and the synaptic mechanisms are unknown. We show by immunocytochemistry that GABA and a tachykinin-related peptide (TRP) are localized in the amacrine neurons of the crayfish lamina ganglionaris. Indirect evidence suggests that GABA and TRP may be colocalized in these neurons. The extensive processes of the amacrine neurons occupy lamina layers containing the terminals of photoreceptors. Application of exogenous GABA and TRP to photoreceptor terminals produces a short-latency, dose-dependent hyperpolarization with a decay time constant on the order of a few seconds. TRP also exhibits actions that evolve over several minutes. These include a reduction of the receptor potential (and the light-elicited current) by approximately 40% and potentiation of the action of GABA by approximately 100%. The mechanisms of TRP action in crayfish are not known, but a plausible pathway is a TRP-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) that reduces photoreceptor sensitivity in arthropods. Although the mechanisms are not established, the results indicate that in crayfish photoreceptors TRP displays actions on two time scales and can exert profound modulatory control over cell function.

  13. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  14. Presynaptic Inhibition in the Striatum of the Basal Ganglia Improves Pattern Classification and Thus Promotes Superior Goal Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, David J.; Houk, James C.

    2015-01-01

    This review article takes a multidisciplinary approach to understand how presynaptic inhibition in the striatum of the basal ganglia (BG) contributes to pattern classification and the selection of goals that control behavior. It is a difficult problem both because it is multidimensional and because it is has complex system dynamics. We focus on the striatum because, as the main site for input to the BG, it gets to decide what goals are important to consider. PMID:26696840

  15. Presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferents does not vary with center of pressure displacements during upright standing.

    PubMed

    Johannsson, J; Duchateau, J; Baudry, S

    2015-07-01

    The present work was designed to investigate the presynaptic modulation of soleus Ia afferents with the position and the direction of the displacement of the center of pressure (CoP) during unperturbed upright standing and exaggerated CoP displacements in young adults. Hoffmann (H) reflex was evoked in the soleus by stimulating the tibial nerve at the knee level. Modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition was assessed by conditioning the H reflex with fibular nerve (D1 inhibition) and femoral nerve (heteronymous facilitation) stimulation. Leg muscle activity was assessed by electromyography (EMG). The results indicate that in unperturbed standing and exaggerated CoP displacements, the H-reflex amplitude was greater during forward than backward CoP direction (p<0.05). However, the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex (expressed relative to unconditioned H reflex) did not vary with CoP displacement, regardless of the experimental condition. The soleus EMG was greater during forward than backward CoP direction and during anterior than posterior position in both experimental conditions (p<0.05). The modulation of the unconditioned H reflex with CoP direction was positively associated with the corresponding changes in soleus EMG (r(2)>0.34). The tibialis anterior EMG did not change during unperturbed standing, but was greater for backward than forward CoP direction during exaggerated CoP displacements. In this experimental condition, soleus EMG was negatively associated with tibialis anterior EMG (r(2)=0.81). These results indicate that Ia presynaptic inhibition is not modulated with CoP direction and position, but rather suggest that CoP displacements induced changes in excitability of the soleus motor neuron pool. PMID:25869621

  16. Different mechanisms of inhibition of nerve terminals by botulinum and snake presynaptic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Cesare; Rossetto, Ornella; Caccin, Paola; Rigoni, Michela; Carli, Luca; Morbiato, Laura; Muraro, Lucia; Paoli, Marco

    2009-10-01

    The different mode of action on peripheral nerve terminals of the botulinum neurotoxins and of the snake presynaptic phospholipase A2 neurotoxins is reviewed here. These two groups of toxins are highly toxic because they are neurospecific and at the same time are enzymes that can modify many substrate molecules before being inactivated. The similarity of symptoms they cause in humans derives from the fact that both botulinum neurotoxins (seven serotypes named A-G) and snake presynaptic PLA2 neurotoxins block the nerve terminals and that peripheral cholinergic terminals are major targets. Given this general similarity of targets and clinical symptoms, the specific molecular and cellular mechanisms at the basis of their action are very different. This difference appears evident from the beginning of intoxication, i.e. neurotoxins binding to peripheral nerve terminals and proceeds with the different site of actions and molecular targets.

  17. Developmental regulation and activity-dependent maintenance of GABAergic presynaptic inhibition onto rod bipolar cell axonal terminals.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Timm; Hoon, Mrinalini; Euler, Thomas; Lukasiewicz, Peter D; Wong, Rachel O L

    2013-04-10

    Presynaptic inhibition onto axons regulates neuronal output, but how such inhibitory synapses develop and are maintained in vivo remains unclear. Axon terminals of glutamatergic retinal rod bipolar cells (RBCs) receive GABAA and GABAC receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. We found that perturbing GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmission does not prevent GABAergic synaptogenesis onto RBC axons. But, GABA release is necessary for maintaining axonal GABA receptors. This activity-dependent process is receptor subtype specific: GABAC receptors are maintained, whereas GABAA receptors containing α1, but not α3, subunits decrease over time in mice with deficient GABA synthesis. GABAA receptor distribution on RBC axons is unaffected in GABAC receptor knockout mice. Thus, GABAA and GABAC receptor maintenance are regulated separately. Although immature RBCs elevate their glutamate release when GABA synthesis is impaired, homeostatic mechanisms ensure that the RBC output operates within its normal range after eye opening, perhaps to regain proper visual processing within the scotopic pathway. PMID:23583111

  18. Concentration-invariant odor representation in the olfactory system by presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Li, Yuanqing; Wu, Si

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a network model for implementing concentration-invariant representation for odors in the olfactory system. The network consists of olfactory receptor neurons, projection neurons, and inhibitory local neurons. Receptor neurons send excitatory inputs to projection neurons, which are modulated by the inhibitory inputs from local neurons. The modulation occurs at the presynaptic site from a receptor neuron to a projection one, leading to the operation of divisive normalization. The responses of local interneurons are determined by the total activities of olfactory receptor neurons. We find that with a proper parameter condition, the responses of projection neurons become effectively independent of the odor concentration. Simulation results confirm our theoretical analysis.

  19. Tail shock produces inhibition as well as sensitization of the siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia: possible behavioral role for presynaptic inhibition mediated by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2.

    PubMed

    Mackey, S L; Glanzman, D L; Small, S A; Dyke, A M; Kandel, E R; Hawkins, R D

    1987-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that, in addition to being modulated by presynaptic facilitation, the sensory neurons of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia are also capable of being modulated by transient presynaptic inhibition produced by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2. These two modulatory effects involve different second-messenger systems: the facilitation is mediated through cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, and the inhibition is mediated through the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid. To explore the behavioral function of this inhibition, we have carried out a parametric analysis of the effect of tail shock on the siphon-withdrawal reflex. In addition to producing sensitization of the withdrawal reflex, tail shock also transiently inhibits the reflex. The inhibition is produced by relatively weak shock, whereas sensitization is more prominent and may mask the inhibition with stronger shock. Furthermore, inhibition is not observed after habituation training. Cellular studies suggest that the behavioral inhibition is mediated, at least in part, by presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release from the siphon sensory neurons. Moreover, we have identified an interneuron within the left pleural ganglion (LPL16) that shows Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 immunoreactivity, is activated by tail shock, and simulates the presynaptic inhibitory actions produced by tail shock. Therefore, our results suggest that presynaptic inhibition mediated by Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 and its lipoxygenase second messenger contributes to behavioral inhibition of the siphon-withdrawal reflex.

  20. Characterization of mechanisms involved in presynaptic inhibition of sympathetic pressor effects induced by some 5-HT1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M M; Calama, E; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2000-01-01

    1. In a previous study, we showed that the presynaptic inhibitory action of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists on sympathetic pressor effects obtained in the pithed rats were mainly mediated by activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1D receptor subtypes. At the time, we observed that some 5-HT1 receptors antagonists - WAY 100,635 and NAN-190 (both 5-HT1A receptor antagonists), methiothepin (a 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist) and spiperone (a 5-HT1,2 receptor antagonist) - reduced per se the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanism participating in this inhibitory effect. 2. The inhibition induced by WAY 100,635 (1000 microg kg-1, i.v.) was blocked after i.v. treatment with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (300 and 1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified after i.v. treatment with propranolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1) and sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1). The inhibition induced by spiperone (500 microg kg-1 i.v.) was significantly blocked by sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified by idazoxan or propranolol. 3. Sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) partially blocked the inhibition induced by methiothepin (50 microg kg-1 i.v.). Only pretreatment with idazoxan (300 microg kg-1) modified the inhibition induced by NAN-190 (100 microg kg-1 i.v.), such inhibition increasing after intravenous administration of idazoxan. 4. All the antagonists used in our experiments failed to inhibit the pressor responses elicited by i.v. noradrenaline administration. 5. The above results suggest that the inhibitory effects of these 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are presynaptic in nature, but not related to the blockade of 5-HT1 receptors subtypes. The simultaneous activation or inhibition of other receptor systems could explain the inhibition produced by each 5-HT1 receptor antagonist studied.

  1. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  2. Inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release by activation of A3 adenosine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cinalli, A R; Guarracino, J F; Fernandez, V; Roquel, L I; Losavio, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The role of inosine at the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has not been clearly defined. Moreover, inosine was classically considered to be the inactive metabolite of adenosine. Hence, we investigated the effect of inosine on spontaneous and evoked ACh release, the mechanism underlying its modulatory action and the receptor type and signal transduction pathway involved. Experimental Approach End-plate potentials (EPPs) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded from the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations using conventional intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Inosine (100 μM) reduced MEPP frequency and the amplitude and quantal content of EPPs; effects inhibited by the selective A3 receptor antagonist MRS-1191. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the presence of A3 receptors at mammalian NMJ. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocker Cd2+, the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and the L-type and P/Q-type VGCC antagonists, nitrendipine and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively, all prevented inosine-induced inhibition. In the absence of endogenous adenosine, inosine decreased the hypertonic response. The effects of inosine on ACh release were prevented by the Gi/o protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, PKC antagonist chelerytrine and calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by PKA antagonists, H-89 and KT-5720, or the inhibitor of CaMKII KN-62. Conclusion and Implications Our results suggest that, at motor nerve terminals, inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release by activating A3 receptors through a mechanism that involves L-type and P/Q-type VGCCs and the secretory machinery downstream of calcium influx. A3 receptors appear to be coupled to Gi/o protein. PKC and calmodulin may be involved in these effects of inosine. PMID:23731236

  3. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  4. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  5. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  6. Circuit Motifs for Contrast-Adaptive Differentiation in Early Sensory Systems: The Role of Presynaptic Inhibition and Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems. PMID:25723493

  7. Circuit motifs for contrast-adaptive differentiation in early sensory systems: the role of presynaptic inhibition and short-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems.

  8. D-amino acid oxidase activity is inhibited by an interaction with bassoon protein at the presynaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Popiolek, Michael; Ross, John F; Charych, Erik; Chanda, Pranab; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Moss, Stephen J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Pausch, Mark H

    2011-08-19

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder affecting ∼1% of the world's population. Linkage and association studies have identified multiple candidate schizophrenia susceptibility genes whose functions converge on the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system. One such susceptibility gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that metabolizes the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist D-serine, has the potential to modulate NMDAR function in the context of schizophrenia. To further investigate its cellular regulation, we sought to identify DAO-interacting proteins that participate in its functional regulation in rat cerebellum, where DAO expression is especially high. Immunoprecipitation with DAO-specific antibodies and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of co-precipitated proteins yielded 24 putative DAO-interacting proteins. The most robust interactions occurred with known components of the presynaptic active zone, such as bassoon (BSN) and piccolo (PCLO). The interaction of DAO with BSN was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation assays using DAO- and BSN-specific antibodies. Moreover, DAO and BSN colocalized with one another in cultured cerebellar granule cells and in synaptic junction membrane protein fractions derived from rat cerebellum. The functional consequences of this interaction were studied through enzyme assay experiments, where DAO enzymatic activity was significantly inhibited as a result of its interaction with BSN. Taking these results together, we hypothesize that synaptic D-serine concentrations may be under tight regulation by a BSN-DAO complex. We therefore predict that this mechanism plays a role in the modulation of glutamatergic signaling through NMDARs. It also furthers our understanding of the biology underlying this potential therapeutic entry point for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

  9. Presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response during septic shock in pithed rats

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Malinowska, Barbara; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2004-01-01

    Our study was undertaken to investigate whether bacterial endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects the neurogenic vasopressor response in rats in vivo by presynaptic mechanisms and, if so, to characterize the type of presynaptic receptor(s) operating in the initial phase of septic shock. In pithed and vagotomized rats treated with pancuronium, electrical stimulation (ES) (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 10 s) of the preganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers or intravenous bolus injection of noradrenaline (NA) (1–3 nmol kg−1) increased the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by about 30 mmHg. Administration of LPS (0.4 and 4 mg kg−1) under continuous infusion of vasopressin inhibited the neurogenic vasopressor response by 25 and 50%, respectively. LPS did not affect the increase in DBP induced by exogenous NA. The LPS-induced inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response was counteracted by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (0.1 μmol kg−1), but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist SR 144528 (3 μmol kg−1), the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 μmol kg−1) or the histamine H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 μmol kg−1). The four antagonists by themselves did not affect the increase in DBP induced by ES or by injection of NA in rats not exposed to LPS. We conclude that in the initial phase of septic shock, the activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors by endogenously formed cannabinoids contributes to the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response. PMID:15159284

  10. Presynaptic cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are involved in the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response during septic shock in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Malinowska, Barbara; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2004-06-01

    1. Our study was undertaken to investigate whether bacterial endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects the neurogenic vasopressor response in rats in vivo by presynaptic mechanisms and, if so, to characterize the type of presynaptic receptor(s) operating in the initial phase of septic shock. 2. In pithed and vagotomized rats treated with pancuronium, electrical stimulation (ES) (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 10 s) of the preganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers or intravenous bolus injection of noradrenaline (NA) (1-3 nmol x kg(-1)) increased the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by about 30 mmHg. Administration of LPS (0.4 and 4 mg x kg(-1)) under continuous infusion of vasopressin inhibited the neurogenic vasopressor response by 25 and 50%, respectively. LPS did not affect the increase in DBP induced by exogenous NA. 3. The LPS-induced inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response was counteracted by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist SR 141716A (0.1 micromol x kg(-1)), but not by the CB(2) receptor antagonist SR 144528 (3 micromol x kg(-1)), the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 micromol x kg(-1)) or the histamine H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 micromol x kg(-1)). The four antagonists by themselves did not affect the increase in DBP induced by ES or by injection of NA in rats not exposed to LPS. 4. We conclude that in the initial phase of septic shock, the activation of presynaptic CB(1) receptors by endogenously formed cannabinoids contributes to the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response.

  11. ZC88, a novel N-type calcium channel blocker from 4-amino-piperidine derivatives state-dependent inhibits Cav2.2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yang, Lujia; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Weiwei; Zhang, Cheng; Yong, Zheng; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2015-04-24

    Small molecular inhibitors of Cav2.2 have been reported for the treatment of neuropathic pain; however, low selectivity and side effects limit their further development. In our study, a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized by optimizing the 4-amino-piperidine template. The results show that ZC88 inhibits transiently expressed Cav2.2 in state-dependent manner in oocytes with an IC50 of 0.45 ± 0.09 μM. The steady-state inactivation relationship curve is shifted to more negative potentials for the calcium channels, suggesting that ZC88 blocks inactivated state of the channel. ZC88 does not present any remarkable effects on voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel currents, l-type calcium channel currents, potassium channel and sodium channel currents. Taken together, these in vitro data suggest that ZC88 is a voltage-dependent, subtype-selective Cav2.2 channel inhibitor and can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Cav2.2-selective inhibitor, which may have potential to be developed into a novel analgesic agent. PMID:25681549

  12. ZC88, a novel N-type calcium channel blocker from 4-amino-piperidine derivatives state-dependent inhibits Cav2.2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yang, Lujia; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Weiwei; Zhang, Cheng; Yong, Zheng; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2015-04-24

    Small molecular inhibitors of Cav2.2 have been reported for the treatment of neuropathic pain; however, low selectivity and side effects limit their further development. In our study, a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized by optimizing the 4-amino-piperidine template. The results show that ZC88 inhibits transiently expressed Cav2.2 in state-dependent manner in oocytes with an IC50 of 0.45 ± 0.09 μM. The steady-state inactivation relationship curve is shifted to more negative potentials for the calcium channels, suggesting that ZC88 blocks inactivated state of the channel. ZC88 does not present any remarkable effects on voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel currents, l-type calcium channel currents, potassium channel and sodium channel currents. Taken together, these in vitro data suggest that ZC88 is a voltage-dependent, subtype-selective Cav2.2 channel inhibitor and can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Cav2.2-selective inhibitor, which may have potential to be developed into a novel analgesic agent.

  13. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy – Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation–Inhibition Balance Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation–inhibition (E–I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS–EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E–I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual “forward models” to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E–I-based brain models. Furthermore, E–I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E–I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E–I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of

  14. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy - Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation-Inhibition Balance Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E-I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual "forward models" to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E-I-based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E-I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E-I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of neurostimulation with

  15. Group I mGluRs increase locomotor network excitability in Xenopus tadpoles via presynaptic inhibition of glycinergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rebecca J; Issberner, Jonathan P; Sillar, Keith T

    2008-09-01

    The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihyroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) increases the frequency of rhythmic swimming activity in Xenopus tadpoles. This study explores the possibility that group I receptor modulation occurs in part via depression of inhibitory synaptic transmission. Applications of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine occluded the effects of DHPG, providing preliminary evidence that group I receptors affect motor network output by reducing glycinergic transmission. This evidence was supported further by intracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from presumed motorneurons. DHPG applications produced two prominent effects: (i) during swimming activity, glycinergic mid-cycle IPSPs were reduced in amplitude; and (ii) during quiescent periods, the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSPs was also reduced. No change in membrane potential or input resistance following group I receptor activation was detected. The reduction in fast synaptic inhibition provides a plausible explanation for the increased excitability of the locomotor network, although other contributory mechanisms activated in parallel by group I receptors cannot be discounted. Aspects of this work have been published previously in abstract form [R. J. Chapman & K. T. Sillar (2003) SFN Abstracts 277.8]. PMID:18691329

  16. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases. PMID:26343381

  17. Cyfip1 Regulates Presynaptic Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Kuangfu; Harony-Nicolas, Hala; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations encompassing the gene encoding Cyfip1 have been associated with a variety of human diseases, including autism and schizophrenia. Here we show that juvenile mice hemizygous for Cyfip1 have altered presynaptic function, enhanced protein translation, and increased levels of F-actin. In developing hippocampus, reduced Cyfip1 levels serve to decrease paired pulse facilitation and increase miniature EPSC frequency without a change in amplitude. Higher-resolution examination shows these changes to be caused primarily by an increase in presynaptic terminal size and enhanced vesicle release probability. Short hairpin-mediated knockdown of Cyfip1 coupled with expression of mutant Cyfip1 proteins indicates that the presynaptic alterations are caused by dysregulation of the WAVE regulatory complex. Such dysregulation occurs downstream of Rac1 as acute exposure to Rac1 inhibitors rescues presynaptic responses in culture and in hippocampal slices. The data serve to highlight an early and essential role for Cyfip1 in the generation of normally functioning synapses and suggest a means by which changes in Cyfip1 levels could impact the generation of neural networks and contribute to abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Several developmental brain disorders have been associated with gene duplications and deletions that serve to increase or decrease levels of encoded proteins. Cyfip1 is one such protein, but the role it plays in brain development is poorly understood. We asked whether decreased Cyfip1 levels altered the function of developing synapses. The data show that synapses with reduced Cyfip1 are larger and release neurotransmitter more rapidly. These effects are due to Cyfip1's role in actin polymerization and are reversed by expression of a Cyfip1 mutant protein retaining actin regulatory function or by inhibiting Rac1. Thus, Cyfip1 has a more prominent early role regulating presynaptic activity during a stage of development when

  18. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  19. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  20. State-dependent molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ciann-Dong; Weng, Hung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM)-molecular mechanics (MM) approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM), which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  1. Presynaptic neurotoxins: an expanding array of natural and modified molecules.

    PubMed

    Davletov, Bazbek; Ferrari, Enrico; Ushkaryov, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The process of neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals is a target for a wide array of presynaptic toxins produced by various species, from humble bacteria to arthropods to vertebrate animals. Unlike other toxins, most presynaptic neurotoxins do not kill cells but simply inhibit or activate synaptic transmission. In this review, we describe two types of presynaptic neurotoxins: clostridial toxins and latrotoxins, which are, respectively, the most potent blockers and stimulators of neurotransmitter release. These toxins have been instrumental in defining presynaptic functions and are now widely used in research and medicine. Here, we would like to analyse the diversity of these toxins and demonstrate how the knowledge of their structures and mechanisms of action can help us to design better tools for research and medical applications. We will look at natural and synthetic variations of these exquisite molecular machines, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of presynaptic toxins and questions that remain to be answered. If we can decipher how a given biomolecule is modified by nature to target different species, we will be able to design new variants that carry only desired characteristics to achieve specific therapeutic, agricultural or research goals. Indeed, a number of research groups have already initiated a quest to harness the power of natural toxins with the aim of making them more specifically targeted and safer for future research and medical applications.

  2. Putative duality of presynaptic events.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Tatiana; Borysov, Arsenii

    2016-06-01

    The main structure in the brain responsible not only for nerve signal transmission but also for its simultaneous regulation is chemical synapse, where presynaptic nerve terminals are of considerable importance providing release of neurotransmitters. Analyzing transport of glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, the authors suggest that there are two main relatively independent mechanisms at the presynaptic level that can influence the extracellular glutamate concentration, and so signaling, and its regulation. The first one is well-known precisely regulated compound exocytosis of synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters stimulated by membrane depolarization, which increases significantly glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and initiates glutamate signaling through postsynaptic glutamate receptors. The second one is permanent glutamate turnover across the plasma membrane that occurs without stimulation and is determined by simultaneous non-pathological transporter-mediated release of glutamate thermodynamically synchronized with uptake. Permanent glutamate turnover is responsible for maintenance of dynamic glutamatein/glutamateout gradient resulting in the establishment of a flexible extracellular level of glutamate, which can be unique for each synapse because of dependence on individual presynaptic parameters. These two mechanisms, i.e. exocytosis and transporter-mediated glutamate turnover, are both precisely regulated but do not directly interfere with each other, because they have different intracellular sources of glutamate in nerve terminals for release purposes, i.e. glutamate pool of synaptic vesicles and the cytoplasm, respectively. This duality can set up a presynaptic base for memory consolidation and storage, maintenance of neural circuits, long-term potentiation, and plasticity. Arguments against this suggestion are also considered. PMID:26812863

  3. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Mediation of Frequency Facilitation at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Dietmar; Mellor, Jack; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2001-03-01

    Inhibition of transmitter release by presynaptic receptors is widespread in the central nervous system and is typically mediated via metabotropic receptors. In contrast, very little is known about facilitatory receptors, and synaptic activation of a facilitatory autoreceptor has not been established. Here we show that activation of presynaptic kainate receptors can facilitate transmitter release from hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Synaptic activation of these presumed ionotropic kainate receptors is very fast (<10 ms) and lasts for seconds. Thus, these presynaptic kainate receptors contribute to the short-term plasticity characteristics of mossy fiber synapses, which were previously thought to be an intrinsic property of the synapse.

  4. High-content imaging of presynaptic assembly

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Goh, Chiatzun; Voorhoeve, P. Mathijs; Fivaz, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Presynaptic assembly involves the specialization of a patch of axonal membrane into a complex structure that supports synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. In mammalian neurons, presynaptic assembly is widely studied in a co-culture assay, where a synaptogenic cue expressed at the surface of a heterologous cell induces presynaptic differentiation in a contacting axon. This assay has led to the discovery of numerous synaptogenic proteins, but has not been used to probe neuronal mechanisms regulating presynaptic induction. The identification of regulatory pathways that fine-tune presynaptic assembly is hindered by the lack of adequate tools to quantitatively image this process. Here, we introduce an image-processing algorithm that identifies presynaptic clusters in mammalian co-cultures and extracts a range of synapse-specific parameters. Using this software, we assessed the intrinsic variability of this synaptic induction assay and probed the effect of eight neuronal microRNAs on presynaptic assembly. Our analysis revealed a novel role for miR-27b in augmenting the density of presynaptic clusters. Our software is applicable to a wide range of synaptic induction protocols (including spontaneous synaptogenesis observed in neuron cultures) and is a valuable tool to determine the subtle impact of disease-associated genes on presynaptic assembly. PMID:24624059

  5. A presynaptic gain control mechanism fine-tunes olfactory behavior.

    PubMed

    Root, Cory M; Masuyama, Kaoru; Green, David S; Enell, Lina E; Nässel, Dick R; Lee, Chi-Hon; Wang, Jing W

    2008-07-31

    Early sensory processing can play a critical role in sensing environmental cues. We have investigated the physiological and behavioral function of gain control at the first synapse of olfactory processing in Drosophila. Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) express the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R), and its expression expands the dynamic range of ORN synaptic transmission that is preserved in projection neuron responses. Strikingly, each ORN channel has a unique baseline level of GABA(B)R expression. ORNs that sense the aversive odorant CO(2) do not express GABA(B)Rs and do not have significant presynaptic inhibition. In contrast, pheromone-sensing ORNs express a high level of GABA(B)Rs and exhibit strong presynaptic inhibition. Furthermore, pheromone-dependent mate localization is impaired in flies that lack GABA(B)Rs in specific ORNs. These findings indicate that different olfactory receptor channels employ heterogeneous presynaptic gain control as a mechanism to allow an animal's innate behavioral responses to match its ecological needs.

  6. Transsynaptic EphB/Ephrin-B signaling regulates growth of presynaptic boutons required for classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2011-06-01

    Learning-related presynaptic remodeling has been documented in only a few systems, and its molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we describe a role for the bidirectional EphB/ephrin-B signaling system in structural plasticity of presynaptic nerve terminals using an in vitro model of classical conditioning. Conditioning or BDNF application induced significant growth of auditory nerve presynaptic boutons that convey the conditioned stimulus to abducens motor neurons. Interestingly, bouton enlargement occurred only for those synapses apposed to motor neuron dendrites rather than to somata. Phosphorylation of ephrin-B1, but not EphB2, was induced by both conditioning and BDNF application and was inhibited by postsynaptic injections of ephrin-B antibody. Finally, suppression of postsynaptic ephrin-B function inhibited presynaptic bouton enlargement that was rescued by activation of EphB2 by ephrin-B1-Fc. These data provide evidence for ephrin-B-induced EphB2 forward signaling in presynaptic structural plasticity during classical conditioning. They also reveal a functional interaction between BDNF/TrkB and the Eph/ephrin signaling systems in the coordination of presynaptic and postsynaptic modifications during conditioning.

  7. The proteasome controls presynaptic differentiation through modulation of an on-site pool of polyubiquitinated conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Alves, Pedro L.; Martins, Luís; Pedro, Joana R.; Ryu, Hyun R.; Jeon, Noo Li; Taylor, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of the presynaptic terminal is a complex and rapid event that normally occurs in spatially specific axonal regions distant from the soma; thus, it is believed to be dependent on intra-axonal mechanisms. However, the full nature of the local events governing presynaptic assembly remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), the major degradative pathway, in the local modulation of presynaptic differentiation. We found that proteasome inhibition has a synaptogenic effect on isolated axons. In addition, formation of a stable cluster of synaptic vesicles onto a postsynaptic partner occurs in parallel to an on-site decrease in proteasome degradation. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins at nascent sites is a local trigger for presynaptic clustering. Finally, proteasome-related ubiquitin chains (K11 and K48) function as signals for the assembly of presynaptic terminals. Collectively, we propose a new axon-intrinsic mechanism for presynaptic assembly through local UPS inhibition. Subsequent on-site accumulation of proteins in their polyubiquitinated state triggers formation of presynapses. PMID:27022091

  8. Bounds for state-dependent quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yongjian; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2002-11-01

    Due to the no-cloning theorem, the unknown quantum state can only be cloned approximately or exactly with some probability. There are two types of cloners: universal and state-dependent cloner. The optimal universal cloner has been found and can be viewed as a special state-dependent quantum cloner that has no information about the states. In this paper, we investigate the state-dependent cloning when the state set contains more than two states. We get some bounds of the global fidelity for these processes. This method is not dependent on the number of the states contained in the state set. It is also independent of the numbers of copying.

  9. Functional tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels are expressed presynaptically in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, Y V; Kim, M-S; Schnizler, K; Usachev, Y M

    2009-03-17

    The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated Na(+) channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 are expressed by a subset of primary sensory neurons and have been implicated in various pain states. Although recent studies suggest involvement of TTX-R Na(+) channels in sensory synaptic transmission and spinal pain processing, it remains unknown whether TTX-R Na(+) channels are expressed and function presynaptically. We examined expression of TTX-R channels at sensory synapses formed between rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord (SC) neurons in a DRG/SC co-culture system. Immunostaining showed extensive labeling of presynaptic axonal boutons with Na(v)1.8- and Na(v)1.9-specific antibodies. Measurements using the fluorescent Na(+) indicator SBFI demonstrated action potential-induced presynaptic Na(+) entry that was resistant to tetrodotoxin (TTX) but was blocked by lidocaine. Furthermore, presynaptic [Ca(2+)](i) elevation in response to a single action potential was not affected by TTX in TTX-resistant DRG neurons. Finally, glutamatergic synaptic transmission was not inhibited by TTX in more than 50% of synaptic pairs examined; subsequent treatment with lidocaine completely blocked these TTX-resistant excitatory postsynaptic currents. Taken together, these results provide evidence for presynaptic expression of functional TTX-R Na(+) channels that may be important for shaping presynaptic action potentials and regulating transmitter release at the first sensory synapse. PMID:19162133

  10. Distinguishing between state-dependent and non-state-dependent depression-related psychosocial variables.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, M; Lewinsohn, P M; Gotlib, I H

    1996-09-01

    The goals of this study were: (a) to determine which among a set of depression-related psychosocial variables are state-dependent; (b) to examine whether state-trait distinctions among psychosocial variables are a function of gender; and (c) to test the hypothesis that state-dependence of psychosocial variables is mostly evident in people with a history of clinical depression. Altogether, 562 participants residing in two communities completed a battery of psychosocial measures at point of entry into the study (T1) and after an average interval of 8.3 months (T2). The state-dependence of psychosocial variables was examined in two groups of participants: (a) low-high (LH: those who were low on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at T1 and high at T2; N = 45); and (b) high-low (HL: those who were high at T1 and low at T2; N = 64). The following variables were found to be state-dependent: engagement in pleasant and unpleasant events; frequency of social contacts; dissatisfaction with oneself, one's neighborhood dwelling and one's friends; irrational beliefs, and positive and negative expectancies. In contrast, the following variables were not state-dependent: dissatisfaction with family and job, perception of control, and external attributions for positive and negative events. State-dependence was not moderated by age, gender or a history of depression. Possible explanations for why some variables are state-dependent and others are not state-dependent are offered.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat induces excitotoxic loss of presynaptic terminals in hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Angela H.; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection of the CNS produces dendritic damage that correlates with cognitive decline in patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HIV-induced neurotoxicity results in part from viral proteins shed from infected cells, including the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat). We previously showed that Tat binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), resulting in overactivation of NMDA receptors, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and subsequent loss of postsynaptic densities. Here, we show that Tat also induces a loss of presynaptic terminals. The number of presynaptic terminals was quantified using confocal imaging of synaptophysin fused to green fluorescent protein (Syn-GFP). Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was secondary to excitatory postsynaptic mechanisms because treatment with an LRP antagonist or an NMDA receptor antagonist inhibited this loss. Treatment with nutlin-3, an E3 ligase inhibitor, prevented Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals. These data suggest that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is a consequence of excitotoxic postsynaptic activity. We previously found that ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonist, induced recovery of postsynaptic densities. Here we show that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was reversed by ifenprodil treatment. Thus, Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is reversible, and this recovery can be initiated by inhibiting a subset of postsynaptic NMDA receptors. Understanding the dynamics of synaptic changes in response to HIV infection of the CNS may lead to the design of improved pharmacotherapies for HAND patients. PMID:23267846

  12. Mechanisms underlying presynaptic Ca2+ transient and vesicular glutamate release at a CNS nerve terminal during in vitro ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Yi; Kim, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    ischaemia-induced increases in presynaptic Ca2+ and vesicular glutamate release. In addition, the removal of extracellular Na+ completely inhibited the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise. It therefore appears that a link between Na+ accumulation and Ca2+ uptake via NCX underlies the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise and the consequent increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in the early phase of brain ischaemia. PMID:25833340

  13. Locomotor depression in mice by norcocaine does not involve central alpha 2-adrenergic or presynaptic dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Reith, M E; Lajtha, A

    1986-02-01

    The inhibition of spontaneous locomotor behavior of mice by norcocaine was antagonized neither by the adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine and phentolamine, nor by the neuroleptics haloperidol and spiperone, at low doses aimed at presynaptic dopamine receptors. In contrast, the antagonists were effective in reducing the hypomotility induced by clonidine and apomorphine, respectively. These results make it unlikely that central alpha 2-adrenergic or presynaptic dopamine receptors are involved in the hypomotive effect of norcocaine.

  14. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-08-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses.

  15. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  16. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  17. Presynaptic injection of syntaxin-specific antibodies blocks transmission in the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, M; Tong, C K; Fukuda, M; Moreira, J E; Kojima, T; Mikoshiba, K; Llinás, R

    1998-09-01

    A polyclonal antibody, raised against the squid (Loligo pealei) syntaxin I, inhibited Ca2+-dependent interaction of syntaxin with synaptotagmin C2A domain in vitro. Presynaptic injection of the anti-Loligo syntaxin IgG into the squid giant synapse blocked synaptic transmission without affecting the presynaptic action potential or the voltage-gated calcium current responsible for transmitter release. Repetitive presynaptic stimulation produced a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the postsynaptic potential as the synaptic block progressed, indicating that the antibody interferes with vesicular fusion. Confocal microscopy of the fluorescein-labelled anti-Loligo syntaxin IgG showed binding at the synaptic active zone, while ultrastructurally, an increase in synaptic vesicular numbers in synapses blocked when this antibody was observed. These results implicate syntaxin in the vesicular fusion step of transmitter release in concert with synaptotagmin.

  18. State-dependent choice and ecological rationality.

    PubMed

    Nevai, Andrew L; Waite, Thomas A; Passino, Kevin M

    2007-08-01

    Decision makers who minimize costly errors should flexibly adjust the way they trade off competing demands, depending on their current state. We explore how state (amount of hoarded food) affects willingness to take extra predation risk to obtain larger food rewards, particularly in animals that may overemphasize safety. Assuming a sigmoid fitness function, we explore how a supplement in state influences this willingness trade danger for food energy. Above a threshold, the model predicts the supplement will weaken this willingness. Incremental increases in state in the deceleratory phase yield smaller fitness gains, so it pays to increase emphasis on safety after receiving a supplement. Below this threshold, the model makes the opposite prediction because incremental increases in state yield bigger fitness gains and so it pays to decrease emphasis on safety. We use the model to explain why hoarding gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) were induced by an experimental subsidy to accept greater danger. This formerly puzzling finding makes sense if the jays' effective hoard was relatively small, due to theft and decomposition. We discuss adaptive state-dependent choice as a general explanation for apparently irrational behavior.

  19. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  20. Membrane association of presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon.

    PubMed

    Sanmartí-Vila, L; tom Dieck, S; Richter, K; Altrock, W; Zhang, L; Volknandt, W; Zimmermann, H; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Dresbach, T

    2000-08-18

    Components of the specialized cytomatrix at active zones of presynaptic nerve terminals are thought to be involved in organizing synaptic events such as immobilisation or translocation of synaptic vesicles and assemblingactive zone components. The 420-kDa non-transmembraneprotein Bassoon is a specific componentof the presynaptic cytomatrix that shares features with both cytoskeleton-associated and peripheral-membrane proteins. Using immunogold electron microscopy we show here that synapse associated Bassoon is distributed in a subregion of active zones. Using a biochemical assay we show that a fraction of Bassoon is membrane associated. Electron microscopy performed on the same biochemical fraction further revealed that Bassoon is associated with vesicular structures. Together these data suggest that at least a fraction of Bassoon is associated with a membraneous compartment in neurons.

  1. Presynaptic Molecular Determinants of Quantal Size

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950’s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in SVs that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size—the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle—clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in SVs can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size. PMID:26903855

  2. Regulation of quantal size by presynaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, D; Pothos, E N

    2000-01-01

    Quantal size is often modeled as invariant, although it is now well established that the number of transmitter molecules released per synaptic vesicle during exocytosis can be modulated in central and peripheral synapses. In this review, we suggest why presynaptically altered quantal size would be important at social synapses that provide extrasynaptic neurotransmitter. Current techniques used to measure quantal size are reviewed with particular attention to amperometry, the first approach to provide direct measurement of the number of molecules and kinetics of presynaptic quantal release, and to CNS dopamine neuronal terminals. The known interventions that alter quantal size at the presynaptic locus are reviewed and categorized as (1) alteration of transvesicular free energy gradients, (2) modulation of vesicle transmitter transporter activity, (3) modulation of fusion pore kinetics, (4) altered transmitter degranulation, and (5) changes in synaptic vesicle volume. Modulation of the number of molecules released per quantum underlies mechanisms of drug action of L-DOPA and the amphetamines, and seems likely to be involved in both normal synaptic modification and disease states. Statistical analysis for examining quantal size and data presentation is discussed. We include detailed information on performing nonparametric resampling statistical analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for two populations, and random walk simulations using spreadsheet programs.

  3. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  4. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fedder, Karlie N.; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases. PMID:26694480

  5. Further characterization of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Misu, Y; Kuwahara, M; Kaiho, M; Kubo, T

    1983-07-22

    Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors were further characterized in spiral strips of guinea-pig pulmonary arteries preloaded with [3H]norepinephrine. l-Metoprolol (3 X 10(-6) M) inhibited isoproterenol (3 X 10(-7) M)-induced increases in 3H efflux by transmural field stimulation, whereas the d-isomer produced no inhibition. However, IPS 339, H 35/25, butoxamine and metoprolol (3 X 10(-6) M) antagonized salbutamol (3 X 10(-7) M)-induced increases in the parameter, whereas acebutolol, bevantolol and practolol (3 X 10(-6) M) produced no antagonism. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig pulmonary arteries appear to have characteristics similar to those postsynaptic classical beta-adrenoceptors.

  6. Presynaptic LTP and LTD of Excitatory and Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Pablo E.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) are caused by enduring increases or decreases in neurotransmitter release. Such forms or presynaptic plasticity are equally observed at excitatory and inhibitory synapses and the list of locations expressing presynaptic LTP and LTD continues to grow. In addition to the mechanistically distinct forms of postsynaptic plasticity, presynaptic plasticity offers a powerful means to modify neural circuits. A wide range of induction mechanisms has been identified, some of which occur entirely in the presynaptic terminal, whereas others require retrograde signaling from the postsynaptic to presynaptic terminals. In spite of this diversity of induction mechanisms, some common induction rules can be identified across synapses. Although the precise molecular mechanism underlying long-term changes in transmitter release in most cases remains unclear, increasing evidence indicates that presynaptic LTP and LTD can occur in vivo and likely mediate some forms of learning. PMID:22147943

  7. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  8. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  9. State-dependent control of breathing by the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter GR; Kanbar, Roy; Basting, Tyler M; Hodges, Walter M; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-01

    Key points This study explores the state dependence of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex (HCVR). We simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity by activating or inhibiting the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) by optogenetics in conscious rats. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia increased both breathing frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. Optogenetic inhibition of RTN reduced VT in all sleep–wake states, but reduced fR only during quiet wake and non-REM sleep. RTN stimulation always increased VT but raised fR only in quiet wake and non-REM sleep. Phasic RTN stimulation produced active expiration and reduced early expiratory airflow (i.e. increased upper airway resistance) only during wake. We conclude that the HCVR is highly state-dependent. The HCVR is reduced during REM sleep because fR is no longer under chemoreceptor control and thus could explain why central sleep apnoea is less frequent in REM sleep. Abstract Breathing has different characteristics during quiet wake, non-REM or REM sleep, including variable dependence on . We investigated whether the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a proton-sensitive structure that mediates a large portion of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex, regulates breathing differently during sleep vs. wake. Electroencephalogram, neck electromyogram, blood pressure, respiratory frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) were recorded in 28 conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Optogenetic stimulation of RTN with channelrhodopsin-2, or inhibition with archaerhodopsin, simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity. Both opsins were delivered with PRSX8-promoter-containing lentiviral vectors. RTN and catecholaminergic neurons were transduced. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia (3 or 6% ) increased both fR and VT whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. RTN

  10. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  11. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  12. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  13. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  14. A presynaptic complex in the giant synapse of the squid.

    PubMed

    Martin, R; Miledi, R

    1975-04-01

    A presynaptic complex consisting of thin lamellae associated with vesicles was found frequently in presynaptic terminals of the squid giant synapse. The lamellae, made of osmiophilic material, had an average length and width of about 10 mum and a thickness of 30 nm; they were of rectangular shape. While most frequent in the axoplasm of the most distal, and largest, terminal of the presynaptic giant axon, the lamellae were found also in smaller terminal branches of this fibre; They have not been observed in the proximal parts of the presynaptic or postsynaptic giant axons. Vesicles the size of synaptic vesicles surrounded the sides of the lamellae. The presynaptic complex resembles the synaptic ribbons in sensory cells.

  15. Intertime jump statistics of state-dependent Poisson processes.

    PubMed

    Daly, Edoardo; Porporato, Amilcare

    2007-01-01

    A method to obtain the probability distribution of the interarrival times of jump occurrences in systems driven by state-dependent Poisson noise is proposed. Such a method uses the survivor function obtained by a modified version of the master equation associated to the stochastic process under analysis. A model for the timing of human activities shows the capability of state-dependent Poisson noise to generate power-law distributions. The application of the method to a model for neuron dynamics and to a hydrological model accounting for land-atmosphere interaction elucidates the origin of characteristic recurrence intervals and possible persistence in state-dependent Poisson models.

  16. Intertime jump statistics of state-dependent Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Edoardo; Porporato, Amilcare

    2007-01-01

    A method to obtain the probability distribution of the interarrival times of jump occurrences in systems driven by state-dependent Poisson noise is proposed. Such a method uses the survivor function obtained by a modified version of the master equation associated to the stochastic process under analysis. A model for the timing of human activities shows the capability of state-dependent Poisson noise to generate power-law distributions. The application of the method to a model for neuron dynamics and to a hydrological model accounting for land-atmosphere interaction elucidates the origin of characteristic recurrence intervals and possible persistence in state-dependent Poisson models.

  17. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  18. Transmembrane AMPAR Regulatory Protein γ-2 Is Required for the Modulation of GABA Release by Presynaptic AMPARs

    PubMed Central

    Cull-Candy, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  19. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release.

  20. Presynaptic Control of Corticostriatal Synapses by Endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABAB receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABAA, and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABAB receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABAB receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  1. Axonal cap-dependent translation regulates presynaptic p35

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Kuangfu; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Benson, Deanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal growth cones synthesize proteins during development and in response to injury in adult animals. Proteins locally translated in axons are used to generate appropriate responses to guidance cues, contribute to axon growth, and can serve as retrograde messengers. In addition to growth cones, mRNAs and translational machinery are also found along the lengths of axons where synapses form en passant, but contributions of intra-axonal translation to developing synapses are poorly understood. Here, we engineered a subcellular-targeting translational repressor to inhibit mRNA translation in axons, and we used this strategy to investigate presynaptic contributions of cap-dependent protein translation to developing CNS synapses. Our data show that intra-axonal mRNA translation restrains synaptic vesicle recycling pool size and that one target of this regulation is p35, a Cdk5 activating protein. Cdk5/p35 signaling regulates the size of vesicle recycling pools, p35 levels diminish when cap-dependent translation is repressed, and restoring p35 levels rescues vesicle recycling pools from the effects of spatially targeted translation repression. Together our findings show that intra-axonal synthesis of p35 is required for normal vesicle recycling in developing neurons, and that targeted translational repression provides a novel strategy to investigate extrasomal protein synthesis in neurons. PMID:24254883

  2. Muscarinic presynaptic modulation in GABAergic pallidal synapses of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Aceves, José J; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E; Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is central for basal ganglia processing. It expresses muscarinic cholinergic receptors and receives cholinergic afferents from the pedunculopontine nuclei (PPN) and other regions. The role of these receptors and afferents is unknown. Muscarinic M1-type receptors are expressed by synapses from striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Because axons from SPNs project to the GPe, one hypothesis is that striatopallidal GABAergic terminals may be modulated by M1 receptors. Alternatively, some M1 receptors may be postsynaptic in some pallidal neurons. Evidence of muscarinic modulation in any of these elements would suggest that cholinergic afferents from the PPN, or other sources, could modulate the function of the GPe. In this study, we show this evidence using striatopallidal slice preparations: after field stimulation in the striatum, the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine significantly reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) from synapses that exhibited short-term synaptic facilitation. This inhibition was associated with significant increases in paired-pulse facilitation, and quantal content was proportional to IPSC amplitude. These actions were blocked by atropine, pirenzepine, and mamba toxin-7, suggesting that receptors involved were M1. In addition, we found that some pallidal neurons have functional postsynaptic M1 receptors. Moreover, some evoked IPSCs exhibited short-term depression and a different kind of modulation: they were indirectly modulated by muscarine via the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Thus pallidal synapses presenting distinct forms of short-term plasticity were modulated differently. PMID:25392165

  3. CSPα—chaperoning presynaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on precisely regulated and exceedingly fast protein-protein interactions that involve voltage-gated channels, the exocytosis/endocytosis machinery as well as signaling pathways. Although we have gained an ever more detailed picture of synaptic architecture much remains to be learned about how synapses are maintained. Synaptic chaperones are “folding catalysts” that preserve proteostasis by regulating protein conformation (and therefore protein function) and prevent unwanted protein-protein interactions. Failure to maintain synapses is an early hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic vesicle protein and molecular chaperone that has a central role in preventing synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Over the past few years, a number of different “client proteins” have been implicated as CSPα substrates including voltage-dependent ion channels, signaling proteins and proteins critical to the synaptic vesicle cycle. Here we review the ion channels and synaptic protein complexes under the influence of CSPα and discuss gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:24808827

  4. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes.

    PubMed

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Helm, Martin S

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures. PMID:25939282

  5. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Helm, Martin S.

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  6. [Molecular mechanism at the presynaptic active zone].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2011-07-01

    Our higher brain functions such as learning and memory, emotion, and consciousness depend on the precise regulation of complicated neural networks in the brain. Neurons communicate with each other through the synapse, which comprise 3 regions: the presynapse, synaptic cleft, and postsynapse. The active zone (AZ) beneath the presynaptic membrane is the principal site for Ca2+ -dependent neurotransmitter release: AZ is involved in determining the site for docking and synaptic vesicle fusion. Presently, the full molecular composition of AZ is unclear, but it is known to contain several AZ-specific proteins, including cytomatrix of the active zone-associated protein (CAST)/ERC2, ELKS, RIM1, Munc13-1, Piccolo/Aczonin, and Bassoon. CAST and ELKS are novel active zone proteins that directly bind to Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs), Bassoon, and Piccolo, and are thought to play a role in neurotransmitter release by binding these to AZ proteins. In this review, current advances in studies on AZ structure and function have been summarized, and the focus is mainly on protein-protein interactions among the AZ proteins.

  7. Postnatal development of GABAergic signalling in the rat lateral geniculate nucleus: presynaptic dendritic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Marie-Claude; Qin, Yi; Heggelund, Paul; Zhu, J Julius

    2003-01-01

    Diverse forms of GABAergic inhibition are found in the mature brain. To understand how this diversity develops, we studied the changes in morphology of inhibitory interneurons and changes in interneuron-mediated synaptic transmission in the rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). We found a steady expansion of the dendritic tree of interneurons over the first three postnatal weeks. During this period, the area around a thalamocortical cell from which GABAA inhibition could be elicited also expanded. Dendritic branching and burst firing in interneurons evolved more slowly. The distal dendrites of interneurons began to branch extensively after the third week, and at the same time burst firing appeared. The appearance of burst firing and an elaborated dendritic tree were accompanied by a pronounced GABAB inhibition of thalamocortical cells. Thus, GABA inhibition of thalamocortical cells developed from one type of GABAA inhibition (spatially restricted) in the young animal into two distinct types of GABAA inhibition (short- and long-range) and GABAB inhibition in the adult animal. The close temporal relationships between the development of the diverse forms of inhibition and the postnatal changes in morphology of local GABAergic interneurons in the dLGN suggest that postnatal dendritic maturation is an important presynaptic factor for the developmental time course of the various types of feedforward inhibition in thalamus. PMID:12509484

  8. Reduced Presynaptic Dopamine Activity in Adolescent Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis. PMID:23358239

  9. Reduced presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescent dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis.

  10. Target-Specific Expression of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors in Neocortical Microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Katherine A.; Blackman, Arne V.; Moreau, Alexandre W.; Elgar, Dale; Costa, Rui P.; Lalanne, Txomin; Tudor Jones, Adam A.; Oyrer, Julia; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Summary Traditionally, NMDA receptors are located postsynaptically; yet, putatively presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) have been reported. Although implicated in controlling synaptic plasticity, their function is not well understood and their expression patterns are debated. We demonstrate that, in layer 5 of developing mouse visual cortex, preNMDARs specifically control synaptic transmission at pyramidal cell inputs to other pyramidal cells and to Martinotti cells, while leaving those to basket cells unaffected. We also reveal a type of interneuron that mediates ascending inhibition. In agreement with synapse-specific expression, we find preNMDAR-mediated calcium signals in a subset of pyramidal cell terminals. A tuned network model predicts that preNMDARs specifically reroute information flow in local circuits during high-frequency firing, in particular by impacting frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition mediated by Martinotti cells, a finding that we experimentally verify. We conclude that postsynaptic cell type determines presynaptic terminal molecular identity and that preNMDARs govern information processing in neocortical columns. PMID:22884329

  11. Strength and precision of neurotransmission at mammalian presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Classically, the basic concept of chemical synaptic transmission was established at the frog neuromuscular junction, and direct intracellular recordings from presynaptic terminals at the squid giant presynaptic terminal have further clarified principles of neurotransmitter release. More recently, whole-cell patch-camp recordings from the calyx of Held in rodent brainstem slices have extended the classical concept to mammalian synapses providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying strength and precision of neurotransmission and developmental changes therein. This review summarizes findings from our laboratory and others on these subjects, mainly at the calyx of Held, with a particular focus on precise, high-fidelity, fast neurotransmission. The mechanisms by which presynaptic terminals acquire strong, precise neurotransmission during postnatal development are also discussed. PMID:26194855

  12. Theoretical versus operational state-dependent error growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khade, V.; Hansen, J.

    2003-04-01

    The state dependence of singular values is well known, and shows that global measures of uncertainty growth like Lyapunov exponents are irrelevant when it comes to forecasts over time scales of interest. But the studies to date do not tell the whole story. It is found that the singular vector error growth in the perfect model scenario, with perfect initial conditions and isotropic uncertainty is markedly different from that for imperfect initial conditions & operationally obtainable uncertainty (for example when data is assimilated). When the model error is included the picture changes yet again. The state dependent error growth in a range of scenarios using a toy model has been compared and contrasted, giving a picture of the large range of issues impacting the predictability problem.

  13. State dependence of Rydberg interaction-induced collisional loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Zhao, Kejia; Miao, Jingyuan; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhaochun; He, Zhao; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple analytical formula from an existing theoretical model and theoretically investigate in detail the state dependence of interaction-induced collisional loss rate coefficients, and the various parameter effects on collisional loss rate. We also investigate the different mechanisms and corresponding effects on collisional loss by analyzing our previous experimental results using the present formula, and even investigate the time evolution of Rydberg atom number for different Rydberg states.

  14. State-dependent control of lumbar motoneurons by the hypocretinergic system.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, Jack; Fung, Simon J; Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H

    2010-02-01

    Neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that synthesize hypocretins (Hcrt-1 and Hcrt-2) are active during wakefulness and excite lumbar motoneurons. Because hypocretinergic cells also discharge during phasic periods of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, we sought to examine their action on the activity of motoneurons during this state. Accordingly, cat lumbar motoneurons were intracellularly recorded, under alpha-chloralose anesthesia, prior to (control) and during the carbachol-induced REM sleep-like atonia (REMc). During control conditions, LH stimulation induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials (composite EPSP) in motoneurons. In contrast, during REMc, identical LH stimulation induced inhibitory PSPs in motoneurons. We then tested the effects of LH stimulation on motoneuron responses following the stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) which is part of a brainstem-spinal cord system that controls motoneuron excitability in a state-dependent manner. LH stimulation facilitated NRGc stimulation-induced composite EPSP during control conditions whereas it enhanced NRGc stimulation-induced IPSPs during REMc. These intriguing data indicate that the LH exerts a state-dependent control of motor activity. As a first step to understand these results, we examined whether hypocretinergic synaptic mechanisms in the spinal cord were state dependent. We found that the juxtacellular application of Hcrt-1 induced motoneuron excitation during control conditions whereas motoneuron inhibition was enhanced during REMc. These data indicate that the hypocretinergic system acts on motoneurons in a state-dependent manner via spinal synaptic mechanisms. Thus, deficits in Hcrt-1 may cause the coexistence of incongruous motor signs in cataplectic patients, such as motor suppression during wakefulness and movement disorders during REM sleep. PMID:19962375

  15. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  16. State Dependence of Network Output: Modeling and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nadim, Farzan; Brezina, Vladimir; Destexhe, Alain; Linster, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Emerging experimental evidence suggests that both networks and their component neurons respond to similar inputs differently depending on the state of network activity. The network state is determined by the intrinsic dynamical structure of the network and may change as a function of neuromodulation, the balance or stochasticity of synaptic inputs to the network and the history of network activity. Much of the knowledge on state-dependent effects comes from comparisons of awake and sleep states of the mammalian brain. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these states are difficult to unravel. Several vertebrate and invertebrate studies have elucidated cellular and synaptic mechanisms of state-dependence resulting from neuromodulation, sensory input, and experience. Recent studies have combined modeling and experiments to examine the computational principles that emerge when network state is taken into account; these studies are highlighted in this article. We discuss these principles in a variety of systems (mammalian, crustacean, and mollusk) to demonstrate the unifying theme of state-dependence of network output. PMID:19005044

  17. Modeling state-dependent inactivation of membrane currents.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Abbott, L F

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of many ion channels occurs through largely voltage-independent transitions to an inactivated state from the open state or from other states in the pathway leading to opening of the channel. Because this form of inactivation is state-dependent rather than voltage-dependent, it cannot be described by the standard Hodgkin-Huxley formalism used in virtually all modeling studies of neuronal behavior. Using two examples, cumulative inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel and inactivation of the fast sodium channel, we extend the standard formalism for modeling macroscopic membrane currents to account for state-dependent inactivation. Our results provide an accurate description of cumulative inactivation of the Kv3 channel, new insight into inactivation of the sodium channel, and a general framework for modeling macroscopic currents when state-dependent processes are involved. In a model neuron, the macroscopic Kv3 current produces a novel short-term memory effect and firing delays similar to those seen in hippocampal neurons. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:7524708

  18. Presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors regulate retinohypothalamic neurotransmission in the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, Richard; Cato, Matthew; Colbert, Costa; Rea, Michael A

    2002-09-01

    Adenosine has been implicated as a modulator of retinohypothalamic neurotransmission in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the seat of the light-entrainable circadian clock in mammals. Intracellular recordings were made from SCN neurons in slices of hamster hypothalamus using the in situ whole-cell patch clamp method. A monosynaptic, glutamatergic, excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) was evoked by stimulation of the optic nerve. The EPSC was blocked by bath application of the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal concentration of 1.7 microM. The block of EPSC amplitude by CHA was antagonized by concurrent application of the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). The adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS21680 was ineffective in attenuating the EPSC at concentrations up to 50 microM. Trains of four consecutive stimuli at 25 ms intervals usually depressed the EPSC amplitude. However, after application of CHA, consecutive responses displayed facilitation of EPSC amplitude. The induction of facilitation by CHA suggested a presynaptic mechanism of action. After application of CHA, the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs declined substantially, while their amplitude distribution was unchanged or slightly reduced, again suggesting a mainly presynaptic site of action for CHA. Application of glutamate by brief pressure ejection evoked a long-lasting inward current that was unaffected by CHA at concentrations sufficient to reduce the evoked EPSC amplitude substantially (1 to 5 microM), suggesting that postsynaptic glutamate receptor-gated currents were unaffected by the drug. Taken together, these observations indicate that CHA inhibits optic nerve-evoked EPSCs in SCN neurons by a predominantly presynaptic mechanism. PMID:12210106

  19. Patterns of sequence conservation in presynaptic neural genes

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Dexter; Murphy, Tara; Valladares, Otto; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Ungar, Lyle; Kim, Junhyong; Bućan, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Background The neuronal synapse is a fundamental functional unit in the central nervous system of animals. Because synaptic function is evolutionarily conserved, we reasoned that functional sequences of genes and related genomic elements known to play important roles in neurotransmitter release would also be conserved. Results Evolutionary rate analysis revealed that presynaptic proteins evolve slowly, although some members of large gene families exhibit accelerated evolutionary rates relative to other family members. Comparative sequence analysis of 46 megabases spanning 150 presynaptic genes identified more than 26,000 elements that are highly conserved in eight vertebrate species, as well as a small subset of sequences (6%) that are shared among unrelated presynaptic genes. Analysis of large gene families revealed that upstream and intronic regions of closely related family members are extremely divergent. We also identified 504 exceptionally long conserved elements (≥360 base pairs, ≥80% pair-wise identity between human and other mammals) in intergenic and intronic regions of presynaptic genes. Many of these elements form a highly stable stem-loop RNA structure and consequently are candidates for novel regulatory elements, whereas some conserved noncoding elements are shown to correlate with specific gene expression profiles. The SynapseDB online database integrates these findings and other functional genomic resources for synaptic genes. Conclusion Highly conserved elements in nonprotein coding regions of 150 presynaptic genes represent sequences that may be involved in the transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Furthermore, comparative sequence analysis will facilitate selection of genes and noncoding sequences for future functional studies and analysis of variation studies in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:17096848

  20. Synapse number and synaptic efficacy are regulated by presynaptic cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Munno, David W; Prince, David J; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-05-15

    The mechanisms by which neurons regulate the number and strength of synapses during development and synaptic plasticity have not yet been defined fully. This lack of fundamental knowledge in the fields of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity can be attributed, in part, to compensatory mechanisms by which neurons accommodate for the loss of function in their synaptic partners. This is generally achieved either by scaling up neuronal transmitter release capabilities or by enhancing the postsynaptic responsiveness. Here, we demonstrate that regulation of synaptic strength and number between identified Lymnaea neurons visceral dorsal 4 (VD4, the presynaptic cell) and left pedal dorsal 1 (LPeD1, the postsynaptic cell) requires presynaptic activation of a cAMP-PKA-dependent signal. Experimental activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway resulted in reduced synaptic efficacy, whereas inhibition of the cAMP-PKA cascade permitted hyperinnervation and an overall enhancement of synaptic strength. Because synaptic transmission between VD4 and LPeD1 does not require a cAMP-PKA pathway, our data show that these messengers may play a novel role in regulating the synaptic efficacy during early synaptogenesis and plasticity.

  1. Modulation of ethanol state-dependent learning by dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Rezayof, Ameneh; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Rassouli, Yassaman

    2008-12-01

    The possible role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of dorsal hippocampus on ethanol state-dependent learning was studied in adult male mice (Pasteur Institute, Iran). As a model of memory, a single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used. All animals were bilaterally implanted with cannulae into the CA1 regions of dorsal hippocampi. Results show that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (0.5 and 1 g/kg) 30 min before training impaired memory performance in animals when tested 24h later. Pretest administration of the same doses of ethanol-induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under pretraining ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) influence. Pretest intra-CA1 microinjection of NMDA (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 microg/mouse) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and ethanol-induced amnesia. However, pretest intra-CA1 administration of the same doses of NMDA with an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.25 g/kg, i.p.) significantly restored the retrieval and potentiated ethanol state-dependent learning. On the other hand, pretest administration of a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) (0.01, 0.1, and 1 microg/mouse, intra-CA1) or a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 maleate [(5S, 10R)-(+)-5-Methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a, d] cyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate] (0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/mouse, intra-CA1) 5 min before the administration of ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited ethanol state-dependent learning. Intra-CA1 pretest administration of D-AP5 (0.01, 0.1, and 1 microg/mouse) or MK-801 maleate [5S, 10R)-(+)-5-Methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a, d] cyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate] (0.25, 0.5, and 1 microg/mouse) alone did not affect memory retention. It may be concluded that dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors are involved in mediating ethanol state-dependent learning.

  2. Studies on the possible contribution of a peripheral presynaptic action of clonidine and dopamine to their vascular effects under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, G

    1976-12-01

    The functional consequences of drug-induced stimulation under in vivo conditions of alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors at vascular adrenergic nerve endings (presynaptic receptors) was studied in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs of cats anaesthetized with urethane. The changes in perfusion pressure in response to electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain were taken as a measure of noradrenaline release from the vascular adrenergic nerves. Presynaptic inhibitory alpha-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors were activated by clonidine and dopamine, respectively. According to in vitro experiments these two drugs are more potent stimulants of peripheral presynaptic than postsynaptic receptors. The lowest frequency of stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain which yielded a reproducible pressor response was 4 HZ for the autoperfused hindquarters and 1 HZ for the hindlegs; Clonidine was tested over a wide dose range (1-100 mug/kg i;v). A reduction of the stimulation-induced pressor response in the autoperfused hindquarters or hindlegs was observed only after the rather high dose of 100 mug/kg of clonidine. The inhibition was marked at low frequencies of stimulation (1-4 HZ) and weak or absent at high frequencies (16 and 32 HZ). The dose of clonidine (100 mug/kg) which proved to be effective at presynaptic receptors produced a transient increase in blood pressure and in perfusion pressure of the hindquarters and hindlegs and virtually abolished spontaneous sympathetic nervous activity. In spinal cats, the clonidine-induced increases in blood pressure and perfusion pressure were very pronounced and of rather long duration. Thus, under in vivo conditions clonidine showed no selectivity for presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in a blood-perfused vascular bed, and its presynaptic action was negligible as compared to its powerful central sympatho-inhibitory effect. Dopamine was constantly infused into the auto-perfused hindquarters or hindlegs at

  3. State-dependent μ-opioid modulation of social motivation

    PubMed Central

    Loseth, Guro E.; Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by μ-opioid transmission. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviors, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the μ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for μ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for μ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account. PMID:25565999

  4. Presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor activation and coupling of the receptor-presynaptic effector system in the perfused rat heart: affinity and efficacy of phenethylamines and imidazoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fuder, H; Braun, H J; Schimkus, R

    1986-04-01

    The right sympathetic nerves of perfused rat hearts were stimulated in the presence of inhibitors of neuronal and extraneuronal uptake and propranolol. The inhibition by alpha adrenoceptor agonists of stimulation-evoked (10 pulses, 0.1 Hz) [3H]norepinephrine (NE) overflow into the perfusate was taken as a parameter of presynaptic adrenoceptor activation. Under the present conditions, autoinhibition of NE release is not activated by endogenous NE as evident from ineffectiveness of adrenoceptor antagonists in facilitating evoked [3H]NE overflow. The potency (EC50, -log10), affinity (agonist-presynaptic receptor dissociation constant KA, -log10) and relative efficacies (RE) were determined for phenethylamines (NE or alpha-methylepinephrine) and for imidazoline derivatives. NE (-log EC50, 7.76) was 0.88 log units more potent than alpha-methylepinephrine (-log EC50, 6.88) and about the same difference was observed for the -log KA values (5.92 vs. 4.75). RE were similar (NE, 100%; alpha methylepinephrine, 98%) and 22- to 50-fold higher than efficacies of imidazoline derivatives. Hydroxylations in positions 3 and 4 of the phenyl moiety of phenylaminoimidazoline (-log EC50, less than 5; -log KA, less than 5; RE, less than 1%) resulted in a marked increase in potency (-log EC50, 8.32) of the resulting dihydroxyphenylaminoimidazoline due to a high affinity (-log KA, 8.22) at a low efficacy (2% of NE). In contrast, hydroxylation in positions 3 and 4 of the phenyl ring of tolazoline (no agonist activity under the present conditions; antagonist affinity constant from the literature, 6.4-6.6) produced dihydroxytolazoline, a moderately potent agonist (-log EC50, 7.25) with an efficacy of 3.5% at an affinity (-log KA, 6.92) not much different from that of tolazine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores. PMID:23100436

  6. Charge state dependence of channeled ion energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchenko, J. A.; Goland, A. N.; Rosner, J. S.; Thorn, C. E.; Wegner, H. E.; Knudsen, H.; Moak, C. D.

    1981-02-01

    The charge state dependence of channeled ion energy loss has been determined for a series of ions ranging from fluorine to chlorine along the <110> direction in a silicon crystal. Energy losses for both bare ions and ions partially clothed with bound electrons at EA≅3 MeV/amu have been measured. The energy-loss rate for bare ions follows a strict Z21 scaling and agrees reasonably well with quantal perturbation calculations without the need for polarization or Bloch corrections. An explanation for this result is discussed. The clothed-ion energy losses appear to demonstrate screening effects that agree qualitatively with simple estimates. The angular dependence of the observed energy-loss effects is also presented.

  7. Mobility of calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Romy; Hosy, Eric; Kohl, Johannes; Klueva, Julia; Choquet, Daniel; Thomas, Ulrich; Voigt, Andreas; Heine, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Unravelling principles underlying neurotransmitter release are key to understand neural signaling. Here, we describe how surface mobility of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) modulates release probabilities (P(r)) of synaptic vesicles (SVs). Coupling distances of <10 to >100 nm have been reported for SVs and VDCCs in different synapses. Tracking individual VDCCs revealed that within hippocampal synapses, ∼60% of VDCCs are mobile while confined to presynaptic membrane compartments. Intracellular Ca(2+) chelation decreased VDCC mobility. Increasing VDCC surface populations by co-expression of the α2δ1 subunit did not alter channel mobility but led to enlarged active zones (AZs) rather than higher channel densities. VDCCs thus scale presynaptic scaffolds to maintain local mobility. We propose that dynamic coupling based on mobile VDCCs supports calcium domain cooperativity and tunes neurotransmitter release by equalizing Pr for docked SVs within AZs. PMID:25892305

  8. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  9. Presynaptic Active Zone Density during Development and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Chen, Jie; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density) during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS), active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  10. The Innate Immune Receptor PGRP-LC Controls Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nathan; Braiser, Daniel J; Dickman, Dion K; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-12-16

    It is now appreciated that the brain is immunologically active. Highly conserved innate immune signaling responds to pathogen invasion and injury and promotes structural refinement of neural circuitry. However, it remains generally unknown whether innate immune signaling has a function during the day-to-day regulation of neural function in the absence of pathogens and irrespective of cellular damage or developmental change. Here we show that an innate immune receptor, a member of the peptidoglycan pattern recognition receptor family (PGRP-LC), is required for the induction and sustained expression of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. This receptor functions presynaptically, controlling the homeostatic modulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles following inhibition of postsynaptic glutamate receptor function. Thus, PGRP-LC is a candidate receptor for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling, a novel activity for innate immune signaling and the first known function of a PGRP-type receptor in the nervous system of any organism. PMID:26687223

  11. Presynaptic modulation of transmitter release via alpha2-adrenoceptors: nonsynaptic interactions.

    PubMed

    Vizi, E S

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neurochemical transmission occurring at the synapse is the primary way of sending messages from one neuron to another. Neurotransmitters released from axon terminal in a [Ca2+]0-dependent manner act transsynaptically on the postsynaptic site. The past 30 years have witnessed something of a revolution in the understanding of how neurons communicate with each other. It has been shown that the exocytotic release of transmitters from axon terminals is subject to presynaptic modulation via presynatic hetero- and auto-receptors. For example via stimulation of alpha2-adrenoceptors expressed on varicosities and coupled to G-protein the stimulation-evoked release of different transmitters can be inhibited. This review will focus on nonsynaptic interactions between axon terminals. The present data clearly show that transmitters released from axon terminals without synaptic contact play an important role in the fine tuning of communication between neurons within a neuronal circuit.

  12. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  13. Oxidation state-dependent conformational changes in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, A M; Brayer, G D

    1992-02-20

    High-resolution three-dimensional structural analyses of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c have now been completed in both oxidation states using isomorphous crystalline material and similar structure determination methodologies. This approach has allowed a comprehensive comparison to be made between these structures and the elucidation of the subtle conformational changes occurring between oxidation states. The structure solution of reduced yeast iso-1-cytochrome c has been published and the determination of the oxidized protein and a comparison of these structures are reported herein. Our data show that oxidation state-dependent changes are expressed for the most part in terms of adjustments to heme structure, movement of internally bound water molecules and segmental thermal parameter changes along the polypeptide chain, rather than as explicit polypeptide chain positional shifts, which are found to be minimal. This result is emphasized by the retention of all main-chain to main-chain hydrogen bond interactions in both oxidation states. Observed thermal factor changes primarily affect four segments of polypeptide chain. Residues 37-39 show less mobility in the oxidized state, with Arg38 and its side-chain being most affected. In contrast, residues 47-59, 65-72 and 81-85 have significantly higher thermal factors, with maximal increases being observed for Asn52, Tyr67 and Phe82. The side-chains of two of these residues are hydrogen bonded to the internally bound water molecule, Wat166, which shows a large 1.7 A displacement towards the positively charged heme iron atom in the oxidized protein. Further analyses suggest that Wat166 is a major factor in stabilizing both oxidation states of the heme through differential orientation of dipole moment, shift in distance to the heme iron atom and alterations in the surrounding hydrogen bonding network. It also seems likely that Wat166 movement leads to the disruption of the hydrogen bond from the side-chain of Tyr67 to the Met80

  14. Botulinum toxin type A blocks the morphological changes induced by chemical stimulation on the presynaptic membrane of Torpedo synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Marsal, J; Egea, G; Solsona, C; Rabasseda, X; Blasi, J

    1989-01-01

    The action of botulinum neurotoxin on acetylcholine release, and on the structural changes at the presynaptic membrane associated with the transmitter release, was studied by using a subcellular fraction of cholinergic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) isolated from the Torpedo electric organ. Acetylcholine and ATP release were continuously monitored by chemiluminescent methods. To catch the membrane morphological changes, the quick-freezing method was applied. Our results show that botulinum neurotoxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine from these isolated nerve terminals in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ATP release is not affected. The maximal inhibition (70%) is achieved at neurotoxin concentrations as low as 125 pM with an incubation time of 6 min. This effect is not linked to an alteration of the integrity of the synaptosomes since, after poisoning by botulinum neurotoxin type A, they show a nonmodified occluded lactate dehydrogenase activity. Moreover, membrane potential is not altered by the toxin with respect to the control, either in resting condition or after potassium depolarization. In addition to acetylcholine release inhibition, botulinum neurotoxin blocks the rearrangement of the presynaptic intramembrane particles induced by potassium stimulation. The action of botulinum neurotoxin suggests that the intramembrane particle rearrangement is related to the acetylcholine secretion induced by potassium stimulation in synaptosomes isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata. Images PMID:2463625

  15. Initial-state dependency of learning in young infants.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hama; Taga, Gentaro

    2011-02-01

    With the aim of investigating the effect of the initial state of pre-learning on subsequent infant learning (i.e., the initial-state dependency), we observed the limb movements in 3-month-old infants in the course of a motor learning task. The session comprised 2-min pre-learning and 4-min learning periods, and the infants learned to move a toy using a string attached to either an arm (arm-based learning, Experiment 1) or a leg (leg-based learning, Experiment 2). Infants were assigned to low- and high-state groups in the initial-state condition according to the average velocity of the arm (Experiment 1) or leg (Experiment 2) movements during the pre-learning period. The results revealed that, during the learning period, infants in the low-state group increased the movement of their limbs, whereas those in the high-state group showed no significant changes in the movement of most of their limbs. These results suggest that infants demonstrating a low average velocity of movement in the initial state easily observed and learned the circular causality between self-produced movements and environmental changes. On the other hand, it seemed that infants demonstrating a high average velocity of movement in the initial state could not or did not need to increase their limb movements (the toy would already be shaking enough to form striking movements). PMID:21163544

  16. The ecological rationality of state-dependent valuation.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J M; Trimmer, P C; Houston, A I

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory studies on a range of animals have identified a bias that seems to violate basic principles of rational behavior: a preference is shown for feeding options that previously provided food when reserves were low, even though another option had been found to give the same reward with less delay. The bias presents a challenge to normative models of decision making (which only take account of expected rewards and the state of the animal at the decision time). To understand the behavior, we take a broad ecological perspective and consider how valuation mechanisms evolve when the best action depends upon the environment being faced. We show that in a changing and uncertain environment, state-dependent valuation can be favored by natural selection: Individuals should allow their hunger to affect learning for future decisions. The valuation mechanism that typically evolves produces the kind of behavior seen in standard laboratory tests. By providing an insight into why learning should be affected by the state of an individual, we provide a basis for understanding psychological principles in terms of an animal's ecology.

  17. Glucose enhancement of memory is not state-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Opezzo, J W; Baratti, C M

    1993-11-01

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) significantly enhanced retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in an inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U in this range of dose. However, of the doses tested, only 30 mg/kg was effective. Glucose did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, suggesting that the actions of glucose on retention performance were not due to nonspecific effects on response latencies. The influence of glucose (30 mg/kg) was time-dependent, which suggests that glucose facilitated memory consolidation processes. Administration of glucose (30 mg/kg) 2 or 10 min prior to the retention test did not affect the retention performance of mice given post-training injections of either saline or glucose (30 mg/kg). These findings indicate that the memory-enhancing effects of post-training administration of glucose are not state-dependent and are consistent with the view that the behavioral effects of glucose are mediated through an interaction with the neural or neurohumoral processes underlying the storage of acquired information. PMID:8297314

  18. Vibrational State Dependent Large Amplitude Tunneling Dynamics in Malonaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant; Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-06-01

    The quantum dynamics of intramolecular proton transfer in malonaldehyde has represented a major challenge for first principles theoretical calculation, in large measure due to the highly concerted motion of all 9 nuclei throughout the tunneling event. This talk describes efforts to predict quantum state dependent tunneling rates from high level ab initio calculations, exploiting the large amplitude motion (LAM) Hamiltonian methods of Hougen, Bunker and Johns.A An effective adiabatic potential surface for the tunneling path is constructed from CCSD(T)/AVnZ-F12 calculations using explicitly correlated basis set methods and extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This potential is adiabatically corrected by zero point excitation in the remaining 3N-7 = 20 vibrational modes, with the multidimensional tunneling dependence of the effective mass explicitly taken into AccountB and numerically solved with Numerov methods. Of special importance, this method permits calculation of mode dependent tunneling splittings as a function of vibrational quantum state, which offers interesting prospects for comparison with recent FTIR slit jet cooled data of Suhm and coworkers.C A J. T. Hougen, P. R. Bunker and J. W. C. Johns, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 34, 136 (1970). B D. J. Rush and K. B. Wiberg, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 3143 (1997). C N. O. B. Luttschwager, T. N. Wassermann, S. Coussan and M. A. Suhm, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1039/c002345k (2010)

  19. Identifying state-dependent model error in numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaitis, J.; Hansen, J.; Toth, Z.; Zhu, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Model forecasts of complex systems such as the atmosphere lose predictive skill because of two different sources of error: initial conditions error and model error. While much study has been done to determine the nature and consequences of initial conditions error in operational forecast models, relatively little has been done to identify the source of model error and to quantify the effects of model error on forecasts. Here, we attempt to "disentangle" model error from initial conditions error by applying a diagnostic tool in a simple model framework to identify poor forecasts for which model error is likely responsible. The diagnostic is based on the premise that for a perfect ensemble forecast, verification should fall outside the range of ensemble forecast states only a small percentage of the time, according to the size of the ensemble. Identifying these outlier verifications and comparing the statistics of their occurrence to those of a perfect ensemble can tell us about the role of model error in a quantitative, state-dependent manner. The same diagnostic is applied to operational NWP models to quantify the role of model error in poor forecasts (see companion paper by Toth et al.). From these results, we can infer the atmospheric processes the model cannot adequately simulate.

  20. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  1. Glucose enhancement of memory is not state-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Opezzo, J W; Baratti, C M

    1993-11-01

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) significantly enhanced retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in an inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U in this range of dose. However, of the doses tested, only 30 mg/kg was effective. Glucose did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, suggesting that the actions of glucose on retention performance were not due to nonspecific effects on response latencies. The influence of glucose (30 mg/kg) was time-dependent, which suggests that glucose facilitated memory consolidation processes. Administration of glucose (30 mg/kg) 2 or 10 min prior to the retention test did not affect the retention performance of mice given post-training injections of either saline or glucose (30 mg/kg). These findings indicate that the memory-enhancing effects of post-training administration of glucose are not state-dependent and are consistent with the view that the behavioral effects of glucose are mediated through an interaction with the neural or neurohumoral processes underlying the storage of acquired information.

  2. Differential myotoxic and cytotoxic activities of pre-synaptic neurotoxins from Papuan taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) and Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus) venoms.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Parkington, Helena C; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2013-05-01

    Pre-synaptic PLA(2) neurotoxins are important components of many Australasian elapid snake venoms. These toxins disrupt neurotransmitter release. Taipoxin, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the coastal taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus), causes necrosis and muscle degeneration. The present study examined the myotoxic and cytotoxic activities of venoms from the Papuan taipan (O. scutellatus) and Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus), and also tested their pre-synaptic neurotoxins: cannitoxin and P-EPTX-Ar1a. Based on size-exclusion chromatography analysis, cannitoxin represents 16% of O. scutellatus venom, while P-EPTX-Ar1a represents 6% of A. rugosus venom. In the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, A. rugosus venom displayed significantly higher myotoxic activity than O. scutellatus venom as indicated by inhibition of direct twitches, and an increase in baseline tension. Both cannitoxin and P-EPTX-Ar1a displayed marked myotoxic activity. A. rugosus venom (50-300 μg/ml) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6), while 300 μg/ml of O. scutellatus venom was required to inhibit cell proliferation, following 24-hr incubation. P-EPTX-Ar1a had greater cytotoxicity than cannitoxin, inhibiting cell proliferation after 24-hr incubation in L6 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase levels were increased after 1-hr incubation with A. rugosus venom (100-250 μg/ml), O. scutellatus venom (200-250 μg/ml) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (1-2 μM), but not cannitoxin (1-2 μM), suggesting venoms/toxin generated cell necrosis. Thus, A. rugosus and O. scutellatus venoms possess different myotoxic and cytotoxic activities. The proportion of pre-synaptic neurotoxin in the venoms and PLA(2) activity of the whole venoms are unlikely to be responsible for these activities.

  3. State-dependent phenomena in cat masseter motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; López-Rodríguez, F; Liu, R H; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-05-25

    In the present study we explored the mechanisms of carbachol-induced muscle atonia in the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized animal. We compared our findings to those that have been previously obtained in unanesthetized cats during muscle atonia occurring during natural active sleep. Accordingly, in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, intracellular records were obtained from masseter motoneurons before and after carbachol-induced motor atonia. Following the induction of atonia, the membrane potential activity was dominated by high-frequency, discrete, hyperpolarizing potentials. These hyperpolarizing potentials were reversed in polarity by the intracellular injection of chloride ions and abolished by the application of strychnine. These findings indicate that they were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) mediated by glycine. These IPSPs appeared exclusively during muscle atonia. In addition, masseter motoneurons were significantly hyperpolarized and their rheobase increased. There was a decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant. In the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized preparation, stimulation of the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) induced IPSPs in masseter motoneurons following, but never prior to, the pontine injection of carbachol. Thus, this is the first demonstration that "reticular response-reversal' may be elicited in an anesthetized preparation. Another state-dependent phenomenon of active sleep, the occurrence of IPSPs in motoneurons that are temporally correlated with ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, was also observed in this preparation only after carbachol administration. Based on the data in this report, we conclude that the inhibitory system that mediates atonia during the state of active sleep can be activated in an animal that is anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. Specifically, the neuronal groups that generate spontaneous IPSPs, those that mediate the phenomenon of reticular response-reversal, and those involved in the generation

  4. Number sense and state-dependent valuation in cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsang-I; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2016-08-31

    Identifying the amount of prey available is an important part of an animal's foraging behaviour. The risk-sensitive foraging theory predicts that an organism's foraging decisions with regard to food rewards depending upon its satiation level. However, the precise interaction between optimal risk-tolerance and satiation level remains unclear. In this study, we examined, firstly, whether cuttlefish, with one of the most highly evolved nervous system among the invertebrates, have number sense, and secondly, whether their valuation of food reward is satiation state dependent. When food such as live shrimps is present, without training, cuttlefish turn toward the prey and initiate seizure behaviour. Using this visual attack behaviour as a measure, cuttlefish showed a preference for a larger quantity when faced with two-alternative forced choice tasks (1 versus 2, 2 versus 3, 3 versus 4 and 4 versus 5). However, cuttlefish preferred the small quantity when the choice was between one live and two dead shrimps. More importantly, when the choice was between one large live shrimp and two small live shrimps (a prey size and quantity trade-off), the cuttlefish chose the large single shrimp when they felt hunger, but chose the two smaller prey when they were satiated. These results demonstrate that cuttlefish are capable of number discrimination and that their choice of prey number depends on the quality of the prey and on their appetite state. The findings also suggest that cuttlefish integrate both internal and external information when making a foraging decision and that the cost of obtaining food is inversely correlated with their satiation level, a phenomenon similar to the observation that metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk among humans. PMID:27559063

  5. LIM Kinase, a Newly Identified Regulator of Presynaptic Remodeling by Rod Photoreceptors After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rod photoreceptors retract their axon terminals and develop neuritic sprouts in response to retinal detachment and reattachment, respectively. This study examines the role of LIM kinase (LIMK), a component of RhoA and Rac pathways, in the presynaptic structural remodeling of rod photoreceptors. Methods Phosphorylated LIMK (p-LIMK), the active form of LIMK, was examined in salamander retina with Western blot and confocal microscopy. Axon length within the first 7 hours and process growth after 3 days of culture were assessed in isolated rod photoreceptors treated with inhibitors of upstream regulators ROCK and p21-activated kinase (Pak) (Y27632 and IPA-3) and a direct LIMK inhibitor (BMS-5). Porcine retinal explants were also treated with BMS-5 and analyzed 24 hours after detachment. Because Ca2+ influx contributes to axonal retraction, L-type channels were blocked in some experiments with nicardipine. Results Phosphorylated LIMK is present in rod terminals during retraction and in newly formed processes. Axonal retraction over 7 hours was significantly reduced by inhibition of LIMK or its regulators, ROCK and Pak. Process growth was reduced by LIMK or Pak inhibition especially at the basal (axon-bearing) region of the rod cells. Combining Ca2+ channel and LIMK inhibition had no additional effect on retraction but did further inhibit sprouting after 3 days. In detached porcine retina, LIMK inhibition reduced rod axonal retraction and improved retinal morphology. Conclusions Thus structural remodeling, in the form of either axonal retraction or neuritic growth, requires LIMK activity. LIM kinase inhibition may have therapeutic potential for reducing pathologic rod terminal plasticity after retinal injury. PMID:26658506

  6. Presynaptic and postsynaptic effects of the venom of the Australian tiger snake at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Datyner, M. E.; Gage, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    1. Crude venom (TSV) from the Australian tiger snake (Notechis scutatus scutatus) has both presynaptic and postsynaptic effects at the neuromuscular junctions of toads. 2. TSV (50 μg/ml) rapidly blocked indirectly elicited muscle twitches without affecting the compound action potential in the sciatic nerve or twitches elicited by direct stimulation. 3. Low concentrations of the venom (1-10 μg/ml) reduced the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials (m.e.p.ps) and inhibited the depolarization of muscle fibres normally caused by carbachol. It was concluded that a fraction of the venom binds to acetylcholine receptors. 4. The frequency of m.e.p.ps was at first increased by TSV at a concentration of 1 μg/ml. Occasional, high frequency `bursts' of m.e.p.ps were recorded in some preparations. The mean frequency of m.e.p.ps appeared to fall after several hours in the venom. 5. The quantal content of endplate potentials (e.p.ps) was reduced by the venom. With low concentrations (1 μg/ml), an initial increase in quantal content was often seen. When the quantal content was markedly depressed there was no parallel reduction in the amplitude of nerve terminal spikes recorded extracellularly, though a later fall in size and slowing of time course was often seen. 6. There was evidence that TSV eventually changed the normal Poisson characteristics of the spontaneous release of quanta and this may be correlated with electronmicroscopic changes in nerve terminals. 7. Tiger snake antivenene counteracted the postsynaptic, but not the presynaptic effects of TSV when they had developed. PMID:4367126

  7. Presynaptic Spontaneous Activity Enhances the Accuracy of Latency Coding.

    PubMed

    Levakova, Marie; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2016-10-01

    The time to the first spike after stimulus onset typically varies with the stimulation intensity. Experimental evidence suggests that neural systems use such response latency to encode information about the stimulus. We investigate the decoding accuracy of the latency code in relation to the level of noise in the form of presynaptic spontaneous activity. Paradoxically, the optimal performance is achieved at a nonzero level of noise and suprathreshold stimulus intensities. We argue that this phenomenon results from the influence of the spontaneous activity on the stabilization of the membrane potential in the absence of stimulation. The reported decoding accuracy improvement represents a novel manifestation of the noise-aided signal enhancement. PMID:27557098

  8. Presynaptic Spontaneous Activity Enhances the Accuracy of Latency Coding.

    PubMed

    Levakova, Marie; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2016-10-01

    The time to the first spike after stimulus onset typically varies with the stimulation intensity. Experimental evidence suggests that neural systems use such response latency to encode information about the stimulus. We investigate the decoding accuracy of the latency code in relation to the level of noise in the form of presynaptic spontaneous activity. Paradoxically, the optimal performance is achieved at a nonzero level of noise and suprathreshold stimulus intensities. We argue that this phenomenon results from the influence of the spontaneous activity on the stabilization of the membrane potential in the absence of stimulation. The reported decoding accuracy improvement represents a novel manifestation of the noise-aided signal enhancement.

  9. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  10. SNAP-25, a Known Presynaptic Protein with Emerging Postsynaptic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Flavia; Corradini, Irene; Fossati, Giuliana; Tomasoni, Romana; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different “synaptopathies”. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis, and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions. PMID:27047369

  11. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases.

  12. SNAP-25, a Known Presynaptic Protein with Emerging Postsynaptic Functions.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Flavia; Corradini, Irene; Fossati, Giuliana; Tomasoni, Romana; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different "synaptopathies". The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis, and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  13. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  14. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases. PMID:26502758

  15. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R; Court, Felipe A; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  16. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R.; Court, Felipe A.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  17. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  18. The Roles of Microtubule-Based Transport at Presynaptic Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Yagensky, Oleksandr; Kalantary Dehaghi, Tahere; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Targeted intracellular movement of presynaptic proteins plays important roles during synapse formation and, later, in the homeostatic maintenance of mature synapses. Movement of these proteins, often as vesicular packages, is mediated by motor complexes travelling along intracellular cytoskeletal networks. Presynaptic protein transport by kinesin motors in particular plays important roles during synaptogenesis to bring newly synthesized proteins to establish nascent synaptic sites. Conversely, movement of proteins away from presynaptic sites by Dynein motors enables synapse-nuclear signaling and allows for synaptic renewal through degradation of unwanted or damaged proteins. Remarkably, recent data has indicated that synaptic and protein trafficking machineries can modulate each other’s functions. Here, we survey the mechanisms involved in moving presynaptic components to and away from synapses and how this process supports presynaptic function. PMID:26903856

  19. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  20. Dynamics and control of state-dependent networks for probing genomic organization

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Groudine, Mark; Mesbahi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    A state-dependent dynamic network is a collection of elements that interact through a network, whose geometry evolves as the state of the elements changes over time. The genome is an intriguing example of a state-dependent network, where chromosomal geometry directly relates to genomic activity, which in turn strongly correlates with geometry. Here we examine various aspects of a genomic state-dependent dynamic network. In particular, we elaborate on one of the important ramifications of viewing genomic networks as being state-dependent, namely, their controllability during processes of genomic reorganization such as in cell differentiation. PMID:21911407

  1. SUMOylation of Syntaxin1A regulates presynaptic endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Craig, Tim J; Anderson, Dina; Evans, Ashley J; Girach, Fatima; Henley, Jeremy M

    2015-12-04

    Neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminal is under very precise spatial and temporal control. Following neurotransmitter release, synaptic vesicles are recycled by endocytosis and refilled with neurotransmitter. During the exocytosis event leading to release, SNARE proteins provide most of the mechanical force for membrane fusion. Here, we show one of these proteins, Syntaxin1A, is SUMOylated near its C-terminal transmembrane domain in an activity-dependent manner. Preventing SUMOylation of Syntaxin1A reduces its interaction with other SNARE proteins and disrupts the balance of synaptic vesicle endo/exocytosis, resulting in an increase in endocytosis. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates the emerging role of Syntaxin1A in vesicle endocytosis, which in turn, modulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic function.

  2. Presynaptic control of dopamine release by BETA-phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikova, A.D.; Godukhin, O.V.

    1985-04-01

    The authors study the effect of extracellular ions (Ca/sup 2 +/, Na/sup 2 +/) on the beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) releasing effect, dependence of this effect on the membrane potential of dopaminergic endings, and the participation of dopamine presynaptic autoreceptors in the realization of the effects of beta-PEA on dopamine (DA) release. Experi ments were carried out on noninbred male albino rats. By means of a microsyringe, (/sup 3/H)-DA hydrochloride was injected. The significance of the difference in levels of (/sup 3/H)-DA release during analogous periods of perfusion in the groups of animals compared was estimated by Student's test. These experiments in vivo thus demonstrated the ability of beta-PEA to regulate DA release in different directions depending on the functional state of the dopaminergic neuron.

  3. Presynaptic elements involved in the maintenance of the neuromuscular junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in the neuromuscular junction were observed in rats preceding loss of muscle mass. In view of the possibility that these alterations involve changes in the secretion of myotrophic agents by presynaptic motor neurons, an investigation was undertaken to characterize a neuronall factor which is thought to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cholinergic synapses. This factor, which is secreted into the incubation medium by NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells, induces the aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on primary cultures of rat hindlimb myotubes. Previous attempts to purify this factor failed. Extensive washing of the NG108-15 cells with hepes-buffered salt solution followed by short (4 hour) collection times resulted in the collection of incubation medium containing maximal aggregation activity with as little as 5 ug secreted protein per ml of fresh medium. A three-fold increase in specific activity was obtained after anion exchange chromatography.

  4. Piccolo, a presynaptic zinc finger protein structurally related to bassoon.

    PubMed

    Fenster, S D; Chung, W J; Zhai, R; Cases-Langhoff, C; Voss, B; Garner, A M; Kaempf, U; Kindler, S; Gundelfinger, E D; Garner, C C

    2000-01-01

    Piccolo is a novel component of the presynaptic cytoskeletal matrix (PCM) assembled at the active zone of neurotransmitter release. Analysis of its primary structure reveals that Piccolo is a multidomain zinc finger protein structurally related to Bassoon, another PCM protein. Both proteins were found to be shared components of glutamatergic and GABAergic CNS synapses but not of the cholinergic neuromuscular junction. The Piccolo zinc fingers were found to interact with the dual prenylated rab3A and VAMP2/Synaptobrevin II receptor PRA1. We show that PRA1 is a synaptic vesicle-associated protein that is colocalized with Piccolo in nerve terminals of hippocampal primary neurons. These data suggest that Piccolo plays a role in the trafficking of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the active zone.

  5. Temporal appearance of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon during synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, R; Olias, G; Chung, W J; Lester, R A; tom Dieck, S; Langnaese, K; Kreutz, M R; Kindler, S; Gundelfinger, E D; Garner, C C

    2000-05-01

    Bassoon is a 420-kDa presynaptic cytomatrix protein potentially involved in the structural organization of neurotransmitter release sites. In this study, we have investigated a possible role for Bassoon in synaptogenesis and in defining synaptic vesicle recycling sites. We find that it is expressed at early stages of neuronal differentiation in which it is selectively sorted into axons. As synaptogenesis begins, Bassoon clusters appear along dendritic profiles simultaneously with synaptotagmin I, sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, and the acquisition of functional excitatory and inhibitory synapses. A role for Bassoon in the assembly of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is supported by the colocalization of Bassoon clusters with clusters of GKAP and AMPA receptors as well as GABA(A) receptors. These data indicate that the recruitment of Bassoon is an early step in the formation of synaptic junctions.

  6. Seasonal effects on human striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Daniel P; Kohn, Philip D; Baller, Erica B; Bronstein, Joel A; Masdeu, Joseph C; Berman, Karen F

    2010-11-01

    Past studies in rodents have demonstrated circannual variation in central dopaminergic activity as well as a host of compelling interactions between melatonin--a scotoperiod-responsive neurohormone closely tied to seasonal adaptation--and dopamine in the striatum and in midbrain neuronal populations with striatal projections. In humans, seasonal effects have been described for dopaminergic markers in CSF and postmortem brain, and there exists a range of affective, psychotic, and substance abuse disorders that have been associated with both seasonal symptomatic fluctuations and dopamine neurotransmission abnormalities. Together, these data indirectly suggest a potentially crucial link between circannual biorhythms and central dopamine systems. However, seasonal effects on dopamine function in the living, healthy human brain have never been tested. For this study, 86 healthy adults underwent (18)F-DOPA positron emission tomography scanning, each at a different time throughout the year. Striatal regions of interest (ROIs) were evaluated for differences in presynaptic dopamine synthesis, measured by the kinetic rate constant, K(i), between fall-winter and spring-summer scans. Analyses comparing ROI average K(i) values showed significantly greater putamen (18)F-DOPA K(i) in the fall-winter relative to the spring-summer group (p = 0.038). Analyses comparing voxelwise K(i) values confirmed this finding and evidenced intrastriatal localization of seasonal effects to the caudal putamen (p < 0.05, false-discovery rate corrected), a region that receives dopaminergic input predominantly from the substantia nigra. These data are the first to directly demonstrate a seasonal effect on striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis and merit future research aimed at elucidating underlying mechanisms and implications for neuropsychiatric disease and new treatment approaches.

  7. In vivo imaging of dorsal root regeneration: rapid immobilization and presynaptic differentiation at the CNS/PNS border.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Alessandro; Skuba, Andrew; Himes, B Timothy; Bhagat, Srishiti L; Hyun, Jung Keun; Tessler, Alan; Bishop, Derron; Son, Young-Jin

    2011-03-23

    Dorsal root (DR) axons regenerate in the PNS but turn around or stop at the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the entrance into the CNS. Earlier studies that relied on conventional tracing techniques or postmortem analyses attributed the regeneration failure to growth inhibitors and lack of intrinsic growth potential. Here, we report the first in vivo imaging study of DR regeneration. Fluorescently labeled, large-diameter DR axons in thy1-YFPH mice elongated through a DR crush site, but not a transection site, and grew along the root at >1.5 mm/d with little variability. Surprisingly, they rarely turned around at the DREZ upon encountering astrocytes, but penetrated deeper into the CNS territory, where they rapidly stalled and then remained completely immobile or stable, even after conditioning lesions that enhanced growth along the root. Stalled axon tips and adjacent shafts were intensely immunolabeled with synapse markers. Ultrastructural analysis targeted to the DREZ enriched with recently arrived axons additionally revealed abundant axonal profiles exhibiting presynaptic features such as synaptic vesicles aggregated at active zones, but not postsynaptic features. These data suggest that axons are neither repelled nor continuously inhibited at the DREZ by growth-inhibitory molecules but are rapidly stabilized as they invade the CNS territory of the DREZ, forming presynaptic terminal endings on non-neuronal cells. Our work introduces a new experimental paradigm to the investigation of DR regeneration and may help to induce significant regeneration after spinal root injuries.

  8. Structural organization of the presynaptic density at identified synapses in the locust central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leitinger, Gerd; Masich, Sergej; Neumüller, Josef; Pabst, Maria Anna; Pavelka, Margit; Rind, F Claire; Shupliakov, Oleg; Simmons, Peter J; Kolb, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    In a synaptic active zone, vesicles aggregate around a densely staining structure called the presynaptic density. We focus on its three-dimensional architecture and a major molecular component in the locust. We used electron tomography to study the presynaptic density in synapses made in the brain by identified second-order neuron of the ocelli. Here, vesicles close to the active zone are organized in two rows on either side of the presynaptic density, a level of organization not previously reported in insect central synapses. The row of vesicles that is closest to the density's base includes vesicles docked with the presynaptic membrane and thus presumably ready for release, whereas the outer row of vesicles does not include any that are docked. We show that a locust ortholog of the Drosophila protein Bruchpilot is localized to the presynaptic density, both in the ocellar pathway and compound eye visual neurons. An antibody recognizing the C-terminus of the Bruchpilot ortholog selectively labels filamentous extensions of the presynaptic density that reach out toward vesicles. Previous studies on Bruchpilot have focused on its role in neuromuscular junctions in Drosophila, and our study shows it is also a major functional component of presynaptic densities in the central nervous system of an evolutionarily distant insect. Our study thus reveals Bruchpilot executes similar functions in synapses that can sustain transmission of small graded potentials as well as those relaying large, spike-evoked signals.

  9. Afadin Regulates Puncta Adherentia Junction Formation and Presynaptic Differentiation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Mandai, Kenji; Maruo, Tomohiko; Supriyanto, Irwan; Togashi, Hideru; Inoue, Takahito; Mori, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs) in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation. PMID:24587018

  10. Cortical Presynaptic Control of Dorsal Horn C–Afferents in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C–fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C–fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C–fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C–fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory

  11. Cortical presynaptic control of dorsal horn C-afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Moreno-López, Yunuen; Pérez-Sánchez, Jimena; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C-fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C-fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C-fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C-fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons

  12. Prediction of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins by the increment of diversity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Li, Qianzhong

    2009-03-01

    Presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins have very important application in basic research and drug design. The successful prediction of neurotoxin is becoming an important task in recent years. In this study, based on the concept of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions, an algorithm of increment of diversity (ID) is proposed for predicting presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins. The results of jackknife test show that the accuracies of prediction are 90.23% for presynaptic neurotoxins and 89.40% for postsynaptic neurotoxins. In addition, toxins and non-toxins are also predicted by using this algorithm.

  13. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine's actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  14. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F. Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine’s actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  15. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; González, Maria Carmen; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% ± 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% ± 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% ± 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% ± 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain.

  16. Nanoscale-targeted patch-clamp recordings of functional presynaptic ion channels.

    PubMed

    Novak, Pavel; Gorelik, Julia; Vivekananda, Umesh; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S; Bailey, Russell J; Bushby, Andrew J; Moss, Guy W J; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Klenerman, David; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Volynski, Kirill E; Korchev, Yuri E

    2013-09-18

    Direct electrical access to presynaptic ion channels has hitherto been limited to large specialized terminals such as the calyx of Held or hippocampal mossy fiber bouton. The electrophysiology and ion-channel complement of far more abundant small synaptic terminals (≤ 1 μm) remain poorly understood. Here we report a method based on superresolution scanning ion conductance imaging of small synapses in culture at approximately 100-150 nm 3D resolution, which allows presynaptic patch-clamp recordings in all four configurations (cell-attached, inside-out, outside-out, and whole-cell). Using this technique, we report presynaptic recordings of K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) channels. This semiautomated approach allows direct investigation of the distribution and properties of presynaptic ion channels at small central synapses. PMID:24050398

  17. Calpains participate in nerve terminal degeneration induced by spider and snake presynaptic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Duregotti, Elisa; Tedesco, Erik; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2013-03-15

    α-latrotoxin and snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins target the presynaptic membrane of axon terminals of the neuromuscular junction causing paralysis. These neurotoxins display different biochemical activities, but similarly alter the presynaptic membrane permeability causing Ca(2+) overload within the nerve terminals, which in turn induces nerve degeneration. Using different methods, here we show that the calcium-activated proteases calpains are involved in the cytoskeletal rearrangements that we have previously documented in neurons exposed to α-latrotoxin or to snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins. These results indicate that calpains, activated by the massive calcium influx from the extracellular medium, target fundamental components of neuronal cytoskeleton such as spectrin and neurofilaments, whose cleavage is functional to the ensuing nerve terminal fragmentation.

  18. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  19. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  20. Functional Reorganization of the Presynaptic Dopaminergic Terminal in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Brian P.; Sanberg, Stefan G.; Andersson, Magnus; Mithyantha, Jahnavi; Carroll, F. Ivy; Garris, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Whether dopamine release is compensated during the presymptomatic phase of Parkinson's disease is controversial. Here we use in vivo voltammetry in the parkinsonian rat and an electrical stimulation protocol established to fatigue nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to investigate the plasticity of dopamine release mechanisms. Amplitudes of evoked voltammetric signals recorded in intact rat striata decreased with repetitive, high-frequency stimulation (60 Hz, every 5 min. / 60 min.). Strikingly, dopamine levels were maintained during an identical “fatiguing” protocol in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (<40% denervation) striata in the absence of enhanced dopamine synthesis. In contrast, more severely lesioned striata (>55% denervation) also appeared to sustain DA release, however, this was demonstrated in the presence of enhanced synthesis. Sustained release was replicated in intact animals after irreversible blockade of the dopamine transporter via RTI-76, implicating neuronal uptake as a trigger. We further demonstrate through kinetic analysis that lesions and compromised uptake target a “long-term” (time constant of minutes) presynaptic depression, which underlies the maintenance of release. Taken together, our findings identify a denervation-induced maintenance of dopamine release that was independent of activated synthesis and driven by altered uptake. This novel neuroadaptation may contribute to early preclinical normalization of function and help resolve discrepant findings regarding compensatory changes in dopamine release during progression of the parkinsonian state. PMID:21787843

  1. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  2. Presynaptic action of adenosine on a 4-aminopyridine-sensitive current in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Vandier, C; Conway, A F; Landauer, R C; Kumar, P

    1999-01-01

    Plasma adenosine concentration increases during hypoxia to a level that excites carotid body chemoreceptors by an undetermined mechanism. We have examined this further by determining the electrophysiological responses to exogenous adenosine of sinus nerve chemoafferents in vitro and of whole-cell currents in isolated type I cells.Steady-state, single-fibre chemoafferent discharge was increased approximately 5-fold above basal levels by 100 μM adenosine. This adenosine-stimulated discharge was reversibly and increasingly reduced by methoxyverapamil (D600, 100 μM), by application of nickel chloride (Ni2+, 2 mM) and by removal of extracellular Ca2+. These effects strongly suggest a presynaptic, excitatory action of adenosine on type I cells of the carotid body.Adenosine decreased whole-cell outward currents at membrane potentials above -40 mV in isolated type I cells recorded during superfusion with bicarbonate-buffered saline solution at 34–36 °C. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent with a maximal effect at 10 μM.The degree of current inhibition induced by 10 μM adenosine was voltage independent (45.39 ± 2.55% (mean ± s.e.m.) between −40 and +30 mV) and largely (∼75%), but not entirely, Ca2+ independent. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, 5 mM) decreased the amplitude of the control outward current by 80.60 ± 3.67% and abolished the effect of adenosine.Adenosine was without effect upon currents near the resting membrane potential of approximately −55 mV and did not induce depolarization in current-clamp experiments.We conclude that adenosine acts to inhibit a 4-AP-sensitive current in isolated type I cells of the rat carotid body and suggest that this mechanism contributes to the chemoexcitatory effect of adenosine in the whole carotid body. PMID:10050009

  3. Nonoisotopic Assay for the Presynaptic Choline Transporter Reveals Capacity for Allosteric Modulation of Choline Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies to enhance CNS cholinergic function rely primarily on extracellular acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, a pharmacotherapeutic strategy that produces dose-limiting side effects. The Na+-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is an unexplored target for cholinergic medication development. Although functional at the plasma membrane, CHT at steady-state is localized to synaptic vesicles such that vesicular fusion can support a biosynthetic response to neuronal excitation. To identify allosteric potentiators of CHT activity, we mapped endocytic sequences in the C-terminus of human CHT, identifying transporter mutants that exhibit significantly increased transport function. A stable HEK-293 cell line was generated from one of these mutants (CHT LV-AA) and used to establish a high-throughput screen (HTS) compatible assay based on the electrogenic nature of the transporter. We established that the addition of choline to these cells, at concentrations appropriate for high-affinity choline transport at presynaptic terminals, generates a hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-sensitive, membrane depolarization that can be used for the screening of CHT inhibitors and activators. Using this assay, we discovered that staurosporine increased CHT LV-AA choline uptake activity, an effect mediated by a decrease in choline KM with no change in Vmax. As staurosporine did not change surface levels of CHT, nor inhibit HC-3 binding, we propose that its action is directly or indirectly allosteric in nature. Surprisingly, staurosporine reduced choline-induced membrane depolarization, suggesting that increased substrate coupling to ion gradients, arising at the expense of nonstoichiometric ion flow, accompanies a shift of CHT to a higher-affinity state. Our findings provide a new approach for the identification of CHT modulators that is compatible with high-throughput screening approaches and presents a novel model by which small molecules can enhance substrate flux

  4. Presynaptic pH and vesicle fusion in Drosophila larvae neurones.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Lesley; Harries, Peter; Sydlik, Sebastian; Schwiening, Christof J

    2013-11-01

    Both intracellular pH (pHi) and synaptic cleft pH change during neuronal activity yet little is known about how these pH shifts might affect synaptic transmission by influencing vesicle fusion. To address this we imaged pH- and Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent indicators (HPTS, Oregon green) in boutons at neuromuscular junctions. Electrical stimulation of motor nerves evoked presynaptic Ca(2+) i rises and pHi falls (∼0.1 pH units) followed by recovery of both Ca(2+) i and pHi. The plasma-membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) inhibitor, 5(6)-carboxyeosin diacetate, slowed both the calcium recovery and the acidification. To investigate a possible calcium-independent role for the pHi shifts in modulating vesicle fusion we recorded post-synaptic miniature end-plate potential (mEPP) and current (mEPC) frequency in Ca(2+) -free solution. Acidification by propionate superfusion, NH(4)(+) withdrawal, or the inhibition of acid extrusion on the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) induced a rise in miniature frequency. Furthermore, the inhibition of acid extrusion enhanced the rise induced by propionate addition and NH(4)(+) removal. In the presence of NH(4)(+), 10 out of 23 cells showed, after a delay, one or more rises in miniature frequency. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent pHi shifts, caused by the PMCA and regulated by NHE, may stimulate vesicle release. Furthermore, in the presence of membrane permeant buffers, exocytosed acid or its equivalents may enhance release through positive feedback. This hitherto neglected pH signalling, and the potential feedback role of vesicular acid, could explain some important neuronal excitability changes associated with altered pH and its buffering.

  5. Modeling of twitch fade based on slow interaction of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants with the presynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shashi B; Amann, Anton; Nigrovic, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (MRs) diminish the indirectly evoked single twitch due to their binding to the postsynaptic receptors. Additionally, the MRs produce progressive diminution of successive twitches upon repetitive stimulation (fade). Our study addresses the generation of fade as observed under clinical situation. The study was conducted in two phases. In the clinical part, we have evaluated the time course of twitch depression and fade following the administration of several doses of three MRs (rocuronium, pancuronium, and cisatracurium). In the second part, we have modified our model of neuromuscular transmission to simulate the time course of twitch depression and fade. The MR was assumed to bind to a single site on the presynaptic receptor to produce fade. The rates of interaction with the presynaptic receptors were characterized in terms of the arbitrarily assigned equilibrium dissociation constant and the half-life for dissociation of the presynaptic complex. A method was developed to relate the release of acetylcholine to the occupancy of the presynaptic receptors. The strength of the first and the fourth twitch was calculated from the peak concentration of the activated postsynaptic receptors, i.e., of those receptors with both sites occupied by acetylcholine. Our results indicate that, while the affinity of the MR for the presynaptic receptor plays little role in the time course of fade, the rate of dissociation of the complex between the presynaptic receptors and the muscle relaxant may be critical in determining the time course of fade. Tentative estimates of this parameter are offered.

  6. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  7. V102862 (Co 102862): a potent, broad-spectrum state-dependent blocker of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ilyin, Victor I; Hodges, Dianne D; Whittemore, Edward R; Carter, Richard B; Cai, Sui Xiong; Woodward, Richard M

    2005-01-01

    4-(4-Fluorophenoxy)benzaldehyde semicarbazone (V102862) was initially described as an orally active anticonvulsant with robust activity in a variety of rodent models of epilepsy. The mechanism of action was not known. We used whole-cell patch-clamp techniques to study the effects of V102862 on native and recombinant mammalian voltage-gated Na+ channels. V102862 blocked Na+ currents (INa) in acutely dissociated cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Potency increased with membrane depolarization, suggesting a state-dependent mechanism of inhibition. There was no significant effect on the voltage dependence of activation of INa. The dissociation constant for the inactivated state (KI) was ∼0.6 μM, whereas the dissociation constant for the resting state (KR) was >15 μM. The binding to inactivated channels was slow, requiring a few seconds to reach steady state at −80 mV. The mechanism of inhibition was characterized in more detail using human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing rat brain type IIA Na+ (rNav1.2) channels, a major Na+ channel α subunit in rat hippocampal neurons. Similar to hippocampal neurons, V102862 was a potent state-dependent blocker of rNav1.2 channels with a KI of ∼0.4 μM and KR ∼30 μM. V102862 binding to inactivated channels was relatively slow (k+≃1.7 μM−1 s−1). V102862 shifted the steady-state availability curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and significantly retarded recovery of Na+ channels from inactivation. These results suggest that inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels is a major mechanism underlying the anticonvulsant properties of V102862. Moreover, understanding the biophysics of the interaction may prove to be useful in designing a new generation of potent Na+ channel blocker therapeutics. PMID:15778702

  8. Isolation and characterisation of P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a: pre-synaptic neurotoxins from the venom of the northern (Acanthophis praelongus) and Irian Jayan (Acanthophis rugosus) death adders.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2010-09-15

    The neurotoxicity observed following death adder envenoming has been thought to be solely due to the presence of potent post-synaptic neurotoxins. Clinically, these effects are often poorly reversed by death adder antivenom or anticholinesterase, particularly when patients present with established paralysis. This suggests that either the post-synaptic neurotoxins are irreversible/'pseudo' irreversible, or the venom contains pre-synaptic neurotoxins that do not respond to antivenom. To support the later hypothesis, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin (P-EPTX-Aa1a) has recently been isolated from the venom of Acanthophis antarcticus. We examined Acanthophis praelongus and Acanthophis rugosus venoms for the presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (40,719Da) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (40,879Da) were isolated from A. praelongus and A. rugosus venoms, respectively. P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are comprised of three different subunits, alpha, beta1 and beta2. The two toxins displayed similar levels of PLA(2) activity which was almost solely attributed to the alpha subunit in both toxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (20-100nM) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (20-100nM) caused inhibition of indirect twitches of the skeletal muscle preparation without affecting contractile responses to nicotinic receptor agonists. Interestingly, only the alpha subunit of both toxins (300nM) displayed neurotoxic activity. Inhibition of PLA(2) activity markedly reduced the effect of the toxins on muscle twitch height. These results confirm that P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are pre-synaptic neurotoxins and represent the second and third such toxins to be isolated from death adder venom. The presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins in Acanthophis sp. venoms indicates that treatment strategies for envenoming by these snakes needs to be reassessed given the likelihood of irreversible neurotoxicity. PMID:20488165

  9. Isolation and characterisation of P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a: pre-synaptic neurotoxins from the venom of the northern (Acanthophis praelongus) and Irian Jayan (Acanthophis rugosus) death adders.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2010-09-15

    The neurotoxicity observed following death adder envenoming has been thought to be solely due to the presence of potent post-synaptic neurotoxins. Clinically, these effects are often poorly reversed by death adder antivenom or anticholinesterase, particularly when patients present with established paralysis. This suggests that either the post-synaptic neurotoxins are irreversible/'pseudo' irreversible, or the venom contains pre-synaptic neurotoxins that do not respond to antivenom. To support the later hypothesis, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin (P-EPTX-Aa1a) has recently been isolated from the venom of Acanthophis antarcticus. We examined Acanthophis praelongus and Acanthophis rugosus venoms for the presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (40,719Da) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (40,879Da) were isolated from A. praelongus and A. rugosus venoms, respectively. P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are comprised of three different subunits, alpha, beta1 and beta2. The two toxins displayed similar levels of PLA(2) activity which was almost solely attributed to the alpha subunit in both toxins. P-EPTX-Ap1a (20-100nM) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (20-100nM) caused inhibition of indirect twitches of the skeletal muscle preparation without affecting contractile responses to nicotinic receptor agonists. Interestingly, only the alpha subunit of both toxins (300nM) displayed neurotoxic activity. Inhibition of PLA(2) activity markedly reduced the effect of the toxins on muscle twitch height. These results confirm that P-EPTX-Ap1a and P-EPTX-Ar1a are pre-synaptic neurotoxins and represent the second and third such toxins to be isolated from death adder venom. The presence of pre-synaptic neurotoxins in Acanthophis sp. venoms indicates that treatment strategies for envenoming by these snakes needs to be reassessed given the likelihood of irreversible neurotoxicity.

  10. State-dependent and reflex drives to the upper airway: basic physiology with clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stuart W.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The root cause of the most common and serious of the sleep disorders is impairment of breathing, and a number of factors predispose a particular individual to hypoventilation during sleep. In turn, obstructive hypopneas and apneas are the most common of the sleep-related respiratory problems and are caused by dysfunction of the upper airway as a conduit for airflow. The overarching principle that underpins the full spectrum of clinical sleep-related breathing disorders is that the sleeping brain modifies respiratory muscle activity and control mechanisms and diminishes the ability to respond to respiratory distress. Depression of upper airway muscle activity and reflex responses, and suppression of arousal (i.e., “waking-up”) responses to respiratory disturbance, can also occur with commonly used sedating agents (e.g., hypnotics and anesthetics). Growing evidence indicates that the sometimes critical problems of sleep and sedation-induced depression of breathing and arousal responses may be working through common brain pathways acting on common cellular mechanisms. To identify these state-dependent pathways and reflex mechanisms, as they affect the upper airway, is the focus of this paper. Major emphasis is on the synthesis of established and recent findings. In particular, we specifically focus on 1) the recently defined mechanism of genioglossus muscle inhibition in rapid-eye-movement sleep; 2) convergence of diverse neurotransmitters and signaling pathways onto one root mechanism that may explain pharyngeal motor suppression in sleep and drug-induced brain sedation; 3) the lateral reticular formation as a key hub of respiratory and reflex drives to the upper airway. PMID:23970535

  11. Positive periodic solutions for a neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun; Zhao, Lili

    2009-04-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

  12. A novel mathematical setup for fault tolerant control systems with state-dependent failure process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitraganti, S.; Aberkane, S.; Aubrun, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a fault tolerant control system (FTCS) with state- dependent failures and provide a tractable mathematical model to handle the state-dependent failures. By assuming abrupt changes in system parameters, we use a jump process modelling of failure process and the fault detection and isolation (FDI) process. In particular, we assume that the failure rates of the failure process vary according to which set the state of the system belongs to.

  13. Pre-synaptic histamine H3 receptors regulate glutamate, but not GABA release in rat thalamus.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Torres, Belén; Treviño, Mario; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2007-02-01

    We have investigated the presence of histamine H(3) receptors (H(3)Rs) on rat thalamic isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and the effect of their activation on glutamate and GABA release. N-alpha-[methyl-(3)H]histamine ([(3)H]-NMHA) bound specifically to synaptosomal membranes with dissociation constant (K(d)) 0.78+/-0.20 nM and maximum binding (B(max)) 141+/-12fmol/mg protein. Inhibition of [(3)H]-NMHA binding by histamine and the H(3)R agonist immepip fit better to a two-site model, whereas for the H(3)R antagonist clobenpropit the best fit was to the one-site model. GTPgammaS (30 microM) decreased [(3)H]-NMHA binding by 55+/-4% and made the histamine inhibition fit better to the one-site model. Immepip (30 nM) induced a modest, but significant increase (113+/-2% of basal) in [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding to synaptosomal membranes, an effect prevented by clobenpropit (1 microM) and by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin. In thalamus synaptosomes depolarisation-induced, Ca(2+)-dependent glutamate release was inhibited by histamine (1 microM, 25+/-4% inhibition) and immepip (30 nM, 38+/-5% reduction). These effects were reversed by clobenpropit (1microM). Conversely, immepip (up to 1 microM) had no effect on depolarisation-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release. Extracellular synaptic responses were recorded in the thalamus ventrobasal complex by stimulating corticothalamic afferents. H(3)R activation reduced by 38+/-7% the glutamate receptor-mediated field potentials (FPs), but increased the FP2/FP1 ratio (from 0.86+/-0.03 to 1.38+/-0.05) in a paired-pulse paradigm. Taken together, our results confirm the presence of H(3)Rs on thalamic nerve terminals and show that their activation modulates pre-synaptically glutamatergic, but not GABAergic neurotransmission.

  14. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  15. Presynaptic K(+) channels, vesicular Ca(2+)/H (+) antiport--synaptotagmin, and acetylcholinesterase, three mechanisms cutting short the cholinergic signal at neuromuscular and nerve-electroplaque junctions.

    PubMed

    Dunant, Yves; Cordeiro, J Miguel

    2014-07-01

    In neuromuscular and nerve-electroplaque junctions, nerve impulses can be transmitted at high frequencies. This implies that transmission of individual impulses must be very brief. We describe three mechanisms which curtail the time course of individual impulses at these synapses: (1) opening of presynaptic K(+) channels (delayed rectifier) efficiently curtails the presynaptic action potential. Inhibition of K(+) channel by aminopyridines transforms the normally brief postsynaptic potential (2-3 ms) to a long-lasting "giant" potential (exceeding half a second); (2) a low-affinity Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport ensures rapid Ca(2+) sequestration into synaptic vesicles, curtailing the calcium signal and thereby the duration of transmitter release. Indeed vesicular Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport inhibition by bafilomycin or Sr(2+) prolongs the duration of the postsynaptic potential. We recently showed that synaptotagmin-1 is required for this antiport activity; thus the vesicular Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport might be synaptotagmin itself, or regulated by it; and (3) it is recalled that, in these junctions, acetylcholinesterase is highly concentrated in the synaptic cleft and that anticholinesterases lengthen the endplate time course. Therefore, at three different steps of synaptic transmission, an efficient mechanism curtails the local synaptic signal. When one of these three mechanisms is inhibited, the duration of individual impulses is prolonged, but the synapse loses its faculty to fire at high frequencies. PMID:24390960

  16. Strontium, barium, and manganese metabolism in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasgado-Flores, H.; Sanchez-Armass, S.; Blaustein, M.P.; Nachshen, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms by which the divalent cations Sr, Ba, and Mn affect neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals, the authors examined the sequestration of these cations, ion comparison to Ca, by mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial organelles and the extrusion of these cations from isolated nerve terminals. Sequestration was studied in synaptosomes made leaky to small ions by treatment with saponin; efflux was examined in intact synaptosomes that were preloaded with the divalent cations by incubation in depolarizing (K rich) media. The selectivity sequence for ATP-dependent mitochondrial uptake that they observed was Mn>>Ca>Sr>>Ba, whereas that for the SER was Ca greater than or equal to Mn>Sr>>Ba. When synaptosomes that were preloaded with divalent cations were incubated in Na- and Ca-free media, there was little efflux of /sup 45/Ca, /sup 133/Ba, /sup 85/Sr, or /sup 54/Mn. When the incubation was carried out in media containing Na without Ca, there was substantial stimulation of Ca and Sr efflux, but only slight stimulation of Ba or Mn efflux. In Na-free media, the addition of 1 mM Ca promoted the efflux of all four divalent cations, probably via Ca-divalent cation exchange. In summary, the sequestration and extrusion data suggest that, with equal loads, Mn will be buffered to the greatest extent, whereas Ba will be least well buffered. These results may help to explain why Mn has a very long-lasting effect on transmitter release, while the effect of Sr is much briefer.

  17. Basolateral amygdala CB1 cannabinoid receptors are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ofogh, Sattar Norouzi; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol and morphine are largely co-abused and affect memory formation. The present study intended to investigate the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. Adult male Wistar rats received bilateral cannulation of the BLA, and memory retrieval was measured in step-through type passive avoidance apparatus. Our results showed that post-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine (6mg/kg) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) significantly improved morphine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that there is cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. It should be considered that pre-test administration of ethanol (0.1 and 0.5g/kg, i.p.) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval in the passive avoidance task. Interestingly, pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of WIN55,212-2 (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3μg/rat), a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, plus an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.1g/kg, i.p.) improved morphine-induced memory impairment. Intra-BLA microinjection of AM251 (0.4-0.6ng/rat), a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the improved effect of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) on morphine response. Pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of WIN55,212-2 or AM251 had no effect on memory retrieval or morphine-induced amnesia. Taken together, it can be concluded that morphine and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, the BLA endocannabinoid system mediates via CB1 receptors the functional interaction of morphine and ethanol state-dependent memory retrieval which may depend on the rewarding effects of the drugs. PMID:27327764

  18. Neuropeptide Y signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits male sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A; Komori, Y; Muroi, Y; Kinoshita, K; Ishii, T

    2016-04-21

    Animals change their biological activities depending on their nutritional state. Reproductive functions, including sexual behavior, are suppressed under low-energy conditions; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic molecule released in response to low-energy conditions and has an inhibitory effect on sexual behavior. We examined how NPY is involved in energy state-dependent regulation of male sexual behavior. Mounting, intromission, and ejaculation were evaluated as parameters of sexual behavior. Almost all parameters indicated that fasting for 24h suppressed male sexual behavior. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY inhibited sexual behavior in males that free-fed for 8h following 24-h fasting (fed males). We next examined whether the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which serotonergic (5-HT) neurons are distributed, is involved in NPY-mediated inhibition of male sexual behavior. NPY-positive processes immunoreactive for a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin, were distributed in the DRN of both fed and fasted males. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor in 5-HT neurons was also observed. Direct injection of NPY or 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist that inhibits the activity of 5-HT neurons) into the DRN inhibited male sexual behavior in fed males. In contrast, injection of BIBP-3226, a NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, or (+)-DOI hydrochloride (DOI), a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist that activates 5-HT neurons, into the DRN partially recovered male sexual behavior in 24-h fasted males. These results suggest that NPY inhibits serotonergic neuronal activity via the Y1 receptor in the DRN, resulting in suppression of male sexual behavior in low-energy conditions.

  19. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  20. Some properties of the presynaptic nerve terminals in a mammalian sympathetic ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1. Superior cervical ganglia of adult rats were excised and maintained in vitro in stable conditions. Potentials were recorded with external electrodes. After transmission was blocked by mecamylamine, a small potential change was recorded from the rostral area of the ganglion in response to preganglionic stimulation. 2. This electrical response was identified as the presynaptic action potential recorded from the nerve terminals by a number of criteria based on histological and physiological considerations including the disappearance of the spike in a glucose free solution. As shown by Nicolescu, Dolivo, Rouiller & Foroglou-Kerameus (1966) on the same preparation this condition causes an irreversible and selective lesion of the presynaptic nerve endings. 3. A suitable concentration of mecamylamine permitted the presynaptic response and the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) to be recorded simultaneously. As the stimulus was increased, the EPSP increased linearly with the amplitude of the presynaptic response. 4. After replacement of potassium ions in the bathing solution by caesium and during the early phase of post-tetanic facilitation there was an increase in the presynaptic response accompanied by a disproportionate increase in the EPSP. 5. No changes in the presynaptic response were found in the presence of the following drugs, all of which depressed the EPSP: acetylcholine, hemicholinium, curare, further doses of ganglion-blocking agents, and high Mg2+ and low Ca2+ concentrations. 6. Ouabain (4·5 × 10-4 M) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the presynaptic response and increased the spontaneous release of transmitter. The EPSP was at first enhanced and then depressed. PMID:4335802

  1. Extensive remodeling of the presynaptic cytomatrix upon homeostatic adaptation to network activity silencing.

    PubMed

    Lazarevic, Vesna; Schöne, Cornelia; Heine, Martin; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2011-07-13

    Global changes of activity in neuronal networks induce homeostatic adaptations of synaptic strengths, which involve functional remodeling of both presynaptic and postsynaptic apparatuses. Despite considerable advances in understanding cellular properties of homeostatic synaptic plasticity, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we explored the hypothesis that adaptive homeostatic adjustment of presynaptic efficacy involves molecular remodeling of the release apparatus including the presynaptic cytomatrix, which spatially and functionally coordinates neurotransmitter release. We found significant downregulation of cellular expression levels of presynaptic scaffolding proteins Bassoon, Piccolo, ELKS/CAST, Munc13, RIM, liprin-α, and synapsin upon prolonged (48 h) activity depletion in rat neuronal cultures. This was accompanied by a general reduction of Bassoon, Piccolo, ELKS/CAST, Munc13, and synapsin levels at synaptic sites. Interestingly, RIM was upregulated in a subpopulation of synapses. At the level of individual synapses, RIM quantities correlated well with synaptic activity, and a constant relationship between RIM levels and synaptic activity was preserved upon silencing. Silencing also induced synaptic enrichment of other previously identified regulators of presynaptic release probability, i.e., synaptotagmin1, SV2B, and P/Q-type calcium channels. Seeking responsible cellular mechanisms, we revealed a complex role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the functional presynaptic remodeling and enhanced degradation rates of Bassoon and liprin-α upon silencing. Together, our data indicate a significant molecular reorganization of the presynaptic release apparatus during homeostatic adaptation to network inactivity and identify RIM, synaptotagmin1, Ca(v)2.1, and SV2B as molecular candidates underlying the main silencing-induced functional hallmark at presynapse, i.e., increase of neurotransmitter release probability.

  2. Transmission at voltage-clamped giant synapse of the squid: evidence for cooperativity of presynaptic calcium action.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S J; Augustine, G J; Charlton, M P

    1985-01-01

    Synaptic transmission was studied at the squid giant synapse with voltage clamp control of both presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. Because presynaptic voltage gradients can complicate interpretation of electrophysiological data obtained from this preparation, we used local Ca application to restrict Ca influx and transmitter release to a short and relatively isopotential portion of the elongated presynaptic terminal. Under these conditions, we found that postsynaptic current varies approximately as the third power of presynaptic Ca current. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that several Ca ions cooperate in triggering secretion of a single transmitter quantum. PMID:2982166

  3. Presynaptic facilitation of glycinergic mIPSC is reduced in mice lacking α3 glycine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Kono, Y; Hülsmann, S

    2016-04-21

    Glycinergic neurons provide an important mechanism to control excitation of motoneurons in the brainstem and a reduction or loss of glycinergic inhibition can be deleterious by leading to hyperexcitation such as in hyperekplexia or neurodegeneration and neuronal death as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Second messenger systems that change cyclic AMP and lead to phosphorylation of the α3 subunit of the glycine receptor (GlyR α3) have been shown to be potent modulators of synaptic inhibition in the spinal cord and brain stem. In this study we analyzed the role of GlyR α3 in synaptic inhibition to the hypoglossal nucleus using Glra3 (the gene encoding the glycine receptor α3 subunit) knockout mice. We observed that baseline glycinergic synaptic transmission to nucleus of hypoglossal motoneurons is rather normal in Glra3 knockout mice. Interestingly, we found that the modulation of synaptic transmission by cAMP-mediated pathways appeared to be reduced in Glra3 knockout mice. In the second postnatal week the forskolin-induced increase of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potential (mIPSC) frequency was significantly larger in control as compared to Glra3 knockout mice suggesting that presynaptic glycine release in the hypoglossal nucleus is partially depending on GlyR α3. PMID:26851771

  4. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C. )

    1989-11-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine continuously synthesized from ({sup 3}H)tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10{sup {minus}6} M tetrodotoxin, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M acetylcholine stimulated ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of ({sup 3}H) dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of ({sup 3}H)dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively.

  5. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-01

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  6. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation. PMID:2253262

  7. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation.

  8. LGI1 acts presynaptically to regulate excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Lee, Chun-Yao; Allene, Camille; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The secreted leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) protein is an important actor for human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune etiology: mutations in LGI1 cause inherited temporal lobe epilepsy, while LGI1 is involved in antibody-mediated encephalitis. Remarkably, Lgi1-deficient (Lgi1−/−) mice recapitulate the epileptic disorder and display early-onset spontaneous seizures. To understand how Lgi1-deficiency leads to seizures during postnatal development, we here investigated the early functional and structural defects occurring before seizure onset in Lgi1−/− mice. We found an increased excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices from Lgi1−/− mice. No structural alteration in the morphology of pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses was observed at this stage, indicating that Lgi1-deficiency is unlikely to trigger early developmental abnormalities. Consistent with the presynaptic subcellular localization of the protein, Lgi1-deficiency caused presynaptic defects, with no alteration in postsynaptic AMPA receptor activity in Lgi1−/− pyramidal cells before seizure onset. Presynaptic dysfunction led to increased synaptic glutamate levels, which were associated with hyperexcitable neuronal networks. Altogether, these data show that Lgi1 acts presynaptically as a negative modulator of excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development. We therefore here reveal that increased presynaptic glutamate release is a key early event resulting from Lgi1-deficiency, which likely contributes to epileptogenesis. PMID:26878798

  9. The amino-terminal domain of glutamate receptor {delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2008-12-26

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) {delta}2 selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells plays key roles in synapse formation, long-term depression and motor learning. We propose that GluR{delta}2 regulates synapse formation by making a physical linkage between the active zone and postsynaptic density. To examine the issue, GluR{delta}2-transfected 293T cells were cultured with cerebellar neurons. We found numerous punctate signals for presynaptic markers on the surface of 293T cells expressing GluR{delta}2. The presynaptic specializations induced by GluR{delta}2 were capable of exo- and endocytosis as indicated by FM1-43 dye labeling. Replacement of the extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluR{delta}2 with that of the AMPA receptor GluR{alpha}1 abolished the inducing activity. The NTD of GluR{delta}2 fused to the immunoglobulin constant region successfully induced the accumulation of presynaptic specializations on the surface of beads bearing the fusion protein. These results suggest that GluR{delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation by direct interaction with presynaptic components through the NTD.

  10. LGI1 acts presynaptically to regulate excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Lee, Chun-Yao; Allene, Camille; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The secreted leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) protein is an important actor for human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune etiology: mutations in LGI1 cause inherited temporal lobe epilepsy, while LGI1 is involved in antibody-mediated encephalitis. Remarkably, Lgi1-deficient (Lgi1(-/-)) mice recapitulate the epileptic disorder and display early-onset spontaneous seizures. To understand how Lgi1-deficiency leads to seizures during postnatal development, we here investigated the early functional and structural defects occurring before seizure onset in Lgi1(-/-) mice. We found an increased excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices from Lgi1(-/-) mice. No structural alteration in the morphology of pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses was observed at this stage, indicating that Lgi1-deficiency is unlikely to trigger early developmental abnormalities. Consistent with the presynaptic subcellular localization of the protein, Lgi1-deficiency caused presynaptic defects, with no alteration in postsynaptic AMPA receptor activity in Lgi1-/- pyramidal cells before seizure onset. Presynaptic dysfunction led to increased synaptic glutamate levels, which were associated with hyperexcitable neuronal networks. Altogether, these data show that Lgi1 acts presynaptically as a negative modulator of excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development. We therefore here reveal that increased presynaptic glutamate release is a key early event resulting from Lgi1-deficiency, which likely contributes to epileptogenesis. PMID:26878798

  11. Mood-state-dependent retrieval: the effects of induced mood on memory reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, P M

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of studies investigating mood-state-dependent retrieval identifies methodological problems that may have contributed to the controversy surrounding the reliability of the effect-in particular, the possible confounding of encoding and retrieval in previous studies. Five experiments are reported investigating the effects of mood on learning and recall. Mood-state-dependent retrieval was observed in Experiment 1a (using Velten's Mood Induction Procedure); Experiment 1b (using a music MIP); and Experiment lc (using Velten's MIP at encoding and a music MIP at retrieval). Subjects who learned and recalled in different moods had significantly greater decrements in recall than did subjects in the same moods. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the effect of observable retrieval cues on mood-state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 2, the presence of observable retrieval cues at recall overrode state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 3, by manipulating the presence or absence of observable cues at recall, both the occurrence and the erasure of the mood-state dependency was demonstrated. Mood state during learning and cued recall was also shown to affect performance in a third session under conditions of free recall. PMID:9225625

  12. GABAergic mechanisms regulated by miR-33 encode state-dependent fear

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Yamawaki, Naoki; Guedea, Anita L; Chen, Helen J; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Restricted access to such memories can present a risk for psychiatric disorders and hamper their treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying state-dependent fear, we used a mouse model of contextual fear conditioning. We found that heightened activity of hippocampal extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, believed to impair fear and memory, actually enabled their state-dependent encoding and retrieval. This effect required protein kinase C-βII and was influenced by miR-33, a microRNA that regulates several GABA-related proteins. In the extended hippocampal circuit, extrasynaptic GABAA receptors promoted subcortical, but impaired cortical, activation during memory encoding of context fear. Moreover, suppression of retrosplenial cortical activity, which normally impairs retrieval, had an enhancing effect on the retrieval of state-dependent fear. These mechanisms can serve as treatment targets for managing access to state-dependent memories of stressful experiences. PMID:26280760

  13. GABA-Mediated Presynaptic Inhibition Is Required for Precision of Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Patrick K.; Dulka, Brooke N.; Ortiz, Samantha; Riccio, David C.; Jasnow, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of contextual memories, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of memory precision. Here, we demonstrate a rapid time-dependent decline in memory precision in GABA [subscript B(1a)] receptor knockout mice. First, we…

  14. Distinct circuit-dependent functions of presynaptic neurexin-3 at GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Jason; Földy, Csaba; Ilcus, Silviana Maria Ciurea; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C

    2015-07-01

    α- and β-neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules whose general importance for synaptic transmission is well documented. The specific functions of neurexins, however, remain largely unknown because no conditional neurexin knockouts are available and targeting all α- and β-neurexins produced by a particular gene is challenging. Using newly generated constitutive and conditional knockout mice that target all neurexin-3α and neurexin-3β isoforms, we found that neurexin-3 was differentially required for distinct synaptic functions in different brain regions. Specifically, we found that, in cultured neurons and acute slices of the hippocampus, extracellular sequences of presynaptic neurexin-3 mediated trans-synaptic regulation of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. In cultured neurons and acute slices of the olfactory bulb, however, intracellular sequences of presynaptic neurexin-3 were selectively required for GABA release. Thus, our data indicate that neurexin-3 performs distinct essential pre- or postsynaptic functions in different brain regions by distinct mechanisms.

  15. Rapamycin protects against Aβ-induced synaptotoxicity by increasing presynaptic activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A E; Pacheco, C R; Aguayo, L G; Opazo, C M

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is involved in the regulation of learning and memory. Recently, rapamycin has been shown to be neuroprotective in models for Alzheimer's disease in an autophagy-dependent manner. Here we show that rapamycin exerts neuroprotection via a novel mechanism that involves presynaptic activation. Rapamycin increases the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and calcium transients of rat hippocampal primary neurons by a mechanism that involves the up regulation of SV2, a presynaptic vesicular protein linked to neurotransmitter release. Under these conditions, rapamycin-treated hippocampal neurons are resistant to the synaptotoxic effect induced by Aβ oligomers, suggesting that enhancers of presynaptic activity can be therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24794719

  16. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  17. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders. PMID:27426949

  18. Unitary assembly of presynaptic active zones from Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Mika; Zhai, R Grace; Dresbach, Thomas; Bresler, Tal; Torres, Viviana I; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Ziv, Noam E; Garner, Craig C

    2003-04-24

    Recent studies indicate that active zones (AZs)-sites of neurotransmitter release-may be assembled from preassembled AZ precursor vesicles inserted into the presynaptic plasma membrane. Here we report that one putative AZ precursor vesicle of CNS synapses-the Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicle (PTV)-carries a comprehensive set of AZ proteins genetically and functionally coupled to synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Time-lapse imaging reveals that PTVs are highly mobile, consistent with a role in intracellular transport. Quantitative analysis reveals that the Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM content of individual PTVs is, on average, half of that of individual presynaptic boutons and shows that the synaptic content of these molecules can be quantitatively accounted for by incorporation of integer numbers (typically two to three) of PTVs into presynaptic membranes. These findings suggest that AZs are assembled from unitary amounts of AZ material carried on PTVs.

  19. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity.

  20. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. PMID:27498877

  1. State-dependent self-representations: a culture-bound aspect of identity.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Amar

    2009-03-01

    The concepts of identity, self and self-representation have been discussed extensively in psychoanalytic metapsychology. These concepts are at times confusing and are used interchangeably by various authors. Regardless of what one calls it, what one experiences in a given moment is one's representation as an analyst or a father or a son or daughter, depending on the situation one is in. This paper describes such state-dependent self-representations as an aspect of the self and argues that state-dependent self-representations are probably more clinically relevant and useful in day-to-day practice.

  2. Central presynaptic terminals are enriched in ATP but the majority lack mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Vrushali; Willis, Jeffery; Walker, Sidney K; Clark, Helen R; Liu, Xinran; Fox, Michael A; Srivastava, Sarika; Mukherjee, Konark

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission is known to be an energy demanding process. At the presynapse, ATP is required for loading neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles, for priming synaptic vesicles before release, and as a substrate for various kinases and ATPases. Although it is assumed that presynaptic sites usually harbor local mitochondria, which may serve as energy powerhouse to generate ATP as well as a presynaptic calcium depot, a clear role of presynaptic mitochondria in biochemical functioning of the presynapse is not well-defined. Besides a few synaptic subtypes like the mossy fibers and the Calyx of Held, most central presynaptic sites are either en passant or tiny axonal terminals that have little space to accommodate a large mitochondrion. Here, we have used imaging studies to demonstrate that mitochondrial antigens poorly co-localize with the synaptic vesicle clusters and active zone marker in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and the cerebellum. Confocal imaging analysis on neuronal cultures revealed that most neuronal mitochondria are either somatic or distributed in the proximal part of major dendrites. A large number of synapses in culture are devoid of any mitochondria. Electron micrographs from neuronal cultures further confirm our finding that the majority of presynapses may not harbor resident mitochondria. We corroborated our ultrastructural findings using serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) and found that more than 60% of the presynaptic terminals lacked discernible mitochondria in the wild-type mice hippocampus. Biochemical fractionation of crude synaptosomes into mitochondria and pure synaptosomes also revealed a sparse presence of mitochondrial antigen at the presynaptic boutons. Despite a low abundance of mitochondria, the synaptosomal membranes were found to be highly enriched in ATP suggesting that the presynapse may possess alternative mechanism/s for concentrating ATP for its function. The potential mechanisms including

  3. Calcium dependence of presynaptic calcium current and post-synaptic response at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, G J; Charlton, M P

    1986-01-01

    1. Neurotransmitter release has a non-linear dependence upon the external Ca concentration, [Ca]o. This may be due to a 'co-operative' action of Ca in triggering release. The dependence of presynaptic Ca currents and post-synaptic currents (p.s.c.s) upon [Ca]o was examined at voltage-clamped 'giant' synapses of squid to determine whether this 'co-operativity' occurs during or after influx of Ca into the presynaptic terminal. 2. Presynaptic Ca current was proportional to [( Ca]o/(1 + [Ca]o/KD]n, where n, the order of the function, was roughly 1 and KD, the apparent dissociation constant for Ca, was approximately 80 mM. 3. P.s.c.s also could be described by the same function, but had an n of 3-4 and a lower KD. 4. These results suggest that the 'co-operative' action of Ca occurs at a step or steps beyond entry of Ca into the presynaptic terminal. 5. Synaptic transfer curves relating presynaptic Ca currents, elicited by depolarizations to different potentials, to resultant p.s.c.s were power functions whose exponent depended upon [Ca]o. Maximum exponents were as high as 4 at [Ca]o of 3 mM. The dependence of these curves upon [Ca]o helps to explain why previous determinations, which were performed at a variety of [Ca]o levels, yielded a variety of transfer curve exponent values. 6. Transfer curves generated from responses to constant presynaptic depolarizations, with Ca current varied by [Ca]o changes, also were power functions with exponents of approximately 4. Thus p.s.c.s were high-exponent power functions of Ca current regardless of whether Ca current was modified by changes in membrane potential or in [Ca]o. PMID:2442355

  4. Involvement of dorsal hippocampal and medial septal nicotinic receptors in cross state-dependent memory between WIN55, 212-2 and nicotine or ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, S; Rezayof, A

    2013-08-15

    The present study examined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and medial septum (MS) are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between WIN55, 212-2 (WIN, a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist) and nicotine or ethanol. Memory retrieval was measured in one-trial step-down type passive avoidance apparatus in male adult mice. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of WIN (0.1-1mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired memory retrieval when it was tested 24h later. Pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.6 and 0.7mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) improved WIN-induced memory impairment, suggesting a cross state-dependent memory retrieval between the drugs. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) before systemic administration of an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.25g/kg) significantly reversed WIN-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (1 and 3μg/mouse) inhibited cross state-dependent memory between WIN and nicotine or ethanol. Moreover, pre-test intra-MS microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) in combination with systemic administration of a lower dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.25g/kg), improved memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. On the other hand, in the animals that received pre-training WIN and pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.7mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.5g/kg), pre-test intra-MS microinjection of mecamylamine (1-5μg/mouse) inhibited WIN-nicotine state-dependent memory retrieval. It should be noted that pre-test intra-CA1 or intra-MS microinjection of nicotine or mecamylamine by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and also could not reverse memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. It can be concluded that WIN and nicotine or WIN and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In

  5. Design of Free Parameters of State-Dependent Coefficient Form Based on the Relation between State-Dependent Riccati Inequality and Hamilton Jacobi Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakayanagi, Yoshihiro; Nakaura, Shigeki; Sampei, Mitsuji

    The solvable condition of nonlinear H∞ control problems is given by the Hamilton Jacobi inequality (HJI). The state-dependent Riccati inequality (SDRI) is one of the approaches used to solve the HJI. The SDRI contains the state-dependent coefficient (SDC) form of a nonlinear system. The SDC form is not unique. If a poor SDC form is chosen, then there is no solution for the SDRI. In other words, there exist free parameters of the SDC form that affect the solvability of the SDRI. This study focuses on the free parameters of the SDC form. First, a representation of the free parameters of the SDC form is introduced. The solvability of an SDRI is a sufficient condition for that of the related HJI, and the free parameters affect the conservativeness of the SDRI approach. In addition, a new method for designing the free parameters that reduces the conservativeness of the SDRI approach is introduced. Finally, numerical examples to verify the effect of this method are presented.

  6. Pre-synaptic and post-synaptic effects of xylazine and naphazoline on the bisected rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Moore, P K; Griffiths, R J

    1982-11-01

    The effect of the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, naphazoline and xylazine, was studied on the field stimulated bisected rat vas deferens. Xylazine inhibited the twitch response to field stimulation in both the prostatic (ID50 = 0.10 microM) and epididymal (ID50 = 0.08 microM) halves of the rat vas deferens. This effect was antagonized by yohimbine (0.01-0.10 microM). Naphazoline also inhibited the response to field stimulation in the prostatic (ID50 = 0.12 microM) but had no such action on the epididymal half of the rat vas deferens. Indeed, low concentrations of naphazoline (threshold, 0.05 microM) contracted the epididymal vas deferens preparation. These contractions were competitively antagonized by prazosin suggesting an action on post-synaptic alpha 1-adrenoceptors. Neither pre-synaptic nor post-synaptic actions of either drug were affected by cocaine (10 microM) or beta-oestradiol (10 microM) added to the Krebs' solution. The results provide further evidence for the existence of two types of post-synaptic alpha 1-adrenoceptors and suggest a different anatomical localization of these receptors between the two ends of the rat vas deferens.

  7. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed.

  8. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed. PMID:23363704

  9. State Dependence and Trait Stability of Perfectionism: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Aldea, Mirela A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined state dependency on depression, trait stability, and state-trait characteristics of perfectionism in a short-term longitudinal study of university students. Relative stability of perfectionism was assessed with test-retest correlations across 3 time points, and results showed higher rank order and relative stability for…

  10. Presynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Activity Is Increased Through Protein Kinase C in Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Zeng, Wei-An; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a severe adverse effect of chemotherapeutic drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol). The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. However, paclitaxel treatment does not alter the postsynaptic NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we determined whether paclitaxel affects presynaptic NMDAR activity by recording excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) of dorsal horn neurons in spinal cord slices. In paclitaxel-treated rats, the baseline frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) was significantly increased; the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) completely normalized this frequency. Also, AP5 significantly reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation and reversed the reduction in the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in paclitaxel-treated rats. Blocking GluN2A-containing, but not GluN2B-containing, NMDARs largely decreased the frequency of mEPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs of dorsal horn neurons in paclitaxel-treated rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C fully reversed the increased frequency of mEPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in paclitaxel-treated rats. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased the protein level of GluN2A and phosphorylated GluN1 in the dorsal root ganglion. In addition, intrathecal injection of AP5 or systemic administration of memantine profoundly attenuated pain hypersensitivity induced by paclitaxel. Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment induces tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs in the spinal cord through protein kinase C to potentiate nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27458019

  11. A TRPV Channel in Drosophila Motor Neurons Regulates Presynaptic Resting Ca2+ Levels, Synapse Growth, and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ching-On; Chen, Kuchuan; Lin, Yong Qi; Chao, Yufang; Duraine, Lita; Lu, Zhongmin; Yoon, Wan Hee; Sullivan, Jeremy M.; Broadhead, Geoffrey T.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Macleod, Gregory T.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venkatachalam, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Presynaptic resting Ca2+ influences synaptic vesicle (SV) release probability. Here, we report that a TRPV channel, Inactive (Iav), maintains presynaptic resting [Ca2+] by promoting Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in Drosophila motor neurons, and is required for both synapse development and neurotransmission. We find that Iav activates the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin, which is essential for presynaptic microtubule stabilization at the neuromuscular junction. Thus, loss of Iav induces destabilization of presynaptic microtubules resulting in diminished synaptic growth. Interestingly, expression of human TRPV1 in Iav-deficient motor neurons rescues these defects. We also show that the absence of Iav causes lower SV release probability and diminished synaptic transmission, whereas Iav overexpression elevates these synaptic parameters. Together, our findings indicate that Iav acts as a key regulator of synaptic development and function by influencing presynaptic resting [Ca2+]. PMID:25451193

  12. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed.

  13. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Karin E.; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K.

    2014-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2 × 2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10 mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15 min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc → Sal or Sal → Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc → Coc or Sal → Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc → Coc or Sal → Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal → Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc → Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which may, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  14. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  15. Presynaptic neurexin-3 alternative splicing trans-synaptically controls postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Jason; Martinelli, David C; Malenka, Robert C; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-07-01

    Neurexins are essential presynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are linked to schizophrenia and autism and are subject to extensive alternative splicing. Here, we used a genetic approach to test the physiological significance of neurexin alternative splicing. We generated knockin mice in which alternatively spliced sequence #4 (SS4) of neuexin-3 is constitutively included but can be selectively excised by cre-recombination. SS4 of neurexin-3 was chosen because it is highly regulated and controls neurexin binding to neuroligins, LRRTMs, and other ligands. Unexpectedly, constitutive inclusion of SS4 in presynaptic neurexin-3 decreased postsynaptic AMPA, but not NMDA receptor levels, and enhanced postsynaptic AMPA receptor endocytosis. Moreover, constitutive inclusion of SS4 in presynaptic neurexin-3 abrogated postsynaptic AMPA receptor recruitment during NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. These phenotypes were fully rescued by constitutive excision of SS4 in neurexin-3. Thus, alternative splicing of presynaptic neurexin-3 controls postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking, revealing an unanticipated alternative splicing mechanism for trans-synaptic regulation of synaptic strength and long-term plasticity.

  16. Selective synaptic targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers FGF22 and FGF7

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Timmons, Kendall M.; Kikuma, Koto; Pechmann, Yvonne; Kneussel, Matthias; Umemori, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is crucial for proper functioning of the brain. Fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and FGF7 are postsynaptic-cell-derived presynaptic organizers necessary for excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation, respectively, in the hippocampus. For the establishment of specific synaptic networks, these FGFs must localize to appropriate synaptic locations – FGF22 to excitatory and FGF7 to inhibitory postsynaptic sites. Here, we show that distinct motor and adaptor proteins contribute to intracellular microtubule transport of FGF22 and FGF7. Excitatory synaptic targeting of FGF22 requires the motor proteins KIF3A and KIF17 and the adaptor protein SAP102 (also known as DLG3). By contrast, inhibitory synaptic targeting of FGF7 requires the motor KIF5 and the adaptor gephyrin. Time-lapse imaging shows that FGF22 moves with SAP102, whereas FGF7 moves with gephyrin. These results reveal the basis of selective targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers that supports their different synaptogenic functions. Finally, we found that knockdown of SAP102 or PSD95 (also known as DLG4), which impairs the differentiation of excitatory synapses, alters FGF7 localization, suggesting that signals from excitatory synapses might regulate inhibitory synapse formation by controlling the distribution of the inhibitory presynaptic organizer. PMID:25431136

  17. Differential presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers on noradrenaline release in cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofol, R.M.; Rodriguez-Farre, E. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, the release of noradrenaline (NA) in brain tissue was analyzed using rat cerebral cortical slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-NA. {gamma}-HCH (lindane) 50 {mu}M significantly enhanced the ({sup 3}H)-NA release evoked by 15-25 mM K{sup +}. {alpha}- and {beta}-HCH did not produce any significant effect on K{sup +}-evoked ({sup 3}H)-NA release. {delta}-HCH induced a significant decrease of the 25 mM K{sup +}-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-NA. The effect of the {gamma}- and {delta}-HCH isomers on the presynaptic action of the {alpha}{sub 2}-agonist clonidine and the {alpha}{sub 2}-antagonist yohimbine was also studied. The presynaptic inhibitory effect of clonidine and the stimulatory effect of yohimbine on ({sup 3}H)-NA release was attenuated by lindane and {delta}-HCH, respectively. These results are consistent with a presynaptic action of the HCH isomers on noradrenergic release processes.

  18. Presynaptic Mechanisms of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: The Findings, the Debate, and the Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, M. Angela

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) precursor l-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes with disease progression, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements) and motor fluctuations within a few years of l-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal DA transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large DA swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma l-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in DA transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the DA transporter, aberrant release of DA from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from DA) play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25566170

  19. A Presynaptic Role for FMRP during Protein Synthesis-Dependent Long-Term Plasticity in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Sally M.; Li, Hsiu-Ling; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Kandel, Eric R.; Choi, Yun-Beom

    2011-01-01

    Loss of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is associated with presumed postsynaptic deficits in mouse models of Fragile X syndrome. However, the possible presynaptic roles of FMRP in learning-related plasticity have received little attention. As a result, the mechanisms whereby FMRP influences synaptic function remain poorly…

  20. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  1. Synapse formation between isolated axons requires presynaptic soma and redistribution of postsynaptic AChRs.

    PubMed

    Meems, Ryanne; Munno, David; van Minnen, Jan; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of neuronal protein synthetic machinery and extrinsic trophic factors during synapse formation is poorly understood. Here we determine the roles of these processes by reconstructing synapses between the axons severed from identified Lymnaea neurons in cell culture, either in the presence or absence of trophic factors. We demonstrate that, although synapses are maintained between isolated pre- and postsynaptic axons for several days, the presynaptic, but not the postsynaptic, cell body, however, is required for new synapse formation between soma-axon pairs. The formation of cholinergic synapses between presynaptic soma and postsynaptic axon requires gene transcription and protein synthesis solely in the presynaptic neuron. We show that this synaptogenesis is contingent on extrinsic trophic factors present in brain conditioned medium (CM). The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation is mediated through receptor tyrosine kinases. We further demonstrate that, although the postsynaptic axon does not require new protein synthesis for synapse formation, its contact with the presynaptic cell in CM, but not in defined medium (no trophic factors), differentially alters its responsiveness to exogenously applied acetylcholine at synaptic compared with extrasynaptic sites. Together, these data suggest a synergetic action of cell-cell signaling and trophic factors to bring about specific changes in both pre- and postsynaptic neurons during synapse formation.

  2. Molecular organization and assembly of the presynaptic active zone of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fejtova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2006-01-01

    At chemical synapses, neurotransmitter is released at a restricted region of the presynaptic plasma membrane, called the active zone. At the active zone, a matrix of proteins is assembled, which is termed the presynaptic grid or cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ). Components of the CAZ are thought to localize and organize the synaptic vesicle cycle, a series of membrane trafficking events underlying regulated neurotransmitter exocytosis. This review is focused on a set of specific proteins involved in the structural and functional organization of the CAZ. These include the multi-domain Rab3-effector proteins RIM1alpha and RIM2alpha; Bassoon and Piccolo, two multi-domain CAZ scaffolding proteins of enormous size; as well as members of the CAST/ERC family of CAZ-specific structural proteins. Studies on ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptor cells have fostered understanding the molecular design of the CAZ. In addition, the analysis of the delivery pathways for Bassoon and Piccolo to presynaptic sites during development has produced new insights into assembly mechanisms of brain synapses during development. Based on these studies, the active zone transport vesicle hypothesis was formulated, which postulates that active zones, at least in part, are pre-assembled in neuronal cell bodies and transported as so-called Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs) to sites of synaptogenesis. Several PTVs can fuse on demand with the presynaptic membrane to rapidly form an active zone.

  3. Subsecond regulation of striatal dopamine release by presynaptic KATP channels

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti C.; Witkovsky, Paul; Coetzee, William A.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels are composed of pore-forming subunits, typically Kir6.2 in neurons, and regulatory sulfonylurea receptor subunits. In dorsal striatum, activity-dependent H2O2 produced from glutamatergic AMPA-receptor activation inhibits dopamine release via KATP channels. Sources of modulatory H2O2 include medium spiny neurons, but not dopaminergic axons. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in guinea-pig striatal slices and immunohistochemistry, we determined the time window for H2O2/KATP-channel-mediated inhibition and assessed whether modulatory KATP channels are on dopaminergic axons. Comparison of paired-pulse suppression of dopamine release in the absence and presence of glibenclamide, a KATP-channel blocker, or mercaptosuccinate, a glutathione peroxidase inhibitor that enhances endogenous H2O2 levels, revealed a time window for inhibition of 500 to 1000 ms after stimulation. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated localization of Kir6.2 KATP-channel subunits on dopaminergic axons. Consistent with the presence of functional KATP channels on dopaminergic axons, KATP-channel openers, diazoxide and cromakalim, suppressed single-pulse evoked dopamine release. Although cholinergic interneurons that tonically regulate dopamine release also express KATP channels, diazoxide did not induce the enhanced frequency responsiveness of dopamine release seen with nicotinic-receptor blockade. Together, these studies reveal subsecond regulation of striatal dopamine release by endogenous H2O2 acting at KATP channels on dopaminergic axons, including a role in paired-pulse suppression. PMID:21689107

  4. GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in the rat globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-08-01

    The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in the presence of gabazine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in rat globus pallidus slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor blockade by the intra-cellular application of N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)-triethylammonium bromide (OX314), bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without a significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GAT blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio of eEPSCs was increased, whereas the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was reduced in the presence of either GAT blocker, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to the globus pallidus are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced

  5. Allopregnanolone modulates spontaneous GABA release via presynaptic Cl- permeability in rat preoptic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Haage, David; Druzin, Michael; Johansson, Staffan

    2002-12-27

    The endogenous neurosteroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnane-20-one (allopregnanolone) affects presynaptic nerve terminals and thereby increases the frequency of spontaneous GABA release. The present study aimed at clarifying the mechanisms underlying this presynaptic neurosteroid action, by recording the frequency of spontaneous GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in neurons from the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of rat. Acutely dissociated neurons with functional adhering nerve terminals were studied by perforated-patch recording under voltage-clamp conditions. It was shown that the sIPSC frequency increased with the external K(+) concentration ([K(+)](o)). Further, the effect of allopregnanolone on the sIPSC frequency was strongly dependent on [K(+)](o). In a [K(+)](o) of 5 mM, 2.0 microM allopregnanolone caused a clear increase in sIPSC frequency. However, the effect declined rapidly with increased [K(+)](o) and at high [K(+)](o) allopregnanolone reduced the sIPSC frequency. The effect of allopregnanolone was also strongly dependent on the external Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)](o)). In a reduced [Cl(-)](o) (40 mM, but with a standard [K(+)](o) of 5 mM), the effect on sIPSC frequency was larger than that in the standard [Cl(-)](o) of 146 mM. The dependence of the effect of allopregnanolone on [K(+)](o) and on estimated presynaptic membrane potential was also altered by the reduction in [Cl(-)](o). As in standard [Cl(-)](o), the effect in low [Cl(-)](o) declined when [K(+)](o) was raised, but reversed at a higher [K(+)](o). The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol also potentiated the sIPSC frequency. Altogether, the results suggest that allopregnanolone exerts its presynaptic effect by increasing the presynaptic Cl(-) permeability, most likely via GABA(A) receptors. PMID:12470877

  6. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  7. Presynaptic ultrastructural plasticity along CA3→CA1 axons during LTP in Mature Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jennifer N.; Chirillo, Michael A.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    In area CA1 of the mature hippocampus, synaptogenesis occurs within 30 min after the induction of LTP; however, by 2 hr many small dendritic spines are lost, and those remaining have larger synapses. Little is known, however, about associated changes in presynaptic vesicles and axonal boutons. Axons in CA1 stratum radiatum were evaluated with three-dimensional reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy at 30 min and 2 hr after induction of LTP by theta-burst stimulation (TBS). The frequency of axonal boutons with a single postsynaptic partner was decreased by 33% at 2 hr, corresponding perfectly to the 33% loss specifically of small dendritic spines (head diameters <0.45 μm). Docked vesicles were reduced at 30 min and then returned to control levels by 2 hr following induction of LTP. By 2 hr there were fewer small synaptic vesicles overall in the presynaptic vesicle pool. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was used as a marker of local activity, and axonal boutons containing clathrin-coated pits showed a more pronounced decrease in presynaptic vesicles at both 30 min and 2 hr after induction of LTP relative to control values. Putative transport packets, identified as a cluster of less than 10 axonal vesicles occurring between synaptic boutons, were stable at 30 min but markedly reduced by 2 hr after the induction of LTP. APV blocked these effects, suggesting that the loss of axonal boutons and presynaptic vesicles was dependent on NMDA receptor activation during LTP. These findings show that specific presynaptic ultrastructural changes complement postsynaptic ultrastructural plasticity during LTP. PMID:23784793

  8. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of ultra low doses of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance in mice.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Azita; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of ultra low doses (ULDs) of histamine, clobenpropit and pyrilamine are studied on morphine state-dependent (STD) memory in mice. Although pre-test administration of different doses of histamine and clobenpropit showed no effect on impairment of memory induced by pre-training morphine, when the above drugs were co-administered with morphine, they inhibited the restoration of memory by morphine. These effects were opposite to microgram doses of the same drugs.

  9. Presynaptic control of striatal dopamine neurotransmission in adult vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti; Mooslehner, Katrin A; Chan, Pok Man; Emson, Piers C; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2003-05-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) plays a pivotal role in regulating the size of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine (DA) storage pools within the CNS, and can thus influence extracellular DA neurotransmission. Transgenic mice have been generated with a dramatically reduced (by approximately 95%) expression of the VMAT2 gene which, unlike complete knockout lines, survive into adulthood. We compared the pre-synaptic regulation of both impulse-dependent (exocytotic) and carrier-mediated (via reversal of the DA transporter, DAT) DA release in the dorsolateral caudate putamen (CPu) of striatal slices derived from adult homozygous VMAT2 mutant and wild-type mice using fast cyclic voltammetry. Impulse-dependent DA release, evoked by a single electrical pulse, was lower in homozygous (116 nm) than wild-type mice (351 nm) indicating smaller vesicular DA stores, an observation supported by the evanescent effect of amfonelic acid (300 nm) in homozygous mice. Amphetamine (2 microm) increased extracellular DA via DAT reversal in both wild-type (by 459 nm) and VMAT2 mutant (by 168 nm, p < 0.01 vs. wild-type) mice. In both cases, the effect was blocked by the DAT inhibitor GBR12935 (1 microm). Simultaneously, amphetamine decreased impulse-dependent DA release, albeit less in homozygous (by 55%) than in wild-type (by 78%) mice. In wild-types, this decrement was largely reversed by GBR12935 but not by the D2/D3 autoreceptor antagonist (-)sulpiride (1 microm). Conversely, in homozygous VMAT2 mutant mice, it was attenuated by (-)sulpiride but not GBR12935. The D2/D3 receptor agonist quinpirole inhibited impulse-dependent DA release with a lower EC50 value in homozygous mice (12 nm) compared with wild-types (34 nm), indicating the compensatory presence of functionally supersensitive release-regulating autoreceptors. However, analysis of DA reuptake kinetics obtained in the absence and presence of DAT blockade (by cocaine and amfonelic acid) revealed only minor differences in

  10. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc.

    PubMed

    Kalappa, Bopanna I; Anderson, Charles T; Goldberg, Jacob M; Lippard, Stephen J; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-12-22

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses.

  11. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  12. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results.

  13. State-Dependent Riccati Equation Regulation of Systems with State and Control Nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, Scott C.; Cox, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The state-dependent Riccati equations (SDRE) is the basis of a technique for suboptimal feedback control of a nonlinear quadratic regulator (NQR) problem. It is an extension of the Riccati equation used for feedback control of linear problems, with the addition of nonlinearities in the state dynamics of the system resulting in a state-dependent gain matrix as the solution of the equation. In this paper several variations on the SDRE-based method will be considered for the feedback control problem with control nonlinearities. The control nonlinearities may result in complications in the numerical implementation of the control, which the different versions of the SDRE method must try to overcome. The control methods will be applied to three test problems and their resulting performance analyzed.

  14. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  15. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  17. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  18. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  19. Nonlinear closed loop optimal control: a modified state-dependent Riccati equation.

    PubMed

    Rafee Nekoo, S

    2013-03-01

    The state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE), as a controller, has been introduced and implemented since the 90s. In this article, the other aspects of this controller are declared which shows the capability of this technique. First, a general case which has control nonlinearities and time varying weighting matrix Q is solved with three approaches: exact solution (ES), online control update (OCU) and power series approximation (PSA). The proposed PSA in this paper is able to deal with time varying or state-dependent Q in nonlinear systems. As a result of having the solution of nonlinear systems with complex Q containing constraints, using OCU and proposed PSA, a method is introduced to prevent the collision of an end-effector of a robot and an obstacle which shows the adaptability of the SDRE controller. Two examples to support the idea are presented and conferred. Supplementing constraints to the SDRE via matrix Q, this approach is named a modified SDRE.

  20. State-dependency of neuronal slow dynamics during sleep observed in cat lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Yamamoto, M; Takahashi, K; Nakao, M; Mizutani, Y; Katayama, N; Kodama, T

    2000-01-01

    From the accumulated results, we hypothesize that neurons in the central processor systems of the brain generally exhibit a common state-dependency in slow dynamics of their spontaneous activities during sleep. In this paper, activities of relay cells in the cat's lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) were studied to see if our hypothesis can be applied in this thalamic region. Data segments in polygraphically steady states were strictly extracted in order to sample the activities whose stationarity was guaranteed in a statistical sense. During slow wave sleep (SWS), the discharge pattern was characterized by short bursts. In contrast, the rather tonic discharge pattern was observed to prevail during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Spectral analyses showed white noise-like spectra in the low frequency range of 0.04-1.0 Hz during SWS, and 1/f noise-like spectra in the same frequency range during REM sleep. This state-dependency of the slow dynamics was consistently characterized by the other statistical parameters concerning the second-order moment as well. In contrast, the fast dynamics over 1.0 Hz tended to exhibit neuron-specific changes associated with the sleep state in terms of the Markovian dependency analysis. Consequently, our working hypothesis was not rejected for the LGN relay cells. The result here extends the possibility that the state-dependency of the slow dynamics we found is a general rule concerning single neuronal dynamics in widespread areas of the brain during sleep. The state-dependency of the slow dynamics of the LGN relay cells could be understood according to the proposed mechanism that a state-associated alteration in the global biasing input to a neural network during sleep induces the phenomenon with which we are concerned. The slow dynamics of neuronal activities might provide a novel framework defining SWS and REM sleep states instead of the polygraphic characteristics. PMID:11382913

  1. The dynamics of a delayed predator-prey model with state dependent feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anuraj; Gakkhar, Sunita

    2011-11-30

    A delayed prey-predator model with state-dependent impulses is investigated. The sufficient conditions of existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive period-1 solution are obtained by using the Poincare map and analogue of the Poincare Criterion. The qualitative analysis shows that the positive period-one solution bifurcates from the semi-trivial solution through a fold bifurcation. The complex dynamics including chaos is obtained and numerical simulations substantiate the analytical results.

  2. Stability and Bifurcation in a State-Dependent Delayed Predator-Prey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Aiyu; Guo, Shangjiang

    In this paper, we consider a class of predator-prey equations with state-dependent delayed feedback. Firstly, we investigate the local stability of the positive equilibrium and the existence of the Hopf bifurcation. Then we use perturbation methods to determine the sub/supercriticality of Hopf bifurcation and hence the stability of Hopf bifurcating periodic solutions. Finally, numerical simulations supporting our theoretical results are also provided.

  3. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity. PMID:25901168

  4. Anti-periodic solutions of Liénard equations with state dependent impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belley, J.-M.; Bondo, É.

    2016-10-01

    Subject to a priori bounds, Liénard equations with state dependent impulsive forcing are shown to admit a unique absolutely continuous anti-periodic solution with first derivative of bounded variation on finite intervals. The point-wise convergence of a sequence of iterates to the solution is obtained, along with a bound for the rate of convergence. The results are applied to Josephson's and van der Pol's equations.

  5. Identity state-dependent attentional bias for facial threat in dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Erno J; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; van Honk, Jack; Huntjens, Rafaële J C; van der Hart, Onno

    2006-02-28

    Biased attention for threatening stimuli has been associated with many forms of psychopathology. Attention to threatening faces presented below perceptual thresholds was assessed in patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder using a pictorial emotional Stroop task. Patients were tested in two different identity states, in one of which they claimed strong awareness of trauma. Attentional bias for social threat proved state-dependent in the patients and deviated from the patterns observed in controls.

  6. Positive periodic solutions of periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun

    2007-06-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays where (i,j=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions and (i=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions with respect to their first arguments, respectively.

  7. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  8. Perinatal asphyxia results in changes in presynaptic bouton number in striatum and cerebral cortex-a stereological and behavioral analysis.

    PubMed

    Van de Berg, W D; Blokland, A; Cuello, A C; Schmitz, C; Vreuls, W; Steinbusch, H W; Blanco, C E

    2000-10-01

    Deficits in cognitive function have been related to quantitative changes in synaptic population, particularly in the cerebral cortex. Here, we used an established model of perinatal asphyxia that induces morphological changes, i.e. neuron loss in the cerebral cortex and striatum, as well as behavioural deficits. We hypothesized that perinatal asphyxia may lead to a neurodegenerative process resulting in cognitive impairment and altered presynaptic bouton numbers in adult rats. We studied cognitive performance at 18 months and presynaptic bouton numbers at 22 months following perinatal asphyxia. Data of the spatial Morris water escape task did not reveal clear memory or learning deficits in aged asphyctic rats compared to aged control rats. However, a memory impairment in aged rats versus young rats was observed, which was more pronounced in asphyctic rats. We found an increase in presynaptic bouton density in the parietal cortex, whereas no changes were found in striatum and frontal cortex in asphyctic rats. An increase of striatal volume was observed in asphyctic rats, leading to an increase in presynaptic bouton numbers in this area. These findings stress the issue that volume measurements have to be taken into account when determining presynaptic bouton density. Furthermore, perinatal asphyxia led to region-specific changes in presynaptic bouton numbers and it worsened the age-related cognitive impairment. These results suggest that perinatal asphyxia induced neuronal loss, which is compensated for by an increase in presynaptic bouton numbers.

  9. Presynaptic NR2A-containing NMDA receptors implement a high-pass filter synaptic plasticity rule.

    PubMed

    Bidoret, Céline; Ayon, Annick; Barbour, Boris; Casado, Mariano

    2009-08-18

    The detailed characterization of synaptic plasticity has led to the replacement of simple Hebbian rules by more complex rules depending on the order of presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials. Here, we describe a mechanism endowing a plasticity rule with additional computational complexity--a dependence on the pattern of presynaptic action potentials. The classical Hebbian rule is based on detection of conjunctive presynaptic and postsynaptic activity by postsynaptic NMDA receptors, but there is also accumulating evidence for the existence of presynaptic NMDA receptors in several brain structures. Here, we examine the role of presynaptic NMDA receptors in defining the temporal structure of the plasticity rule governing induction of long-term depression (LTD) at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. We show that multiple presynaptic action potentials at frequencies between 40 Hz and 1 kHz are necessary for LTD induction. We characterize the subtype, kinetics, and role of presynaptic NMDA receptors involved in the induction of LTD, showing how the kinetics of the NR2A subunits expressed by parallel fibers implement a high-pass filter plasticity rule that will selectively attenuate synapses undergoing high-frequency bursts of activity. Depending on the type of NMDA receptor subunit expressed, high-pass filters of different corner frequencies could be implemented at other synapses expressing NMDA autoreceptors.

  10. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  11. State-Dependent Pseudo-Linear Filter for Spacecraft Attitude and Rate Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the development and performance of a special algorithm for estimating the attitude and angular rate of a spacecraft. The algorithm is a pseudo-linear Kalman filter, which is an ordinary linear Kalman filter that operates on a linear model whose matrices are current state estimate dependent. The nonlinear rotational dynamics equation of the spacecraft is presented in the state space as a state-dependent linear system. Two types of measurements are considered. One type is a measurement of the quaternion of rotation, which is obtained from a newly introduced star tracker based apparatus. The other type of measurement is that of vectors, which permits the use of a variety of vector measuring sensors like sun sensors and magnetometers. While quaternion measurements are related linearly to the state vector, vector measurements constitute a nonlinear function of the state vector. Therefore, in this paper, a state-dependent linear measurement equation is developed for the vector measurement case. The state-dependent pseudo linear filter is applied to simulated spacecraft rotations and adequate estimates of the spacecraft attitude and rate are obtained for the case of quaternion measurements as well as of vector measurements.

  12. State-Dependent Propagation of Neuronal Sub-Population in Spontaneous Synchronized Bursts

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Yuichiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Repeating stable spatiotemporal patterns emerge in synchronized spontaneous activity in neuronal networks. The repertoire of such patterns can serve as memory, or a reservoir of information, in a neuronal network; moreover, the variety of patterns may represent the network memory capacity. However, a neuronal substrate for producing a repertoire of patterns in synchronization remains elusive. We herein hypothesize that state-dependent propagation of a neuronal sub-population is the key mechanism. By combining high-resolution measurement with a 4096-channel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectrode array (MEA) and dimensionality reduction with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), we investigated synchronized bursts of dissociated rat cortical neurons at approximately 3 weeks in vitro. We found that bursts had a repertoire of repeating spatiotemporal patterns, and different patterns shared a partially similar sequence of sub-population, supporting the idea of sequential structure of neuronal sub-populations during synchronized activity. We additionally found that similar spatiotemporal patterns tended to appear successively and periodically, suggesting a state-dependent fluctuation of propagation, which has been overlooked in existing literature. Thus, such a state-dependent property within the sequential sub-population structure is a plausible neural substrate for performing a repertoire of stable patterns during synchronized activity. PMID:27065820

  13. Remarks on the necessity and implications of state-dependence in the black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large anti-de Sitter black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to successfully describe local physics behind the horizon—not only for single-sided black holes but even in the eternal black hole. We show that state-dependence is invisible to an infalling observer who cannot differentiate these operators from those of ordinary quantum effective field theory. Therefore the infalling observer does not observe any violations of quantum mechanics. We successfully resolve a large class of potential ambiguities in our construction. We analyze states where the CFT is entangled with another system and show that the ER =EPR conjecture emerges from our construction in a natural and precise form. We comment on the possible semiclassical origins of state-dependence.

  14. Regulation of transmitter release at the squid giant synapse by presynaptic delayed rectifier potassium current.

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, G J

    1990-01-01

    1. The three-microelectrode voltage clamp technique and pharmacological agents were used to examine the properties and functions of potassium currents in squid giant presynaptic terminals. 2. Outward currents consisted of two components: a slow component which activated over hundreds of milliseconds and was blocked by extracellular application of tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions and a more rapidly activating component which was relatively insensitive to extracellular TEA. 3. The more rapid component was studied in isolation by treating presynaptic terminals with extracellular TEA, as well as tetrodotoxin (to block sodium channel currents) and manganese (to block calcium channel currents). The magnitude of this current component was 1-2 mA cm-2 at 0 mV. Rates of activation and deactivation were voltage dependent and little evidence of inactivation was seen for depolarizations less than several seconds in duration. 4. The reversal potential of the current was -70 to -80 mV in normal saline and became more positive with elevated extracellular potassium concentrations, suggesting that potassium is the primary permeant ion. Accumulation of extracellular potassium appeared to be marked during depolarizations that produced significant activation of the current. 5. Extracellular application of 3,4-diaminopyridine (DAP) blocked the current with an apparent dissociation constant of 7 microM at 0 mV. Intracellular applications of DAP and TEA also were effective in reducing this current. These treatments, but not extracellular TEA application, broadened presynaptic action potentials and increased the magnitude and time-to-peak of postsynaptic currents elicited by the broadened presynaptic action potentials. Postsynaptic currents were a sensitive and linear function of action potential duration; a 30% increase in action potential duration increased postsynaptic current amplitude by 190%. 6. Estimation of the magnitude and time course of the presynaptic calcium current, based on

  15. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  16. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  17. Presynaptic action of trifluoperazine at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Publicover, S J

    1983-02-01

    Treatment of frog neuromuscular preparations bathed in basic frog saline (1.8 mM Ca2+) with trifluoperazine (25 microM) caused an increase in MEPP frequency in 6 out of 10 preparations tested. The mean normalised MEPP frequency after 15 min of treatment was approximately 1.5. 10 microM trifluoperazine had a similar effect. In salines containing low concentrations of Ca2+ (50 microM Ca2+, 2 mM Mg2+ or 0 Ca2+, 1 mM EGTA) the stimulatory action of trifluoperazine was more marked and occurred in a higher proportion of the preparations tested (11 out of 14). When evoked release of transmitter was reduced to very low levels by Mg2+-containing salines treatment with trifluoperazine (2.5-25 microM) caused an increase in quantal content of 20-60%. Depolarisation of preparations bathed in standard frog saline by increasing [K+]o to 10 mM resulted in a 10-fold increase in MEPP frequency. This response was inhibited by about 25% in 10 microM trifluoperazine and by about 45% in 25 microM trifluoperazine. Pre-treatment of preparations with trifluoperazine (25 microM) caused a marked reduction in the response of MEPP frequency to tetanic stimulation (50 Hz) both in the presence of an inward electrochemical gradient for Ca2+ (50 microM Ca2+, 2 mM Mg2+) and in a Ca2+-free saline (0 Ca2+, 1 mM EGTA). The effects of trifluoperazine on tetanic enhancement of MEPP frequency are compared to those of other agents and it is shown that the results are inconsistent with an effect of the drug on Ca2+-fluxes at the plasma membrane. It is concluded that trifluoperazine has both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on transmitter release at the frog neuromuscular junction and that the inhibitory effect is probably due to inhibition of excitation-secretion coupling at a point subsequent to Ca2+ mobilization.

  18. Dynamics of presynaptic protein recruitment induced by local presentation of artificial adhesive contacts

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Fernando; Thostrup, Peter; Colman, David; Grutter, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel approach to induce and observe the formation of presynaptic compartments in axons through a combination of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy. First, we use a poly-D-lysine coated bead attached to an AFM tip to induce the recruitment of two synaptic proteins, bassoon and synaptophysin, and measure their absolute arrival times to the presynaptic department. We find that bassoon arrives before synaptophysin. Second, we observed the formation of very long (several 10s of µm), structured, protein-containing membranous strings as the AFM tip was withdrawn from the axon. It is conceivable that these strings might be a novel mechanism by which new neurites or branch points along existing neurites may be generated in situ. PMID:22648784

  19. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C; Hell, Stefan W; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-10-16

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis.

  20. DGKθ Catalytic Activity is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Hana L.; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.; Raben, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian central nervous system in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity and its byproduct, phosphatidic acid, at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Together these data suggest DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  1. Dynamics of presynaptic protein recruitment induced by local presentation of artificial adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Fernando; Thostrup, Peter; Colman, David; Grutter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we introduce a novel approach to induce and observe the formation of presynaptic compartments in axons through a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy. First, we use a poly-D-lysine-coated bead attached to an AFM tip to induce the recruitment of two synaptic proteins, bassoon and synaptophysin, and measure their absolute arrival times to the presynaptic department. We find that bassoon arrives before synaptophysin. Second, we observe the formation of very long (several 10s of μm), structured, protein-containing membranous strings as the AFM tip was withdrawn from the axon. It is conceivable that these strings might be a novel mechanism by which new neurites or branch points along existing neurites may be generated in situ.

  2. The presynaptic active zone protein bassoon is essential for photoreceptor ribbon synapse formation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Dick, Oliver; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko Detlef; Ammermüller, Josef; Weiler, Reto; Garner, Craig Curtis; Gundelfinger, Eckart Dieter; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2003-03-01

    The photoreceptor ribbon synapse is a highly specialized glutamatergic synapse designed for the continuous flow of synaptic vesicles to the neurotransmitter release site. The molecular mechanisms underlying ribbon synapse formation are poorly understood. We have investigated the role of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon, a major component of the photoreceptor ribbon, in a mouse retina deficient of functional Bassoon protein. Photoreceptor ribbons lacking Bassoon are not anchored to the presynaptic active zones. This results in an impaired photoreceptor synaptic transmission, an abnormal dendritic branching of neurons postsynaptic to photoreceptors, and the formation of ectopic synapses. These findings suggest a critical role of Bassoon in the formation and the function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the mammalian retina.

  3. Involvement of presynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Casado, Mariano; Isope, Philippe; Ascher, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    At the cerebellar synapses between parallel fibers (PFs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), long-term depression (LTD) of the excitatory synaptic current has been assumed to be independent of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation because PCs lack NMDA receptors. However, we now report that LTD is suppressed by NMDA receptor antagonists that act on presynaptic NMDA receptors of the PFs. This effect is still observed when the input is restricted to a single fiber. Therefore, LTD does not require the spatial integration of multiple inputs. In contrast, it involves a temporal integration, since reliable LTD induction requires the PFs to fire two action potentials in close succession. This implies that LTD will selectively depress the response to a burst of presynaptic action potentials.

  4. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    PubMed

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception.

  5. Optical quantal analysis reveals a presynaptic component of LTP at hippocampal Schaffer-associational synapses.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Nigel J; Reid, Christopher A; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Timothy V P

    2003-06-01

    The mechanisms by which long-term potentiation (LTP) is expressed are controversial, with evidence for both presynaptic and postsynaptic involvement. We have used confocal microscopy and Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes to study LTP at individual visualized synapses. Synaptically evoked Ca(2+) transients were imaged in distal dendritic spines of pyramidal cells in cultured hippocampal slices, before and after the induction of LTP. At most synapses, from as early as 10 min to at least 60 min after induction, LTP was associated with an increase in the probability of a single stimulus evoking a postsynaptic Ca(2+) response. These observations provide compelling evidence of a presynaptic component to the expression of early LTP at Schaffer-associational synapses. In most cases, the store-dependent evoked Ca(2+) transient in the spine was also increased after induction, a novel postsynaptic aspect of LTP.

  6. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A.; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C.; Hell, Stefan W.; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M.; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  7. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature. PMID:27630571

  8. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature.

  9. Bassoon and piccolo regulate ubiquitination and link presynaptic molecular dynamics with activity-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Daniela; Dirks, Anika; Fejtova, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Release of neurotransmitter is executed by complex multiprotein machinery, which is assembled around the presynaptic cytomatrix at the active zone. One well-established function of this proteinaceous scaffold is the spatial organization of synaptic vesicle cluster, the protein complexes that execute membrane fusion and compensatory endocytosis, and the transmembrane molecules important for alignment of pre- and postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic cytomatrix proteins function also in processes other than the formation of a static frame for assembly of the release apparatus and synaptic vesicle cycling. They actively contribute to the regulation of multiple steps in this process and are themselves an important subject of regulation during neuronal plasticity. We are only beginning to understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways controlling these regulations. They are mainly dependent on posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation and small-molecules conjugation, such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of presynaptic proteins might lead to their degradation by proteasomes, but evidence is growing that this modification also affects their function independently of their degradation. Signalling from presynapse to nucleus, which works on a much slower time scale and more globally, emerged as an important mechanism for persistent usage-dependent and homeostatic neuronal plasticity. Recently, two new functions for the largest presynaptic scaffolding proteins bassoon and piccolo emerged. They were implied (1) in the regulation of specific protein ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated proteolysis that potentially contributes to short-term plasticity at the presynapse and (2) in the coupling of activity-induced molecular rearrangements at the presynapse with reprogramming of expression of neuronal activity-regulated genes.

  10. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature. PMID:27630571

  11. Dressed projectile charge state dependence of differential electron emission from Ne atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Monti, J. M.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the projectile charge state dependence of doubly differential electron emission cross section (DDCS) in ionization of Ne under the impact of dressed and bare oxygen ions. Experimental DDCS results measured at different angles are compared with the calculations based on a CDW-EIS approximation using the GSZ model potential to describe projectile active-electron interaction. This prescription gives an overall very good agreement. In general a deviation from the q2-law was observed in the DDCS. The observations crudely identify the dominance of different projectile electron loss mechanisms at certain electron energy range.

  12. Creating State-Dependent Lattices for Ultracold Fermions by Magnetic Gradient Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Görg, Frederik; Greif, Daniel; Desbuquois, Rémi; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a versatile method for creating state-dependent optical lattices by applying a magnetic field gradient modulated in time. This allows for tuning the relative amplitude and sign of the tunneling for different internal states. We observe substantially different momentum distributions depending on the spin state of fermionic 40K atoms. Using dipole oscillations, we probe the spin-dependent band structure and find good agreement with theory. In situ expansion dynamics demonstrate that one state can be completely localized while others remain itinerant. A systematic study shows negligible heating and lifetimes of several seconds in the Hubbard regime.

  13. Frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in a state-dependent optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangfa; Chen Zhixin; Zhou Zhengwei; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2010-02-15

    We propose a general method to realize frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in a state-dependent optical lattice. Two typical lattice configurations are considered, the square lattice with competing interaction and the kagome lattice with geometrical frustration. The ideal can be extended to implement frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in various geometries, which enable us to investigate the physics of frustration in both bosonic and spin systems. We study the mean-field phase diagrams of the considered models and the experimental situations are also discussed.

  14. Approximate controllability of impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Anandhi, E. R.

    2010-02-01

    In order to describe various real-world problems in physical and engineering sciences subject to abrupt changes at certain instants during the evolution process, impulsive differential equations have been used to describe the system model. In this article, the problem of approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay is investigated. We study the approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential system under the assumption that the corresponding linear control system is approximately controllable. Using methods of functional analysis and semigroup theory, sufficient conditions are formulated and proved. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the proposed theory.

  15. Role of presynaptic calcium ions and channels in synaptic facilitation and depression at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, M P; Smith, S J; Zucker, R S

    1982-01-01

    1. The roles of presynaptic calcium influx and calcium accumulation in synaptic facilitation and depression were explored at the giant synapse in the stellate ganglion of the squid. 2. Calcium currents were recorded in the presynaptic terminal, using a three-electrode voltage clamp and blocking sodium and potassium currents pharmacologically. The calcium influx was constant during pairs or trains of brief depolarizing pulses that elicited facilitating or depressing excitatory post-synaptic potentials (e.p.s.p.s). 3. The relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release during brief depolarizing pulses of varying amplitude resembled a power function with exponent of about 2. 4. Presynaptic calcium concentration transients were measured by injecting the dye arsenazo III and detecting absorbance changes microspectrophotometrically. Increments in intracellular free calcium accompanying single action potentials appeared constant for repeated action potentials that elicited facilitating e.p.s.p.s. 5. The presynaptic calcium concentration remains elevated for several seconds following action potentials. 6. Presynaptic injection of calcium ions by interbarrel ionophoresis evokes a postsynaptic depolarization, apparently reflecting a large increase in miniature e.p.s.p. frequency. Presynaptic action potentials remain unaffected by this treatment, but e.p.s.p.s triggered by them are facilitated for several seconds, and then depressed. 7. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that synaptic facilitation is due to the action of residual calcium or a calcium complex remaining in the presynaptic terminal after electrical activity. The late depression of release during calcium injection may be a result of the continual release of transmitter and consequent depletion of a presynaptic store. PMID:6284915

  16. PRESYNAPTIC FACILITATION OF GLUTAMATE RELEASE IN THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA: A MECHANISM FOR THE ANXIOGENIC AND SEIZUROGENIC FUNCTION OF GLUK1 RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Prager, Eric M.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit (GluK1Rs; previously known as GluR5 kainate receptors) are concentrated in certain brain regions, where they play a prominent role in the regulation of neuronal excitability, by modulating GABAergic and/or glutamatergic synaptic transmission. In the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA), which plays a central role in anxiety as well as in seizure generation, GluK1Rs modulate GABAergic inhibition via postsynaptic and presynaptic mechanisms. However, the role of these receptors in the regulation of glutamate release, and the net effect of their activation on the excitability of the BLA network are not well understood. Here, we show that in amygdala slices from 35 to 50 day-old rats, the GluK1 agonist ATPA (300 nM) increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) recorded from BLA principal neurons, and decreased the rate of failures of evoked EPSCs. The GluK1 antagonist UBP302 (25 or 30 μM) decreased the frequency of mEPSCs, reduced evoked field potentials, and increased the “paired-pulse ratio” of the field potential amplitudes. Taken together, these results suggest that GluK1Rs in the rat BLA are present on presynaptic terminals of principal neurons, where they mediate facilitation of glutamate release. In vivo bilateral microinjections of ATPA (250 pmol) into the rat BLA increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field test, while 2 nmol ATPA induced seizures. Similar intra-BLA injections of UBP302 (20 nmol) had anxiolytic effects in the open field and the acoustic startle response tests, without affecting pre-pulse inhibition. These results suggest that although GluK1Rs in the rat BLA facilitate both GABA and glutamate release, the facilitation of glutamate release prevails, and these receptors can have an anxiogenic and seizurogenic net function. Presynaptic facilitation of glutamate release may, in part, underlie the hyperexcitability

  17. Enhancing the fidelity of neurotransmission by activity-dependent facilitation of presynaptic potassium currents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Mei; Wang, Wei; Fedchyshyn, Michael J.; Zhou, Zhuan; Ding, Jiuping; Wang, Lu-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Neurons convey information in bursts of spikes across chemical synapses where the fidelity of information transfer critically depends on synaptic input-output relationship. With a limited number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) in the readily-releasable pool (RRP), how nerve terminals sustain transmitter release during intense activity remains poorly understood. Here we report that presynaptic K+ currents evoked by spikes facilitate in a Ca2+-independent but frequency- and voltage-dependent manner. Experimental evidence and computer simulations demonstrate this facilitation originates from dynamic transition of intermediate gating states of voltage-gated K+ channels (Kvs), and specifically attenuates spike amplitude and inter-spike potential during high-frequency firing. Single or paired recordings from a mammalian central synapse further reveal that facilitation of Kvs constrains presynaptic Ca2+ influx, thereby efficiently allocating SVs in the RRP to drive postsynaptic spiking at high rates. We conclude that presynaptic Kv facilitation imparts neurons with a powerful control of transmitter release to dynamically support high-fidelity neurotransmission. PMID:25078759

  18. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-07-10

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation.

  19. In vivo knockdown of Piccolino disrupts presynaptic ribbon morphology in mouse photoreceptor synapses

    PubMed Central

    Regus-Leidig, Hanna; Fuchs, Michaela; Löhner, Martina; Leist, Sarah R.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio; Chiodo, Vince A.; Hauswirth, William W.; Garner, Craig C.; Brandstätter, Johann H.

    2014-01-01

    Piccolo is the largest known cytomatrix protein at active zones of chemical synapses. A growing number of studies on conventional chemical synapses assign Piccolo a role in the recruitment and integration of molecules relevant for both endo- and exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, the dynamic assembly of presynaptic F-actin, as well as the proteostasis of presynaptic proteins, yet a direct function in the structural organization of the active zone has not been uncovered in part due to the expression of multiple alternatively spliced isoforms. We recently identified Piccolino, a Piccolo splice variant specifically expressed in sensory ribbon synapses of the eye and ear. Here we down regulated Piccolino in vivo via an adeno-associated virus-based RNA interference approach and explored the impact on the presynaptic structure of mouse photoreceptor ribbon synapses. Detailed immunocytochemical light and electron microscopical analysis of Piccolino knockdown in photoreceptors revealed a hitherto undescribed photoreceptor ribbon synaptic phenotype with striking morphological changes of synaptic ribbon ultrastructure. PMID:25232303

  20. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites. PMID:24698275

  1. Nicotine enhances presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic neurotransmission to activate cardiac parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Neff, R A; Humphrey, J; Mihalevich, M; Mendelowitz, D

    Although peripheral cholinergic neurotransmission has long been known to play a pivotal role in the control of heart rate and blood pressure, recent evidence has suggested that central cholinergic mechanisms may be involved in the genesis of hypertension, anxiety, cardiorespiratory control, and, in particular, the respiratory modulation of heart rate. Yet, the sites, mechanisms, and receptor subtypes involved in the action of nicotine within the central nervous system are controversial. The present study demonstrates that nicotine has at least 3 sites of action to increase the activity of vagal cardiac neurons. Nicotine, but not muscarinic agonists, activates postsynaptic receptors and a depolarizing inward current in vagal cardiac neurons studied with the perforated patch-clamp technique in a visualized brain stem slice. In addition, nicotine acts at different presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to facilitate glutamatergic neurotransmission. Presynaptic nicotinic receptors increase the frequency of transmitter release and are sensitive to block by alpha-bungarotoxin. Nicotine also elicits a previously undescribed augmentation of postsynaptic non-NMDA currents. The presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors may prove to be future targets in the search for agonists to increase vagal cardiac activity and reduce the fatality associated with cardiac hyperexcitability and for antagonists to reduce cardiac vagal activity in pathological conditions associated with abnormally low heart rates and cardiac function such as sudden infant death syndrome.

  2. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  3. Netrin and Frazzled regulate presynaptic gap junctions at a Drosophila giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brian O; Borgen, Melissa A; Caruccio, Phyllis M; Murphey, Rodney K

    2014-04-16

    Netrin and its receptor, Frazzled, dictate the strength of synaptic connections in the giant fiber system (GFS) of Drosophila melanogaster by regulating gap junction localization in the presynaptic terminal. In Netrin mutant animals, the synaptic coupling between a giant interneuron and the "jump" motor neuron was weakened and dye coupling between these two neurons was severely compromised or absent. In cases in which Netrin mutants displayed apparently normal synaptic anatomy, half of the specimens exhibited physiologically defective synapses and dye coupling between the giant fiber (GF) and the motor neuron was reduced or eliminated, suggesting that gap junctions were disrupted in the Netrin mutants. When we examined the gap junctions with antibodies to Shaking-B (ShakB) Innexin, they were significantly decreased or absent in the presynaptic terminal of the mutant GF. Frazzled loss of function mutants exhibited similar defects in synaptic transmission, dye coupling, and gap junction localization. These data are the first to show that Netrin and Frazzled regulate the placement of gap junctions presynaptically at a synapse. PMID:24741033

  4. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites.

  5. Activity-related redistribution of presynaptic proteins at the active zone.

    PubMed

    Tao-Cheng, J-H

    2006-09-01

    Immunogold labeling distributions of seven presynaptic proteins were quantitatively analyzed under control conditions and after high K+ depolarization in excitatory synapses from dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Three parallel zones in presynaptic terminals were sampled: zones I and II, each about one synaptic vesicle wide extending from the active zone; and zone III, containing a distal pool of vesicles up to 200 nm from the presynaptic membrane. The distributions of SV2 and synaptophysin, two synaptic vesicle integral membrane proteins, generally followed the distribution of synaptic vesicles, which were typically evenly distributed under control conditions and had a notable depletion in zone III after stimulation. Labels of synapsin I and synuclein, two synaptic vesicle-associated proteins, were similar to each other; both were particularly sparse in zone I under control conditions but showed a prominent enrichment toward the active zone, after stimulation. Labels of Bassoon, Piccolo and RIM 1, three active zone proteins, had very different distribution profiles from one another under control conditions. Bassoon was enriched in zone II, Piccolo and RIM 1 in zone I. After stimulation, Bassoon and Piccolo remained relatively unchanged, but RIM 1 redistributed with a significant decrease in zone I, and increases in zones II and III. These results demonstrate that Bassoon and Piccolo are stable components of the active zone while RIM 1, synapsin I and synuclein undergo dynamic redistribution with synaptic activity.

  6. Presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon is localized at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Richter, K; Langnaese, K; Kreutz, M R; Olias, G; Zhai, R; Scheich, H; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D

    1999-06-01

    Bassoon is a 420-kDa protein specifically localized at the active zone of presynaptic nerve terminals. It is thought to be involved in the structural organization of the neurotransmitter release site. We studied the distribution of Bassoon transcripts and protein in rat brain and assessed which types of presynaptic terminals contain the protein. As shown by in situ hybridization, Bassoon transcripts are widely distributed in the brain and occur primarily in excitatory neurons. In addition, examples of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons expressing Bassoon are detected. At the light microscopic level, Bassoon immunoreactivity is found in synaptic neuropil regions throughout the brain, with the strongest expression in the hippocampus, the cerebellar cortex, and the olfactory bulb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that Bassoon immunoreactivity is found in both asymmetric type 1 and symmetric type 2 synapses. Immunopositive asymmetric synapses include mossy fiber boutons and various spine and shaft synapses in the hippocampus and mossy fiber terminals and parallel fiber terminals in the cerebellum. Bassoon-containing symmetric synapses are observed, e.g., between basket and granule cells in the hippocampus, between Golgi cells and granule cells, and between basket cells and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Within synaptic terminals, Bassoon appears highly concentrated at sites opposite to postsynaptic densities. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Bassoon was found to colocalize with GABA(A) and glutamate (GluR1) receptors. These data indicate that Bassoon is a component of the presynaptic apparatus of both excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic synapses.

  7. Modulation of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents in frog motor nerve terminals by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Ben; Gradwohl, Gideon; Moore, Homer J; Grossman, Yoram

    2013-09-01

    Presynaptic Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms have already been implicated in depression of evoked synaptic transmission by high pressure (HP). Therefore, pressure effects on terminal Ca(2+) currents were studied in Rana pipiens peripheral motor nerves. The terminal currents, evoked by nerve or direct stimulation, were recorded under the nerve perineurial sheath with a loose macropatch clamp technique. The combined use of Na(+) and K(+) channel blockers, [Ca(2+) ]o changes, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) blocker treatments and HP perturbations revealed two components of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents: an early fast Ca(2+) current (ICaF ), possibly carried by N-type (CaV 2.2) Ca(2+) channels, and a late slow Ca(2+) current (ICaS ), possibly mediated by L-type (CaV 1) Ca(2+) channels. HP reduced the amplitude and decreased the maximum (saturation level) of the Ca(2+) currents, ICaF being more sensitive to pressure, and may have slightly shifted the voltage dependence. HP also moderately diminished the Na(+) action current, which contributed to the depression of VDCC currents. Computer-based modeling was used to verify the interpretation of the currents and investigate the influence of HP on the presynaptic currents. The direct HP reduction of the VDCC currents and the indirect effect of the action potential decrease are probably the major cause of pressure depression of synaptic release. PMID:23738821

  8. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07266.001 PMID:26159615

  9. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain.

  10. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 activation presynaptically enhances spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory transmission in adult rat substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Liu, T; Nakatsuka, T; Kumamoto, E

    2009-07-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) have a unique activation mechanism in that a proteolytically exposed N-terminal region acts as a tethered ligand. A potential impact of PAR on sensory processing has not been fully examined yet. Here we report that synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to PAR ligands enhance glutamatergic excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) was increased by PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN-NH2 (by 47% at 1 microM) with small increases by PAR-2 and -4 agonists (SLIGKV-NH2 and GYPGQV-OH, respectively; at >3 microM); there was no change in its amplitude or in holding current at -70 mV. The PAR-1 peptide action was inhibited by PAR-1 antagonist YFLLRNP-OH. TFLLR-NH2, an agonist which is more selective to PAR-1 than SFLLRN-NH2, dose-dependently increased spontaneous EPSC frequency (EC50=0.32 microM). A similar presynaptic effect was produced by PAR-1 activating proteinase thrombin in a manner sensitive to YFLLRNP-OH. The PAR-1 peptide action was resistant to tetrodotoxin and inhibited in Ca2+-free solution. Primary-afferent monosynaptically evoked EPSC amplitudes were unaffected by PAR-1 agonist. These results indicate that PAR-1 activation increases the spontaneous release of L-glutamate onto SG neurons from nerve terminals in a manner dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Considering that sensory processing within the SG plays a pivotal role in regulating nociceptive transmission to the spinal dorsal horn, the PAR-1-mediated glutamatergic transmission enhancement could be involved in a positive modulation of nociceptive transmission. PMID:19420120

  11. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  12. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  13. State-dependent climate sensitivity in past warm climates and its implications for future climate projections

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Rodrigo; Huber, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Projections of future climate depend critically on refined estimates of climate sensitivity. Recent progress in temperature proxies dramatically increases the magnitude of warming reconstructed from early Paleogene greenhouse climates and demands a close examination of the forcing and feedback mechanisms that maintained this warmth and the broad dynamic range that these paleoclimate records attest to. Here, we show that several complementary resolutions to these questions are possible in the context of model simulations using modern and early Paleogene configurations. We find that (i) changes in boundary conditions representative of slow “Earth system” feedbacks play an important role in maintaining elevated early Paleogene temperatures, (ii) radiative forcing by carbon dioxide deviates significantly from pure logarithmic behavior at concentrations relevant for simulation of the early Paleogene, and (iii) fast or “Charney” climate sensitivity in this model increases sharply as the climate warms. Thus, increased forcing and increased slow and fast sensitivity can all play a substantial role in maintaining early Paleogene warmth. This poses an equifinality problem: The same climate can be maintained by a different mix of these ingredients; however, at present, the mix cannot be constrained directly from climate proxy data. The implications of strongly state-dependent fast sensitivity reach far beyond the early Paleogene. The study of past warm climates may not narrow uncertainty in future climate projections in coming centuries because fast climate sensitivity may itself be state-dependent, but proxies and models are both consistent with significant increases in fast sensitivity with increasing temperature. PMID:23918397

  14. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-08-24

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models.

  15. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  16. Frequency domain source localization shows state-dependent diazepam effects in 47-channel EEG.

    PubMed

    Michel, C M; Pascual-Marqui, R D; Strik, W K; Koenig, T; Lehmann, D

    1995-01-01

    The topic of this study was to evaluate state-dependent effects of diazepam on the frequency characteristics of 47-channel spontaneous EEG maps. A novel method, the FFT-Dipole-Approximation (Lehmann and Michel, 1990), was used to study effects on the strength and the topography of the maps in the different frequency bands. Map topography was characterized by the 3-dimensional location of the equivalent dipole source and map strength was defined as the spatial standard deviation (the Global Field Power) of the maps of each frequency point. The Global Field Power can be considered as a measure of the amount of energy produced by the system, while the source location gives an estimate of the center of gravity of all sources in the brain that were active at a certain frequency. State-dependency was studied by evaluating the drug effects before and after a continuous performance task of 25 min duration. Clear interactions between drug (diazepam vs. placebo) and time after drug intake (before and after the task) were found, especially in the inferior-superior location of the dipole sources. It supports the hypothesis that diazepam, like other drugs, has different effects on brain functions depending on the momentary functional state of the brain. In addition to the drug effects, clearly different source locations and Global Field Power were found for the different frequency bands, replicating earlier reports (Michel et al., 1992).

  17. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  18. State-dependent firing determines intrinsic dendritic Ca2+ signaling in thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Errington, Adam C; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    Activity-dependent dendritic Ca(2+) signals play a critical role in multiple forms of nonlinear cellular output and plasticity. In thalamocortical neurons, despite the well established spatial separation of sensory and cortical inputs onto proximal and distal dendrites, respectively, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling during the different state-dependent firing patterns that are characteristic of these neurons. Here we demonstrate that T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed throughout the entire dendritic tree of rat thalamocortical neurons and that they mediate regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes, typical of, but not exclusive to, sleep states, resulting in global dendritic Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, actively backpropagating action potentials, typical of wakefulness, result in smaller Ca(2+) influxes that can temporally summate to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to firing frequency but spatially confined to proximal dendritic regions. Furthermore, dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by both action potentials and low-threshold spikes are shaped by Ca(2+) uptake by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases but do not rely on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Our data demonstrate that thalamocortical neurons are endowed with intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling properties that are spatially and temporally modified in a behavioral state-dependent manner and suggest that backpropagating action potentials faithfully inform proximal sensory but not distal corticothalamic synapses of neuronal output, whereas corticothalamic synapses only "detect" Ca(2+) signals associated with low-threshold spikes.

  19. Relative navigation for autonomous formation flying satellites using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Han-Earl; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-01-01

    A relative navigation method for autonomous formation flying using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter (SDREF) is presented. In the SDREF, nonlinear relative dynamics, including J2 perturbation, are parameterized into a state-dependent coefficient (SDC) form without any loss of nonlinearity. The relative navigation algorithm is established based on the carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS) and single-frequency GPS data, in which the SDREF is used as a nonlinear estimator. To evaluate the SDREF performance, two different extended Kalman filters (EKFR1 and EKFR2) are introduced. The dynamic models of all the filters are based on relative motion including J2 perturbation. However, the SDREF and the EKFR1 use linear state propagation, whereas EKFR2 employs nonlinear state propagation. The navigation simulation is performed for each filter using live GPS signals simulated by a GPS signal generator, and the result is analyzed in terms of estimation accuracy and computational load. As a result, the SDREF provides a relative navigation solution with 3-D RMS accuracies of 6.0 mm and 0.153 mm/s for position and velocity, respectively, for a separation of 50 km with a computation time of approximately 34 s. The simulation results demonstrate that the SDREF estimates the relative states as rapidly as the EKFR1 and as accurately as the EKFR2, which means that the developed SDREF combines the strong points of EKFR1 and EKFR2 and overcomes their disadvantages.

  20. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  1. Prolonged nicotine exposure down-regulates presynaptic NMDA receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Alessia; Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Agostinho, Paula; Tomé, Angelo R; Chen, Jiayang; Pittaluga, Anna; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Marchi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    The presynaptic control of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by glutamate and acetylcholine has a profound impact on reward signaling. Here we provide immunocytochemical and neurochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the NAc. Most NAc dopaminergic terminals possessed the nAChR α4 subunit and the pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 μM) or to the α4β2-containing nAChR agonist 5IA85380 (10 nM) selectively inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked, but not the 4-aminopyridine (10 μM)-evoked, [(3)H] dopamine outflow; this inhibition was blunted by mecamylamine (10 μM). Nicotine and 5IA85380 pretreatment also inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked increase of calcium levels in single nerve terminals, an effect prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (1 μM). This supports a functional interaction between α4β2-containing nAChR and NMDA receptors within the same terminal, as supported by the immunocytochemical co-localization of α4 and GluN1 subunits in individual NAc dopaminergic terminals. The NMDA-evoked [(3)H]dopamine outflow was blocked by MK801 (1 μM) and inhibited by the selective GluN2B-selective antagonists ifenprodil (1 μM) and RO 25-6981 (1 μM), but not by the GluN2A-preferring antagonists CPP-19755 (1 μM) and ZnCl2 (1 nM). Notably, nicotine pretreatment significantly decreased the density of biotin-tagged GluN2B proteins in NAc synaptosomes. These results show that nAChRs dynamically and negatively regulate NMDA receptors in NAc dopaminergic terminals through the internalization of GluN2B receptors.

  2. Evaluating State Dependence and Subtype Selectivity of Calcium Channel Modulators in Automated Electrophysiology Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Brown, Arthur M.; Duzic, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels play essential roles in control of neurosecretion and muscle contraction. The pharmacological significance of Cav channels stem from their identification as the molecular targets of calcium blockers used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, angina, and arrhythmia, and neurologic diseases, such as pain and seizure. It has been proposed that state-dependent Cav inhibitors, that is, those that preferentially bind to channels in open or inactivated states, may improve the therapeutic window over relatively state-independent Cav inhibitors. High-throughput fluorescent-based functional assays have been useful in screening chemical libraries to identify Cav inhibitors. However, hit confirmation, mechanism of action, and subtype selectivity are better suited to automated patch clamp assays that have sufficient capacity to handle the volume of compounds identified during screening, even of modest sized libraries (≤500,000 compounds), and the flexible voltage control that allows evaluation of state-dependent drug blocks. IonWorks™ Barracuda (IWB), the newest generation of IonWorks instruments, provides the opportunity to accelerate the Cav drug discovery studies in an automated patch clamp platform in 384-well format capable of medium throughput screening and profiling studies. We have validated hCav1.2, hCav2.1, hCav2.2, and hCav3.2 channels assays on the IWB platform (population patch clamp mode) and demonstrated that the biophysical characteristics of the channels (activation, inactivation, and steady-state inactivation) obtained with the IWB system are consistent with known subtype-specific characteristics. Using standard reference compounds (nifedipine, BAY K8644, verapamil, mibefradil, and pimozide), we demonstrated subtype-selective and state- and use-dependent characteristics of drug–channel interactions. Here we describe the design and validation of novel robust high-throughput Cav channel

  3. Boundary control of bidomain equations with state-dependent switching source functions in the ionic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamakuri, Nagaiah; Engwer, Christian; Kunisch, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Optimal control for cardiac electrophysiology based on the bidomain equations in conjunction with the Fenton-Karma ionic model is considered. This generic ventricular model approximates well the restitution properties and spiral wave behavior of more complex ionic models of cardiac action potentials. However, it is challenging due to the appearance of state-dependent discontinuities in the source terms. A computational framework for the numerical realization of optimal control problems is presented. Essential ingredients are a shape calculus based treatment of the sensitivities of the discontinuous source terms and a marching cubes algorithm to track iso-surface of excitation wavefronts. Numerical results exhibit successful defibrillation by applying an optimally controlled extracellular stimulus.

  4. Breaking inversion symmetry in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: artificial graphene with tunable band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Staarmann, C.; Ölschläger, C.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present the application of a novel method for controlling the geometry of a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: the energy offset between the two sublattices of the honeycomb structure can be adjusted by rotating the atomic quantization axis. This enables us to continuously tune between a homogeneous graphene-like honeycomb lattice and a triangular lattice and to open an energy gap at the characteristic Dirac points. We probe the symmetry of the lattice with microwave spectroscopy techniques and investigate the behavior of atoms excited to the second energy band. We find a striking influence of the energy gap at the Dirac cones onto the lifetimes of bosonic atoms in the excited band.

  5. Smoothness of semiflows for parabolic partial differential equations with state-dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yunfei; Yuan, Rong; Pei, Yongzhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the smoothness properties of semiflows on C1-solution submanifold of a parabolic partial differential equations with state-dependent delay are investigated. The problem is formulated as an abstract ordinary retarded functional differential equation of the form du (t) / dt = Au (t) + F (ut) with a continuously differentiable map G from an open subset U of the space C1 ([ - h , 0 ] ,L2 (Ω)), where A is the infinitesimal generator of a compact C0-semigroup. The present study is continuation of a previous work [14] that highlights the classical solutions and C1-smoothness of solution manifold. Here, we further prove the continuous differentiability of the semiflow. We finally verify all hypotheses by a biological example which describes a stage structured diffusive model where the delay, which is the time taken from birth to maturity, is assumed as a function of a immature species population.

  6. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V.; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca2+ cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca2+ re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100–200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50µM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100–200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  7. Brain State-Dependent Closed-Loop Modulation of Paired Associative Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Royter, Vladislav; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI)-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects—sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD), and TMS-induced peripheral responses—motor-evoked potentials (MEP). However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold (RMT)) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) was controlled by beta-band (16–22 Hz) ERD during MI of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC) of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain state-dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied. Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation (PAS) in the context of neurorehabilitation. PMID

  8. Glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on the mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Piazza, P V; Rougé-Pont, F; Deroche, V; Maccari, S; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1996-08-01

    An increase in the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the appearance of pathological behaviors such as psychosis and drug abuse. Several observations suggest that glucocorticoids might contribute to such an increase in dopaminergic activity. The present experiments therefore analyzed the effects of corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, both on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving animals by means of microdialysis, and on locomotor activity, a behavior dependent on accumbens dopamine. Given that glucocorticoids have certain state-dependent neuronal effects, their action on dopamine was studied in situations differing in dopaminergic tonus, including during the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle, during eating, and in groups of animals differing in their locomotor reactivity to novelty. Dopaminergic activity is increased in the dark period, further increased during food-intake, and is higher in rats defined as high responders to novelty than in low responders. Corticosterone, peripherally administered in a dose that approximates stress-induced plasma concentrations, increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine, and this increase was augmented in the dark phase, during eating, and in high responder rats. Corticosterone had little or no effects in the light phase and in low responder rats. Corticosterone also stimulated locomotor activity, an effect that paralleled the release of dopamine and was abolished by neurochemical (6-hydroxydopamine) depletion of accumbens dopamine. In conclusion, glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission, and an interaction between these two factors might be involved in the appearance of behavioral disturbances. PMID:8710937

  9. Glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on the mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, P V; Rougé-Pont, F; Deroche, V; Maccari, S; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1996-01-01

    An increase in the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the appearance of pathological behaviors such as psychosis and drug abuse. Several observations suggest that glucocorticoids might contribute to such an increase in dopaminergic activity. The present experiments therefore analyzed the effects of corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, both on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving animals by means of microdialysis, and on locomotor activity, a behavior dependent on accumbens dopamine. Given that glucocorticoids have certain state-dependent neuronal effects, their action on dopamine was studied in situations differing in dopaminergic tonus, including during the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle, during eating, and in groups of animals differing in their locomotor reactivity to novelty. Dopaminergic activity is increased in the dark period, further increased during food-intake, and is higher in rats defined as high responders to novelty than in low responders. Corticosterone, peripherally administered in a dose that approximates stress-induced plasma concentrations, increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine, and this increase was augmented in the dark phase, during eating, and in high responder rats. Corticosterone had little or no effects in the light phase and in low responder rats. Corticosterone also stimulated locomotor activity, an effect that paralleled the release of dopamine and was abolished by neurochemical (6-hydroxydopamine) depletion of accumbens dopamine. In conclusion, glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission, and an interaction between these two factors might be involved in the appearance of behavioral disturbances. PMID:8710937

  10. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females.

  11. Heterogeneous presynaptic distribution of monoacylglycerol lipase, a multipotent regulator of nociceptive circuits in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Eszter; Woodhams, Stephen G; Nyilas, Rita; Henstridge, Christopher M; Kano, Masanobu; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Katona, István

    2014-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) is a multifunctional serine hydrolase, which terminates anti-nociceptive endocannabinoid signaling and promotes pro-nociceptive prostaglandin signaling. Accordingly, both acute nociception and its sensitization in chronic pain models are prevented by systemic or focal spinal inhibition of MGL activity. Despite its analgesic potential, the neurobiological substrates of beneficial MGL blockade have remained unexplored. Therefore, we examined the regional, cellular and subcellular distribution of MGL in spinal circuits involved in nociceptive processing. All immunohistochemical findings obtained with light, confocal or electron microscopy were validated in MGL-knockout mice. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed a highly concentrated accumulation of MGL in the dorsal horn, especially in superficial layers. Further electron microscopic analysis uncovered that the majority of MGL-immunolabeling is found in axon terminals forming either asymmetric glutamatergic or symmetric γ-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synapses in laminae I/IIo. In line with this presynaptic localization, analysis of double-immunofluorescence staining by confocal microscopy showed that MGL colocalizes with neurochemical markers of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive terminals, and also with markers of local excitatory or inhibitory interneurons. Interestingly, the ratio of MGL-immunolabeling was highest in calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive peptidergic primary afferents, and the staining intensity of nociceptive terminals was significantly reduced in MGL-knockout mice. These observations highlight the spinal nociceptor synapse as a potential anatomical site for the analgesic effects of MGL blockade. Moreover, the presence of MGL in additional terminal types raises the possibility that MGL may play distinct regulatory roles in synaptic endocannabinoid or prostaglandin signaling according to its different cellular locations in the dorsal horn pain circuitry

  12. Presynaptic targeting of alpha4beta 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is regulated by neurexin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bin; Amici, Stephanie A; Ren, Xiao-Qin; McKay, Susan B; Treuil, Magdalen W; Lindstrom, Jon M; Rao, Jayaraman; Anand, Rene

    2009-08-28

    The mechanisms involved in the targeting of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), critical for their functional organization at neuronal synapses, are not well understood. We have identified a novel functional association between alpha4beta2 AChRs and the presynaptic cell adhesion molecule, neurexin-1beta. In non-neuronal tsA 201 cells, recombinant neurexin-1beta and mature alpha4beta2 AChRs form complexes. alpha4beta2 AChRs and neurexin-1beta also coimmunoprecipitate from rat brain lysates. When exogenous alpha4beta2 AChRs and neurexin-1beta are coexpressed in hippocampal neurons, they are robustly targeted to hemi-synapses formed between these neurons and cocultured tsA 201 cells expressing neuroligin-1, a postsynaptic binding partner of neurexin-1beta. The extent of synaptic targeting is significantly reduced in similar experiments using a mutant neurexin-1beta lacking the extracellular domain. Additionally, when alpha4beta2 AChRs, alpha7 AChRs, and neurexin-1beta are coexpressed in the same neuron, only the alpha4beta2 AChR colocalizes with neurexin-1beta at presynaptic terminals. Collectively, these data suggest that neurexin-1beta targets alpha4beta2 AChRs to presynaptic terminals, which mature by trans-synaptic interactions between neurexins and neuroligins. Interestingly, human neurexin-1 gene dysfunctions have been implicated in nicotine dependence and in autism spectrum disorders. Our results provide novel insights as to possible mechanisms by which dysfunctional neurexins, through downstream effects on alpha4beta2 AChRs, may contribute to the etiology of these neurological disorders.

  13. Facilitation of the presynaptic calcium current at an auditory synapse in rat brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Cuttle, Matthew F; Tsujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Forsythe, Ian D; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    1998-01-01

    The presynaptic calcium current (IpCa) was recorded from the calyx of Held in rat brainstem slices using the whole-cell patch clamp technique.Tetanic activation of IpCa by 1 ms depolarizing voltage steps markedly enhanced the amplitude of IpCa. Using a paired pulse protocol, the second (test) response was facilitated with inter-pulse intervals of less than 100 ms. The facilitation was greater at shorter intervals and was maximal (about 20 %) at intervals of 5–10 ms.When the test pulse duration was extended, the facilitation was revealed as an increased rate of IpCa activation. From the current-voltage relationship measured at 1 ms from onset, facilitation could be described by a shift in the half-activation voltage of about −4 mV.IpCa facilitation was not attenuated when guanosine-5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) or guanosine-5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) was included in the patch pipette, suggesting that G-proteins are not involved in this phenomenon.On reducing [Ca2+]o, the magnitude of facilitation diminished proportionally to the amplitude of IpCa. Replacement of [Ca2+]o by Ba2+ or Na+, or buffering of [Ca2+]i with EGTA or BAPTA attenuated IpCa facilitation.We conclude that repetitive presynaptic activity can facilitate the presynaptic Ca2+ current through a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. This mechanism would be complementary to the action of residual Ca2+ on the exocytotic machinery in producing activity-dependent facilitation of synaptic responses. PMID:9769416

  14. The role of sensory experience in presynaptic development is cortical area specific

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, Claire E J; Fox, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The postsynaptic response to a stimulus is dependent on the history of previous activity at that synapse. This short-term plasticity (STP) is a key determinant of neural network function. During postnatal development, many excitatory intracortical synapses switch from strong depression during early postnatal life, to weaker depression and in some cases facilitation in adulthood. However, it is not known whether this developmental switch is an innate feature of synaptic maturation, or whether it requires activity. We investigated this question in the barrel and visual cortex, two widely studied models of experience-dependent plasticity. We have previously defined the time course over which presynaptic development occurs in these two cortical areas, enabling us to make the first direct comparison of the role of sensory experience during synaptic development. We found that maturation of STP in visual cortex was unaffected by dark rearing from before eye opening. In marked contrast, total whisker deprivation completely blocked the developmental decrease in presynaptic release probability (Pr), and the concomitant increase in paired pulse ratio (PPR), which occur in barrel cortex during the third and fourth postnatal weeks. However, the developmental increase in the steady state response to a train of stimuli was unaffected by whisker deprivation. This supports a mechanistic link between Pr and the PPR, but dissociates Pr from the steady state amplitude during repetitive stimulation. Our findings indicate that sensory experience plays a greater role in presynaptic development at L4 to L2/3 excitatory synapses in the barrel cortex than in the visual cortex. PMID:21946850

  15. Selective presynaptic insectotoxin (alpha-latroinsectotoxin) isolated from black widow spider venom.

    PubMed

    Magazanik, L G; Fedorova, I M; Kovalevskaya, G I; Pashkov, V N; Bulgakov, O V; Grishin, E V

    1992-01-01

    A homogenous protein of 120,000 mol. wt isolated from black widow spider (Lactrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus) venom and referred to as alpha-latroinsectotoxin was highly potent (4 nM) in the induction of an increase of the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials in blowfly (Calliphora vicina) larvae neuromuscular preparations. In the frog nerve ending, however, even 50 nM alpha-latroinsectotoxin failed to affect transmitter release. Pretreatment of insect preparations with alpha-latrotoxin or frog preparations with alpha-latroinsectotoxin did not prevent the specific effect of consequent applications of alpha-latroinsectotoxin (insect) and alpha-latrotoxin (frog), respectively. The binding of labelled [125I]alpha-latroinsectotoxin to insect and [125I]alpha-latrotoxin to bovine membrane preparations was saturable and highly specific. The presynaptic effect, but not the binding of alpha-latroinsectotoxin, was dependent on the presence of divalent cations in the external medium. Mg2+ could readily substitute for Ca2+ and increase of transmitter release induced by alpha-latroinsectotoxin also occurred in Ca(2+)-free solutions. Pretreatment of preparations with 300 micrograms/ml concanavalin A completely abolished both the presynaptic effect of alpha-latroinsectotoxin and its binding to insect membrane preparations. Thus, the phenomenology of alpha-latroinsectotoxin action on insects resembles in general that described for the action of alpha-latrotoxin on vertebrates. The selectivity of alpha-latrotoxin and alpha-latroinsectotoxin seems to be due to differences in the structure of neurotoxin receptors in nerve endings of vertebrates and insects, although the mode of presynaptic action has a great deal in common. PMID:1594101

  16. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J.; Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Forsythe, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca2+ concentration, we observed that with low Ca2+ concentrations (<1 mM) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed increased amplitudes in R192Q KI mice compared with wild type (WT), meaning significant differences in the nonlinear calcium dependence of nerve-evoked transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K+ channels) via Cav2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles. PMID:22956801

  17. Myasthenia gravis with presynaptic neurophysiological signs: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alboini, Paolo Emilio; Damato, Valentina; Iorio, Raffaele; Luigetti, Marco; Evoli, Amelia

    2015-08-01

    The distinction between myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is based on clinical, neurophysiological and immunological features. We hereby report two cases with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and neurophysiological features consistent with a pre-synaptic neuromuscular transmission defect. Both patients had increased anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres and showed a good response to cholinesterase inhibitors, along with a >100% facilitation of the compound muscle action potential on electrophysiological studies. We provide a review of English literature studies on co-existing features of myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and discuss diagnostic controversies.

  18. Presynaptic Spike Timing-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Paulsen, Ole; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a Hebbian learning rule important for synaptic refinement during development and for learning and memory in the adult. Given the importance of the hippocampus in memory, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms and functions of hippocampal STDP. In the present work, we investigated the requirements for induction of hippocampal spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) and spike timing-dependent long-term depression (t-LTD) and the mechanisms of these 2 forms of plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in young (P12–P18) mouse hippocampus. We found that both t-LTP and t-LTD can be induced at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses by pairing presynaptic activity with single postsynaptic action potentials at low stimulation frequency (0.2 Hz). Both t-LTP and t-LTD require NMDA-type glutamate receptors for their induction, but the location and properties of these receptors are different: While t-LTP requires postsynaptic ionotropic NMDA receptor function, t-LTD does not, and whereas t-LTP is blocked by antagonists at GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors, t-LTD is blocked by GluN2C or GluN2D subunit-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists. Both t-LTP and t-LTD require postsynaptic Ca2+ for their induction. Induction of t-LTD also requires metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, phospholipase C activation, postsynaptic IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, postsynaptic endocannabinoid (eCB) synthesis, activation of CB1 receptors and astrocytic signaling, possibly via release of the gliotransmitter d-serine. We furthermore found that presynaptic calcineurin is required for t-LTD induction. t-LTD is expressed presynaptically as indicated by fluctuation analysis, paired-pulse ratio, and rate of use-dependent depression of postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents by MK801. The results show that CA3-CA1 synapses display both NMDA receptor-dependent t-LTP and t-LTD during development and identify a

  19. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  20. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-02-15

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins.

  1. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  2. Early Exposure to General Anesthesia Disrupts Spatial Organization of Presynaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals of the Developing Rat Subiculum.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, N; Oklopcic, A; Prillaman, M; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to general anesthesia (GA) during critical stages of brain development induces widespread neuronal apoptosis and causes long-lasting behavioral deficits in numerous animal species. Although several studies have focused on the morphological fate of neurons dying acutely by GA-induced developmental neuroapoptosis, the effects of an early exposure to GA on the surviving synapses remain unclear. The aim of this study is to study whether exposure to GA disrupts the fine regulation of the dynamic spatial organization and trafficking of synaptic vesicles in presynaptic terminals. We exposed postnatal day 7 (PND7) rat pups to a clinically relevant anesthetic combination of midazolam, nitrous oxide, and isoflurane and performed a detailed ultrastructural analysis of the synaptic vesicle architecture at presynaptic terminals in the subiculum of rats at PND 12. In addition to a significant decrease in the density of presynaptic vesicles, we observed a reduction of docked vesicles, as well as a reduction of vesicles located within 100 nm from the active zone, in animals 5 days after an initial exposure to GA. We also found that the synaptic vesicles of animals exposed to GA are located more distally with respect to the plasma membrane than those of sham control animals and that the distance between presynaptic vesicles is increased in GA-exposed animals compared to sham controls. We report that exposure of immature rats to GA during critical stages of brain development causes significant disruption of the strategic topography of presynaptic vesicles within the nerve terminals of the subiculum. PMID:26048670

  3. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  4. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-12-01

    It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP), the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar palaeodata

  5. On the state-dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-07-01

    A still open question is how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - is depending on background climate. We here present paleo-data based evidence on the state-dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with 3-D ice-sheet model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land-ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity was in similar approaches not accounted for due to previously more simplistic approximations of land-ice albedo radiative forcing being a linear function of sea level change. Important for the non-linearity between land-ice albedo and sea level is a latitudinal dependency in ice sheet area changes.In our setup, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land-ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state-dependency in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods S[CO2,LI] is on average ∼ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevents a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land-ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP) the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state-change in the climate system with the wide appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land-ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar paleo data-based approaches to calculate climate

  6. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is declustered using the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. We perform a systematic study on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. The Omori-Utsu law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum likelihood methods. We compare the Dieterich and the Omori-Utsu forecasts using the Akaike information

  7. State-dependent climate sensitivity of the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Peter; de Boer, Bas; von der Heydt, Anna; Stap, Lennert; van de Wal, Roderik

    2015-04-01

    Equilibrium temperature rise in response to increase in radiative forcing is called equilibrium climate sensitivity, an important quantity calculated by climate models to project future warming. For model validation comparisons with estimates based on paleo reconstructions are necessary. Here we use an energy balance model (Köhler et al., 2010) to estimate climate sensitivity using CO2 proxy data together with model-based reconstruction of land ice (de Boer et al., 2014) over the last 5 million years. We find that equilibrium climate sensitivity containing the radiative forcing of CO2 and land ice albedo depends on the background climate. This state-dependency is mainly contained in the non-linearity of the land-ice forcing. Results differ in detail if based on ice core CO2 of the last 800,000 years covering mainly colder than present climates (von der Heydt et al., 2014) or on CO2 proxies of the last 5 million years. Nevertheless, the climate sensitivity of the warm Pliocene, a paleo-analogy for a warmer future, is at least about a third higher than for preindustrial background climates. References: de Boer, B., Lourens, L. J. & van de Wal, R. S. Persistent 400,000-year variability of Antarctic ice volume and the carbon cycle is revealed throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. Nature Communications 5, 2999 (2014). doi: 10.1038/ncomms3999. Köhler, P. Bintanja, R., Fischer, H., Joos, F., Knutti, R., Lohmann, G. & Masson-Delmotte, V. What caused Earth's temperature variations during the last 800,000 years? Data-based evidences on radiative forcing and constraints on climate sensitivity. Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 129-145 (2010). doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.09.026. von der Heydt, A. S., Köhler, P., van de Wal, R. S. & Dijkstra, H. A. On the state dependency of fast feedback processes in (paleo) climate sensitivity. Geophysical Research Letters 41, 6484-6492 (2014). doi: 10.1002/2014GL061121.

  8. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  9. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  11. Sea state dependence of the wind stress over the ocean under hurricane winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Brandon G.; Hara, Tetsu; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the surface wave field (sea state) on the wind stress over the ocean is investigated with fetch-dependent seas under uniform wind and with complex seas under idealized tropical cyclone winds. Two different approaches are employed to calculate the wind stress and the mean wind profile. The near-peak frequency range of the surface wave field is simulated using the WAVEWATCH III model. The high-frequency part of the surface wave field is empirically determined using a range of different tail levels. The results suggest that the drag coefficient magnitude is very sensitive to the spectral tail level but is not as sensitive to the drag coefficient calculation methods. The drag coefficients at 40 m/s vary from 1×10-3 to 4×10-3 depending on the saturation level. The misalignment angle between the wind stress vector and the wind vector is sensitive to the stress calculation method used. In particular, if the cross-wind swell is allowed to contribute to the wind stress, it tends to increase the misalignment angle. Our results predict enhanced sea state dependence of the drag coefficient for a fast moving tropical cyclone than for a slow moving storm or for simple fetch-dependent seas. This may be attributed to swell that is significantly misaligned with local wind.

  12. The effect of a musical mood induction procedure on mood state-dependent word retrieval.

    PubMed

    De L'Etoile, Shannon K

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to replicate and expand upon an earlier study by Thaut and de l'Etoile (1993) by examining the effect of a musical mood induction procedure on mood state-dependent word retrieval. Participants (N = 45) completed a 2-day testing procedure. On day one, participants read a list of adjectives and wrote down an antonym for each one. On day two, participants recalled as many of the antonyms as possible. During the testing procedure, participants were placed in 1 of 4 conditions: (a) mood induction at encoding, (b) mood induction at recall, (c) no mood induction, and (d) mood induction at both encoding and recall. The mood induction procedure included 3 steps. Participants first assessed their current mood state using a visual analog scale. They then listened to music for 5 minutes, determined the mood of the piece while listening, and tried to match their mood to the music. Finally, participants again used the visual analog scale to indicate their mood. Results indicated that participants who received mood induction prior to both encoding and recall were able to retrieve significantly more words than participants who did not undergo any mood induction. The results are discussed in light of the associative network theory of memory and emotions and the treatment of mood disorders.

  13. Plasticity of chemoreceptor gene expression: Sensory and circuit inputs modulate state-dependent chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Matthew; van der Linden, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Animals dramatically modify their chemosensory behaviors when starved, which could allow them to alter and optimize their food-search strategies. Dynamic changes in the gene expression of chemoreceptors may be a general mechanism underlying food and state-dependent changes in chemosensory behaviors. In our recent study,(1) we identified chemoreceptors in the ADL sensory neuron type of C. elegans that are modulated by feeding state and food availability. Here, we highllight our recent findings by which sensory inputs into ADL, neuronal outputs from ADL, and circuit inputs from the RMG interneuron, which is electrically connected to ADL, are required to regulate an ADL-expressed chemoreceptor. This sensory and circuit-mediated regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression is dependent on cell-autonomous pathways acting in ADL, e.g. KIN-29, DAF-2, OCR-2 and calcium signaling, and circuit inputs from RMG mediated by NPR-1. Based on these findings, we propose an intriguing but speculative feedback modulatory circuit mechanism by which sensory perception of food and internal state signals may be coupled to regulate ADL-expressed chemoreceptors, which may allow animals to precisely regulate and fine-tune their chemosensory neuron responses as a function of feeding state. PMID:26430563

  14. Endocannabinoid modulation of fear responses: learning and state-dependent performance effects.

    PubMed

    Reich, C G; Mohammadi, M H; Alger, B E

    2008-09-01

    Recently, disruption of the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid, eCB) system was found to impair extinction in delay and contextual fear conditioning models. However, conditioning procedures used in that work precluded investigation of possible eCB effects on acquisition of learned fear. We therefore examined the role of eCBs in modulating fear responses using multiple-trial versions of trace (hippocampal-dependent) and delay (amygdala-dependent) Pavlovian fear conditioning. By administering the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (5 mg/kg, i.p) to C57/Bl/6 mice at various times, we systematically identified the stages of learning and memory (i.e. acquisition, consolidation, recall and extinction) that are modulated by eCB signaling. During tone (CS) - footshock (US) conditioning, AM251 enhanced acquisition of freezing behavior for both trace- and delay-conditioning protocols. CB1 antagonism also enhanced generalized fear (baseline freezing) and cued (CS) freezing during memory recall tests in a state-dependent manner for both trace and delay conditioned animals. Furthermore, in trace-conditioned animals, AM251 impaired extinction performance of both cued and generalized fear. CB1 antagonism did not affect short-term memory (STM) or long-term memory (LTM) consolidation processes. Together, these results suggest that during acquisition and recall of aversive learning, eCBs prevent the expression and retention of inappropriate generalized and learned responses. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic use of CB1 antagonists.

  15. Effect of rotational-state-dependent molecular alignment on the optical dipole force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Lee Yeong; Lee, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Hye Ah; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Friedrich, Bretislav; Zhao, Bum Suk

    2016-07-01

    The properties of molecule-optical elements such as lenses or prisms based on the interaction of molecules with optical fields depend in a crucial way on the molecular quantum state and its alignment created by the optical field. Herein, we consider the effects of state-dependent alignment in estimating the optical dipole force acting on the molecules and, to this end, introduce an effective polarizability which takes proper account of molecular alignment and is directly related to the alignment-dependent optical dipole force. We illustrate the significance of including molecular alignment in the optical dipole force by a trajectory study that compares previously used approximations with the present approach. The trajectory simulations were carried out for an ensemble of linear molecules subject to either propagating or standing-wave optical fields for a range of temperatures and laser intensities. The results demonstrate that the alignment-dependent effective polarizability can serve to provide correct estimates of the optical dipole force, on which a state-selection method applicable to nonpolar molecules could be based. We note that an analogous analysis of the forces acting on polar molecules subject to an inhomogeneous static electric field reveals a similarly strong dependence on molecular orientation.

  16. Singular Hopf bifurcation in a differential equation with large state-dependent delay

    PubMed Central

    Kozyreff, G.; Erneux, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study the onset of sustained oscillations in a classical state-dependent delay (SDD) differential equation inspired by control theory. Owing to the large delays considered, the Hopf bifurcation is singular and the oscillations rapidly acquire a sawtooth profile past the instability threshold. Using asymptotic techniques, we explicitly capture the gradual change from nearly sinusoidal to sawtooth oscillations. The dependence of the delay on the solution can be either linear or nonlinear, with at least quadratic dependence. In the former case, an asymptotic connection is made with the Rayleigh oscillator. In the latter, van der Pol’s equation is derived for the small-amplitude oscillations. SDD differential equations are currently the subject of intense research in order to establish or amend general theorems valid for constant-delay differential equation, but explicit analytical construction of solutions are rare. This paper illustrates the use of singular perturbation techniques and the unusual way in which solvability conditions can arise for SDD problems with large delays. PMID:24511255

  17. Thirst and the state-dependent representation of incentive stimulus value in human motive circuitry.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christoph A; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T

    2015-12-01

    Depletion imposes both need and desire to drink, and potentiates the response to need-relevant cues in the environment. The present fMRI study aimed to determine which neural structures selectively increase the incentive value of need-relevant stimuli in a thirst state. Towards this end, participants were scanned twice--either in a thirst or no-thirst state--while viewing pictures of beverages and chairs. As expected, thirst led to a selective increase in self-reported pleasantness and arousal by beverages. Increased responses to beverage when compared with chair stimuli were observed in the cingulate cortex, insular cortex and the amygdala in the thirst state, which were absent in the no-thirst condition. Enhancing the incentive value of need-relevant cues in a thirst state is a key mechanism for motivating drinking behavior. Overall, distributed regions of the motive circuitry, which are also implicated in salience processing, craving and interoception, provide a dynamic body-state dependent representation of stimulus value.

  18. State dependence, personality, and plants: light-foraging decisions in Mimosa pudica (L.).

    PubMed

    Simon, Franz W; Hodson, Christina N; Roitberg, Bernard D

    2016-09-01

    Plants make foraging decisions that are dependent on ecological conditions, such as resource availability and distribution. Despite the field of plant behavioral ecology gaining momentum, ecologists still know little about what factors impact plant behavior, especially light-foraging behavior. We made use of the behavioral reaction norm approach to investigate light foraging in a plant species that exhibits rapid movement: Mimosa pudica. We explored how herbivore avoidance behavior in M. pudica (which closes its leaflets temporarily when disturbed) is affected by an individual's energy state and the quality of the current environment and also repeatedly tested the behavior of individuals from two seed sources to determine whether individuals exhibit a "personality" (i.e., behavioral syndrome). We found that when individuals are in a low-energy state, they adopt a riskier light-foraging strategy, opening leaflets faster, and not closing leaflets as often in response to a disturbance. However, when plants are in a high-energy state, they exhibit a plastic light-foraging strategy dependent on environment quality. Although we found no evidence that individuals exhibit behavioral syndromes, we found that individuals from different seed sources consistently behave differently from each other. Our results suggest that plants are capable of making state-dependent decisions and that plant decision making is complex, depending on the interplay between internal and external factors. PMID:27648244

  19. Estrogen- and Satiety State-Dependent Metabolic Lateralization in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Toth, Istvan; Kiss, David S; Jocsak, Gergely; Somogyi, Virag; Toronyi, Eva; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V; Horvath, Tamas L; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is the highest center and the main crossroad of numerous homeostatic regulatory pathways including reproduction and energy metabolism. Previous reports indicate that some of these functions may be driven by the synchronized but distinct functioning of the left and right hypothalamic sides. However, the nature of interplay between the hemispheres with regard to distinct hypothalamic functions is still unclear. Here we investigated the metabolic asymmetry between the left and right hypothalamic sides of ovariectomized female rats by measuring mitochondrial respiration rates, a parameter that reflects the intensity of cell and tissue metabolism. Ovariectomized (saline injected) and ovariectomized+estrogen injected animals were fed ad libitum or fasted to determine 1) the contribution of estrogen to metabolic asymmetry of hypothalamus; and 2) whether the hypothalamic asymmetry is modulated by the satiety state. Results show that estrogen-priming significantly increased both the proportion of animals with detected hypothalamic lateralization and the degree of metabolic difference between the hypothalamic sides causing a right-sided dominance during state 3 mitochondrial respiration (St3) in ad libitum fed animals. After 24 hours of fasting, lateralization in St3 values was clearly maintained; however, instead of the observed right-sided dominance that was detected in ad libitum fed animals here appeared in form of either right- or left-sidedness. In conclusion, our results revealed estrogen- and satiety state-dependent metabolic differences between the two hypothalamic hemispheres in female rats showing that the hypothalamic hemispheres drive the reproductive and satiety state related functions in an asymmetric manner.

  20. State-Dependent Network Connectivity Determines Gating in a K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bollepalli, Murali K.; Fowler, Philip W.; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  1. State-dependent network connectivity determines gating in a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bollepalli, Murali K; Fowler, Philip W; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  2. Singular Hopf bifurcation in a differential equation with large state-dependent delay.

    PubMed

    Kozyreff, G; Erneux, T

    2014-02-01

    We study the onset of sustained oscillations in a classical state-dependent delay (SDD) differential equation inspired by control theory. Owing to the large delays considered, the Hopf bifurcation is singular and the oscillations rapidly acquire a sawtooth profile past the instability threshold. Using asymptotic techniques, we explicitly capture the gradual change from nearly sinusoidal to sawtooth oscillations. The dependence of the delay on the solution can be either linear or nonlinear, with at least quadratic dependence. In the former case, an asymptotic connection is made with the Rayleigh oscillator. In the latter, van der Pol's equation is derived for the small-amplitude oscillations. SDD differential equations are currently the subject of intense research in order to establish or amend general theorems valid for constant-delay differential equation, but explicit analytical construction of solutions are rare. This paper illustrates the use of singular perturbation techniques and the unusual way in which solvability conditions can arise for SDD problems with large delays.

  3. Self-similar slip instability on interfaces with rate- and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the development of a frictional instability, with diverging sliding rate, at the interface of elastic bodies in contact. Evolution of friction is determined by a slip rate and state dependence. Following Viesca (2016 Phys. Rev. E 93, 060202(R). (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.93.060202)), we show through an appropriate change of variable, the existence of blow-up solutions that are fixed points of a dynamical system. The solutions show self-similarity of the simple variety: separable dependence of time and space. For an interface with uniform frictional properties, there is a single-problem parameter. We examine the linear stability of these fixed points, as this problem parameter is varied. Specifically, we consider two archetypical elastic settings of the slip surface, in which interactions between points on the surface are either local or non-local. We show that, independent of the nature of elastic interactions, the fixed-points lose stability in the same matter as the parameter is increased towards a limit value: an apparently infinite sequence of Hopf bifurcations. However, for any value of the parameter, the nonlinear development of the instability is attraction, if not asymptotic convergence, towards these fixed points, owing to the existence of stable eigenmodes. For comparison, we perform numerical solutions of the original evolution equations and find precise agreement with the results of the analysis.

  4. Role of the pH in state-dependent blockade of hERG currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibo; Guo, Jiqing; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Lees-Miller, James; Teng, Guoqi; Durdagi, Serdar; Duff, Henry J.; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Mutations that reduce inactivation of the voltage-gated Kv11.1 potassium channel (hERG) reduce binding for a number of blockers. State specific block of the inactivated state of hERG block may increase risks of drug-induced Torsade de pointes. In this study, molecular simulations of dofetilide binding to the previously developed and experimentally validated models of the hERG channel in open and open-inactivated states were combined with voltage-clamp experiments to unravel the mechanism(s) of state-dependent blockade. The computations of the free energy profiles associated with the drug block to its binding pocket in the intra-cavitary site display startling differences in the open and open-inactivated states of the channel. It was also found that drug ionization may play a crucial role in preferential targeting to the open-inactivated state of the pore domain. pH-dependent hERG blockade by dofetilie was studied with patch-clamp recordings. The results show that low pH increases the extent and speed of drug-induced block. Both experimental and computational findings indicate that binding to the open-inactivated state is of key importance to our understanding of the dofetilide’s mode of action.

  5. State-dependent amygdala stimulation-induced cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Liang, Keng-Chen; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2009-12-31

    Stimulation of the amygdala is known to produce pressor, depressor, or has no effects. The present study was performed to test whether amygdala cardiovascular effects are influenced by consciousness states and by different types of anesthetics. Adult rats were set up for stimulation amygdala and measurement of blood pressure in a chronic preparation. After recovery, same sites of the amygdala were stimulated electrically for several trials with the rat under conscious or anesthetic states induced by pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, alpha-chloralose and urethane plus alpha-chloralose, respectively. The interval between any two stimulation trials was at least 2 days. The stimulation was an 80-Hz, 0.5-ms, 100-micro A square wave pulse train lasting for 15 s. Cardiovascular responsive sites were found in the central, medial, and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. In stimulating these responsive sites, significantly different cardiovascular effects were induced under a conscious state and an anesthetized state of the animal, yet no significant differences were found among the various anesthetic agents. We conclude, that the cardiovascular influence of the amygdala is state-dependent in the rat.

  6. Eyes wide shut: Transcranial alternating current stimulation drives alpha rhythm in a state dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Neuling, Toralf; Fuscá, Marco; Herrmann, Christoph S.; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is used to modulate brain oscillations to measure changes in cognitive function. It is only since recently that brain activity in human subjects during tACS can be investigated. The present study aims to investigate the phase relationship between the external tACS signal and concurrent brain activity. Subjects were stimulated with tACS at individual alpha frequency during eyes open and eyes closed resting states. Electrodes were placed at Cz and Oz, which should affect parieto-occipital areas most strongly. Source space magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were used to estimate phase coherence between tACS and brain activity. Phase coherence was significantly increased in areas in the occipital pole in eyes open resting state only. The lag between tACS and brain responses showed considerable inter-individual variability. In conclusion, tACS at individual alpha frequency entrains brain activity in visual cortices. Interestingly, this effect is state dependent and is clearly observed with eyes open but only to a lesser extent with eyes closed. PMID:27252047

  7. Role of the pH in state-dependent blockade of hERG currents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yibo; Guo, Jiqing; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Lees-Miller, James; Teng, Guoqi; Durdagi, Serdar; Duff, Henry J.; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that reduce inactivation of the voltage-gated Kv11.1 potassium channel (hERG) reduce binding for a number of blockers. State specific block of the inactivated state of hERG block may increase risks of drug-induced Torsade de pointes. In this study, molecular simulations of dofetilide binding to the previously developed and experimentally validated models of the hERG channel in open and open-inactivated states were combined with voltage-clamp experiments to unravel the mechanism(s) of state-dependent blockade. The computations of the free energy profiles associated with the drug block to its binding pocket in the intra-cavitary site display startling differences in the open and open-inactivated states of the channel. It was also found that drug ionization may play a crucial role in preferential targeting to the open-inactivated state of the pore domain. pH-dependent hERG blockade by dofetilie was studied with patch-clamp recordings. The results show that low pH increases the extent and speed of drug-induced block. Both experimental and computational findings indicate that binding to the open-inactivated state is of key importance to our understanding of the dofetilide’s mode of action. PMID:27731415

  8. State-Dependent Decisions Cause Apparent Violations of Rationality in Animal Choice

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Normative models of choice in economics and biology usually expect preferences to be consistent across contexts, or “rational” in economic language. Following a large body of literature reporting economically irrational behaviour in humans, breaches of rationality by animals have also been recently described. If proven systematic, these findings would challenge long-standing biological approaches to behavioural theorising, and suggest that cognitive processes similar to those claimed to cause irrationality in humans can also hinder optimality approaches to modelling animal preferences. Critical differences between human and animal experiments have not, however, been sufficiently acknowledged. While humans can be instructed conceptually about the choice problem, animals need to be trained by repeated exposure to all contingencies. This exposure often leads to differences in state between treatments, hence changing choices while preserving rationality. We report experiments with European starlings demonstrating that apparent breaches of rationality can result from state-dependence. We show that adding an inferior alternative to a choice set (a “decoy”) affects choices, an effect previously interpreted as indicating irrationality. However, these effects appear and disappear depending on whether state differences between choice contexts are present or not. These results open the possibility that some expressions of maladaptive behaviour are due to oversights in the migration of ideas between economics and biology, and suggest that key differences between human and nonhuman research must be recognised if ideas are to safely travel between these fields. PMID:15550984

  9. Effects of Electronic-State-Dependent Solute Polarizability: Application to Solute-Pump/Solvent-Probe Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Ladanyi, Branka M; Stratt, Richard M

    2015-07-23

    Experimental studies of solvation dynamics in liquids invariably ask how changing a solute from its electronic ground state to an electronically excited state affects a solution's dynamics. With traditional time-dependent-fluorescence experiments, that means looking for the dynamical consequences of the concomitant change in solute-solvent potential energy. But if one follows the shift in the dynamics through its effects on the macroscopic polarizability, as recent solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra do, there is another effect of the electronic excitation that should be considered: the jump in the solute's own polarizability. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of this solute polarizability change in the classic example of the solvation dye coumarin 153 dissolved in acetonitrile. After demonstrating that standard quantum chemical methods can be used to construct accurate multisite models for the polarizabilities of ground- and excited-state solvation dyes, we show via simulation that this polarizability change acts as a contrast agent, significantly enhancing the observable differences in optical-Kerr spectra between ground- and excited-state solutions. A comparison of our results with experimental solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra supports our interpretation and modeling of this spectroscopy. We predict, in particular, that solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra should be sensitive to changes in both the solvent dynamics near the solute and the electronic-state-dependence of the solute's own rotational dynamics. PMID:25299940

  10. Thirst and the state-dependent representation of incentive stimulus value in human motive circuitry.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christoph A; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T

    2015-12-01

    Depletion imposes both need and desire to drink, and potentiates the response to need-relevant cues in the environment. The present fMRI study aimed to determine which neural structures selectively increase the incentive value of need-relevant stimuli in a thirst state. Towards this end, participants were scanned twice--either in a thirst or no-thirst state--while viewing pictures of beverages and chairs. As expected, thirst led to a selective increase in self-reported pleasantness and arousal by beverages. Increased responses to beverage when compared with chair stimuli were observed in the cingulate cortex, insular cortex and the amygdala in the thirst state, which were absent in the no-thirst condition. Enhancing the incentive value of need-relevant cues in a thirst state is a key mechanism for motivating drinking behavior. Overall, distributed regions of the motive circuitry, which are also implicated in salience processing, craving and interoception, provide a dynamic body-state dependent representation of stimulus value. PMID:25971601

  11. Are high-quality mates always attractive?: State-dependent mate preferences in birds and humans.

    PubMed

    Riebel, Katharina; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Verhulst, Simon; Fawcett, Tim W

    2010-05-01

    Sexual selection theory posits that females should choose mates in a way that maximizes their reproductive success. But what exactly is the optimal choice? Most empirical research is based on the assumption that females seek a male of the highest possible quality (in terms of the genes or resources he can provide), and hence show directional preferences for indicators of male quality. This implies that attractiveness and quality should be highly correlated. However, females frequently differ in what they find attractive. New theoretical and empirical insights provide mounting evidence that a female's own quality biases her judgement of male attractiveness, such that male quality and attractiveness do not always coincide. A recent experiment in songbirds demonstrated for the first time that manipulation of female condition can lead to divergent female preferences, with low-quality females actively preferring low-quality males over high-quality males. This result is in line with theory on state-dependent mate choice and is reminiscent of assortative mating preferences in humans. Here we discuss the implications of this work for the study of mate preferences. PMID:20714411

  12. A microphysical interpretation of rate- and state-dependent friction for fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Marone, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of fault strength during the seismic cycle plays a key role in the mode of fault slip, nature of earthquake stress drop, and earthquake nucleation. Laboratory-based rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) laws can describe changes in fault strength during slip, but the connections between fault strength and the mechanisms that dictate the mode of failure, from aseismic creep to earthquake rupture, remain poorly understood. The empirical nature of RSF laws remains a drawback to their application in nature. Here we analyze an extensive data set of friction constitutive parameters with the goal of illuminating the microphysical processes controlling RSF. We document robust relationships between: (1) the initial value of sliding (or kinetic) friction, (2) RSF parameters, and (3) the time rates of frictional strengthening (aging). We derive a microphysical model based on asperity contact mechanics and show that these relationships are dictated by: (1) an activation energy that controls the rate of asperity growth by plastic creep, and (2) an inverse relationship between material hardness and the activation volume of plastic deformation. Collectively, our results illuminate the physics expressed by the RSF parameters, and which describe the absolute value of frictional strength and its dependence on time and slip rate. Moreover, we demonstrate that seismogenic fault behavior may be dictated by the interplay between grain properties and ambient conditions controlling the local shear strength of grain-scale asperity contacts.

  13. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  14. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Rachel E.; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  15. Contributions of SERCA pump and ryanodine-sensitive stores to presynaptic residual Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Chessa S.; Partridge, L. Donald

    2010-01-01

    The presynaptic Ca2+ signal, which triggers vesicle release, disperses to a broadly distributed residual [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]res) that plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We have previously reported a slowing in the decay timecourse of [Ca2+]res during the second of paired pulses. In this study, we investigated the contributions of organelle and plasma membrane Ca2+ flux pathways to the reduction of effectiveness of [Ca2+]res clearance during short-term plasticity in Schaffer collateral terminals in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. We show that the slowed decay timecourse is mainly the result of a transport-dependent Ca2+ clearance process; that presynaptic caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ stores are not functionally loaded in the unstimulated terminal, but that these stores can effectively take up Ca2+ even during high frequency trains of stimuli; and that a rate limiting step of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) kinetics following the first pulse is responsible for a large portion of the observed slowing of [Ca2+]res clearance during the second pulse. We were able to accurately fit our [Ca2+]res data with a kinetic model based on these observations and this model predicted a reduction in availability of unbound SERCA during paired pulses, but no saturation of Ca2+ buffer in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:20153896

  16. Activity-dependent modulation of the presynaptic potassium current in the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, F; Solsona, C

    1996-01-01

    1. Changes in the electrical properties of frog motor nerve endings caused by the invasion of an action potential were studied by the perineural recording technique. Two equal supramaximal stimuli separated by a variable time interval were applied to the nerve trunk. The latency and amplitude of the deflections associated with the nodal Na+ current and presynaptic K+ current elicited by the second pulse were compared with control currents. 2. The deflection associated with the presynaptic K+ current elicited in response to the second stimulus was absent at the shortest interstimulus interval and showed a progressive increase in its amplitude as the interstimulus interval was lengthened, reaching values greater than control in most terminals. During the same period the nodal Na+ current did not change. 3. The experimental results were compared with a computer model of the distal axonal segment and its terminal. Response of the model to twin-pulse stimulation was in marked disagreement with the experimental results unless an inactivating K+ channel, with properties derived ad hoc, was incorporated into the simulation. 4. These results suggest that in the first 6-7 ms after a nerve impulse has invaded a frog motor nerve ending, maximal K+ conductance remains below the value at rest due to the fast inactivation of a K+ conductance. Following this, there is a period in which K+ conductance is greater than control values although the basis for this is unknown. PMID:8887778

  17. Impaired development of hippocampal mossy fibre synapses in mouse mutants for the presynaptic scaffold protein Bassoon.

    PubMed

    Lanore, Frederic; Blanchet, Christophe; Fejtova, Anna; Pinheiro, Paulo; Richter, Karin; Balschun, Detlef; Gundelfinger, Eckart; Mulle, Christophe

    2010-06-15

    Bassoon, a protein highly concentrated at the synaptic active zone, is thought to participate in the organization of the cytomatrix at the site of neurotransmitter release. Bassoon is amongst the first proteins to accumulate at newly formed synaptic junctions, raising the question of the functional role of this protein in the early stages of synaptic development. Here we show that the course of synaptic maturation of hippocampal mossy fibre (MF) synapses (glutamatergic synapses with multiple release sites) is markedly altered during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development in mutant mice lacking the central region of Bassoon (Bsn(-/-) mice). At postnatal day 7 (P7), Bsn(-/-) mice display large amplitude MF-EPSCs with decreased paired pulse ratios, an abnormality which may be linked to deficits in the organization of the presynaptic active zone. Surprisingly, 1 week later, decreased MF-EPSCs amplitude is observed in Bsn(-/-) mice, consistent with the inactivation of a subset of synaptic release sites. Finally, at more mature states a decreased posttetanic potentiation is observed at MF-synapses. These results support the notion that Bassoon is important for organizing the presynaptic active zone during the postnatal maturation of glutamatergic synapses.

  18. Differential expression of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon among ribbon synapses in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, J H; Fletcher, E L; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Wässle, H

    1999-10-01

    Bassoon is a 420-kDa presynaptic protein which is highly concentrated at the active zones of nerve terminals of conventional synapses, both excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic, in rat brain. It is thought to be involved in the organization of the cytomatrix at the site of neurotransmitter release. In the retina, there are two structurally and functionally distinct types of synapses: ribbon and conventional synapses. Antibodies against bassoon were applied to sections of rat and rabbit retina. Strong punctate immunofluorescence was found in the outer and inner plexiform layers. Using pre- and post-embedding immunostaining and electron microscopy, bassoon was localized in the outer plexiform layer at ribbon synapses formed by rods and cones but was absent from basal synaptic contacts formed by cones. In the inner plexiform layer a different picture emerged. As in the brain, bassoon was found at conventional inhibitory GABAergic synapses, made by amacrine cells, but it was absent from the bipolar cell ribbon synapses. These data demonstrate differences in the molecular composition of the presynaptic apparatuses of outer and inner plexiform layer ribbon synapses. Thus, differential equipment with cytomatrix proteins may account for the functional differences observed between the two types of ribbon synapses in the retina.

  19. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rachel E; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  20. Presynaptic DLG regulates synaptic function through the localization of voltage-activated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, César; Jorquera, Ramón A.; Ramírez, Mauricio; Kohler, Andrés; López, Estefanía; Delgado, Ricardo; Córdova, Alex; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2016-01-01

    The DLG-MAGUK subfamily of proteins plays a role on the recycling and clustering of glutamate receptors (GLUR) at the postsynaptic density. discs-large1 (dlg) is the only DLG-MAGUK gene in Drosophila and originates two main products, DLGA and DLGS97 which differ by the presence of an L27 domain. Combining electrophysiology, immunostaining and genetic manipulation at the pre and postsynaptic compartments we study the DLG contribution to the basal synaptic-function at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction. Our results reveal a specific function of DLGS97 in the regulation of the size of GLUR fields and their subunit composition. Strikingly the absence of any of DLG proteins at the presynaptic terminal disrupts the clustering and localization of the calcium channel DmCa1A subunit (Cacophony), decreases the action potential-evoked release probability and alters short-term plasticity. Our results show for the first time a crucial role of DLG proteins in the presynaptic function in vivo. PMID:27573697

  1. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  2. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Parras, M. Teresa; Delgado-García, José M.; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics. PMID:26848590

  3. Presynaptic DLG regulates synaptic function through the localization of voltage-activated Ca(2+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Astorga, César; Jorquera, Ramón A; Ramírez, Mauricio; Kohler, Andrés; López, Estefanía; Delgado, Ricardo; Córdova, Alex; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2016-01-01

    The DLG-MAGUK subfamily of proteins plays a role on the recycling and clustering of glutamate receptors (GLUR) at the postsynaptic density. discs-large1 (dlg) is the only DLG-MAGUK gene in Drosophila and originates two main products, DLGA and DLGS97 which differ by the presence of an L27 domain. Combining electrophysiology, immunostaining and genetic manipulation at the pre and postsynaptic compartments we study the DLG contribution to the basal synaptic-function at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction. Our results reveal a specific function of DLGS97 in the regulation of the size of GLUR fields and their subunit composition. Strikingly the absence of any of DLG proteins at the presynaptic terminal disrupts the clustering and localization of the calcium channel DmCa1A subunit (Cacophony), decreases the action potential-evoked release probability and alters short-term plasticity. Our results show for the first time a crucial role of DLG proteins in the presynaptic function in vivo. PMID:27573697

  4. Evidence for the pharmacological similarity between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and postsynaptic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D. M.; Marek, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty antagonist substances with varying potencies for central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors have been examined for effects on the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor. This has been monitored by measuring the stimulating effects of the substances on acetylcholine synthesis by rat neocortical tissue prisms. Dose-response curves for selected agents showed that maximal stimulation of synthesis was to 136-140% of the value without an antagonist. At a concentration of 1 microM, 17 of the substances caused a significant increase in synthesis, whilst at 0.01 microM significant stimulation occurred with only atropine, dexetimide, N-methyl-piperdin-4-yl (R)-2-cyclohexyl-2-hydroxyl-2-phenylacetate, quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and scopolamine. Linear regression analysis between synthesis values obtained with the substances and published data for the effects on either cholinoceptor-agonist induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum or the binding of [3H]-QNB to rat forebrain membranes gave correlation coefficients of r = 0.84 (P less than 0.01), and r = 0.75 (P less than 0.02) respectively. The results provide no indication of a pharmacological difference between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors. PMID:7186824

  5. State-dependent variation in the inhibitory effect of (D-Ala sup 2 , D-Leu sup 5 )-enkephalin on hippocampal serotonin release in ground squirrels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramarova, L.I.; Lee, T.F.; Cui, Y.; Wang, L.C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that increased endogenous opioid activities may facilitate the onset of hibernation either directly or possibly through modulation of other neurotransmitter systems. The seasonal change of (D-Ala{sup 2}, D-Leu{sup 5})-enkephalin (DADLE), a {delta} receptor agonist, in modulating K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)-5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from the hippocampal and hypothalamic slices of euthermic and hibernating Richardsons' ground squirrels was therefore investigated. DADLE had no effect on 5-HT release in the hypothalamic slices but elicited a dose-related inhibition on ({sup 3}H)-5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the euthermic ground squirrel. The inhibitory effect of DADLE was completely reversed by naloxone, but not by tetrodotoxin. In contrast, DADLE failed to alter the K{sup +}-induced 5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the hibernating ground squirrel. This state-dependent reduction in responsiveness to an opioid is consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced endogenous opioid activity in the hibernating phase could lead to down regulation of the opioid receptors and minimize its inhibition on hippocampal serotonergic activity. A high 5-HT activity would inhibit midbrain reticular activating system indirectly through non-serotonergic fibers, which in turn facilitate the onset or maintenance of hibernation.

  6. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  7. The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A binds to the presynaptic nerve endings in neuromuscular junctions of mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Senda, T; Sugimoto, N; Horiguchi, Y; Matsuda, M

    1995-04-01

    The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A, a channel-pore forming protein toxin, inhibited neuromuscular transmission in isolated mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation at low concentrations of calcium. We investigated immunohistochemically the localization of the binding sites of the enterotoxin in the preparation under the conditions in which the enterotoxin reduced maximally the amplitudes of the twitch tension elicited by electrical stimulations to the phrenic nerve. Under the conditions, double immunohistochemical staining of the preparation with (1) rabbit anti-enterotoxin IgG-rhodamine-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG and (2) mouse anti-synaptophysin (one of the synaptic vesicle-specific membrane proteins)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled goat anti-mouse IgG showed that the enterotoxin binds specifically to most of the sites which were stained with anti-synaptophysin exactly in the same configurations having the shapes of the nerve endings in the endplates. The thin section electron micrographs of the enterotoxin-intoxicated preparation showed no alterations in the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction and the nerve endings filled with numerous synaptic vesicles. The present results, together with our previous electrophysiological findings, indicate that the enterotoxin binds specifically to the presynaptic nerve endings and inhibits neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction.

  8. Estrogen- and Satiety State-Dependent Metabolic Lateralization in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Istvan; Kiss, David S.; Jocsak, Gergely; Somogyi, Virag; Toronyi, Eva; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is the highest center and the main crossroad of numerous homeostatic regulatory pathways including reproduction and energy metabolism. Previous reports indicate that some of these functions may be driven by the synchronized but distinct functioning of the left and right hypothalamic sides. However, the nature of interplay between the hemispheres with regard to distinct hypothalamic functions is still unclear. Here we investigated the metabolic asymmetry between the left and right hypothalamic sides of ovariectomized female rats by measuring mitochondrial respiration rates, a parameter that reflects the intensity of cell and tissue metabolism. Ovariectomized (saline injected) and ovariectomized+estrogen injected animals were fed ad libitum or fasted to determine 1) the contribution of estrogen to metabolic asymmetry of hypothalamus; and 2) whether the hypothalamic asymmetry is modulated by the satiety state. Results show that estrogen-priming significantly increased both the proportion of animals with detected hypothalamic lateralization and the degree of metabolic difference between the hypothalamic sides causing a right-sided dominance during state 3 mitochondrial respiration (St3) in ad libitum fed animals. After 24 hours of fasting, lateralization in St3 values was clearly maintained; however, instead of the observed right-sided dominance that was detected in ad libitum fed animals here appeared in form of either right- or left-sidedness. In conclusion, our results revealed estrogen- and satiety state-dependent metabolic differences between the two hypothalamic hemispheres in female rats showing that the hypothalamic hemispheres drive the reproductive and satiety state related functions in an asymmetric manner. PMID:26339901

  9. A state-dependent model for the optimal management of an invasive metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Bogich, Tiffany; Shea, Katriona

    2008-04-01

    Management of invasive species involves choosing between different management strategy options, but often the best strategy for a particular scenario is not obvious. We illustrate the use of optimization methods to determine the most efficient management strategy using one of the most devastating invasive forest pests in North America, the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar), as a case study. The optimization approach involves the application of stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) to a metapopulation framework with different infestation patch sizes, with the goal of minimizing infestation spread. We use a novel "moving window" approach as a way to address a spatially explicit problem without being explicitly spatial. We examine results for two cases in order to develop general rules of thumb for management. We explore a model with limited parameter information and then assess how strategies change with specific parameterization for the gypsy moth. The model results in a complex but stable, state-dependent management strategy for a multiyear management program that is robust even under situations of uncertainty. The general rule of thumb for the basic model consists of three strategies: eradicating medium-density infestations, reducing large-density infestations, and reducing the colonization rate from the main infestation, depending on the state of the system. With specific gypsy moth parameterization, reducing colonization decreases in importance relative to the other two strategies. The application of this model to gypsy moth management emphasizes the importance of managing based on the state of the system, and if applied to a specific geographic area, has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of current gypsy moth eradication programs, helping to slow the spread of this pest. Additionally, the approach used for this particular invasive species can be extended to the optimization of management programs for the spread of other

  10. The properties of batrachotoxin-modified cardiac Na channels, including state-dependent block by tetrodotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX) modification and tetrodotoxin (TTX) block of BTX- modified Na channels were studied in single cardiac cells of neonatal rats using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. The properties of BTX-modified Na channels in heart are qualitatively similar to those in nerve. However, quantitative differences do exist between the modified channels of these two tissues. In the heart, the shift of the conductance-voltage curve for the modified channel was less pronounced, the maximal activation rate constant, (tau m)max, of modified channels was considerably slower, and the slow inactivation of the BTX-modified cardiac Na channels was only partially abolished. TTX blocked BTX-modified mammalian cardiac Na channels and the block decreased over the potential range of -80 to -40 mV. The apparent dissociation constant of TTX changed from 0.23 microM at -50 mV to 0.69 microM at 0 mV. No further reduction of block was observed at potentials greater than -40 mV. This is the potential range over which gating from closed to open states occurred. These results were explained by assuming that TTX has a higher affinity for closed BTX- modified channels than for open modified channels. Hence, the TTX- binding rate constants are considered to be state dependent rather than voltage dependent. This differs from the voltage dependence of TTX block reported for BTX-modified Na channels from membrane vesicles incorporated into lipid bilayers and from amphibian node of Ranvier. PMID:2443605

  11. Outbreaks by canopy-feeding geometrid moth cause state-dependent shifts in understorey plant communities.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Stein Rune; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Odland, Arvid; Ims, Rolf Anker; Elvebakk, Arve

    2013-11-01

    The increased spread of insect outbreaks is among the most severe impacts of climate warming predicted for northern boreal forest ecosystems. Compound disturbances by insect herbivores can cause sharp transitions between vegetation states with implications for ecosystem productivity and climate feedbacks. By analysing vegetation plots prior to and immediately after a severe and widespread outbreak by geometrid moths in the birch forest-tundra ecotone, we document a shift in forest understorey community composition in response to the moth outbreak. Prior to the moth outbreak, the plots divided into two oligotrophic and one eutrophic plant community. The moth outbreak caused a vegetation state shift in the two oligotrophic communities, but only minor changes in the eutrophic community. In the spatially most widespread communities, oligotrophic dwarf shrub birch forest, dominance by the allelopathic dwarf shrub Empetrum nigrum ssp. hermaphroditum, was effectively broken and replaced by a community dominated by the graminoid Avenella flexuosa, in a manner qualitatively similar to the effect of wild fires in E. nigrum communities in coniferous boreal forest further south. As dominance by E. nigrum is associated with retrogressive succession the observed vegetation state shift has widespread implications for ecosystem productivity on a regional scale. Our findings reveal that the impact of moth outbreaks on the northern boreal birch forest system is highly initial-state dependent, and that the widespread oligotrophic communities have a low resistance to such disturbances. This provides a case for the notion that climate impacts on arctic and northern boreal vegetation may take place most abruptly when conveyed by changed dynamics of irruptive herbivores.

  12. Using Brain–Computer Interfaces and Brain-State Dependent Stimulation as Tools in Cognitive Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ole; Bahramisharif, Ali; Oostenveld, Robert; Klanke, Stefan; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Okazaki, Yuka O.; van Gerven, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used, e.g., for brain–computer interfacing (BCI). A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for aiding the disabled and for augmenting human performance. While technical developments obviously are important, we will here argue that new insight gained from cognitive neuroscience can be used to identify signatures of neural activation which reliably can be modulated by the subject at will. This review will focus mainly on oscillatory activity in the alpha band which is strongly modulated by changes in covert attention. Besides developing BCIs for their traditional purpose, they might also be used as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience. There is currently a strong interest in how brain-state fluctuations impact cognition. These state fluctuations are partly reflected by ongoing oscillatory activity. The functional role of the brain state can be investigated by introducing stimuli in real-time to subjects depending on the actual state of the brain. This principle of brain-state dependent stimulation may also be used as a practical tool for augmenting human behavior. In conclusion, new approaches based on online analysis of ongoing brain activity are currently in rapid development. These approaches are amongst others informed by new insight gained from electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies in cognitive neuroscience and hold the promise of providing new ways for investigating the brain at work. PMID:21687463

  13. Brain state-dependent abnormal LFP activity in the auditory cortex of a schizophrenia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Kazuhito; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2014-01-01

    In schizophrenia, evoked 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are impaired, which reflects the sensory deficits in this disorder, and baseline spontaneous oscillatory activity also appears to be abnormal. It has been debated whether the evoked ASSR impairments are due to the possible increase in baseline power. GABAergic interneuron-specific NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction mutant mice mimic some behavioral and pathophysiological aspects of schizophrenia. To determine the presence and extent of sensory deficits in these mutant mice, we recorded spontaneous local field potential (LFP) activity and its click-train evoked ASSRs from primary auditory cortex of awake, head-restrained mice. Baseline spontaneous LFP power in the pre-stimulus period before application of the first click trains was augmented at a wide range of frequencies. However, when repetitive ASSR stimuli were presented every 20 s, averaged spontaneous LFP power amplitudes during the inter-ASSR stimulus intervals in the mutant mice became indistinguishable from the levels of control mice. Nonetheless, the evoked 40-Hz ASSR power and their phase locking to click trains were robustly impaired in the mutants, although the evoked 20-Hz ASSRs were also somewhat diminished. These results suggested that NMDAR hypofunction in cortical GABAergic neurons confers two brain state-dependent LFP abnormalities in the auditory cortex; (1) a broadband increase in spontaneous LFP power in the absence of external inputs, and (2) a robust deficit in the evoked ASSR power and its phase-locking despite of normal baseline LFP power magnitude during the repetitive auditory stimuli. The “paradoxically” high spontaneous LFP activity of the primary auditory cortex in the absence of external stimuli may possibly contribute to the emergence of schizophrenia-related aberrant auditory perception. PMID:25018691

  14. The influence of sleep on emotional and cognitive processing is primarily trait- (but not state-) dependent.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Itamar; Lupkin, Shira M; Corter, James E; Peters, Suzanne E; Cannella, Lee Anne; Gluck, Mark A

    2016-10-01

    Human studies of sleep and cognition have established thatdifferent sleep stages contribute to distinct aspects of cognitive and emotional processing. However, since the majority of these findings are based on single-night studies, it is difficult to determine whether such effects arise due to individual, between-subject differences in sleep patterns, or from within-subject variations in sleep over time. In the current study, weinvestigated the longitudinal relationship between sleep patterns and cognitive performance by monitoring both in parallel, daily, for a week. Using two cognitive tasks - one assessing emotional reactivity to facial expressions and the other evaluating learning abilities in a probabilistic categorization task - we found that between-subjectdifferences in the average time spent in particular sleep stages predicted performance in these tasks far more than within-subject daily variations. Specifically, the typical time individualsspent in Rapid-Eye Movement (REM) sleep and Slow-Wave Sleep (SWS) was correlated to their characteristic measures of emotional reactivity, whereas the typical time spent in SWS and non-REM stages 1 and 2 was correlated to their success in category learning. These effects were maintained even when sleep properties werebased onbaseline measures taken prior to the experimental week. In contrast, within-subject daily variations in sleep patterns only contributed to overnight difference in one particular measure of emotional reactivity. Thus, we conclude that the effects of natural sleep onemotional cognition and categorylearning are more trait-dependent than state-dependent, and suggest ways to reconcile these results with previous findings in the literature. PMID:27481220

  15. State dependent effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Shahbabaie, Alireza; Golesorkhi, Mehrshad; Zamanian, Behnam; Ebrahimpoor, Mitra; Keshvari, Fatemeh; Nejati, Vahid; Fregni, Felipe; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate subjective craving ratings in drug dependents by modification of cortical excitability in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Given the mechanism of craving in methamphetamine (meth) users, we aimed to test whether tDCS of DLPFC could also alter self-reported craving in abstinent meth users while being exposed to meth cues. In this double-blinded, crossover, sham-controlled study, thirty two right-handed abstinent male meth users were recruited. We applied 20 min 'anodal' tDCS (2 mA) or 'sham' tDCS over right DLPFC in a random sequence while subjects performed a computerized cue-induced craving task (CICT) starting after 10 min of stimulation. Immediate craving was assessed before the stimulation, after 10 min of tDCS, and after tDCS termination by visual analog scale (VAS) of 0 to 100. Anodal tDCS of rDLPFC altered craving ratings significantly. We found a significant reduction of craving at rest in real tDCS relative to the sham condition (p = 0.016) after 10 min of stimulation. On the other hand, cue-induced VAS craving was rated significantly higher in the real condition in comparison with sham stimulation (p = 0.012). Our findings showed a state dependent effect of tDCS: while active prefrontal tDCS acutely reduced craving at rest in the abstinent meth users, it increased craving during meth-related cue exposure. These findings reflect the important role of the prefrontal cortex in both cue saliency evaluation and urge to meth consumption.

  16. Natural selection on unpalatable species imposed by state-dependent foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Thomas N; Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2004-05-21

    Müllerian mimicry is typically thought to arise as a consequence of defended prey species adopting a similar way of signalling their unprofitability, thereby reducing the costs of predator education. Here we consider subsequent selection on the morphology of prey species, in the potentially lengthy period of time when predators are generally aware of the noxious qualities of their prey (and so no further learning is involved). Using a pair of stochastic dynamic programming equations which describe both the toxin burdens of a predator and its energy level, we identified the optimal state-dependent rules that maximize a predator's long-term survivorship, and examined the implications of this behaviour for the evolution of prey morphologies. When palatable prey are in short supply then those prey species which contain relatively low doses of toxins become profitable to consume by hungry predators. Under these conditions, a weakly defended prey could gain selective advantage in the post educational period by resembling a prey species which contained a higher dose of the same or different toxins, although the precise nature of the ecological relationship between model and mimic could either be mutualistic or parasitic depending on how mimic density increases when favoured by selection. Our work formally demonstrates that one does not always need to invoke educational effects to explain why two or more unpalatable species have evolved a similar appearance, or to explain why mimetic similarity among distasteful species is maintained over time. When two species contain high levels of different toxins then they may gain mutual advantage by resembling one another, not only by educating the predator as to their common unprofitability (classical Müllerian mimicry), but also by increasing predator uncertainty as to the specific kind of toxin a prey item contains.

  17. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal.

  18. Localization of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Piccolo at ribbon and conventional synapses in the rat retina: comparison with Bassoon.

    PubMed

    Dick, O; Hack, I; Altrock, W D; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Brandstätter, J H

    2001-10-15

    In recent years significant progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular assembly of the postsynaptic density at synapses, whereas little is known as yet about the components of the presynaptic active zone. Piccolo and Bassoon, two structurally related presynaptic cytomatrix proteins, are highly concentrated at the active zones of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses in rat brain. In this study we used immunocytochemistry to examine the cellular and ultrastructural localization of Piccolo at synapses in the rat retina and compared it with that of Bassoon. Both proteins showed strong punctate immunofluorescence in the outer and the inner plexiform layers of the retina. They were found presynaptically at glutamatergic ribbon synapses and at conventional GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. Although the two proteins were coexpressed at all photoreceptor ribbon synapses and at some conventional amacrine cell synapses, at bipolar cell ribbon synapses only Piccolo was present. Our data demonstrate similarities but also differences in the molecular composition of the presynaptic apparatuses of the synapses in the retina, differences that may account for the functional differences observed between the ribbon and the conventional amacrine cell synapses and between the photoreceptor and the bipolar cell ribbon synapses in the retina.

  19. Syntabulin-kinesin-1 family member 5B-mediated axonal transport contributes to activity-dependent presynaptic assembly.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Pan, Ping-Yue; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2007-07-01

    The mechanism by which microtubule-based axonal transport regulates activity-dependent presynaptic plasticity in developing neurons remains mostly unknown. Our previous studies established that syntabulin is an adaptor capable of conjoining the kinesin family member 5B (KIF5B) motor and syntaxin-1. We now report that the complex of syntaxin-1-syntabulin-KIF5B mediates axonal transport of the active zone (AZ) components essential for presynaptic assembly. Syntabulin associates with AZ precursor carriers and colocalizes and comigrates with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Bassoon-labeled AZ transport cargos within developing axons. Knock-down of syntabulin or disruption of the syntaxin-1-syntabulin-KIF5B complex impairs the anterograde transport of GFP-Bassoon out of the soma and reduces the axonal densities of synaptic vesicle (SV) clusters and FM4-64 [N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl)pyridinium, dibromide] loading. Furthermore, syntabulin loss of function results in a reduction in both the amplitude of postsynaptic currents and the frequency of asynchronous quantal events, and abolishes the activity-induced recruitment of new GFP-Bassoon into the axons and subsequent coclustering with SVs. Consequently, syntabulin loss of function blocks the formation of new presynaptic boutons during activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in developing neurons. These studies establish that a kinesin motor-adaptor complex is critical for the anterograde axonal transport of AZ components, thus contributing to activity-dependent presynaptic assembly during neuronal development.

  20. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  1. State Dependency of Chemosensory Coding in the Gustatory Thalamus (VPMpc) of Alert Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixin

    2015-01-01

    The parvicellular portion of the ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPMpc) is the part of the thalamus that processes gustatory information. Anatomical evidence shows that the VPMpc receives ascending gustatory inputs from the parabrachial nucleus (PbN) in the brainstem and sends projections to the gustatory cortex (GC). Although taste processing in PbN and GC has been the subject of intense investigation in behaving rodents, much less is known on how VPMpc neurons encode gustatory information. Here we present results from single-unit recordings in the VPMpc of alert rats receiving multiple tastants. Thalamic neurons respond to taste with time-varying modulations of firing rates, consistent with those observed in GC and PbN. These responses encode taste quality as well as palatability. Comparing responses to tastants either passively delivered, or self-administered after a cue, unveiled the effects of general expectation on taste processing in VPMpc. General expectation led to an improvement of taste coding by modulating response dynamics, and single neuron ability to encode multiple tastants. Our results demonstrate that the time course of taste coding as well as single neurons' ability to encode for multiple qualities are not fixed but rather can be altered by the state of the animal. Together, the data presented here provide the first description that taste coding in VPMpc is dynamic and state-dependent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Over the past years, a great deal of attention has been devoted to understanding taste coding in the brainstem and cortex of alert rodents. Thanks to this research, we now know that taste coding is dynamic, distributed, and context-dependent. Alas, virtually nothing is known on how the gustatory thalamus (VPMpc) processes gustatory information in behaving rats. This manuscript investigates taste processing in the VPMpc of behaving rats. Our results show that thalamic neurons encode taste and palatability with time-varying patterns of activity

  2. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  3. Stereotyped initiation of retinal waves by bipolar cells via presynaptic NMDA autoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-wei; Li, Xiao-quan; Kawakami, Koichi; Du, Jiu-lin

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic retinal waves, the spontaneous patterned neural activities propagating among developing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), instruct the activity-dependent refinement of visuotopic maps. However, its initiation and underlying mechanism remain largely elusive. Here using larval zebrafish and multiple in vivo approaches, we discover that bipolar cells (BCs) are responsible for the generation of glutamatergic retinal waves. The wave originates from BC axon terminals (ATs) and propagates laterally to nearby BCs and vertically to downstream RGCs and the optic tectum. Its initiation is triggered by the activation of and consequent glutamate release from BC ATs, and is mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) expressed at these ATs. Intercellular asymmetry of NMDAR expression at BC ATs enables the preferential initiation of waves at the temporal retina, where BC ATs express more NMDARs. Thus, our findings indicate that glutamatergic retinal waves are initiated by BCs through a presynaptic NMDA autoreceptor-dependent process. PMID:27586999

  4. CGP 36216 is a selective antagonist at GABA(B) presynaptic receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-03-01

    In rat neocortical preparations maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, baclofen depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) = 6 microM), sensitive to (3-aminopropyl)ethylphosphinic acid (CGP 36216) (100, 300 and 500 microM) (pA(2) = 3.9 +/- 0.1). By contrast, CGP 36216, up to 1 mM, was ineffective in antagonising baclofen-induced hyperpolarisations, mediated through gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) postsynaptic receptors. In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, CGP 36216 increased [3H]GABA release (IC(50) = 43 microM), which was reversed by baclofen (20 microM). While CGP 36216 is ineffective at GABA(B) postsynaptic receptors, it is appreciably more active at presynaptic receptors.

  5. Stereotyped initiation of retinal waves by bipolar cells via presynaptic NMDA autoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Quan; Kawakami, Koichi; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic retinal waves, the spontaneous patterned neural activities propagating among developing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), instruct the activity-dependent refinement of visuotopic maps. However, its initiation and underlying mechanism remain largely elusive. Here using larval zebrafish and multiple in vivo approaches, we discover that bipolar cells (BCs) are responsible for the generation of glutamatergic retinal waves. The wave originates from BC axon terminals (ATs) and propagates laterally to nearby BCs and vertically to downstream RGCs and the optic tectum. Its initiation is triggered by the activation of and consequent glutamate release from BC ATs, and is mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) expressed at these ATs. Intercellular asymmetry of NMDAR expression at BC ATs enables the preferential initiation of waves at the temporal retina, where BC ATs express more NMDARs. Thus, our findings indicate that glutamatergic retinal waves are initiated by BCs through a presynaptic NMDA autoreceptor-dependent process. PMID:27586999

  6. Adaptations of Presynaptic Dopamine Terminals Induced by Psychostimulant Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of research has focused on investigating neurobiological alterations induced by chronic psychostimulant use in an effort to describe, understand, and treat the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. It has been known for several decades that dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is integrally involved in the selection and execution of motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and that psychostimulants act on this system to exert many of their effects. As such, a large body of work has focused on defining the consequences of psychostimulant use on dopamine signaling in the striatum as it relates to addictive behaviors. Here, we review presynaptic dopamine terminal alterations observed following self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine, as well as possible mechanisms by which these alterations occur and their impact on the progression of addiction. PMID:25491345

  7. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses.

  8. A presynaptic role for the cytomatrix protein GIT in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Podufall, Jasmin; Tian, Rui; Knoche, Elena; Puchkov, Dmytro; Walter, Alexander M; Rosa, Stefanie; Quentin, Christine; Vukoja, Anela; Jung, Nadja; Lampe, Andre; Wichmann, Carolin; Böhme, Mathias; Depner, Harald; Zhang, Yong Q; Schmoranzer, Jan; Sigrist, Stephan J; Haucke, Volker

    2014-06-12

    Neurotransmission involves the exo-endocytic cycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs) within nerve terminals. Exocytosis is facilitated by a cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (AZ). The precise spatial and functional relationship between exocytic fusion of SVs at AZ membranes and endocytic SV retrieval is unknown. Here, we identify the scaffold G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting (GIT) protein as a component of the AZ-associated cytomatrix and as a regulator of SV endocytosis. GIT1 and its D. melanogaster ortholog, dGIT, are shown to directly associate with the endocytic adaptor stonin 2/stoned B. In Drosophila dgit mutants, stoned B and synaptotagmin levels are reduced and stoned B is partially mislocalized. Moreover, dgit mutants show morphological and functional defects in SV recycling. These data establish a presynaptic role for GIT in SV recycling and suggest a connection between the AZ cytomatrix and the endocytic machinery. PMID:24882013

  9. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues.

  10. Functional regions of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon: significance for synaptic targeting and cytomatrix anchoring.

    PubMed

    Dresbach, Thomas; Hempelmann, Anne; Spilker, Christina; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko D; Zuschratter, Werner; Garner, Craig C; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2003-06-01

    Exocytosis of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles is restricted to specialized sites of the presynaptic plasma membrane called active zones. A complex cytomatrix of proteins exclusively assembled at active zones, the CAZ, is thought to form a molecular scaffold that organizes neurotransmitter release sites. Here, we have analyzed synaptic targeting and cytomatrix association of Bassoon, a major scaffolding protein of the CAZ. By combining immunocytochemistry and transfection of cultured hippocampal neurons, we show that the central portion of Bassoon is crucially involved in synaptic targeting and CAZ association. An N-terminal region harbors a distinct capacity for N-myristoylation-dependent targeting to synaptic vesicle clusters, but is not incorporated into the CAZ. Our data provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of distinct functional regions in Bassoon and suggest that a centrally located CAZ targeting function may be complemented by an N-terminal capacity for targeting to membrane-bounded synaptic organelles.

  11. CAST and ELKS proteins: structural and functional determinants of the presynaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Hida, Yamato; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2010-08-01

    Cytomatrix at the active zone-associated structural protein (CAST) was first purified from rat brain. It belongs to a protein family with the protein ELKS being its close relative. In nerve terminals, these proteins are specifically localized in the active zone (AZ). They have been shown to directly interact with other AZ proteins, including RIM1, Piccolo and Bassoon, and indirectly with Munc13-1 through RIM1, forming a large molecular complex at AZ. Moreover, the direct interaction of CAST with RIM1 and Bassoon appears to be involved in the release of neurotransmitters. However, it still remains elusive how CAST and ELKS regulate the assembly and function of AZ during synapse maturation. This review focuses on recent findings about the ELKS/CAST family revealed by biochemical strategies and genetic studies, and discusses the potential roles of this protein family in the function and organization of the presynaptic AZ.

  12. Molecular Remodeling of the Presynaptic Active Zone of Drosophila Photoreceptors via Activity-Dependent Feedback.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Atsushi; Hakeda-Suzuki, Satoko; Suzuki, Emiko; Silies, Marion; Shimozono, Mai; Möhl, Christoph; Suzuki, Takashi; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2015-05-01

    Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.

  13. Mood State-Dependent Retention Using Identical or Non-Identical Mood Inductions at Learning and Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haaga, David A.

    State-dependent retention (SDR) refers to the tendency to recall something more easily when in the same state as when one first learned it. The most directly relevant evidence in favor of mood SDR has confounded matching of mood at learning and recall with matching of mood induction procedure. A study was conducted to test directly whether the use…

  14. Dopamine modulates peripheral purinergic neurotransmission through multiple presynaptic receptors: tissue-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, M M; Elmallah, A I; Omar, A G; Sharabi, F

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the identity of presynaptic receptors involved in dopaminergic modulation of purinergic transmission in peripheral tissues including isolated rat vas deferens and urinary bladder. Isometric muscle twitches were established in the two tissues by low frequency electric field-stimulation (0.05 Hz, 1-ms duration, and supramaximal voltage). Exposure to prazosin, 50 nmol l-1 (vas deferens), or atropine, 3 micromol l-1 (urinary bladder), had no effect on the developed twitches. In contrast, desensitisation of P2X-purinoceptors by alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-mATP, 30 micromol l-1) abolished the twitches in both tissues, confirming their purinergic origin. Dopamine (1.8x10(-7) to 4.2x10(-5) mol l-1) reduced the twitch response in a concentration-related manner. Yohimbine (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, 0.3 micromol l-1) significantly (P<0.05) attenuated the inhibitory effects of dopamine and caused an upward shift in the concentration-response curves in the vas deferens and the urinary bladder. On the other hand, a blockade of DA2-dopaminoceptors by domperidone (1 micromol l-1) produced significant (P<0.05) reductions in dopamine responses only in rat vas deferens, with no effect in the urinary bladder. These data suggest that dopamine exerts inhibitory influences on purinergically-mediated muscle twitches in rat vas deferens and urinary bladder. More importantly, the nature of presynaptic receptors (alpha2-adrenergic and/or DA2-dopaminergic) involved in mediating dopamine effects is dependent on the tissue under investigation.

  15. The Amyloid Precursor Protein-A Novel Player within the Molecular Array of Presynaptic Nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Volknandt, Walter

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP) was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of AD. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of APPs. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the PAZ. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of AD and the physiological function of APP in the central nervous system.

  16. The Amyloid Precursor Protein—A Novel Player within the Molecular Array of Presynaptic Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP) was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of AD. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of APPs. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the PAZ. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of AD and the physiological function of APP in the central nervous system

  17. Resting-state functional connectivity and presynaptic monoamine signaling in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Dutta, Nisha; Helton, Sarah G; Schwandt, Melanie; Yan, Jia; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Cortes, Carlos R; Kerich, Mike; Hall, Samuel; Sun, Hui; Phillips, Monte; Momenan, Reza; Lohoff, Falk W

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol Dependence (AD) is a chronic relapsing disorder with high degrees of morbidity and mortality. While multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved in the complex symptomatology of AD, monoamine dysregulation and subsequent neuroadaptations have been long postulated to play an important role. Presynaptic monoamine transporters, such as the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), are likely critical as they represent a key common entry point for monoamine regulation and may represent a shared pathway for susceptibility to AD. Excessive monoaminergic signaling as mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1 might affect functional brain connectivity in particular in alcoholics compared to controls. We conducted resting-state fMRI functional connectivity (FC) analysis using the independent component analysis (ICA) approach in 68 AD subjects and 72 controls. All subjects were genotyped for the Thr136Ile (rs1390938) variant in VMAT1. Functional connectivity analyses showed a significant increase of resting-state FC in 4 networks in alcoholics compared to controls (P < 0.05, corrected). The FC was significantly positively correlated with Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS). The hyperfunction allele 136Ile was associated with a significantly decreased FC in the Default Mode Network, Prefrontal Cortex Network, and Executive Control Network in alcohol dependent participants (P < 0.05, corrected), but not in controls. Our data suggest that increased FC might represent a neuroadaptive mechanism relevant to AD that is furthermore mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1. The hyperfunction allele Thr136Ile might have a protective effect that is, in particular, relevant in AD by mechanism of increased monoamine transport into presynaptic storage vesicles.

  18. Presynaptic GluN2D receptors detect glutamate spillover and regulate cerebellar GABA release.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Christophe J; Lachamp, Philippe M; Sun, Lu; Mishina, Masayoshi; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate directly activates N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on presynaptic inhibitory interneurons and enhances GABA release, altering the excitatory-inhibitory balance within a neuronal circuit. However, which class of NMDA receptors is involved in the detection of glutamate spillover is not known. GluN2D subunit-containing NMDA receptors are ideal candidates as they exhibit a high affinity for glutamate. We now show that cerebellar stellate cells express both GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits. Genetic deletion of GluN2D subunits prevented a physiologically relevant, stimulation-induced, lasting increase in GABA release from stellate cells [long-term potentiation of inhibitory transmission (I-LTP)]. NMDA receptors are tetramers composed of two GluN1 subunits associated to either two identical subunits (di-heteromeric receptors) or to two different subunits (tri-heteromeric receptors). To determine whether tri-heteromeric GluN2B/2D NMDA receptors mediate I-LTP, we tested the prediction that deletion of GluN2D converts tri-heteromeric GluN2B/2D to di-heteromeric GluN2B NMDA receptors. We find that prolonged stimulation rescued I-LTP in GluN2D knockout mice, and this was abolished by GluN2B receptor blockers that failed to prevent I-LTP in wild-type mice. Therefore, NMDA receptors that contain both GluN2D and GluN2B mediate the induction of I-LTP. Because these receptors are not present in the soma and dendrites, presynaptic tri-heteromeric GluN2B/2D NMDA receptors in inhibitory interneurons are likely to mediate the cross talk between excitatory and inhibitory transmission.

  19. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  20. Cognitive enhancing treatment with a PPARγ agonist normalizes dentate granule cell presynaptic function in Tg2576 APP mice.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Miroslav N; Laezza, Fernanda; Haidacher, Sigmund J; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G; Starkey, Jonathan M; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A; Dineley, Kelly T; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-15

    Hippocampal network hyperexcitability is considered an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease (AD) memory impairment. Some AD mouse models exhibit similar network phenotypes. In this study we focused on dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell spontaneous and evoked properties in 9-month-old Tg2576 mice that model AD amyloidosis and cognitive deficits. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that Tg2576 DG granule cells exhibited spontaneous EPSCs that were higher in frequency but not amplitude compared with wild-type mice, suggesting hyperactivity of DG granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism. Further support of a presynaptic mechanism was revealed by increased I-O relationships and probability of release in Tg2576 DG granule cells. Since we and others have shown that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) axis improves hippocampal cognition in mouse models for AD as well as benefitting memory performance in some humans with early AD, we investigated how PPARγ agonism affected synaptic activity in Tg2576 DG. We found that PPARγ agonism normalized the I-O relationship of evoked EPSCs, frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, and probability of release that, in turn, correlated with selective expression of DG proteins essential for presynaptic SNARE function that are altered in patients with AD. These findings provide evidence that DG principal cells may contribute to early AD hippocampal network hyperexcitability via a presynaptic mechanism, and that hippocampal cognitive enhancement via PPARγ activation occurs through regulation of presynaptic vesicular proteins critical for proper glutamatergic neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and short-term plasticity.

  1. Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals Presynaptic Localization of the ALS/FTD Related Protein FUS in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Michael; Reichel, Jochen M.; Demestre, Maria; Putz, Stefan; Deshpande, Dhruva; Proepper, Christian; Liebau, Stefan; Schmeisser, Michael J.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Michaelis, Jens; Boeckers, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) is a multifunctional RNA-/DNA-binding protein, which is involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). A common hallmark of these disorders is the abnormal accumulation of mutated FUS protein in the cytoplasm. Under normal conditions FUS is confined to the nuclear compartment, in neurons, however, additional somatodendritic localization can be observed. In this study, we carefully analyzed the subcellular localization of endogenous FUS at synaptic sites of hippocampal neurons which are among the most affected cell types in FTD with FUS pathology. We could confirm a strong nuclear localization of FUS as well as its prominent and widespread neuronal expression throughout the adult and developing rat brain, particularly in the hippocampus, the cerebellum and the outer layers of the cortex. Intriguingly, FUS was also consistently observed at synaptic sites as detected by neuronal subcellular fractionation as well as by immunolabeling. To define a pre- and/or postsynaptic localization of FUS, we employed super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. FUS was found to be localized within the axon terminal in close proximity to the presynaptic vesicle protein Synaptophysin1 and adjacent to the active zone protein Bassoon, but well separated from the postsynaptic protein PSD-95. Having shown the presynaptic localization of FUS in the nervous system, a novel extranuclear role of FUS at neuronal contact sites has to be considered. Since there is growing evidence that local presynaptic translation might also be an important mechanism for plasticity, FUS – like the fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP – might act as one of the presynaptic RNA-binding proteins regulating this machinery. Our observation of presynaptic FUS should foster further investigations to determine its role in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and FTD. PMID:26834559

  2. Hindered submicron mobility and long-term storage of presynaptic dense-core granules revealed by single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B. A.; Jacobs, C.; Fulwiler, A.; Prahl, L.; Simon, A.; Hilken, L.; Lochner, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in neuroendocrine cells and neurons that house, transport, and release a number of important peptides and proteins. In neurons, DCG cargo can include the secreted neuromodulatory proteins tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a key role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus. This function has spurred interest in DCGs that localize to synaptic contacts between hippocampal neurons, and several studies recently have established that DCGs localize to, and undergo regulated exocytosis from, postsynaptic sites. To complement this work, we have studied presynaptically-localized DCGs in hippocampal neurons, which are much more poorly understood than their postsynaptic analogs. Moreover, to enhance relevance, we visualized DCGs via fluorescence labeling of exogenous and endogenous tPA and BDNF. Using single-particle tracking, we determined trajectories of more than 150 presynaptically-localized DCGs. These trajectories reveal that mobility of DCGs in presynaptic boutons is highly hindered and that storage is long-lived. We also computed mean-squared displacement curves, which can be used to elucidate mechanisms of transport. Over shorter time windows, most curves are linear, demonstrating that DCG transport in boutons is driven predominantly by diffusion. The remaining curves plateau with time, consistent with motion constrained by a submicron-sized corral. These results have relevance to recent models of presynaptic organization and to recent hypotheses about DCG cargo function. The results also provide estimates for transit times to the presynaptic plasma membrane that are consistent with measured times for onset of neurotrophin release from synaptically-localized DCGs. PMID:21976424

  3. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibition Extends the Upper Temperature Limit of Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Responses in Motoneuronal Boutons of Drosophila melanogaster Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    While the mammalian brain functions within a very narrow range of oxygen concentrations and temperatures, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has employed strategies to deal with a much wider range of acute environmental stressors. The foraging (for) gene encodes the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), has been shown to regulate thermotolerance in many stress-adapted species, including Drosophila, and could be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of hyperthermia in mammals. Whereas previous thermotolerance studies have looked at the effects of PKG variation on Drosophila behavior or excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), little is known about PKG effects on presynaptic mechanisms. In this study, we characterize presynaptic calcium ([Ca2+]i) dynamics at the Drosophila larval NMJ to determine the effects of high temperature stress on synaptic transmission. We investigated the neuroprotective role of PKG modulation both genetically using RNA interference (RNAi), and pharmacologically, to determine if and how PKG affects presynaptic [Ca2+]i dynamics during hyperthermia. We found that PKG activity modulates presynaptic neuronal Ca2+ responses during acute hyperthermia, where PKG activation makes neurons more sensitive to temperature-induced failure of Ca2+ flux and PKG inhibition confers thermotolerance and maintains normal Ca2+ dynamics under the same conditions. Targeted motoneuronal knockdown of PKG using RNAi demonstrated that decreased PKG expression was sufficient to confer thermoprotection. These results demonstrate that the PKG pathway regulates presynaptic motoneuronal Ca2+ signaling to influence thermotolerance of presynaptic function during acute hyperthermia. PMID:27711243

  4. State-dependent mechanisms of LTP expression revealed by optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bonnie; McGuinness, Lindsay; Akerman, Colin J; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Tim V P; Emptage, Nigel J

    2006-11-22

    The expression mechanism of long-term potentiation (LTP) remains controversial. Here we combine electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging to examine the role of silent synapses in LTP expression. Induction of LTP fails to change p(r) at these synapses but instead mediates an unmasking process that is sensitive to the inhibition of postsynaptic membrane fusion. Once unmasked, however, further potentiation of formerly silent synapses leads to an increase in p(r). The state of the synapse thus determines how LTP is expressed.

  5. [Mechanisms of the formation of long-periodicity oscillations in activity in nerve nets. Nets with pre- and postsynaptic inhibition].

    PubMed

    Degtiarenko, A M

    1986-01-01

    The role of presynaptic and postsynaptic processes in formation of the long-term (hundreds of milliseconds) activity of neuronal networks was analyzed by the mathematical simulation model. The long-term activity of networks with presynaptic inhibition was discontinued due to the depolarization of the neuronal terminals that achieved its critical level and to significant suppression of the effectiveness of synaptic interaction. The long-term activity of networks with postsynaptic inhibition was discontinued because of the activation of inhibitory neurons exerting strong hyperpolarizing effects on other neurons of the networks. Synchronization of neuronal discharges was important in achievement of the critical level by terminal depolarization or inhibitory postsynaptic processes that interrupted the network activity. Properties of neuronal networks with presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition were compared with those of uniform neuronal networks (with a positive feedback between neurons only). It is concluded that introduction of the additional negative feedback circuits in a form of presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition contributes to improvement of reliability and accuracy of the mechanism which terminates the network activity.

  6. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning. PMID:25747605

  7. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  8. AF-DX 116, a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, potentiates the effects of glucose and reverses the effects of insulin on memory.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    1998-11-01

    Male Swiss mice were tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Low subeffective doses of d-(+)-glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), but not its stereoisomer l-(-)-glucose (30 mg/kg,ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.3 mg/kg,ip), a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, given 10 min after training, interact to improve retention. Insulin (8 IU/kg, ip) impaired retention when injected immediately after training, and the effects were reversed, in a dose-related manner, by AF-DX 116 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, ip) administered 10 min following insulin. Since AF-DX 116 possibly blocks autoreceptors mediating the inhibition of acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerve terminals, the present data support the view that changes in the central nervous system glucose availability, subsequent to modification of circulating glucose levels, influence the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms involved in memory storage of an inhibitory avoidance response in mice. PMID:9774523

  9. AF-DX 116, a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, potentiates the effects of glucose and reverses the effects of insulin on memory.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    1998-11-01

    Male Swiss mice were tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Low subeffective doses of d-(+)-glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), but not its stereoisomer l-(-)-glucose (30 mg/kg,ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.3 mg/kg,ip), a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, given 10 min after training, interact to improve retention. Insulin (8 IU/kg, ip) impaired retention when injected immediately after training, and the effects were reversed, in a dose-related manner, by AF-DX 116 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, ip) administered 10 min following insulin. Since AF-DX 116 possibly blocks autoreceptors mediating the inhibition of acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerve terminals, the present data support the view that changes in the central nervous system glucose availability, subsequent to modification of circulating glucose levels, influence the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms involved in memory storage of an inhibitory avoidance response in mice.

  10. On robust control of continuous-time systems with state-dependent uncertainties and its application to mechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengchao; Zhao, Xudong; Yu, Jinyong

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the problems of robust stability analysis and control of continuous-time systems with state-dependent uncertainties. First, a more general polytopic model describing systems with state-dependent uncertain parameters is proposed, and such a system model is more applicable in practice. A low conservative stability condition is obtained for the system by introducing the Lagrange multiplier term and adding some weight matrix variables. Then, based on our proposed idea, the output-feedback controllers will be designed in two cases: (1) the system matrices share the same polytopic parameters; (2) the system matrices do not share the same polytopic parameters. The controllers are designed in a model-dependent manner, which can provide more flexibilities in control synthesis. Besides, a decay rate can be set in advance to achieve better system performances. Finally, a numerical example together with a classic mechanical system is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of our theoretical findings.

  11. An M/M/c/K State-Dependent Model for Pedestrian Flow Control and Design of Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdul Ghani, Noraida; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Chowdhury, Md. Ahmed Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian overflow causes queuing delay and in turn, is controlled by the capacity of a facility. Flow control or blocking control takes action to avoid queues from building up to extreme values. Thus, in this paper, the problem of pedestrian flow control in open outdoor walking facilities in equilibrium condition is investigated using M/M/c/K queuing models. State dependent service rate based on speed and density relationship is utilized. The effective rate of the Poisson arrival process to the facility is determined so as there is no overflow of pedestrians. In addition, the use of the state dependent queuing models to the design of the facilities and the effect of pedestrian personal capacity on the design and the traffic congestion are discussed. The study does not validate the sustainability of adaptation of Western design codes for the pedestrian facilities in the countries like Bangladesh. PMID:26196124

  12. An M/M/c/K State-Dependent Model for Pedestrian Flow Control and Design of Facilities.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdul Ghani, Noraida; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Chowdhury, Md Ahmed Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian overflow causes queuing delay and in turn, is controlled by the capacity of a facility. Flow control or blocking control takes action to avoid queues from building up to extreme values. Thus, in this paper, the problem of pedestrian flow control in open outdoor walking facilities in equilibrium condition is investigated using M/M/c/K queuing models. State dependent service rate based on speed and density relationship is utilized. The effective rate of the Poisson arrival process to the facility is determined so as there is no overflow of pedestrians. In addition, the use of the state dependent queuing models to the design of the facilities and the effect of pedestrian personal capacity on the design and the traffic congestion are discussed. The study does not validate the sustainability of adaptation of Western design codes for the pedestrian facilities in the countries like Bangladesh. PMID:26196124

  13. Novel conditions on exponential stability of a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Shen, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability on a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching. Under the novel conditions, some sufficient criteria ensuring exponential stability of the proposed system are obtained. In particular, the obtained conditions complement and improve earlier publications on conventional neural networks with continuous or discontinuous right-hand side. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  14. Disentangling the roles of frequency-vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mathot, Kimberley J; van den Hout, Piet J; Piersma, Theunis; Kempenaers, Bart; Réale, Denis; Dingemanse, Niels J

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical work suggests that both negative frequency-dependent payoffs and state-dependent payoffs can lead to individual variation in behavioural plasticity. We investigated the roles of both frequency- and state-dependence on the occurrence of individual variation in behavioural plasticity in a series of experiments where we manipulated perceived predation danger for red knots (Calidris canutus islandica). We found individual variation in plasticity in a trait with negative frequency-dependent payoffs (vigilance), but not in a trait with positive frequency-dependent payoffs (escape flights). Furthermore, there was no correlation between the average level of vigilance under low predation danger and the magnitude of response to increased predation danger, as would be expected under state-dependence. Thus, our results provide support for the hypothesis that negative-frequency dependence favours individual variation in plasticity. However, negative-frequency dependence alone cannot explain why plasticity would be consistent within individuals, and future studies should address the factors that might favour individual consistency.

  15. Finite-time state-dependent Riccati equation for time-varying nonaffine systems: rigid and flexible joint manipulator control.

    PubMed

    Korayem, M H; Nekoo, S R

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates finite-time optimal and suboptimal controls for time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities. The state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) controller was the main framework. A finite-time constraint imposed on the equation changes it to a differential equation, known as the state-dependent differential Riccati equation (SDDRE) and this equation was applied to the problem reported in this study that provides general formulation and stability analysis. The following four solution methods were developed for solving the SDDRE; backward integration, state transition matrix (STM) and the Lyapunov based method. In the Lyapunov approach, both positive and negative definite solutions to related SDRE were used to provide suboptimal gain for the SDDRE. Finite-time suboptimal control is applied for robotic manipulator, as finite-time constraint strongly decreases state error and operation time. General state-dependent coefficient (SDC) parameterizations for rigid and flexible joint arms (prismatic or revolute joints) are introduced. By including nonlinear control inputs in the formulation, the actuator׳s limits can be inserted directly to the state-space equation of a manipulator. A finite-time SDRE was implemented on a 6R manipulator both in theory and experimentally. And a reduced 3R arm was modeled and tested as a flexible joint robot (FJR). Evaluations of load carrying capacity and operation time were investigated to assess the capability of this approach, both of which showed significant improvement.

  16. Cell Type-Specific Circuit Mapping Reveals the Presynaptic Connectivity of Developing Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Cocas, Laura A.; Fernandez, Gloria; Barch, Mariya; Doll, Jason; Zamora Diaz, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex is a dense network composed of local, subcortical, and intercortical synaptic connections. As a result, mapping cell type-specific neuronal connectivity in the cerebral cortex in vivo has long been a challenge for neurobiologists. In particular, the development of excitatory and inhibitory interneuron presynaptic input has been hard to capture. We set out to analyze the development of this connectivity in the first postnatal month using a murine model. First, we surveyed the connectivity of one of the earliest populations of neurons in the brain, the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells in the neocortex, which are known to be critical for cortical layer formation and are hypothesized to be important in the establishment of early cortical networks. We found that CR cells receive inputs from deeper-layer excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the first postnatal week. We also found that both excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons received broad inputs in the first postnatal week, including inputs from CR cells. Expanding our analysis into the more mature brain, we assessed the inputs onto inhibitory interneurons and excitatory projection neurons, labeling neuronal progenitors with Cre drivers to study discrete populations of neurons in older cortex, and found that excitatory cortical and subcortical inputs are refined by the fourth week of development, whereas local inhibitory inputs increase during this postnatal period. Cell type-specific circuit mapping is specific, reliable, and effective, and can be used on molecularly defined subtypes to determine connectivity in the cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mapping cortical connectivity in the developing mammalian brain has been an intractable problem, in part because it has not been possible to analyze connectivity with cell subtype precision. Our study systematically targets the presynaptic connections of discrete neuronal subtypes in both the mature and developing

  17. An animal model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure elicits a long-lasting deficit in presynaptic long-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Jonathan W; Corches, Alex; Vieira, Philip A; Hiroto, Alex S; Mackie, Ken; Korzus, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis continues to be the most accessible and popular illicit recreational drug. Whereas current data link adolescence cannabinoid exposure to increased risk for dependence on other drugs, depression, anxiety disorders and psychosis, the mechanism(s) underlying these adverse effects remains controversial. Here we show in a mouse model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure deficient endocannabinoid (eCB)-mediated signaling and presynaptic forms of long-term depression at adult central glutamatergic synapses in the prefrontal cortex. Increasing endocannabinoid levels by blockade of monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with the specific inhibitor JZL 184 ameliorates eCB-LTD deficits. The observed deficit in cortical presynaptic signaling may represent a neural maladaptation underlying network instability and abnormal cognitive functioning. Our study suggests that adolescent cannabinoid exposure may permanently impair brain functions, including the brain's intrinsic ability to appropriately adapt to external influences.

  18. An animal model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure elicits a long-lasting deficit in presynaptic long-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Jonathan W; Corches, Alex; Vieira, Philip A; Hiroto, Alex S; Mackie, Ken; Korzus, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis continues to be the most accessible and popular illicit recreational drug. Whereas current data link adolescence cannabinoid exposure to increased risk for dependence on other drugs, depression, anxiety disorders and psychosis, the mechanism(s) underlying these adverse effects remains controversial. Here we show in a mouse model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure deficient endocannabinoid (eCB)-mediated signaling and presynaptic forms of long-term depression at adult central glutamatergic synapses in the prefrontal cortex. Increasing endocannabinoid levels by blockade of monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with the specific inhibitor JZL 184 ameliorates eCB-LTD deficits. The observed deficit in cortical presynaptic signaling may represent a neural maladaptation underlying network instability and abnormal cognitive functioning. Our study suggests that adolescent cannabinoid exposure may permanently impair brain functions, including the brain's intrinsic ability to appropriately adapt to external influences. PMID:25979486

  19. A novel SDS-stable dimer of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein at presynaptic terminals of squid neurons.

    PubMed

    Lico, D T P; Lopes, G S; Brusco, J; Rosa, J C; Gould, R M; De Giorgis, J A; Larson, R E

    2015-08-01

    The presence of mRNAs in synaptic terminals and their regulated translation are important factors in neuronal communication and plasticity. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes are involved in the translocation, stability, and subcellular localization of mRNA and the regulation of its translation. Defects in these processes and mutations in components of the hnRNP complexes have been related to the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite much data on mRNA localization and evidence for protein synthesis, as well as the presence of translation machinery, in axons and presynaptic terminals, the identity of RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA transport and function in presynaptic regions is lacking. We previously characterized a strongly basic RNA-binding protein (p65), member of the hnRNPA/B subfamily, in squid presynaptic terminals. Intriguingly, in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), p65 migrated as a 65-kDa protein, whereas members of the hnRNPA/B family typically have molecular masses ranging from 35 to 42kDa. In this report we present further biochemical and molecular characterization that shows endogenous p65 to be an SDS-stable dimer composed of ∼37-kDa hnRNPA/B-like subunits. We cloned and expressed a recombinant protein corresponding to squid hnRNPA/B-like protein and showed its propensity to aggregate and form SDS-stable dimers in vitro. Our data suggest that this unique hnRNPA/B-like protein co-localizes with synaptic vesicle protein 2 and RNA-binding protein ELAV and thus may serve as a link between local mRNA processing and presynaptic function and regulation.

  20. Proteomics, ultrastructure, and physiology of hippocampal synapses in a fragile X syndrome mouse model reveal presynaptic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klemmer, Patricia; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Holmgren, Carl D; Klychnikov, Oleg I; Stahl-Zeng, Jianru; Loos, Maarten; van der Schors, Roel C; Wortel, Joke; de Wit, Heidi; Spijker, Sabine; Rotaru, Diana C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Li, Ka Wan

    2011-07-22

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the Fmr1 gene, which encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP affects dendritic protein synthesis, thereby causing synaptic abnormalities. Here, we used a quantitative proteomics approach in an FXS mouse model to reveal changes in levels of hippocampal synapse proteins. Sixteen independent pools of Fmr1 knock-out mice and wild type mice were analyzed using two sets of 8-plex iTRAQ experiments. Of 205 proteins quantified with at least three distinct peptides in both iTRAQ series, the abundance of 23 proteins differed between Fmr1 knock-out and wild type synapses with a false discovery rate (q-value) <5%. Significant differences were confirmed by quantitative immunoblotting. A group of proteins that are known to be involved in cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth was regulated; they included Basp1 and Gap43, known PKC substrates, and Cend1. Basp1 and Gap43 are predominantly expressed in growth cones and presynaptic terminals. In line with this, ultrastructural analysis in developing hippocampal FXS synapses revealed smaller active zones with corresponding postsynaptic densities and smaller pools of clustered vesicles, indicative of immature presynaptic maturation. A second group of proteins involved in synaptic vesicle release was up-regulated in the FXS mouse model. In accordance, paired-pulse and short-term facilitation were significantly affected in these hippocampal synapses. Together, the altered regulation of presynaptically expressed proteins, immature synaptic ultrastructure, and compromised short-term plasticity points to presynaptic changes underlying glutamatergic transmission in FXS at this stage of development.

  1. Intrinsic variability in Pv, RRP size, Ca(2+) channel repertoire, and presynaptic potentiation in individual synaptic boutons.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Pablo; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    The strength of individual synaptic contacts is considered a key modulator of information flow across circuits. Presynaptically the strength can be parsed into two key parameters: the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) and the probability that a vesicle in that pool will undergo exocytosis when an action potential fires (Pv). How these variables are controlled and the degree to which they vary across individual nerve terminals is crucial to understand synaptic plasticity within neural circuits. Here we report robust measurements of these parameters in rat hippocampal neurons and their variability across populations of individual synapses. We explore the diversity of presynaptic Ca(2+) channel repertoires and evaluate their effect on synaptic strength at single boutons. Finally, we study the degree to which synapses can be differentially modified by a known potentiator of presynaptic function, forskolin. Our experiments revealed that both Pv and RRP spanned a large range, even for synapses made by the same axon, demonstrating that presynaptic efficacy is governed locally at the single synapse level. Synapses varied greatly in their dependence on N or P/Q type Ca(2+) channels for neurotransmission, but there was no association between specific channel repertoires and synaptic efficacy. Increasing cAMP concentration using forskolin enhanced synaptic transmission in a Ca(2+)-independent manner that was inversely related with a synapse's initial Pv, and independent of its RRP size. We propose a simple model based on the relationship between Pv and calcium entry that can account for the variable potentiation of synapses based on initial probability of vesicle fusion.

  2. Cell type-specific, presynaptic LTP of inhibitory synapses on fast-spiking GABAergic neurons in the mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Jiang, Bin; Sohya, Kazuhiro; Safari, Mir-Shahram; Arami, Masoumeh Kourosh; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Tsumoto, Tadaharu

    2012-09-19

    Properties and plasticity of inhibitory synapses on fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic (FS-GABA) interneurons in layer II/III of the mouse visual cortex were examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of IPSCs or IPSPs evoked by activation of presynaptic FS or non-FS GABAergic interneurons. Unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs) evoked by action potentials of FS-GABA neurons have shorter onset latency, faster rising slope, higher peak amplitude, and faster decay time than those evoked by action potentials of non-FS-GABA neurons. Tetanic activation of presynaptic FS-GABA neurons induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of uIPSCs, whereas that of presynaptic non-FS-GABA neurons did not induce LTP, indicating that long-term plasticity of inhibitory synapses on FS-GABA neurons is pathway specific. For further analysis of inhibitory synaptic plasticity, IPSPs evoked by electrical stimulation of an adjacent site in the cortex were recorded from FS-GABA neurons. Theta burst stimulation induced LTP of IPSPs in 12 of 14 FS-GABA neurons. The paired-pulse stimulation protocol and coefficient of variation analysis indicated that this form of LTP may be presynaptic in origin. Filling postsynaptic cells with a Ca(2+) chelator did not block the induction of LTP, suggesting no involvement of postsynaptic Ca(2+) rise. Also, this form of LTP was dependent neither on metabotropic glutamate receptors nor voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels of the L and T types. Further pharmacological analysis indicated that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels other than the P/Q type, such as N and R types, were not involved in LTP, suggesting that P/Q-type channels are a candidate for factors inducing LTP of inhibitory synapses between FS-GABA neurons. PMID:22993435

  3. Metal Toxicity at the Synapse: Presynaptic, Postsynaptic, and Long-Term Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Sanah; Ghazala, Zena; Chowdhury, Arnab; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Metal neurotoxicity is a global health concern. This paper summarizes the evidence for metal interactions with synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Presynaptically metal ions modulate neurotransmitter release through their interaction with synaptic vesicles, ion channels, and the metabolism of neurotransmitters (NT). Many metals (e.g., Pb2+, Cd2+, and Hg+) also interact with intracellular signaling pathways. Postsynaptically, processes associated with the binding of NT to their receptors, activation of channels, and degradation of NT are altered by metals. Zn2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Li3+, Hg+, and methylmercury modulate NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and/or GABA receptors activity. Al3+, Pb2+, Cd2+, and As2O3 also impair synaptic plasticity by targeting molecules such as CaM, PKC, and NOS as well as the transcription machinery involved in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. The multiple effects of metals might occur simultaneously and are based on the specific metal species, metal concentrations, and the types of neurons involved. PMID:22287959

  4. The schizophrenia risk gene product miR-137 alters presynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Sandra; Seo, Jinsoo; Kwon, Ester J.; Rudenko, Andrii; Cho, Sukhee; Wang, Wenyuan; Flood, Zachary; Martorell, Anthony J.; Ericsson, Maria; Mungenast, Alison E.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding variants in the human MIR137 gene locus increase schizophrenia risk at a genome-wide significance level. However, the functional consequence of these risk alleles is unknown. Here, we examined induced human neurons harboring the minor alleles of four disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MIR137, and observed increased MIR137 levels compared to major allele-carrying cells. We found that miR-137 gain-of-function causes downregulation of the presynaptic target genes, Complexin-1 (Cplx1), Nsf, and Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1), leading to impaired vesicle release. In vivo, miR-137 gain-of-function results in changes in synaptic vesicle pool distribution, impaired mossy fiber-LTP induction and deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. By sequestering endogenous miR-137, we were able to ameliorate the synaptic phenotypes. Moreover, reinstatement of Syt1 expression partially restored synaptic plasticity, demonstrating the importance of Syt1 as a miR-137 target. Our data provide new insight into the mechanism by which miR-137 dysregulation can impair synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:26005852

  5. Presynaptic effect of a methanolic extract of toad (Rhinella schneideri) poison in avian neuromuscular preparation

    PubMed Central

    Rostelato-Ferreira, Sandro; Dal Belo, Cháriston A; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Hyslop, Stephen; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa

    2011-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of a methanolic extract of toad (Rhinella schneideri) poison was examined in chick biventer cervicis preparations. The methanolic extract (1, 3, 10 and 30µg/ml) caused concentration-dependent blockade at the three highest concentrations (time for 50% blockade, mean±SEM: 84±10, 51±3 and 12±0.8min for 3, 10 and 30µg/ml, respectively; n=6-8 each) that was preceded by significant, transient facilitation at 10μg/ml. Contractures to exogenous ACh (110μM) or KCl (20mM) were unaffected by the blockade. In curarized (d-Tc, 1μg/ml) preparations, the extract (10µg/ml) caused complete, irreversible blockade that persisted after extensive washing. The extract did not significantly alter the creatine kinase release or morphology of biventer cervicis muscle. These results indicate that the methanolic extract of R. schneideri poison acts primarily presynaptically to enhance neurotransmitter release in this avian preparation. PMID:21994808

  6. Extrasynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neuronal Cell Bodies Regulate Presynaptic Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jason P.; Staab, Trisha A.; Wang, Han; Mazzasette, Chiara; Butte, Zara

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a potent neuromodulator in the brain, and its effects on cognition and memory formation are largely performed through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). mAChRs are often preferentially distributed on specialized membrane regions in neurons, but the significance of mAChR localization in modulating neuronal function is not known. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the M1/M3/M5 family of mAChRs, gar-3, is expressed in cholinergic motor neurons, and GAR-3-GFP fusion proteins localize to cell bodies where they are enriched at extrasynaptic regions that are in contact with the basal lamina. The GAR-3 N-terminal extracellular domain is necessary and sufficient for this asymmetric distribution, and mutation of a predicted N-linked glycosylation site within the N-terminus disrupts GAR-3-GFP localization. In transgenic animals expressing GAR-3 variants that are no longer asymmetrically localized, synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions is impaired and there is a reduction in the abundance of the presynaptic protein sphingosine kinase at release sites. Finally, GAR-3 can be activated by endogenously produced ACh released from neurons that do not directly contact cholinergic motor neurons. Together, our results suggest that humoral activation of asymmetrically localized mAChRs by ACh is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which ACh modulates neuronal function. PMID:23986249

  7. Optogenetic activation of presynaptic inputs in lateral amygdala forms associative fear memory.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Kim, Hyung-Su; Jeong, Yire; Augustine, George J; Han, Jin-Hee

    2014-11-01

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning, the lateral amygdala (LA) has been highlighted as a key brain site for association between sensory cues and aversive stimuli. However, learning-related changes are also found in upstream sensory regions such as thalamus and cortex. To isolate the essential neural circuit components for fear memory association, we tested whether direct activation of presynaptic sensory inputs in LA, without the participation of upstream activity, is sufficient to form fear memory in mice. Photostimulation of axonal projections from the two main auditory brain regions, the medial geniculate nucleus of the thalamus and the secondary auditory cortex, was paired with aversive footshock. Twenty-four hours later the same photostimulation induced robust conditioned freezing and this fear memory formation was disrupted when glutamatergic synaptic transmission was locally blocked in the LA. Therefore, our results prove for the first time that synapses between sensory input areas and the LA, previously implicated as a crucial brain site for fear memory formation, actually are sufficient to serve as a conditioned stimulus. Our results strongly support the idea that the LA may be sufficient to encode and store associations between neutral cue and aversive stimuli during natural fear conditioning as a critical part of a broad fear memory engram.

  8. The presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon: sequence and chromosomal localization of the human BSN gene.

    PubMed

    Winter, C; tom Dieck, S; Boeckers, T M; Bockmann, J; Kämpf, U; Sanmartí-Vila, L; Langnaese, K; Altrock, W; Stumm, M; Soyke, A; Wieacker, P; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D

    1999-05-01

    Bassoon is a novel 420-kDa protein recently identified as a component of the cytoskeleton at presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites. Analysis of the rat and mouse sequences revealed a polyglutamine stretch in the C-terminal part of the protein. Since it is known for some proteins that abnormal amplification of such polyglutamine regions can cause late-onset neurodegeneration, we cloned and localized the human BASSOON gene (BSN). Phage clones spanning most of the open reading frame and the 3' untranslated region were isolated from a human genomic library and used for chromosomal localization of BSN to chromosome 3p21 by FISH. The localization was confirmed by PCR on rodent/human somatic cell hybrids; it is consistent with the localization of the murine Bsn gene at chromosome 9F. Sequencing revealed a polyglutamine stretch of only five residues in human, and PCR amplifications from 50 individuals showed no obvious length polymorphism in this region. Analysis of the primary structure of Bassoon and comparison to previous database entries provide evidence for a newly emerging protein family.

  9. CHRONIC INTERMITTENT ETHANOL EXPOSURE REDUCES PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE NEUROTRANSMISSION IN THE MOUSE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Rose, Jamie H.; Huggins, Kimberly N.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing evidence suggests that chronic ethanol exposure decreases dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), contributing to a hypodopaminergic state during withdrawal. However, few studies have investigated adaptations in presynaptic DA terminals after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. In monkeys and rats, chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been shown to increase DA uptake and D2 autoreceptor sensitivity. METHODS The current study examined the effects of ethanol on DA terminals in CIE exposed mice during two time-points after the cessation of CIE exposure. DA release and uptake were measured using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc core slices from C57BL/6J mice, 0 and 72 hours following three weekly cycles (4 days of 16 hrs ethanol vapor/8 hrs room air/day + 3 days withdrawal) of CIE vapor exposure. RESULTS Current results showed that DA release was reduced, uptake rates were increased, and inhibitory D2-type autoreceptor activity was augmented following CIE exposure in mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, these CIE-induced adaptations in the accumbal DA system reduce DA signaling and therefore reveal several potential mechanisms contributing to a functional hypodopaminergic state during alcohol withdrawal. PMID:25765483

  10. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  11. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    PubMed Central

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  12. State-dependent modulation of feeding behavior by proopiomelanocortin-derived beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Low, Malcolm J; Hayward, Michael D; Appleyard, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2003-06-01

    primary reinforcer. In contrast, it appears that endogenous beta-endorphin may inhibit food consumption in parallel with melanocortins and that the orexigenic properties previously ascribed to it may actually be due to other classes of endogenous opioid peptides.

  13. State-dependent modulation of feeding behavior by proopiomelanocortin-derived beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Low, Malcolm J; Hayward, Michael D; Appleyard, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2003-06-01

    primary reinforcer. In contrast, it appears that endogenous beta-endorphin may inhibit food consumption in parallel with melanocortins and that the orexigenic properties previously ascribed to it may actually be due to other classes of endogenous opioid peptides. PMID:12851316

  14. Presynaptic Ca2+-activated K+ channels in glutamatergic hippocampal terminals and their role in spike repolarization and regulation of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Shao, L R; Chavoshy, S; Gu, N; Trieb, M; Behrens, R; Laake, P; Pongs, O; Knaus, H G; Ottersen, O P; Storm, J F

    2001-12-15

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK, also called Maxi-K or Slo channels) are widespread in the vertebrate nervous system, but their functional roles in synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. By combining electrophysiology and immunogold cytochemistry, we demonstrate the existence of functional BK channels in presynaptic terminals in the hippocampus and compare their functional roles in somata and terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells. Double-labeling immunogold analysis with BK channel and glutamate receptor antibodies indicated that BK channels are targeted to the presynaptic membrane facing the synaptic cleft in terminals of Schaffer collaterals in stratum radiatum. Whole-cell, intracellular, and field-potential recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells showed that the presynaptic BK channels are activated by calcium influx and can contribute to repolarization of the presynaptic action potential (AP) and negative feedback control of Ca(2+) influx and transmitter release. This was observed in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 40-100 microm), which broadened the presynaptic compound action potential. In contrast, the presynaptic BK channels did not contribute significantly to regulation of action potentials or transmitter release under basal experimental conditions, i.e., without 4-AP, even at high stimulation frequencies. This is unlike the situation in the parent cell bodies (CA3 pyramidal cells), where BK channels contribute strongly to action potential repolarization. These results indicate that the functional role of BK channels depends on their subcellular localization.

  15. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  16. Fear extinction can be made state-dependent on peripheral epinephrine: role of norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Jessica; Myskiw, Jociane C; Furini, Cristiane R G; Sapiras, Gerson G; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    We investigate whether the extinction of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning can be subjected to endogenous state-dependence with systemic injections of epinephrine (E), and whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS)→locus coeruleus→hippocampus/amygdala (HIPP/BLA) pathway participate in this. Rats trained in IA were submitted to two sessions of extinction 24 h apart: In the first, the animals were submitted to a training session of extinction, and in the second they were tested for the retention of extinction. Saline or E were given i.p. immediately after the extinction training (post-extinction training injections) and/or 6 min before the extinction test (pre-extinction test). Post-extinction training E (50 or 100 μg/kg) induced a poor retrieval of extinction in the test session of this task unless an additional E injection (50 μg/kg) was given prior to the extinction test. This suggested state-dependence. Muscimol (0.01 μg/side) microinfused into the NTS prior to the extinction test session blocked E-induced state-dependence. Norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg/side) infused bilaterally into NTS restores the extinction impairment caused by post-extinction training i.p. E. In animals with bilateral NTS blockade induced by muscimol, NE (1 μg/side) given prior to the extinction test into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or into the basolateral amygdala restored the normal extinction levels that had been impaired by muscimol. These results suggest a role for the NTS→locus coeruleus→HIPP/BLA pathway in the retrieval of extinction, as it has been shown to have in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance and of object recognition learning.

  17. Existence and stability of periodic solution of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Linfei; Peng, Jigen; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin

    2009-02-01

    According to biological and chemical control strategy for pest, we investigate the dynamic behavior of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey state-dependent impulsive system by releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different thresholds. By using Poincaré map and the properties of the Lambert W function, we prove that the sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive periodic solution. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results.

  18. Lack of effect of Z-butylidenephthalide on presynaptic N-type Ca²⁺ channels in isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marcelo; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2016-02-01

    Z-Butylidenephthalide (Bdph) was reported to more potently inhibit electrically induced twitch responses than acetylcholine-induced tonic contraction in isolated guinea-pig ileum (GPI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of Z-Bdph on Ca2+ and K+ channels on GPI. In Locke-Ringer’s solution, both responses were isometrically recorded on a polygraph. Incubation of ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but not Z-Bdph, in the electrically stimulated GPI prior to adding ω-conotoxin GVIA, an irreversible blocker of N-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs), protected the binding sites and resulted in the twitch responses reversible by washing, suggesting that Z-Bdph did not bind to the N-type VDCCs. Interestingly, we found Z-Bdph concentration dependently delayed the onsets of K+-induced twitch responses, suggesting that Z-Bdph may be a blocker of K+ channels to interfere extracellular K+ across through the pre-junctional membrane of nerve ending in K+-free medium. Z-Bdph similar to nifedipine non-competitively inhibited cumulative ACh-induced phasic contractions, suggesting that Z-Bdph may bind to L-type of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ channels on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. In the presence of verapamil, a L-type Ca2+ channel blocker or Z-Bdph, the twitch inhibitions by either were effectively reversed by exogenous Ca2+, suggesting that they may freely pass through pre-junctional N-type, but not L-type which was blocked at least a part by either, of VDDCs open when each electrical coaxial stimulation (ECS) into intracellular space of cholinergic nerve terminal and trigger release of transmitters. In conclusion, results confirm that Z-Bdph more potently inhibits ECS-induced twitch responses than ACh-induced PCs in GPI and suggest that this effect is not mediated by interaction with presynaptic N-type VDCCs. PMID:26497186

  19. Presynaptic neuromuscular action of a methanolic extract from the venom of Rhinella schneideri toad

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhinella schneideri, previously known as Bufo paracnemis, is a common toad in many regions of Brazil. Its venom exerts important cardiovascular effects on humans and other animals. Although this toad venom has been the subject of intense investigations, little is known about its neuromuscular activity. Methods The neurotoxicity of a methanolic extract of R. schneideri venom was tested on mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations mounted for conventional twitch tension recording – in response to indirect stimulation – and for electrophysiological measurements. Results Venom extract (50 μg/mL) increased the muscle twitch tension in PND preparations but did not significantly alter the resting membrane potential values. Electrophysiological evaluations showed that the extract (50 μg/mL) significantly augmented the frequency of miniature end-plate potential (from 38 ± 3.5 to 88 ± 15 after 60 minutes; n = 5; p < 0.05) and quantal content (from 128 ± 13 to 272 ± 34 after five minutes; n = 5; p < 0.05). Pretreatment with ouabain (1 μg/mL) for five minutes prevented the increase in quantal content (117 ± 18 and 154 ± 33 after five and 60 minutes, respectively). Conclusion These results indicate that the methanolic extract of R. schneideri venom acts primarily presynaptically to enhance neurotransmitter release in mouse phrenic-diaphragm preparations. PMID:25024696

  20. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S. Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W.; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Griggs, Robert C.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  1. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  2. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development.

  3. Differing Presynaptic Contributions to LTP and Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse is an excellent experimental model for studying the interactions between short- and long-term plastic changes taking place following high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of Schaffer collaterals and during the acquisition and extinction of a classical eyeblink conditioning in behaving mice. Input/output curves and a full-range paired-pulse study enabled determining the optimal intensities and inter-stimulus intervals for evoking paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) or depression (PPD) at the CA3-CA1 synapse. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by HFS lasted ≈10 days. HFS-induced LTP evoked an initial depression of basal PPF. Recovery of PPF baseline values was a steady and progressive process lasting ≈20 days, i.e., longer than the total duration of the LTP. In a subsequent series of experiments, we checked whether PPF was affected similarly during activity-dependent synaptic changes. Animals were conditioned using a trace paradigm, with a tone as a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electrical shock to the trigeminal nerve as an unconditioned stimulus (US). A pair of pulses (40 ms interval) was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) during the CS-US interval. Basal PPF decreased steadily across conditioning sessions (i.e., in the opposite direction to that during LTP), reaching a minimum value during the 10th conditioning session. Thus, LTP and classical eyeblink conditioning share some presynaptic mechanisms, but with an opposite evolution. Furthermore, PPF and PPD might play a homeostatic role during long-term plastic changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse. PMID:19636387

  4. Submicromolar Aβ42 reduces hippocampal glutamate receptors and presynaptic markers in an aggregation-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Hwang, Jeannie; Bahr, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic pathology in Alzheimer's disease brains is thought to involve soluble Aβ42 peptide. Here, sterile incubation in PBS caused small Aβ42 oligomer formation as well as heterogeneous, 6E10-immunopositive aggregates of 80-100 kDa. High molecular weight aggregates (H-agg) formed in a time-dependent manner over an extended 30-day period. Interestingly, an inverse relationship between dimeric and H-agg formation was more evident when incubations were performed at 37°C as compared to 23°C, thus providing an experimental strategy with which to address synaptic compromise produced by the different Aβ aggregates. H-agg species formed faster and to higher levels at 37°C compared to 23°C, and the two aggregate preparations were evaluated in hippocampal slice cultures, a sensitive system for monitoring synaptic integrity. Applied daily at 80-600 nM for 7 days, the Aβ42 preparations caused dose-dependent and aggregation-dependent declines in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits as well as in presynaptic components. Unlike the synaptic effects, Aβ42 induced only trace cellular degeneration that was CA1 specific. The 37°C preparation was less effective at decreasing synaptic markers, corresponding with its reduced levels of Aβ42 monomers and dimers. Aβ42 dimers decayed significantly faster at 37°C than 23°C, and more rapidly than monomers at either temperature. These findings indicate that Aβ42 can self-aggregate into potent synaptotoxic oligomers as well as into larger aggregates that may serve to neutralize the toxic formations. These results will add to the growing debate concerning whether high molecular weight Aβ complexes that form amyloid plaques are protective through the sequestration of oligomeric species. PMID:21978994

  5. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  6. Is Alzheimer's disease a result of presynaptic failure? Synaptic dysfunctions induced by oligomeric beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, Volker; Ebert, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Since Alois Alzheimer first described morphological alterations associated with his patient's dementia more than 100 years ago, Alzheimer's disease (AD) was defined as neurodegenerative disease caused by extracellular deposits of misfolded proteins. These amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles have been unambiguously considered as hallmarks of this ailment, accompanied by devastating brain atrophy and cell loss. When a 40-42 amino acid peptide, called beta-amyloid (Abeta), was identified as a main component of amyloid plaques and a few genetic cases of AD were linked to Abeta metabolism, the Abeta hypothesis of AD was proposed. It was initially thought that an increase in Abeta42 precipitates plaque formation, which causes the generation of neurofibrillary tangles and ultimately the death of neurons. However, during the last decade it became apparent that soluble rather than deposited Abeta is associated with dementia. Among the constituents of soluble Abeta, small oligomeric forms were increasingly associated with neuropathology. There is now ample evidence that Abeta oligomers do not affect neuronal viability in general, but interfere specifically with synaptic function. Long-term neurophysiological impairment ultimately causes degeneration of synapses, which becomes most apparent on the morphological level by retraction of dendritic spines. Loss of meaningful synaptic connections in the brain of patients with AD will shatter their capacity to encode and retrieve memories. The precise molecular mechanism of Abeta oligomer-induced impairment of synaptic transmission is not fully understood, but there are several independent observations that oligomers interfere with the vesicular release machinery at the presynaptic terminal. While this hypothesis offers a promising avenue to understand the underlying cause of cognition and memory deficits in the AD brain, it also opens a possibility to address new mechanisms for preventing and ultimately curing AD.

  7. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  8. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  9. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  10. Drosophila Neuroligin 2 is Required Presynaptically and Postsynaptically for proper Synaptic Differentiation and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Lin, Yong Qi; Banerjee, Swati; Venken, Koen; Li, Jingjun; Ismat, Afshan; Chen, Kuchuan; Duraine, Lita; Bellen, Hugo J.; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Trans-synaptic adhesion between Neurexins and Neuroligins is thought to be required for proper synapse organization and modulation, and mutations in several human NEUROLIGINS have shown association with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here we report the generation and phenotypic characterization of Drosophila neuroligin 2 (dnlg2) mutants. Loss of dnlg2 results in reduced bouton numbers, aberrant pre- and post-synaptic development at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), and impaired synaptic transmission. In dnlg2 mutants, the evoked responses are decreased in amplitude, whereas the total active zone numbers at the NMJ are comparable to wild type, suggesting a decrease in the release probability. Ultrastructurally, the presynaptic active zone number per bouton area and the postsynaptic density area are both increased in dnlg2 mutants, whereas the subsynaptic reticulum (SSR) is reduced in volume. We show that both pre- and post-synaptic expression of Dnlg2 is required to restore synaptic growth and function in dnlg2 mutants. Post-synaptic expression of Dnlg2 in dnlg2 mutants and wild type leads to reduced bouton growth whereas pre- and post-synaptic overexpression in wild type animals results in synaptic overgrowth. Since Neuroligins have been shown to bind to Neurexins, we created double mutants. These mutants are viable and display phenotypes that closely resemble those of dnlg2 and dnrx single mutants. Our results provide compelling evidence that Dnlg2 functions both pre- and post-synaptically together with Neurexin to determine the proper number of boutons as well as the number of active zones and size of synaptic densities during the development of NMJs. PMID:23136438

  11. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse.

  12. Differentiation of dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease using a dopaminergic presynaptic ligand

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Z; Costa, D; Walker, R; Shaw, K; Gacinovic, S; Stevens, T; Livingston, G; Ince, P; McKeith, I; Katona, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is one of the main differential diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Key pathological features of patients with DLB are not only the presence of cerebral cortical neuronal loss, with Lewy bodies in surviving neurones, but also loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurones, similar to that of Parkinson's disease (PD). In DLB there is 40–70% loss of striatal dopamine. Objective: To determine if detection of this dopaminergic degeneration can help to distinguish DLB from AD during life. Methods: The integrity of the nigrostriatal metabolism in 27 patients with DLB, 17 with AD, 19 drug naive patients with PD, and 16 controls was assessed using a dopaminergic presynaptic ligand, 123I-labelled 2ß-carbomethoxy-3ß-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)nortropane (FP-CIT), and single photon emission tomography (SPET). A SPET scan was carried out with a single slice, brain dedicated tomograph (SME 810) 3.5 hours after intravenous injection of 185 MBq FP-CIT. With occipital cortex used as a radioactivity uptake reference, ratios for the caudate nucleus and the anterior and posterior putamen of both hemispheres were calculated. All scans were also rated by a simple visual method. Results: Both DLB and PD patients had significantly lower uptake of radioactivity than patients with AD (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.001) in the caudate nucleus and the anterior and posterior putamen. Conclusion: FP-CIT SPET provides a means of distinguishing DLB from AD during life. PMID:12122169

  13. When the sense of smell meets emotion: anxiety-state-dependent olfactory processing and neural circuitry adaptation.

    PubMed

    Krusemark, Elizabeth A; Novak, Lucas R; Gitelman, Darren R; Li, Wen

    2013-09-25

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction-emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion-olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress.

  14. A Discrete Event Simulation Model for Evaluating the Performances of an M/G/C/C State Dependent Queuing System

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Ruzelan; M. Nawawi, Mohd Kamal; Kawsar, Luthful A.; Ghani, Noraida A.; Kamil, Anton A.; Mustafa, Adli

    2013-01-01

    M/G/C/C state dependent queuing networks consider service rates as a function of the number of residing entities (e.g., pedestrians, vehicles, and products). However, modeling such dynamic rates is not supported in modern Discrete Simulation System (DES) software. We designed an approach to cater this limitation and used it to construct the M/G/C/C state-dependent queuing model in Arena software. Using the model, we have evaluated and analyzed the impacts of various arrival rates to the throughput, the blocking probability, the expected service time and the expected number of entities in a complex network topology. Results indicated that there is a range of arrival rates for each network where the simulation results fluctuate drastically across replications and this causes the simulation results and analytical results exhibit discrepancies. Detail results that show how tally the simulation results and the analytical results in both abstract and graphical forms and some scientific justifications for these have been documented and discussed. PMID:23560037

  15. State-dependent differential Riccati equation to track control of time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Korayem, M H; Nekoo, S R

    2015-07-01

    This work studies an optimal control problem using the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) in differential form to track for time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities. The trajectory tracking structure provides two nonlinear differential equations: the state-dependent differential Riccati equation (SDDRE) and the feed-forward differential equation. The independence of the governing equations and stability of the controller are proven along the trajectory using the Lyapunov approach. Backward integration (BI) is capable of solving the equations as a numerical solution; however, the forward solution methods require the closed-form solution to fulfill the task. A closed-form solution is introduced for SDDRE, but the feed-forward differential equation has not yet been obtained. Different ways of solving the problem are expressed and analyzed. These include BI, closed-form solution with corrective assumption, approximate solution, and forward integration. Application of the tracking problem is investigated to control robotic manipulators possessing rigid or flexible joints. The intention is to release a general program for automatic implementation of an SDDRE controller for any manipulator that obeys the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) principle when only D-H parameters are received as input data.

  16. Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulations of spacecraft attitude synchronization using the State-Dependent Riccati Equation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Junoh; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Eun, Young Ho; Chang, Young-Keun

    2013-02-01

    A nonlinear control technique pertaining to attitude synchronization problems is presented for formation flying spacecraft by utilizing the State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) technique. An attitude controller consisting of relative control and absolute control is designed using a reaction wheel assembly for regulator and tracking problems. To achieve effective relative control, the selective state-dependent connectivity is also adopted. The global asymptotic stability of the controller is confirmed using the Lyapunov theorem and is verified by Monte-Carlo simulations. An air-bearing-based Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulator (HILS) is also developed to validate the proposed control laws in real-time environments. The SDRE controller is discretized for implementation of a real-time processor in the HILS. The pointing errors are about 0.2° in the numerical simulations and about 1° in the HILS simulations, and experimental simulations confirm the effectiveness of the control algorithm for attitude synchronization in a spacecraft formation flying mission. Consequently, experiments using the HILS in a real-time environment can appropriately perform spacecraft attitude synchronization algorithms for formation flying spacecraft.

  17. A target-cell specific role for presynaptic Fmr1 in regulating glutamate release onto neocortical fast-spiking inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankur B.; Hays, Seth A.; Bureau, Ingrid; Huber, Kimberly M.; Gibson, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome, the Fmr1 knockout, local excitation of layer 4 fast-spiking (FS) inhibitory neurons is robustly decreased by 50%, but the mechanisms mediating this change are unknown. Here, we performed recordings in acutely prepared slices obtained from Fmr1 “mosaic” mice where Fmr1 is deleted in about half of all neurons, and we find that loss of presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, Fmr1 fully recapitulates the deficit. The change in connection strength is primarily due to a decrease in release probability indicating that FMRP normally positively regulates these processes. This change in presynaptic neurotransmitter release is observed both in the mosaic mice and in the constitutive Fmr1 knockout mice. Manipulations in release probability enabled both the mimic and rescue of the impaired function in this synaptic pathway. Loss of presynaptic Fmr1 has no effect on excitatory synapses onto excitatory neurons, indicating a target-cell specific function for presynaptic FMRP. Finally, we demonstrate that the excitation decrement onto FS neurons also exists in layer 5 of the Fmr1 KO suggesting a widespread role for presynaptic Fmr1 in the excitation of inhibitory neurons. In summary, we identify a novel function for presynaptic FMRP in promoting presynaptic neurotransmitter release, and we show that loss of this function accounts for impaired excitation of neocortical FS inhibitory neurons. These changes may contribute to the cognitive dysfunction and circuit hyperexcitability associated with Fragile X Syndrome – including patients with complete deletion of FMRP and those with mosaic expression of FMRP. PMID:23392687

  18. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4(-/-)) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4(-/-) mice (Salm3(-/-); Salm4(-/-)) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions.

  20. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4(-/-)) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4(-/-) mice (Salm3(-/-); Salm4(-/-)) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion. PMID:27480238

  1. Copper Inhibits NMDA Receptor-Independent LTP and Modulates the Paired-Pulse Ratio after LTP in Mouse Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Weber, Nina L; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Copper misregulation has been implicated in the pathological processes underlying deterioration of learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Supporting this, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) by copper (II) has been well established, but the exact mechanism is poorly characterized. It is thought that an interaction between copper and postsynaptic NMDA receptors is a major part of the mechanism; however, in this study, we found that copper (II) inhibited NMDA receptor-independent LTP in the CA3 region of hippocampal slices. In addition, in the CA3 and CA1 regions, copper modulated the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) in an LTP-dependent manner. Combined, this suggests the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism in the modulation of synaptic plasticity by copper. Inhibition of the copper-dependent changes in the PPR with cyclothiazide suggested that this may involve an interaction with the presynaptic AMPA receptors that regulate neurotransmitter release.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of the racemate and individual enantiomers of C-11 labeled methylphenidate as radioligands for the presynaptic dopaminergic neuron

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP, ritalin) is a psychostimulant drug widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Its therapeutic properties are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine (DA) transporter enhancing synaptic DA. MP has two chiral centers and is marketed as the dl-threo racemic form. However, its pharmacological activity is believed due solely to the d-enantiomer. We have synthesized [{sup 11}C]d,l-threo-methylphenidate ([{sup 11}C]MP) in order to examine its pharmacokinetics in vivo and to examine its suitability as a radioligand for PET studies of the presynaptic DA neuron. [{sup 11}C]MP was prepared by O-{sup 11}C-alkylation of a protected derivative of ritalinic acid with labeled methyl iodide. Serial studies at baseline and after treatment with methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior); GBR 12909 (1.5 mg/kg; 30 min prior); tomoxetine (1.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior) and citalopram (2.0 mg/kg, 30 min prior) were performed to assess non-specific binding and binding to the DA, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters respectively. Only MP and GBR 12909 changed the SR/CB distribution volume ratio (decrease of 38 and 37% respectively) demonstrating selectivity for DA transporters over other monoamine transporters. We then pursued the synthesis of enantiomerically pure C-{sup 11} labeled d- and l-MP by using enantiomerically pure protected d- and l-ritalinic acids as precursors. A striking difference in SR/CB ratio (3.3 and 1.1 for d- and l-respectively at 1 hr. after i.v. injections) strongly suggests that the pharmacological specificity of MP resides entirely in the d-isomer and the binding of l-isomer was mostly non-specific. Further evaluations are underway. Radioligand reversibility, selectivity and the fact that MP is an approved drug are advantages of using [{sup 11}C]MP.

  3. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  4. Inhibitory synapse dynamics: coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic mobility and the major contribution of recycled vesicles to new synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dobie, Frederick A; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-07-20

    Dynamics of GABAergic synaptic components have been studied previously over milliseconds to minutes, revealing mobility of postsynaptic scaffolds and receptors. Here we image inhibitory synapses containing fluorescently tagged postsynaptic scaffold Gephyrin, together with presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) or postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor γ2 subunit (GABA(A)Rγ2), over seconds to days in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, revealing modes of inhibitory synapse formation and remodeling. Entire synapses were mobile, translocating rapidly within a confined region and exhibiting greater nonstochastic motion over multihour periods. Presynaptic and postsynaptic components moved in unison, maintaining close apposition while translocating distances of several micrometers. An observed flux in the density of synaptic puncta partially resulted from the apparent merging and splitting of preexisting clusters. De novo formation of inhibitory synapses was observed, marked by the appearance of stably apposed Gephyrin and VGAT clusters at sites previously lacking either component. Coclustering of GABA(A)Rγ2 supports the identification of such new clusters as synapses. Nascent synapse formation occurred by gradual accumulation of components over several hours, with VGAT clustering preceding that of Gephyrin and GABA(A)Rγ2. Comparing VGAT labeling by active uptake of a luminal domain antibody with post hoc immunocytochemistry indicated that recycling vesicles from preexisting boutons significantly contribute to vesicle pools at the majority of new inhibitory synapses. Although new synapses formed primarily on dendrite shafts, some also formed on dendritic protrusions, without apparent interconversion. Altogether, the long-term imaging of GABAergic presynaptic and postsynaptic components reveals complex dynamics and perpetual remodeling with implications for mechanisms of assembly and synaptic integration.

  5. Regulation of presynaptic anchoring of the scaffold protein Bassoon by phosphorylation-dependent interaction with 14-3-3 adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Markus S; Stellmacher, Anne; Romorini, Stefano; Marini, Claudia; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Altrock, Wilko D; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The proper organization of the presynaptic cytomatrix at the active zone is essential for reliable neurotransmitter release from neurons. Despite of the virtual stability of this tightly interconnected proteinaceous network it becomes increasingly clear that regulated dynamic changes of its composition play an important role in the processes of synaptic plasticity. Bassoon, a core component of the presynaptic cytomatrix, is a key player in structural organization and functional regulation of presynaptic release sites. It is one of the most highly phosphorylated synaptic proteins. Nevertheless, to date our knowledge about functions mediated by any one of the identified phosphorylation sites of Bassoon is sparse. In this study, we have identified an interaction of Bassoon with the small adaptor protein 14-3-3, which depends on phosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding motif of Bassoon. In vitro phosphorylation assays indicate that phosphorylation of the critical Ser-2845 residue of Bassoon can be mediated by a member of the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 protein kinase family. Elimination of Ser-2845 from the 14-3-3 binding motif results in a significant decrease of Bassoon's molecular exchange rates at synapses of living rat neurons. We propose that the phosphorylation-induced 14-3-3 binding to Bassoon modulates its anchoring to the presynaptic cytomatrix. This regulation mechanism might participate in molecular and structural presynaptic remodeling during synaptic plasticity.

  6. About the robustness of the middle stabilizing controller for quasi-linear state dependent coefficients discrete-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danik, Yulia

    2016-08-01

    This paper is dedicated to the robustness analysis of a stabilizing controller for quasi-linear state dependent coefficients discrete systems. The interval parametric uncertainties in the linear part of the system are investigated. The nonlinear stabilizing regulator proposed for such systems is calculated at the average values of the uncertainty parameters and is used for all realizations of the system. The basic idea is that the existence of only weak nonlinearity in the system allows us to study its robustness based on the robustness of the corresponding unperturbed discrete linear system. The robustness conditions are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities. Numerical experiments demonstrating the robustness of the closed-loop system are presented.

  7. The dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest for predator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Linfei; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin; Peng, Jigen

    2009-11-01

    According to the economic and biological aspects of renewable resources management, we propose a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest. By using the Poincaré map, some conditions for the existence and stability of positive periodic solution are obtained. Moreover, we show that there is no periodic solution with order larger than or equal to three under some conditions. Numerical results are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The bifurcation diagrams of periodic solutions are obtained by using the numerical simulations, and it is shown that a chaotic solution is generated via a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex.

  8. Revisiting Antagonist Effects in Hypoglossal Nucleus: Brainstem Circuit for the State-Dependent Control of Hypoglossal Motoneurons: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Fenik, Victor B.

    2015-01-01

    We reassessed and provided new insights into the findings that were obtained in our previous experiments that employed the injections of combined adrenergic, serotonergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus in order to pharmacologically abolish the depression of hypoglossal nerve activity that occurred during carbachol-induced rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-like state in anesthetized rats. We concluded that noradrenergic disfacilitation is the major mechanism that is responsible for approximately 90% of the depression of hypoglossal motoneurons, whereas the remaining 10% can be explained by serotonergic mechanisms that have net inhibitory effect on hypoglossal nerve activity during REM sleep-like state. We hypothesized that both noradrenergic and serotonergic state-dependent mechanisms indirectly control hypoglossal motoneuron excitability during REM sleep; their activities are integrated and mediated to hypoglossal motoneurons by reticular formation neurons. In addition, we proposed a brainstem neural circuit that can explain the new findings. PMID:26648908

  9. A STATE-DEPENDENT INFLUENCE OF TYPE I BURSTS ON THE ACCRETION IN 4U 1608-52?

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Long; Zhang, Shu; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F.; Kretschmar, Peter

    2014-08-20

    We investigated the possible feedback of type I bursts on the accretion process during the spectral evolution of the atoll source 4U 1608-52. By fitting the burst spectrum with a blackbody and an adjustable, persistent spectral component, we found that the latter is significantly state-dependent. In the banana state, the persistent flux increases along the burst evolution, while in the island state this trend holds only when the bursts are less luminous and start to reverse at higher burst luminosities. We speculate that, by taking into account both the Poynting-Robertson drag and radiation pressure, these phenomena may arise from the interactions between the radiation field of the type I burst and the inner region of the accretion disk.

  10. The near optimality of the stabilizing control in a weakly nonlinear system with state-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Mikhail G.; Makarov, Dmitry A.

    2016-08-01

    We carried out analysis of near optimality of one computationally effective nonlinear stabilizing control built for weakly nonlinear systems with coefficients depending on the state and the formal small parameter. First investigation of that problem was made in [M. G. Dmitriev, and D. A. Makarov, "The suboptimality of stabilizing regulator in a quasi-linear system with state-depended coefficients," in 2016 International Siberian Conference on Control and Communications (SIBCON) Proceedings, National Research University, Moscow, 2016]. In this paper, another optimal control and gain matrix representations were used and theoretical results analogous to cited work above were obtained. Also as in the cited work above the form of quality criterion on which this close-loop control is optimal was constructed.

  11. The dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest for predator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Linfei; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin; Peng, Jigen

    2009-11-01

    According to the economic and biological aspects of renewable resources management, we propose a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest. By using the Poincaré map, some conditions for the existence and stability of positive periodic solution are obtained. Moreover, we show that there is no periodic solution with order larger than or equal to three under some conditions. Numerical results are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The bifurcation diagrams of periodic solutions are obtained by using the numerical simulations, and it is shown that a chaotic solution is generated via a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex. PMID:19523503

  12. Memory and pain: tests of mood congruity and state dependent learning in experimentally induced and clinical pain.

    PubMed

    Pearce, S A; Isherwood, S; Hrouda, D; Richardson, P H; Erskine, A; Skinner, J

    1990-11-01

    The associative network theory of memory [2] is outlined along with the concepts of mood congruity and state dependent learning. Two experiments are reported which investigate the occurrence of these effects where memory for pain is concerned. In experiment 1 the performance of 25 chronic pain patients was compared with that of 25 non-patient controls on a test involving both immediate and delayed recall of a mixed list of stimulus words of 3 types: pain-related, negative or neutral. No significant group differences were found in overall rates of immediate recall. As predicted, however, pain patients recalled more pain-related words than non-patient controls (P less than 0.001). On delayed recall the same significant group x word-type interaction was obtained (P less than 0.02), but in addition the non-patient controls recalled significantly more words overall (P less than 0.02). These results provide some evidence for the occurrence of a mood congruity effect. Experiment 2 investigated state dependent learning and mood congruity effects in experimentally induced pain. Twenty volunteer subjects were allocated to 1 of 4 conditions in which a wordlist (as in experiment 1) was presented following either a painful stimulus (cold pressor test) or a non-painful one (warm water) and was then recalled immediately following further exposure to stimulus conditions which were congruent with the original stimulus (warm/warm and cold/cold conditions) or non-congruent (warm/cold and cold/warm conditions). A 3-way split plot ANOVA yielded no significant main effects for group or word-type, but a significant interaction emerged between state at encoding and at recall (P less than 0.04).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. ATP-dependent directional movement of rat synaptic vesicles injected into the presynaptic terminal of squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Sugimori, M; Lin, J W; Leopold, P L; Brady, S T

    1989-01-01

    The question as to whether synaptic vesicles prepared from vertebrate brain can be transported to the active zones of the squid giant synapse was studied by using a combined optical and electrophysiological approach. In order to visualize the behavior of the vertebrate synaptic vesicles in situ, synaptic vesicles isolated from rat brain were labeled with a fluorescent dye (Texas red) and injected into the presynaptic terminal of the squid giant synapse. The pattern of fluorescence that would result from passive diffusion was determined by coinjection of an unconjugated fluorescent dye (fluorescein). The patterns obtained with fluorescent synaptic vesicles were strikingly different from that obtained by simple diffusion of fluorescein. Although the fluorescein diffused freely in both directions, the vesicles moved preferentially into the terminal--i.e., toward the release sites--at a rate of 0.5 microns/sec. The final distribution of the injected fluorescent synaptic vesicles displayed a discrete localization that suggested a distribution coincident with the active zones of the presynaptic terminal. Like fast axonal transport, but unlike fluorescein movements in the terminal, the vesicle movement was energy dependent, since the addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol blocked the redistribution of vesicles completely. In addition, reduction of extracellular calcium concentration reversibly blocked vesicular movement as well. In conclusion, mammalian synaptic vesicles retain the cytoplasmic surface components necessary for translocation, sorting, and targeting to the proper locations by the native machinery of the squid giant synapse. Images PMID:2748609

  14. ATP-dependent directional movement of rat synaptic vesicles injected into the presynaptic terminal of squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Llinás, R; Sugimori, M; Lin, J W; Leopold, P L; Brady, S T

    1989-07-01

    The question as to whether synaptic vesicles prepared from vertebrate brain can be transported to the active zones of the squid giant synapse was studied by using a combined optical and electrophysiological approach. In order to visualize the behavior of the vertebrate synaptic vesicles in situ, synaptic vesicles isolated from rat brain were labeled with a fluorescent dye (Texas red) and injected into the presynaptic terminal of the squid giant synapse. The pattern of fluorescence that would result from passive diffusion was determined by coinjection of an unconjugated fluorescent dye (fluorescein). The patterns obtained with fluorescent synaptic vesicles were strikingly different from that obtained by simple diffusion of fluorescein. Although the fluorescein diffused freely in both directions, the vesicles moved preferentially into the terminal--i.e., toward the release sites--at a rate of 0.5 microns/sec. The final distribution of the injected fluorescent synaptic vesicles displayed a discrete localization that suggested a distribution coincident with the active zones of the presynaptic terminal. Like fast axonal transport, but unlike fluorescein movements in the terminal, the vesicle movement was energy dependent, since the addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol blocked the redistribution of vesicles completely. In addition, reduction of extracellular calcium concentration reversibly blocked vesicular movement as well. In conclusion, mammalian synaptic vesicles retain the cytoplasmic surface components necessary for translocation, sorting, and targeting to the proper locations by the native machinery of the squid giant synapse.

  15. Thalamic Glutamatergic Afferents into the Rat Basolateral Amygdala Exhibit Increased Presynaptic Glutamate Function Following Withdrawal from Chronic Intermittent Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Daniel T; Alexander, Nancy J; Diaz, Marvin R; McCool, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    Amygdala glutamatergic neurotransmission regulates withdrawal induced anxiety-like behaviors following chronic ethanol exposure. The lateral/basolateral amygdala receives multiple glutamatergic projections that contribute to overall amygdala function. Our lab has previously shown that rat cortical (external capsule) afferents express postsynaptic alterations during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal. However, thalamic (internal capsule) afferents also provide crucial glutamatergic input during behavioral conditioning, and they have not been studied in the context of chronic drug exposure. We report here that these thalamic inputs express altered presynaptic function during withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure. This is characterized by enhanced release probability, as exemplified by altered paired-pulse ratios and decreased failure rates of unitary events, and increased concentrations of synaptic glutamate. Quantal analysis further implicates a withdrawal-dependent enhancement of the readily-releasable pool of vesicles as a probable mechanism. These functional alterations are accompanied by increased expression of vesicle associated protein markers. These data demonstrate that chronic ethanol modulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the rat lateral/basolateral amygdala is afferent-specific. Further, presynaptic regulation of lateral/basolateral amygdala thalamic inputs by chronic ethanol may be a novel neurobiological mechanism contributing to the increased anxiety-like behaviors that characterize withdrawal. PMID:22982568

  16. Expression of long-term plasticity at individual synapses in hippocampus is graded, bidirectional, and mainly presynaptic: optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Hu, Yi-Ling; Hamilton, David; Fine, Alan

    2009-04-30

    Key aspects of the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) remain unresolved despite decades of investigation. Alterations in postsynaptic glutamate receptors are believed to contribute to the expression of various forms of LTP and LTD, but the relative importance of presynaptic mechanisms is controversial. In addition, while aggregate synaptic input to a cell can undergo sequential and graded (incremental) LTP and LTD, it has been suggested that individual synapses may only support binary changes between initial and modified levels of strength. We have addressed these issues by combining electrophysiological methods with two-photon optical quantal analysis of plasticity at individual active (non-silent) Schaffer collateral synapses on CA1 pyramidal neurons in acute slices of hippocampus from adolescent rats. We find that these synapses sustain graded, bidirectional long-term plasticity. Remarkably, changes in potency are small and insignificant; long-term plasticity at these synapses is expressed overwhelmingly via presynaptic changes in reliability of transmitter release.

  17. Presynaptic Secretion of Mind-the-Gap Organizes the Synaptic Extracellular Matrix-Integrin Interface and Postsynaptic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Emma; Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Mind-the-Gap (MTG) is required during synaptogenesis of the Drosophila glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to organize the postsynaptic domain. Here, we generate MTG::GFP transgenic animals to demonstrate MTG is synaptically targeted, secreted, and localized to punctate domains in the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM). Drosophila NMJs form specialized ECM carbohydrate domains, with carbohydrate moieties and integrin ECM receptors occupying overlapping territories. Presynaptically secreted MTG recruits and reorganizes secreted carbohydrates, and acts to recruit synaptic integrins and ECM glycans. Transgenic MTG::GFP expression rescues hatching, movement, and synaptogenic defects in embryonic-lethal mtg null mutants. Targeted neuronal MTG expression rescues mutant synaptogenesis defects, and increases rescue of adult viability, supporting an essential neuronal function. These results indicate that presynaptically secreted MTG regulates the ECM-integrin interface, and drives an inductive mechanism for the functional differentiation of the postsynaptic domain of glutamatergic synapses. We suggest that MTG pioneers a novel protein family involved in ECM-dependent synaptic differentiation. PMID:19235718

  18. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  19. Calcium channels link the muscle-derived synapse organizer laminin β2 to Bassoon and CAST/Erc2 to organize presynaptic active zones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Billings, Sara E; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2011-01-12

    Synapse formation requires the organization of presynaptic active zones, the synaptic vesicle release sites, in precise apposition to postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor clusters; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these processes remain unclear. Here, we show that P/Q-type and N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) play essential roles as scaffolding proteins in the organization of presynaptic active zones. The neuromuscular junction of double knock-out mice for P/Q- and N-type VDCCs displayed a normal size but had significantly reduced numbers of active zones and docked vesicles and featured an attenuation of the active-zone proteins Bassoon, Piccolo, and CAST/Erc2. Consistent with this phenotype, direct interactions of the VDCC β1b or β4 subunits and the active zone-specific proteins Bassoon or CAST/Erc2 were confirmed by immunoprecipitation. A decrease in the number of active zones caused by a loss of presynaptic VDCCs resembled the pathological conditions observed in the autoimmune neuromuscular disorder Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. At the synaptic cleft of double knock-out mice, we also observed a decrease of the synaptic organizer laminin β2 protein, an extracellular ligand of P/Q- and N-type VDCCs. However, the transcription level of laminin β2 did not decrease in double knock-out mice, suggesting that the synaptic accumulation of laminin β2 protein required its interaction with presynaptic VDCCs. These results suggest that presynaptic VDCCs link the target-derived synapse organizer laminin β2 to active-zone proteins and function as scaffolding proteins to anchor active-zone proteins to the presynaptic membrane.

  20. A syntaxin 1, Galpha(o), and N-type calcium channel complex at a presynaptic nerve terminal: analysis by quantitative immunocolocalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Lau, Anthony; Morris, Terence J; Guo, Lin; Fordyce, Christopher B; Stanley, Elise F

    2004-04-21

    Presynaptic Ca(V)2.2 (N-type) calcium channels are subject to modulation by interaction with syntaxin 1 and by a syntaxin 1-sensitive Galpha(O) G-protein pathway. We used biochemical analysis of neuronal tissue lysates and a new quantitative test of colocalization by intensity correlation analysis at the giant calyx-type presynaptic terminal of the chick ciliary ganglion to explore the association of Ca(V)2.2 with syntaxin 1 and Galpha(O). Ca(V)2.2 could be localized by immunocytochemistry (antibody Ab571) in puncta on the release site aspect of the presynaptic terminal and close to synaptic vesicle clouds. Syntaxin 1 coimmunoprecipitated with Ca(V)2.2 from chick brain and chick ciliary ganglia and was widely distributed on the presynaptic terminal membrane. A fraction of the total syntaxin 1 colocalized with the Ca(V)2.2 puncta, whereas the bulk colocalized with MUNC18-1. Galpha(O,) whether in its trimeric or monomeric state, did not coimmunoprecipitate with Ca(V)2.2, MUNC18-1, or syntaxin 1. However, the G-protein exhibited a punctate staining on the calyx membrane with an intensity that varied in synchrony with that for both Ca channels and syntaxin 1 but only weakly with MUNC18-1. Thus, syntaxin 1 appears to be a component of two separate complexes at the presynaptic terminal, a minor one at the transmitter release site with Ca(V)2.2 and Galpha(O), as well as in large clusters remote from the release site with MUNC18-1. These syntaxin 1 protein complexes may play distinct roles in presynaptic biology.