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Sample records for state-dependent presynaptic inhibition

  1. In search of lost presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, Pablo

    2009-06-01

    This chapter presents an historical review on the development of some of the main findings on presynaptic inhibition. Particular attention is given to recent studies pertaining the differential GABAa control of the synaptic effectiveness of muscle, cutaneous and articular afferents, to some of the problems arising with the identification of the interneurons mediating the GABAergic depolarization of primary afferents (PAD) of muscle afferents, on the influence of the spontaneous activity of discrete sets of dorsal horn neurons on the pathways mediating PAD of muscle and cutaneous afferents, and to the unmasking of the cutaneous-evoked responses in the lumbosacral spinal cord and associated changes in tonic PAD that follow acute and chronic section of cutaneous nerves. The concluding remarks are addressed to several issues that need to be considered to have a better understanding of the functional role of presynaptic inhibition and PAD on motor performance and sensory processing and on their possible contribution to the shaping of a higher coherence between the cortically programmed and the executed movements.

  2. Presynaptic inhibition in the vertebrate spinal cord revisited.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Schmidt, R F

    1999-11-01

    The present review examines the experimental evidence supporting the existence of central mechanisms able to modulate the synaptic effectiveness of sensory fibers ending in the spinal cord of vertebrates. The first section covers work on the mode of operation and the synaptic mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition, in particular of the presynaptic control involving axo-axonic synapses made by GABAergic interneurons with the terminal arborizations of the afferent fibers. This includes reviewing of the ionic mechanisms involved in the generation of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) by GABAergic synapses, the ultrastructural basis underlying the generation of PAD, the relationship between PAD and presynaptic inhibition, the conduction of action potentials in the terminal arborizations of the afferent fibers, and the modeling of the presynaptic inhibitory synapse. The second section of the review deals with the functional organization of presynaptic inhibition. This includes the segmental and descending presynaptic control of the synaptic effectiveness of group-I and group-II muscle afferents, the evidence dealing with the local character of PAD as well as the differential inhibition of PAD in selected collaterals of individual muscle-spindle afferents by cutaneous and descending inputs. This section also examines observations on the presynaptic modulation of large cutaneous afferents, including the modulation of the synaptic effectiveness of thin myelinated and unmyelinated cutaneous fibers and of visceral afferents, as well as the presynaptic control of the synaptic actions of interneurons and descending tract neurons. The third section deals with the changes in PAD occurring during sleep and fictive locomotion in higher vertebrates and with the changes of presynaptic inhibition in humans during the execution of a variety of voluntary movements. In the final section, we examine the non-synaptic presynaptic modulation of transmitter release, including the

  3. Optogenetic Visualization of Presynaptic Tonic Inhibition of Cerebellar Parallel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Ken; Wen, Lei; Dunbar, Robert L.; Feng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Tonic inhibition was imaged in cerebellar granule cells of transgenic mice expressing the optogenetic chloride indicator, Clomeleon. Blockade of GABAA receptors substantially reduced chloride concentration in granule cells due to block of tonic inhibition. This indicates that tonic inhibition is a significant contributor to the resting chloride concentration of these cells. Tonic inhibition was observed not only in granule cell bodies, but also in their axons, the parallel fibers (PFs). This presynaptic tonic inhibition could be observed in slices both at room and physiological temperatures, as well as in vivo, and has many of the same properties as tonic inhibition measured in granule cell bodies. GABA application revealed that PFs possess at least two types of GABAA receptor: one high-affinity receptor that is activated by ambient GABA and causes a chloride influx that mediates tonic inhibition, and a second with a low affinity for GABA that causes a chloride efflux that excites PFs. Presynaptic tonic inhibition regulates glutamate release from PFs because GABAA receptor blockade enhanced both the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs at the PF-Purkinje cell synapse. We conclude that tonic inhibition of PFs could play an important role in regulating information flow though cerebellar synaptic circuits. Such cross talk between phasic and tonic signaling could be a general mechanism for fine tuning of synaptic circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This paper demonstrates that an unconventional form of signaling, known as tonic inhibition, is found in presynaptic terminals and affects conventional synaptic communication. Our results establish the basic characteristics and mechanisms of presynaptic tonic inhibition and show that it occurs in vivo as well as in isolated brain tissue. PMID:27225762

  4. GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition in guinea-pig hippocampus is caused by reduction of presynaptic Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L G; Saggau, P

    1995-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that activation of GABAB receptors inhibits evoked synaptic transmission by reducing the presynaptic Ca2+ influx was tested using a recently developed technique for simultaneously recording the presynaptic Ca2+ transient ([Ca2+]t) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) evoked by a single electrical stimulus at CA3 to CA1 synapses of guinea-pig hippocampus. 2. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reversibly blocked, in a dose-dependant manner, both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t with similar time courses. During application of baclofen, the fEPSP was proportional to about the fourth power of the presynaptic [Ca2+]t, and the presynaptic fibre volley and the resting Ca2+ level did not change. These results are similar to those we previously observed following application of several voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that baclofen inhibits the fEPSP by blocking the presynaptic Ca2+ influx. 3. The inhibition by baclofen of both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t was blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, consistent with the causal relationship between the GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of the [Ca2+]t and the fEPSP. 4. The inhibition by baclofen of the [Ca2+]t was partially occluded by application of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CgTX-GVIA), but not omega-agatoxin-IVA (omega-AgaTX-IVA), suggesting that baclofen reduces the presynaptic [Ca2+]t by blocking Ca2+ channels including the omega-CgTX-GVIA-sensitive type. 5. We conclude that baclofen inhibits evoked transmitter release by reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7562607

  5. Presynaptic inhibition: an intramural mechanism regulating cardiac afferentation

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.A.; Bilibin, D.P.; Shevelev, O.A.

    1986-09-01

    The authors attempt to show the existence of extracardiac and intracardiac influences able to limit the conductivity of afferent channels belonging to the spinal afferent system of the heart. The data presented serve as the basis for the hypothesis that total or partial afferent blockade of this kind is affected through activation of a mechanism of presynaptic inhibition, acting at the intramural level. The results described were obtained in several series of acute experiments on 20 mature cats anesthetized with chloralose and curarized. Ultrathin sections of the heart were cut on the ultramicrotome, stained with lead hydroxide and uranyl acetate, and examined with an electron microscope. It is shown that presynaptic inhibition is evidently the principal intramural physiological mechanism restricting conductivity of the spinal afferent channel of the heart.

  6. Static otolithic drive alters presynaptic inhibition in soleus motor pool.

    PubMed

    Fox, Apollonia; Koceja, David

    2017-02-01

    The vestibular system has both direct and indirect connections to the soleus motor pool via the vestibulospinal and reticulospinal tracts. The exact nature of how this vestibular information is integrated within the spinal cord is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify whether changes in static otolithic drive altered the amount of presynaptic inhibition in the soleus H-reflex pathway. Changes in static otolithic drive were investigated in sixteen healthy participants using a tilt table. Two presynaptic pathways (common peroneal and femoral) to the soleus H-reflex were tested in three weight conditions (supine, non-weight bearing, and weight bearing). The dependent variable was the peak-to-peak amplitude of the soleus H-reflex. Inhibition to the soleus motor pool through the common peroneal nerve pathway differed significantly during weight conditions and tilt. During tilt and non-weight bearing there was greater inhibition of the soleus H-reflex compared to supine, however, this effect was reversed during tilt and weight bearing. Facilitation from the femoral nerve pathway was reduced by tilt compared to supine, but this reduction was unaffected by weight condition. This supports a role of the vestibular system as providing complex, task-dependent presynaptic input to motoneurons in the lower limbs.

  7. Presynaptic inhibition of synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus by activation of muscarinic receptors: involvement of presynaptic calcium influx

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Saggau, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by muscarinic receptors at the CA3–CA1 synapse of rat hippocampal slices was investigated by using the calcium indicator fura-2. Stimulation-evoked presynaptic calcium transients ([Capre]t) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.ps) were simultaneously recorded. The relationship between presynaptic calcium influx and synaptic transmission was studied. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibited [Capre]t, thereby reducing synaptic transmission. Carbachol (CCh, 10 μM) inhibited [Capre]t by 35% and reduced fe.p.s.p. by 85%. The inhibition was completely antagonized by 1 μM atropine. An approximate 4th power relationship was found between presynaptic calcium influx and postsynaptic responses. Application of the N-type VDCC-blocking peptide toxin ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CTx GVIA, 1 μM) inhibited [Capre]t and fe.p.s.ps by 21% and 49%, respectively, while the P/Q-type VDCC blocker ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-Aga IVA, 1 μM) reduced [Capre]t and fe.p.s.ps by 35% and 85%, respectively. Muscarinic receptor activation differentially inhibited distinct presynaptic VDCCs. ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive calcium channels were inhibited by muscarinic receptors, while ω-Aga IVA-sensitive channels were not. The percentage inhibition of ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive [Capre]t was about 63%. Muscarinic receptors inhibited presynaptic VDCCs in a way similar to adenosine (Ad) receptors. The percentage inhibition of ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive [Capre]t by Ad (100 μM) was about 59%. There was no significant inhibition of ω-Aga IVA-sensitive channels by Ad. The inhibitions of [Capre]t by CCh and Ad were mutually occlusive. These results indicate that inhibition of synaptic transmission by muscarinic receptors is mainly the consequence of a reduction of the [Capre]t due to inhibition of presynaptic VDCCs. PMID:9351508

  8. Relationships between presynaptic inhibition and static postural sway in subjects with and without diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jihyun; Hong, Junggi

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can often lead to balance impairment. The spinal reflex is a mechanism that is reportedly important for balance, but it has not been investigated in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Moreover, inhibitory or facilitatory behavior of the spinal reflex-known as presynaptic inhibition-is essential for controlling postural sway. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in as presynaptic inhibition and balance in subjects with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy to determine the influence of presynaptic inhibition on balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. [Subjects and Methods] Presynaptic inhibition and postural sway were tested in eight patients (mean age, 58±6 years) and eight normal subjects (mean age, 59±7 years). The mean percent difference in conditioned reflex amplitude relative to the unconditioned reflex amplitude was assessed to calculate as presynaptic inhibition. The single-leg balance index was measured using a computerized balance-measuring device. [Results] The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group showed lower presynaptic inhibition (47±30% vs. 75±22%) and decreased balance (0.65±0.24 vs. 0.38±0.06) as compared with the normal group. No significant correlation was found between as presynaptic inhibition and balance score (R=0.37). [Conclusion] Although the decreased as presynaptic inhibition observed in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients may suggest central nervous system involvement, further research is necessary to explore the role of presynaptic inhibition in decreased balance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients.

  9. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A.; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  10. Contrasting effects of presynaptic alpha2-adrenergic autoinhibition and pharmacologic augmentation of presynaptic inhibition on sympathetic heart rate control.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Kawada, Toru; Yanagiya, Yusuke; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Kamiya, Atsunori; Mizuno, Masaki; Takaki, Hiroshi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2008-11-01

    Presynaptic alpha2-adrenergic receptors are known to exert feedback inhibition on norepinephrine release from the sympathetic nerve terminals. To elucidate the dynamic characteristics of the inhibition, we stimulated the right cardiac sympathetic nerve according to a binary white noise signal while measuring heart rate (HR) in anesthetized rabbits (n = 6). We estimated the transfer function from cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation to HR and the corresponding step response of HR, with and without the blockade of presynaptic inhibition by yohimbine (1 mg/kg followed by 0.1 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) iv). We also examined the effect of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine (0.3 and 1.5 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) iv) in different rabbits (n = 5). Yohimbine increased the maximum step response (from 7.2 +/- 0.8 to 12.2 +/- 1.7 beats/min, means +/- SE, P < 0.05) without significantly affecting the initial slope (0.93 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.22 beats.min(-1).s(-1)). Higher dose but not lower dose clonidine significantly decreased the maximum step response (from 6.3 +/- 0.8 to 6.8 +/- 1.0 and 2.8 +/- 0.5 beats/min, P < 0.05) and also reduced the initial slope (from 0.56 +/- 0.07 to 0.51 +/- 0.04 and 0.22 +/- 0.06 beats.min(-1).s(-1), P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that presynaptic alpha2-adrenergic autoinhibition limits the maximum response without significantly compromising the rapidity of effector response. In contrast, pharmacologic augmentation of the presynaptic inhibition not only attenuates the maximum response but also results in a sluggish effector response.

  11. Reliability of presynaptic inhibition in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Shannon J; Hong, Junggi

    2012-09-01

    There has been rising interest in evaluating spinal reflex activity within the clinical population, however no study has yet investigated the reliability of presynaptic inhibition (PI) on patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Because neuropathy is closely related to central nervous system modification, it is important to understand the mechanism of spinal reflex activity in the DPN population. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the reliability of PI in patients with DPN. Eight participants (58.24 ± 6.38 yrs.) diagnosed with either type I or type II diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were recruited for the study. Each subject's H-reflex was measured using an EMG to elicit and record a series of 10 paired reflex depression trials. Reliability was measured by calculating Intra Class Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) with a 95% confidence interval. The results showed excellent reliability in both intraday (0.94) and interday (0.88) reliability. Therefore, analyzing PI in the central nervous system allows for an accurate evaluation of spinal cord circuitry in a non-invasive manner.

  12. Stance-phase force on the opposite limb dictates swing-phase afferent presynaptic inhibition during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Heather Brant; Chang, Young-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is a powerful mechanism for selectively and dynamically gating sensory inputs entering the spinal cord. We investigated how hindlimb mechanics influence presynaptic inhibition during locomotion using pioneering approaches in an in vitro spinal cord–hindlimb preparation. We recorded lumbar dorsal root potentials to measure primary afferent depolarization-mediated presynaptic inhibition and compared their dependence on hindlimb endpoint forces, motor output, and joint kinematics. We found that stance-phase force on the opposite limb, particularly at toe contact, strongly influenced the magnitude and timing of afferent presynaptic inhibition in the swinging limb. Presynaptic inhibition increased in proportion to opposite limb force, as well as locomotor frequency. This form of presynaptic inhibition binds the sensorimotor states of the two limbs, adjusting sensory inflow to the swing limb based on forces generated by the stance limb. Functionally, it may serve to adjust swing-phase sensory transmission based on locomotor task, speed, and step-to-step environmental perturbations. PMID:22442562

  13. Kainate receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition at the mouse hippocampal mossy fibre synapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Haruyuki; Ozawa, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    The presynaptic action of kainate (KA) receptor activation at the mossy fibre-CA3 synapse was examined using fluorescence measurement of presynaptic Ca2+ influx as well as electrophysiological recordings in mouse hippocampal slices. Bath application of a low concentration (0·2 μM) of KA reversibly increased the amplitude of presynaptic volley evoked by stimulation of mossy fibres to 146 ± 6 % of control (n = 6), whereas it reduced the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSPs) to 30 ± 4 %. The potentiating effect of KA on the presynaptic volleys was also observed in Ca2+-free solution, and was partly antagonized by (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid (SYM 2081, 1 μM), which selectively desensitizes KA receptors. The antidromic population spike of dentate granule cells evoked by stimulation of mossy fibres was increased by application of 0·2 μM KA to 160 ± 10 % of control (n = 6). Whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the stimulus threshold for generating antidromic spikes recorded from a single granule cell was lowered by KA application. Application of KA (0·2 μM) suppressed presynaptic Ca2+ influx to 78 ± 4 % of control (n = 6), whereas the amplitude of the presynaptic volley was increased. KA at 0·2 μM reversibly suppressed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by mossy fibre simulation to 38 ± 9 % of control (n = 5). These results suggest that KA receptor activation enhances the excitability of mossy fibres, probably via axonal depolarization, and reduces action potential-induced Ca2+ influx, thereby inhibiting mossy fibre EPSCs presynaptically. This novel presynaptic inhibitory action of KA at the mossy fibre-CA3 synapse may regulate the excitability of highly interconnected CA3 networks. PMID:10718745

  14. Paired Associative Stimulation Induces Change in Presynaptic Inhibition of Ia Terminals in Wrist Flexors in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Russmann, Heike; Shamim, Ejaz A.; Meunier, Sabine; Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Enhancements in the strength of corticospinal projections to muscles are induced in conscious humans by paired associative stimulation (PAS) to the motor cortex. Although most of the previous studies support the hypothesis that the increase of the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) by PAS involves long-term potentiation (LTP)-like mechanism in cortical synapses, changes in spinal excitability after PAS have been reported, suggestive of parallel modifications in both cortical and spinal excitability. In a first series of experiments (experiment 1), we confirmed that both flexor carpi radialis (FCR) MEPs and FCR H reflex recruitment curves are enhanced by PAS. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this change in the H reflex amplitude, we tested, using the same subjects, the hypothesis that enhanced H reflexes are caused by a down-regulation of the efficacy of mechanisms controlling Ia afferent discharge, including presynaptic Ia inhibition and postactivation depression. To address this question, amounts of both presynaptic Ia inhibition of FCR Ia terminals (D1and D2 inhibitions methods; experiment 2) and postactivation depression (experiment 3) were determined before and after PAS. Results showed that PAS induces a significant decrease of presynaptic Ia inhibition of FCR terminals, which was concomitant with the facilitation of the H reflex. Postactivation depression was unaffected by PAS. It is argued that enhancement of segmental excitation by PAS relies on a selective effect of PAS on the interneurons controlling presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. PMID:20538768

  15. Early postnatal development of GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of Ia proprioceptive afferent connections in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sonner, Patrick M; Ladle, David R

    2013-04-01

    Sensory feedback is critical for normal locomotion and adaptation to external perturbations during movement. Feedback provided by group Ia afferents influences motor output both directly through monosynaptic connections and indirectly through spinal interneuronal circuits. For example, the circuit responsible for reciprocal inhibition, which acts to prevent co-contraction of antagonist flexor and extensor muscles, is driven by Ia afferent feedback. Additionally, circuits mediating presynaptic inhibition can limit Ia afferent synaptic transmission onto central neuronal targets in a task-specific manner. These circuits can also be activated by stimulation of proprioceptive afferents. Rodent locomotion rapidly matures during postnatal development; therefore, we assayed the functional status of reciprocal and presynaptic inhibitory circuits of mice at birth and compared responses with observations made after 1 wk of postnatal development. Using extracellular physiological techniques from isolated and hemisected spinal cord preparations, we demonstrate that Ia afferent-evoked reciprocal inhibition is as effective at blocking antagonist motor neuron activation at birth as at 1 wk postnatally. In contrast, at birth conditioning stimulation of muscle nerve afferents failed to evoke presynaptic inhibition sufficient to block functional transmission at synapses between Ia afferents and motor neurons, even though dorsal root potentials could be evoked by stimulating the neighboring dorsal root. Presynaptic inhibition at this synapse was readily observed, however, at the end of the first postnatal week. These results indicate Ia afferent feedback from the periphery to central spinal circuits is only weakly gated at birth, which may provide enhanced sensitivity to peripheral feedback during early postnatal experiences.

  16. Muscarinic presynaptic inhibition of neostriatal glutamatergic afferents is mediated by Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Barral, J; Galarraga, E; Bargas, J

    1999-07-01

    Cholinergic presynaptic inhibition was investigated on neostriatal glutamatergic transmission. Paired pulse facilitation (PPF) of orthodromic population spikes (PS) were used to construct a concentration-response relationship for muscarine on presynaptic inhibition. Muscarine had an effect proportional to its extracellular concentration with an EC50 (mean +/- standard estimation error) of: 2.5 +/- 1.5 nM, and a maximal effect (saturation) of 245 +/- 16%. Several peptidic toxins against some voltage-gated Ca2+-channels increased PPF indicating that the Ca2+-channels they block participate in transmitter release. However, neither 1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA, a specific blocker of N-type Ca2+-channels, nor 10-30 nM omega-agatoxinTK, a selective blocker of P-type Ca2+-channels, were able to occlude muscarine's effect on presynaptic inhibition. Nevertheless, 100-400 nM omega-agatoxinTK occluded muscarine's action on PPF in a dose-dependent manner. These results are consistent with Q-type Ca2+-channels mediating muscarinic presynaptic inhibition of neostriatal afferents.

  17. Loss of Striatonigral GABAergic Presynaptic Inhibition Enables Motor Sensitization in Parkinsonian Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borgkvist, Anders; Avegno, Elizabeth M.; Wong, Minerva Y.; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Sonders, Mark S.; Hen, Rene; Sulzer, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD) causes hypokinesia, but DA replacement therapy can elicit exaggerated voluntary and involuntary behaviors that have been attributed to enhanced DA receptor sensitivity in striatal projection neurons. Here we reveal that in hemiparkinsonian mice, striatal D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) directly projecting to the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) lose tonic presynaptic inhibition by GABAB receptors. The absence of presynaptic GABAB response potentiates evoked GABA release from MSN efferents to the SNr and drives motor sensitization. This alternative mechanism of sensitization suggests a synaptic target for PD pharmacotherapy. PMID:26335644

  18. Acetylcholine-Induced Inhibition of Presynaptic Calcium Signals and Transmitter Release in the Frog Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Khaziev, Eduard; Samigullin, Dmitry; Zhilyakov, Nikita; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Bukharaeva, Ellya; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Nikolsky, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), released from axonal terminals of motor neurons in neuromuscular junctions regulates the efficacy of neurotransmission through activation of presynaptic nicotinic and muscarinic autoreceptors. Receptor-mediated presynaptic regulation could reflect either direct action on exocytotic machinery or modulation of Ca2+ entry and resulting intra-terminal Ca2+ dynamics. We have measured free intra-terminal cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) using Oregon-Green 488 microfluorimetry, in parallel with voltage-clamp recordings of spontaneous (mEPC) and evoked (EPC) postsynaptic currents in post-junctional skeletal muscle fiber. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic and nicotinic receptors with exogenous acetylcholine and its non-hydrolized analog carbachol reduced amplitude of the intra-terminal [Ca2+]i transients and decreased quantal content (calculated by dividing the area under EPC curve by the area under mEPC curve). Pharmacological analysis revealed the role of muscarinic receptors of M2 subtype as well as d-tubocurarine-sensitive nicotinic receptor in presynaptic modulation of [Ca2+]i transients. Modulation of synaptic transmission efficacy by ACh receptors was completely eliminated by pharmacological inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels. We conclude that ACh receptor-mediated reduction of Ca2+ entry into the nerve terminal through N-type Ca2+ channels represents one of possible mechanism of presynaptic modulation in frog neuromuscular junction. PMID:28018246

  19. Release-dependent feedback inhibition by a presynaptically localized ligand-gated anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Presynaptic ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) have long been proposed to affect neurotransmitter release and to tune the neural circuit activity. However, the understanding of their in vivo physiological action remains limited, partly due to the complexity in channel types and scarcity of genetic models. Here we report that C. elegans LGC-46, a member of the Cys-loop acetylcholine (ACh)-gated chloride (ACC) channel family, localizes to presynaptic terminals of cholinergic motor neurons and regulates synaptic vesicle (SV) release kinetics upon evoked release of acetylcholine. Loss of lgc-46 prolongs evoked release, without altering spontaneous activity. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation of lgc-46 shortens evoked release to reduce synaptic transmission. This inhibition of presynaptic release requires the anion selectivity of LGC-46, and can ameliorate cholinergic over-excitation in a C. elegans model of excitation-inhibition imbalance. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of presynaptic negative feedback in which an anion-selective LGIC acts as an auto-receptor to inhibit SV release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21734.001 PMID:27782882

  20. The effect of the ankle joint angle in the level of soleus Ia afferent presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patikas, D A; Kotzamanidis, C; Robertson, C T; Koceja, D M

    2004-12-01

    The factors that are responsible for the relationship between motoneuron excitability and muscle length may have both mechanical and/or neurophysiologic origins. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the level of presynaptic inhibition, as measured with a soleus H-reflex conditioning protocol, and muscle length. Ten healthy volunteers were measured at three different ankle angles: 30 degrees plantar flexion, neutral position (0 degrees) and 15 degrees dorsiflexion. At each position the soleus H-reflex and the maximum M-wave were measured while the limb was relaxed. The H-reflex was conditioned by a stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, 100 ms prior to the tibial nerve stimulation. The results revealed that the level of presynaptic inhibition was higher at the neutral position in comparison to the dorsiflexed or plantarflexed positions. Additionally, the HMAX/MMAX ratio was significantly decreased when the joint position was set at dorsiflexion. Further, there was a significant correlation, independent of ankle joint angle, between presynaptic inhibition levels and the HMAX/MMAX ratio. The above findings support the concept that peripheral feedback from passive, static modifications in the joint angle and consequently in muscle length, can modify the input/output threshold of the motoneurons on a presynaptic level.

  1. GCP II (NAALADase) Inhibition Suppresses Mossy Fiber-CA3 Synaptic Neurotransmission by a Presynaptic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Garrido Sanabria, Emilio R.; Wozniak, Krystyna M.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Keller, Asaf

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) presynaptically inhibits glutamate release at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. For this purpose, we made use of 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), an inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase II [GCP II; also known as N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase)], the enzyme that hydrolyzes NAAG into N-acetylaspartate and glutamate. Application of 2-MPPA (1–20 μM) had no effect on intrinsic membrane properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons recorded in vitro in whole cell current- or voltage-clamp mode. Bath application of 10 μM 2-MPPA suppressed evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitudes. Attenuation of EPSC amplitudes was accompanied by a significant increase in paired-pulse facilitation (50-ms interpulse intervals), suggesting that a presynaptic mechanism is involved. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-y l) propanoic acid (LY341495) prevented the 2-MPPA-dependent suppression of EPSC amplitudes. 2-MPPA reduced the frequencies of TTX-insensitive miniature EPSCs (mEPSC), without affecting their amplitudes, further supporting a presynaptic action for GCP II inhibition. 2-MPPA-induced reduction of mEPSC frequencies was prevented by LY341495, reinforcing the role of presynaptic group II mGluR. Because GCP II inhibition is thought to increase NAAG levels, these results suggest that NAAG suppresses synaptic transmission at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses through presynaptic activation of group II mGluRs. PMID:12917384

  2. Does trans-spinal and local DC polarization affect presynaptic inhibition and post-activation depression?

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, D; Ristikankare, J; Jankowska, E

    2017-03-01

    Trans-spinal polarization was recently introduced as a means to improve deficient spinal functions. However, only a few attempts have been made to examine the mechanisms underlying DC actions. We have now examined the effects of DC on two spinal modulatory systems, presynaptic inhibition and post-activation depression, considering whether they might weaken exaggerated spinal reflexes and enhance excessively weakened ones. Direct current effects were evoked by using local intraspinal DC application (0.3-0.4 μA) in deeply anaesthetized rats and were compared with the effects of trans-spinal polarization (0.8-1.0 mA). Effects of local intraspinal DC were found to be polarity dependent, as locally applied cathodal polarization enhanced presynaptic inhibition and post-activation depression, whereas anodal polarization weakened them. In contrast, both cathodal and anodal trans-spinal polarization facilitated them. The results suggest some common DC-sensitive mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition and post-activation depression, because both were facilitated or depressed by DC in parallel. Direct current (DC) polarization has been demonstrated to alleviate the effects of various deficits in the operation of the central nervous system. However, the effects of trans-spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) have been investigated less extensively than the effects of transcranial DC stimulation, and their cellular mechanisms have not been elucidated. The main objectives of this study were, therefore, to extend our previous analysis of DC effects on the excitability of primary afferents and synaptic transmission by examining the effects of DC on two spinal modulatory feedback systems, presynaptic inhibition and post-activation depression, in an anaesthetized rat preparation. Other objectives were to compare the effects of locally and trans-spinally applied DC (locDC and tsDCS). Local polarization at the sites of terminal branching of afferent fibres was found to induce polarity

  3. Spinal reflex adaptation in dancers changes with body orientation and role of pre-synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Rachel; Kitano, Koichi; Koceja, David M

    2010-01-01

    Dancers undergo specific activity-dependent neuromuscular adaptations following long-term training that allow them to develop the refined motor skills required for success in dance. The spinal stretch reflex circuit has demonstrated specific adaptations following prolonged dance training. Adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex can be studied using H-reflex methodology, first described by Paul Hoffmann in 1910. This article discusses H-reflex methodology and presents data that examine the neural mechanisms that contribute to adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex with dance training. Two groups of subjects, modern dancers (N = 5) and untrained controls (N = 5), were tested. On one-half of the trials common peronal nerve (CPN) conditioning of the soleus H-reflex was used to assess one spinal mechanism, pre-synaptic inhibition; the other half tested the soleus H-reflex only (unconditioned). The dependent variables were the H(max)/M(max) ratios, unconditioned and with CPN conditioning, expressed as percent values. The results revealed three main findings: 1. Modern dancers had smaller H(max)/M(max) ratios than control subjects; 2. The H(max)/M(max) ratio was smaller in standing posture than in prone among both dancers and controls; and 3. Pre-synaptic inhibition was not different between dancers and controls in standing. In conclusion, modern dancers have smaller H-reflexes than untrained controls, but pre-synaptic inhibition does not appear to explain this difference.

  4. Gender differences in the effects of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopamine agonists on latent inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Chou; He, Bo-Han; Chen, Chih-Chung; Huang, Andrew Chih Wei; Yeh, Yu-Chi

    2012-04-04

    The present study investigated gender differences in the effects of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA agonists on latent inhibition in the passive avoidance paradigm. During the preexposure phase, 32 male and 32 female Wistar rats were exposed to a passive avoidance box (or a different context) and received drug injections in three trials: the control group received an injection of 10% ascorbic acid in a different context. The experimental groups received injections of 10% ascorbic acid (latent inhibition [LI] group), 1mg/kg of the postsynaptic DA D(1)/D(2) agonist apomorphine (APO group), and 1.5mg/kg of the presynaptic DA agonist methamphetamine (METH group) in a passive avoidance box. All experimental groups were placed in the light compartment of the passive avoidance box and were allowed to enter into the dark compartment to receive a footshock (1mA, 2s) in five trials over 5 days. The latency to enter into the dark compartment was recorded in these five trials. The latent inhibition occurred in the female LI group but not in the male LI group. Regardless of gender, the APO group exhibited an increase in latent inhibition. Male rats in the METH group exhibited a decrease in latent inhibition, but female rats in the METH group exhibited an increase in latent inhibition, indicating that the METH group exhibited sexual dimorphism. The gender factor interacted only with the METH group and not the LI or APO group. The present paper discusses whether gender, the postsynaptic DA D(1)/D(2) agonist APO, and presynaptic DA agonist METH may be related to schizophrenia.

  5. Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents in the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1990-12-01

    More than 30 years ago, Frank and Fuortes proposed that the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindle afferents associated with spinal motoneurones could be diminished by the activation of nerves from flexor muscles. Since that time, research has focused on disclosing the mode of operation and the spinal pathways involved in this presynaptic inhibitory control. Initially, it was assumed that the same last-order interneurones mediated presynaptic inhibition of both muscle spindle and tendon organ afferent fibres. More recent evidence indicates that the synaptic effectiveness of these two groups of afferents is controlled by separate sets of GABAergic interneurones synapsing directly with the intraspinal terminals of the afferent fibres. This unique arrangement allows for selective control of the information on muscle length or muscle tension, despite the convergence of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents on second-order interneurones.

  6. Presynaptic Inhibition at Inhibitory Nerve Terminals. A New Synapse in the Crayfish Stretch Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasuko; Tisdale, Ann D.; Henkart, Maryanna P.

    1973-01-01

    Previous physiological evidence has shown that the receptor neuron of the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish receives synapses from three inhibitory axons, while the receptor muscle is innervated by both excitatory and inhibitory axons. Fine structural studies have indicated that after certain preparative procedures synaptic vesicles in the inhibitory terminals on dendrites of the receptor neuron appear small and elongate, while those in the excitatory terminals on the receptor muscle are round and larger. This study describes a new synapse between two inhibitory nerve endings on the receptor neuron. One axon, containing small elongate vesicles, forms a presynaptic chemical contact with another morphologically similar axon that, itself, presumably releases inhibitory transmitter onto the receptor neuron. A second type of presynaptic axo-axonic synapse, analogous to one previously described in another crustacean muscle, was also found between presumed inhibitory and excitatory nerve terminals on the receptor muscle. Thus, the stretch receptor has a relatively complex organization with a morphological basis for two types of presynaptic inhibition: one on excitatory terminals and the other on inhibitory terminals. Images PMID:4365382

  7. Task- and time-dependent modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition during fatiguing contractions performed by humans.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Stéphane; Maerz, Adam H; Gould, Jeffrey R; Enoka, Roger M

    2011-07-01

    Presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents converging onto the motor neuron pool of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) was compared during contractions (20% of maximal force) sustained to failure as subjects controlled either the angular position of the wrist while supporting an inertial load (position task) or exerted an equivalent force against a rigid restraint (force task). Test Hoffmann (H) reflexes were evoked in the ECR by stimulating the radial nerve above the elbow. Conditioned H reflexes were obtained by stimulating either the median nerve above the elbow or at the wrist (palmar branch) to assess presynaptic inhibition of homonymous (D1 inhibition) and heteronymous Ia afferents (heteronymous Ia facilitation), respectively. The position task was briefer than the force task (P = 0.001), although the maximal voluntary force and electromyograph for ECR declined similarly at failure for both tasks. Changes in the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex were positively correlated between the two conditioning methods (P = 0.02) and differed between the two tasks (P < 0.05). The amplitude of the conditioned H reflex during the position task first increased (129 ± 20.5% of the initial value, P < 0.001) before returning to its initial value (P = 0.22), whereas it increased progressively during the force task to reach 122 ± 17.4% of the initial value at failure (P < 0.001). Moreover, changes in conditioned H reflexes were associated with the time to task failure and force fluctuations. The results suggest a task- and time-dependent modulation of presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents during fatiguing contractions.

  8. Presynaptic inhibition and antidromic spikes in primary afferents of the crayfish: a computational and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Cattaert, D; Libersat, F; El Manira A, A

    2001-02-01

    Primary afferent depolarizations (PADs) are associated with presynaptic inhibition and antidromic discharges in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we have elaborated a realistic compartment model of a primary afferent from the coxobasipodite chordotonal organ of the crayfish based on anatomical and electrophysiological data. The model was used to test the validity of shunting and sodium channel inactivation hypotheses to account for presynaptic inhibition. Previous studies had demonstrated that GABA activates chloride channels located on the main branch close to the first branching point. We therefore focused the analysis on the effect of GABA synapses on the propagation of action potentials in the first axonal branch. Given the large diameters of the sensory axons in the region in which PADs were likely to be produced and recorded, the model indicates that a relatively large increase in chloride conductance (up to 300 nS) is needed to significantly reduce the amplitude of sensory spikes. The role of the spatial organization of GABA synapses in the sensory arborization was analyzed, demonstrating that the most effective location for GABA synapses is in the area of transition from active to passive conduction. This transition is likely to occur on the main branch a few hundred micrometers distal to the first branching point. As a result of this spatial organization, antidromic spikes generated by large-amplitude PADs are prevented from propagating distally.

  9. Presynaptic serotonergic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission in mechanically dissociated rat basolateral amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Susumu; Kubo, Chiharu; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Akaike, Norio

    1999-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (ABL) nuclei contribute to the process of anxiety. GABAergic transmission is critical in these nuclei and serotonergic inputs from dorsal raphe nuclei also significantly regulate GABA release. In mechanically dissociated rat ABL neurons, spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) arising from attached GABAergic presynaptic nerve terminals were recorded with the nystatin-perforated patch method and pharmacological isolation.5-HT reversibly reduced the GABAergic mIPSC frequency without affecting the mean amplitude. The serotonergic effect was mimicked by the 5-HT1A specific agonist 8-OH DPAT (8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin) and blocked by the 5-HT1A antagonist spiperone.The GTP-binding protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide removed the serotonergic inhibition of mIPSC frequency. In either K+-free or Ca2+-free external solution, 5-HT could inhibit mIPSC frequency.High K+ stimulation increased mIPSC frequency and 8-OH DPAT inhibited this increase even in the presence of Cd2+.Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), significantly increased synaptic GABA release frequency. Pretreatment with forskolin prevented the serotonergic inhibition of mIPSC frequency in both the standard and high K+ external solution.Ruthenium Red (RR), an agent facilitating the secretory process in a Ca2+-independent manner, increased synaptic GABA release. 5-HT also suppressed RR-facilitated mIPSC frequency.We conclude that 5-HT inhibits GABAergic mIPSCs by inactivating the AC-cAMP signal transduction pathway via a G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A receptor and this intracellular pathway directly acts on the GABA-releasing process independent of K+ and Ca2+ channels in the presynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:10381597

  10. Persistence of PAD and presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle afferents after peripheral nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Denton, M; Manjarrez, E; Rudomin, P

    2004-11-19

    Two to twelve weeks after crushing a muscle nerve, still before the damaged afferents reinnervate the muscle receptors, conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexor muscles depolarizes the damaged afferents [M. Enriquez, I. Jimenez, P. Rudomin, Changes in PAD patterns of group I muscle afferents after a peripheral nerve crush. Exp. Brain Res., 107 (1996), 405-420]. It is not known, however, if this primary afferent depolarization (PAD) is indeed related to presynaptic inhibition. We now show in the cat that 2-12 weeks after crushing the medial gastrocnemius nerve (MG), conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexors increases the excitability of the intraspinal terminals of both the intact lateral gastrocnemius plus soleus (LGS) and of the previously damaged MG fibers ending in the motor pool, because of PAD. The PAD is associated with the depression of the pre- and postsynaptic components of the extracellular field potentials (EFPs) evoked in the motor pool by stimulation of either the intact LGS or of the previously damaged MG nerves. These observations indicate, in contrast to what has been reported for crushed cutaneous afferents [K.W. Horch, J.W. Lisney, Changes in primary afferent depolarization of sensory neurones during peripheral nerve regeneration in the cat, J. Physiol., 313 (1981), 287-299], that shortly after damaging their peripheral axons, the synaptic efficacy of group I spindle afferents remains under central control. Presynaptic inhibitory mechanisms could be utilized to adjust the central actions of muscle afferents not fully recovered from peripheral lesions.

  11. Depletion of glucose causes presynaptic inhibition of neuronal transmission in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Akasu, T; Tsurusaki, M; Shoji, S

    1996-10-01

    The role of glucose in synaptic transmission was examined in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) with single-microelectrode voltage-clamp and slice-patch technique. Removal of glucose from the oxygenated Krebs solution caused an outward current associated with an increased membrane conductance. The current-voltage relationship (I-V curve) showed that the hypoglycemia-induced outward current was reversed in polarity at the equilibrium potential for K+. Exposure of DLSN neurons to the glucose-free solution for 5-20 min depressed the excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC), the inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC), and the late hyperpolarizing current (LHC). Replacement of glucose with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), an antimetabolic substrate, mimicked the deprivation of glucose. Mannoheptulose (10 mM) and dinitrophenol, inhibitors of glucose metabolism, also depressed the PSCs, even in the presence of 10 mM glucose. Glucose-free perfusion did not significantly depress the glutamate-induced inward current, indicating that the inhibition of the EPSC by the glucose-free perfusion was presynaptic. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced outward currents were depressed by the glucose-free solution. Intracellular dialysis of DLSN neurons with a patch-pipette solution containing 5 mM ATP attenuated the hypoglycemia-induced outward current. Glucose-free superfusion consistently inhibited the IPSC and the LHC without changing the GABA-induced outward current in ATP-treated DLSN neurons. It is suggested that glucose metabolism directly regulates the release of both excitatory amino acids and GABA from the presynaptic nerve terminals.

  12. 5-HT2 presynaptic receptors mediate inhibition of glutamate release from cerebellar mossy fibre terminals.

    PubMed

    Maura, G; Carbone, R; Guido, M; Pestarino, M; Raiteri, M

    1991-09-17

    'Giant' synaptosomes originating from mossy fibre terminals and having sedimentation properties different from those of standard synaptosomes were obtained from rat cerebellum. Exposure of superfused giant synaptosomes to 15 mM KCl caused the release of endogenous glutamate in a largely (about 80%) calcium-dependent manner. The K(+)-evoked overflow of glutamate was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and by the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl (DOI), but not by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The effects of 5-HT and DOI were quite potent, already reaching significant inhibition (about 25%) at 10 nM. The 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin counteracted the inhibitory effect of 5-HT. In cerebellar slices, ketanserin increased on its own the calcium-dependent K(+)-evoked release of glutamate and this effect was not prevented by tetrodotoxin (TTX). The results support the idea that cerebellar mossy fibres use glutamate as a transmitter and show that the release of glutamate can be inhibited via presynaptic heteroreceptors of the 5-HT2 type probably localized on the mossy fibre terminals.

  13. Inhibition of GABA release by presynaptic ionotropic GABA receptors in hippocampal CA3.

    PubMed

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Draguhn, Andreas

    2004-02-09

    Vesicular transmitter release can be regulated by transmitter-gated ion channels at presynaptic axon terminals. The central inhibitory transmitter GABA acts on such presynaptic ionotropic receptors in various cells, including inhibitory interneurons. Here we report that GABA-mediated postsynaptic inhibitory currents in CA3 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampal slices are suppressed by agonists of GABAA receptors. The effect is present for both stimulus-induced and miniature IPSCs, indicating a reduction in the probability of vesicular release by presynaptic, action-potential-independent mechanisms. We conclude that the release of GABA from hippocampal CA3 interneurons is regulated by a negative feedback via presynaptic ionotropic GABA autoreceptors.

  14. Endocannabinoids gate state-dependent plasticity of synaptic inhibition in feeding circuits.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Karen M; Inoue, Wataru; Pittman, Quentin J; Bains, Jaideep S

    2011-08-11

    Changes in food availability alter the output of hypothalamic nuclei that underlie energy homeostasis. Here, we asked whether food deprivation impacts the ability of GABA synapses in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), an important integrator of satiety signals, to undergo activity-dependent changes. GABA synapses in DMH slices from satiated rats exhibit endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (LTD(GABA)) in response to high-frequency stimulation of afferents. When CB1Rs are blocked, however, the same stimulation elicits long-term potentiation (LTP(GABA)), which manifests presynaptically and requires heterosynaptic recruitment of NMDARs and nitric oxide (NO). Interestingly, NO signaling is required for eCB-mediated LTD(GABA). Twenty-four hour food deprivation results in a CORT-mediated loss of CB1R signaling and, consequently, GABA synapses only exhibit LTP(GABA). These observations indicate that CB1R signaling promotes LTD(GABA) and gates LTP(GABA). Furthermore, the satiety state of an animal, through regulation of eCB signaling, determines the polarity of activity-dependent plasticity at GABA synapses in the DMH.

  15. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  16. Melanocortin 4 receptor activation inhibits presynaptic N-type calcium channels in amygdaloid complex neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Francina; López Soto, Eduardo J; Cabral, Agustina; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Schioth, Helgi B; Perelló, Mario; Raingo, Jesica

    2014-09-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in food intake and energy expenditure regulation. MC4R activation modifies neuronal activity but the molecular mechanisms by which this regulation occurs remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R activation regulates the activity of voltage-gated calcium channels and, as a consequence, synaptic activity. We also tested whether the proposed effect occurs in the amygdala, a brain area known to mediate the anorexigenic actions of MC4R signaling. Using the patch-clamp technique, we found that the activation of MC4R with its agonist melanotan II specifically inhibited 34.5 ± 1.5% of N-type calcium currents in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. This inhibition was concentration-dependent, voltage-independent and occluded by the Gαs pathway inhibitor cholera toxin. Moreover, we found that melanotan II specifically inhibited 25.9 ± 2.0% of native N-type calcium currents and 55.4 ± 14.4% of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in mouse cultured amygdala neurons. In vivo, we found that the MC4R agonist RO27-3225 increased the marker of cellular activity c-Fos in several components of the amygdala, whereas the N-type channel blocker ω conotoxin GVIA increased c-Fos expression exclusively in the central subdivision of the amygdala. Thus, MC4R specifically inhibited the presynaptic N-type channel subtype, and this inhibition may be important for the effects of melanocortin in the central subdivision of the amygdala.

  17. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  18. Presynaptic inhibition of optogenetically identified VGluT3+ sensory fibres by opioids and baclofen.

    PubMed

    Honsek, Silke D; Seal, Rebecca P; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Distinct subsets of sensory nerve fibres are involved in mediating mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity. They may also differentially respond to analgesics. Heat-sensitive C-fibres, for example, are thought to respond to μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation while mechanoreceptive fibres are supposedly sensitive to δ-opioid receptor (DOR) or GABAB receptor (GABABR) activation. The suggested differential distribution of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors on different subsets of sensory fibres is, however, heavily debated. In this study, we quantitatively compared the degree of presynaptic inhibition exerted by opioids and the GABABR agonist baclofen on (1) vesicular glutamate transporter subtype 3-positive (VGluT3) non-nociceptive primary afferent fibres and (2) putative nociceptive C-fibres. To investigate VGluT3 sensory fibres, we evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents with blue light at the level of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in spinal cord slices of mice, expressing channelrhodopsin-2. Putative nociceptive C-fibres were explored in VGluT3-knockout mice through electrical stimulation. The MOR agonist DAMGO strongly inhibited both VGluT3 and VGluT3 C-fibres innervating lamina I neurons but generally had less influence on fibres innervating lamina II neurons. The DOR agonist SNC80 did not have any pronounced effect on synaptic transmission in any fibre type tested. Baclofen, in striking contrast, powerfully inhibited all fibre populations investigated. In summary, we report optogenetic stimulation of DRG neurons in spinal slices as a capable approach for the subtype-selective investigation of primary afferent nerve fibres. Overall, pharmacological accessibility of different subtypes of sensory fibres considerably overlaps, indicating that MOR, DOR, and GABABR expressions are not substantially segregated between heat and mechanosensitive fibres.

  19. Apomorphine-induced changes in synaptic dopamine levels: positron emission tomography evidence for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    de La Fuente-Fernández, R; Lim, A S; Sossi, V; Holden, J E; Calne, D B; Ruth, T J; Stoessl, A J

    2001-10-01

    The authors developed a novel positron emission tomography method to estimate changes in the synaptic level of dopamine ([DA]) induced by direct dopamine agonists (for example, apomorphine) in patients with Parkinson disease. The method is based on the typical asymmetry of the nigrostriatal lesion that often occurs in Parkinson disease. Using the between-side difference (ipsilateral (I) and contralateral (C) putamen to the more affected body side) of the inverse of the putamen [11C]raclopride binding potential (BP), the authors obtained [equation: see text] at baseline (that is, before apomorphine administration) and [equation: see text] after apomorphine administration (assuming the concentration of apomorphine is equal in both putamina). The between-side difference in the estimated synaptic concentration of dopamine (diff[DA]) should remain constant unless apomorphine affects dopamine release differently between the two sides. The authors found that apomorphine given subcutaneously at doses of 0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg induced significant changes in their estimate of diff[DA] (P < 0.05). Such changes were more pronounced when only patients with a stable response to levodopa were considered (P < 0.01). These findings provide in vivo evidence that direct dopamine agonists can inhibit the release of endogenous dopamine. The authors propose that this effect is mainly mediated by the activation of presynaptic D2/D3 dopamine receptors.

  20. Presynaptic Inhibition of Glutamate Transmission by Alpha-2 Receptors in the VTA

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rivera, Carlos A.; Figueroa, Johnny; Vázquez, Rafael; Vélez, María; Schwarz, David; Velásquez-Martinez, María C.; Arencibia-Albite, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) forms part of the mesocorticolimbic system and plays a pivotal role in reward and reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse. Glutamate transmission within the VTA controls important aspects of goal-directed behavior and motivation. Noradrenergic receptors also present in the VTA have important functions in the modulation of neuronal activity. Here we studied the effects of alpha-2 noradrenergic receptor activation in the alteration of glutamate neurotransmission in VTA dopaminergic neurons from male Sprague-Dawley rats. We used whole cell patch clamp recordings from putative VTA dopaminergic neurons and measured excitatory postsynaptic currents. Clonidine (40 μM) and UK 13,408 (40 μM), both alpha-2 receptor agonists, reduced (~ 40%) the amplitude of glutamate-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents. After clonidine administration, there was a dose-dependent reduction over the concentration range of 15–40 μM. Using yohimbine (20μM) and two other alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, idaxozan (40 μM) and atipemazole (20μM), we demonstrated that the inhibitory action is specifically mediated by alpha-2 receptors. Moreover, by inhibiting protein kinases with H-7 (75 μM), Rp-adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic (11 μM) and chelerythrine (1 μM) it was shown that the clonidine-induced inhibition seems to involve a selective activation of the protein kinase C intracellular pathway. An increased paired-pulse ratios and changes in spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents frequencies but not amplitudes indicated that the alpha-2 agonist’s effect was presynaptically mediated. It is suggested that the suppression of glutamate excitatory inputs onto VTA dopaminergic neurons might be relevant in the regulation of reward and drug seeking behaviors. PMID:22564071

  1. Network state-dependent inhibition of identified hippocampal CA3 axo-axonic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Viney, Tim J; Lasztoczi, Balint; Katona, Linda; Crump, Michael G; Tukker, John J; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal sharp waves are population discharges initiated by an unknown mechanism in pyramidal cell networks of CA3. Axo-axonic cells (AACs) regulate action potential generation through GABAergic synapses on the axon initial segment. We found that CA3 AACs in anesthetized rats and AACs in freely moving rats stopped firing during sharp waves, when pyramidal cells fire most. AACs fired strongly and rhythmically around the peak of theta oscillations, when pyramidal cells fire at low probability. Distinguishing AACs from other parvalbumin-expressing interneurons by their lack of detectable SATB1 transcription factor immunoreactivity, we discovered a somatic GABAergic input originating from the medial septum that preferentially targets AACs. We recorded septo-hippocampal GABAergic cells that were activated during hippocampal sharp waves and projected to CA3. We hypothesize that inhibition of AACs, and the resulting subcellular redistribution of inhibition from the axon initial segment to other pyramidal cell domains, is a necessary condition for the emergence of sharp waves promoting memory consolidation.

  2. Inhibition of intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase by Ag+: redox state dependent binding.

    PubMed

    Santagostini, Laura; Gullotti, Michele; Hazzard, James T; Maritano, Silvana; Tollin, Gordon; Marchesini, Augusto

    2005-02-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer within zucchini squash ascorbate oxidase is inhibited in a novel manner in the presence of an equimolar concentration of Ag(+). At pH 5.5 in acetate buffer reduction of the enzyme by laser flash photolytically generated 5-deazariboflavin semiquinone occurs at the Type I Cu with a rate constant of 5 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1). Subsequent to this initial reduction step, equilibration of the reducing equivalent between the Type I Cu and the trinuclear Type II, III copper cluster (TNC) occurs with rate constant of 430 s(-1). The 41% of the reduced Type I Cu is oxidized by this intramolecular electron transfer reaction. When these reactions are performed in the presence of Ag(+) equimolar to dimeric AO, the bimolecular reduction of the enzyme by the 5-deazariboflavin semiquinone is not affected. As in the case of the native enzyme, intramolecular electron transfer between the Type I Cu and the TNC occurs, which continues until 25% of the reducing equivalent has been transferred. At that point, the reducing equivalent is observed to more slowly return to the Type I Cu, resulting a second reduction phase whose rate constant (100 s(-1)) is protein and Ag(+) concentration independent. The data suggest that partial reduction of the TNC results in Ag(+) binding to the enzyme which causes the apparent midpoint potential of the TNC as a whole to decrease thereby reversing the direction of electron flow. These results are consistent with the inhibitory effect of Ag(+) on the steady-state activity of ascorbate oxidase [S. Maritano, E. Malusa, A. Marchesini, presented at The Meeting on Metalloproteins, SERC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, England, 1992; A. Marchesini, XIX Convegno Nazionale SICA, Italian Society of Agricultural Chemistry, Reggio Calabria, Italy, September 2001.].

  3. Blockade of the dorsal hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors inhibits the scopolamine-induced state-dependent learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Piri, M; Rostampour, M; Nasehi, M; Zarrindast, M R

    2013-11-12

    In the present study, we investigated the possible role of the dorsal hippocampal (CA1) dopamine D1 receptors on scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as scopolamine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats. Animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training for their step-through latency. Results indicated that pre-training or pre-test intra-CA1 administration of scopolamine (1.5 and 3 μg/rat) dose-dependently reduced the step-through latency, showing an amnestic response. The pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia (3 μg/rat) was reversed by the pre-test administration of scopolamine, indicating a state-dependent effect. Similarly, the pre-test administration of dopamine D1 receptor agonist, 1-phenyl-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SKF38393; 1, 2 and 4 μg/rat, intra-CA1), could significantly reverse the scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, administration of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.25 μg/rat, intra-CA1) before different doses of SKF38393, blocked the reversal effect of SKF38393 on the pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia. Moreover, while the pre-test intra-CA1 injection of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH23390; 0.1 and 0.5 μg/rat, intra-CA1), resulted in apparent memory impairment, microinjection of the same doses of this agent inhibited the scopolamine-induced state-dependent memory. These results indicate that the CA1 dopamine D1 receptors may potentially play an important role in scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as the scopolamine state-dependent memory. Furthermore, our results propose that dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 reverses the scopolamine-induced amnesia via acetylcholine release and possibly through the activation of muscarinic

  4. Age-related influence of vision and proprioception on Ia presynaptic inhibition in soleus muscle during upright stance.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Stéphane; Duchateau, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the modulation of Ia afferent input in young and elderly adults during quiet upright stance in normal and modified visual and proprioceptive conditions. The surface EMG of leg muscles, recruitment curve of the soleus (SOL) Hoffmann (H) reflex and presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents from SOL, assessed with the D1 inhibition and single motor unit methods, were recorded when young and elderly adults stood with eyes open or closed on two surfaces (rigid vs. foam) placed over a force platform. The results showed that elderly adults had a longer path length for the centre of pressure and larger antero-posterior body sway across balance conditions (P < 0.05). Muscle EMG activities were greater in elderly compared with young adults (P < 0.05), whereas the H(max) expressed as a percentage of the H(max) was lower (P = 0.048) in elderly (38 ± 16%) than young adults (58 ± 16%). The conditioned H reflex/test H reflex ratio (D1 inhibition method) increased with eye closure and when standing on foam (P < 0.05), with greater increases for elderly adults (P = 0.019). These changes were accompanied by a reduced peak motor unit discharge probability when standing on rigid and foam surfaces (P 0.001), with a greater effect for elderly adults (P = 0.026). Based on these latter results, the increased conditioned H reflex/test H reflex ratio in similar sensory conditions is likely to reflect occlusion at the level of presynaptic inhibitory interneurones. Together, these findings indicate that elderly adults exhibit greater modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition than young adults with variation in the sensory conditions during upright standing.

  5. Robust presynaptic serotonin 5-HT1B receptor inhibition of the striatonigral output and its sensitization by chronic fluoxetine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengyuan; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    The striatonigral projection is a striatal output pathway critical to motor control, cognition, and emotion regulation. Its axon terminals in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) express a high level of serotonin (5-HT) type 1B receptors (5-HT1BRs), whereas the SNr also receives an intense 5-HT innervation that expresses 5-HT transporters, providing an anatomic substrate for 5-HT and selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-based antidepressant treatment to regulate the striatonigral output. In this article we show that 5-HT, by activating presynaptic 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals, potently inhibited the striatonigral GABA output, as reflected in the reduction of the striatonigral inhibitory postsynaptic currents in SNr GABA neurons. Functionally, 5-HT1BR agonism reduced the striatonigral GABA output-induced pause of the spontaneous high-frequency firing in SNr GABA neurons. Equally important, chronic SSRI treatment with fluoxetine enhanced this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated pause reduction in SNr GABA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that activation of the 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals can limit the motor-promoting GABA output. Furthermore, in contrast to the desensitization of 5-HT1 autoreceptors, chronic SSRI-based antidepressant treatment sensitizes this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated effect in the SNr, a novel cellular mechanism that alters the striatonigral information transfer, potentially contributing to the behavioral effects of chronic SSRI treatment. PMID:25787955

  6. Sertraline inhibits pre-synaptic Na⁺ channel-mediated responses in hippocampus-isolated nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Aldana, Blanca I; Sitges, María

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a possible sertraline action on cerebral pre-synaptic Na(+) channels was investigated. For this purpose, the effect of sertraline on responses induced by the Na(+) channel opener, veratridine, namely the increase in Na(+) and in neurotransmitter release in hippocampus-isolated nerve endings was investigated. Results show that sertraline in the low μM range (1.5-25 μM) progressively inhibits the rise in Na(+) and the release of pre-loaded [(3) H]Glu as well as the release of endogenous 5-HT, Glu and GABA (detected by HPLC) induced by veratridine depolarization either under external Ca(2+) -free conditions or in the presence of external Ca(2+) . In addition, under non-depolarized conditions, sertraline (25 μM) increased the external concentration of 5-HT at expense of its internal concentration, and unchanged the external and internal concentrations of the amino acid neurotransmitters and of the 5-HT main metabolite, 5-HIAA. This result is consistent with the sertraline inhibitory action of the serotonin transporter. However, sertraline is unlikely to inhibit pre-synaptic Na(+) channels permeability by increasing external 5-HT. Because 5-HT in a wide concentration range (1-1000 μM) did not change the veratridine-induced increase in Na(+) . In summary, present findings demonstrate that besides the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake, sertraline is an effective inhibitor of pre-synaptic Na(+) channels controlling neurotransmitter release. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Differential effects of acidosis, high potassium concentrations, and metabolic inhibition on noradrenaline release and its presynaptic muscarinic regulation.

    PubMed

    Haunstetter, Armin; Schulze Icking, Babette; Backs, Johannes; Krüger, Carsten; Haass, Markus

    2002-03-01

    It was the aim of the present study to characterize the effect of single components of ischaemia, such as inhibition of aerobic and anaerobic energy production by combined anoxic and glucose-free perfusion (metabolic inhibition), high extracellular potassium concentrations (hyperkalaemia), and acidosis, on (1). the stimulated release of noradrenaline from the in situ perfused guinea-pig heart and (2). its presynaptic modulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The release of endogenous noradrenaline from efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve endings was induced by electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (1 min, 5 V, 12 Hz) and quantified in the coronary venous effluent by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions, two consecutive electrical stimulations (S1, S2) elicited a similar noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.98 plus minus 0.05). After 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was significantly reduced (S2/S1: 0.18 plus minus 0.03; P< 0.05). When studied separately, metabolic inhibition, hyperkalaemia (16 mM), and acidosis (pH 6.0) each markedly attenuated stimulated noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.65 plus minus 0.05, 0.43 plus minus 0.14, and 0.37 plus minus 0.09, respectively; P< 0.05). The muscarinic agonist carbachol (10 microM) inhibited stimulated noradrenaline release under normoxic conditions (S2/S1: 0.41 plus minus 0.07; P< 0.05). However, after 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia the inhibitory effect of carbachol on noradrenaline overflow was completely lost. Single components of ischaemia had a differential effect on presynaptic muscarinic modulation. Whereas hyperkalaemia (8-16 mM) did not affect muscarinic inhibition of noradrenaline release, carbachol lost its inhibitory effect during acidosis and metabolic inhibition. In conclusion, hyperkalaemia, metabolic inhibition, and severe acidosis each contribute to reduced overflow of noradrenaline after 10 min of myocardial

  8. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  9. Inhibition of noradrenaline release from the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein by presynaptic histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Weissenborn, G; Schlicker, E; Likungu, J; Göthert, M

    1992-07-01

    The human saphenous vein was used to examine whether presynaptic histamine receptors can modulate noradrenaline release and, if so, to determine their pharmacological characteristics. Strips of this blood vessel were incubated with [3H]noradrenaline and subsequently superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine and corticosterone. Electrically (2 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was inhibited by histamine and the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine. Histamine-induced inhibition of electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade by rauwolscine. S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine (up to 3 mumol/l) and dimaprit (up to 30 mumol/l), respectively, were ineffective. The selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine. The histamine H2 and H1 receptor antagonists ranitidine and pheniramine, respectively, did not affect the histamine-induced inhibition of evoked tritium overflow. The present results are compatible with the suggestion that the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein are endowed with inhibitory presynaptic histamine receptors of the H3 class.

  10. Presynaptic inhibition upon CB1 or mGlu2/3 receptor activation requires ERK/MAPK phosphorylation of Munc18-1.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sabine K; King, Cillian; Kortleven, Christian; Huson, Vincent; Kroon, Tim; Kevenaar, Josta T; Schut, Desiree; Saarloos, Ingrid; Hoetjes, Joost P; de Wit, Heidi; Stiedl, Oliver; Spijker, Sabine; Li, Ka Wan; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2016-06-01

    Presynaptic cannabinoid (CB1R) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) regulate synaptic strength by inhibiting secretion. Here, we reveal a presynaptic inhibitory pathway activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that mediates CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced secretion inhibition. This pathway is triggered by a variety of events, from foot shock-induced stress to intense neuronal activity, and induces phosphorylation of the presynaptic protein Munc18-1. Mimicking constitutive phosphorylation of Munc18-1 results in a drastic decrease in synaptic transmission. ERK-mediated phosphorylation of Munc18-1 ultimately leads to degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, preventing ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation increases synaptic strength. CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced synaptic inhibition and depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) are reduced upon ERK/MEK pathway inhibition and further reduced when ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation is blocked. Thus, ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation provides a major negative feedback loop to control synaptic strength upon activation of presynaptic receptors and during intense neuronal activity.

  11. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  12. Ontogenesis of presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; McLean, H A; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1998-03-01

    although GABAB receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition are present onGABAergic terminals and functional, they do not operate at the level of monosynaptic GABAergic synaptic transmission at early stages of development. Absence of presynaptic autoinhibition of GABA release seems to be due to the small amount of transmitter that can access presynaptic regulatory sites.

  13. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Shi-Bing; Cheng, Sin-Jhong; Hung, Wei-Chen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC) analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE. PMID:26659605

  14. Inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release by activation of A3 adenosine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cinalli, A R; Guarracino, J F; Fernandez, V; Roquel, L I; Losavio, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The role of inosine at the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has not been clearly defined. Moreover, inosine was classically considered to be the inactive metabolite of adenosine. Hence, we investigated the effect of inosine on spontaneous and evoked ACh release, the mechanism underlying its modulatory action and the receptor type and signal transduction pathway involved. Experimental Approach End-plate potentials (EPPs) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded from the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations using conventional intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Inosine (100 μM) reduced MEPP frequency and the amplitude and quantal content of EPPs; effects inhibited by the selective A3 receptor antagonist MRS-1191. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the presence of A3 receptors at mammalian NMJ. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocker Cd2+, the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and the L-type and P/Q-type VGCC antagonists, nitrendipine and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively, all prevented inosine-induced inhibition. In the absence of endogenous adenosine, inosine decreased the hypertonic response. The effects of inosine on ACh release were prevented by the Gi/o protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, PKC antagonist chelerytrine and calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by PKA antagonists, H-89 and KT-5720, or the inhibitor of CaMKII KN-62. Conclusion and Implications Our results suggest that, at motor nerve terminals, inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release by activating A3 receptors through a mechanism that involves L-type and P/Q-type VGCCs and the secretory machinery downstream of calcium influx. A3 receptors appear to be coupled to Gi/o protein. PKC and calmodulin may be involved in these effects of inosine. PMID:23731236

  15. Presynaptic modulation of spinal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R

    1993-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that independent sets of interneurons mediate presynaptic inhibition of primary and secondary muscle spindles and of tendon organ afferents. There is also evidence that the information which flows through different intraspinal collaterals of a single muscle spindle or tendon organ afferent fiber is selectively affected by electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. These studies suggest that presynaptic inhibition plays an important role in the selection of the sensory signals required for the execution of a specific motor task.

  16. Okadaic acid-induced inhibition of B-50 dephosphorylation by presynaptic membrane-associated protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Han, Y F; Dokas, L A

    1991-10-01

    The neuronal tissue-specific protein kinase C (PKC) substrate B-50 can be dephosphorylated by endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs) in synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs). The present study characterizes membrane-associated B-50 phosphatase activity by using okadaic acid (OA) and purified 32P-labeled substrates. At a low concentration of [gamma-32P]ATP, PKC-mediated [32P]phosphate incorporation into B-50 in SPMs reached a maximal value at 30 s, followed by dephosphorylation. OA, added 30 s after the initiation of phosphorylation, partially prevented the dephosphorylation of B-50 at 2 nM, a dose that inhibits PP-2A. At the higher concentration of 1 microM, a dose of OA that inhibits PP-1 as well as PP-2A, a nearly complete blockade of B-50 dephosphorylation was seen. Heat-stable PP inhibitor-2 (I-2) also inhibited dephosphorylation of B-50. The effects of OA and I-2 on B-50 phosphatase activity were additive. Endogenous PP-1- and PP-2A-like activities in SPMs were also demonstrated by their capabilities of dephosphorylating [32P]phosphorylase a and [32P]casein. With these exogenous substrates, sensitivities of the membrane-bound phosphatases to OA and I-2 were found to be similar to those of purified forms of these enzymes. These results indicate that PP-1- and PP-2A-like enzymes are the major B-50 phosphatases in SPMs.

  17. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  18. Presynaptic inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors by noradrenaline in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Elvezio, Vincent; Kaczocha, Martin; Rebecchi, Mario; Puopolo, Michelino

    2017-04-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a polymodal molecular integrator in the pain pathway expressed in Aδ- and C-fibre nociceptors and is responsible for the thermal hyperalgesia associated with inflammatory pain. Noradrenaline strongly inhibited the activity of TRPV1 channels in dorsal root ganglia neurons. The effect of noradrenaline was reproduced by clonidine and antagonized by yohimbine, consistent with contribution of α2 adrenergic receptors. The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline on TRPV1 channels was dependent on calcium influx and linked to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In spinal cord slices, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced miniature EPSCs in the presence of tetrodotoxin and ω-conotoxin-MVIIC, consistent with inhibition of presynaptic TRPV1 channels by α2 adrenergic receptors. We suggest that modulation of presynaptic TRPV1 channels in nociceptive neurons by descending noradrenergic inputs may constitute a mechanism for noradrenaline to modulate incoming noxious stimuli in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a well-known contributor to nociceptor excitability. To address whether noradrenaline can down-regulate TRPV1 channel activity in nociceptors and reduce their synaptic transmission, the effects of noradrenaline and clonidine were tested on the capsaicin-activated current recorded from acutely dissociated small diameter (<27 μm) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and on miniature (m)EPSCs recorded from large lamina I neurons in horizontal spinal cord slices. Noradrenaline or clonidine inhibited the capsaicin-activated current by ∼60%, and the effect was reversed by yohimbine, confirming that it was mediated by activation of α2 adrenergic receptors. Similarly, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced mEPSCs by ∼60%. Inhibition of capsaicin-activated current by noradrenaline was mediated by GTP

  19. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  20. Inhibition of noradrenaline release in the rat brain cortex via presynaptic H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Fink, K; Hinterthaner, M; Göthert, M

    1989-12-01

    The effects of histamine and related drugs on the evoked tritium overflow from superfused rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were determined. Tritium overflow was stimulated electrically (3 Hz; slices superfused with normal physiological salt solution) or by introduction of CaCl2 1.3 mmol/l (slices superfused with Ca2(+)-free medium containing K+ 20 mmol/l). Histamine slightly decreased the electrically evoked 3H overflow in slices superfused in the presence of desipramine. The degree of inhibition obtained with histamine was doubled when both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium (pIC15 6.46). Under the latter condition, the evoked overflow was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine and its S-(+) enantiomer (pIC15 7.36 and 5.09, respectively), but was not affected by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and the H1 receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine (both at up to 32 mumols/l). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide, impromidine and burimamide (apparent pA2 8.37, 6.86 and 7.05, respectively), by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (apparent pA2 4.27) and was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene (32 mumols/l). The inhibitory effect of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the evoked overflow was also counteracted by thioperamide. Given alone, none of the five histamine receptor antagonists affected the evoked overflow. In the absence of desipramine plus phentolamine, impromidine and burimamide facilitated the electrically evoked 3H overflow whereas thioperamide had no effect. The facilitatory effects of impromidine and burimamide were abolished by phentolamine, but not affected by desipramine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Circuit Motifs for Contrast-Adaptive Differentiation in Early Sensory Systems: The Role of Presynaptic Inhibition and Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems. PMID:25723493

  2. Circuit motifs for contrast-adaptive differentiation in early sensory systems: the role of presynaptic inhibition and short-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems.

  3. Human presynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Feuerstein, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Presynaptic receptors are sites at which transmitters, locally formed mediators or hormones inhibit or facilitate the release of a given transmitter from its axon terminals. The interest in the identification of presynaptic receptors has faded in recent years and it may therefore be justified to give an overview of their occurrence in the autonomic and central nervous system; this review will focus on presynaptic receptors in human tissues. Autoreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which a given transmitter restrains its further release, though in some instances may also increase its release. Inhibitory autoreceptors represent a typical example of a negative feedback; they are tonically activated by the respective endogenous transmitter and/or are constitutively active. Autoreceptors also play a role under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. by limiting the massive noradrenaline release occurring during congestive heart failure. They can be used for therapeutic purposes; e.g., the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist mirtazapine is used as an antidepressant and the inverse histamine H3 receptor agonist pitolisant has been marketed as a new drug for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2016. Heteroreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which transmitters from adjacent neurons, locally formed mediators (e.g. endocannabinoids) or hormones (e.g. adrenaline) can inhibit or facilitate transmitter release; they may be subject to an endogenous tone. The constipating effect of the sympathetic nervous system or of the antihypertensive drug clonidine is related to the activation of inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on postganglionic parasympathetic neurons. Part of the stimulating effect of adrenaline on the sympathetic nervous system during stress is related to its facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release via β2-adrenoceptors.

  4. Serotonin, Dopamine and Noradrenaline Adjust Actions of Myelinated Afferents via Modulation of Presynaptic Inhibition in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, David L.; Calvo, Jorge R.; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N.

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  5. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ying; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca(2+)-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca(2+)-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP2) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H3 receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry by diminishing PLA2/PGE2/EP2 receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  6. Activation of histamine H3 receptors produces presynaptic inhibition of neurally evoked cat nictitating membrane responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1992-08-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine the potential role of prejunctional histamine H3 receptors in an in vivo adrenergic model system. Frequency-dependent nictitating membrane responses were elicited by sympathetic nerve stimulation in anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-related depression of amplitude of the evoked nictitating membrane responses with a threshold of about 10 micrograms/kg and maximal effect (50% depression at the lowest frequency; 0.5 Hz) seen at 100-300 micrograms/kg. Responses obtained with low frequency stimulation were more sensitive to depression by R alpha MeHA than were responses evoked with higher frequencies of stimulation. Larger doses of R alpha MeHA given to the same animals, failed to produce additional inhibition. R alpha MeHA depressed the amplitude of nictitating membrane responses evoked by either pre- or postganglionic nerve stimulation to an equivalent degree. This depressant action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by pretreatment with the specific histamine H3 antagonist, thioperamide (3 mg/kg), but not by combined pretreatment with histamine H1 and H2 blockers chlorpheniramine (300 micrograms/kg) and cimetidine (5 mg/kg). Intravenous administration of adrenaline (1-30 micrograms/kg) also produced graded nictitating membrane responses that were not altered by subsequent administration of R alpha MeHA. These results suggest that histamine H3 receptors are involved in the modulation of neurally evoked noradrenaline release in the cat nictitating membrane by an inhibitory presynaptic action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García-Ramírez, David L; Calvo, Jorge R; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  8. Effects of stimulation of group I afferents from flexor muscles on heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes produced by Ia and descending inputs: a test for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Jiménez, I; Enriquez, M

    1991-01-01

    1. In the chloralose anesthetized cat, conditioning stimulation of group I flexor afferents depresses the monosynaptic potentials generated by Ia afferents in single spinal motoneurons or in populations of motoneurons without affecting the monosynaptic potentials produced by stimulation of descending fibers in the ipsilateral ventromedial fasciculus (VMF). 2. Heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes was used to test changes in the presynaptic effectiveness of excitatory inputs with direct connections with motoneurons. We found that the heterosynaptic facilitation of Ia origin was reduced by conditioning stimulation of group I afferents from flexors, without affecting the heterosynaptic facilitation produced by stimulation of the VMF. 3. These results confirm and expand previous observations showing that the synaptic effectiveness of descending fibers synapsing with motoneurons is not subjected to a presynaptic control mechanism of the type acting on Ia fiber terminals, and provide further basis for the use of changes in heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes of Ia origin as an estimate of changes in presynaptic inhibition of Ia fibers (Hultborn et al. 1987a).

  9. Temporal redistribution of inhibition over neuronal subcellular domains underlies state-dependent rhythmic change of excitability in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Peter; Katona, Linda; Klausberger, Thomas; Lasztóczi, Bálint; Viney, Tim J

    2014-02-05

    The behaviour-contingent rhythmic synchronization of neuronal activity is reported by local field potential oscillations in the theta, gamma and sharp wave-related ripple (SWR) frequency ranges. In the hippocampus, pyramidal cell assemblies representing temporal sequences are coordinated by GABAergic interneurons selectively innervating specific postsynaptic domains, and discharging phase locked to network oscillations. We compare the cellular network dynamics in the CA1 and CA3 areas recorded with or without anaesthesia. All parts of pyramidal cells, except the axon initial segment, receive GABA from multiple interneuron types, each with distinct firing dynamics. The axon initial segment is exclusively innervated by axo-axonic cells, preferentially firing after the peak of the pyramidal layer theta cycle, when pyramidal cells are least active. Axo-axonic cells are inhibited during SWRs, when many pyramidal cells fire synchronously. This dual inverse correlation demonstrates the key inhibitory role of axo-axonic cells. Parvalbumin-expressing basket cells fire phase locked to field gamma activity in both CA1 and CA3, and also strongly increase firing during SWRs, together with dendrite-innervating bistratified cells, phasing pyramidal cell discharge. Subcellular domain-specific GABAergic innervation probably developed for the coordination of multiple glutamatergic inputs on different parts of pyramidal cells through the temporally distinct activity of GABAergic interneurons, which differentially change their firing during different network states.

  10. β1-Blockers Lower Norepinephrine Release by Inhibiting Presynaptic, Facilitating β1-Adrenoceptors in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Torill

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral norepinephrine release is facilitated by presynaptic β-adrenoceptors, believed to involve the β2-subtype exclusively. However, β1-selective blockers are the most commonly used β-blockers in hypertension. Here the author tested the hypothesis that β1AR may function as presynaptic, release-facilitating auto-receptors. Since β1AR-blockers are injected during myocardial infarction, their influence on the cardiovascular response to acute norepinephrine release was also studied. By a newly established method, using tyramine-stimulated release through the norepinephrine transporter (NET), presynaptic control of catecholamine release was studied in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. β1AR-selective antagonists (CGP20712A, atenolol, metoprolol) reduced norepinephrine overflow to plasma equally efficient as β2AR-selective (ICI-118551) and β1+2AR (nadolol) antagonists in both strains. Neither antagonist lowered epinephrine secretion. Atenolol, which does not cross the blood–brain barrier, reduced norepinephrine overflow after adrenalectomy (AdrX), AdrX + ganglion blockade, losartan, or nephrectomy. Atenolol and metoprolol reduced resting cardiac work load. During tyramine-stimulated norepinephrine release, they had little effect on work load, and increased the transient rise in total peripheral vascular resistance, particularly atenolol when combined with losartan. In conclusion, β1AR, like β2AR, stimulated norepinephrine but not epinephrine release, independent of adrenal catecholamines, ganglion transmission, or renal renin release/angiotensin AT1 receptor activation. β1AR therefore functioned as a peripheral, presynaptic, facilitating auto-receptor. Like tyramine, hypoxia may induce NET-mediated release. Augmented tyramine-induced vasoconstriction, as observed after injection of β1AR-blocker, particularly atenolol combined with losartan, may hamper organ perfusion, and may have clinical relevance in hypoxic conditions such as

  11. Presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors dynamically modify vesicle fusion, synaptic cleft glutamate concentrations and motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gerachshenko, Tatyana; Schwartz, Eric; Bleckert, Adam; Photowala, Huzefa; Seymour, Andrew; Alford, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how neuromodulators regulate behavior requires investigating their effects on functional neural systems, but also their underlying cellular mechanisms. Utilizing extensively characterized lamprey motor circuits, and the unique access to reticulospinal presynaptic terminals in the intact spinal cord that initiate these behaviours, we have investigated effects of presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors on locomotion from the systems level, to the molecular control of vesicle fusion. 5-HT inhibits neurotransmitter release via a Gβγ interaction with the SNARE complex that promotes kiss-and-run vesicle fusion. In the lamprey spinal cord we demonstrate that while presynaptic 5-HT receptors inhibit evoked neurotransmitter release from reticulospinal command neurons, their activation does not abolish locomotion, but rather modulates locomotor rhythms. Liberation of presynaptic Gβγ causes substantial inhibition of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic responses, but leaves NMDA receptor-mediated components of neurotransmission largely intact. Because Gβγ binding to the SNARE complex is displaced by Ca2+-synaptotagmin binding, 5-HT-mediated inhibition displays Ca2+ sensitivity. We show that as Ca2+ accumulates presynaptically during physiological bouts of activity, 5-HT/Gβγ-mediated presynaptic inhibition is relieved leading to a frequency-dependent increase in synaptic concentrations of glutamate. This frequency dependent phenomenon mirrors a shift in the vesicle fusion mode and a recovery of AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs from inhibition without a modification of NMDA receptor EPSCs. We conclude that activation of presynaptic 5-HT GPCRs state-dependently alters vesicle fusion properties to shift the weight of NMDA vs AMPA receptor-mediated responses at excitatory synapses. We have therefore identified a novel mechanism in which modification of vesicle fusion modes may profoundly alter locomotor behaviour. PMID:19692597

  12. Pre- and postsynaptic excitation and inhibition at octopus optic lobe photoreceptor terminals; implications for the function of the 'presynaptic bags'.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Stefania; Moccia, Francesco; Di Cristo, Carlo; Caputi, Luigi; Di Cosmo, Anna; Brown, Euan R

    2007-10-01

    Synaptic transmission was examined in the plexiform zone of Octopus vulgaris optic lobes using field-potential recording from optic lobe slices. Stimulation of the optic nerve produced pre- and postsynaptic field potentials. Transmission was abolished in calcium-free seawater, L- glutamate or the AMPA/Kainate receptor blocker CNQX (EC(50), 40 microm), leaving an intact presynaptic field potential. ACh markedly reduced or blocked and d-tubocurarine augmented both pre- and postsynaptic field potentials, while alpha-bungarotoxin and atropine were without effect. Paired-pulse stimulation showed short-term depression of pre- and postsynaptic components with a half-time of recovery of approximately 500 ms. The depression was partially relieved in the presence of d-tubocurarine (half-time of recovery, 350 ms). No long-term changes in synaptic strength were induced by repetitive stimulation. A polyclonal antibody raised against a squid glutamate receptor produced positive staining in the third radial layer of the plexiform zone. No positive staining was observed in the other layers. Taking into account previous morphological data and our results, we propose that the excitatory terminations of the photoreceptors are in the innermost layer of the plexiform zone where the transmitter is likely to be glutamate and postsynaptic receptors are AMPA/kainate-like. Thus, the function of the terminal bags is to provide a location for a presynaptic cholinergic inhibitory shunt. The results imply that this arrangement provides a temporal filter for visual processing and enhances the perception of moving vs. stationary objects.

  13. Prenatal melamine exposure impairs spatial cognition and hippocampal synaptic plasticity by presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic transmission in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    An, Lei; Sun, Wei

    2017-03-05

    Our previous studies showed that prenatal melamine exposure (PME) could impair spatial cognition and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). More importantly, the synaptic dysfunction induced by PME was associated with the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Considering the crucial role of the other form of synaptic plasticity, long-term depression (LTD), in some types of learning and memory process, the aim of present study was to investigate if the hippocampal LTD and cognitive flexibility were affected. And then we attempted to explore the underlying mechanism. The animal model was produced by melamine exposure throughout gestational period with 400mg/kg bodyweight, the male offspring rats were used in the study. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed, and then LTD was recorded from Schaffer collaterals to CA1 region in the hippocampus. Behavioral test showed that learning, reference memory and re-acquisition learning abilities were impaired significantly by PME. The field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) slopes of LTD were significantly higher after PME. Furthermore, the data of whole-cell patch-clamp experiments showed that PME markedly diminished the frequencies of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) and simultaneously reduced the amplitude of sEPSCs. In conclusion, PME inhibited glutamate transmission presynaptically and postsynaptically which could contribute importantly to the depressed hippocampal synaptic plasticity and further induced cognitive deficits in MWM tests.

  14. RGS2 determines short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons by regulating Gi/o-mediated inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Mark, Melanie D; Li, Xiang; Xie, Mian; Waka, Sayumi; Rettig, Jens; Herlitze, Stefan

    2006-09-07

    RGS2, one of the small members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family, is highly expressed in brain and regulates G(i/o) as well as G(q)-coupled receptor pathways. RGS2 modulates anxiety, aggression, and blood pressure in mice, suggesting that RGS2 regulates synaptic circuits underlying animal physiology and behavior. How RGS2 in brain influences synaptic activity is unknown. We therefore analyzed the synaptic function of RGS2 in hippocampal neurons by comparing electrophysiological recordings from RGS2 knockout and wild-type mice. Our study provides a general mechanism of the action of the RGS family containing RGS2 by demonstrating that RGS2 increases synaptic vesicle release by downregulating the G(i/o)-mediated presynaptic Ca(2+) channel inhibition and therefore provides an explanation of how regulation of RGS2 expression can modulate the function of neuronal circuits underlying behavior.

  15. A Presynaptic Group III mGluR Recruits Gβγ/SNARE Interactions to Inhibit Synaptic Transmission by Cone Photoreceptors in the Vertebrate Retina.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Babai, Norbert; Zurawski, Zack; Yim, Yun Young; Hamm, Heidi E; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2017-04-26

    G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) interact with presynaptic proteins and regulate neurotransmitter release downstream of Ca(2+) influx. To accomplish their roles in sensory signaling, photoreceptor synapses use specialized presynaptic proteins that support neurotransmission at active zone structures known as ribbons. While several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) influence synaptic transmission at ribbon synapses of cones and other retinal neurons, it is unknown whether Gβγ contributes to these effects. We tested whether activation of one particular GPCR, a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR), can reduce cone synaptic transmission via Gβγ in tiger salamander retinas. In recordings from horizontal cells, we found that an mGluR agonist (L-AP4) reduced cone-driven light responses and mEPSC frequency. In paired recordings of cones and horizontal cells, L-AP4 slightly reduced cone ICa (∼10%) and caused a larger reduction in cone-driven EPSCs (∼30%). Proximity ligation assay revealed direct interactions between SNAP-25 and Gβγ subunits in retinal synaptic layers. Pretreatment with the SNAP-25 cleaving protease BoNT/A inhibited L-AP4 effects on synaptic transmission, as did introduction of a peptide derived from the SNAP-25 C terminus. Introducing Gβγ subunits directly into cones reduced EPSC amplitude. This effect was inhibited by BoNT/A, supporting a role for Gβγ/SNAP-25 interactions. However, the mGluR-dependent reduction in ICa was not mimicked by Gβγ, indicating that this effect was independent of Gβγ. The finding that synaptic transmission at cone ribbon synapses is regulated by Gβγ/SNAP-25 interactions indicates that these mechanisms are shared by conventional and ribbon-type synapses. Gβγ liberated from other photoreceptor GPCRs is also likely to regulate synaptic transmission.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dynamic regulation of synaptic transmission by presynaptic G-protein coupled receptors shapes information flow through neural circuits. At

  16. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy - Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation-Inhibition Balance Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E-I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual "forward models" to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E-I-based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E-I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E-I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of neurostimulation with

  17. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy – Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation–Inhibition Balance Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation–inhibition (E–I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS–EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E–I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual “forward models” to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E–I-based brain models. Furthermore, E–I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E–I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E–I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of

  18. Acamprosate enhances N-methyl-D-apartate receptor-mediated neurotransmission but inhibits presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in nucleus accumbens neurons.

    PubMed

    Berton, F; Francesconi, W G; Madamba, S G; Zieglgänsberger, W; Siggins, G R

    1998-02-01

    Acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurine) is used therapeutically in Europe to reduce relapse in weaned alcoholics. However, the mechanisms of acamprosate action in the central nervous system are still obscure, although early studies suggested an action on GABA receptors. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is a brain region thought to underlie ethanol reinforcement. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that ethanol inhibits both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA types of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the NAcc. In the present study, we used voltage- and current-clamp intracellular recording of NAcc core neurons in a slice preparation to examine acamprosate actions on resting membrane properties and pharmacologically isolated synaptic responses. We isolated NMDA and non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials or currents (EPSP/Cs) with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (d-APV), respectively. Bicuculline was also included to block GABA(A) receptors. Superfusion of acamprosate (5, 50, and 300 microM) did not alter the resting membrane properties of NAcc neurons. However, 300 microM acamprosate significantly increased the NMDA receptor-mediated components of EPSP/Cs (NMDA-EPSP/Cs) with recovery on washout. In contrast, 300 microM acamprosate had no significant effect on the non-NMDA receptor component of the EPSP/Cs (non-NMDA-EPSP/Cs). To test acamprosate actions on the GABA system, we superfused 60 microM d-APV and 20 microM CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission and evoked monosynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic responses within the NAcc. Acamprosate (300 microM) did not change these monosynaptic GABA(A)-IPSCs. We also used a paired-pulse paradigm to test whether acamprosate could act on presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptors, in the presence of d-APV and CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission. Like 0.5 microM CGP 34358 (a GABA[B] receptor blocker), acamprosate significantly

  19. Presynaptic inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acidB-mediated synaptic current by adenosine recorded in vitro in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y N; Mercuri, N B; Johnson, S W

    1995-05-01

    Adenosine receptor antagonists such as caffeine cause dopamine-dependent behavioral arousal and hyperlocomotion in rodents. In the present study, we used the whole-cell recording technique in the rat brain slice to investigate effects of adenosine on dopamine neurons and their synaptic inputs in the substantia nigra zona compacta and ventral tegmental area. Adenosine was most potent for inhibiting the amplitude of the inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors (EC50 = 47 +/- 3 microM) compared with inhibition of the GABAA-mediated IPSC (117 +/- 51 microM) and the excitatory amino acid-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current (119 +/- 36 microM). Adenosine failed to inhibit current evoked by exogenous GABA or baclofen, suggesting that adenosine acted presynaptically to reduce GABA release from nerve terminals. Adenosine inhibited the GABAB-mediated IPSC by acting at the adenosine A1 receptor, because its effect was blocked by the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (100 nM), as well as by the methylxanthines caffeine (1 mM) and theophylline (300 microM). The rank-order of potency of adenosine agonists [N6-cyclohexyladenosine > R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine = N6- cyclohexyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine] also was consistent with activation of the adenosine A1 receptor, whereas the selective adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine] had no effect on the GABAB IPSC. None of the adenosine agonists or antagonists affected holding current or membrane conductance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Noradrenaline release-inhibiting receptors on PC12 cells devoid of alpha(2(-)) and CB(1) receptors: similarities to presynaptic imidazoline and edg receptors.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Bönisch, H; Hammermann, R; Göthert, M; Brüss, M

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to classify release-inhibiting receptors on rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Veratridine-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release from PC12 cells was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the imidazoline and guanidine derivatives cirazoline, clonidine, aganodine, 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine, BDF6143 and agmatine, and of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-yl](1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate), but not by noradrenaline. The inhibitory effect of clonidine was antagonized by micromolar concentrations of rauwolscine and SR141716A (N-[piperidin-1-yl]-5-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[2,4-dichlorophenyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide). The potencies of the agonists and antagonists were compatible with an action at previously characterized presynaptic imidazoline receptors. 1-Oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid, but not sphingosine-1-phosphate, produced an inhibition of release that was antagonized by 30 microM rauwolscine, 1 microM SR141716A and 10 microM LY320135 as well as by pretreatment of the cells with 100 microM clonidine for 72 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments on cDNA from PC12 mRNA suggest mRNA expression of lysophospholipid receptors encoded by the genes edg2, edg3, edg5 and edg7, but not of receptors encoded by edg1, edg4, edg6 and edg8, and not of alpha(2A(-))nd CB(1) receptors. In conclusion, PC12 cells are not endowed with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors, but with an inhibitory receptor recognizing imidazolines, guanidines and WIN55,212-2 similar to that on sympathetic nerves. The PCR results and the ability of 1-oleoyl-LPA to mimic these drugs (also with respect to their susceptibility to antagonists) suggest that the release-inhibiting receptor may be an edg-encoded lysophospholipid receptor.

  1. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases.

  2. Sr2+ supports depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition and provides new evidence for a presynaptic expression mechanism in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, W; Alger, B E

    1997-01-01

    1. We studied the transient suppression of evoked GABAA ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) that follows brief membrane depolarization in rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, a process called depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI). We used whole-cell patch electrodes filled with a CsCl-based solution to voltage clamp the currents. All experiments were done in the presence of 50 microM 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 20 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) to block ionotropic glutamate-induced currents and polysynaptic transmission in the slice preparation. 2. Substituting strontium (Sr2+) for extracellular calcium (Ca2+) led to the appearance of numerous 'asynchronous' small IPSCs following an eIPSC. These asynchronous IPSCs were indistinguishable from TTX-insensitive quantal IPSCs. 3. Although somewhat less effective than Ca2+, Sr2+ was capable of supporting DSI, and both asynchronous and synchronous IPSCs were blocked by the DSI process. 4. During DSI, quantal content of eIPSCs, but not quantal size, was significantly reduced. 5. Sr2+ converted paired-pulse depression (PPD) of eIPSCs to a paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), presumably by altering the probability of release at inhibitory nerve terminals. DSI had no effect on either PPD or PPF. 6. The results show that Sr2+ induces asynchronous release of GABA as it does of other neurotransmitters and changes the probability of release at GABAA ergic terminals as well. Most importantly, the results support the hypothesis that, despite being induced postsynaptically, DSI is expressed presynaptically as a decrease in GABA release, possibly by acting at a site other than the Ca(2+)-dependent release step. PMID:9423174

  3. Sr2+ supports depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition and provides new evidence for a presynaptic expression mechanism in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Morishita, W; Alger, B E

    1997-12-01

    1. We studied the transient suppression of evoked GABAA ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) that follows brief membrane depolarization in rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, a process called depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI). We used whole-cell patch electrodes filled with a CsCl-based solution to voltage clamp the currents. All experiments were done in the presence of 50 microM 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 20 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) to block ionotropic glutamate-induced currents and polysynaptic transmission in the slice preparation. 2. Substituting strontium (Sr2+) for extracellular calcium (Ca2+) led to the appearance of numerous 'asynchronous' small IPSCs following an eIPSC. These asynchronous IPSCs were indistinguishable from TTX-insensitive quantal IPSCs. 3. Although somewhat less effective than Ca2+, Sr2+ was capable of supporting DSI, and both asynchronous and synchronous IPSCs were blocked by the DSI process. 4. During DSI, quantal content of eIPSCs, but not quantal size, was significantly reduced. 5. Sr2+ converted paired-pulse depression (PPD) of eIPSCs to a paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), presumably by altering the probability of release at inhibitory nerve terminals. DSI had no effect on either PPD or PPF. 6. The results show that Sr2+ induces asynchronous release of GABA as it does of other neurotransmitters and changes the probability of release at GABAA ergic terminals as well. Most importantly, the results support the hypothesis that, despite being induced postsynaptically, DSI is expressed presynaptically as a decrease in GABA release, possibly by acting at a site other than the Ca(2+)-dependent release step.

  4. Presynaptic autoinhibition of central noradrenaline release in vitro: operational characteristics and effects of drugs acting at alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the presence of uptake inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, B.; Drobny, H.; Singer, E.A.

    1988-06-01

    Functional characteristics of autoinhibition of central noradrenaline release were studied in the presence of uptake inhibition. Slices of rat cerebral cortex were incubated with (3H)noradrenaline, superfused and field-stimulated with 1 to 16 monophasic rectangular pulses at frequencies of 0.02 to 40 Hz. 1) Substances acting at presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors were identified as antagonists, agonists or partial agonists by comparing their effects on 3H-overflow evoked by a single pulse or by two consecutive pulses at 1 Hz. 2) When 1 to 16 pulses were delivered at 0.02, 0.08, 0.3 and 1 Hz to stimulate outflow of tritium, a frequency-dependent suppression of responses to the second and the following pulses was observed. In the presence of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (10(-6) M), comparable amounts of tritium were released by the first stimulus and each of the following stimuli at 0.02 Hz. In contrast, at 0.08, 0.3 and 1 Hz the amount of 3H-overflow evoked by the first pulse was not reached in response to the following pulses. Clonidine (10(-6) M) diminished markedly the response to the first as well as to the following stimuli, irrespective of the frequency of stimulation. 3) Using two consecutive pulses delivered with decreasing pulse intervals, an apparent reduction or complete abolition of autoinhibition was observed at intervals of less than 100 msec, indicated by reduction or loss of the facilitatory effects of alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonists. The present results provide detailed insights in operational characteristics of alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated autoinhibition and the effects of drugs on this regulatory mechism.

  5. Role of the Local Anesthetic Receptor in the State-Dependent Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by the Insecticide Metaflumizone

    PubMed Central

    von Stein, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium channel inhibitor (SCI) insecticides selectively target voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels in the slow-inactivated state by binding at or near the local anesthetic receptor within the sodium channel pore. Metaflumizone is a new insecticide for the treatment of fleas on domesticated pets and has recently been reported to block insect sodium channels in the slow-inactivated state, thereby implying that it is also a member of the SCI class. Using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, we examined metaflumizone inhibition of rat Nav1.4 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Metaflumizone selectively inhibited Nav1.4 channels at potentials that promoted slow inactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of slow inactivation in the direction of hyperpolarization. Metaflumizone perfusion at a hyperpolarized holding potential also shifted the conductance-voltage curve for activation in the direction of depolarization and antagonized use-dependent lidocaine inhibition of fast-inactivated sodium channels, actions not previously observed with other SCI insecticides. We expressed mutated Nav1.4/F1579A and Nav1.4/Y1586A channels to investigate whether metaflumizone shares the domain IV segment S6 (DIV-S6) binding determinants identified for other SCI insecticides. Consistent with previous investigations of SCI insecticides on rat Nav1.4 channels, the F1579A mutation reduced sensitivity to block by metaflumizone, whereas the Y1586A mutation paradoxically increased the sensitivity to metaflumizone. We conclude that metaflumizone selectively inhibits slow-inactivated Nav1.4 channels and shares DIV-S6 binding determinants with other SCI insecticides and therapeutic drugs. However, our results suggest that metaflumizone interacts with resting and fast-inactivated channels in a manner that is distinct from other compounds in this insecticide class. PMID:22127519

  6. Dual pools of actin at presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Bleckert, Adam; Photowala, Huzefa; Alford, Simon

    2012-06-01

    We investigated actin's function in vesicle recycling and exocytosis at lamprey synapses and show that FM1-43 puncta and phalloidin-labeled filamentous actin (F-actin) structures are colocalized, yet recycling vesicles are not contained within F-actin clusters. Additionally, phalloidin also labels a plasma membrane-associated cortical actin. Injection of fluorescent G-actin revealed activity-independent dynamic actin incorporation into presynaptic synaptic vesicle clusters but not into cortical actin. Latrunculin-A, which sequesters G-actin, dispersed vesicle-associated actin structures and prevented subsequent labeled G-actin and phalloidin accumulation at presynaptic puncta, yet cortical phalloidin labeling persisted. Dispersal of presynaptic F-actin structures by latrunculin-A did not disrupt vesicle clustering or recycling or alter the amplitude or kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). However, it slightly enhanced release during repetitive stimulation. While dispersal of presynaptic actin puncta with latrunculin-A failed to disperse synaptic vesicles or inhibit synaptic transmission, presynaptic phalloidin injection blocked exocytosis and reduced endocytosis measured by action potential-evoked FM1-43 staining. Furthermore, phalloidin stabilization of only cortical actin following pretreatment with latrunculin-A was sufficient to inhibit synaptic transmission. Conversely, treatment of axons with jasplakinolide, which induces F-actin accumulation but disrupts F-actin structures in vivo, resulted in increased synaptic transmission accompanied by a loss of phalloidin labeling of cortical actin but no loss of actin labeling within vesicle clusters. Marked synaptic deficits seen with phalloidin stabilization of cortical F-actin, in contrast to the minimal effects of disruption of a synaptic vesicle-associated F-actin, led us to conclude that two structurally and functionally distinct pools of actin exist at presynaptic sites.

  7. Cyfip1 Regulates Presynaptic Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Kuangfu; Harony-Nicolas, Hala; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations encompassing the gene encoding Cyfip1 have been associated with a variety of human diseases, including autism and schizophrenia. Here we show that juvenile mice hemizygous for Cyfip1 have altered presynaptic function, enhanced protein translation, and increased levels of F-actin. In developing hippocampus, reduced Cyfip1 levels serve to decrease paired pulse facilitation and increase miniature EPSC frequency without a change in amplitude. Higher-resolution examination shows these changes to be caused primarily by an increase in presynaptic terminal size and enhanced vesicle release probability. Short hairpin-mediated knockdown of Cyfip1 coupled with expression of mutant Cyfip1 proteins indicates that the presynaptic alterations are caused by dysregulation of the WAVE regulatory complex. Such dysregulation occurs downstream of Rac1 as acute exposure to Rac1 inhibitors rescues presynaptic responses in culture and in hippocampal slices. The data serve to highlight an early and essential role for Cyfip1 in the generation of normally functioning synapses and suggest a means by which changes in Cyfip1 levels could impact the generation of neural networks and contribute to abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Several developmental brain disorders have been associated with gene duplications and deletions that serve to increase or decrease levels of encoded proteins. Cyfip1 is one such protein, but the role it plays in brain development is poorly understood. We asked whether decreased Cyfip1 levels altered the function of developing synapses. The data show that synapses with reduced Cyfip1 are larger and release neurotransmitter more rapidly. These effects are due to Cyfip1's role in actin polymerization and are reversed by expression of a Cyfip1 mutant protein retaining actin regulatory function or by inhibiting Rac1. Thus, Cyfip1 has a more prominent early role regulating presynaptic activity during a stage of development when

  8. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  9. Group II and III mGluRs-mediated presynaptic inhibition of EPSCs recorded from hippocampal interneurons of CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare.

    PubMed

    Price, Christopher J; Karayannis, Theofanis; Pál, Balázs Zoltán; Capogna, Marco

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the effects of groups II and III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation on excitatory responses recorded from hippocampal interneurons of CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM). Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by stimulation of the perforant pathway were reduced either by the group II mGluR agonist LY354740 (50-100 nM, 49.1+/-5.7% of control) or by the group III mGluR agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (50 microM, 36.8+/-4.4% of control). Both drugs significantly enhanced paired-pulse facilitation of the EPSCs. Furthermore, both 100 nM LY354740 and 50 microM l-AP4 reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs), recorded in the presence of 1 microM TTX and 50 microM picrotoxin, or EPSCs evoked by perforant pathway stimulation in the presence of 2.5 mM Sr2+. The broad-spectrum mGluR antagonist LY341495 (10-50 microM) did not affect test EPSCs elicited 210 ms after stimulation at 100 Hz. At network level, 1-5 microM LY354740 significantly reduced the power of gamma frequency oscillations induced by 20 microM carbachol, 600 nM kainate and 5 mM K+ in hippocampal CA1 area. Our results show powerful modulation of excitatory transmission impinging on interneurons of CA1 SLM by presynaptic group II or III mGluRs.

  10. Glycolysis selectively shapes the presynaptic action potential waveform.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Brendan; Kushmerick, Christopher; Banerjee, Tania Das; Dagda, Ruben K; Renden, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy in neurons; however, utilization of energy from glycolysis vs. mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in the presynaptic compartment during neurotransmission is largely unknown. Using presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings from the mouse calyx of Held, we examined the effect of acute selective pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial OxPhos on multiple mechanisms regulating presynaptic function. Inhibition of glycolysis via glucose depletion and iodoacetic acid (1 mM) treatment, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, rapidly altered transmission, resulting in highly variable, oscillating responses. At reduced temperature, this same treatment attenuated synaptic transmission because of a smaller and broader presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform. We show via experimental manipulation and ion channel modeling that the altered AP waveform results in smaller Ca(2+) influx, resulting in attenuated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). In contrast, inhibition of mitochondria-derived ATP production via extracellular pyruvate depletion and bath-applied oligomycin (1 μM) had no significant effect on Ca(2+) influx and did not alter the AP waveform within the same time frame (up to 30 min), and the resultant EPSC remained unaffected. Glycolysis, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, is thus required to maintain basal synaptic transmission at the presynaptic terminal. We propose that glycolytic enzymes are closely apposed to ATP-dependent ion pumps on the presynaptic membrane. Our results indicate a novel mechanism for the effect of hypoglycemia on neurotransmission. Attenuated transmission likely results from a single presynaptic mechanism at reduced temperature: a slower, smaller AP, before and independent of any effect on synaptic vesicle release or receptor activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  12. Presynaptic BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are involved in prostanoid TP receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release from the rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2010-03-10

    Previously, we reported that prostanoid TP receptor mediates the inhibition of electrically evoked noradrenaline release from gastric sympathetic nerves in rats. Prostanoid TP receptor has been shown to activate phospholipase C (PLC), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol; IP(3) triggers the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these PLC-mediated mechanisms are involved in the TP receptor-mediated inhibition of gastric noradrenaline release using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. U-46619 (9,11-dideoxy-9alpha,11alpha-methanoepoxy PGF(2alpha)) (a prostanoid TP receptor agonist)-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from the stomach was reduced by U-73122 [1-[6-[[(17beta)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]-amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dine] (a PLC inhibitor) and ET-18-OCH(3) (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) (a phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC inhibitor), respectively. 2-APB (2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate) (a putative IP(3) receptor antagonist) also abolished the U-46619-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release, but Ro 31-8220 [2-{1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl]-1H-indol-3-yl}-3-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-maleimide] (a protein kinase C inhibitor) had no effect. Furthermore, a small dose of tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin [blockers of BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel] abolished the U-46619-induced inhibition, but apamin (a blocker of SK-type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel) had no effect. These results suggest that BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are involved in prostanoid TP receptor-mediated inhibition of electrically evoked noradrenaline release from the gastric sympathetic nerve terminals in rats.

  13. Involvement of presynaptic voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2012-11-05

    We previously reported that two types of K(+) channels, the BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel coupled with phospholipase C (PLC) and the voltage-dependent K(+) channel (Kv channel), are, respectively, involved in the prostanoid TP receptor- and muscarinic M(2) receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these K(+) channels are involved in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release, using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. The gastric sympathetic postganglionic nerves around the left gastric artery were electrically stimulated twice at 2.5 Hz for 1 min, and endothelin-1 was added during the second stimulation. Endothelin-1 (1, 2 and 10 nM) dose-dependently inhibited gastric NA release. Endothelin-1 (2 nM)-induced inhibition of NA release was neither attenuated by PLC inhibitors [U-73122 (3 μM) and ET-18-OCH(3) (3 μM)] nor by Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockers [charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) (a blocker of BK type K(+) channel) and apamin (0.3 μM) (a blocker of SK type K(+) channel)]. The endothelin-1-induced inhibitory response was also not attenuated by α-dendrotoxin (0.1 μM) (a selective inhibitor of Kv1 channel), but abolished by 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) (a selectively inhibitory dose for Kv3 channel). These results suggest the involvement of a voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in the endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release from the gastric sympathetic nerves in rats.

  14. Greater Ethanol Inhibition of Presynaptic Dopamine Release in C57BL/6J than DBA/2J Mice: Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Rose, Jamie H.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Ferris, Mark J.; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system, originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), has been heavily implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol. Recent slice voltammetry studies have shown that ethanol inhibits dopamine release selectively during highfrequency activity that elicits phasic dopamine release shown to be important for learning and reinforcement. Presently, we examined ethanol inhibition of electrically evoked NAc dopamine in two mouse strains with divergent dopamine responses to ethanol, C57BL/6 (C57) and DBA/2J (DBA) mice. Previous electrophysiology and microdialysis studies have demonstrated greater ethanol induced VTA dopaminergic firing and NAc dopamine elevations in DBA compared to C57 mice. Additionally, DBA mice have greater ethanol responses in dopamine-related behaviors, including hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference. Currently, we demonstrate greater sensitivity of ethanol inhibition of NAc dopamine signaling in C57 compared to DBA mice. The reduced sensitivity to ethanol inhibition in DBA mice may contribute to the overall greater ethanol-induced dopamine signaling and related behaviors observed in this strain. NAc cholinergic activity is known to potently modulate terminal dopamine release. Additionally, ethanol is known to interact with multiple aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activity. Therefore, we examined ethanol-mediated inhibition of dopamine release at two ethanol concentrations (80 and 160mM) during bath application of the non-selective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, as well as compounds selective for the β2- (DhβE) and α6- (α-conotoxin MII [H9A; L15A]) subunit-containing receptors. Mecamylamine and DhβE decreased dopamine release and reduced ethanol's inhibitory effects on dopamine in both DBA and C57 mice. Further, α-conotoxin also reduced the dopamine release and the dopamine-inhibiting effects of ethanol at the 80mM, but not 160m

  15. A Presynaptic Gain Control Mechanism Fine-Tunes Olfactory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Root, Cory M.; Masuyama, Kaoru; Green, David S.; Enell, Lina E.; Nässel, Dick R.; Lee, Chi-Hon; Wang, Jing W.

    2008-01-01

    Early sensory processing can play a critical role in sensing environmental cues. We have investigated the physiological and behavioral function of gain control at the first synapse of olfactory processing in Drosophila. We report that olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) express the GABAB receptor (GABABR) and its expression expands the dynamic range of ORN synaptic transmission that is preserved in projection neuron responses. Strikingly, we find that different ORN channels have unique baseline levels of GABABR expression. ORNs that sense the aversive odorant CO2 do not express GABABRs nor exhibit any presynaptic inhibition. In contrast, pheromone-sensing ORNs express a high level of GABABRs and exhibit strong presynaptic inhibition. Furthermore, a behavioral significance of presynaptic inhibition was revealed by a courtship behavior in which pheromone-dependent mate localization is impaired in flies that lack GABABRs in specific ORNs. Together, these findings indicate that different olfactory receptor channels may employ heterogeneous presynaptic gain control as a mechanism to allow an animal’s innate behavioral responses to match its ecological needs. PMID:18667158

  16. Presynaptic modulation by somatostatin in the neostriatum.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Huerta, Violeta Gisselle; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Guzman, Jaime N; Bargas, Jose; Galarraga, Elvira

    2008-08-01

    Medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) are the main neuronal population in the neostriatum. MSNs are inhibitory and GABAergic. MSNs connect with other MSNs via local axon collaterals that produce lateral inhibition, which is thought to select cell assemblies for motor action. MSNs also receive inhibitory inputs from GABAergic local interneurons. This work shows, through the use of the paired pulse protocol, that somatostatin (SST) acts presynaptically to regulate GABA release from the terminals interconnecting MSNs. This SST action is reversible and not mediated through the release of dopamine. It is blocked by the SST receptor (SSTR) antagonist ciclosomatostatin (cicloSST). In contrast, SST does not regulate inhibition coming from interneurons. Because, SST is released by a class of local interneuron, it is concluded that this neuron helps to regulate the selection of motor acts.

  17. Synthetic Aβ oligomers (Aβ(1-42) globulomer) modulate presynaptic calcium currents: prevention of Aβ-induced synaptic deficits by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Hermann, David; Mezler, Mario; Müller, Michaela K; Wicke, Karsten; Gross, Gerhard; Draguhn, Andreas; Bruehl, Claus; Nimmrich, Volker

    2013-02-28

    Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by increased brain levels of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. It has been suggested that oligomers directly impair synaptic function, thereby causing cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease patients. Recently, it has been shown that synthetic Aβ oligomers directly modulate P/Q-type calcium channels, possibly leading to excitotoxic cascades and subsequent synaptic decline. Using whole-cell recordings we studied the modulation of recombinant presynaptic calcium channels in HEK293 cells after application of a stable Aβ oligomer preparation (Aβ1-42 globulomer). Aβ globulomer shifted the half-activation voltage of P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels to more hyperpolarized values (by 11.5 and 7.5 mV). Application of non-aggregated Aβ peptides had no effect. We then analyzed the potential of calcium channel blockers to prevent Aβ globulomer-induced synaptic decline in hippocampal slice cultures. Specific block of P/Q-type or N-type calcium channels with peptide toxins completely reversed Aβ globulomer-induced deficits in glutamatergic neurotransmission. Two state-dependent low molecular weight P/Q-type and N-type calcium channel blockers also protected neurons from Aβ-induced alterations. On the contrary, inhibition of L-type calcium channels failed to reverse the deficit. Our data show that Aβ globulomer directly modulates recombinant P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels in HEK293 cells. Block of presynaptic calcium channels with both state-dependent and state-independent modulators can reverse Aβ-induced functional deficits in synaptic transmission. These findings indicate that presynaptic calcium channel blockers may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. 3,4-Diaminopyridine masks the inhibition of noradrenaline release from chick sympathetic neurons via presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors: insights into the role of N- and L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, V; Huang, H Y; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1996-05-20

    antagonised this effect. UK 14304 did not measurably inhibit the stimulation-evoked rise of intraterminal [Ca2+]i in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine but it produced an inhibition by 26% if nifedipine had been applied together with 3,4-diaminopyridine. Our observations show that, under control conditions, the stimulated release of [3H]noradrenaline is mainly associated with the opening of N-type channels, while in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine the contribution of L-type channels becomes more important. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by UK 14304 inhibits the release of [3H]noradrenaline but, in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine, the inhibition of release can only be observed if the massive influx through L-type calcium channels is prevented. These data suggest that presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors of chick sympathetic neurons preferentially influence the N-type calcium channels.

  19. Macroautophagy can press a brake on presynaptic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ciara A; Sulzer, David

    2012-10-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) has been implicated in regulating synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, but MTOR's role in modulating presynaptic function through autophagy is unexplored. We studied presynaptic function in ventral dopamine neurons, a system from which neurotransmitter release can be measured directly by cyclic voltammetry. We generated mutant mice that were specifically deficient for macroautophagy in dopaminergic neurons by deleting the Atg7 gene in cells that express the dopamine uptake transporter. Dopamine axonal profiles in the mutant dorsal striatum were ~one third larger in the mutant mice, released ~50% more stimulus-evoked dopamine release, and exhibited more rapid presynaptic recovery than controls. Rapamycin reduced dopamine neuron axon profile size by ~30% in control mice, but had no effect on macroautophagy deficient axons. Acute rapamycin decreased dopaminergic synaptic vesicle density by ~25% and inhibited evoked dopamine release by ~25% in control mice, but not in the Atg7 deficient mutants. Thus, both basal and induced macroautophagy can provide a brake on presynaptic activity in vivo, perhaps by regulating the turnover of synaptic vesicles, and further regulates terminal volume and the kinetics of transmitter release.

  20. High-content imaging of presynaptic assembly

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Goh, Chiatzun; Voorhoeve, P. Mathijs; Fivaz, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Presynaptic assembly involves the specialization of a patch of axonal membrane into a complex structure that supports synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. In mammalian neurons, presynaptic assembly is widely studied in a co-culture assay, where a synaptogenic cue expressed at the surface of a heterologous cell induces presynaptic differentiation in a contacting axon. This assay has led to the discovery of numerous synaptogenic proteins, but has not been used to probe neuronal mechanisms regulating presynaptic induction. The identification of regulatory pathways that fine-tune presynaptic assembly is hindered by the lack of adequate tools to quantitatively image this process. Here, we introduce an image-processing algorithm that identifies presynaptic clusters in mammalian co-cultures and extracts a range of synapse-specific parameters. Using this software, we assessed the intrinsic variability of this synaptic induction assay and probed the effect of eight neuronal microRNAs on presynaptic assembly. Our analysis revealed a novel role for miR-27b in augmenting the density of presynaptic clusters. Our software is applicable to a wide range of synaptic induction protocols (including spontaneous synaptogenesis observed in neuron cultures) and is a valuable tool to determine the subtle impact of disease-associated genes on presynaptic assembly. PMID:24624059

  1. Hallucinogenic indoleamines: Preferential action upon presynaptic serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Aghajanian, G K; Hailgler, H J

    1975-01-01

    Previously, d-lysergic acid diethylamide was found to have a more powerful inhibitory action upon serotonergic (raphe) neurons than upon neurons in areas receiving an identified serotonergic input (e. g., amygdala, ventral lateral geniculate). In the present studies, using microiontophoretic techniques, the relative potencies of 3 indoleamine hallucinogens, psilocin, DMT, and bufotenine were tested upon 5HT neurons in the raphe (presynaptic neurons) and postsynaptic neurons in the ventral lateral geniculate and amygdala of the rat. Psilocin showed the greatest preferential inhibitory effect upon raphe as compared to postsynaptic neurons. DMT was intermdeiate and bufotenine had the least differential activity. This rank ordering correlates with the relative hallucinogenic potencies of these compounds: psilocin greater than DMT greater than bufotenine. The results support the hypothesis that low doses of indoleamine halluciogens act preferentially upon presynaptic serotonin receptors to inhibit raphe neurons, thus releasing postsynaptic neurons from a tonic inhibitory serotonergic influence.

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPδ, PTPσ, and LAR: presynaptic hubs for synapse organization

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hideto; Craig, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Synapse development requires differentiation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites and postsynaptic receptive apparatus coordinated by synapse organizing proteins. In addition to the well-characterized neurexins, recent studies identified presynaptic type IIa receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) as mediators of presynaptic differentiation and triggers of postsynaptic differentiation, thus extending the roles of RPTPs from axon outgrowth and guidance. Similarly to neurexins, RPTPs exist in multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing that interact in a splice-selective code with diverse postsynaptic partners. The parallel RPTP and neurexin hub design facilitates synapse self-assembly through cooperation, pairs presynaptic similarity with postsynaptic diversity, and balances excitation with inhibition. Upon mutation of individual genes in neuropsychiatric disorders, imbalance of this synaptic organizing network may contribute to impaired cognitive function. PMID:23835198

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPδ, PTPσ, and LAR: presynaptic hubs for synapse organization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideto; Craig, Ann Marie

    2013-09-01

    Synapse development requires differentiation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites and postsynaptic receptive apparatus coordinated by synapse organizing proteins. In addition to the well-characterized neurexins, recent studies identified presynaptic type IIa receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) as mediators of presynaptic differentiation and triggers of postsynaptic differentiation, thus extending the roles of RPTPs from axon outgrowth and guidance. Similarly to neurexins, RPTPs exist in multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing that interact in a splice-selective code with diverse postsynaptic partners. The parallel RPTP and neurexin hub design facilitates synapse self-assembly through cooperation, pairs presynaptic similarity with postsynaptic diversity, and balances excitation with inhibition. Upon mutation of individual genes in neuropsychiatric disorders, imbalance of this synaptic organizing network may contribute to impaired cognitive function.

  4. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Presynaptic CaMKII and BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and the BK channel are enriched at the presynaptic nerve terminal, where CaMKII associates with synaptic vesicles whereas the BK channel colocalizes with voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs) in the plasma membrane. Mounting evidence suggests that these two proteins play important roles in controlling neurotransmitter release. Presynaptic BK channels primarily serve as a negative regulator of neurotransmitter release. In contrast, presynaptic CaMKII either enhances or inhibits neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity depending on experimental/physiological conditions and properties of specific synapses. The different functions of presynaptic CaMKII appear to be mediated by distinct downstream proteins, including the BK channel. PMID:18759010

  5. The proteasome controls presynaptic differentiation through modulation of an on-site pool of polyubiquitinated conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Alves, Pedro L.; Martins, Luís; Pedro, Joana R.; Ryu, Hyun R.; Jeon, Noo Li; Taylor, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of the presynaptic terminal is a complex and rapid event that normally occurs in spatially specific axonal regions distant from the soma; thus, it is believed to be dependent on intra-axonal mechanisms. However, the full nature of the local events governing presynaptic assembly remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), the major degradative pathway, in the local modulation of presynaptic differentiation. We found that proteasome inhibition has a synaptogenic effect on isolated axons. In addition, formation of a stable cluster of synaptic vesicles onto a postsynaptic partner occurs in parallel to an on-site decrease in proteasome degradation. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins at nascent sites is a local trigger for presynaptic clustering. Finally, proteasome-related ubiquitin chains (K11 and K48) function as signals for the assembly of presynaptic terminals. Collectively, we propose a new axon-intrinsic mechanism for presynaptic assembly through local UPS inhibition. Subsequent on-site accumulation of proteins in their polyubiquitinated state triggers formation of presynapses. PMID:27022091

  6. Presynaptic muscarinic control of glutamatergic synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Buño, W; Cabezas, C; Fernández de Sevilla, D

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the medial septal nucleus and Broca's diagonal band that terminate in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions (Frotscher and Leranth, 1985). Glutamatergic synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons are presynaptically inhibited by acetylcholine (ACh), via activation of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) at the terminals of Schaffer collaterals (SCs) (Hounsgaard, 1978; Fernández de Sevilla et al., 2002, 2003). There are two types of SC-CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. One type, called functional synapse, shows postsynaptic alpha- amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-receptor mediated currents at resting potential (Vm) and both AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents when depolarized. The other type, termed silent synapse, only displays postsynaptic NMDAR-mediated currents at depolarized Vms, but does not respond at the resting Vm (Isaac et al., 1995). Using hippocampal slices obtained from young Wistar rats, we examined the effects of activation of cholinergic afferents at the stratum oriens/alveus on excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in CA1 pyramidal neurons by stimulation of SCs. We also tested the action of the nonhydrolyzable cholinergic agonist carbamylcholine chloride (CCh) on EPSCs evoked by minimal stimulation of SCs (which activates a single or very few synapses) in functional and silent synapses.

  7. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Arbilla, S; Langer, S Z

    1981-12-17

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [3H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01--1 microM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [3H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.01--1 microM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1--10 microM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1 microM) of the stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [3H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat induces excitotoxic loss of presynaptic terminals in hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Angela H.; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection of the CNS produces dendritic damage that correlates with cognitive decline in patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HIV-induced neurotoxicity results in part from viral proteins shed from infected cells, including the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat). We previously showed that Tat binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), resulting in overactivation of NMDA receptors, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and subsequent loss of postsynaptic densities. Here, we show that Tat also induces a loss of presynaptic terminals. The number of presynaptic terminals was quantified using confocal imaging of synaptophysin fused to green fluorescent protein (Syn-GFP). Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was secondary to excitatory postsynaptic mechanisms because treatment with an LRP antagonist or an NMDA receptor antagonist inhibited this loss. Treatment with nutlin-3, an E3 ligase inhibitor, prevented Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals. These data suggest that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is a consequence of excitotoxic postsynaptic activity. We previously found that ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonist, induced recovery of postsynaptic densities. Here we show that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was reversed by ifenprodil treatment. Thus, Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is reversible, and this recovery can be initiated by inhibiting a subset of postsynaptic NMDA receptors. Understanding the dynamics of synaptic changes in response to HIV infection of the CNS may lead to the design of improved pharmacotherapies for HAND patients. PMID:23267846

  9. Mechanisms underlying presynaptic Ca2+ transient and vesicular glutamate release at a CNS nerve terminal during in vitro ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Yi; Kim, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    ischaemia-induced increases in presynaptic Ca2+ and vesicular glutamate release. In addition, the removal of extracellular Na+ completely inhibited the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise. It therefore appears that a link between Na+ accumulation and Ca2+ uptake via NCX underlies the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise and the consequent increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in the early phase of brain ischaemia. PMID:25833340

  10. Presynaptic Mechanisms of Lead Neurotoxicity: Effects on Vesicular Release, Vesicle Clustering and Mitochondria Number

    PubMed Central

    McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Stanton, Patric K.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  11. Non-Markovian State-Dependent Networks in Critical Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-23

    orthant. We give an application to generalised Jackson networks with state-dependent rates. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13...process is a continuous-path reflected process on the nonnegative orthant. We give an application to generalised Jackson networks with state-dependent...We give an application to generalised Jackson networks with state-dependent rates. Keywords: State-dependent networks, non-Markovian networks

  12. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  13. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  14. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  15. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  16. Presynaptic Regulation of Dopamine Transmission in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Gholson J.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Moore, Holly; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    A role for dopamine (DA) release in the hallucinations and other positive symptoms associated with schizophrenia has long been inferred from the antipsychotic response to D2 DA receptor antagonists and because the DA releaser amphetamine can be psychotogenic. Recent studies suggest that patients with schizophrenia, including those never exposed to antipsychotic drugs, maintain high presynaptic DA accumulation in the striatum. New laboratory approaches are elucidating mechanisms that control the level of presynaptic DA stores, thus contributing to fundamental understanding of the basic pathophysiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. PMID:19525353

  17. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  18. Presynaptic and extrasynaptic regulation of posterior nucleus of thalamus.

    PubMed

    Park, Anthony; Li, Ying; Masri, Radi; Keller, Asaf

    2017-03-22

    The posterior nucleus of thalamus (PO) is a higher-order nucleus involved in sensorimotor processing, including nociception. An important characteristic of PO is its wide range of activity profiles that vary across states of arousal, thought to underlie differences in somatosensory perception subject to attention and degree of consciousness. Further, PO loses the ability to down-regulate its activity level in some forms of chronic pain, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms underlying the normal modulation of PO activity may be pathologically altered. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for regulating such a wide dynamic range of activity are unknown. Here, we test a series of hypotheses regarding the function of several presynaptic receptors on both GABAergic and glutamatergic afferents targeting PO in mouse, using acute slice electrophysiology. We found that presynaptic GABAB receptors are present on both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals in PO, but only those on GABAergic terminals are tonically active. We also found that release from GABAergic terminals, but not glutamatergic terminals, is suppressed by cholinergic activation, and that a subpopulation of GABAergic terminals is regulated by cannabinoids. Finally, we discovered the presence of tonic currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in PO that are heterogeneously distributed across the nucleus. Thus, we demonstrate that multiple regulatory mechanisms concurrently exist in PO, and we propose that regulation of inhibition, rather than excitation, is the more consequential mechanism by which PO activity can be regulated.

  19. Presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents in young and old adults when performing force and position control.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Stéphane; Maerz, Adam H; Enoka, Roger M

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigated presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) when young and old adults exerted a wrist extension force either to support an inertial load (position control) or to achieve an equivalent constant torque against a rigid restraint (force control) at 5, 10, and 15% of the maximal force. H reflexes were evoked in the ECR by stimulating the radial nerve above the elbow. A conditioning stimulus was applied to the median nerve above the elbow to assess presynaptic inhibition of homonymous Ia afferents (D1 inhibition) or at the wrist (palmar branch) to assess the ongoing presynaptic inhibition of heteronymous Ia afferents that converge onto the ECR motor neuron pool (heteronymous Ia facilitation). The young adults had less D1 inhibition and greater heteronymous Ia facilitation during the position task (79 and 132.1%, respectively) compared with the force task (69.1 and 115.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). In contrast, the old adults exhibited no difference between the two tasks for either D1 inhibition ( approximately 72%) or heteronymous Ia facilitation ( approximately 114%). Contraction intensity did not influence the amount of D1 inhibition or heteronymous Ia facilitation for either group of subjects. The amount of antagonist coactivation was similar between tasks for young adults, whereas it was greater in the position task for old adults (P = 0.02). These data indicate that in contrast to young adults, old adults did not modulate presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents when controlling the position of a compliant load but rather increased coactivation of the antagonist muscle.

  20. Presynaptic selection of afferent inflow in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1999-01-01

    The synaptic effectiveness of sensory fibers ending in the spinal cord of vertebrates can be centrally controlled by means of specific sets of GABAergic interneurons that make axo-axonic synapses with the terminal arborizations of the afferent fibers. In the steady state, the intracellular concentration of chloride ions in these terminals is higher than that predicted from a passive distribution, because of an active transport mechanism. Following the release of GABA by spinal interneurons and activation of GABA(A) receptors in the afferent terminals, there is an outwardly directed efflux of chloride ions that produces primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and reduces transmitter release (presynaptic inhibition). Studies made by intrafiber recording of PAD, or by measuring changes in the intraspinal threshold of single afferent terminals (which is reduced during PAD), have further indicated that muscle and cutaneous afferents have distinctive, but modifiable PAD patterns in response to segmental and descending stimuli. This has suggested that PAD and presynaptic inhibition in the various types of afferents is mediated by separate sets of last-order GABAergic interneurons. Direct activation, by means of intraspinal microstimulation, of single or small groups of last-order PAD-mediating interneurons shows that the monosynaptic PAD elicited in Ia and Ib afferents can remain confined to some sets of the intraspinal collaterals and not spread to nearby collaterals. The local character of PAD allows cutaneous and descending inputs to selectively inhibit the PAD of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of individual muscle spindle afferents. It thus seems that the intraspinal branches of the sensory fibers are not hard wired routes that diverge excitation to spinal neurons, but are instead dynamic pathways that can be centrally controlled to address information to selected neuronal targets. This feature appears to play an important role in the selection of

  1. Presynaptic gain control drives sweet and bitter taste integration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bonnie; Chui, Vincent; Mann, Kevin; Gordon, Michael D

    2014-09-08

    The sense of taste is critical in determining the nutritional suitability of foods. Sweet and bitter are primary taste modalities in mammals, and their behavioral relevance is similar in flies. Sweet taste drives the appetitive response to energy sources, whereas bitter taste drives avoidance of potential toxins and also suppresses the sweet response [1, 2]. Despite their importance to survival, little is known about the neural circuit mechanisms underlying integration of sweet and bitter taste. Here, we describe a presynaptic gain control mechanism in Drosophila that differentially affects sweet and bitter taste channels and mediates integration of these opposing stimuli. Gain control is known to play an important role in fly olfaction, where GABAB receptor (GABABR) mediates intra- and interglomerular presynaptic inhibition of sensory neuron output [3-5]. In the taste system, we find that gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) responding to sweet compounds express GABABR, whereas those that respond to bitter do not. GABABR mediates presynaptic inhibition of calcium responses in sweet GRNs, and both sweet and bitter stimuli evoke GABAergic neuron activity in the vicinity of GRN axon terminals. Pharmacological blockade and genetic reduction of GABABR both lead to increased sugar responses and decreased suppression of the sweet response by bitter compounds. We propose a model in which GABA acts via GABABR to expand the dynamic range of sweet GRNs through presynaptic gain control and suppress the output of sweet GRNs in the presence of opposing bitter stimuli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. State-dependent control of breathing by the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter GR; Kanbar, Roy; Basting, Tyler M; Hodges, Walter M; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-01

    Key points This study explores the state dependence of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex (HCVR). We simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity by activating or inhibiting the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) by optogenetics in conscious rats. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia increased both breathing frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. Optogenetic inhibition of RTN reduced VT in all sleep–wake states, but reduced fR only during quiet wake and non-REM sleep. RTN stimulation always increased VT but raised fR only in quiet wake and non-REM sleep. Phasic RTN stimulation produced active expiration and reduced early expiratory airflow (i.e. increased upper airway resistance) only during wake. We conclude that the HCVR is highly state-dependent. The HCVR is reduced during REM sleep because fR is no longer under chemoreceptor control and thus could explain why central sleep apnoea is less frequent in REM sleep. Abstract Breathing has different characteristics during quiet wake, non-REM or REM sleep, including variable dependence on . We investigated whether the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a proton-sensitive structure that mediates a large portion of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex, regulates breathing differently during sleep vs. wake. Electroencephalogram, neck electromyogram, blood pressure, respiratory frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) were recorded in 28 conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Optogenetic stimulation of RTN with channelrhodopsin-2, or inhibition with archaerhodopsin, simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity. Both opsins were delivered with PRSX8-promoter-containing lentiviral vectors. RTN and catecholaminergic neurons were transduced. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia (3 or 6% ) increased both fR and VT whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. RTN

  3. Presynaptic nanodomains: a tale of two synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Yang; Augustine, George J

    2014-01-01

    Here we summarize the evidence from two "giant" presynaptic terminals-the squid giant synapse and the mammalian calyx of Held-supporting the involvement of nanodomain calcium signals in triggering of neurotransmitter release. At the squid synapse, there are three main lines of experimental evidence for nanodomain signaling. First, changing the size of the unitary calcium channel current by altering external calcium concentration causes a non-linear change in transmitter release, while changing the number of open channels by broadening the presynaptic action potential causes a linear change in release. Second, low-affinity calcium indicators, calcium chelators, and uncaging of calcium all suggest that presynaptic calcium concentrations are as high as hundreds of micromolar, which is more compatible with a nanodomain type of calcium signal. Finally, neurotransmitter release is much less affected by the slow calcium chelator, ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), in comparison to the rapid chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Similarly, as the calyx of Held synapse matures, EGTA becomes less effective in attenuating transmitter release while the number of calcium channels required to trigger a single fusion event declines. This suggests a developmental transformation of microdomain to nanodomain coupling between calcium channels and transmitter release. Calcium imaging and uncaging experiments, in combination with simulations of calcium diffusion, indicate the peak calcium concentration seen by presynaptic calcium sensors reaches at least tens of micromolar at the calyx of Held. Taken together, data from these provide a compelling argument that nanodomain calcium signaling gates very rapid transmitter release.

  4. Presynaptic nanodomains: a tale of two synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Yang; Augustine, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we summarize the evidence from two “giant” presynaptic terminals—the squid giant synapse and the mammalian calyx of Held—supporting the involvement of nanodomain calcium signals in triggering of neurotransmitter release. At the squid synapse, there are three main lines of experimental evidence for nanodomain signaling. First, changing the size of the unitary calcium channel current by altering external calcium concentration causes a non-linear change in transmitter release, while changing the number of open channels by broadening the presynaptic action potential causes a linear change in release. Second, low-affinity calcium indicators, calcium chelators, and uncaging of calcium all suggest that presynaptic calcium concentrations are as high as hundreds of micromolar, which is more compatible with a nanodomain type of calcium signal. Finally, neurotransmitter release is much less affected by the slow calcium chelator, ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), in comparison to the rapid chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N’,N’-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Similarly, as the calyx of Held synapse matures, EGTA becomes less effective in attenuating transmitter release while the number of calcium channels required to trigger a single fusion event declines. This suggests a developmental transformation of microdomain to nanodomain coupling between calcium channels and transmitter release. Calcium imaging and uncaging experiments, in combination with simulations of calcium diffusion, indicate the peak calcium concentration seen by presynaptic calcium sensors reaches at least tens of micromolar at the calyx of Held. Taken together, data from these provide a compelling argument that nanodomain calcium signaling gates very rapid transmitter release. PMID:25674049

  5. Optical measurement of presynaptic calcium currents.

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, B L; Regehr, W G

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of presynaptic calcium currents are vital to understanding the control of transmitter release. However, most presynaptic boutons in the vertebrate central nervous system are too small to allow electrical recordings of presynaptic calcium currents (I(Ca)pre). We therefore tested the possibility of measuring I(Ca)pre optically in boutons loaded with calcium-sensitive fluorophores. From a theoretical treatment of a system containing an endogenous buffer and an indicator, we determined the conditions necessary for the derivative of the stimulus-evoked change in indicator fluorescence to report I(Ca)pre accurately. Matching the calcium dissociation rates of the endogenous buffer and indicator allows the most precise optical measurements of I(Ca)pre. We tested our ability to measure I(Ca)pre in granule cells in rat cerebellar slices. The derivatives of stimulus-evoked fluorescence transients from slices loaded with the low-affinity calcium indicators magnesium green and mag-fura-5 had the same time courses and were unaffected by changes in calcium influx or indicator concentration. Thus both of these indicators were well suited to measuring I(Ca)pre. In contrast, the high-affinity indicator fura-2 distorted I(Ca)pre. The optically determined I(Ca)pre was well approximated by a Gaussian with a half-width of 650 micros at 24 degrees C and 340 micros at 34 degrees C. PMID:9512051

  6. Dopamine presynaptically and heterogeneously modulates nucleus accumbens medium-spiny neuron GABA synapses in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Geldwert, Daron; Norris, J Madison; Feldman, Igor G; Schulman, Joshua J; Joyce, Myra P; Rayport, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background The striatal complex is the major target of dopamine action in the CNS. There, medium-spiny GABAergic neurons, which constitute about 95% of the neurons in the area, form a mutually inhibitory synaptic network that is modulated by dopamine. When put in culture, the neurons reestablish this network. In particular, they make autaptic connections that provide access to single, identified medium-spiny to medium-spiny neuron synaptic connections. Results We examined medium-spiny neuron autaptic connections in postnatal cultures from the nucleus accumbens, the ventral part of the striatal complex. These connections were subject to presynaptic dopamine modulation. D1-like receptors mediated either inhibition or facilitation, while D2-like receptors predominantly mediated inhibition. Many connections showed both D1 and D2 modulation, consistent with a significant functional colocalization of D1 and D2-like receptors at presynaptic sites. These same connections were subject to GABAA, GABAB, norepinephrine and serotonin modulation, revealing a multiplicity of modulatory autoreceptors and heteroreceptors on individual varicosities. In some instances, autaptic connections had two components that were differentially modulated by dopamine agonists, suggesting that dopamine receptors could be distributed heterogeneously on the presynaptic varicosities making up a single synaptic (i.e. autaptic) connection. Conclusion Differential trafficking of dopamine receptors to different presynaptic varicosities could explain the many controversial studies reporting widely varying degrees of dopamine receptor colocalization in medium-spiny neurons, as well as more generally the diversity of dopamine actions in target areas. Longer-term changes in the modulatory actions of dopamine in the striatal complex could be due to plasticity in the presynaptic distribution of dopamine receptors on medium-spiny neuron varicosities. PMID:16813648

  7. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  8. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase ablation disrupts presynaptic architecture and function via an ubiquitin- proteasome mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mitroi, Daniel N.; Deutschmann, André U.; Raucamp, Maren; Karunakaran, Indulekha; Glebov, Konstantine; Hans, Michael; Walter, Jochen; Saba, Julie; Gräler, Markus; Ehninger, Dan; Sopova, Elena; Shupliakov, Oleg; Swandulla, Dieter; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild

    2016-01-01

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a degradation product of sphingolipids that are particularly abundant in neurons. We have shown previously that neuronal S1P accumulation is toxic leading to ER-stress and an increase in intracellular calcium. To clarify the neuronal function of S1P, we generated brain-specific knockout mouse models in which S1P-lyase (SPL), the enzyme responsible for irreversible S1P cleavage was inactivated. Constitutive ablation of SPL in the brain (SPLfl/fl/Nes) but not postnatal neuronal forebrain-restricted SPL deletion (SPLfl/fl/CaMK) caused marked accumulation of S1P. Hence, altered presynaptic architecture including a significant decrease in number and density of synaptic vesicles, decreased expression of several presynaptic proteins, and impaired synaptic short term plasticity were observed in hippocampal neurons from SPLfl/fl/Nes mice. Accordingly, these mice displayed cognitive deficits. At the molecular level, an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was detected which resulted in a decreased expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 and several presynaptic proteins. Upon inhibition of proteasomal activity, USP14 levels, expression of presynaptic proteins and synaptic function were restored. These findings identify S1P metabolism as a novel player in modulating synaptic architecture and plasticity. PMID:27883090

  9. Presynaptic LTP and LTD of excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Pablo E

    2012-02-01

    Ubiquitous forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) are caused by enduring increases or decreases in neurotransmitter release. Such forms or presynaptic plasticity are equally observed at excitatory and inhibitory synapses and the list of locations expressing presynaptic LTP and LTD continues to grow. In addition to the mechanistically distinct forms of postsynaptic plasticity, presynaptic plasticity offers a powerful means to modify neural circuits. A wide range of induction mechanisms has been identified, some of which occur entirely in the presynaptic terminal, whereas others require retrograde signaling from the postsynaptic to presynaptic terminals. In spite of this diversity of induction mechanisms, some common induction rules can be identified across synapses. Although the precise molecular mechanism underlying long-term changes in transmitter release in most cases remains unclear, increasing evidence indicates that presynaptic LTP and LTD can occur in vivo and likely mediate some forms of learning.

  10. The Proteome of the Murine Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Volknandt, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The proteome of the presynaptic active zone controls neurotransmitter release and the short- and long-term structural and functional dynamics of the nerve terminal. The proteinaceous inventory of the presynaptic active zone has recently been reported. This review will evaluate the subcellular fractionation protocols and the proteomic approaches employed. A breakthrough for the identification of the proteome of the presynaptic active zone was the successful employment of antibodies directed against a cytosolic epitope of membrane integral synaptic vesicle proteins for the immunopurification of synaptic vesicles docked to the presynaptic plasma membrane. Combining immunopurification and subsequent analytical mass spectrometry, hundreds of proteins, including synaptic vesicle proteins, components of the presynaptic fusion and retrieval machinery, proteins involved in intracellular and extracellular signaling and a large variety of adhesion molecules, were identified. Numerous proteins regulating the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton are indicative of the functional and structural dynamics of the presynapse. This review will critically discuss both the experimental approaches and prominent protein candidates identified. Many proteins have not previously been assigned to the presynaptic release sites and may be directly involved in the short- and long-term structural modulation of the presynaptic compartment. The identification of proteinaceous constituents of the presynaptic active zone provides the basis for further analyzing the interaction of presynaptic proteins with their targets and opens novel insights into the functional role of these proteins in neuronal communication. PMID:28250380

  11. Presynaptic strontium dynamics and synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Xu-Friedman, M A; Regehr, W G

    1999-04-01

    Strontium can replace calcium in triggering neurotransmitter release, although peak release is reduced and the duration of release is prolonged. Strontium has therefore become useful in probing release, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. Here we study the action of strontium at the granule cell to Purkinje cell synapse in mouse cerebellar slices. Presynaptic residual strontium levels were monitored with fluorescent indicators, which all responded to strontium (fura-2, calcium orange, fura-2FF, magnesium green, and mag-fura-5). When calcium was replaced by equimolar concentrations of strontium in the external bath, strontium and calcium both entered presynaptic terminals. Contaminating calcium was eliminated by including EGTA in the extracellular bath, or by loading parallel fibers with EGTA, enabling the actions of strontium to be studied in isolation. After a single stimulus, strontium reached higher peak free levels than did calcium (approximately 1.7 times greater), and decayed more slowly (half-decay time 189 ms for strontium and 32 ms for calcium). These differences in calcium and strontium dynamics are likely a consequence of greater strontium permeability through calcium channels, lower affinity of the endogenous buffer for strontium, and less efficient extrusion of strontium. Measurements of presynaptic divalent levels help to explain properties of release evoked by strontium. Parallel fiber synaptic currents triggered by strontium are smaller in amplitude and longer in duration than those triggered by calcium. In both calcium and strontium, release consists of two components, one more steeply dependent on divalent levels than the other. Strontium drives both components less effectively than does calcium, suggesting that the affinities of the sensors involved in both phases of release are lower for strontium than for calcium. Thus, the larger and slower strontium transients account for the prominent slow component of release triggered by

  12. Presynaptic strontium dynamics and synaptic transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Xu-Friedman, M A; Regehr, W G

    1999-01-01

    Strontium can replace calcium in triggering neurotransmitter release, although peak release is reduced and the duration of release is prolonged. Strontium has therefore become useful in probing release, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. Here we study the action of strontium at the granule cell to Purkinje cell synapse in mouse cerebellar slices. Presynaptic residual strontium levels were monitored with fluorescent indicators, which all responded to strontium (fura-2, calcium orange, fura-2FF, magnesium green, and mag-fura-5). When calcium was replaced by equimolar concentrations of strontium in the external bath, strontium and calcium both entered presynaptic terminals. Contaminating calcium was eliminated by including EGTA in the extracellular bath, or by loading parallel fibers with EGTA, enabling the actions of strontium to be studied in isolation. After a single stimulus, strontium reached higher peak free levels than did calcium (approximately 1.7 times greater), and decayed more slowly (half-decay time 189 ms for strontium and 32 ms for calcium). These differences in calcium and strontium dynamics are likely a consequence of greater strontium permeability through calcium channels, lower affinity of the endogenous buffer for strontium, and less efficient extrusion of strontium. Measurements of presynaptic divalent levels help to explain properties of release evoked by strontium. Parallel fiber synaptic currents triggered by strontium are smaller in amplitude and longer in duration than those triggered by calcium. In both calcium and strontium, release consists of two components, one more steeply dependent on divalent levels than the other. Strontium drives both components less effectively than does calcium, suggesting that the affinities of the sensors involved in both phases of release are lower for strontium than for calcium. Thus, the larger and slower strontium transients account for the prominent slow component of release triggered by

  13. Presynaptic G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Gatekeepers of Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kari A.; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse and addiction cause widespread social and public health problems, and the neurobiology underlying drug actions and drug use and abuse is an area of intensive research. Drugs of abuse alter synaptic transmission, and these actions contribute to acute intoxication as well as the chronic effects of abused substances. Transmission at most mammalian synapses involves neurotransmitter activation of two receptor subtypes, ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic responses and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have slower neuromodulatory actions. The GPCRs represent a large proportion of neurotransmitter receptors involved in almost all facets of nervous system function. In addition, these receptors are targets for many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neuromodulation mediated by GPCRs, with important consequences for intoxication, drug taking and responses to prolonged drug exposure, withdrawal and addiction. Among the GPCRs are several subtypes involved in presynaptic inhibition, most of which are coupled to the Gi/o class of G protein. There is increasing evidence that these presynaptic Gi/o-coupled GPCRs have important roles in the actions of drugs of abuse, as well as behaviors related to these drugs. This topic will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on receptors for three neurotransmitters, Dopamine (DA; D1- and D2-like receptors), Endocannabinoids (eCBs; CB1 receptors) and glutamate (group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors). The focus is on recent evidence from laboratory animal models (and some evidence in humans) implicating these receptors in the acute and chronic effects of numerous abused drugs, as well as in the control of drug seeking and taking. The ability of drugs targeting these receptors to modify drug seeking behavior has raised the possibility of using compounds targeting these receptors for addiction pharmacotherapy. This topic is also discussed, with emphasis on

  14. Ketamine regulates the presynaptic release machinery in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wegener, Gregers; Liebenberg, Nico; Zarate, Carlos A; Popoli, Maurizio; Elfving, Betina

    2013-07-01

    In the search for new drug targets, that may help point the way to develop fast-acting treatments for mood disorders, we have explored molecular pathways regulated by ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, which has consistently shown antidepressant response within a few hours of administration. Using Sprague-Dawley rats we investigated the effects of ketamine on the presynaptic release machinery responsible for neurotransmitter release at 1, 2 and 4 h as well as 7 days after administration of a single subanesthetic dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg). A large reduction in the accumulation of SNARE complexes was observed in hippocampal synaptic membranes after 1, 2 and 4 h of ketamine administration. In parallel, we found a selective reduction in the expression of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin I and an increase in the levels of synapsin I in hippocampal synaptosomes suggesting a mechanism by which ketamine reduces SNARE complex formation, in part, by regulating the number of synaptic vesicles in the nerve terminals. Moreover, ketamine reduced Thr(286)-phosphorylated αCaMKII and its interaction with syntaxin 1A, which identifies CaMKII as a potential target for second messenger-mediated actions of ketamine. In addition, despite previous reports of ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK-3, we were unable to detect regulation of its activity after ketamine administration. Our findings demonstrate that ketamine rapidly induces changes in the hippocampal presynaptic machinery similar to those that are obtained only with chronic treatments with traditional antidepressants. This suggests that reduction of neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus has possible relevance for the rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine.

  15. Ketamine regulates the presynaptic release machinery in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wegener, Gregers; Liebenberg, Nico; Zarate, Carlos A.; Popoli, Maurizio; Elfving, Betina

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new drug targets, that may help point the way to develop fast-acting treatments for mood disorders, we have explored molecular pathways regulated by ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, which has consistently shown antidepressant response within a few hours of administration. Using Sprague-Dawley rats we investigated the effects of ketamine on the presynaptic release machinery responsible for neurotransmitter release at 1, 2 and 4 h as well as 7 days after administration of a single subanesthetic dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg). A large reduction in the accumulation of SNARE complexes was observed in hippocampal synaptic membranes after 1, 2 and 4 h of ketamine administration. In parallel, we found a selective reduction in the expression of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin I and an increase in the levels of synapsin I in hippocampal synaptosomes suggesting a mechanism by which ketamine reduces SNARE complex formation, in part, by regulating the number of synaptic vesicles in the nerve terminals. Moreover, ketamine reduced Thr286-phosphorylated αCaMKII and its interaction with syntaxin 1A, which identifies CaMKII as a potential target for second messenger-mediated actions of ketamine. In addition, despite previous reports of ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK-3, we were unable to detect regulation of its activity after ketamine administration. Our findings demonstrate that ketamine rapidly induces changes in the hippocampal presynaptic machinery similar to those that are obtained only with chronic treatments with traditional antidepressants. This suggests that reduction of neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus has possible relevance for the rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine. PMID:23548331

  16. Trait- and state-dependent cortical inhibitory deficits in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Palomar, Francisco J; Porcacchia, Paolo; Álvarez de Toledo, Paloma; Perona-Garcelán, Salvador; Rodríguez-Testal, Juan Francisco; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Mir, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have deficits in cortical inhibition. However, whether cortical inhibitory deficits are trait- or state-dependent impairments is not yet known and their relationship with psychiatric symptoms is not yet understood. In the present study, we examined trait- and state-dependent cortical inhibitory deficits and evaluated the potential clinical significance of these deficits. Nineteen patients with bipolar I disorder were evaluated using the paired-pulse transcranial stimulation protocol, which assessed cortical inhibition during an acute manic episode. Cortical inhibition measures were compared with those obtained in 28 demographically matched healthy controls. A follow-up assessment was performed in 15 of these patients three months later, when there was remission from their mood and psychotic symptoms. The association between cortical inhibitory measures and severity of psychiatric symptoms was also studied. During mania, patients showed decreased short-interval intracortical and transcallosal inhibition, as well as a normal cortical silent period and long-interval cortical inhibition. These findings were the same during euthymia. Symptoms associated with motor hyperactivity were correlated negatively with the degree of cortical inhibition. These correlations were not significant when a Bonferroni correction was applied. The present longitudinal study showed cortical inhibitory deficits in patients with BD, and supports the hypothesis that cortical inhibitory deficits in BD are trait dependent. Further research is necessary to confirm the clinical significance of these deficits. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Presynaptic mechanisms of learning and memory].

    PubMed

    Yawo, Hiromu; Ishizuka, Toru

    2008-07-01

    Synaptic transmission is regulated by vesicular exocytosis and subsequent recycling at the presynaptic terminals. These vesicular dynamics were quantified by measuring the synaptop Hluorin fluorescence from individual large mossy fiber boutons in the hippocampus of a TV-42 transgenic mouse in which synaptopHluorin is specifically expressed in the mossy fiber boutons. We found that there are 2 distinct vesicle pools: a resting pool, which is resistant to exocytosis, and a releasable pool. The initially docked vesicles are easily depleted and the readily releasable pool (RRP) is replenished by the reserve subpopulation of the releasable pool ("reserve" releasable pool, RsvRP). When some of the silent synapses, which are pre-existing but are incapable of transmission, are recruited for transmission, a large number of alternative neuronal circuits are created in an off/on-switching manner. Here, we show that protein kinase C (PKC) activation facilitates presynaptic unsilencing at certain release sites, provided by the large mossy fiber boutons in the mouse hippocampus, by redirecting the synaptic vesicles from the resting pool to the RsvRP. At other sites PKC also facilitates the replenishment of the RRP from the RsvRP. Synaptic transmission was also potentiated through a mechanism involving non-PKC C1 domain-containing receptors, which would increase the size of the RRP. Thus, PKC and non-PKC mechanisms differentially reorganize vesicular dynamics and synergistically potentiate transmission.

  18. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  19. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-07-06

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  20. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  1. Heterogeneous reallocation of presynaptic efficacy in recurrent excitatory circuits adapting to inactivity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ananya; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Tsien, Richard W

    2011-12-18

    Recurrent excitatory circuits face extreme challenges in balancing efficacy and stability. We recorded from CA3 pyramidal neuron pairs in rat hippocampal slice cultures to characterize synaptic and circuit-level changes in recurrent synapses resulting from long-term inactivity. Chronic tetrodotoxin treatment greatly reduced the percentage of connected CA3-CA3 neurons, but enhanced the strength of the remaining connections; presynaptic release probability sharply increased, whereas quantal size was unaltered. Connectivity was decreased in activity-deprived circuits by functional silencing of synapses, whereas three-dimensional anatomical analysis revealed no change in spine or bouton density or aggregate dendrite length. The silencing arose from enhanced Cdk5 activity and could be reverted by acute Cdk5 inhibition with roscovitine. Our results suggest that recurrent circuits adapt to chronic inactivity by reallocating presynaptic weights heterogeneously, strengthening certain connections while silencing others. This restricts synaptic output and input, preserving signaling efficacy among a subset of neuronal ensembles while protecting network stability.

  2. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Decrease Neurotransmitter Release in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons During Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral damage to the peripheral vestibular receptors precipitates a debilitating syndrome of oculomotor and balance deficits at rest, which extensively normalize during the first week after the lesion due to vestibular compensation. In vivo studies suggest that GABAB receptor activation facilitates recovery. However, the presynaptic or postsynaptic sites of action of GABAB receptors in vestibular nuclei neurons after lesions have not been determined. Accordingly, here presynaptic and postsynaptic GABAB receptor activity in principal cells of the tangential nucleus, a major avian vestibular nucleus, was investigated using patch-clamp recordings correlated with immunolabeling and confocal imaging of the GABAB receptor subunit-2 (GABABR2) in controls and operated chickens shortly after unilateral vestibular ganglionectomy (UVG). Baclofen, a GABAB agonist, generated no postsynaptic currents in principal cells in controls, which correlated with weak GABABR2 immunolabeling on principal cell surfaces. However, baclofen decreased miniature excitatory (mEPSC) and GABAergic inhibitory (mIPSC) events in principal cells in controls, compensating and uncompensated chickens three days after UVG, indicating the presence of functional GABAB receptors on presynaptic terminals. Baclofen decreased GABAergic mIPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side of compensating chickens, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in synaptotagmin2 (Syt2)-labeled terminals. In uncompensated chickens, baclofen decreased mEPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in Syt1-labeled terminals. Altogether, these results revealed changes in presynaptic GABAB receptor function and expression which differed in compensating and uncompensated chickens shortly after UVG. This work supports an important role for GABAB autoreceptor

  3. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  4. Presynaptic gain control by endogenous cotransmission of dopamine and GABA in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Vaaga, Christopher E; Yorgason, Jordan T; Williams, John T; Westbrook, Gary L

    2017-03-01

    In the olfactory bulb, lateral inhibition mediated by local juxtaglomerular interneurons has been proposed as a gain control mechanism, important for decorrelating odorant responses. Among juxtaglomerular interneurons, short axon cells are unique as dual-transmitter neurons that release dopamine and GABA. To examine their intraglomerular function, we expressed channelrhodopsin under control of the DAT-cre promoter and activated olfactory afferents within individual glomeruli. Optical stimulation of labeled cells triggered endogenous dopamine release as measured by cyclic voltammetry and GABA release as measured by whole cell GABAA receptor currents. Activation of short axon cells reduced the afferent presynaptic release probability via D2 and GABAB receptor activation, resulting in reduced spiking in both mitral and external tufted cells. Our results suggest that short axon cells influence glomerular activity not only by direct inhibition of external tufted cells but also by inhibition of afferent inputs to external tufted and mitral cells.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Sensory systems, including the olfactory system, encode information across a large dynamic range, making synaptic mechanisms of gain control critical to proper function. Here we demonstrate that a dual-transmitter interneuron in the olfactory bulb controls the gain of intraglomerular afferent input via two distinct mechanisms, presynaptic inhibition as well as inhibition of a principal neuron subtype, and thereby potently controls the synaptic gain of afferent inputs. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Regulation of postsynaptic retrograde signaling by presynaptic exosome release

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Ceren; Li, Yihang; Koles, Kate; Brewer, Cassandra; Ashley, James; Yoshihara, Motojiro; Budnik, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Retrograde signals from postsynaptic targets are critical during development and plasticity of synaptic connections. These signals serve to adjust the activity of presynaptic cells according to postsynaptic cell outputs and to maintain synaptic function within a dynamic range. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that trigger the release of retrograde signals and the role of presynaptic cells in this signaling event are unknown. Here we show that a retrograde signal mediated by Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4) is transmitted to the postsynaptic cell through anterograde delivery of Syt4 via exosomes. Thus, by transferring an essential component of retrograde signaling through exosomes, presynaptic cells enable retrograde signaling. PMID:23522040

  6. Prefrontal and Striatal Glutamate Differently Relate to Striatal Dopamine: Potential Regulatory Mechanisms of Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine Function?

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Deserno, Lorenz; Lorenz, Robert Christian; Boehme, Rebecca; Pankow, Anne; Buchert, Ralph; Kühn, Simone; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and animal work has proposed that prefrontal cortex (PFC) glutamate inhibits dopaminergic inputs to the ventral striatum (VS) indirectly, whereas direct VS glutamatergic afferents have been suggested to enhance dopaminergic inputs to the VS. In the present study, we aimed to investigate relationships of glutamate and dopamine measures in prefrontostriatal circuitries of healthy humans. We hypothesized that PFC and VS glutamate, as well as their balance, are differently associated with VS dopamine. Glutamate concentrations in the left lateral PFC and left striatum were assessed using 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity was measured by fluorine-18-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-18-FDOPA) positron emission tomography. First, a negative relationship was observed between glutamate concentrations in lateral PFC and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 28). Second, a positive relationship was revealed between striatal glutamate and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 26). Additionally, the intraindividual difference between PFC and striatal glutamate concentrations correlated negatively with VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 24). The present results indicate an involvement of a balance in PFC and striatal glutamate in the regulation of VS dopamine synthesis capacity. This notion points toward a potential mechanism how VS presynaptic dopamine levels are kept in a fine-tuned range. A disruption of this mechanism may account for alterations in striatal dopamine turnover as observed in mental diseases (e.g., in schizophrenia). The present work demonstrates complementary relationships between prefrontal and striatal glutamate and ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine using human imaging measures: a negative correlation between prefrontal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine and a positive relationship between striatal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine are revealed. The results may reflect a regulatory role

  7. Presynaptic Control of Corticostriatal Synapses by Endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABAB receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABAA, and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABAB receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABAB receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  8. Muscarinic presynaptic modulation in GABAergic pallidal synapses of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Aceves, José J; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E; Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is central for basal ganglia processing. It expresses muscarinic cholinergic receptors and receives cholinergic afferents from the pedunculopontine nuclei (PPN) and other regions. The role of these receptors and afferents is unknown. Muscarinic M1-type receptors are expressed by synapses from striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Because axons from SPNs project to the GPe, one hypothesis is that striatopallidal GABAergic terminals may be modulated by M1 receptors. Alternatively, some M1 receptors may be postsynaptic in some pallidal neurons. Evidence of muscarinic modulation in any of these elements would suggest that cholinergic afferents from the PPN, or other sources, could modulate the function of the GPe. In this study, we show this evidence using striatopallidal slice preparations: after field stimulation in the striatum, the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine significantly reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) from synapses that exhibited short-term synaptic facilitation. This inhibition was associated with significant increases in paired-pulse facilitation, and quantal content was proportional to IPSC amplitude. These actions were blocked by atropine, pirenzepine, and mamba toxin-7, suggesting that receptors involved were M1. In addition, we found that some pallidal neurons have functional postsynaptic M1 receptors. Moreover, some evoked IPSCs exhibited short-term depression and a different kind of modulation: they were indirectly modulated by muscarine via the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Thus pallidal synapses presenting distinct forms of short-term plasticity were modulated differently. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Postsynaptic protein synthesis is required for presynaptic enhancement in persistent forms of long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P. A.; Raymond, Clarke R.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus is a fundamental process underlying learning and memory in the brain. At CA3-CA1 synapses, three discrete forms of LTP (LTP1, 2, and 3) have been differentiated on the basis of their persistence, maintenance mechanisms, Ca2+ signaling pathways, expression loci, and electrophysiological requirements. We previously showed that LTP2 and LTP3 involve a presynaptic expression component that is established in a translation-dependent manner. Here we investigate the locus of translation required for presynaptic expression. Neurotransmitter release rate was estimated via FM 1-43 destaining from CA3 terminals in hippocampal slices from male Wistar rats (6–8 weeks). Destaining was measured at sites making putative contact with CA1 dendritic processes in stratum radiatum that had been filled with a membrane impermeable translation inhibitor and a fluorescent indicator. Our results suggest that inhibition of postsynaptic translation eliminates the enhanced release ordinarily observed at 160 min post-LTP induction, and that this effect is limited to sites closely apposed to the filled postsynaptic cell. We conclude that postsynaptic translation is required for the presynaptic component of LTP2 and LTP3 expression. These data considerably strengthen the mechanistic separation of LTP1, 2, and 3 and provide evidence for an expanded repertoire of communication between synaptic elements. PMID:23450328

  10. Modulation of Presynaptic Plasticity and Learning by the H-ras/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase/Synapsin I Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Steven A.; Elgersma, Ype; Murphy, Geoffrey G.; Jaarsma, Dick; van Woerden, Geeske M.; Hojjati, Mohammad Reza; Cui, Yijun; LeBoutillier, Janelle C.; Marrone, Diano F.; Choi, Esther S.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Petit, Ted L.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Silva, Alcino J.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular and cellular studies of the mechanisms underlying mammalian learning and memory have focused almost exclusively on postsynaptic function. We now reveal an experience-dependent presynaptic mechanism that modulates learning and synaptic plasticity in mice. Consistent with a presynaptic function for endogenous H-ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, we observed that, under normal physiologic conditions in wild-type mice, hippocampus-dependent learning stimulated the ERK-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I, and MEK (MAP kinase kinase)/ERK inhibition selectively decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs. By generating transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of H-ras (H-rasG12V), which is abundantly localized in axon terminals, we were able to increase the ERK-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I. This resulted in several presynaptic changes, including a higher density of docked neurotransmitter vesicles in glutamatergic terminals, an increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, and increased paired-pulse facilitation. In addition, we observed facilitated neurotransmitter release selectively during high-frequency activity with consequent increases in long-term potentiation. Moreover, these mice showed dramatic enhancements in hippocampus-dependent learning. Importantly, deletion of synapsin I, an exclusively presynaptic protein, blocked the enhancements of learning, presynaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Together with previous invertebrate studies, these results demonstrate that presynaptic plasticity represents an important evolutionarily conserved mechanism for modulating learning and memory. PMID:16237176

  11. Predicting Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Neurotoxins by Developing Feature Selection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunchun; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Huang, Po

    2017-01-01

    Presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins are proteins which act at the presynaptic and postsynaptic membrane. Correctly predicting presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins will provide important clues for drug-target discovery and drug design. In this study, we developed a theoretical method to discriminate presynaptic neurotoxins from postsynaptic neurotoxins. A strict and objective benchmark dataset was constructed to train and test our proposed model. The dipeptide composition was used to formulate neurotoxin samples. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was proposed to find out the optimal feature set which can produce the maximum accuracy. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the overall accuracy of 94.9% was achieved. We believe that the proposed model will provide important information to study neurotoxins. PMID:28303250

  12. Effects of fast presynaptic noise in attractor neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cortes, J M; Torres, J J; Marro, J; Garrido, P L; Kappen, H J

    2006-03-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the effect of presynaptic noise on the transmission of information in attractor neural networks. The noise occurs on a very short timescale compared to that for the neuron dynamics and it produces short-time synaptic depression. This is inspired in recent neurobiological findings that show that synaptic strength may either increase or decrease on a short timescale depending on presynaptic activity. We thus describe a mechanism by which fast presynaptic noise enhances the neural network sensitivity to an external stimulus. The reason is that, in general, presynaptic noise induces nonequilibrium behavior and, consequently, the space of fixed points is qualitatively modified in such a way that the system can easily escape from the attractor. As a result, the model shows, in addition to pattern recognition, class identification and categorization, which may be relevant to the understanding of some of the brain complex tasks.

  13. Mitochondria and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase control presynaptic Ca2+ clearance in capsaicin-sensitive rat sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shutov, Leonid P; Kim, Man-Su; Houlihan, Patrick R; Medvedeva, Yuliya V; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2013-01-01

    The central processes of primary nociceptors form synaptic connections with the second-order nociceptive neurons located in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These synapses gate the flow of nociceptive information from the periphery to the CNS, and plasticity at these synapses contributes to centrally mediated hyperalgesia and allodynia. Although exocytosis and synaptic plasticity are controlled by Ca2+ at the release sites, the mechanisms underlying presynaptic Ca2+ signalling at the nociceptive synapses are not well characterized. We examined the presynaptic mechanisms regulating Ca2+ clearance following electrical stimulation in capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors using a dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord neuron co-culture system. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) recovery following electrical stimulation was well approximated by a monoexponential function with a τ∼2 s. Inhibition of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase did not affect presynaptic [Ca2+]i recovery, and blocking plasmalemmal Na+/Ca2+ exchange produced only a small reduction in the rate of [Ca2+]i recovery (∼12%) that was independent of intracellular K+. However, [Ca2+]i recovery in presynaptic boutons strongly depended on the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) and mitochondria that accounted for ∼47 and 40%, respectively, of presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. Measurements using a mitochondria-targeted Ca2+ indicator, mtPericam, demonstrated that presynaptic mitochondria accumulated Ca2+ in response to electrical stimulation. Quantitative analysis revealed that the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is highly sensitive to presynaptic [Ca2+]i elevations, and occurs at [Ca2+]i levels as low as ∼200–300 nm. Using RT-PCR, we detected expression of several putative mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters in DRG, such as MCU, Letm1 and NCLX. Collectively, this work identifies PMCA and mitochondria as the major regulators of presynaptic Ca2+ signalling at the first sensory synapse, and underlines the high

  14. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Helm, Martin S.

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  15. The molecular architecture of ribbon presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Zanazzi, George; Matthews, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The primary receptor neurons of the auditory, vestibular, and visual systems encode a broad range of sensory information by modulating the tonic release of the neurotransmitter glutamate in response to graded changes in membrane potential. The output synapses of these neurons are marked by structures called synaptic ribbons, which tether a pool of releasable synaptic vesicles at the active zone, where glutamate release occurs in response to calcium influx through L-type channels. Ribbons are composed primarily of the protein, RIBEYE, which is unique to ribbon synapses, but cytomatrix proteins that regulate the vesicle cycle in conventional terminals, such as Piccolo and Bassoon, also are found at ribbons. Conventional and ribbon terminals differ, however, in the size, molecular composition, and mobilization of their synaptic vesicle pools. Calcium-binding proteins and plasma-membrane calcium pumps, together with endomembrane pumps and channels, play important roles in calcium handling at ribbon synapses. Taken together, emerging evidence suggests that several molecular and cellular specializations work in concert to support the sustained exocytosis of glutamate that is a hallmark of ribbon synapses. Consistent with its functional importance, abnormalities in a variety of functional aspects of the ribbon presynaptic terminal underlie several forms of auditory neuropathy and retinopathy. PMID:19253034

  16. State-dependent neutral delay equations from population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Barbarossa, M V; Hadeler, K P; Kuttler, C

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of state-dependent delay equations is derived from the balance laws of age-structured population dynamics, assuming that birth rates and death rates, as functions of age, are piece-wise constant and that the length of the juvenile phase depends on the total adult population size. The resulting class of equations includes also neutral delay equations. All these equations are very different from the standard delay equations with state-dependent delay since the balance laws require non-linear correction factors. These equations can be written as systems for two variables consisting of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and a generalized shift, a form suitable for numerical calculations. It is shown that the neutral equation (and the corresponding ODE--shift system) is a limiting case of a system of two standard delay equations.

  17. Complex state-dependent games between owls and gerbils.

    PubMed

    Berger-Tal, Oded; Mukherjee, Shomen; Kotler, Burt P; Brown, Joel S

    2010-03-01

    Predator-prey interactions are often behaviourally sophisticated games in which the predator and prey are players. Past studies teach us that hungrier prey take higher risks when foraging and that hungrier predators increase their foraging activity and are willing to take higher risks of injury. Yet no study has looked at the simultaneous responses of predator and prey to their own and each other's hunger levels in a controlled environment. We looked for evidence of a state-dependent game between predators and their prey by simultaneously manipulating the hunger state of barn owls, and Allenby's gerbils as prey. The owls significantly increased their activity when hungry. However, they did not appear to respond to changes in the hunger state of the gerbils. The gerbils reacted strongly to the owls' state, as well as to their own state when the risk was perceived as high. Our study shows that predator-prey interactions give rise to a complex state-dependent game.

  18. Rapid Assembly of Functional Presynaptic Boutons Triggered by Adhesive Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Lucido, Anna Lisa; Suarez Sanchez, Fernando; Thostrup, Peter; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio; Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Liazoghli, Dalinda; Belkaid, Wiam; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grutter, Peter; Garner, Craig C.

    2009-01-01

    CNS synapse assembly typically follows after stable contacts between “appropriate” axonal and dendritic membranes are made. We show that presynaptic boutons selectively form de novo following neuronal fiber adhesion to beads coated with poly-d-lysine (PDL), an artificial cationic polypeptide. As demonstrated by atomic force and live confocal microscopy, functional presynaptic boutons self-assemble as rapidly as 1 h after bead contact, and are found to contain a variety of proteins characteristic of presynaptic endings. Interestingly, presynaptic compartment assembly does not depend on the presence of a biological postsynaptic membrane surface. Rather, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, including syndecan-2, as well as others possibly adsorbed onto the bead matrix or expressed on the axon surface, are required for assembly to proceed by a mechanism dependent on the dynamic reorganization of F-actin. Our results indicate that certain (but not all) nonspecific cationic molecules like PDL, with presumably electrostatically mediated adhesive properties, can effectively bypass cognate and natural postsynaptic ligands to trigger presynaptic assembly in the absence of specific target recognition. In contrast, we find that postsynaptic compartment assembly depends on the prior presence of a mature presynaptic ending. PMID:19812321

  19. Risk, resources and state-dependent adaptive behavioural syndromes.

    PubMed

    Luttbeg, Barney; Sih, Andrew

    2010-12-27

    Many animals exhibit behavioural syndromes-consistent individual differences in behaviour across two or more contexts or situations. Here, we present adaptive, state-dependent mathematical models for analysing issues about behavioural syndromes. We find that asset protection (where individuals with more 'assets' tend be more cautious) and starvation avoidance, two state-dependent mechanisms, can explain short-term behavioural consistency, but not long-term stable behavioural types (BTs). These negative-feedback mechanisms tend to produce convergence in state and behaviour over time. In contrast, a positive-feedback mechanism, state-dependent safety (where individuals with higher energy reserves, size, condition or vigour are better at coping with predators), can explain stable differences in personality over the long term. The relative importance of negative- and positive-feedback mechanisms in governing behavioural consistency depends on environmental conditions (predation risk and resource availability). Behavioural syndromes emerge more readily in conditions of intermediate ecological favourability (e.g. medium risk and medium resources, or high risk and resources, or low risk and resources). Under these conditions, individuals with higher initial state maintain a tendency to be bolder than individuals that start with low initial state; i.e. later BT is determined by state during an early 'developmental window'. In contrast, when conditions are highly favourable (low risk, high resources) or highly unfavourable (high risk, low resources), individuals converge to be all relatively bold or all relatively cautious, respectively. In those circumstances, initial differences in BT are not maintained over the long term, and there is no early developmental window where initial state governs later BT. The exact range of ecological conditions favouring behavioural syndromes depends also on the strength of state-dependent safety.

  20. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors suppresses GABAergic synaptic transmission in the rat globus pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Smith, Yoland

    2007-01-01

    The globus pallidus (GP) plays a central integrative role in the basal ganglia circuitry. It receives strong GABAergic inputs from the striatum and significant glutamatergic afferents from the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The change in firing rate and pattern of GP neurons is a cardinal feature of Parkinson’s disease pathophysiology. Kainate receptor GluR6/7 subunits immunoreactivity is expressed presynaptically in GABAergic striatopallidal terminals (Kane-Jackson and Smith 2003; Jin et al., 2006), which provides a substrate for regulation of GABAergic transmission in GP. To test this hypothesis, we recorded GABAA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in the GP following electrical stimulation of the striatum. Following blockade of AMPA and NMDA receptors with selective antagonists, bath application of kainate (KA) (0.3–3 μM) reduced significantly the amplitude of evoked IPSCs. This inhibition was associated with a significant increase in paired-pulse facilitation ratio and a reduction of the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs), suggesting a presynaptic site of KA action. The KA effects on striatopallidal GABAergic transmission were blocked by the G-protein inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C. Our results demonstrate that KAR activation inhibits GABAergic transmission through a presynaptic G protein-coupled, PKC-dependent metabotropic mechanism in the rat GP. These findings open up the possibility for the development of kainate-mediated pharmacotherapies aim at decreasing the excessive and abnormally regulated inhibition of GP neurons in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:17881134

  1. Reconsolidation may incorporate state-dependency into previously consolidated memories.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Rodrigo O; Cassini, Lindsey F; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana P; Duran, Johanna M; Haubrich, Josué; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas; Quillfeldt, Jorge A

    2013-06-19

    Some memories enter into a labile state after retrieval, requiring reconsolidation in order to persist. One functional role of memory reconsolidation is the updating of existing memories. There are reports suggesting that reconsolidation can be modulated by a particular endogenous process taking place concomitantly to its natural course, such as water or sleep deprivation. Here, we investigated whether an endogenous process activated during a natural/physiological experience, or a pharmacological intervention, can also contribute to memory content updating. Using the contextual fear conditioning paradigm in rats, we found that the endogenous content of an aversive memory can be updated during its reconsolidation incorporating consequences of natural events such as water deprivation, transforming a previously stored memory into a state-dependent one. This updating seems to be mediated by the activation of angiotensin AT1 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus and local infusion of human angiotensin II (ANGII) was shown to mimic the water deprivation effects on memory reconsolidation. Systemic morphine injection was also able to turn a previously acquired experience into a state-dependent memory, reproducing the very same effects obtained by water deprivation or local angiotensin II infusion, and suggesting that other state-dependent-inducing protocols would also be able to contribute to memory updating. These findings trigger new insights about the influence of ordinary daily life events upon memory in its continuing reconstruction, adding the realm of reconsolidation to the classical view of endogenous modulation of consolidation.

  2. Endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression in a nociceptive synapse requires coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2013-03-06

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) play an important role in long-term regulation of synaptic signaling in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the role of transcription- and translation-dependent processes in presynaptic versus postsynaptic neurons was examined during eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in the CNS of the leech. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of non-nociceptive afferents elicits eCB-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) heterosynaptically in nociceptive synapses that lasts at least 2 h. Bath application of emetine, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked eCB-LTD after afferent LFS or exogenous eCB application, indicating that this depression was translation dependent. Bath application of actinomycin D, an irreversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole 1-β-d-ribofurandoside (DRB), a reversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, also prevented eCB-LTD. Selective injection of DRB or emetine into the presynaptic or postsynaptic neuron before LFS indicated that eCB-LTD required transcription and translation in the postsynaptic neuron but only translation in the presynaptic cell. Depression observed immediately after LFS was also blocked when these transcription- and translation-dependent processes were inhibited. It is proposed that induction of eCB-LTD in this nociceptive synapse requires the coordination of presynaptic protein synthesis and postsynaptic mRNA and protein synthesis. These findings provide significant insights into both eCB-based synaptic plasticity and understanding how activity in non-nociceptive afferents modulates nociceptive pathways.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls activity-dependent maturation of CA1 synapses by downregulating tonic activation of presynaptic kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Sallert, Marko; Rantamäki, Tomi; Vesikansa, Aino; Anthoni, Heidi; Harju, Kirsi; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Taira, Tomi; Castren, Eero; Lauri, Sari E

    2009-09-09

    Immature hippocampal synapses express presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs), which tonically inhibit glutamate release. Presynaptic maturation involves activity-dependent downregulation of the tonic KAR activity and consequent increase in release probability; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this developmental process are unknown. Here, we have investigated whether brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a secreted protein implicated in developmental plasticity in several areas of the brain, controls presynaptic maturation by regulating KARs. Application of BDNF in neonate hippocampal slices resulted in increase in synaptic transmission that fully occluded the immature-type KAR activity in area CA1. Conversely, genetic ablation of BDNF was associated with delayed synaptic maturation and persistent presynaptic KAR activity, suggesting a role for endogenous BDNF in the developmental regulation of KAR function. In addition, our data suggests a critical role for BDNF TrkB signaling in fast activity-dependent regulation of KARs. Selective acute inhibition of TrkB receptors using a chemical-genetic approach prevented rapid change in synapse dynamics and loss of tonic KAR activity that is typically seen in response to induction of LTP at immature synapses. Together, these data show that BDNF-TrkB-dependent maturation of glutamatergic synapses is tightly associated with a loss of endogenous KAR activity. The coordinated action of these two receptor mechanisms has immediate physiological relevance in controlling presynaptic efficacy and transmission dynamics at CA3-CA1 synapses at a stage of development when functional contact already exists but transmission is weak.

  4. On the background state dependency of (palaeo) climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heydt, Anna; Dijkstra, Henk; Köhler, Peter; van de Wal, Roderik

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium (Charney) climate sensitivity, here indicated by Sa, is the equilibrium change in Earth's global mean surface temperature due to a radiative forcing associated with a doubling of pCO2, the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although known for decades, little progress has been made in constraining upper and lower limits for climate sensitivity. Originally, Sa was derived from climate models where the atmospheric CO2 concentration is doubled in typically about 100 years. Also palaeo data have been frequently used to determine Sa, and - if slow feedback processes are adequately taken into account - indicate a similar range as those based on climate models used in the IPCC. However, palaeo data usually span a much larger time than the 100 year model experiments. Here, we focus on the last 800 kyr, where climate variability has occurred on time scales ranging from the 100.000-year ice-age cycles to millennial-scale climate variations. The traditional linear and equilibrium concept of climate sensitivity as is applied in typical (short time scale) climate model simulations might not apply to the climate system's non-stationary and non-linear response to changing forcing. One example is the background state dependency of the fast feedback processes. In this presentation, we assess the dependency of the fast feedback processes on the background climate state using data of the last 800 kyr and a conceptual climate model. Though still (locally) linear, we propose a different approach to estimate climate sensitivity which better accounts for a possible state dependency of the fast feedbacks. This approach uses local slopes of temperature versus radiative perturbation and is most suitable for palaeo-data spanning a range of background climate states. We find the specific climate sensitivities generally lower during cold (glacial) than during warm periods. Within the conceptual climate model we further estimate how the background state-dependency of the fast

  5. The determination of presynaptic KA values of methacholine and pilocarpine and of a presynaptic receptor reserve in the rat perfused heart.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, P.; Fuder, H.

    1985-01-01

    Rat isolated perfused hearts with the right sympathetic nerves attached were loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline. The nerves were stimulated with up to 11 trains of 10 pulses at 0.1 Hz. The evoked increases of [3H]-noradrenaline overflow into the perfusate were measured in the presence of cocaine, corticosterone and propranolol. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors by methacholine or pilocarpine inhibited the evoked transmitter release in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. Preperfusion with phenoxybenzamine (5 microM) for 15 min (followed by a washout of 35 min) changed neither resting nor evoked overflow of [3H]-noradrenaline. The concentration-response curve of methacholine was shifted to the right after exposure of the hearts to phenoxybenzamine (1 microM) without depression of the maximum effect. Pretreatment with phenoxybenzamine (5 microM) reduced the maximum inhibition of release by about 50%. Analysis of the data gave a dissociation constant for the agonist-receptor complex (KA) of 4.0 microM and a receptor reserve of roughly 70%. Half-maximal inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release occurred when about 2% of the total receptor population was occupied. Comparison of the concentration-response data for methacholine and pilocarpine revealed a relative efficacy (methacholine/pilocarpine) of 16, a KA of 10 microM for pilocarpine and no receptor reserve for this agonist. The results show that KA values for methacholine and pilocarpine obtained at presynaptic receptors are similar to those obtained at postsynaptic muscarinic receptors. This is in agreement with the idea that muscarinic receptors located on postganglionic adrenergic nerves are not different from those located on effector sites of non-neuronal tissue. PMID:2983804

  6. State-dependent μ-opioid modulation of social motivation.

    PubMed

    Loseth, Guro E; Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by μ-opioid transmission. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviors, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the μ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for μ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for μ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account.

  7. Cross state-dependent retrieval between histamine and lithium.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Fazli-Tabaei, Soheila; Khalilzadeh, Azita; Farahmanfar, Maryam; Yahyavi, Seyed-Hossein

    2005-09-15

    Histamine and lithium state-dependent (StD) retrieval of passive avoidance task and their interactions was examined in mice. The pre-training or pre-test intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine (20 microg/mouse) impaired retrieval when it was tested 24 h later. In the animals, in which retrieval was impaired due to histamine pre-training administration, pre-test administration of histamine, with the same dose, restored retrieval. The H1 blocker, pyrilamine (20 microg/mouse, i.c.v.), but not the H(2) blocker; ranitidine prevented the restoration of retrieval by pre-test histamine. The pre-training (5 and 10 mg/kg) or pre-test (5 mg/kg) injection of lithium also impaired retrieval, when it was tested 24 h later. In the animals that received lithium (5 mg/kg) or histamine (20 microg/mouse) as pre-training treatment, administration of histamine, clobenpropit or lithium, respectively, resulted in restoration of memory retrieval. Neither pyrilamine nor ranitidine prevented the restoration of retrieval by pre-test lithium. In conclusion, histamine or lithium can induce state-dependent retrieval and a cross-StD exists between these drugs, which may be mediated through the inositol pathway.

  8. State-dependent μ-opioid modulation of social motivation

    PubMed Central

    Loseth, Guro E.; Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by μ-opioid transmission. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviors, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the μ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for μ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for μ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account. PMID:25565999

  9. Adenosine A1 receptors presynaptically modulate excitatory synaptic input onto subiculum neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous neuromodulator previously shown to suppress synaptic transmission and membrane excitability in the CNS. In this study we have determined the actions of adenosine on excitatory synaptic transmission in the subiculum, the main output area for the hippocampus. Adenosine (10 μM) reversibly inhibited excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs) recorded from subiculum neurons. These actions were mimicked by the A1 receptor specific agonist, N6-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CPA, 10 nM) and blocked by the A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 500 nM), but were unaffected by the A2A antagonist ZM 241385 (50 nM). In membrane excitability experiments, bath application of adenosine and CPA reversibly inhibited action potentials (AP) in subiculum neurons that were evoked by stimulation of the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1, but not by depolarizing current injection steps in subiculum neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action. In support, adenosine and CPA application reduced mEPSC frequency without modulating mEPSC amplitude. These studies suggest that modulation of subiculum neuron excitability by adenosine is mediated via presynaptic A1 receptors. PMID:19450566

  10. Retrograde BMP Signaling Modulates Rapid Activity-Dependent Synaptic Growth via Presynaptic LIM Kinase Regulation of Cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Piccioli, Zachary D.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is capable of rapidly budding new presynaptic varicosities over the course of minutes in response to elevated neuronal activity. Using live imaging of synaptic growth, we characterized this dynamic process and demonstrated that rapid bouton budding requires retrograde bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling and local alteration in the presynaptic actin cytoskeleton. BMP acts during development to provide competence for rapid synaptic growth by regulating the levels of the Rho-type guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio, a transcriptional output of BMP–Smad signaling. In a parallel pathway, we find that the BMP type II receptor Wit signals through the effector protein LIM domain kinase 1 (Limk) to regulate bouton budding. Limk interfaces with structural plasticity by controlling the activity of the actin depolymerizing protein Cofilin. Expression of constitutively active or inactive Cofilin in motor neurons demonstrates that increased Cofilin activity promotes rapid bouton formation in response to elevated synaptic activity. Correspondingly, the overexpression of Limk, which inhibits Cofilin, inhibits bouton budding. Live imaging of the presynaptic F-actin cytoskeleton reveals that activity-dependent bouton addition is accompanied by the formation of new F-actin puncta at sites of synaptic growth. Pharmacological disruption of actin turnover inhibits bouton budding, indicating that local changes in the actin cytoskeleton at pre-existing boutons precede new budding events. We propose that developmental BMP signaling potentiates NMJs for rapid activity-dependent structural plasticity that is achieved by muscle release of retrograde signals that regulate local presynaptic actin cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:24647957

  11. Differential surface density and modulatory effects of presynaptic GABAB receptors in hippocampal cholecystokinin and parvalbumin basket cells.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Althof, Daniel; Degro, Claudius E; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2017-05-02

    The perisomatic domain of cortical neurons is under the control of two major GABAergic inhibitory interneuron types: regular-spiking cholecystokinin (CCK) basket cells (BCs) and fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) BCs. CCK and PV BCs are different not only in their intrinsic physiological, anatomical and molecular characteristics, but also in their presynaptic modulation of their synaptic output. Most GABAergic terminals are known to contain GABAB receptors (GABABR), but their role in presynaptic inhibition and surface expression have not been comparatively characterized in the two BC types. To address this, we performed whole-cell recordings from CCK and PV BCs and postsynaptic pyramidal cells (PCs), as well as freeze-fracture replica-based quantitative immunogold electron microscopy of their synapses in the rat hippocampal CA1 area. Our results demonstrate that while both CCK and PV BCs contain functional presynaptic GABABRs, their modulatory effects and relative abundance are markedly different at these two synapses: GABA release is dramatically inhibited by the agonist baclofen at CCK BC synapses, whereas a moderate reduction in inhibitory transmission is observed at PV BC synapses. Furthermore, GABABR activation has divergent effects on synaptic dynamics: paired-pulse depression (PPD) is enhanced at CCK BC synapses, but abolished at PV BC synapses. Consistent with the quantitative differences in presynaptic inhibition, virtually all CCK BC terminals were found to contain GABABRs at high densities, but only 40% of PV BC axon terminals contain GABABRs at detectable levels. These findings add to an increasing list of differences between these two interneuron types, with implications for their network functions.

  12. Strength and precision of neurotransmission at mammalian presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Classically, the basic concept of chemical synaptic transmission was established at the frog neuromuscular junction, and direct intracellular recordings from presynaptic terminals at the squid giant presynaptic terminal have further clarified principles of neurotransmitter release. More recently, whole-cell patch-camp recordings from the calyx of Held in rodent brainstem slices have extended the classical concept to mammalian synapses providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying strength and precision of neurotransmission and developmental changes therein. This review summarizes findings from our laboratory and others on these subjects, mainly at the calyx of Held, with a particular focus on precise, high-fidelity, fast neurotransmission. The mechanisms by which presynaptic terminals acquire strong, precise neurotransmission during postnatal development are also discussed. PMID:26194855

  13. Motile axonal mitochondria contribute to the variability of presynaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Qiao, Haifa; Pan, Ping-Yue; Chen, Yanmin; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2013-08-15

    One of the most notable characteristics of synaptic transmission is the wide variation in synaptic strength in response to identical stimulation. In hippocampal neurons, approximately one-third of axonal mitochondria are highly motile, and some dynamically pass through presynaptic boutons. This raises a fundamental question: can motile mitochondria contribute to the pulse-to-pulse variability of presynaptic strength? Recently, we identified syntaphilin as an axonal mitochondrial-docking protein. Using hippocampal neurons and slices of syntaphilin knockout mice, we demonstrate that the motility of axonal mitochondria correlates with presynaptic variability. Enhancing mitochondrial motility increases the pulse-to-pulse variability, whereas immobilizing mitochondria reduces the variability. By dual-color live imaging at single-bouton levels, we further show that motile mitochondria passing through boutons dynamically influence synaptic vesicle release, mainly by altering ATP homeostasis in axons. Thus, our study provides insight into the fundamental properties of the CNS to ensure the plasticity and reliability of synaptic transmission.

  14. Dynamic Control of Neurotransmitter Release by Presynaptic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zbili, Mickael; Rama, Sylvain; Debanne, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Action potentials (APs) in the mammalian brain are thought to represent the smallest unit of information transmitted by neurons to their postsynaptic targets. According to this view, neuronal signaling is all-or-none or digital. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that subthreshold changes in presynaptic membrane potential before triggering the spike also determines spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter. We discuss here how analog changes in presynaptic voltage may regulate spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter through the modulation of biophysical state of voltage-gated potassium, calcium and sodium channels in the presynaptic compartment. The contribution of this regulation has been greatly underestimated and we discuss the impact for information processing in neuronal circuits. PMID:27994539

  15. Presynaptic glutamate receptors: physiological functions and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Mulle, Christophe

    2008-06-01

    Glutamate acts on postsynaptic glutamate receptors to mediate excitatory communication between neurons. The discovery that additional presynaptic glutamate receptors can modulate neurotransmitter release has added complexity to the way we view glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we review evidence of a physiological role for presynaptic glutamate receptors in neurotransmitter release. We compare the physiological roles of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in short- and long-term regulation of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological conditions that are necessary for their activation, the source of the glutamate that activates them, their mechanisms of action and their involvement in higher brain function.

  16. Roles of presynaptic NMDA receptors in neurotransmission and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Larsen, Rylan S.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Paulsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) play pivotal roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. They facilitate presynaptic neurotransmitter release and modulate mechanisms controlling synaptic maturation and plasticity during formative periods of brain development. There is an increasing understanding of the roles of preNMDARs in experience-dependent synaptic and circuit-specific computation. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of compartment-specific expression and function of preNMDARs, and how they contribute to synapse-specific and circuit-level information processing. PMID:26726120

  17. Blockade of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors impaired morphine-induced state-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Rastipisheh, Sareh

    2016-12-01

    Behavioral abnormalities associated with opiate addiction include memory and learning deficits, which are the result of some alterations in the neuromodulatory systems. Recently, orexin has shown to influence drug addiction neural circuitry, specifically in mediating reward-related perception and memory. To explore the possible interaction of orexinergic and opioidergic system on modulation of learning and memory, we have investigated the effects of intra-dorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) administration of orexin-1 receptor agonist and the competitive orexin-1 antagonist, SB-334867, on morphine-induced memory impairment by using step-down passive avoidance task in mice. Pre-training injection of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) impaired memory, which was restored when 24h later the same dose of the drug was administered. Pre-test administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) had not a significant effect on the retention latency compared to the saline-treated animals, but it restored the memory impairment induced by pre-training morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-test administration of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) by itself decreased the retention latencies of passive avoidance task. Co-administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) and morphine (1mg/kg, i.p.) on the test day induced morphine state-dependent memory. Conversely, pre-test injection of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) inhibited the orexin-1-induced potentiation of morphine state-dependent learning on the test day. It is concluded that dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors may be involved, at least in part, in morphine state-dependent learning in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A state-dependent noncontextuality inequality in algebraic quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2017-08-01

    The noncontextuality condition states that a value of any observable is independent of which other compatible observable is measured jointly with it. Klyachko, Can, Binicioğlu, and Shumovsky have introduced an inequality which holds if there is a noncontextual hidden variable theory. It is called KCBS inequality, which is state-dependent. Its violation shows a contradiction between predictions of quantum theory and noncontextual hidden variable theories. In the present paper, it is shown that there is a state which does not violate KCBS inequality in the case of quantum mechanics of finite degrees of freedom, and that any normal state violates it in the case of algebraic quantum field theory. It is a difference between quantum mechanics of finite degrees of freedom and algebraic quantum field theory from a point of view of KCBS inequality.

  19. Presynaptic α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Enhance Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Glutamatergic Transmission via PKA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed widely in the CNS, and mediate both synaptic and perisynaptic activities of endogenous cholinergic inputs and pharmacological actions of exogenous compounds (e.g., nicotine and choline). Behavioral studies indicate that nicotine improves such cognitive functions as learning and memory. However, the mechanism of nicotine's action on cognitive function remains elusive. We performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to determine the effect of nicotine on mossy fiber glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We found that nicotine in combination with NS1738, an α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator, strongly potentiated the amplitude of evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs), and reduced the EPSC paired-pulse ratio. The action of nicotine and NS1738 was mimicked by PNU-282987 (an α7 nAChR agonist), and was absent in α7 nAChR knock-out mice. These data indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs was both necessary and sufficient to enhance the amplitude of eEPSCs. BAPTA applied postsynaptically failed to block the action of nicotine and NS1738, suggesting again a presynaptic action of the α7 nAChRs. We also observed α7 nAChR-mediated calcium rises at mossy fiber giant terminals, indicating the presence of functional α7 nAChRs at presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, the addition of PNU-282987 enhanced action potential-dependent calcium transient at these terminals. Last, the potentiating effect of PNU-282987 on eEPSCs was abolished by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). Our findings indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs at presynaptic sites, via a mechanism involving PKA, plays a critical role in enhancing synaptic efficiency of hippocampal mossy fiber transmission. PMID:24381273

  20. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  1. State-dependent alterations in inhibitory control and emotional face identification in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Hjordt, Liv V; Stenbæk, Dea S; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Mc Mahon, Brenda; Jensen, Christian G; Vestergaard, Martin; Hageman, Ida; Meder, David; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-04-01

    Depressed individuals often exhibit impaired inhibition to negative input and identification of positive stimuli, but it is unclear whether this is a state or trait feature. We here exploited a naturalistic model, namely individuals with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), to study this feature longitudinally. The goal of this study was to examine seasonal changes in inhibitory control and identification of emotional faces in individuals with SAD. Twenty-nine individuals diagnosed with winter-SAD and 30 demographically matched controls with no seasonality symptoms completed an emotional Go/NoGo task, requiring inhibition of prepotent responses to emotional facial expressions and an emotional face identification task twice, in winter and summer. In winter, individuals with SAD showed impaired ability to inhibit responses to angry (p = .0006) and sad faces (p = .011), and decreased identification of happy faces (p = .032) compared with controls. In summer, individuals with SAD and controls performed similarly on these tasks (ps > .24). We provide novel evidence that inhibition of angry and sad faces and identification of happy faces are impaired in SAD in the symptomatic phase, but not in the remitted phase. The affective biases in cognitive processing constitute state-dependent features of SAD. Our data show that reinstatement of a normal affective cognition should be possible and would constitute a major goal in psychiatric treatment to improve the quality of life for these patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. [Presynaptic histamine H3-receptors exist on cardiac sympathetic terminals of guinea pig].

    PubMed

    Luo, X X

    1995-07-01

    This is the first time to report the existence of new presynaptic inhibitory autoreceptors--histamine H3-receptors in guinea pig myocardium. We found that (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (alpha-MeHA), a selective histamine H3-receptor agonist, attenuates the sympathetic inotropic response of isolated guinea pig atria elicited by electrical field stimulation. This inhibition was associated with a marked reduction in endogenous norepinephrine release. The above phenomenon was antagonised by selective histamine H3-receptor antagonists, and inhibited by pretreatment with N ethylmeleimide. The cardiac sympathetic response could be attenuated or facilitated by increase or decrease of endogenous histamine. Our findings indicate that the endogenous histamine might be involved in the modulation of cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission by interacting with histamine H3-receptors and the receptors are probably coupled to a G(o)/Gi protein.

  3. State-dependent sculpting of olfactory sensory neurons is attributed to sensory enrichment, odor deprivation, and aging.

    PubMed

    Cavallin, Melissa Ann; Powell, Katelyn; Biju, K C; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2010-10-11

    Gene-targeted deletion of the predominant Shaker potassium channel, Kv1.3, in the mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, decreases the number of presynaptic, odorant receptor (OR)-identified olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and alters the nature of their postsynaptic connections to mitral cell targets. The current study examined whether OSN density was state-dependent by examining the impact of (1) odor enrichment, (2) sensory deprivation, and (3) aging upon the number of P2- or M72-expressing neurons. Histological approaches were used to quantify the number of OSNs across entire epithelia for wildtype (WT) vs. Kv1.3-null (KO) mice bred onto an ORtauLacZ reporter background. Following either odor enrichment or early unilateral naris-occlusion, the number of M72-expressing OSNs was significantly decreased in WT mice, but was unchanged in KO animals. Following naris-occlusion, the number of P2-expressing OSNs was decreased regardless of genotype. Animals that were reared to 2 years of age demonstrated loss of both P2- and M72-expressing OSNs in WT mice and a concomitant loss of only M72-expressing neurons in KO mice. These findings suggest that voltage-gated activity of the mitral cells is important for OSN plasticity, and can prevent neuronal loss via sensory- and OR-dependent mechanisms.

  4. Nutritional State-Dependent Ghrelin Activation of Vasopressin Neurons via Retrograde Trans-Neuronal–Glial Stimulation of Excitatory GABA Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C.; Di, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal–glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal–glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal–glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis. PMID:24790191

  5. Nutritional state-dependent ghrelin activation of vasopressin neurons via retrograde trans-neuronal-glial stimulation of excitatory GABA circuits.

    PubMed

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C; Di, Shi; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2014-04-30

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal-glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal-glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal-glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis.

  6. Ethanol potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission may be self-limiting: role of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeffrey L

    2004-11-24

    Ethanol enhances GABAergic synaptic inhibition, and this interaction contributes to many of the behavioral and cognitive effects of this drug. Most studies suggest that ethanol enhances GABAergic neurotransmission via an allosteric potentiation of the postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors that mediate fast synaptic inhibition in the mammalian CNS. Despite widespread acceptance of this hypothesis, direct support for such a mechanism has been difficult to obtain. Ethanol does not enhance GABA(A) receptor function in all brain regions or under all experimental conditions, and factors responsible for this variability remain mostly unknown. Notably, blockade of GABA(B) receptors dramatically enhances ethanol potentiation of hippocampal GABA(A) IPSPs and IPSCs, suggesting that some unknown GABA(B) receptor mechanism limits the overall potentiating effect of ethanol on GABAergic synapses. In this study, we demonstrate that, at perisomatic synapses in the rat hippocampus, ethanol enhances presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptor function and that this interaction reduces the overall potentiating effect of ethanol at these synapses. We further show that ethanol significantly elevates basal presynaptic GABA(B) receptor tone, possibly via an increase in spontaneous GABA release, and that pretreatment with a subthreshold concentration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen blocks ethanol but not flunitrazepam or pentobarbital potentiation of GABA(A) IPSCs. These data suggest that an interaction between ethanol and presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptor activity regulates the ethanol sensitivity of GABAergic synapses. Given that the in vitro ethanol sensitivity of these synapses correlates with in vivo ethanol responsiveness in a number of rodent lines, our data further suggest that presynaptic GABA(B) receptor activity may play a role in regulating behavioral sensitivity to ethanol.

  7. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jennifer HK; Luczak, Vince; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory because PKA also regulates presynaptic transmitter release. Here, we examine this issue using genetic and pharmacological application of Ht31, a PKA anchoring disrupting peptide. At the hippocampal Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, Ht31 treatment elicits a rapid decay of synaptic responses to repetitive stimuli, indicating a fast depletion of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The interaction between PKA and proteins involved in producing this pool of synaptic vesicles is supported by biochemical assays showing that synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), Rim1, and SNAP25 are components of a complex that interacts with cAMP. Moreover, acute treatment with Ht31 reduces the levels of SV2. Finally, experiments with transgenic mouse lines, which express Ht31 in excitatory neurons at the Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, highlight a requirement for presynaptically anchored PKA in pathway-specific synaptic tagging and long-term contextual fear memory. These results suggest that a presynaptically compartmentalized PKA is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory by regulating the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. PMID:24882624

  8. Astrocytes regulate heterogeneity of presynaptic strengths in hippocampal networks

    PubMed Central

    Letellier, Mathieu; Park, Yun Kyung; Chater, Thomas E.; Chipman, Peter H.; Gautam, Sunita Ghimire; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Goda, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Dendrites are neuronal structures specialized for receiving and processing information through their many synaptic inputs. How input strengths are modified across dendrites in ways that are crucial for synaptic integration and plasticity remains unclear. We examined in single hippocampal neurons the mechanism of heterosynaptic interactions and the heterogeneity of synaptic strengths of pyramidal cell inputs. Heterosynaptic presynaptic plasticity that counterbalances input strengths requires N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and astrocytes. Importantly, this mechanism is shared with the mechanism for maintaining highly heterogeneous basal presynaptic strengths, which requires astrocyte Ca2+ signaling involving NMDAR activation, astrocyte membrane depolarization, and L-type Ca2+ channels. Intracellular infusion of NMDARs or Ca2+-channel blockers into astrocytes, conditionally ablating the GluN1 NMDAR subunit, or optogenetically hyperpolarizing astrocytes with archaerhodopsin promotes homogenization of convergent presynaptic inputs. Our findings support the presence of an astrocyte-dependent cellular mechanism that enhances the heterogeneity of presynaptic strengths of convergent connections, which may help boost the computational power of dendrites. PMID:27118849

  9. Presynaptic Filament Dynamics in Homologous Recombination and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ehmsen, Kirk T.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Morrical, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) is an essential genome stability mechanism used for high-fidelity repair of DNA double-strand breaks and for the recovery of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. The crucial homology search and DNA strand exchange steps of HR are catalyzed by presynaptic filaments—helical filaments of a recombinase enzyme bound to single-stranded DNA. Presynaptic filaments are fundamentally dynamic structures, the assembly, catalytic turnover, and disassembly of which must be closely coordinated with other elements of the DNA recombination, repair, and replication machinery in order for genome maintenance functions to be effective. Here, we review the major dynamic elements controlling the assembly, activity, and disassembly of presynaptic filaments: some intrinsic such as recombinase ATP binding and hydrolytic activities, others extrinsic such as ssDNA-binding proteins, mediator proteins, and DNA motor proteins. We examine dynamic behavior on multiple levels, including atomic- and filament-level structural changes associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis as evidenced in crystal structures, as well as subunit binding and dissociation events driven by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We examine the biochemical properties of recombination proteins from four model systems (T4 phage, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and H. sapiens), demonstrating how their properties are tailored for the context-specific requirements in these diverse species. We propose that the presynaptic filament has evolved to rely on multiple external factors for increased multi-level regulation of HR processes in genomes with greater structural and sequence complexity. PMID:21599536

  10. Cytosolic calcium coordinates mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Amit K; Ivannikov, Maxim V; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R; Macleod, Gregory T

    2012-01-25

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations that blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+ and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11 nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13 nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates, [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs.

  11. Cytosolic Calcium Coordinates Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism with Presynaptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Amit K.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Macleod, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations which blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+, and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs. PMID:22279208

  12. Expression of GluK1c underlies the developmental switch in presynaptic kainate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Vesikansa, Aino; Sakha, Prasanna; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Molchanova, Svetlana; Rivera, Claudio; Huttunen, Henri J.; Rauvala, Heikki; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via multiple mechanisms, depending on their subunit composition. Presynaptic KARs tonically depress glutamatergic transmission during restricted period of synapse development; however, the molecular basis behind this effect is unknown. Here, we show that the developmental and cell-type specific expression pattern of a KAR subunit splice variant, GluK1c, corresponds to the immature-type KAR activity in the hippocampus. GluK1c localizes to dendritic contact sites at distal axons, the distal targeting being promoted by heteromerization with the subunit GluK4. Presynaptic expression of GluK1c strongly suppresses glutamatergic transmission in cell-pairs in vitro and mimics the immature-type KAR activity at CA3-CA1 synapses in vivo, at a developmental stage when the endogenous expression is already downregulated. These data support a central role for GluK1c in mediating tonic inhibition of glutamate release and the consequent effects on excitability and activity-dependent fine-tuning of the developing hippocampal circuitry. PMID:22413061

  13. Presynaptic Neuronal Pentraxin Receptor Organizes Excitatory and Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mengping; Zhang, Chen; Pak, ChangHui; Trotter, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Three neuronal pentraxins are expressed in brain, the membrane-bound “neuronal pentraxin receptor” (NPR) and the secreted proteins NP1 and NARP (i.e., NP2). Neuronal pentraxins bind to AMPARs at excitatory synapses and play important, well-documented roles in the activity-dependent regulation of neural circuits via this binding activity. However, it is unknown whether neuronal pentraxins perform roles in synapses beyond modulating postsynaptic AMPAR-dependent plasticity, and whether they may even act in inhibitory synapses. Here, we show that NPR expressed in non-neuronal cells potently induces formation of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic specializations in cocultured hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of NPR in hippocampal neurons, conversely, dramatically decreased assembly and function of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic specializations. Overexpression of NPR rescued the NPR knockdown phenotype but did not in itself change synapse numbers or properties. However, the NPR knockdown decreased the levels of NARP, whereas NPR overexpression produced a dramatic increase in the levels of NP1 and NARP, suggesting that NPR recruits and stabilizes NP1 and NARP on the presynaptic plasma membrane. Mechanistically, NPR acted in excitatory synapse assembly by binding to the N-terminal domain of AMPARs; antagonists of AMPA and GABA receptors selectively inhibited NPR-induced heterologous excitatory and inhibitory synapse assembly, respectively, but did not affect neurexin-1β-induced synapse assembly as a control. Our data suggest that neuronal pentraxins act as signaling complexes that function as general trans-synaptic organizers of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses by a mechanism that depends, at least in part, on the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors at these synapses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal pentraxins comprise three neuronal proteins, neuronal pentraxin receptor (NPR) which is a type-II transmembrane protein on the neuronal

  14. Presynaptic Neuronal Pentraxin Receptor Organizes Excitatory and Inhibitory Synapses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Wei, Mengping; Zhang, Chen; Maxeiner, Stephan; Pak, ChangHui; Calado Botelho, Salome; Trotter, Justin; Sterky, Fredrik H; Südhof, Thomas C

    2017-02-01

    Three neuronal pentraxins are expressed in brain, the membrane-bound "neuronal pentraxin receptor" (NPR) and the secreted proteins NP1 and NARP (i.e., NP2). Neuronal pentraxins bind to AMPARs at excitatory synapses and play important, well-documented roles in the activity-dependent regulation of neural circuits via this binding activity. However, it is unknown whether neuronal pentraxins perform roles in synapses beyond modulating postsynaptic AMPAR-dependent plasticity, and whether they may even act in inhibitory synapses. Here, we show that NPR expressed in non-neuronal cells potently induces formation of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic specializations in cocultured hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of NPR in hippocampal neurons, conversely, dramatically decreased assembly and function of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic specializations. Overexpression of NPR rescued the NPR knockdown phenotype but did not in itself change synapse numbers or properties. However, the NPR knockdown decreased the levels of NARP, whereas NPR overexpression produced a dramatic increase in the levels of NP1 and NARP, suggesting that NPR recruits and stabilizes NP1 and NARP on the presynaptic plasma membrane. Mechanistically, NPR acted in excitatory synapse assembly by binding to the N-terminal domain of AMPARs; antagonists of AMPA and GABA receptors selectively inhibited NPR-induced heterologous excitatory and inhibitory synapse assembly, respectively, but did not affect neurexin-1β-induced synapse assembly as a control. Our data suggest that neuronal pentraxins act as signaling complexes that function as general trans-synaptic organizers of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses by a mechanism that depends, at least in part, on the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors at these synapses. Neuronal pentraxins comprise three neuronal proteins, neuronal pentraxin receptor (NPR) which is a type-II transmembrane protein on the neuronal surface, and secreted

  15. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  16. Noise-induced transitions in state-dependent dichotomous processes.

    PubMed

    Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    In a number of stochastic systems the random forcing is represented as a dichotomous Markov noise. A common characteristic of these models is that the noise is usually supposed to be independent of the state of the forced dynamical system. However, there are several situations in which positive or negative feedback exist between the system and the random driver. This paper investigates a class of systems characterized by feedback between dichotomous Markov noise and the system's dynamics. The effect of the feedback is accounted for through a state dependency in the transition rates of the dichotomous noise. We study noise-induced transitions in these systems, with special attention to the delicate problem of correctly defining the deterministic counterpart of the stochastic system. We find that (i) if in the absence of any feedback the dynamical system has a single deterministic stable point, the deterministic dynamics remain monostable when a negative feedback is introduced, while they may become bistable in the presence of a positive feedback. (ii) Noise may induce bistability in the presence of a null or negative feedback. (iii) Bistable deterministic dynamics, induced by the positive feedback, may be destroyed by the noise, which tends to stabilize the system around a new intermediate stable state between those of the deterministic dynamics.

  17. Rate and state dependent seismicity during fluid injection in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Dieterich (1994) developed a theoretical frame of seismicity evolution from a background seismicity due to stress changes in a medium. The theory assumes a volume density of seismic faults with a specific initial slip velocity distribution upon which the stress changes act. Each fault then follows the rate and state dependent frictional law where instabilities develop, but not as Coulomb failure. The evolution is expressed in the form of a differntial equation, which can be adapted for the case of fluid pressure changes resulting from injection and even linearized to allow for analytic insight into the properties of the solution. For a constant injection rate the seismic activity increases at a given distance from the injection point once the pressure exceeds a threshold value. If the presusure rate is high enough the seismic activity becomes proportional to the pressure rate in accordance with criticality theory of Shapiro (2002). Once the rate drops the seismicity reduced to lower levels. Shut off and variable injection rates must be evaluated numerically but lead to results comparable to the criticality theory. The presentation outlines the physical concept of the rate and state approach in comparison to the criticality approach and shows the main analytic and numerical results.

  18. The ecological rationality of state-dependent valuation.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J M; Trimmer, P C; Houston, A I

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory studies on a range of animals have identified a bias that seems to violate basic principles of rational behavior: a preference is shown for feeding options that previously provided food when reserves were low, even though another option had been found to give the same reward with less delay. The bias presents a challenge to normative models of decision making (which only take account of expected rewards and the state of the animal at the decision time). To understand the behavior, we take a broad ecological perspective and consider how valuation mechanisms evolve when the best action depends upon the environment being faced. We show that in a changing and uncertain environment, state-dependent valuation can be favored by natural selection: Individuals should allow their hunger to affect learning for future decisions. The valuation mechanism that typically evolves produces the kind of behavior seen in standard laboratory tests. By providing an insight into why learning should be affected by the state of an individual, we provide a basis for understanding psychological principles in terms of an animal's ecology.

  19. Mechanism of Action of Presynaptic Neurotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    ganglioside composition similar to that. found in brain. GM3 - GM2 -. Goib GD• !bl GT~bG~lb l BOVINE NOE-108-15 NI8-RE-lOS BRAIN CELLS CELLS FIGURE 1. TLC...naeirona1 cells, tokin internalization, gangliosides , 0615 Keurotran smsii 19 ABSTRACT (Co~ntinue on rev’erse if necessa ~nd oidentify by block n br Theg...closely related bacteria. They both bind to nervous tissue, and to gangliosides , and Inhibit the release of neurotransmitter from "the same systems In

  20. Enhanced nitric oxide production during lead (Pb²⁺) exposure recovers protein expression but not presynaptic localization of synaptic proteins in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neal, April P; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2012-02-23

    We have previously reported that lead (Pb(2+)) exposure results in both presynaptic and postsynaptic changes in developing neurons as a result of inhibition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). NMDAR inhibition by Pb(2+) during synaptogenesis disrupts downstream trans-synaptic signaling of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and exogenous addition of BDNF can recover the effects of Pb(2+) on both presynaptic protein expression and presynaptic vesicular release. NMDAR activity can modulate other trans-synaptic signaling pathways, such as nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Thus, it is possible that other trans-synaptic pathways in addition to BDNF signaling may be disrupted by Pb(2+) exposure. The current study investigated whether exogenous addition of NO could recover the presynaptic vesicular proteins lost as a result of Pb(2+) exposure during synaptogenesis, namely Synaptophysin (Syn) and Synaptobrevin (Syb). We observed that exogenous addition of NO during Pb(2+) exposure results in complete recovery of whole-cell Syn levels and partial recovery of Syn and Syb synaptic targeting in Pb(2+)-exposed neurons.

  1. Sensory integration in presynaptic inhibitory pathways during fictive locomotion in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Ariane; Leblond, Hugues; Gossard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study is to understand how sensory inputs of different modalities are integrated into spinal cord pathways controlling presynaptic inhibition during locomotion. Primary afferent depolarization (PAD), an estimate of presynaptic inhibition, was recorded intra-axonally in group I afferents (n = 31) from seven hindlimb muscles in L(6)-S(1) segments during fictive locomotion in the decerebrate cat. PADs were evoked by stimulating alternatively low-threshold afferents from a flexor nerve, a cutaneous nerve and a combination of both. The fictive step cycle was divided in five bins and PADs were averaged in each bin and their amplitude compared. PADs evoked by muscle stimuli alone showed a significant phase-dependent modulation in 20/31 group I afferents. In 12/20 afferents, the cutaneous stimuli alone evoked a phase-dependent modulation of primary afferent hyperpolarization (PAH, n = 9) or of PADs (n = 3). Combining the two sensory modalities showed that cutaneous volleys could significantly modify the amplitude of PADs evoked by muscle stimuli in at least one part (bin) of the step cycle in 17/31 (55%) of group I afferents. The most common effect (13/17) was a decrease in the PAD amplitude by 35% on average, whereas it was increased by 17% on average in the others (4/17). Moreover, in 8/13 afferents, the PAD reduction was obtained in 4/5 bins i.e., for most of the duration of the step cycle. These effects were seen in group I afferents from all seven muscles. On the other hand, we found that different cutaneous nerves had quite different efficacy; the superficial peroneal (SP) being the most efficient (85% of trials) followed by Saphenous (60%) and caudal sural (44%) nerves. The results indicate that cutaneous interneurons may act, in part, by modulating the transmission in PAD pathways activated by group I muscle afferents. We conclude that cutaneous input, especially from the skin area on the dorsum of the paw (SP), could subtract presynaptic inhibition

  2. RETRACTED: Protonation State-Dependent Communication in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Ghane, Tahereh; Reidelbach, Marco; Woelke, Anna Lena; Knapp, Ernst Walter; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-09

    Proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase from the cellular inside to the binuclear redox center (BNC) can occur through two distinct pathways, the D- and K-channels. For the protein to function as both redox enzyme and proton pump, proton transfer out of either of the channels toward the BNC or into the protein toward a proton loading site, and ultimately through the membrane, must be highly regulated. The O→E intermediate of cytochrome c oxidase is the first redox state in its catalytic cycle, where proton transfer through the K-channel, from K362 to Y288 at the BNC, is important. Molecular dynamics simulations of this intermediate with 16 different combinations of protonation states of key residues in the D- and K-channel show the mutual impact of the two proton-conducting channels to be protonation state-dependent. Strength as well as means of communication, correlations in positions, or connections along the hydrogen-bonded network, change with the protonation state of the K-channel residue K362. The conformational and hydrogen-bond dynamics of the D-channel residue N139 regulated by an interplay of protonation in the D-channel and K362. N139 thus assumes a gating function by which proton passage through the D-channel toward E286 is likely facilitated for states with protonated K362 and unprotonated E286, which would in principle allow proton transfer to the BNC, but no proton pumping until a proton has reached E286. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radio pulsar glitches as a state-dependent Poisson process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulgenzi, W.; Melatos, A.; Hughes, B. D.

    2017-10-01

    Gross-Pitaevskii simulations of vortex avalanches in a neutron star superfluid are limited computationally to ≲102 vortices and ≲102 avalanches, making it hard to study the long-term statistics of radio pulsar glitches in realistically sized systems. Here, an idealized, mean-field model of the observed Gross-Pitaevskii dynamics is presented, in which vortex unpinning is approximated as a state-dependent, compound Poisson process in a single random variable, the spatially averaged crust-superfluid lag. Both the lag-dependent Poisson rate and the conditional distribution of avalanche-driven lag decrements are inputs into the model, which is solved numerically (via Monte Carlo simulations) and analytically (via a master equation). The output statistics are controlled by two dimensionless free parameters: α, the glitch rate at a reference lag, multiplied by the critical lag for unpinning, divided by the spin-down rate; and β, the minimum fraction of the lag that can be restored by a glitch. The system evolves naturally to a self-regulated stationary state, whose properties are determined by α/αc(β), where αc(β) ≈ β-1/2 is a transition value. In the regime α ≳ αc(β), one recovers qualitatively the power-law size and exponential waiting-time distributions observed in many radio pulsars and Gross-Pitaevskii simulations. For α ≪ αc(β), the size and waiting-time distributions are both power-law-like, and a correlation emerges between size and waiting time until the next glitch, contrary to what is observed in most pulsars. Comparisons with astrophysical data are restricted by the small sample sizes available at present, with ≤35 events observed per pulsar.

  4. Number sense and state-dependent valuation in cuttlefish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tsang-I

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the amount of prey available is an important part of an animal's foraging behaviour. The risk-sensitive foraging theory predicts that an organism's foraging decisions with regard to food rewards depending upon its satiation level. However, the precise interaction between optimal risk-tolerance and satiation level remains unclear. In this study, we examined, firstly, whether cuttlefish, with one of the most highly evolved nervous system among the invertebrates, have number sense, and secondly, whether their valuation of food reward is satiation state dependent. When food such as live shrimps is present, without training, cuttlefish turn toward the prey and initiate seizure behaviour. Using this visual attack behaviour as a measure, cuttlefish showed a preference for a larger quantity when faced with two-alternative forced choice tasks (1 versus 2, 2 versus 3, 3 versus 4 and 4 versus 5). However, cuttlefish preferred the small quantity when the choice was between one live and two dead shrimps. More importantly, when the choice was between one large live shrimp and two small live shrimps (a prey size and quantity trade-off), the cuttlefish chose the large single shrimp when they felt hunger, but chose the two smaller prey when they were satiated. These results demonstrate that cuttlefish are capable of number discrimination and that their choice of prey number depends on the quality of the prey and on their appetite state. The findings also suggest that cuttlefish integrate both internal and external information when making a foraging decision and that the cost of obtaining food is inversely correlated with their satiation level, a phenomenon similar to the observation that metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk among humans. PMID:27559063

  5. Number sense and state-dependent valuation in cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsang-I; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2016-08-31

    Identifying the amount of prey available is an important part of an animal's foraging behaviour. The risk-sensitive foraging theory predicts that an organism's foraging decisions with regard to food rewards depending upon its satiation level. However, the precise interaction between optimal risk-tolerance and satiation level remains unclear. In this study, we examined, firstly, whether cuttlefish, with one of the most highly evolved nervous system among the invertebrates, have number sense, and secondly, whether their valuation of food reward is satiation state dependent. When food such as live shrimps is present, without training, cuttlefish turn toward the prey and initiate seizure behaviour. Using this visual attack behaviour as a measure, cuttlefish showed a preference for a larger quantity when faced with two-alternative forced choice tasks (1 versus 2, 2 versus 3, 3 versus 4 and 4 versus 5). However, cuttlefish preferred the small quantity when the choice was between one live and two dead shrimps. More importantly, when the choice was between one large live shrimp and two small live shrimps (a prey size and quantity trade-off), the cuttlefish chose the large single shrimp when they felt hunger, but chose the two smaller prey when they were satiated. These results demonstrate that cuttlefish are capable of number discrimination and that their choice of prey number depends on the quality of the prey and on their appetite state. The findings also suggest that cuttlefish integrate both internal and external information when making a foraging decision and that the cost of obtaining food is inversely correlated with their satiation level, a phenomenon similar to the observation that metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk among humans. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a visuo-motor skill in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Monica A; Lungholt, Bjarke KS; Nielsen, Jens B

    2005-01-01

    Sensory information continuously converges on the spinal cord during a variety of motor behaviours. Here, we examined presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a novel motor skill. We tested whether repetition of two motor tasks with different degrees of difficulty, a novel visuo-motor task involving the ankle muscles, and a control task involving simple voluntary ankle movements, would induce changes in the size of the soleus H-reflex. The slope of the H-reflex recruitment curve and the H-max/M-max ratio were depressed after repetition of the visuo-motor skill task and returned to baseline after 10 min. No changes were observed after the control task. To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the H-reflex depression, we measured the size of the long-latency depression of the soleus H-reflex evoked by peroneal nerve stimulation (D1 inhibition) and the size of the monosynaptic Ia facilitation of the soleus H-reflex evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. The D1 inhibition was increased and the femoral nerve facilitation was decreased following the visuo-motor skill task, suggesting an increase in presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. No changes were observed in the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve (TN) were also unchanged, suggesting that transmission in ascending pathways was unaltered following the visuo-motor skill task. Together these observations suggest that a selective presynaptic control of Ia afferents contributes to the modulation of sensory inputs during acquisition of a novel visuo-motor skill in healthy humans. PMID:16051628

  7. High-resolution structure of the presynaptic RAD51 filament on single-stranded DNA by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Short, Judith M.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaoxia; Soni, Neelesh; Madhusudhan, Mallur S.; Shivji, Mahmud K.K.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous DNA recombination (HR) by the RAD51 recombinase enables error-free DNA break repair. To execute HR, RAD51 first forms a presynaptic filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA, which catalyses pairing with homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA. Here, we report a structure for the presynaptic human RAD51 filament at 3.5–5.0Å resolution using electron cryo-microscopy. RAD51 encases ssDNA in a helical filament of 103Å pitch, comprising 6.4 protomers per turn, with a rise of 16.1Å and a twist of 56.2°. Inter-protomer distance correlates with rotation of an α-helical region in the core catalytic domain that is juxtaposed to ssDNA, suggesting how the RAD51–DNA interaction modulates protomer spacing and filament pitch. We map Fanconi anaemia-like disease-associated RAD51 mutations, clarifying potential phenotypes. We predict binding sites on the presynaptic filament for two modules present in each BRC repeat of the BRCA2 tumour suppressor, a critical HR mediator. Structural modelling suggests that changes in filament pitch mask or expose one binding site with filament-inhibitory potential, rationalizing the paradoxical ability of the BRC repeats to either stabilize or inhibit filament formation at different steps during HR. Collectively, our findings provide fresh insight into the structural mechanism of HR and its dysregulation in human disease. PMID:27596592

  8. MicroRNA-22 Gates Long-Term Heterosynaptic Plasticity in Aplysia through Presynaptic Regulation of CPEB and Downstream Targets.

    PubMed

    Fiumara, Ferdinando; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Antonov, Igor; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Sossin, Wayne S; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-30

    The maintenance phase of memory-related long-term facilitation (LTF) of synapses between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia depends on a serotonin (5-HT)-triggered presynaptic upregulation of CPEB, a functional prion that regulates local protein synthesis at the synapse. The mechanisms whereby serotonin regulates CPEB levels in presynaptic sensory neurons are not known. Here, we describe a sensory neuron-specific microRNA 22 (miR-22) that has multiple binding sites on the mRNA of CPEB and inhibits it in the basal state. Serotonin triggers MAPK/Erk-dependent downregulation of miR-22, thereby upregulating the expression of CPEB, which in turn regulates, through functional CPE elements, the presynaptic expression of atypical PKC (aPKC), another candidate regulator of memory maintenance. Our findings support a model in which the neurotransmitter-triggered downregulation of miR-22 coordinates the regulation of genes contributing synergistically to the long-term maintenance of memory-related synaptic plasticity.

  9. Use-dependent control of presynaptic calcium signalling at central synapses

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels activated by action potentials evoke Ca2+ entry into presynaptic terminals thus briefly distorting the resting Ca2+ concentration. When this happens, a number of processes are initiated to re-establish the Ca2+ equilibrium. During the post-spike period, the increased Ca2+ concentration could enhance the presynaptic Ca2+ signalling. Some of the mechanisms contributing to presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics involve endogenous Ca2+ buffers, Ca2+ stores, mitochondria, the sodium–calcium exchanger, extraterminal Ca2+ depletion and presynaptic receptors. Additionally, subthreshold presynaptic depolarization has been proposed to have an effect on release of neurotransmitters through a mechanism involving changes in resting Ca2+. Direct evidence for the role of any of these participants in shaping the presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics comes from direct recordings of giant presynaptic terminals and from fluorescent Ca2+ imaging of axonal boutons. Here, some of this evidence is presented and discussed. PMID:17523936

  10. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores.

  11. State-dependent trapping of flecainide in the cardiac sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eugene; O'Leary, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Flecainide is a Class I antiarrhythmic drug and a potent inhibitor of the cardiac (Nav1.5) sodium channel. Although the flecainide inhibition of Nav1.5 is typically enhanced by depolarization, the contributions of the open and inactivated states to flecainide binding and inhibition remain controversial. We further investigated the state-dependent binding of flecainide by examining its inhibition of rapidly inactivating and non-inactivating mutants of Nav1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Applying flecainide while briefly depolarizing from a relatively negative holding potential resulted in a low-affinity inhibition of the channel (IC50 = 345 μm). Increasing the frequency of stimulation potentiated the flecainide inhibition (IC50 = 7.4 μm), which progressively increased over the range of voltages where Nav1.5 channels activated. This contrasts with sustained depolarizations that effectively stabilize the channels in inactivated states, which failed to promote significant flecainide inhibition. The voltage sensitivity and strong dependence of the flecainide inhibition on repetitive depolarization suggests that flecainide binding is facilitated by channel opening and that the drug does not directly bind to closed or inactivated channels. The binding of flecainide to open channels was further investigated in a non-inactivating mutant of Nav1.5. Flecainide produced a time-dependent decay in the current of the non-inactivating mutant that displayed kinetics consistent with a simple pore blocking mechanism (KD = 11 μm). At hyperpolarized voltages, flecainide slowed the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 81 ± 3 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 42 ± 3 s) channels. Mutation of a conserved isoleucine of the D4S6 segment (I1756C) creates an alternative pathway that permits the rapid diffusion of anaesthetics out of the Nav1.5 channel. The I1756C mutation accelerated the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 12.6 ± 0.4 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 7

  12. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  13. Protocadherin 17 regulates presynaptic assembly in topographic corticobasal Ganglia circuits.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Naosuke; Tanimura, Asami; Yamasaki, Miwako; Inoue, Takeshi; Fukabori, Ryoji; Kuroda, Teiko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Tezuka, Tohru; Sagara, Hiroshi; Hirano, Shinji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2013-06-05

    Highly topographic organization of neural circuits exists for the regulation of various brain functions in corticobasal ganglia circuits. Although neural circuit-specific refinement during synapse development is essential for the execution of particular neural functions, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for synapse refinement are largely unknown. Here, we show that protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), one of the nonclustered δ2-protocadherin family members, is enriched along corticobasal ganglia synapses in a zone-specific manner during synaptogenesis and regulates presynaptic assembly in these synapses. PCDH17 deficiency in mice causes facilitated presynaptic vesicle accumulation and enhanced synaptic transmission efficacy in corticobasal ganglia circuits. Furthermore, PCDH17(-/-) mice exhibit antidepressant-like phenotypes that are known to be regulated by corticobasal ganglia circuits. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for PCDH17 in the synaptic development of specific corticobasal ganglia circuits and suggest the involvement of PCDH17 in such circuits in depressive behaviors.

  14. State dependence of climate sensitivity and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M.; Knutti, R.; Stone, D.; Frame, D.

    2007-12-01

    It has long been noted (Senior and Mitchell, 2000; Boer and Yu, 2004) that the climate sensitivity of global climate models evolves over time, changing by up to +/-20% in long runs following stabilization of greenhouse forcing. We explore the magnitude and origins of this effect in the ensemble of global coupled models contributed to the IPCC AR4 ensemble. Two possible parameterizations of this effect are discussed, the first in which the net feedback parameter, λ, depends on the degree to which global temperature is out of equilibrium and the second in which λ simply depends simply on global temperature itself. We show that the second parameterization provides a generally better fit to the GCMs' output and explore its implications for recent attempts to constrain long-term climate sensitivity using recent observed climate change. The possibility of an uncertain temperature- dependence of λ has even more profound implications for efforts to constrain climate sensitivity using the last glacial maximum, but this is not the focus of this talk. The possibility of state-dependent feedbacks is a further nail in the coffin of attempts to provide a useful, objectively constrained, upper bound on the long-term equilibrium response to stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gases at any currently conceivable level. We note, however, that this does not preclude our use of observations to constrain equally policy-relevant quantities, such as the familiar transient climate response, or TCR, the equivalent carbon dioxide concentration consistent with a two degree warming, or C2K, or the transient warming commitment, or TWC. The TWC is the maximum warming we expect to result from a linear ramp increase in radiative forcing followed by a linear decrease: at current values of the atmospheric airborne fraction for carbon dioxide, this is approximately equivalent to the forcing that would result from a complete cessation of emissions at any given time. Although this is not a

  15. Actions of Acute and Chronic Ethanol on Presynaptic Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Marisa; Treistman, Steven N.; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Weiner, Jeff; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, Fernando; Zhu, Ping Jun; Lovinger, David; Zhang, Tao A.; Hendricson, Adam H.; Morrisett, Richard; Siggins, George Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium entitled “The Tipsy Terminal: Presynaptic Effects of Ethanol” (held at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, CA, June 27, 2005). The objective of this symposium was to focus on a cellular site of ethanol action underrepresented in the alcohol literature, but quickly becoming a “hot” topic. The chairs of the session were Marisa Roberto and George Robert Siggins. Our speakers were chosen on the basis of the diverse electrophysiological and other methods used to discern the effects of acute and chronic ethanol on presynaptic terminals and on the basis of significant insights that their data provide for understanding ethanol actions on neurons in general, as mechanisms underlying problematic behavioral effects of alcohol. The 5 presenters drew from their recent studies examining the effects of acute and chronic ethanol using a range of sophisticated methods from electrophysiological analysis of paired-pulse facilitation and spontaneous and miniature synaptic currents (Drs. Weiner, Valenzuela, Zhu, and Morrisett), to direct recording of ion channel activity and peptide release from acutely isolated synaptic terminals (Dr. Treistman), to direct microscopic observation of vesicular release (Dr. Morrisett). They showed that ethanol administration could both increase and decrease the probability of release of different transmitters from synaptic terminals. The effects of ethanol on synaptic terminals could often be correlated with important behavioral or developmental actions of alcohol. These and other novel findings suggest that future analyses of synaptic effects of ethanol should attempt to ascertain, in multiple brain regions, the role of presynaptic terminals, relevant presynaptic receptors and signal transduction linkages, exocytotic mechanisms, and their involvement in alcohol’s behavioral actions. Such studies could lead to new treatment strategies for alcohol

  16. State-Dependent Function of Neocortical Chandelier Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Alan R.; McGarry, Laura M.; Vogels, Tim P.; Inan, Melis; Anderson, Stewart A.; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Chandelier (axoaxonic) cells (ChCs) are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells. However, their circuit role and the function of their clearly defined anatomical specificity remain unclear. Recent work has demonstrated that chandelier cells can produce depolarizing GABAergic PSPs, occasionally driving postsynaptic targets to spike. On the other hand, other work suggests that ChCs are hyperpolarizing and may have an inhibitory role. These disparate functional effects may reflect heterogeneity among ChCs. Here, using brain slices from transgenic mouse strains, we first demonstrate that, across different neocortical areas and genetic backgrounds, upper Layer 2/3 ChCs belong to a single electrophysiologically and morphologically defined population, extensively sampling Layer 1 inputs with asymmetric dendrites. Consistent with being a single cell type, we find electrical coupling between ChCs. We then investigate the effect of chandelier cell activation on pyramidal neuron spiking in several conditions, ranging from the resting membrane potential to stimuli designed to approximate in vivo membrane potential dynamics. We find that under quiescent conditions, chandelier cells are capable of both promoting and inhibiting spike generation, depending on the postsynaptic membrane potential. However, during in vivo-like membrane potential fluctuations, the dominant postsynaptic effect was a strong inhibition. Thus, neocortical chandelier cells, even from within a homogeneous population, appear to play a dual role in the circuit, helping to activate quiescent pyramidal neurons, while at the same time inhibiting active ones. PMID:22159102

  17. Neural Control of the Upper Airway: Respiratory and State-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kubin, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Upper airway muscles subserve many essential for survival orofacial behaviors, including their important role as accessory respiratory muscles. In the face of certain predisposition of craniofacial anatomy, both tonic and phasic inspiratory activation of upper airway muscles is necessary to protect the upper airway against collapse. This protective action is adequate during wakefulness, but fails during sleep which results in recurrent episodes of hypopneas and apneas, a condition known as the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA). Although OSA is almost exclusively a human disorder, animal models help unveil the basic principles governing the impact of sleep on breathing and upper airway muscle activity. This article discusses the neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neurophysiology of the different neuronal systems whose activity changes with sleep-wake states, such as the noradrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, orexinergic, histaminergic, GABAergic and glycinergic, and their impact on central respiratory neurons and upper airway motoneurons. Observations of the interactions between sleep-wake states and upper airway muscles in healthy humans and OSA patients are related to findings from animal models with normal upper airway, and various animal models of OSA, including the chronic-intermittent hypoxia model. Using a framework of upper airway motoneurons being under concurrent influence of central respiratory, reflex and state-dependent inputs, different neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides are considered as either causing a sleep-dependent withdrawal of excitation from motoneurons or mediating an active, sleep-related inhibition of motoneurons. Information about the neurochemistry of state-dependent control of upper airway muscles accumulated to date reveals fundamental principles and may help understand and treat OSA. PMID:27783860

  18. Dendritic position is a major determinant of presynaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Arthur P.H.; Schmitz, Sabine K.; Toonen, Ruud F.G.

    2012-01-01

    Different regulatory principles influence synaptic coupling between neurons, including positional principles. In dendrites of pyramidal neurons, postsynaptic sensitivity depends on synapse location, with distal synapses having the highest gain. In this paper, we investigate whether similar rules exist for presynaptic terminals in mixed networks of pyramidal and dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. Unexpectedly, distal synapses had the lowest staining intensities for vesicular proteins vGlut, vGAT, Synaptotagmin, and VAMP and for many nonvesicular proteins, including Bassoon, Munc18, and Syntaxin. Concomitantly, distal synapses displayed less vesicle release upon stimulation. This dependence of presynaptic strength on dendritic position persisted after chronically blocking action potential firing and postsynaptic receptors but was markedly reduced on DG dendrites compared with pyramidal dendrites. These data reveal a novel rule, independent of neuronal activity, which regulates presynaptic strength according to dendritic position, with the strongest terminals closest to the soma. This gradient is opposite to postsynaptic gradients observed in pyramidal dendrites, and different cell types apply this rule to a different extent. PMID:22492722

  19. Dendritic position is a major determinant of presynaptic strength.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Arthur P H; Schmitz, Sabine K; Toonen, Ruud F G; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-04-16

    Different regulatory principles influence synaptic coupling between neurons, including positional principles. In dendrites of pyramidal neurons, postsynaptic sensitivity depends on synapse location, with distal synapses having the highest gain. In this paper, we investigate whether similar rules exist for presynaptic terminals in mixed networks of pyramidal and dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. Unexpectedly, distal synapses had the lowest staining intensities for vesicular proteins vGlut, vGAT, Synaptotagmin, and VAMP and for many nonvesicular proteins, including Bassoon, Munc18, and Syntaxin. Concomitantly, distal synapses displayed less vesicle release upon stimulation. This dependence of presynaptic strength on dendritic position persisted after chronically blocking action potential firing and postsynaptic receptors but was markedly reduced on DG dendrites compared with pyramidal dendrites. These data reveal a novel rule, independent of neuronal activity, which regulates presynaptic strength according to dendritic position, with the strongest terminals closest to the soma. This gradient is opposite to postsynaptic gradients observed in pyramidal dendrites, and different cell types apply this rule to a different extent.

  20. Presynaptic glycine receptors on GABAergic terminals facilitate discharge of dopaminergic neurons in ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiang-Hong; Wang, Fushun; Krnjevic, Kresimir; Wang, Weizhen; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jingli

    2004-10-13

    GABA-mediated postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were recorded from dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats, in acute brain slices, and from enzymatically or mechanically dissociated neurons. In young rats (3-10 d of age), where GABA is excitatory, glycine (1-3 microm) and taurine (10-30 microm) increased the amplitude of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) and the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) but had minimal postsynaptic effects. Strychnine (1 microm) blocked the action of glycine; when applied alone, it reduced the amplitude of eIPSCs and the frequency of sIPSCs, indicating a tonic facilitation of GABAergic excitation by some endogenous glycine agonist(s). In medium containing no Ca2+, or with Cd2+ or tetrodotoxin added, the amplitude and especially the frequency of sIPSCs greatly diminished. In many cells, glycine had no effect on remaining miniature IPSCs, suggesting a preterminal site of glycine receptors (GlyRs). Fura-2 fluorescent imaging showed a glycine-induced increase of [Ca2+] in nerve terminals (on DA neurons), which was suppressed by strychnine or 3 microm omega-conotoxin MVIIA. Therefore, the presynaptic GlyR-mediated facilitation of GABAergic transmission seems to be mediated by N- and/or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. In older rats (22-30 d of age), where GABA causes inhibition, the effect of strychnine on GABAergic IPSCs was reversed to facilitation, indicating a tonic glycinergic inhibition of GABA release. Furthermore, glycine (1-3 microm) reduced the amplitude of eIPSCs and the frequency of sIPSCs. Hence, the overall effect of the presynaptic action of glycine is to enhance the firing of DA cells, both in very young and older rats.

  1. Modulation by presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors of noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Parker, D A; Marino, V; Ivar, P M; de la Lande, I S

    1998-12-01

    This study was undertaken to test for the presence of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors on sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp and, if present, to investigate the subtype. Pulp was excised from freshly extracted teeth, incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (0.6 micromol/l) and subsequently superfused with Krebs solution. Sympathetic nerves were stimulated at 5 Hz for 100 sec. The non-specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (1.0 micromol/l), and the selective beta2-agonist salbutamol (10 micromol/l) facilitated the release of [3H]-noradrenaline; isoprenaline, but not salbutamol, also facilitated this release in the presence of desipramine (DMI, 0.3 micromol/l), corticosterone (10 micromol/l) and rauwolscine (0.1 micromol/l). BRL 37344 (1.0 micromol/l), a beta3-agonist, had no effect on [3H]-noradrenaline release. The facilitatory effects of isoprenaline and salbutamol were inhibited by the non-specific beta-antagonist propranolol (1.0 micromol/l), while that of salbutamol was inhibited in the presence of ICI-188,551 (1.0 micromol/l), a selective beta2-antagonist, as well. The beta1-antagonist atenolol (1.0 micromol/l) potentiated the facilitatory effects of isoprenaline in the presence of DMI and corticosterone. Neither propranolol nor ICI-188,551 alone affected the release of [3H]-noradrenaline. These results establish the presence of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors on sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp. It is suggested that they are of the beta2-subtype, although a greater range of agonists and antagonists needs to be used to clarify the nature of the the beta-adrenoceptors.

  2. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  3. Citalopram antagonizes the stimulation by lysergic acid diethylamide of presynaptic inhibitory serotonin autoreceptors in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Langer, S Z; Moret, C

    1982-07-01

    Slices of rat hypothalamus prelabeled with [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) were superfused and the release of the labeled transmitter was elicited either by electrical stimulation or by fenfluramine. Whereas the electrically stimulated release of [3H]-5-HT was completely abolished by removing calcium from the superfusion medium, the fenfluramine-induced release of [3H]-5-HT was calcium-independent. Methiothepin increased, in a concentration-dependent manner, the [3H]-5-HT release induced by electrical stimulation but had no effect on that elicited by fenfluramine. The 3H-transmitter release elicited by electrical stimulation was inhibited by lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in a concentration-dependent manner, but the release induced by fenfluramine was not modified by LSD. The reduction by LSD of [3H]-5-HT overflow elicited by electrical stimulation was antagonized by methiothepin, but unaffected by phentolamine or by sulpiride. Low concentrations (10-1000 nM) of citalopram, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, antagonized the inhibition by LSD of electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT. These concentrations of citalopram did not modify by themselves the overflow of [3H]-5-HT elicited by electrical stimulation. It is concluded that the modulation of [3H]-5-HT release by presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors is not operational when the neurotransmitter is released through a calcium-independent mechanism. The potent presynaptic inhibition by LSD of serotonergic neurotransmission may contribute to the central actions of this drug. The interaction between citalopram and LSD at the level of [3H]-5-HT release does not seem to involve a competitive interaction at the same receptor site. The possibility that neuronal uptake of 5-HT and the presynaptic 5-HT autoreceptor may be linked in a functional manner cannot be excluded.

  4. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  5. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  6. The Alzheimer's β-secretase BACE1 localizes to normal presynaptic terminals and to dystrophic presynaptic terminals surrounding amyloid plaques.

    PubMed

    Kandalepas, Patty C; Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Zhao, Jie; Nicholson, Daniel A; Vassar, Robert

    2013-09-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is the β-secretase that initiates Aβ production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 levels are increased in AD, which could contribute to pathogenesis, yet the mechanism of BACE1 elevation is unclear. Furthermore, the normal function of BACE1 is poorly understood. We localized BACE1 in the brain at both the light and electron microscopic levels to gain insight into normal and pathophysiologic roles of BACE1 in health and AD, respectively. Our findings provide the first ultrastructural evidence that BACE1 localizes to vesicles (likely endosomes) in normal hippocampal mossy fiber terminals of both non-transgenic and APP transgenic (5XFAD) mouse brains. In some instances, BACE1-positive vesicles were located near active zones, implying a function for BACE1 at the synapse. In addition, BACE1 accumulated in swollen dystrophic autophagosome-poor presynaptic terminals surrounding amyloid plaques in 5XFAD cortex and hippocampus. Importantly, accumulations of BACE1 and APP co-localized in presynaptic dystrophies, implying increased BACE1 processing of APP in peri-plaque regions. In primary cortical neuron cultures, treatment with the lysosomal protease inhibitor leupeptin caused BACE1 levels to increase; however, exposure of neurons to the autophagy inducer trehalose did not reduce BACE1 levels. This suggests that BACE1 is degraded by lysosomes but not by autophagy. Our results imply that BACE1 elevation in AD could be linked to decreased lysosomal degradation of BACE1 within dystrophic presynaptic terminals. Elevated BACE1 and APP levels in plaque-associated presynaptic dystrophies could increase local peri-plaque Aβ generation and accelerate amyloid plaque growth in AD.

  7. The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors in the Mature Hippocampus: Modulation of Long-Term Potentiation through a Presynaptic Mechanism involving TrkB

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoji; Gottschalk, Wolfram; Chow, Ana; Wilson, Rachel I.; Schnell, Eric; Zang, Keling; Wang, Denan; Nicoll, Roger A.; Lu, Bai; Reichardt, Louis F.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophin BDNF has been shown to modulate long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 hippocampal synapses. Mutants in the BDNF receptor gene trkB and antibodies to its second receptor p75NTR have been used to determine the receptors and cells involved in this response. Inhibition of p75NTR does not detectably reduce LTP or affect presynaptic function, but analyses of newly generated trkB mutants implicate TrkB. One mutant has reduced expression in a normal pattern of TrkB throughout the brain. The second mutant was created by cre-loxP-mediated removal of TrkB in CA1 pyramidal neurons of this mouse. Neither mutant detectably impacts survival or morphology of hippocampal neurons. TrkB reduction, however, affects presynaptic function and reduces the ability of tetanic stimulation to induce LTP. Postsynaptic glutamate receptors are not affected by TrkB reduction, indicating that BDNF does not modulate plasticity through postsynaptic TrkB. Consistent with this, elimination of TrkB in postsynaptic neurons does not affect LTP. Moreover, normal LTP is generated in the mutant with reduced TrkB by a depolarization–low-frequency stimulation pairing protocol that puts minimal demands on presynaptic terminal function. Thus, BDNF appears to act through TrkB presynaptically, but not postsynaptically, to modulate LTP. PMID:10995833

  8. Differential myotoxic and cytotoxic activities of pre-synaptic neurotoxins from Papuan taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) and Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus) venoms.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Parkington, Helena C; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2013-05-01

    Pre-synaptic PLA(2) neurotoxins are important components of many Australasian elapid snake venoms. These toxins disrupt neurotransmitter release. Taipoxin, a pre-synaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the coastal taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus), causes necrosis and muscle degeneration. The present study examined the myotoxic and cytotoxic activities of venoms from the Papuan taipan (O. scutellatus) and Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus), and also tested their pre-synaptic neurotoxins: cannitoxin and P-EPTX-Ar1a. Based on size-exclusion chromatography analysis, cannitoxin represents 16% of O. scutellatus venom, while P-EPTX-Ar1a represents 6% of A. rugosus venom. In the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, A. rugosus venom displayed significantly higher myotoxic activity than O. scutellatus venom as indicated by inhibition of direct twitches, and an increase in baseline tension. Both cannitoxin and P-EPTX-Ar1a displayed marked myotoxic activity. A. rugosus venom (50-300 μg/ml) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6), while 300 μg/ml of O. scutellatus venom was required to inhibit cell proliferation, following 24-hr incubation. P-EPTX-Ar1a had greater cytotoxicity than cannitoxin, inhibiting cell proliferation after 24-hr incubation in L6 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase levels were increased after 1-hr incubation with A. rugosus venom (100-250 μg/ml), O. scutellatus venom (200-250 μg/ml) and P-EPTX-Ar1a (1-2 μM), but not cannitoxin (1-2 μM), suggesting venoms/toxin generated cell necrosis. Thus, A. rugosus and O. scutellatus venoms possess different myotoxic and cytotoxic activities. The proportion of pre-synaptic neurotoxin in the venoms and PLA(2) activity of the whole venoms are unlikely to be responsible for these activities. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. LIM Kinase, a Newly Identified Regulator of Presynaptic Remodeling by Rod Photoreceptors After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rod photoreceptors retract their axon terminals and develop neuritic sprouts in response to retinal detachment and reattachment, respectively. This study examines the role of LIM kinase (LIMK), a component of RhoA and Rac pathways, in the presynaptic structural remodeling of rod photoreceptors. Methods Phosphorylated LIMK (p-LIMK), the active form of LIMK, was examined in salamander retina with Western blot and confocal microscopy. Axon length within the first 7 hours and process growth after 3 days of culture were assessed in isolated rod photoreceptors treated with inhibitors of upstream regulators ROCK and p21-activated kinase (Pak) (Y27632 and IPA-3) and a direct LIMK inhibitor (BMS-5). Porcine retinal explants were also treated with BMS-5 and analyzed 24 hours after detachment. Because Ca2+ influx contributes to axonal retraction, L-type channels were blocked in some experiments with nicardipine. Results Phosphorylated LIMK is present in rod terminals during retraction and in newly formed processes. Axonal retraction over 7 hours was significantly reduced by inhibition of LIMK or its regulators, ROCK and Pak. Process growth was reduced by LIMK or Pak inhibition especially at the basal (axon-bearing) region of the rod cells. Combining Ca2+ channel and LIMK inhibition had no additional effect on retraction but did further inhibit sprouting after 3 days. In detached porcine retina, LIMK inhibition reduced rod axonal retraction and improved retinal morphology. Conclusions Thus structural remodeling, in the form of either axonal retraction or neuritic growth, requires LIMK activity. LIM kinase inhibition may have therapeutic potential for reducing pathologic rod terminal plasticity after retinal injury. PMID:26658506

  10. Salvinorin A exerts opposite presynaptic controls on neurotransmitter exocytosis from mouse brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Massimo; Neri, Elisa; Zappettini, Stefania; Massa, Francesca; Bisio, Angela; Romussi, Giovanni; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of salvinorin A on the basal and the 12 mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]noradenaline ([(3)H]NA) and [(3)H]serotonin ([(3)H]5-HT) from mouse hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), as well as on the basal and 12mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA) from mouse striatal and prefrontal cortex (PFc) synaptosomes. Salvinorin A (0.1-1000 nM) failed to affect the basal release of amines, but inhibited the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA. At the same concentration, salvinorin A facilitated the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]NA. These effects could not be observed in pertussis toxin (PTx) entrapped synaptosomes. The broad spectrum kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI, 1-100 nM) antagonized the inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA exocytosis as well as the facilitation of [(3)H]NA overflow induced by 100 nM salvinorin A. The KOR agonist U69593 (1-100 nM) mimicked salvinorin A in inhibiting [(3)H]5-HT and of [(3)H]DA exocytosis, its effect being prevented by norBNI, but leaving unchanged the K(+)-evoked release of [(3)H]NA. The effects of Salvinorin A on neurotransmitter exocytosis were not prevented by the selective mu opioid (MOR) receptor antagonist CTAP (10-100 nM), whereas facilitation of [(3)H]NA exocytosis, but not inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA K(+)-evoked release, was counteracted by the delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (1-100 nM). We conclude that salvinorin A presynaptically modulates central NA, 5-HT, and DA exocytosis evoked by a mild depolarizing stimulus by acting at presynaptic opioid receptors having different pharmacological profiles.

  11. Amyloid-β Oligomers Interact with Neurexin and Diminish Neurexin-mediated Excitatory Presynaptic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yusuke; Tanabe, Yuko; Lee, Alfred Kihoon; Hamel, Edith; Takahashi, Hideto

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by excessive production and deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) proteins as well as synapse dysfunction and loss. While soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs) have deleterious effects on synapse function and reduce synapse number, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we screened synaptic organizer proteins for cell-surface interaction with AβOs and identified a novel interaction between neurexins (NRXs) and AβOs. AβOs bind to NRXs via the N-terminal histidine-rich domain (HRD) of β-NRX1/2/3 and alternatively-spliced inserts at splicing site 4 of NRX1/2. In artificial synapse-formation assays, AβOs diminish excitatory presynaptic differentiation induced by NRX-interacting proteins including neuroligin1/2 (NLG1/2) and the leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein LRRTM2. Although AβOs do not interfere with the binding of NRX1β to NLG1 or LRRTM2, time-lapse imaging revealed that AβO treatment reduces surface expression of NRX1β on axons and that this reduction depends on the NRX1β HRD. In transgenic mice expressing mutated human amyloid precursor protein, synaptic expression of β-NRXs, but not α-NRXs, decreases. Thus our data indicate that AβOs interact with NRXs and that this interaction inhibits NRX-mediated presynaptic differentiation by reducing surface expression of axonal β-NRXs, providing molecular and mechanistic insights into how AβOs lead to synaptic pathology in AD. PMID:28211900

  12. Potentiation of neurotransmitter release by activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses of Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, W M; Liou, J C; Lee, Y H; Liou, H C

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptors play important roles in synaptic plasticity and neural development. Here we report that, at the developing neuromuscular synapses in Xenopus cultures, the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at motor nerve terminals potentiates spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release. 2. Co-cultures of spinal neurons and myotomal muscle cells were prepared from 1-day-old Xenopus embryos. Spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs) were recorded from innervated myocytes using whole-cell recording. Bath application of glutamate (10 microM) markedly increased the frequency of SSCs, and the action of glutamate was reversible. 3. Pretreatment with 0.3 microM tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na+ channels and the conduction of action potentials, only slightly inhibited the potentiating action of glutamate on SSCs. Furthermore, the enhancement of ACh secretion was much more prominent when glutamate was applied locally to the synaptic region. 4. Three types of glutamate receptor agonists, kainate, quisqualate, AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), were effective in inducing the potentiating effect. The ranking order was: glutamate > kainate > NMDA > AMPA > quisqualate. Glycine potentiated the effects induced by NMDA. Metabotropic receptors were not involved in the potentiating action of glutamate. 5. The potentiating effect of glutamate depended on the influx of Ca2+ through both L-type Ca2+ channels and NMDA-gated channels. 6. Since glutamate is known to be co-released with ACh at some cholinergic nerve terminals, the released glutamate may serve as a positive feedback regulation of ACh secretion at developing neuromuscular junctions via its action on presynaptic glutamate receptors. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8788945

  13. Nesfatin-1 modulates murine gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity in a nutritional state dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Li, Hui; Frisby, Claudine L; Page, Amanda J

    2017-03-01

    Food intake is regulated by vagal afferent signals from the stomach. Nesfatin-1 is an anorexigenic peptide produced within the gastrointestinal tract and has well defined central effects. We aimed to determine if nesfatin-1 can modulate gastric vagal afferent signals in the periphery and further whether this is altered in different nutritional states. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks or fasted overnight. Plasma nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2; nesfatin-1 precursor)/nesfatin-1 levels were assayed, the expression of NUCB2 in the gastric mucosa and adipose tissue was assessed using real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. An in vitro preparation was used to determine the effect of nesfatin-1 on gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity. HFD mice exhibited an increased body weight and adiposity. Plasma NUCB2/nesfatin-1 levels were unchanged between any of the groups of mice. NUCB2 mRNA was detected in the gastric mucosa and gonadal fat of SLD, HFD and fasted mice with no difference in mRNA abundance between groups in either tissue. In SLD and fasted mice nesfatin-1 potentiated mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity, an effect not observed in HFD mice. Tension receptor mechanosensitivity was unaffected by nesfatin-1 in SLD and fasted mice, but was inhibited in HFD mice. In conclusion, Nesfatin-1 modulates gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity in a nutritional state dependent manner.

  14. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  15. The importance of presynaptic beta receptors in Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Brotzu, G; Falchi, S; Mannu, B; Montisci, R; Petruzzo, P; Staico, R

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of atenolol, a beta 1-selective blocker, along with flunarizine, a calcium antagonist, in the management of Raynaud's disease. Forty patients with Raynaud's disease were randomized into a trial in which atenolol (50 mg daily) was given with flunarizine (10 mg daily). During the trial all patients were subjected to finger photoplethysmography and were given a diary to note daily the number and duration of the crises and presence or absence of pain and paresthesia. The association of atenolol with flunarizine caused an 80% reduction in the number of vasospastic crises, a significant increase (p less than 0.001) in the photoplethysmographic wave amplitude, and complete disappearance of pain and paresthesia. These results were not observed in patients treated with a placebo. Flunarizine reinforces the action of atenolol in causing a decrease in vasoconstriction in patients with Raynaud's disease, as observed previously by us, in that it acts directly on the beta-presynaptic receptors or on the calcium slow channels connected to the beta-receptors. The present study confirms that the principal role in the physiopathologic progression of Raynaud's disease seems to be played by a modification of the beta-presynaptic receptors in the nerve endings of the peripheral vessels.

  16. SNAP-25, a Known Presynaptic Protein with Emerging Postsynaptic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Flavia; Corradini, Irene; Fossati, Giuliana; Tomasoni, Romana; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different “synaptopathies”. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis, and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions. PMID:27047369

  17. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases.

  18. Paradoxical upregulation of glutamatergic presynaptic boutons during mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen F S; Bennett, David A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2007-10-03

    Synaptic integrity is now recognized as a central component of Alzheimer's disease. Surprisingly, however, the structural status of glutamatergic synapses in Alzheimer's disease is unclear, despite the fact that glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter of the CNS and has key roles in excitotoxicity and long-term potentiation. The identification of specific markers of glutamatergic neurons now allows an assessment of the structural involvement of the glutamatergic system across progressive stages of the Alzheimer's pathology, an opportunity not afforded by previously used neurochemical approaches. Glutamatergic presynaptic bouton density and dystrophic neurite abundance were quantified in midfrontal gyrus brain tissue from subjects with no cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, or mild- or severe-stage Alzheimer's disease. Our study demonstrates a striking pathology-dependent pattern of glutamatergic synaptic remodeling with disease progression. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment display a paradoxical elevation in glutamatergic presynaptic bouton density, a situation akin to that observed in the cholinergic system, which then depletes and drops with disease progression. This pattern of synaptic remodeling mirrors our previous findings in transgenic animal models and is of major relevance to current transmitter-based therapeutics.

  19. Temporal variations in presynaptic release probability in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoyong; Cheon, Myunghyun; Kim, Sungmin; Chung, ChiHye

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmicity plays an important role in a number of biological systems. The habenular complex is reported to contain an intrinsic molecular clock and to show rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes and proteins including per2/PER2. In this study, we observed that there is a temporal rhythmicity in the presynaptic efficacy of the lateral habenula (LHb) neurons. We collected a substantial number of recordings at different time points of the day during the light phase. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory transmission were increased in the afternoon compared to recordings performed in the morning. In addition, the paired-pulse ratio and the success rate of minimal stimulation were also significantly different depending on the time of the recording. We did not see any significant differences in recordings obtained from pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in the same brain slices. Taken together, our data indicates that the LHb exhibits intrinsic temporal oscillation in basal neurotransmission and in presynaptic release probability. Given the rapidly growing interest on the function of the LHb, more careful examination of synaptic transmission in the LHb is thus required. PMID:28106159

  20. Presynaptic 5-HT3 receptor-mediated modulation of synaptic GABA release in the mechanically dissociated rat amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Susumu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kubo, Chiharu; Akaike, Norio

    2000-01-01

    Nystatin-perforated patch recordings were made from mechanically dissociated basolateral amygdala neurons with preserved intact native presynaptic nerve terminals to study the mechanism of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated serotonergic modulation of GABAergic inhibition. The specific 5-HT3 agonist mCPBG (1 μM) rapidly facilitated the frequency of GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) and this facilitation desensitized within 1 min. Tropisetron (30 nM), a specific 5-HT3 antagonist, blocked the mCPBG effect. mCPBG augmented mIPSC amplitude. However, no direct postsynaptic serotonergic currents were evoked by mCPBG. Neither GABA-evoked current amplitude nor the kinetics of individual GABAergic mIPSCs were affected by mCPBG. Therefore, the augmentation is unlikely to be due to postsynaptic effects evoked by mCPBG. At higher concentrations mCPBG produced shorter-duration facilitation of miniature events. While mCPBG increased the mIPSC frequency in calcium-containing solution with Cd2+, this increase was absent in Ca2+-free external solution. It appears that the Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels was not as crucial as that through 5-HT3 receptors for synaptic GABA release. When two pulses of mCPBG (each 1 μM, 1 min) were given, the response to the second pulse elicited full recovery when the interval between pulses was at least 9 min. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation by 8-Br-cAMP (300 μM) shortened and PKA inhibition by Rp-cAMP (100 μM) prolonged the recovery time. PKA activity did not affect the time course of fast desensitization. Our results suggest that a 5-HT3-specific agonist acts on presynaptic nerve terminals facilitating synaptic GABA release without postsynaptic effects. The facilitation requires calcium influx through presynaptic 5-HT3 receptors. PKA modulates the recovery process from desensitization of presynaptic 5-HT3 receptor-mediated regulation of synaptic GABA release. PMID:11101647

  1. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0357 TITLE: New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic...14 Apr 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Transmitter...temporal lobe epilepsy , and highlight the need for preventing the downregulation of sensitivity to levetiracetam observed with chronic administration

  2. Neurotoxin A2NTX blocks fast inhibitory and excitatory transmitter release from presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Yamaga, Toshitaka; Aou, Shuji; Shin, Min-Chul; Wakita, Masahito; Akaike, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Our recent study showed a possibility that newly developed A2 type botulinum toxin (A2NTX) inhibits both spontaneous and evoked transmitter release from inhibitory (glycinergic or GABAergic) and excitatory (glutamatergic) nerve terminals using rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons. In the present study, to determine the modulatory effect of A2NTX on glycinergic and glutamatergic release probabilities, we tested the effects of A2NTX on a single inhibitory or excitatory nerve ending adherent to a dissociated neuron that was activated by paired-pulse stimuli by using the focal electrical stimulation technique. The results of the present paired-pulse experiments showed clearly that A2NTX enhanced paired-pulse facilitation of evoked glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents and increased the failure rate (Rf) of the first postsynaptic currents (P(1)) and both the responses. These effects of A2NTX on the amplitude and Rf of the P(1) and the second postsynaptic currents (P(2)) and paired-pulse ratio were rescued by application of 4-aminophthalimide. In summary, the present results showed that A2NTX acts purely presynaptically and inhibits the release machinery of transmitters such as glycine and glutamate, and the transmitter release machinery became less sensitive to intracellular free-Ca(2+) in A2NTX poisoned nerve terminals.

  3. Presynaptic action of Bothriopsis bilineata smargadina (forest viper) venom in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Floriano, Rafael Stuani; Rostelato-Ferreira, Sandro; Sousa, Norma Cristina; Marangoni, Sergio; Ponce-Soto, Luis Alberto; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Hyslop, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we examined the neuromuscular activity of Bothriopsis bilineata smargadina (forest viper) venom in vertebrate isolated nerve-muscle preparations. In chick biventer cervicis preparations the venom caused concentration-dependent (0.1-30 μg/ml) neuromuscular blockade that was not reversed by washing, with 50% blockade occurring in 15-90 min. Muscle contractures to exogenous acetylcholine and KCl were unaffected by venom, but there was a slight increase in creatine kinase release after 120 min (from 80 ± 15 to 206 ± 25U/ml, n=6, p<0.05). In mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations, the venom (1, 10 and 30 μg/ml) produced marked facilitation (∼120% increase above basal) at the highest concentration followed by neuromuscular blockade; the effects at lower concentrations were considerably less marked. Venom increased the quantal content values after 15 and 30 min followed by significant inhibition at ≥ 90 min. However, venom did not alter the muscle membrane resting potential or the response to exogenous carbachol. In both preparations, incubation at 22 °C instead of 37 °C delayed the onset of blockade, as did inhibition of venom PLA(2) activity. In curarized mouse preparations, the venom produced only muscle facilitation. These results indicate that B. b. smargadina venom causes neuromuscular blockade in vitro by a presynaptic mechanism involving PLA(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  5. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Jia, Yongheng; Pinaud, Raphael; Zhuo, Min

    2006-01-01

    GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs) are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord. PMID:16948848

  6. The Roles of Microtubule-Based Transport at Presynaptic Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Yagensky, Oleksandr; Kalantary Dehaghi, Tahere; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Targeted intracellular movement of presynaptic proteins plays important roles during synapse formation and, later, in the homeostatic maintenance of mature synapses. Movement of these proteins, often as vesicular packages, is mediated by motor complexes travelling along intracellular cytoskeletal networks. Presynaptic protein transport by kinesin motors in particular plays important roles during synaptogenesis to bring newly synthesized proteins to establish nascent synaptic sites. Conversely, movement of proteins away from presynaptic sites by Dynein motors enables synapse-nuclear signaling and allows for synaptic renewal through degradation of unwanted or damaged proteins. Remarkably, recent data has indicated that synaptic and protein trafficking machineries can modulate each other’s functions. Here, we survey the mechanisms involved in moving presynaptic components to and away from synapses and how this process supports presynaptic function. PMID:26903856

  7. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  8. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2014-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for the regulation of information storage and the control of actions, as well as for synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity, the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a 'common pathway' are described. We review here the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate whether all Gi/o-GPCRs are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD.

  9. Presynaptic imidazoline receptors and non-adrenoceptor[3H]-idazoxan binding sites in human cardiovascular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Molderings, G J; Likungu, J; Jakschik, J; Göthert, M

    1997-01-01

    In segments of human right atrial appendages and pulmonary arteries preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline and superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine and corticosterone, the involvement of imidazoline receptors in the modulation of [3H]-noradrenaline release was investigated. In human atrial appendages, the guanidines aganodine and DTG (1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine) which activate presynaptic imidazoline receptors, inhibited electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release. The inhibition was not affected by blockade of α2-adrenoceptors with 1 μM rauwolscine, but antagonized by extremely high concentrations of this drug (10 and/or 30 μM; apparent pA2 against aganodine and DTG: 5.55 and 5.21, respectively). In the presence of 1 μM rauwolscine, [3H]-noradrenaline release in human atrial appendages was also inhibited by the imidazolines idazoxan and cirazoline, but not by agmatine and noradrenaline. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM idazoxan and 30 μM cirazoline were abolished by 30 μM rauwolscine. In the atrial appendages, the rank order of potency of all guanidines and imidazolines for their inhibitory effect on electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release in the presence of 1 μM rauwolscine was: aganodine⩾BDF 6143 [4-chloro-2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl-amino)-isoindoline]>DTG⩾clonidine>cirazoline>idazoxan (BDF 6143 and clonidine were previously studied under identical conditions). This potency order corresponded to that previously determined at the presynaptic imidazoline receptors in the rabbit aorta. When, in the experiments in the human pulmonary artery, rauwolscine was absent from the superfusion fluid, the concentration-response curve for BDF 6143 (a mixed α2-adrenoceptor antagonist/imidazoline receptor agonist) for its facilitatory effect on electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was bell-shaped. In the presence of 1 μM rauwolscine, BDF 6143 and cirazoline concentration-dependently inhibited the

  10. Presynaptic control of dopamine release by BETA-phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikova, A.D.; Godukhin, O.V.

    1985-04-01

    The authors study the effect of extracellular ions (Ca/sup 2 +/, Na/sup 2 +/) on the beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) releasing effect, dependence of this effect on the membrane potential of dopaminergic endings, and the participation of dopamine presynaptic autoreceptors in the realization of the effects of beta-PEA on dopamine (DA) release. Experi ments were carried out on noninbred male albino rats. By means of a microsyringe, (/sup 3/H)-DA hydrochloride was injected. The significance of the difference in levels of (/sup 3/H)-DA release during analogous periods of perfusion in the groups of animals compared was estimated by Student's test. These experiments in vivo thus demonstrated the ability of beta-PEA to regulate DA release in different directions depending on the functional state of the dopaminergic neuron.

  11. [Presynaptic component in the mechanism of fenibut action].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G I; Prikhozhan, A V; Raevskiĭ, K S

    1982-11-01

    Superfusion of crude synaptosomal fractions from the rat brain cortex was used to study in vitro the effect of phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA), a tranquilizing agent, on spontaneous and K+-stimulated release of 3H-GABA. It was found that phenibut in concentrations of 50 and 100 microM enhanced spontaneous tritium efflux by 15.9 and 30.7%, respectively. The effect of exogenous GABA in a concentration of 100 microM was 5 times more remarkable. The K+-stimulated release of the transmitter significantly increased under the effect of phenibut. Bicuculline counteracted this enhancement while picrotoxin did not effect the K+-stimulated egress of 3H-GABA. It is assumed that the presynaptic component described plays a role in the realization of the tranquilizing action of the tranquilizing action of phenibut.

  12. Presynaptic elements involved in the maintenance of the neuromuscular junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in the neuromuscular junction were observed in rats preceding loss of muscle mass. In view of the possibility that these alterations involve changes in the secretion of myotrophic agents by presynaptic motor neurons, an investigation was undertaken to characterize a neuronall factor which is thought to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cholinergic synapses. This factor, which is secreted into the incubation medium by NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells, induces the aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on primary cultures of rat hindlimb myotubes. Previous attempts to purify this factor failed. Extensive washing of the NG108-15 cells with hepes-buffered salt solution followed by short (4 hour) collection times resulted in the collection of incubation medium containing maximal aggregation activity with as little as 5 ug secreted protein per ml of fresh medium. A three-fold increase in specific activity was obtained after anion exchange chromatography.

  13. Presynaptic elements involved in the maintenance of the neuromuscular junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in the neuromuscular junction were observed in rats preceding loss of muscle mass. In view of the possibility that these alterations involve changes in the secretion of myotrophic agents by presynaptic motor neurons, an investigation was undertaken to characterize a neuronall factor which is thought to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cholinergic synapses. This factor, which is secreted into the incubation medium by NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells, induces the aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on primary cultures of rat hindlimb myotubes. Previous attempts to purify this factor failed. Extensive washing of the NG108-15 cells with hepes-buffered salt solution followed by short (4 hour) collection times resulted in the collection of incubation medium containing maximal aggregation activity with as little as 5 ug secreted protein per ml of fresh medium. A three-fold increase in specific activity was obtained after anion exchange chromatography.

  14. Functional presynaptic HCN channels in the rat globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Boyes, Justin; Bolam, J Paul; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Stanford, Ian M

    2007-04-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are expressed postsynaptically in the rodent globus pallidus (GP), where they play several important roles in controlling GP neuronal activity. To further elucidate the role of HCN channels in the GP, immunocytochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to test the hypothesis that HCN channels are also expressed presynaptically on the local axon collaterals of GP neurons. At the electron microscopic level, immunoperoxidase labelling for HCN1 and HCN2 was localized in GP somata and dendritic processes, myelinated and unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals. One population of labelled terminals formed symmetric synapses with somata and proximal dendrites and were immunoreactive for parvalbumin, consistent with the axon collaterals of GABAergic GP projection neurons. In addition, labelling for HCN2 and, to a lesser degree, HCN1 was observed in axon terminals that formed asymmetric synapses and were immunoreactive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 2. Immunogold labelling demonstrated that HCN1 and HCN2 were located predominantly at extrasynaptic sites along the plasma membrane of both types of terminal. To determine the function of presynaptic HCN channels in the GP, we performed whole-cell recordings from GP neurons in vitro. Bath application of the HCN channel blocker ZD7288 resulted in an increase in the frequency of mIPSCs but had no effect on their amplitude, implying that HCN channels tonically regulate the release of GABA. Their presence, and predicted role in modulating transmitter release, represents a hitherto unidentified mechanism whereby HCN channels influence the activity of GP neurons.

  15. State-dependent and reflex drives to the upper airway: basic physiology with clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stuart W.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The root cause of the most common and serious of the sleep disorders is impairment of breathing, and a number of factors predispose a particular individual to hypoventilation during sleep. In turn, obstructive hypopneas and apneas are the most common of the sleep-related respiratory problems and are caused by dysfunction of the upper airway as a conduit for airflow. The overarching principle that underpins the full spectrum of clinical sleep-related breathing disorders is that the sleeping brain modifies respiratory muscle activity and control mechanisms and diminishes the ability to respond to respiratory distress. Depression of upper airway muscle activity and reflex responses, and suppression of arousal (i.e., “waking-up”) responses to respiratory disturbance, can also occur with commonly used sedating agents (e.g., hypnotics and anesthetics). Growing evidence indicates that the sometimes critical problems of sleep and sedation-induced depression of breathing and arousal responses may be working through common brain pathways acting on common cellular mechanisms. To identify these state-dependent pathways and reflex mechanisms, as they affect the upper airway, is the focus of this paper. Major emphasis is on the synthesis of established and recent findings. In particular, we specifically focus on 1) the recently defined mechanism of genioglossus muscle inhibition in rapid-eye-movement sleep; 2) convergence of diverse neurotransmitters and signaling pathways onto one root mechanism that may explain pharyngeal motor suppression in sleep and drug-induced brain sedation; 3) the lateral reticular formation as a key hub of respiratory and reflex drives to the upper airway. PMID:23970535

  16. State-dependent and reflex drives to the upper airway: basic physiology with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Horner, Richard L; Hughes, Stuart W; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-02-01

    The root cause of the most common and serious of the sleep disorders is impairment of breathing, and a number of factors predispose a particular individual to hypoventilation during sleep. In turn, obstructive hypopneas and apneas are the most common of the sleep-related respiratory problems and are caused by dysfunction of the upper airway as a conduit for airflow. The overarching principle that underpins the full spectrum of clinical sleep-related breathing disorders is that the sleeping brain modifies respiratory muscle activity and control mechanisms and diminishes the ability to respond to respiratory distress. Depression of upper airway muscle activity and reflex responses, and suppression of arousal (i.e., "waking-up") responses to respiratory disturbance, can also occur with commonly used sedating agents (e.g., hypnotics and anesthetics). Growing evidence indicates that the sometimes critical problems of sleep and sedation-induced depression of breathing and arousal responses may be working through common brain pathways acting on common cellular mechanisms. To identify these state-dependent pathways and reflex mechanisms, as they affect the upper airway, is the focus of this paper. Major emphasis is on the synthesis of established and recent findings. In particular, we specifically focus on 1) the recently defined mechanism of genioglossus muscle inhibition in rapid-eye-movement sleep; 2) convergence of diverse neurotransmitters and signaling pathways onto one root mechanism that may explain pharyngeal motor suppression in sleep and drug-induced brain sedation; 3) the lateral reticular formation as a key hub of respiratory and reflex drives to the upper airway.

  17. A novel mathematical setup for fault tolerant control systems with state-dependent failure process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitraganti, S.; Aberkane, S.; Aubrun, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a fault tolerant control system (FTCS) with state- dependent failures and provide a tractable mathematical model to handle the state-dependent failures. By assuming abrupt changes in system parameters, we use a jump process modelling of failure process and the fault detection and isolation (FDI) process. In particular, we assume that the failure rates of the failure process vary according to which set the state of the system belongs to.

  18. Synaptic Variability Introduces State-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Spinal Cord Synapses.

    PubMed

    Parker, David

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of neuronal and synaptic variability remains unclear. Cellular and synaptic plasticity and neuromodulation are also variable. This could reflect state-dependent effects caused by the variable initial cellular or synaptic properties or direct variability in plasticity-inducing mechanisms. This study has examined state-dependent influences on synaptic plasticity at connections between excitatory interneurons (EIN) and motor neurons in the lamprey spinal cord. State-dependent effects were examined by correlating initial synaptic properties with the substance P-mediated plasticity of low frequency-evoked EPSPs and the reduction of the EPSP depression over spike trains (metaplasticity). The low frequency EPSP potentiation reflected an interaction between the potentiation of NMDA responses and the release probability. The release probability introduced a variable state-dependent subtractive influence on the postsynaptic NMDA-dependent potentiation. The metaplasticity was also state-dependent: it was greater at connections with smaller available vesicle pools and high initial release probabilities. This was supported by the significant reduction in the number of connections showing metaplasticity when the release probability was reduced by high Mg(2+) Ringer. Initial synaptic properties thus introduce state-dependent influences that affect the potential for plasticity. Understanding these conditions will be as important as understanding the subsequent changes.

  19. Structural organization of the presynaptic density at identified synapses in the locust central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leitinger, Gerd; Masich, Sergej; Neumüller, Josef; Pabst, Maria Anna; Pavelka, Margit; Rind, F Claire; Shupliakov, Oleg; Simmons, Peter J; Kolb, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    In a synaptic active zone, vesicles aggregate around a densely staining structure called the presynaptic density. We focus on its three-dimensional architecture and a major molecular component in the locust. We used electron tomography to study the presynaptic density in synapses made in the brain by identified second-order neuron of the ocelli. Here, vesicles close to the active zone are organized in two rows on either side of the presynaptic density, a level of organization not previously reported in insect central synapses. The row of vesicles that is closest to the density's base includes vesicles docked with the presynaptic membrane and thus presumably ready for release, whereas the outer row of vesicles does not include any that are docked. We show that a locust ortholog of the Drosophila protein Bruchpilot is localized to the presynaptic density, both in the ocellar pathway and compound eye visual neurons. An antibody recognizing the C-terminus of the Bruchpilot ortholog selectively labels filamentous extensions of the presynaptic density that reach out toward vesicles. Previous studies on Bruchpilot have focused on its role in neuromuscular junctions in Drosophila, and our study shows it is also a major functional component of presynaptic densities in the central nervous system of an evolutionarily distant insect. Our study thus reveals Bruchpilot executes similar functions in synapses that can sustain transmission of small graded potentials as well as those relaying large, spike-evoked signals.

  20. Modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission: The role of presynaptic calcium and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Action potentials are usually considered as the smallest unit of neuronal information conveyed by presynaptic neurons to their postsynaptic target. Thus, neuronal signaling in brain circuits is all-or-none or digital. However, recent studies indicate that subthreshold analog variation in presynaptic membrane potential modulates spike-evoked transmission. The informational content of each presynaptic action potential is therefore greater than initially expected. This property constitutes a form of fast activity-dependent modulation of functional coupling. Therefore, it could have important consequences on information processing in neural networks in parallel with more classical forms of presynaptic short-term facilitation based on repetitive stimulation, modulation of presynaptic calcium or modifications of the release machinery. We discuss here how analog voltage shift in the presynaptic neuron may regulate spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter through the modulation of voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in the axon and presynaptic terminal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms underlying short-term modulation of transmitter release by presynaptic depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Presynaptic terminal depolarization modulates the efficacy of transmitter release. Residual Ca2+ remaining after presynaptic depolarization is thought to play a critical role in facilitation of transmitter release, but its downstream mechanism remains unclear. By making simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic recordings at the rodent calyx of Held synapse, we have investigated mechanisms involved in the facilitation and depression of postsynaptic currents induced by presynaptic depolarization. In voltage-clamp experiments, cancellation of the Ca2+-dependent presynaptic Ca2+ current (IpCa) facilitation revealed that this mechanism can account for 50% of postsynaptic current facilitation, irrespective of intraterminal EGTA concentrations. Intraterminal EGTA, loaded at 10 mm, failed to block postsynaptic current facilitation, but additional BAPTA at 1 mm abolished it. Potassium-induced sustained depolarization of non-dialysed presynaptic terminals caused a facilitation of postsynaptic currents, superimposed on a depression, with the latter resulting from reductions in presynaptic action potential amplitude and number of releasable vesicles. We conclude that presynaptic depolarization bidirectionally modulates transmitter release, and that the residual Ca2+ mechanism for synaptic facilitation operates in the immediate vicinity of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the nerve terminal. PMID:19403620

  2. Presynaptic NMDA receptors – dynamics and distribution in developing axons in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ishwar; Droubi, Sammy; Giovedi, Silvia; Fedder, Karlie N.; Bury, Luke A. D.; Bosco, Federica; Sceniak, Michael P.; Benfenati, Fabio; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During cortical development, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) facilitate presynaptic terminal formation, enhance neurotransmitter release and are required in presynaptic neurons for spike-timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD). However, the extent to which NMDARs are found within cortical presynaptic terminals has remained controversial, and the sub-synaptic localization and dynamics of axonal NMDARs are unknown. Here, using live confocal imaging and biochemical purification of presynaptic membranes, we provide strong evidence that NMDARs localize to presynaptic terminals in vitro and in vivo in a developmentally regulated manner. The NR1 and NR2B subunits (also known as GRIN1 and GRIN2B, respectively) were found within the active zone membrane, where they could respond to synaptic glutamate release. Surprisingly, NR1 also appeared in glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic vesicles. During synaptogenesis, NR1 was mobile throughout axons – including growth cones and filopodia, structures that are involved in synaptogenesis. Upon synaptogenic contact, NMDA receptors were quickly recruited to terminals by neuroligin-1 signaling. Unlike dendrites, the trafficking and distribution of axonal NR1 were insensitive to activity changes, including NMDA exposure, local glutamate uncaging or action potential blockade. These results support the idea that presynaptic NMDARs play an early role in presynaptic development. PMID:25526735

  3. Structural Organization of the Presynaptic Density at Identified Synapses in the Locust Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Leitinger, Gerd; Masich, Sergej; Neumüller, Josef; Pabst, Maria Anna; Pavelka, Margit; Rind, F Claire; Shupliakov, Oleg; Simmons, Peter J; Kolb, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    In a synaptic active zone, vesicles aggregate around a densely staining structure called the presynaptic density. We focus on its three-dimensional architecture and a major molecular component in the locust. We used electron tomography to study the presynaptic density in synapses made in the brain by identified second-order neuron of the ocelli. Here, vesicles close to the active zone are organized in two rows on either side of the presynaptic density, a level of organization not previously reported in insect central synapses. The row of vesicles that is closest to the density's base includes vesicles docked with the presynaptic membrane and thus presumably ready for release, whereas the outer row of vesicles does not include any that are docked. We show that a locust ortholog of the Drosophila protein Bruchpilot is localized to the presynaptic density, both in the ocellar pathway and compound eye visual neurons. An antibody recognizing the C-terminus of the Bruchpilot ortholog selectively labels filamentous extensions of the presynaptic density that reach out toward vesicles. Previous studies on Bruchpilot have focused on its role in neuromuscular junctions in Drosophila, and our study shows it is also a major functional component of presynaptic densities in the central nervous system of an evolutionarily distant insect. Our study thus reveals Bruchpilot executes similar functions in synapses that can sustain transmission of small graded potentials as well as those relaying large, spike-evoked signals. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:384–400, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21826661

  4. Basolateral amygdala CB1 cannabinoid receptors are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ofogh, Sattar Norouzi; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol and morphine are largely co-abused and affect memory formation. The present study intended to investigate the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. Adult male Wistar rats received bilateral cannulation of the BLA, and memory retrieval was measured in step-through type passive avoidance apparatus. Our results showed that post-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine (6mg/kg) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) significantly improved morphine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that there is cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. It should be considered that pre-test administration of ethanol (0.1 and 0.5g/kg, i.p.) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval in the passive avoidance task. Interestingly, pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of WIN55,212-2 (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3μg/rat), a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, plus an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.1g/kg, i.p.) improved morphine-induced memory impairment. Intra-BLA microinjection of AM251 (0.4-0.6ng/rat), a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the improved effect of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) on morphine response. Pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of WIN55,212-2 or AM251 had no effect on memory retrieval or morphine-induced amnesia. Taken together, it can be concluded that morphine and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, the BLA endocannabinoid system mediates via CB1 receptors the functional interaction of morphine and ethanol state-dependent memory retrieval which may depend on the rewarding effects of the drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortical Presynaptic Control of Dorsal Horn C–Afferents in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C–fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C–fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C–fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C–fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory

  6. A frequency-dependent switch from inhibition to excitation in a hippocampal unitary circuit.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Abegg, Mathias H; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2004-09-23

    The hippocampus, a brain structure essential for memory and cognition, is classically represented as a trisynaptic excitatory circuit. Recent findings challenge this view, particularly with regard to the mossy fibre input to CA3, the second synapse in the trisynaptic pathway. Thus, the powerful mossy fibre input to CA3 pyramidal cells might mediate both synaptic excitation and inhibition. Here we show, by recording from connected cell pairs in rat entorhinal-hippocampal slice cultures, that single action potentials in a dentate granule cell evoke a net inhibitory signal in a pyramidal cell. The hyperpolarization is due to disynaptic feedforward inhibition, which overwhelms monosynaptic excitation. Interestingly, this net inhibitory synaptic response changes to an excitatory signal when the frequency of presynaptic action potentials increases. The process responsible for this switch involves the facilitation of monosynaptic excitatory transmission coupled with rapid depression of inhibitory circuits. This ability to immediately switch the polarity of synaptic responses constitutes a novel synaptic mechanism, which might be crucial to the state-dependent processing of information in associative hippocampal networks.

  7. Isolation of Functional Presynaptic Complexes from CNS Neurons: A Cell-Free Preparation for the Study of Presynaptic Compartments In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The difficulty in developing successful treatments to facilitate nerve regeneration has prompted a number of new in vitro experimental methods. We have recently shown that functional presynaptic boutons can be formed when neuronal cells are cocultured with surface-modified artificial substrates including poly(d-lysine)-coated beads and supported lipid bilayer-coated beads (Lucido(2009) J. Neurosci.1, 12449−1246619812321; Gopalakrishnan(2010) ACS Chem. Neurosci.1, 86−9422778819). We demonstrate here, using confocal microscopy combined with immunocytochemistry, that it is possible to isolate such in vitro presynaptic endings in an exclusive fashion onto glass substrates through a simple “sandwich/lift-off” technique (Perez(2006) Adv. Funct. Mater.1, 306−312). Isolated presynaptic complexes are capable of releasing and recycling neurotransmitter in response to an external chemical trigger. These bead−presynaptic complexes are facile to prepare and are readily dispersible in solution. They are thus compatible with many experimental methods whose focus is the study of the neuronal presynaptic compartment. PMID:22777142

  8. Presynaptic Inhibitory Terminals Are Functionally Abnormal in a Rat Model of Posttraumatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Leonardo C.

    2010-01-01

    Partially isolated “undercut” neocortex with intact pial circulation is a well-established model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. Results of previous experiments showed a decreased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in layer V pyramidal (Pyr) neurons of undercuts. We further examined possible functional abnormalities in GABAergic inhibition in rat epileptogenic neocortical slices in vitro by recording whole cell monosynaptic IPSCs in layer V Pyr cells and fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons using a paired pulse paradigm. Compared with controls, IPSCs in Pyr neurons of injured slices showed increased threshold and decreased peak amplitude at threshold, decreased input/output slopes, increased failure rates, and a shift from paired pulse depression toward paired pulse facilitation (increased paired pulse ratio or PPR). Increasing [Ca2+]o from 2 to 4 mM partially reversed these abnormalities in Pyr cells of the epileptogenic tissue. IPSCs onto FS cells also had an increased PPR and failures. Blockade of GABAB receptors did not affect the paired results. These findings suggest that there are functional alterations in GABAergic presynaptic terminals onto both Pyr and FS cells in this model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. PMID:20484536

  9. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F. Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine’s actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  10. XE991 and Linopirdine Are State-Dependent Inhibitors for Kv7/KCNQ Channels that Favor Activated Single Subunits.

    PubMed

    Greene, Derek L; Kang, Seungwoo; Hoshi, Naoto

    2017-07-01

    M-channel inhibitors, especially XE991, are being used increasingly in animal experiments; however, insufficient characterization of XE991 at times confounds the interpretation of results when using this compound. Here, we demonstrate that XE991 and linopirdine are state-dependent inhibitors that favor the activated-subunit of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ channels. We performed patch-clamp experiments on homomeric Kv7.2 or heteromeric Kv7.2/3 channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to characterize XE991 and linopirdine. Neither inhibitor was efficacious around the resting membrane potential of cells in physiologic conditions. Inhibition of Kv7.2 and Kv7.2/3 channels by XE991 was closely related with channel activation. When the voltage dependence of activation was left-shifted by retigabine or right-shifted by the mutation, Kv7.2(R214D), the shift in half-activation voltage proportionally coincided with the shift in the half-effective potential for XE991 inhibition. Inhibition kinetics during XE991 wash-in was facilitated at depolarized potentials. Ten-minute washout of XE991 resulted in ∼30% current recovery, most of which was attributed to surface transport of Kv7.2 channels. Linopirdine also exhibited similar inhibition characteristics, with the exception of near- complete current recovery after washout at depolarized potentials. Inhibition kinetics of both XE991 and linopirdine was not as sensitive to changes in voltage as would be predicted by open- channel inhibition. Instead, they were well explained by binding to a single activated subunit. The characteristics of XE991 and linopirdine should be taken into account when these M-channel inhibitors are used in experiments. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. The GABA Transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors in the rat globus pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-01-01

    Intrapallidal application of GAT-1 or GAT-3 transporter blockers (SKF 89976A or SNAP 5114) reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporters (GATs) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory post synaptic currents (eEPSCs) in presence of gabazine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, in rat GP slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABAB receptor blockade by intracellular application of OX314, bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GATs blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by CGP 58845, a GABAB receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked EPSCs was increased, while the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) was reduced in presence of either GAT blockers, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that pre-synaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to GP are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced by GATs inactivation, thereby suggesting that GATs blockade represents a potential mechanism by which overactive subthalamopallidal activity may be reduced in parkinsonism. PMID:22616751

  12. Distinct roles of presynaptic dopamine receptors in the differential modulation of the intrinsic synapses of medium-spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takeo; Schmauss, Claudia; Rayport, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Background In both schizophrenia and addiction, pathological changes in dopamine release appear to induce alterations in the circuitry of the nucleus accumbens that affect coordinated thought and motivation. Dopamine acts principally on medium-spiny GABA neurons, which comprise 95% of accumbens neurons and give rise to the majority of inhibitory synapses in the nucleus. To examine dopamine action at single medium-spiny neuron synapses, we imaged Ca2+ levels in their presynaptic varicosities in the acute brain slice using two-photon microscopy. Results Presynaptic Ca2+ rises were differentially modulated by dopamine. The D1/D5 selective agonist SKF81297 was exclusively facilitatory. The D2/D3 selective agonist quinpirole was predominantly inhibitory, but in some instances it was facilitatory. Studies using D2 and D3 receptor knockout mice revealed that quinpirole inhibition was either D2 or D3 receptor-mediated, while facilitation was mainly D3 receptor-mediated. Subsets of varicosities responded to both D1 and D2 agonists, showing that there was significant co-expression of these receptor families in single medium-spiny neurons. Neighboring presynaptic varicosities showed strikingly heterogeneous responses to DA agonists, suggesting that DA receptors may be differentially trafficked to individual varicosities on the same medium-spiny neuron axon. Conclusion Dopamine receptors are present on the presynaptic varicosities of medium-spiny neurons, where they potently control GABAergic synaptic transmission. While there is significant coexpression of D1 and D2 family dopamine receptors in individual neurons, at the subcellular level, these receptors appear to be heterogeneously distributed, potentially explaining the considerable controversy regarding dopamine action in the striatum, and in particular the degree of dopamine receptor segregation on these neurons. Assuming that post-receptor signaling is restricted to the microdomains of medium-spiny neuron varicosities

  13. Mood-state-dependent retrieval: the effects of induced mood on memory reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, P M

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of studies investigating mood-state-dependent retrieval identifies methodological problems that may have contributed to the controversy surrounding the reliability of the effect-in particular, the possible confounding of encoding and retrieval in previous studies. Five experiments are reported investigating the effects of mood on learning and recall. Mood-state-dependent retrieval was observed in Experiment 1a (using Velten's Mood Induction Procedure); Experiment 1b (using a music MIP); and Experiment lc (using Velten's MIP at encoding and a music MIP at retrieval). Subjects who learned and recalled in different moods had significantly greater decrements in recall than did subjects in the same moods. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the effect of observable retrieval cues on mood-state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 2, the presence of observable retrieval cues at recall overrode state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 3, by manipulating the presence or absence of observable cues at recall, both the occurrence and the erasure of the mood-state dependency was demonstrated. Mood state during learning and cued recall was also shown to affect performance in a third session under conditions of free recall.

  14. GABAergic mechanisms regulated by miR-33 encode state-dependent fear

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Yamawaki, Naoki; Guedea, Anita L; Chen, Helen J; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Restricted access to such memories can present a risk for psychiatric disorders and hamper their treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying state-dependent fear, we used a mouse model of contextual fear conditioning. We found that heightened activity of hippocampal extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, believed to impair fear and memory, actually enabled their state-dependent encoding and retrieval. This effect required protein kinase C-βII and was influenced by miR-33, a microRNA that regulates several GABA-related proteins. In the extended hippocampal circuit, extrasynaptic GABAA receptors promoted subcortical, but impaired cortical, activation during memory encoding of context fear. Moreover, suppression of retrosplenial cortical activity, which normally impairs retrieval, had an enhancing effect on the retrieval of state-dependent fear. These mechanisms can serve as treatment targets for managing access to state-dependent memories of stressful experiences. PMID:26280760

  15. Dendritically released transmitters cooperate via autocrine and retrograde actions to inhibit afferent excitation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Michiru; Schwab, Yannick; Natah, Sirajedin; Hillard, Cecilia J; Mackie, Ken; Sharkey, Keith A; Pittman, Quentin J

    2004-09-01

    Oxytocin is released from supraoptic magnocellular neurones and is thought to act at presynaptic receptors to inhibit transmitter release. We now show that this effect is mediated by endocannabinoids, but that oxytocin nonetheless plays an important role in endocannabinoid signalling. WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, mimicked the action of oxytocin and occluded oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition. The cannabinoid action is at the presynaptic terminal as shown by alteration in paired pulse ratio, a reduction in miniature EPSC frequency and immunohistochemical localization of CB1 receptors on presynaptic terminals. AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist, blocked both the WIN55,212-2 and the oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition of EPSCs. Depolarization of postsynaptic magnocellular neurones (which contain fatty acid amide hydrolase, a cannabinoid catabolic enzyme) caused a transient inhibition of EPSCs that could be blocked by both the AM251 and Manning compound, an oxytocin/vasopressin receptor antagonist. This indicates that somatodendritic peptide release and action on previously identified autoreceptors facilitates the release of endocannabinoids that act as mediators of presynaptic inhibition.

  16. Dendritically released transmitters cooperate via autocrine and retrograde actions to inhibit afferent excitation in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Michiru; Schwab, Yannick; Natah, Sirajedin; Hillard, Cecilia J; Mackie, Ken; Sharkey, Keith A; Pittman, Quentin J

    2004-01-01

    Oxytocin is released from supraoptic magnocellular neurones and is thought to act at presynaptic receptors to inhibit transmitter release. We now show that this effect is mediated by endocannabinoids, but that oxytocin nonetheless plays an important role in endocannabinoid signalling. WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, mimicked the action of oxytocin and occluded oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition. The cannabinoid action is at the presynaptic terminal as shown by alteration in paired pulse ratio, a reduction in miniature EPSC frequency and immunohistochemical localization of CB1 receptors on presynaptic terminals. AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist, blocked both the WIN55,212-2 and the oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition of EPSCs. Depolarization of postsynaptic magnocellular neurones (which contain fatty acid amide hydrolase, a cannabinoid catabolic enzyme) caused a transient inhibition of EPSCs that could be blocked by both the AM251 and Manning compound, an oxytocin/vasopressin receptor antagonist. This indicates that somatodendritic peptide release and action on previously identified autoreceptors facilitates the release of endocannabinoids that act as mediators of presynaptic inhibition. PMID:15254151

  17. The Presynaptic Active Zone Protein RIM1α Is Critical for Normal Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Craig M.; Schoch, Susanne; Monteggia, Lisa; Barrot, Michel; Matos, Maria F.; Feldmann, Nicole; Südhof, Thomas C.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The active zone protein RIM1α is required both for maintaining normal probability of neurotransmitter release and for long-term presynaptic potentiation at brain synapses. We now demonstrate that RIM1α−/− mice exhibit normal coordination and anxiety-related behaviors but display severely impaired learning and memory. Mice with a synaptotagmin 1 mutation, which selectively lowers release probability, and mice with Rab3A deletion, which selectively abolishes presynaptic long-term potentiation, do not exhibit this abnormality. Our data suggest that a decrease in release probability or a loss of presynaptic LTP alone is not sufficient to cause major behavioral alterations, but the combination of presynaptic abnormalities in RIM1α−/− mice severely alters learning and memory. PMID:15066271

  18. Nanoscale-Targeted Patch-Clamp Recordings of Functional Presynaptic Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Pavel; Gorelik, Julia; Vivekananda, Umesh; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S.; Bailey, Russell J.; Bushby, Andrew J.; Moss, Guy W.J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Klenerman, David; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Volynski, Kirill E.; Korchev, Yuri E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Direct electrical access to presynaptic ion channels has hitherto been limited to large specialized terminals such as the calyx of Held or hippocampal mossy fiber bouton. The electrophysiology and ion-channel complement of far more abundant small synaptic terminals (≤1 μm) remain poorly understood. Here we report a method based on superresolution scanning ion conductance imaging of small synapses in culture at approximately 100–150 nm 3D resolution, which allows presynaptic patch-clamp recordings in all four configurations (cell-attached, inside-out, outside-out, and whole-cell). Using this technique, we report presynaptic recordings of K+, Na+, Cl−, and Ca2+ channels. This semiautomated approach allows direct investigation of the distribution and properties of presynaptic ion channels at small central synapses. Video Abstract PMID:24050398

  19. A novel presynaptic inhibitory mechanism underlies paired pulse depression at a fast central synapse.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, M C; Walmsley, B

    1999-05-01

    Several distinct mechanisms may cause synaptic depression, a common form of short-term synaptic plasticity. These include postsynaptic receptor desensitization, presynaptic depletion of releasable vesicles, or other presynaptic mechanisms depressing vesicle release. At the endbulb of Held, a fast central calyceal synapse in the auditory pathway, cyclothiazide (CTZ) abolished marked paired pulse depression (PPD) by acting presynaptically to enhance transmitter release, rather than by blocking postsynaptic receptor desensitization. PPD and its response to CTZ were not altered by prior depletion of the releasable vesicle pool but were blocked by lowering external calcium concentration, while raising external calcium enhanced PPD. We conclude that a major component of PPD at the endbulb is due to a novel, transient depression of release, which is dependent on the level of presynaptic calcium entry and is CTZ sensitive.

  20. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  1. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  2. NMDA receptors in the dorsal hippocampal area are involved in tramadol state-dependent memory of passive avoidance learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Mofidi, Hamed; Attarian-Khosroshahi, Mohammad-Sadegh

    2017-08-03

    The neurobiological mechanisms of tramadol abuse underlying the cognitive function are still imprecise. Considering these, the aim of the present study was to examine the possible effects of intra-CA1 injections of NMDA, an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) agonist and DL-AP5, a competitive NMDAR antagonist, on tramadol state-dependent memory. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retrieval in adult male NMRI mice. Post-training i.p. administration of an atypical MOR agonist, tramadol (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) dose dependently induced impairment of memory retention. Pre-test injection of tramadol (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg) influence. Pre-test intra-CA1 injection of NMDA (10-5 and 10-4 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pre-test intra-CA1 injection of DL-AP5 (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg). Pre-test administration of DL-AP5 (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (1.25 mg/kg) restored the retrieval and induced tramadol state-dependent memory. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal NMDARs mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  3. Early presynaptic changes during plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Ipe; Liu, Shumin; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Arancio, Ottavio

    2006-09-20

    Long-lasting increase in synaptic strength is thought to underlie learning. An explosion of data has characterized changes in postsynaptic (pstS) AMPA receptor cycling during potentiation. However, changes occurring within the presynaptic (prS) terminal remain largely unknown. We show that appearance of new release sites during potentiation between cultured hippocampal neurons is due to (a) conversion of nonrecycling sites to recycling sites, (b) formation of new releasing sites from areas containing diffuse staining for the prS marker Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-2 and (c) budding of new recycling sites from previously existing recycling sites. In addition, potentiation is accompanied by a release probability increase in pre-existing boutons depending upon their individual probability. These prS changes precede and regulate fluorescence increase for pstS GFP-tagged-AMPA-receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggest that potentiation involves early changes in the prS terminal including remodeling and release probability increase of pre-existing synapses.

  4. Two components of glutamate exocytosis differentially affected by presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, I; Castro, E; Miras-Portugal, M T; Sánchez-Prieto, J

    1996-12-01

    The total Ca(2+)-dependent release of glutamate induced by depolarization of cerebrocortical nerve terminals with KCl was analyzed into a fast and a slow component. The fast component exhibited a decay time of < 1 s and accounted for 0.95 +/- 0.10 nmol of glutamate, whereas the slow component, which exhibited a decay time of 52 +/- 7 s, accounted for the release of 2.48 +/- 0.19 nmol of glutamate. These two components were differentially affected by the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the divalent cation Sr2+, or the botulinum neurotoxin A. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine strongly reduced the fast component without altering the slow component. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid and the facilitatory action of the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (1S, 3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylic acid were observed as a decrease and an increase, respectively, in the two components. It is concluded, first, that the fast and slow components correspond to the release of docked and mobilized vesicles, respectively, and second, that presynaptic modulation more significantly alters the fast component of release.

  5. APOE genotype affects the presynaptic compartment of glutamatergic nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Dumanis, Sonya B.; DiBattista, Amanda M.; Miessau, Matthew; Moussa, Charbel E.H.; Rebeck, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype affects outcomes of Alzheimer’s Disease and other conditions of brain damage. Using APOE knock-in mice, we have previously shown that APOE- ε4 Targeted Replacement (TR) mice have fewer dendritic spines and reduced branching in cortical neurons. Since dendritic spines are postsynaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission, we used APOE TR mice to examine whether APOE genotype affected the various elements of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. We found that levels of glutamine synthetase and glutamate uptake transporters were unchanged among the APOE genotypes. However, compared to APOE- ε3 TR mice, APOE-ε4 TR mice had decreased glutaminase levels (18%, p<0.05), suggesting decreased conversion of glutamine to glutamate. APOE-ε4 TR mice also had increased levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1 (20%, p<0.05), suggesting that APOE genotype affects presynaptic terminal composition. To address whether these changes affected normal neurotransmission, we examined the production and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine at 4–5 months and 1 year. Using high frequency 13C/1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we found that APOE-ε4 TR mice have decreased production of glutamate and increased levels of glutamine. These factors may contribute to the increased risk of neurodegeneration associated with APOE-ε4, and also act as surrogate markers for AD risk. PMID:22862561

  6. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H. )

    1991-06-28

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a (3H) (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major (3H)(R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ((3H)ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a (3H) yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors.

  7. Presynaptic pH and vesicle fusion in Drosophila larvae neurones.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Lesley; Harries, Peter; Sydlik, Sebastian; Schwiening, Christof J

    2013-11-01

    Both intracellular pH (pHi) and synaptic cleft pH change during neuronal activity yet little is known about how these pH shifts might affect synaptic transmission by influencing vesicle fusion. To address this we imaged pH- and Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent indicators (HPTS, Oregon green) in boutons at neuromuscular junctions. Electrical stimulation of motor nerves evoked presynaptic Ca(2+) i rises and pHi falls (∼0.1 pH units) followed by recovery of both Ca(2+) i and pHi. The plasma-membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) inhibitor, 5(6)-carboxyeosin diacetate, slowed both the calcium recovery and the acidification. To investigate a possible calcium-independent role for the pHi shifts in modulating vesicle fusion we recorded post-synaptic miniature end-plate potential (mEPP) and current (mEPC) frequency in Ca(2+) -free solution. Acidification by propionate superfusion, NH(4)(+) withdrawal, or the inhibition of acid extrusion on the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) induced a rise in miniature frequency. Furthermore, the inhibition of acid extrusion enhanced the rise induced by propionate addition and NH(4)(+) removal. In the presence of NH(4)(+), 10 out of 23 cells showed, after a delay, one or more rises in miniature frequency. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent pHi shifts, caused by the PMCA and regulated by NHE, may stimulate vesicle release. Furthermore, in the presence of membrane permeant buffers, exocytosed acid or its equivalents may enhance release through positive feedback. This hitherto neglected pH signalling, and the potential feedback role of vesicular acid, could explain some important neuronal excitability changes associated with altered pH and its buffering.

  8. Presynaptic CB(1) cannabinoid receptors control frontocortical serotonin and glutamate release--species differences.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Samira G; Teixeira, Filipe M; Garção, Pedro; Agostinho, Paula; Ledent, Catherine; Cortes, Luísa; Mackie, Ken; Köfalvi, Attila

    2012-07-01

    Both the serotonergic and endocannabinoid systems modulate frontocortical glutamate release; thus they are well positioned to participate in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. With the help of fluorescent and confocal microscopy, we localized the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)R) in VGLUT1- and 2- (i.e. glutamatergic) and serotonin transporter- (i.e. serotonergic) -positive fibers and nerve terminals in the mouse and rat frontal cortex. CB(1)R activation by the synthetic agonists, WIN55212-2 (1 μM) and R-methanandamide (1 μM) inhibited the simultaneously measured evoked Ca(2+)-dependent release of [(14)C]glutamate and [(3)H]serotonin from frontocortical nerve terminals of Wistar rats, in a fashion sensitive to the CB(1)R antagonists, O-2050 (1 μM) and LY320135 (5 μM). CB(1)R agonists also inhibited the evoked release of [(14)C]glutamate in C57BL/6J mice in a reversible fashion upon washout. Interestingly, the evoked release of [(14)C]glutamate and [(3)H]serotonin was significantly greater in the CB(1)R knockout CD-1 mice. Furthermore, CB(1)R binding experiments revealed similar frontocortical CB(1)R density in the rat and the CD-1 mouse. Still, the evoked release of [(3)H]serotonin was modulated by neither CB(1)R agonists nor antagonists in wild-type CD-1 or C57BL/6J mice. Altogether, this is the first study to demonstrate functional presynaptic CB(1)Rs in frontocortical glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals, revealing species differences.

  9. Presynaptically located CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate GABA release from axon terminals of specific hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, I; Sperlágh, B; Sík, A; Käfalvi, A; Vizi, E S; Mackie, K; Freund, T F

    1999-06-01

    To understand the functional significance and mechanisms of action in the CNS of endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids, it is crucial to identify the neural elements that serve as the structural substrate of these actions. We used a recently developed antibody against the CB1 cannabinoid receptor to study this question in hippocampal networks. Interneurons with features typical of basket cells showed a selective, intense staining for CB1 in all hippocampal subfields and layers. Most of them (85.6%) contained cholecystokinin (CCK), which corresponded to 96.9% of all CCK-positive interneurons, whereas only 4.6% of the parvalbumin (PV)-containing basket cells expressed CB1. Accordingly, electron microscopy revealed that CB1-immunoreactive axon terminals of CCK-containing basket cells surrounded the somata and proximal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas PV-positive basket cell terminals in similar locations were negative for CB1. The synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (0.01-3 microM) reduced dose-dependently the electrical field stimulation-induced [3H]GABA release from superfused hippocampal slices, with an EC50 value of 0. 041 microM. Inhibition of GABA release by WIN 55,212-2 was not mediated by inhibition of glutamatergic transmission because the WIN 55,212-2 effect was not reduced by the glutamate blockers AP5 and CNQX. In contrast, the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A (1 microM) prevented this effect, whereas by itself it did not change the outflow of [3H]GABA. These results suggest that cannabinoid-mediated modulation of hippocampal interneuron networks operate largely via presynaptic receptors on CCK-immunoreactive basket cell terminals. Reduction of GABA release from these terminals is the likely mechanism by which both endogenous and exogenous CB1 ligands interfere with hippocampal network oscillations and associated cognitive functions.

  10. Presynaptic pH and vesicle fusion in Drosophila larvae neurones

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Lesley; Harries, Peter; Sydlik, Sebastian; Schwiening, Christof J

    2014-01-01

    Both intracellular pH (pHi) and synaptic cleft pH change during neuronal activity yet little is known about how these pH shifts might affect synaptic transmission by influencing vesicle fusion. To address this we imaged pH- and Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent indicators (HPTS, Oregon green) in boutons at neuromuscular junctions. Electrical stimulation of motor nerves evoked presynaptic Ca2+i rises and pHi falls (∼0.1 pH units) followed by recovery of both Ca2+i and pHi. The plasma-membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) inhibitor, 5(6)-carboxyeosin diacetate, slowed both the calcium recovery and the acidification. To investigate a possible calcium-independent role for the pHi shifts in modulating vesicle fusion we recorded post-synaptic miniature end-plate potential (mEPP) and current (mEPC) frequency in Ca2+-free solution. Acidification by propionate superfusion, NH4+ withdrawal, or the inhibition of acid extrusion on the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) induced a rise in miniature frequency. Furthermore, the inhibition of acid extrusion enhanced the rise induced by propionate addition and NH4+ removal. In the presence of NH4+, 10 out of 23 cells showed, after a delay, one or more rises in miniature frequency. These findings suggest that Ca2+-dependent pHi shifts, caused by the PMCA and regulated by NHE, may stimulate vesicle release. Furthermore, in the presence of membrane permeant buffers, exocytosed acid or its equivalents may enhance release through positive feedback. This hitherto neglected pH signalling, and the potential feedback role of vesicular acid, could explain some important neuronal excitability changes associated with altered pH and its buffering. Synapse 67:729–740, 2013. PMID:23649934

  11. Do presynaptic opiate receptors and alpha-adrenoceptors alter acetylcholine release from a sympathetic ganglion by a similar mechanism?

    PubMed

    Araujo, D M; Collier, B

    1987-07-09

    The present experiments tested the possible involvement of a calcium-sensitive mechanism in the alpha-adrenoceptor- and opiate receptor-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine release from the cat superior cervical ganglion. First, the calcium-dependence of evoked acetylcholine release was measured in the presence and absence of the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist noradrenaline or of the opiate receptor agonist [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7. When ganglia were perfused with Krebs medium containing [Ca2+] = 2.4, 1.2, 0.6, 0.2 mM, evoked release of acetylcholine was depressed by both agonists and the inhibition increased with reduced levels of extracellular Ca2+; this was especially evident when calcium in the medium was reduced to 0.2 mM. Second, the effects of both noradrenaline and [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 on calcium influx into presynaptic nerve endings was determined by measuring the accumulation of 45Ca into ganglia in the presence and absence of either drug. Both agonists reduced the stimulation-induced increase in 45Ca accumulation. The effect of noradrenaline to reduce calcium influx was blocked by yohimbine or by phentolamine; the effect of [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 to decrease 45Ca accumulation by ganglia was blocked by naloxone. It is concluded that activation of presynaptic opiate receptors and alpha-adrenoceptors in the cat superior cervical ganglion can alter acetylcholine release by a similar mechanism, i.e. to reduce Ca2+ influx during preganglionic nerve stimulation.

  12. Increased Presynaptic and Postsynaptic α2-Adrenoceptor Activity in the Spinal Dorsal Horn in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Yuan, Wei-Xiu; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common cause of chronic pain that is not adequately relieved by conventional analgesics. The α2-adrenoceptors are involved in the regulation of glutamatergic input and nociceptive transmission in the spinal dorsal horn, but their functional changes in diabetic neuropathy are not clear. The purpose of the present study was to determine the plasticity of presynaptic and postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors in the control of spinal glutamatergic synaptic transmission in painful diabetic neuropathy. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of lamina II neurons were performed in spinal cord slices from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked from the dorsal root and the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) were significantly higher in diabetic than vehicle-control rats. The specific α2-adrenoceptor agonist 5-bromo-6-(2-imidazolin-2-ylamino)quinoxaline (UK-14304) (0.1–2 μM) inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs more in diabetic than vehicle-treated rats. UK-14304 also inhibited the amplitude of evoked monosynaptic and polysynaptic EPSCs more in diabetic than control rats. Furthermore, the amplitude of postsynaptic G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK) currents elicited by UK-14304 was significantly larger in the diabetic group than in the control group. In addition, intrathecal administration of UK-14304 increased the nociceptive threshold more in diabetic than vehicle-control rats. Our findings suggest that diabetic neuropathy increases the activity of presynaptic and postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors to attenuate glutamatergic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn, which accounts for the potentiated antinociceptive effect of α2-adrenoceptor activation in diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:21248068

  13. Isolation and characterization of a presynaptic neurotoxin, P-elapitoxin-Bf1a from Malaysian Bungarus fasciatus venom.

    PubMed

    Rusmili, Muhamad Rusdi Ahmad; Yee, Tee Ting; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Hodgson, Wayne C; Othman, Iekhsan

    2014-10-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxins are one of the major components in Bungarus venom. Unlike other Bungarus species that have been studied, β-bungarotoxin has never been isolated from Bungarus fasciatus venom. It was hypothesized that the absence of β-bungarotoxin in this species was due to divergence during evolution prior to evolution of β-bungarotoxin. In this study, we have isolated a β-bungarotoxin isoform we named P-elapitoxin-Bf1a by using gel filtration, cation-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from Malaysian B. fasciatus venom. The toxin consists of two heterogeneous subunits, subunit A and subunit B. LCMS/MS data showed that subunit A was homologous to acidic phospholipase A2 subunit A3 from Bungarus candidus and B. multicinctus venoms, whereas subunit B was homologous with subunit B1 from B. fasciatus venom that was previously detected by cDNA cloning. The toxin showed concentration- and time-dependent reduction of indirect-twitches without affecting contractile responses to ACh, CCh or KCl at the end of experiment in the chick biventer preparation. Toxin modification with 4-BPB inhibited the neurotoxic effect suggesting the importance of His-48. Tissue pre-incubation with monovalent B. fasciatus (BFAV) or neuro-polyvalent antivenom (NPV), at the recommended titer, was unable to inhibit the twitch reduction induced by the toxin. This study indicates that Malaysian B. fasciatus venom has a unique β-bungarotoxin isoform which was not neutralized by antivenoms. This suggests that there might be other presynaptic neurotoxins present in the venom and there is a variation in the enzymatic neurotoxin composition in venoms from different localities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Periodic solution for state-dependent impulsive shunting inhibitory CNNs with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Şaylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution for state-dependent impulsive shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with time-varying delays. By means of B-equivalence method, we reduce these state-dependent impulsive neural networks system to an equivalent fix time impulsive neural networks system. Further, by using Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincide degree theory and employing a suitable Lyapunov function some new sufficient conditions for existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution are obtained. Previous results are improved and extended. Finally, we give an illustrative example with numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  15. Presynaptic imaging of projection fibers by in vivo injection of dextran-conjugated calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, Stephan D; Regehr, Wade G

    2012-04-01

    Dextran-conjugated calcium indicators are stably retained within neurons. As a result, they are well suited to measuring presynaptic calcium at physiological temperatures. In addition, dextran indicators can be used to label neurons and their presynaptic boutons in vivo. This has allowed measurements of calcium in the presynaptic boutons of projection fibers that cannot be stably loaded with other types of indicators. This protocol describes a technique for in vivo loading of the climbing fiber projection to the cerebellum with dextran-conjugated indicators for subsequent presynaptic calcium imaging in brain slices. This technique is applicable to studies of projection fibers in many species from which brain slices can be prepared. The dextran indicator is injected into the inferior olive using a stereotaxic device. After a period of 1-3 d, cerebellar slices are prepared and presynaptic calcium transients are measured at physiological temperature in labeled climbing fibers. The protocol also discusses important considerations for using dextran-conjugated indicators to measure presynaptic calcium.

  16. Relevance of presynaptic actin dynamics for synapse function and mouse behavior.

    PubMed

    Rust, Marco B; Maritzen, Tanja

    2015-07-15

    Actin is the most abundant cytoskeletal protein in presynaptic terminals as well as in postsynaptic dendritic spines of central excitatory synapses. While the relevance of actin dynamics for postsynaptic plasticity, for instance activity-induced changes in dendritic spine morphology and synaptic glutamate receptor mobility, is well-documented, only little is known about its function and regulatory mechanisms in presynaptic terminals. Moreover, studies on presynaptic actin dynamics have often been inconsistent, suggesting that actin has diverse presynaptic functions, varying likely between specific types of excitatory synapses and/or their activity states. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the function and upstream regulatory mechanisms of the actin cytoskeleton in presynaptic terminals, focusing on excitatory synapses of the mammalian central nervous system. Due to length restrictions we will mainly concentrate on new insights into actin's presynaptic function that have been gained by cell biological and mouse genetic approaches since the excellent 2008 review by Cingolani and Goda. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling of twitch fade based on slow interaction of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants with the presynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shashi B; Amann, Anton; Nigrovic, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (MRs) diminish the indirectly evoked single twitch due to their binding to the postsynaptic receptors. Additionally, the MRs produce progressive diminution of successive twitches upon repetitive stimulation (fade). Our study addresses the generation of fade as observed under clinical situation. The study was conducted in two phases. In the clinical part, we have evaluated the time course of twitch depression and fade following the administration of several doses of three MRs (rocuronium, pancuronium, and cisatracurium). In the second part, we have modified our model of neuromuscular transmission to simulate the time course of twitch depression and fade. The MR was assumed to bind to a single site on the presynaptic receptor to produce fade. The rates of interaction with the presynaptic receptors were characterized in terms of the arbitrarily assigned equilibrium dissociation constant and the half-life for dissociation of the presynaptic complex. A method was developed to relate the release of acetylcholine to the occupancy of the presynaptic receptors. The strength of the first and the fourth twitch was calculated from the peak concentration of the activated postsynaptic receptors, i.e., of those receptors with both sites occupied by acetylcholine. Our results indicate that, while the affinity of the MR for the presynaptic receptor plays little role in the time course of fade, the rate of dissociation of the complex between the presynaptic receptors and the muscle relaxant may be critical in determining the time course of fade. Tentative estimates of this parameter are offered.

  18. Neuropeptide Y signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits male sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A; Komori, Y; Muroi, Y; Kinoshita, K; Ishii, T

    2016-04-21

    Animals change their biological activities depending on their nutritional state. Reproductive functions, including sexual behavior, are suppressed under low-energy conditions; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic molecule released in response to low-energy conditions and has an inhibitory effect on sexual behavior. We examined how NPY is involved in energy state-dependent regulation of male sexual behavior. Mounting, intromission, and ejaculation were evaluated as parameters of sexual behavior. Almost all parameters indicated that fasting for 24h suppressed male sexual behavior. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY inhibited sexual behavior in males that free-fed for 8h following 24-h fasting (fed males). We next examined whether the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which serotonergic (5-HT) neurons are distributed, is involved in NPY-mediated inhibition of male sexual behavior. NPY-positive processes immunoreactive for a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin, were distributed in the DRN of both fed and fasted males. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor in 5-HT neurons was also observed. Direct injection of NPY or 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist that inhibits the activity of 5-HT neurons) into the DRN inhibited male sexual behavior in fed males. In contrast, injection of BIBP-3226, a NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, or (+)-DOI hydrochloride (DOI), a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist that activates 5-HT neurons, into the DRN partially recovered male sexual behavior in 24-h fasted males. These results suggest that NPY inhibits serotonergic neuronal activity via the Y1 receptor in the DRN, resulting in suppression of male sexual behavior in low-energy conditions. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of dorsal hippocampal and medial septal nicotinic receptors in cross state-dependent memory between WIN55, 212-2 and nicotine or ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, S; Rezayof, A

    2013-08-15

    The present study examined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and medial septum (MS) are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between WIN55, 212-2 (WIN, a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist) and nicotine or ethanol. Memory retrieval was measured in one-trial step-down type passive avoidance apparatus in male adult mice. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of WIN (0.1-1mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired memory retrieval when it was tested 24h later. Pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.6 and 0.7mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) improved WIN-induced memory impairment, suggesting a cross state-dependent memory retrieval between the drugs. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) before systemic administration of an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.25g/kg) significantly reversed WIN-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (1 and 3μg/mouse) inhibited cross state-dependent memory between WIN and nicotine or ethanol. Moreover, pre-test intra-MS microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) in combination with systemic administration of a lower dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.25g/kg), improved memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. On the other hand, in the animals that received pre-training WIN and pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.7mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.5g/kg), pre-test intra-MS microinjection of mecamylamine (1-5μg/mouse) inhibited WIN-nicotine state-dependent memory retrieval. It should be noted that pre-test intra-CA1 or intra-MS microinjection of nicotine or mecamylamine by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and also could not reverse memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. It can be concluded that WIN and nicotine or WIN and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In

  20. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed.

  1. Amphetamine-induced memory impairment in a discriminative avoidance task is state-dependent in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Patti, Camilla L; Zanin, Karina A; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In both humans and laboratory animals, the reports of cognitive effects following acute amphetamine (Amph) administration are mixed and depend, for example, on the timing of administration (e.g. before or after task acquisition) and/or on the memory model used. Besides its cognitive effects, Amph produces other important behavioural effects, including alterations in anxiety and general activity, which could modify the subject's internal state, thereby facilitating state-dependent learning. Importantly, state-dependency has been linked to drug dependence in humans. This study evaluates the role of state-dependent learning in Amph-induced memory deficits in mice submitted to a discriminative avoidance task. Mice were given Amph (3 mg/kg) before training and/or before testing in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task, an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity. Pre-training Amph administration did not affect the ability to learn the discriminative task, but rather induced anxiogenic-like effects and a marked retention deficit in the test session. This memory impairment was completely absent when animals received Amph before both the training and the test sessions. Amph-induced memory impairment of a discriminative avoidance task is state-dependent, such that a response acquired in the 'Amph state' cannot be recalled in the normal state. The involvement of anxiety alterations in this 'Amph state' is discussed.

  2. Role of hippocampal CA1 area gap junction channels on morphine state-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Siamak; Hosseini, Seyyed Akbar Mir Seyyed; Noorbakhshnia, Maryam; Eivani, Mehdi

    2014-12-15

    Morphine produces a state dependent learning. The hippocampus is involved in this kind of learning. Gap junctions (GJs) are involved in some of the effects of morphine and exist in different areas of the hippocampus. We investigated the effects of blocking GJ channels of the hippocampal CA1 area, by means of pre-test bilateral injection of carbenoxolone (CBX), on morphine state dependent learning, using a passive avoidance task. Post-training subcutaneous administrations of morphine (0.5, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test administration of morphine (0.5, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 mg/kg) induced a state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. Pre-test injections of CBX (25, 75 and 150 nM) dose dependently prevented memory retrieval by post-training (7.5 mg/kg) and pre-test (0.5, 2.5, 5, 7.5 mg/kg) injections of morphine. The results suggest that intercellular coupling via GJ channels of the hippocampal CA1 area modulates morphine state dependent learning.

  3. C1 + α-strict solutions and wellposedness of abstract differential equations with state dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Eduardo; Pierri, Michelle; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-12-01

    We study the existence and uniqueness of C 1 + α-strict solutions for a general class of abstract differential equations with state dependent delay. We also study the local well-posedness of this type of problems on subspaces of C 1 + α ([ - p , 0 ] ; X). Some examples involving partial differential equations are presented.

  4. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, Vito; Boi, Fabio; Safaai, Houman; Onken, Arno; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost. PMID:28620273

  5. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Vito; Boi, Fabio; Safaai, Houman; Onken, Arno; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost.

  6. State-dependent doubly weighted stochastic simulation algorithm for automatic characterization of stochastic biochemical rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Min K.; Daigle, Bernie J.; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years there has been substantial growth in the development of algorithms for characterizing rare events in stochastic biochemical systems. Two such algorithms, the state-dependent weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (swSSA) and the doubly weighted SSA (dwSSA) are extensions of the weighted SSA (wSSA) by H. Kuwahara and I. Mura [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 165101 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2987701. The swSSA substantially reduces estimator variance by implementing system state-dependent importance sampling (IS) parameters, but lacks an automatic parameter identification strategy. In contrast, the dwSSA provides for the automatic determination of state-independent IS parameters, thus it is inefficient for systems whose states vary widely in time. We present a novel modification of the dwSSA—the state-dependent doubly weighted SSA (sdwSSA)—that combines the strengths of the swSSA and the dwSSA without inheriting their weaknesses. The sdwSSA automatically computes state-dependent IS parameters via the multilevel cross-entropy method. We apply the method to three examples: a reversible isomerization process, a yeast polarization model, and a lac operon model. Our results demonstrate that the sdwSSA offers substantial improvements over previous methods in terms of both accuracy and efficiency.

  7. State Dependence and Trait Stability of Perfectionism: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Aldea, Mirela A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined state dependency on depression, trait stability, and state-trait characteristics of perfectionism in a short-term longitudinal study of university students. Relative stability of perfectionism was assessed with test-retest correlations across 3 time points, and results showed higher rank order and relative stability for…

  8. State-dependent doubly weighted stochastic simulation algorithm for automatic characterization of stochastic biochemical rare events.

    PubMed

    Roh, Min K; Daigle, Bernie J; Gillespie, Dan T; Petzold, Linda R

    2011-12-21

    In recent years there has been substantial growth in the development of algorithms for characterizing rare events in stochastic biochemical systems. Two such algorithms, the state-dependent weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (swSSA) and the doubly weighted SSA (dwSSA) are extensions of the weighted SSA (wSSA) by H. Kuwahara and I. Mura [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 165101 (2008)]. The swSSA substantially reduces estimator variance by implementing system state-dependent importance sampling (IS) parameters, but lacks an automatic parameter identification strategy. In contrast, the dwSSA provides for the automatic determination of state-independent IS parameters, thus it is inefficient for systems whose states vary widely in time. We present a novel modification of the dwSSA--the state-dependent doubly weighted SSA (sdwSSA)--that combines the strengths of the swSSA and the dwSSA without inheriting their weaknesses. The sdwSSA automatically computes state-dependent IS parameters via the multilevel cross-entropy method. We apply the method to three examples: a reversible isomerization process, a yeast polarization model, and a lac operon model. Our results demonstrate that the sdwSSA offers substantial improvements over previous methods in terms of both accuracy and efficiency.

  9. Presynaptic K(+) channels, vesicular Ca(2+)/H (+) antiport--synaptotagmin, and acetylcholinesterase, three mechanisms cutting short the cholinergic signal at neuromuscular and nerve-electroplaque junctions.

    PubMed

    Dunant, Yves; Cordeiro, J Miguel

    2014-07-01

    In neuromuscular and nerve-electroplaque junctions, nerve impulses can be transmitted at high frequencies. This implies that transmission of individual impulses must be very brief. We describe three mechanisms which curtail the time course of individual impulses at these synapses: (1) opening of presynaptic K(+) channels (delayed rectifier) efficiently curtails the presynaptic action potential. Inhibition of K(+) channel by aminopyridines transforms the normally brief postsynaptic potential (2-3 ms) to a long-lasting "giant" potential (exceeding half a second); (2) a low-affinity Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport ensures rapid Ca(2+) sequestration into synaptic vesicles, curtailing the calcium signal and thereby the duration of transmitter release. Indeed vesicular Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport inhibition by bafilomycin or Sr(2+) prolongs the duration of the postsynaptic potential. We recently showed that synaptotagmin-1 is required for this antiport activity; thus the vesicular Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport might be synaptotagmin itself, or regulated by it; and (3) it is recalled that, in these junctions, acetylcholinesterase is highly concentrated in the synaptic cleft and that anticholinesterases lengthen the endplate time course. Therefore, at three different steps of synaptic transmission, an efficient mechanism curtails the local synaptic signal. When one of these three mechanisms is inhibited, the duration of individual impulses is prolonged, but the synapse loses its faculty to fire at high frequencies.

  10. Effect of blockade of postsynaptic H1 or H2 receptors or activation of presynaptic H3 receptors on catecholamine-induced stimulation of ACTH and prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Willems, E; Knigge, U; Jorgensen, H; Kjaer, A; Warberg, J

    2000-06-01

    The effect of inhibition of the neuronal histaminergic system by blockade of postsynaptic H1 or H2 receptors or activation of presynaptic H3 autoreceptors on the ACTH and prolactin responses to the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine was investigated in conscious male rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated ACTH and prolactin secretion. Prior intracerebroventricular infusion of the H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, or the H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, had no effect on the ACTH response to epinephrine or norepinephrine, while these responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the H3 receptor agonist, imetit. The prolactin response to norepinephrine was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with mepyramine, cimetidine or imetit whereas the three histaminergic compounds had no effect on the prolactin response to epinephrine. The findings suggest that the histaminergic system exerts a mediating or permissive action on the norepinephrine-induced stimulation of prolactin secretion, whereas an intact histaminergic system may not be required for catecholamines to stimulate ACTH secretion. The inhibitory effect of imetit on catecholamine-induced release of ACTH may be due to an activation of H3 receptors located presynaptically on non-histaminergic neurons, e.g. aminergic neurons. The study further indicates an important role of histamine in the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin secretion.

  11. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  12. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  13. The translational regulator Cup controls NMJ presynaptic terminal morphology

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Kaushiki P.; Carrillo, Robert A.; Zinn, Kai

    2015-01-01

    During oogenesis and early embryonic development in Drosophila, translation of proteins from maternally deposited mRNAs is tightly controlled. We and others have previously shown that translational regulatory proteins that function during oogenesis also have essential roles in the nervous system. Here we examine the role of Cup in neuromuscular system development. Maternal Cup controls translation of localized mRNAs encoding the Oskar and Nanos proteins and binds to the general translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this paper, we show that zygotic Cup protein is localized to presynaptic terminals at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). cup mutant NMJs have strong phenotypes characterized by the presence of small clustered boutons called satellite boutons. They also exhibit an increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate release events (mEPSPs). Reduction of eIF4E expression synergizes with partial loss of Cup expression to produce satellite bouton phenotypes. The presence of satellite boutons is often associated with increases in retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and we show that synaptic BMP signaling is elevated in cup mutants. cup genetically interacts with four genes (EndoA, WASp, Dap160, and Synj) encoding proteins involved in endocytosis that are also neuronal modulators of the BMP pathway. Endophilin protein, encoded by the EndoA gene, is downregulated in a cup mutant. Our results are consistent with a model in which Cup and eIF4E work together to ensure efficient localization and translation of endocytosis proteins in motor neurons and control the strength of the retrograde BMP signal. PMID:26102195

  14. State-dependent behavior alters endocrine-energy relationship: implications for conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Jesmer, Brett R; Goheen, Jacob R; Monteith, Kevin L; Kauffman, Matthew J

    2017-08-04

    Glucocorticoids (GC) and triiodothyronine (T3) are two endocrine markers commonly used to quantify resource limitation, yet the relationships between these markers and the energetic state of animals has been studied primarily in small-bodied species in captivity. Free-ranging animals, however, adjust energy intake in accordance with their energy reserves, a behavior known as state-dependent foraging. Further, links between life-history strategies and metabolic allometries cause energy intake and energy reserves to be more strongly coupled in small animals relative to large animals. Because GC and T3 may reflect energy intake or energy reserves, state-dependent foraging and body size may cause endocrine-energy relationships to vary among taxa and environments. To extend the utility of endocrine markers to large-bodied, free-ranging animals, we evaluated how state-dependent foraging, energy reserves, and energy intake influenced fecal GC and fecal T3 concentrations in free-ranging moose (Alces alces). Compared with individuals possessing abundant energy reserves, individuals with few energy reserves had higher energy intake and high fecal T3 concentrations, thereby supporting state-dependent foraging. Although fecal GC did not vary strongly with energy reserves, individuals with higher fecal GC tended to have fewer energy reserves and substantially greater energy intake than those with low fecal GC. Consequently, individuals with greater energy intake had both high fecal T3 and high fecal GC concentrations, a pattern inconsistent with previous documentation from captive animal studies. We posit that a positive relationship between GC and T3 may be expected in animals exhibiting state-dependent foraging if GC is associated with increased foraging and energy intake. Thus, we recommend that additional investigations of GC- and T3-energy relationships be conducted in free-ranging animals across a diversity of body size and life-history strategies before these endocrine

  15. Some properties of the presynaptic nerve terminals in a mammalian sympathetic ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1. Superior cervical ganglia of adult rats were excised and maintained in vitro in stable conditions. Potentials were recorded with external electrodes. After transmission was blocked by mecamylamine, a small potential change was recorded from the rostral area of the ganglion in response to preganglionic stimulation. 2. This electrical response was identified as the presynaptic action potential recorded from the nerve terminals by a number of criteria based on histological and physiological considerations including the disappearance of the spike in a glucose free solution. As shown by Nicolescu, Dolivo, Rouiller & Foroglou-Kerameus (1966) on the same preparation this condition causes an irreversible and selective lesion of the presynaptic nerve endings. 3. A suitable concentration of mecamylamine permitted the presynaptic response and the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) to be recorded simultaneously. As the stimulus was increased, the EPSP increased linearly with the amplitude of the presynaptic response. 4. After replacement of potassium ions in the bathing solution by caesium and during the early phase of post-tetanic facilitation there was an increase in the presynaptic response accompanied by a disproportionate increase in the EPSP. 5. No changes in the presynaptic response were found in the presence of the following drugs, all of which depressed the EPSP: acetylcholine, hemicholinium, curare, further doses of ganglion-blocking agents, and high Mg2+ and low Ca2+ concentrations. 6. Ouabain (4·5 × 10-4 M) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the presynaptic response and increased the spontaneous release of transmitter. The EPSP was at first enhanced and then depressed. PMID:4335802

  16. Synapse Formation in Monosynaptic Sensory–Motor Connections Is Regulated by Presynaptic Rho GTPase Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Ladle, David R.; Leslie, Jennifer R.; Duan, Xin; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal reflex circuit development requires the precise regulation of axon trajectories, synaptic specificity, and synapse formation. Of these three crucial steps, the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation between group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons is the least understood. Here, we show that the Rho GTPase Cdc42 controls synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor connections in presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, neurons. In mice lacking Cdc42 in presynaptic sensory neurons, proprioceptive sensory axons appropriately reach the ventral spinal cord, but significantly fewer synapses are formed with motor neurons compared with wild-type mice. Concordantly, electrophysiological analyses show diminished EPSP amplitudes in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits in these mutants. Temporally targeted deletion of Cdc42 in sensory neurons after sensory–motor circuit establishment reveals that Cdc42 does not affect synaptic transmission. Furthermore, addition of the synaptic organizers, neuroligins, induces presynaptic differentiation of wild-type, but not Cdc42-deficient, proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that Cdc42 in presynaptic neurons is required for synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons form direct synapses with motor neurons, but the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation in these monosynaptic sensory–motor connections are unknown. We show that deleting Cdc42 in sensory neurons does not affect proprioceptive sensory axon targeting because axons reach the ventral spinal cord appropriately, but these neurons form significantly fewer presynaptic terminals on motor neurons. Electrophysiological analysis further shows that EPSPs are decreased in these mice. Finally, we demonstrate that Cdc42 is involved in neuroligin-dependent presynaptic differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro

  17. Epileptogenesis in vivo enhances the sensitivity of inhibitory presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in basolateral amygdala neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, V; Keele, N B; Shinnick-Gallagher, P

    1997-02-01

    Modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) was examined in brain slices from control rats and rats with amygdala-kindled seizures. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp and current-clamp recordings, this study shows for the first time that in control and kindled basolateral amygdala neurons, two pharmacologically distinct presynaptic mGluRs mediate depression of synaptic transmission. Moreover, in kindled neurons, agonists at either group II- or group III-like mGluRs exhibit a 28- to 30-fold increase in potency and suppress synaptically evoked bursting. The group II mGluR agonist (2S,3S,4S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG) dose-dependently depressed monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by stimulation in the lateral amygdala with EC50 values of 36 nM (control) and 1.2 nM (kindled neurons). The group III mGluR agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was less potent, with EC50 values of 297 nM (control) and 10.8 nM (kindled neurons). The effects of L-CCG and L-AP4 were fully reversible. Neither L-CCG (0.0001-10 microM) nor L-AP4 (0.001-50 microM) caused membrane currents or changes in the current-voltage relationship. The novel mGluR antagonists (2S,3S,4S)-2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)-glycine (MCCG; 100 microM) and (S)-2-methyl-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (MAP4; 100 microM) selectively reversed the inhibition by L-CCG and L-AP4 to 81.3 +/- 12% and 65.3 +/- 6.6% of predrug, respectively. MCCG and MAP4 (100-300 microM) themselves did not significantly affect synaptic transmission. The exquisite sensitivity of agonists in the kindling model of epilepsy and the lack of evidence for endogenous receptor activation suggest that presynaptic group II- and group III-like mGluRs might be useful targets for suppression of excessive synaptic activation in neurological disorders such as epilepsy.

  18. Stability of Presynaptic Vesicle Pools and Changes in Synapse Morphology in the Amygdala Following Fear Learning in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ostroff, Linnaea E.; Cain, Christopher K.; Jindal, Neha; Dar, Najia; Ledoux, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength in the lateral amygdale (LA) that occur with fear learning are believed to mediate memory storage, and both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms have been proposed to contribute. In a previous study we used serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM) to observe differences in dendritic spine morphology in the adult rat LA after fear conditioning, conditioned inhibition (safety conditioning), or naïve control handling (Ostroff et al. [2010] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:9418–9423). We have now reconstructed axons from the same dataset and compared their morphology and relationship to the postsynaptic spines between the three training groups. Relative to the naïve control and conditioned inhibition groups, the ratio of postsynaptic density (PSD) area to docked vesicles at synapses was greater in the fear-conditioned group, while the size of the synaptic vesicle pools was unchanged. There was significant coherence in synapse size between neighboring boutons on the same axon in the naïve control and conditioned inhibition groups, but not in the fear-conditioned group. Within multiple-synapse boutons, both synapse size and the PSD-to-docked vesicle ratio were variable between individual synapses. Our results confirm that synaptic connectivity increases in the LA with fear conditioning. In addition, we provide evidence that boutons along the same axon and even synapses on the same bouton are independent in their structure and learning-related morphological plasticity. PMID:21674493

  19. A functionally active presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor in the rat hippocampal CA3 subregion.

    PubMed

    Malva, J O; Ambrósio, A F; Cunha, R A; Ribeiro, J A; Carvalho, A P; Carvalho, C M

    1995-02-09

    We studied the modulation of the intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) by kainate/AMPA receptor activation in synaptosomes isolated from whole rat hippocampus, or from its CA1, CA3 or dentate gyrus subregions. The receptor was activated either by 100 microM S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionic acid (AMPA) (EC50 = 26.6 +/- 4.9 microM) or by 100 microM kainate (EC50 = 0.81 +/- 0.1 microM), but the effects of these agonists were not additive. The response to either AMPA or kainate was competitively inhibited by 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine. Higher [Ca2+]i responses to 100 microM AMPA or to 100 microM kainate were observed in the CA3 subregion (43.2 +/- 2.5 nM or 42.8 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively) than in the whole hippocampus (22.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 22.4 +/- 1.6, respectively), in the CA1 subregion (26.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 26.6 +/- 2.6 nM, respectively) or in dentate gyrus (24.6 +/- 1.4 nM or 21.5 +/- 1.0 nM, respectively). These results indicate that the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus is enriched in a presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor which modulates the [Ca2+]i in nerve terminals.

  20. Presynaptic GABAB and adenosine A1 receptors regulate synaptic transmission to rat substantia nigra reticulata neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, K Z; Johnson, S W

    1997-01-01

    1. Patch pipettes were used to record whole-cell currents under voltage clamp in substantia nigra zona reticulata (SNR) neurones in the rat midbrain slice. Bipolar electrodes evoked synaptic currents mediated by glutamate (EPSCs) and GABAA receptors (IPSCs). 2. Baclofen reduced the amplitude of IPSCs by 48% at its IC50 value of 0.60 microM. The GABAB antagonist CGP 35348 blocked this effect with a Kd value estimated by Schild analysis of 5 microM. 3. Adenosine reduced IPSCs by 48% at its IC50 value of 56 microM. Adenosine agonists reduced IPSCs with the following rank order of potency: CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) > R-PIA (R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine) > CHA (N6-cyclohexyladenosine) = NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) > 2-CADO (2-chloroadenosine) > adenosine. Schild analysis yielded a Kd value of 0.4 nM for antagonism of CPA by the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine). 4. Both baclofen and adenosine reduced the magnitude of paired-pulse depression of IPSCs, and neither blocked currents evoked by GABA, which was pressure-ejected from micropipettes. 5. Glutamate EPSCs were reduced by baclofen (IC50 = 0.78 microM) and adenosine (IC50 = 57 microM). Schild analysis yielded a Kd value of 11 microM for antagonism of baclofen-induced inhibition of EPSCs by CGP 35348. DPCPX (1 microM) completely blocked the inhibitory effects of adenosine (100 microM) and CPA (100 nM) on EPSCs. Neither adenosine nor baclofen reduced inward currents evoked by glutamate which was pressure-ejected from micropipettes. 6. These results show that presynaptic GABAB and A1 receptors reduce glutamate and GABA release from nerve terminals in the SNR. PMID:9409479

  1. Evidence for sympathetic neurotransmission through presynaptic N-type calcium channels in human saphenous vein.

    PubMed Central

    Fabi, F.; Chiavarelli, M.; Argiolas, L.; Chiavarelli, R.; del Basso, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The specific type(s) of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) involved in sympathetic neurotransmission have not yet been characterized in human vascular tissues. We therefore examined the functional role of the N- and L-type VSCCs in human saphenous veins. 2. Contractile response curves for transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) and for exogenously administered noradrenaline (NA) were obtained in superfused saphenous vein rings. The contractions induced by TNS, but not by NA, were inhibited by 1 microM tetrodotoxin and by 10 microM guanethidine. Both responses were substantially reduced by 1 microM phentolamine, indicating that the contractions evoked by TNS were mediated by endogenous NA released from noradrenergic nerves. 3. In the presence of 2 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega Conus Geographus toxin, fraction VI A; omega-CgTx), a polypeptide with specific inhibitory activity on N- and L-type calcium channels, the neurally evoked contractions were almost completely abolished. In contrast, the responses induced by exogenous NA were not affected by the neurotoxin, thus providing evidence of the exclusive presynaptic action of omega-CgTx. 4. In the presence of the calcium antagonist verapamil (10 microM), which selectively blocks L-type VSCCs, the contractions induced by both TNS and NA were diminished to the same extent, suggesting that the organic calcium blocker is active only at the postjunctional level. 5. It is concluded that N-type calcium channels are the main pathway of calcium entry controlling the functional responses induced by activating sympathetic nerves; the role of L-type channels appears to be limited to the postjunctional level, modulating smooth muscle contractions. PMID:8220895

  2. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C. )

    1989-11-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine continuously synthesized from ({sup 3}H)tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10{sup {minus}6} M tetrodotoxin, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M acetylcholine stimulated ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of ({sup 3}H) dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of ({sup 3}H)dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively.

  3. Receptor subtypes involved in the presynaptic and postsynaptic actions of dopamine on striatal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Diego; Grande, Cristina; Usiello, Alessandro; Gubellini, Paolo; Erbs, Eric; Martin, Ana B; Pisani, Antonio; Tognazzi, Nadia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Moratalla, Rosario; Borrelli, Emiliana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-07-16

    By stimulating distinct receptor subtypes, dopamine (DA) exerts presynaptic and postsynaptic actions on both large aspiny (LA) cholinergic and fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the striatum. Lack of receptor- and isoform-specific pharmacological agents, however, has hampered the progress toward a detailed identification of the specific DA receptors involved in these actions. To overcome this issue, in the present study we used four different mutant mice in which the expression of specific DA receptors was ablated. In D1 receptor null mice, D1R-/-, DA dose-dependently depolarized both LA and FS interneurons. Interestingly, SCH 233390 (10 microm), a D1-like (D1 and D5) receptor antagonist, but not l-sulpiride (3-10 microm), a D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptor blocker, prevented this effect, implying D5 receptors in this action. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses in both wild-type and D1R-/- mice confirmed the expression of D5 receptors in both cholinergic and parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the striatum. In mice lacking D2 receptors, D2R-/-, the DA-dependent inhibition of GABA transmission was lost in both interneuron populations. Both isoforms of D2 receptor, D2L and D2S, were very likely involved in this inhibitory action, as revealed by the electrophysiological analysis of the effect of the DA D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole in two distinct mutants lacking D2L receptors and expressing variable contents of D2S receptors. The identification of the receptor subtypes involved in the actions of DA on different populations of striatal cells is essential to understand the circuitry of the basal ganglia and to develop pharmacological strategies able to interfere selectively with specific neuronal functions.

  4. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-08

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  5. Presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors control excitatory, but not inhibitory, transmission at rat hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Boehm, S

    1999-09-01

    affect K+ currents and failed to alter the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents measured in mass cultures of hippocampal neurons. 5. These results show that noradrenaline regulates transmission at glutamatergic, but not at GABAergic, hippocampal synapses via presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors of the alpha2A/D subtype. This inhibitory action involves an inhibition of voltage-activated Ca2+ currents, but no modulation of spontaneous vesicle exocytosis or of voltage-activated K+ currents.

  6. Presynaptic Localization and Possible Function of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Anoctamin 1 in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Myung-Hoon; Oh, Uhtaek; Kim, In-Beom

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)-activated chloride (Cl−) channels (CaCCs) play a role in the modulation of action potentials and synaptic responses in the somatodendritic regions of central neurons. In the vertebrate retina, large Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)) regulate synaptic transmission at photoreceptor terminals; however, the molecular identity of CaCCs that mediate ICl(Ca) remains unclear. The transmembrane protein, TMEM16A, also called anoctamin 1 (ANO1), has been recently validated as a CaCC and is widely expressed in various secretory epithelia and nervous tissues. Despite the fact that tmem16a was first cloned in the retina, there is little information on its cellular localization and function in the mammalian retina. In this study, we found that ANO1 was abundantly expressed as puncta in 2 synaptic layers. More specifically, ANO1 immunoreactivity was observed in the presynaptic terminals of various retinal neurons, including photoreceptors. ICl(Ca) was first detected in dissociated rod bipolar cells expressing ANO1. ICl(Ca) was abolished by treatment with the Ca2+ channel blocker Co2+, the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and the Cl− channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and niflumic acid (NFA). More specifically, a recently discovered ANO1-selective inhibitor, T16Ainh-A01, and a neutralizing antibody against ANO1 inhibited ICl(Ca) in rod bipolar cells. Under a current-clamping mode, the suppression of ICl(Ca) by using NPPB and T16Ainh-A01 caused a prolonged Ca2+ spike-like depolarization evoked by current injection in dissociated rod bipolar cells. These results suggest that ANO1 confers ICl(Ca) in retinal neurons and acts as an intrinsic regulator of the presynaptic membrane potential during synaptic transmission. PMID:23840801

  7. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator.

  8. Presynaptically mediated effects of cholecystokinin-8 on the excitability of area postrema neurons in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Sugeta, Shingo; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Maezawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Funahashi, Makoto

    2015-08-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a well-known gut hormone that shows anorexigenic effects via action at peripheral and central receptors. CCK is also widely distributed throughout the mammalian brain and appears to function as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The area postrema is one of the circumventricular organs, located on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata at the caudal end of the fourth ventricle. Blood vessels in the area postrema lack a blood brain barrier, offering specific central neural elements unique access to circulating substances. Immunohistochemical studies show CCK-A receptors in the area postrema, and we reported CCK-sensitive area postrema neurons. However, the receptive mechanism of CCK in area postrema neurons still remains unexplained. We investigated the responses of area postrema neurons to agonists and antagonists of CCK receptors using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices. The application of CCK-8 elicited excitatory responses, such as increases in the frequency of mEPSCs (miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents), a shift toward larger amplitude mEPSCs, and increases in the frequency of action potentials. These changes were found mostly in cells not displaying the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), except for small excitatory changes in a minority of Ih-positive neurons. Tonic inward currents or an inhibitory response to CCK-8 were never seen. Analysis of the amplitude of mEPSCs before and after the administration of CCK-8 indicated the responses mediated via the presynaptic receptors. The effect of CCK-8 was abolished in the presence of CNQX (AMPA type glutamate receptor antagonist). In the presence of lorglumide (a selective CCK-A receptor antagonist), CCK-8-induced excitatory responses were inhibited. No cells responded to the administration of non-sulfated CCK-8 (CCK-8NS, a selective CCK-B receptor agonist). We conclude that CCK-8 exerts its action via presynaptic CCK-A receptors

  9. Evidence of Presynaptic Localization and Function of the c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Biggi, Silvia; Buccarello, Lucia; Sclip, Alessandra; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Rumio, Cristiano; Di Marino, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is part of a stress signalling pathway strongly activated by NMDA-stimulation and involved in synaptic plasticity. Many studies have been focused on the post-synaptic mechanism of JNK action, and less is known about JNK presynaptic localization and its physiological role at this site. Here we examined whether JNK is present at the presynaptic site and its activity after presynaptic NMDA receptors stimulation. By using N-SIM Structured Super Resolution Microscopy as well as biochemical approaches, we demonstrated that presynaptic fractions contained significant amount of JNK protein and its activated form. By means of modelling design, we found that JNK, via the JBD domain, acts as a physiological effector on T-SNARE proteins; then using biochemical approaches we demonstrated the interaction between Syntaxin-1-JNK, Syntaxin-2-JNK, and Snap25-JNK. In addition, taking advance of the specific JNK inhibitor peptide, D-JNKI1, we defined JNK action on the SNARE complex formation. Finally, electrophysiological recordings confirmed the role of JNK in the presynaptic modulation of vesicle release. These data suggest that JNK-dependent phosphorylation of T-SNARE proteins may have an important functional role in synaptic plasticity. PMID:28367336

  10. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation.

  11. RIM determines Ca2+ channel density and vesicle docking at the presynaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yunyun; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    At presynaptic active zones, neurotransmitter release is initiated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels close to docked vesicles. The mechanisms that enrich Ca2+ channels at active zones are, however, largely unknown, possibly because of the limited presynaptic accessibility of most synapses. Here, we have established a Cre-lox based conditional knock-out approach at a presynaptically accessible CNS synapse, the calyx of Held, to directly study the functions of RIM proteins. Removal of all RIM1/2 isoforms strongly reduced the presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, revealing a new role of RIM proteins in Ca2+ channel targeting. Removal of RIMs also reduced the readily-releasable pool, paralleled by a similar reduction of the number of docked vesicles, and the Ca2+ channel - vesicle coupling was decreased. Thus, RIM proteins co-ordinately regulate key functions for fast transmitter release: enabling a high presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, and vesicle docking at the active zone. PMID:21262468

  12. Role of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in presynaptic differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Wnt signaling pathway regulates several fundamental developmental processes and recently has been shown to be involved in different aspects of synaptic differentiation and plasticity. Some Wnt signaling components are localized at central synapses, and it is thus possible that this pathway could be activated at the synapse. Results We examined the distribution of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons and determined that this receptor is located at synaptic contacts co-localizing with presynaptic proteins. Frizzled-1 was found in functional synapses detected with FM1-43 staining and in synaptic terminals from adult rat brain. Interestingly, overexpression of Frizzled-1 increased the number of clusters of Bassoon, a component of the active zone, while treatment with the extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled-1 decreased Bassoon clustering, suggesting a role for this receptor in presynaptic differentiation. Consistent with this, treatment with the Frizzled-1 ligand Wnt-3a induced presynaptic protein clustering and increased functional presynaptic recycling sites, and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with the CRD of Frizzled-1. Moreover, in synaptically mature neurons Wnt-3a was able to modulate the kinetics of neurotransmitter release. Conclusion Our results indicate that the activation of the Wnt pathway through Frizzled-1 occurs at the presynaptic level, and suggest that the synaptic effects of the Wnt signaling pathway could be modulated by local activation through synaptic Frizzled receptors. PMID:19883499

  13. The amino-terminal domain of glutamate receptor {delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2008-12-26

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) {delta}2 selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells plays key roles in synapse formation, long-term depression and motor learning. We propose that GluR{delta}2 regulates synapse formation by making a physical linkage between the active zone and postsynaptic density. To examine the issue, GluR{delta}2-transfected 293T cells were cultured with cerebellar neurons. We found numerous punctate signals for presynaptic markers on the surface of 293T cells expressing GluR{delta}2. The presynaptic specializations induced by GluR{delta}2 were capable of exo- and endocytosis as indicated by FM1-43 dye labeling. Replacement of the extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluR{delta}2 with that of the AMPA receptor GluR{alpha}1 abolished the inducing activity. The NTD of GluR{delta}2 fused to the immunoglobulin constant region successfully induced the accumulation of presynaptic specializations on the surface of beads bearing the fusion protein. These results suggest that GluR{delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation by direct interaction with presynaptic components through the NTD.

  14. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  15. State-Dependent Riccati Equation Regulation of Systems with State and Control Nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, Scott C.; Cox, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The state-dependent Riccati equations (SDRE) is the basis of a technique for suboptimal feedback control of a nonlinear quadratic regulator (NQR) problem. It is an extension of the Riccati equation used for feedback control of linear problems, with the addition of nonlinearities in the state dynamics of the system resulting in a state-dependent gain matrix as the solution of the equation. In this paper several variations on the SDRE-based method will be considered for the feedback control problem with control nonlinearities. The control nonlinearities may result in complications in the numerical implementation of the control, which the different versions of the SDRE method must try to overcome. The control methods will be applied to three test problems and their resulting performance analyzed.

  16. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  17. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  18. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  19. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  20. Adaptive control with state-dependent modeling of patient impairment for robotic movement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bower, C; Taheri, H; Wolbrecht, E

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control approach for robotic movement therapy that learns a state-dependent model of patient impairment. Unlike previous work, this approach uses an unstructured inertial model that depends on both the position and direction of the desired motion in the robot's workspace. This method learns a patient impairment model that accounts for movement specific disability in neuro-muscular output (such as flexion vs. extension and slow vs. dynamic tasks). Combined with assist-as-needed force decay, this approach may promote further patient engagement and participation. Using the robotic therapy device, FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), several experiments are presented to demonstrate the ability of the adaptive control to learn state-dependent abilities.

  1. State-dependent sensorimotor processing: gaze and posture stability during simulated flight in birds

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular responses play an important role in maintaining gaze and posture stability during rotational motion. Previous studies suggest that these responses are state dependent, their expression varying with the environmental and locomotor conditions of the animal. In this study, we simulated an ethologically relevant state in the laboratory to study state-dependent vestibular responses in birds. We used frontal airflow to simulate gliding flight and measured pigeons′ eye, head, and tail responses to rotational motion in darkness, under both head-fixed and head-free conditions. We show that both eye and head response gains are significantly higher during flight, thus enhancing gaze and head-in-space stability. We also characterize state-specific tail responses to pitch and roll rotation that would help to maintain body-in-space orientation during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular sensorimotor processing is not fixed but depends instead on the animal's behavioral state. PMID:21307332

  2. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of ultra low doses of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance in mice.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Azita; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2006-01-06

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of ultra low doses (ULDs) of histamine, clobenpropit and pyrilamine are studied on morphine state-dependent (STD) memory in mice. Although pre-test administration of different doses of histamine and clobenpropit showed no effect on impairment of memory induced by pre-training morphine, when the above drugs were co-administered with morphine, they inhibited the restoration of memory by morphine. These effects were opposite to microgram doses of the same drugs.

  3. Frequency- and state-dependent blockade of human ether-a-go-go-related gene K+ channel by arecoline hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu-yan; Liu, Yu-qi; Fu, Yi-cheng; Xu, Bin; Gao, Jin-liao; Zheng, Xiao-qin; Lin, Min; Chen, Mei-yan; Li, Yang

    2012-03-01

    The rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kr)), whose pore-forming alpha subunit is encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG), is a key contributor to the third phase of action potential repolarization. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of arecoline hydrobromide induced inhibition of hERG K(+) current (I(hERG)). Transient transfection of hERG channel cDNA plasmid pcDNA3.1 into the cultured HEK293 cells was performed using Lipofectamine. A standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record the I(hERG) before and after the exposure to arecoline. Arecoline decreased the amplitude and the density of the I(hERG) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 9.55 mmol/L). At test potential of +60 mV, the magnitude of I(hERG) tail at test pulse of -40 mV was reduced from (151.7 ± 6.2) pA/pF to (84.4 ± 7.6) pA/pF (P < 0.01, n = 20) and the magnitude of I(hERG) tail at test pulse of -110 mV was reduced from (-187.5 ± 9.8) pA/pF to (-97.6 ± 12.6) pA/pF (P < 0.01, n = 20). The blockade of arecoline in the open and inactivated state was significant in a state-dependent manner. The maximal blockade was achieved in the inactivated state. Studies of gating mechanism showed that the steady-state activation curve of I(hERG) was significantly negatively shifted by arecoline. Time constants of activation were shortened. Steady-state inactivation curve and time constants of fast inactivation were not significantly affected by arecoline. Furthermore, the inhibition of I(hERG) by arecoline was characterized markedly by a frequency-dependent manner from 0.03 to 1.00 Hz pulse. Arecoline could potently block I(hERG) in both frequency and state-dependent manner.

  4. The dynamics of a delayed predator-prey model with state dependent feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anuraj; Gakkhar, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    A delayed prey-predator model with state-dependent impulses is investigated. The sufficient conditions of existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive period-1 solution are obtained by using the Poincare map and analogue of the Poincare Criterion. The qualitative analysis shows that the positive period-one solution bifurcates from the semi-trivial solution through a fold bifurcation. The complex dynamics including chaos is obtained and numerical simulations substantiate the analytical results.

  5. The dynamics of a delayed predator-prey model with state dependent feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anuraj; Gakkhar, Sunita

    2011-11-30

    A delayed prey-predator model with state-dependent impulses is investigated. The sufficient conditions of existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive period-1 solution are obtained by using the Poincare map and analogue of the Poincare Criterion. The qualitative analysis shows that the positive period-one solution bifurcates from the semi-trivial solution through a fold bifurcation. The complex dynamics including chaos is obtained and numerical simulations substantiate the analytical results.

  6. Stability and Bifurcation in a State-Dependent Delayed Predator-Prey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Aiyu; Guo, Shangjiang

    In this paper, we consider a class of predator-prey equations with state-dependent delayed feedback. Firstly, we investigate the local stability of the positive equilibrium and the existence of the Hopf bifurcation. Then we use perturbation methods to determine the sub/supercriticality of Hopf bifurcation and hence the stability of Hopf bifurcating periodic solutions. Finally, numerical simulations supporting our theoretical results are also provided.

  7. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning.

    PubMed

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine's effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity.

  8. Anti-periodic solutions of Liénard equations with state dependent impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belley, J.-M.; Bondo, É.

    2016-10-01

    Subject to a priori bounds, Liénard equations with state dependent impulsive forcing are shown to admit a unique absolutely continuous anti-periodic solution with first derivative of bounded variation on finite intervals. The point-wise convergence of a sequence of iterates to the solution is obtained, along with a bound for the rate of convergence. The results are applied to Josephson's and van der Pol's equations.

  9. GABA-Mediated Presynaptic Inhibition Is Required for Precision of Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Patrick K.; Dulka, Brooke N.; Ortiz, Samantha; Riccio, David C.; Jasnow, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of contextual memories, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of memory precision. Here, we demonstrate a rapid time-dependent decline in memory precision in GABA [subscript B(1a)] receptor knockout mice. First, we…

  10. Noradrenergic inhibition of presynaptic TRPV1 channels: a new pathway of pain control.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Emilio

    2017-02-16

    Chronic pain is a major health problem that heavily conditions life quality and results in a huge socio-economic cost. Currently available drugs and therapies are often inadequate for treating pain in many patients, particularly when "acute" pain converts to a "chronic" state This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast Endocytosis Is Inhibited by GABA-Mediated Chloride Influx at a Presynaptic Terminal

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Court; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although multiple kinetic components of synaptic vesicle endocytosis have been identified, it has remained unclear whether neurons can differentially modulate these components. Using membrane capacitance measurements from isolated goldfish bipolar cell terminals, we found that the kinetics of endocytosis in retinal slices (single exponential decay; τ > 10 s) were significantly slower than those in acutely dissociated terminals (double exponential decay; τfast ≈ 1–2 s; τslow > 10 s). Surprisingly, GABAA and/or GABAC receptor antagonists restored the fast component of endocytosis to terminals in retinal slices. Blocking GABAergic feedback from reciprocal synapses or removing external Cl− ions also allowed for fast endocytosis. Elevating internal Cl− via the patch pipette invariably slowed endocytosis, even in terminals dialyzed with increased Ca2+ buffer. These results suggest a new role for GABA and Cl− ions in blocking the trigger for fast endocytosis at this ribbon-type synapse. PMID:15504327

  12. Investigations into neuropeptide Y-mediated presynaptic inhibition in cultured hippocampal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bleakman, D.; Harrison, N. L.; Colmers, W. F.; Miller, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on synaptic transmission and [Ca2+]i signals in rat hippocampal neurones grown in culture. [Ca2+]i in individual neurones displayed frequent spontaneous fluctuations often resulting in an elevated plateau [Ca2+]i. These fluctuations were reduced by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or combinations of the excitatory amino acid antagonists 6-cyano-7-dinitro-quinoxaline (CNQX) (10 microM) and aminophosphonovalerate (APV) (50 microM), indicating that they were the result of glutamatergic transmission occurring between hippocampal neurones. 2. [Ca2+]i fluctuations were also prevented by Ni2+ (200 microM), by the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen (10 microM) and by NPY (100 nM) or Y2 receptor-selective NPY agonists. Following treatment of cells with pertussis toxin, NPY produced only a brief decrease in [Ca2+]i fluctuations which rapidly recovered. 3. Perfusion of hippocampal neurones with 50 mM K+ produced a large rapid increase in [Ca2+]i. This increase was slightly reduced by NPY or by a combination of CNQX and APV. The effects of CNQX/APV occluded those of NPY. NPY had no effect on Ba2+ currents measured in hippocampal neurones under whole cell voltage-clamp even in the presence of intracellular GTP-gamma-S. On the other hand, Ba2+ currents were reduced by both Cd2+ (200 microM) and baclofen (10 microM). 4. Current clamp recordings from hippocampal neurones demonstrated the occurrence of spontaneous e.p.s.ps and action potential firing which were accompanied by increases in [Ca2+]i. This spontaneous activity and the accompanying [Ca2+]i signals were prevented by application of NPY (100 nM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1358389

  13. GABA-Mediated Presynaptic Inhibition Is Required for Precision of Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Patrick K.; Dulka, Brooke N.; Ortiz, Samantha; Riccio, David C.; Jasnow, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of contextual memories, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of memory precision. Here, we demonstrate a rapid time-dependent decline in memory precision in GABA [subscript B(1a)] receptor knockout mice. First, we…

  14. State-Dependent Pseudo-Linear Filter for Spacecraft Attitude and Rate Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the development and performance of a special algorithm for estimating the attitude and angular rate of a spacecraft. The algorithm is a pseudo-linear Kalman filter, which is an ordinary linear Kalman filter that operates on a linear model whose matrices are current state estimate dependent. The nonlinear rotational dynamics equation of the spacecraft is presented in the state space as a state-dependent linear system. Two types of measurements are considered. One type is a measurement of the quaternion of rotation, which is obtained from a newly introduced star tracker based apparatus. The other type of measurement is that of vectors, which permits the use of a variety of vector measuring sensors like sun sensors and magnetometers. While quaternion measurements are related linearly to the state vector, vector measurements constitute a nonlinear function of the state vector. Therefore, in this paper, a state-dependent linear measurement equation is developed for the vector measurement case. The state-dependent pseudo linear filter is applied to simulated spacecraft rotations and adequate estimates of the spacecraft attitude and rate are obtained for the case of quaternion measurements as well as of vector measurements.

  15. Operational constraints on state-dependent formulations of quantum error-disturbance trade-off relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzekwa, Kamil; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2014-05-01

    We argue for an operational requirement that all state-dependent measures of disturbance should satisfy. Motivated by this natural criterion, we prove that in any d-dimensional Hilbert space and for any pair of noncommuting operators, A and B, there exists a set of at least 2d -1 zero-noise, zero-disturbance (ZNZD) states, for which the first observable can be measured without noise and the second will not be disturbed. Moreover, we show that it is possible to construct such ZNZD states for which the expectation value of the commutator [A,B] does not vanish. Therefore any state-dependent error-disturbance relation, based on the expectation value of the commutator as a lower bound, must violate the operational requirement. We also discuss Ozawa's state-dependent error-disturbance relation in light of our results and show that the disturbance measure used in this relation exhibits unphysical properties. We conclude that the trade-off is inevitable only between state-independent measures of error and disturbance.

  16. Breeding matters: Natal experience influences population state-dependent host acceptance by an eruptive insect herbivore

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Eruptive forest insects are highly influential agents of change in forest ecosystems, and their effects have increased with recent climate change. State-dependent life histories contribute significantly to the population dynamics of eruptive forest insect herbivores; however, the proximate mechanisms by which these species shift between states is poorly understood. Laboratory bioassays were conducted using the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) to determine the effect of maternal host selection on offspring host preferences, as they apply to population state-dependent behaviors. Female mountain pine beetles exhibited state-dependent preference for artificial host material amended with monoterpenes in the absence of other cues, such that individuals reared in high-density epidemic-state simulations rejected low monoterpene conditions, while low-density endemic-state beetles accepted low monoterpene conditions. State-specific behavior in offspring was dependent on rearing conditions, as a function of maternal host selection, and these effects were observed within one generation. Density-dependent host selection behaviors exhibited by female mountain pine beetle offspring is reinforced by context-dependent maternal effects arising from parental host selection, and in situ exposure to conspecifics. These results demonstrate potential proximate mechanisms that control population dynamics in eruptive forest insects, and will allow for more accurate predictions of continued impact and spread of these species. PMID:28207862

  17. Closing the gap: long-term presynaptic plasticity in brain function and disease.

    PubMed

    Monday, Hannah R; Castillo, Pablo E

    2017-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is critical for experience-dependent adjustments of brain function. While most research has focused on the mechanisms that underlie postsynaptic forms of plasticity, comparatively little is known about how neurotransmitter release is altered in a long-term manner. Emerging research suggests that many of the features of canonical 'postsynaptic' plasticity, such as associativity, structural changes and bidirectionality, also characterize long-term presynaptic plasticity. Recent studies demonstrate that presynaptic plasticity is a potent regulator of circuit output and function. Moreover, aberrant presynaptic plasticity is a convergent factor of synaptopathies like schizophrenia, addiction, and Autism Spectrum Disorders, and may be a potential target for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. NFAT regulates pre-synaptic development and activity-dependent plasticity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Amanda; Franciscovich, Amy; Bowers, Mallory; Sandstrom, David J.; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2010-01-01

    The calcium-regulated transcription factor NFAT is emerging as a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity but precise cellular consequences of NFAT function remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the single Drosophila NFAT homolog is widely expressed in the nervous system including motor neurons and unexpectedly controls neural excitability. Likely due to this effect on excitability, NFAT regulates overall larval locomotion and both chronic and acute forms of activity-dependent plasticity at the larval glutamatergic neuro-muscular synapse. Specifically, NFAT-dependent synaptic phenotypes include changes in the number of pre-synaptic boutons, stable modifications in synaptic microtubule architecture and pre-synaptic transmitter release, while no evidence is found for synaptic retraction or alterations in the level of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule FasII. We propose that NFAT regulates pre-synaptic development and constraints long-term plasticity by dampening neuronal excitability. PMID:21185939

  19. Inactivation of presynaptic calcium current contributes to synaptic depression at a fast central synapse.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, I D; Tsujimoto, T; Barnes-Davies, M; Cuttle, M F; Takahashi, T

    1998-04-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are well characterized at neuronal somata but less thoroughly understood at the presynaptic terminal where they trigger transmitter release. In order to elucidate how the intrinsic properties of presynaptic calcium channels influence synaptic function, we have made direct recordings of the presynaptic calcium current (I(pCa)) in a brainstem giant synapse called the calyx of Held. The current was pharmacologically classified as P-type and exhibited marked inactivation. The inactivation was largely dependent upon the inward calcium current magnitude rather than the membrane potential, displayed little selectivity between divalent charge carriers (Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr+), and exhibited slow recovery. Simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic whole-cell recording revealed that I(pCa) inactivation predominantly contributes to posttetanic depression of EPSCs. Thus, because of its slow recovery, I(pCa) inactivation underlies this short-term synaptic plasticity.

  20. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  1. Postsynaptic, not presynaptic NMDA receptors are required for spike timing dependent LTD induction

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Brett C.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) between cortical layer 4 spiny stellate cells and layer 2/3 pyramidal cells requires the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). In young rodents, this form of LTD has been repeatedly reported to require presynaptic NMDARs for its induction. Here we show that at this synapse in the somatosensory cortex of 2 to 3 week old rats and mice, postsynaptic, not presynaptic NMDARs are required for LTD induction. First, we find no evidence for functional NMDARs in L4 neuron axons using 2 photon laser scanning microscopy and 2 photon glutamate uncaging. Second, we find that genetic deletion of postsynaptic, but not presynaptic NMDARs prevents LTD induction. Finally, the pharmacology of the NMDAR requirement is consistent with a non-ionic signaling mechanism. PMID:27399842

  2. Characterization of fluo-3 labelling of dense bodies at the hair cell's presynaptic active zone.

    PubMed

    Issa, N P; Hudspeth, A J

    1996-04-01

    The presynaptic active zone is the critical region of a chemical synapse at which Ca2+ entry provokes neurotransmitter release by exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles. To facilitate investigations of synaptic function, we have identified a group of fluorescent substances that label individual active zones in living hair cells. The Ca2+ indicator fluo-3, the compound studied in most detail, binds to the presynaptic dense bodies that are characteristic of active zones in hair cells and other cells that tonically release transmitter. The indicator's binding is reversible, with a dissociation constant of approximately 350 microM. Because fluo-3 that is bound to a presynaptic dense body continues to detect Ca2+ with an unaltered dissociation constant, the binding of this substance provides a valuable tool for exploration of the Ca2+ concentration at the site of vesicle fusion.

  3. Induction of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation by GluD1.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyounghee; Yokoyama, Marie; Yamashita, Manami; Hirano, Tomoo

    2012-01-06

    The δ subfamily of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits consists of GluD1 and GluD2. GluD2, which is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje neurons, has been shown to contribute to the formation of synapses between granule neurons and Purkinje neurons through interaction with Cbln1 (cerebellin precursor protein1) and presynaptic Neurexin. On the other hand, the synaptogenic activity of GluD1, which is expressed not in the cerebellum but in the hippocampus, remains to be characterized. Here, we report that GluD1 expressed in non-neuronal HEK cells, induced presynaptic differentiation of granule neurons through its N-terminal domain in co-cultures with cerebellar neurons, similarly to GluD2. We also show that GluD1 rescued the defect of synapse formation in GluD2-knockout Purkinje neurons, indicating the functional similarity of GluD1 and GluD2. In contrast, GluD1 expression alone did not induce presynaptic differentiation in co-cultures of HEK cells with hippocampal neurons. However, when Cbln1 was exogenously added to the culture medium, GluD1 induced presynaptic differentiation of not only glutamatergic presynaptic terminals but also GABAergic ones. Cbln1 is not expressed in hippocampal neurons but is expressed in entorhinal cortical neurons projecting to the hippocampus. In co-cultures of HEK cells expressing GluD1 and entorhinal cortical neurons, both glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic terminals were formed on the HEK cells without exogenous application of Cbln1. These results suggest that GluD1 might contribute to the formation of specific synapses in the hippocampus such as those formed by the projecting neurons of the entorhinal cortex.

  4. Presynaptic kainate receptors impart an associative property to hippocampal mossy fiber long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Dietmar; Mellor, Jack; Breustedt, Joerg; Nicoll, Roger A

    2003-10-01

    Hippocampal mossy fiber synapses show an unusual form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDA receptor activation and is expressed presynaptically. Using receptor antagonists, as well as receptor knockout mice, we found that presynaptic kainate receptors facilitate the induction of mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP), although they are not required for this form of LTP. Most importantly, these receptors impart an associativity to mossy fiber LTP such that activity in neighboring mossy fiber synapses, or even associational/commissural synapses, influences the threshold for inducing mossy fiber LTP. Such a mechanism greatly increases the computational power of this form of plasticity.

  5. Posttetanic potentiation critically depends on an enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion mediated by presynaptic PKC

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Lou, Xuelin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Activity-dependent enhancement of transmitter release is a common form of presynaptic plasticity, but the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained largely unknown, perhaps because of the inaccessibility of most CNS nerve terminals. Here we investigated the signaling steps that underlie posttetanic potentiation (PTP), a form of presynaptic plasticity found at many CNS synapses. Direct whole-cell recordings from the large calyx of Held nerve terminals with the perforated patch-clamp technique showed that PTP was not mediated by changes in the presynaptic action potential waveform. Ca2+ imaging revealed a slight increase of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient during PTP (≈15%), which, however, was too small to explain a large part of PTP. The presynaptic PKC pathway was critically involved in PTP because (i) PTP was occluded by activation of PKC with phorbol esters, and (ii) PTP was largely (by approximately two-thirds) blocked by the PKC inhibitors, Ro31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide. Activation of PKC during PTP most likely acts directly on the presynaptic release machinery, because in presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging experiments, activation of PKC by phorbol ester greatly increased the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion in a Ro31-8220-sensitive manner (≈300% with small Ca2+ uncaging stimuli), but only slightly increased presynaptic voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (≈15%). We conclude that a PKC-dependent increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion is a key step in the enhancement of transmitter release during PTP. PMID:17884983

  6. α-Synuclein Membrane Association Is Regulated by the Rab3a Recycling Machinery and Presynaptic Activity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert H. C.; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Samuel, Filsy; Visanji, Naomi P.; Zhang, Gang; Marsilio, Diana; Langman, Tammy; Fraser, Paul E.; Tandon, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an abundant presynaptic protein and a primary component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson disease. Although its pathogenic role remains unclear, in healthy nerve terminals α-synuclein undergoes a cycle of membrane binding and dissociation. An α-synuclein binding assay was used to screen for vesicle proteins involved in α-synuclein membrane interactions and showed that antibodies directed to the Ras-related GTPase Rab3a and its chaperone RabGDI abrogated α-synuclein membrane binding. Biochemical analyses, including density gradient sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation, suggested that α-synuclein interacts with membrane-associated GTP-bound Rab3a but not to cytosolic GDP-Rab3a. Accumulation of membrane-bound α-synuclein was induced by the expression of a GTPase-deficient Rab3a mutant, by a dominant-negative GDP dissociation inhibitor mutant unable to recycle Rab3a off membranes, and by Hsp90 inhibitors, radicicol and geldanamycin, which are known to inhibit Rab3a dissociation from membranes. Thus, all treatments that inhibited Rab3a recycling also increased α-synuclein sequestration on intracellular membranes. Our results suggest that membrane-bound GTP-Rab3a stabilizes α-synuclein on synaptic vesicles and that the GDP dissociation inhibitor·Hsp90 complex that controls Rab3a membrane dissociation also regulates α-synuclein dissociation during synaptic activity. PMID:23344955

  7. Postsynaptic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling maintains presynaptic function of parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses via BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Kazuharu; Okubo, Yohei; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2006-01-01

    The maintenance of synaptic functions is essential for neuronal information processing, but cellular mechanisms that maintain synapses in the adult brain are not well understood. Here, we report an activity-dependent maintenance mechanism of parallel fiber (PF)–Purkinje cell (PC) synapses in the cerebellum. When postsynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) signaling was chronically inhibited in vivo, PF–PC synaptic strength decreased because of a decreased transmitter release probability. The same effects were observed when PF activity was inhibited in vivo by the suppression of NMDA receptor-mediated inputs to granule cells. PF–PC synaptic strength similarly decreased after the in vivo application of an antibody against brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Furthermore, the weakening of synaptic connection caused by the blockade of mGluR–IP3 signaling was reversed by the in vivo application of BDNF. These results indicate that a signaling cascade comprising PF activity, postsynaptic mGluR–IP3 signaling and subsequent BDNF signaling maintains presynaptic functions in the mature cerebellum. PMID:16709674

  8. Effects of carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate and vinpocetine on the presynaptic Ca2+ channel-mediated release of [3H]glutamate: comparison with the Na+ channel-mediated release.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Guarneros, Araceli; Nekrassov, Vladimir

    2007-12-01

    The effect of carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and topiramate, that are among the most widely used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and of the new putative AED vinpocetine on the Ca(2+) channel-mediated release of [(3)H]Glu evoked by high K(+) in hippocampal isolated nerve endings was investigated. Results show that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine and phenytoin reduced [(3)H]Glu release to high K(+) to about 30% and 55% at concentrations of 500 microM and 1500 microM, respectively; lamotrigine and topiramate to about 27% at 1500 microM; while valproate failed to modify it. Vinpocetine was the most potent and effective; 50 microM vinpocetine practically abolished the high K(+) evoked release of [(3)H]Glu. Comparison of the inhibition exerted by the AEDs on [(3)H]Glu release evoked by high K(+) with the inhibition exerted by the AEDs on [(3)H]Glu release evoked by the Na(+) channel opener, veratridine, shows that all the AEDs are in general more effective blockers of the presynaptic Na(+) than of the presynaptic Ca(2+) channel-mediated response. The high doses of AEDs required to control seizures are frequently accompanied by adverse secondary effects. Therefore, the higher potency and efficacy of vinpocetine to reduce the permeability of presynaptic ionic channels controlling the release of the most important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain must be advantageous in the treatment of epilepsy.

  9. Dynamic control of presynaptic Ca(2+) inflow by fast-inactivating K(+) channels in hippocampal mossy fiber boutons.

    PubMed

    Geiger, J R; Jonas, P

    2000-12-01

    Analysis of presynaptic determinants of synaptic strength has been difficult at cortical synapses, mainly due to the lack of direct access to presynaptic elements. Here we report patch-clamp recordings from mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) in rat hippocampal slices. The presynaptic action potential is very short during low-frequency stimulation but is prolonged up to 3-fold during high-frequency stimulation. Voltage-gated K(+) channels in MFBs inactivate rapidly but recover from inactivation very slowly, suggesting that cumulative K(+) channel inactivation mediates activity-dependent spike broadening. Prolongation of the presynaptic voltage waveform leads to an increase in the number of Ca(2+) ions entering the terminal per action potential and to a consecutive potentiation of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents at MFB-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Thus, inactivation of presynaptic K(+) channels contributes to the control of efficacy of a glutamatergic synapse in the cortex.

  10. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Cav2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R.; Rutten, K.; Valdor, M.; Schiene, K.; Wigge, S.; Schunk, S.; Damann, N.; Christoph, T.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Cav2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Cav2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Cav2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  11. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury.

  12. Alterations in the hippocampal phosphorylated CREB expression in drug state-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, Sakineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sepehri, Houri; Delphi, Ladan

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the possible alterations of hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in drug state-dependent memory retrieval. One-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used to assess memory retrieval in adult male NMRI mice. Pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.) reversed ethanol-induced amnesia, indicating ethanol- or ethanol-nicotine induced state-dependent learning (STD). Using Western blot analysis, it was found that the p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus increased in the mice that showed successful memory retrieval as compared with untrained mice. In contrast, pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) decreased the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio in comparison with the control group. The hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio enhanced in ethanol- and ethanol-nicotine induced STD. Moreover, memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.) improved in the animals that received pre-test administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.), ethanol (0.5 g/kg, i.p.) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting a cross STD between the drugs. The p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus decreased in the of WIN-induced amnesia and STD groups in comparison with the control group. In addition, cross state-dependent learning between WIN and ethanol or nicotine was associated with the increase of the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio. It can be concluded that phosphorylation of CREB in the hippocampus is a critical event underlying the interaction of co-administration of drugs on memory retrieval in passive avoidance learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of the substituted N-triazole oxindole TROX-1, a small-molecule, state-dependent inhibitor of Ca(V)2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Herrington, James; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dai, Ge; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Ratliff, Kevin S; Smith, McHardy M; Warren, Vivien A; Arneric, Stephen P; Eduljee, Cyrus; Parker, David; Snutch, Terrance P; Hoyt, Scott B; London, Clare; Duffy, Joseph L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; McManus, Owen B

    2012-03-01

    Biological, genetic, and clinical evidence provide validation for N-type calcium channels (Ca(V)2.2) as therapeutic targets for chronic pain. A state-dependent Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor may provide an improved therapeutic window over ziconotide, the peptidyl Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor used clinically. Supporting this notion, we recently reported that in preclinical models, the state-dependent Ca(V)2 inhibitor (3R)-5-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-3-methyl-3-(pyrimidin-5-ylmethyl)-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (TROX-1) has an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconotide. Here we characterize TROX-1 inhibition of Cav2.2 channels in more detail. When channels are biased toward open/inactivated states by depolarizing the membrane potential under voltage-clamp electrophysiology, TROX-1 inhibits Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 0.11 μM. The voltage dependence of Ca(V)2.2 inhibition was examined using automated electrophysiology. TROX-1 IC(50) values were 4.2, 0.90, and 0.36 μM at -110, -90, and -70 mV, respectively. TROX-1 displayed use-dependent inhibition of Ca(V)2.2 with a 10-fold IC(50) separation between first (27 μM) and last (2.7 μM) pulses in a train. In a fluorescence-based calcium influx assay, TROX-1 inhibited Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 9.5 μM under hyperpolarized conditions and 0.69 μM under depolarized conditions. Finally, TROX-1 potency was examined across the Ca(V)2 subfamily. Depolarized IC(50) values were 0.29, 0.19, and 0.28 μM by manual electrophysiology using matched conditions and 1.8, 0.69, and 1.1 μM by calcium influx for Ca(V)2.1, Ca(V)2.2, and Ca(V)2.3, respectively. Together, these in vitro data support the idea that a state-dependent, non-subtype-selective Ca(V)2 channel inhibitor can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Ca(V)2.2-selective inhibitor ziconotide in preclinical models of chronic pain.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-stimulated noradrenaline (NA) release in rat brain cortex is modulated by presynaptic H3-receptors.

    PubMed

    Fink, K; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-02-01

    In superfused rat brain cortex slices and synaptosomes preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline the effect of agonists or antagonists at presynaptic H3 receptors on NMDA-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release was investigated. In experiments on slices, histamine and the preferential H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow (IC20 values 0.27 mumol/l or 0.032 mumol/l, respectively); S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the selective H1 receptor agonist (2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each up to 10 mumol/l) were ineffective. The H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine whereas the preferential H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene and the preferential H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine were ineffective. In experiments on synaptosomes, histamine and R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow, whereas 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine or dimaprit had no effect. The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished by thioperamide. When tritium overflow was stimulated by NMDA in the presence of omega-conotoxin GVIA (which by itself decreased the response to NMDA by about 55%), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine did not inhibit NMDA-evoked overflow. It is concluded that NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release in the cerebral cortex can be modulated by inhibitory H3 receptors. NMDA receptors and H3 receptors are both located presynaptically and may interact at the same noradrenergic varicosity. An unimpaired function of the N-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel probably is a prerequisite for the inhibition of NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release by H3 receptor stimulation.

  15. Selective synaptic targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers FGF22 and FGF7

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Timmons, Kendall M.; Kikuma, Koto; Pechmann, Yvonne; Kneussel, Matthias; Umemori, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is crucial for proper functioning of the brain. Fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and FGF7 are postsynaptic-cell-derived presynaptic organizers necessary for excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation, respectively, in the hippocampus. For the establishment of specific synaptic networks, these FGFs must localize to appropriate synaptic locations – FGF22 to excitatory and FGF7 to inhibitory postsynaptic sites. Here, we show that distinct motor and adaptor proteins contribute to intracellular microtubule transport of FGF22 and FGF7. Excitatory synaptic targeting of FGF22 requires the motor proteins KIF3A and KIF17 and the adaptor protein SAP102 (also known as DLG3). By contrast, inhibitory synaptic targeting of FGF7 requires the motor KIF5 and the adaptor gephyrin. Time-lapse imaging shows that FGF22 moves with SAP102, whereas FGF7 moves with gephyrin. These results reveal the basis of selective targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers that supports their different synaptogenic functions. Finally, we found that knockdown of SAP102 or PSD95 (also known as DLG4), which impairs the differentiation of excitatory synapses, alters FGF7 localization, suggesting that signals from excitatory synapses might regulate inhibitory synapse formation by controlling the distribution of the inhibitory presynaptic organizer. PMID:25431136

  16. A Presynaptic Role for FMRP during Protein Synthesis-Dependent Long-Term Plasticity in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Sally M.; Li, Hsiu-Ling; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Kandel, Eric R.; Choi, Yun-Beom

    2011-01-01

    Loss of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is associated with presumed postsynaptic deficits in mouse models of Fragile X syndrome. However, the possible presynaptic roles of FMRP in learning-related plasticity have received little attention. As a result, the mechanisms whereby FMRP influences synaptic function remain poorly…

  17. Perlecan antagonizes collagen IV and ADAMTS9/GON-1 in restricting the growth of presynaptic boutons.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianzhen; Liang, Jingjing; Ding, Mei

    2014-07-30

    In the mature nervous system, a significant fraction of synapses are structurally stable over a long time scale. However, the mechanisms that restrict synaptic growth within a confined region are poorly understood. Here, we identified that in the C. elegans neuromuscular junction, collagens Type IV and XVIII, and the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS/GON-1 are critical for growth restriction of presynaptic boutons. Without these components, ectopic boutons progressively invade into the nonsynaptic region. Perlecan/UNC-52 promotes the growth of ectopic boutons and functions antagonistically to collagen Type IV and GON-1 but not to collagen XVIII. The growth constraint of presynaptic boutons correlates with the integrity of the extracellular matrix basal lamina or basement membrane (BM), which surrounds chemical synapses. Fragmented BM appears in the region where ectopic boutons emerge. Further removal of UNC-52 improves the BM integrity and the tight association between BM and presynaptic boutons. Together, our results unravel the complex role of the BM in restricting the growth of presynaptic boutons and reveal the antagonistic function of perlecan on Type IV collagen and ADAMTS protein.

  18. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  19. Loss of Saltation and Presynaptic Action Potential Failure in Demyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mustafa S.; Popovic, Marko A.; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2017-01-01

    In cortical pyramidal neurons the presynaptic terminals controlling transmitter release are located along unmyelinated axon collaterals, far from the original action potential (AP) initiation site, the axon initial segment (AIS). Once initiated, APs will need to reliably propagate over long distances and regions of geometrical inhomogeneity like branch points (BPs) to rapidly depolarize the presynaptic terminals and confer temporally precise synaptic transmission. While axon pathologies such as demyelinating diseases are well established to impede the fidelity of AP propagation along internodes, to which extent myelin loss affects propagation along BPs and axon collaterals is not well understood. Here, using the cuprizone demyelination model, we performed optical voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging from control and demyelinated layer 5 pyramidal neuron axons. In the main axon, we find that myelin loss switches the modality of AP propagation from rapid saltation towards a slow continuous wave. The duration of single AP waveforms at BPs or nodes was, however, only slightly briefer. In contrast, by using two-photon microscopy-guided loose-seal patch recordings from axon collaterals we revealed a presynaptic AP broadening in combination with a reduced velocity and frequency-dependent failure. Finally, internodal myelin loss was also associated with de novo sprouting of axon collaterals starting from the primary (demyelinated) axon. Thus, the loss of oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths bears functional consequences beyond the main axon, impeding the temporal fidelity of presynaptic APs and affecting the functional and structural organization of synaptic connectivity within the neocortex. PMID:28289377

  20. Flap loop of GluD2 binds to Cbln1 and induces presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Tomoaki; Hirano, Tomoo

    2010-07-30

    Glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2) is selectively expressed on the postsynaptic spines at parallel-fiber (PF)-Purkinje neuron (PN) synapses. GluD2 knockout mice show a reduced number of PF-PN synapses, suggesting that GluD2 is involved in synapse formation. Recent studies revealed that GluD2 induces presynaptic differentiation in a manner dependent on its N-terminal domain (NTD) through binding of Cbln1 secreted from cerebellar granule neurons. However, the underlying mechanism of the specific binding of the NTD to Cbln1 remains elusive. Here, we have identified the flap loop (Arg321-Trp339) in the NTD of GluD2 (GluD2-NTD) as a crucial region for the binding to Cbln1 and the induction of presynaptic differentiation. Both induction of presynaptic differentiation and binding of Cbln1 were abolished in the HEK cells expressing not wild-type GluD2 but GluD2 with mutations in the flap loop. Especially, single amino acid substitution of either Arg321 or Trp323 to alanine was sufficient to disable the GluD2 function. Finally, a homology model of GluD2-NTD suggested that the flap loop is located at the distal end, which appears consistent with an interaction with Cbln1 and a presynaptic varicosity.

  1. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    to investigate the effects of levetiracetam, topiramate and carbamazepine in excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic transmission onto granule cells in...effective in reducing excitatory synaptic transmission onto dentate granule cells in slices from chronically epileptic rats while no effect was...transmission onto dentate granule cells by increasing the frequency of mIPSCs. These data indicate that presynaptically acting drugs as levetiracetam

  2. ATM protein is located on presynaptic vesicles and its deficit leads to failures in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vail, Graham; Cheng, Aifang; Han, Yu Ray; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M T; Herrup, Karl; Plummer, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a multisystemic disorder that includes a devastating neurodegeneration phenotype. The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein is well-known for its role in the DNA damage response, yet ATM is also found in association with cytoplasmic vesicular structures: endosomes and lysosomes, as well as neuronal synaptic vesicles. In keeping with this latter association, electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral pathway in hippocampal slices from ATM-deficient mice does not elicit normal long-term potentiation (LTP). The current study was undertaken to assess the nature of this deficit. Theta burst-induced LTP was reduced in Atm(-/-) animals, with the reduction most pronounced at burst stimuli that included 6 or greater trains. To assess whether the deficit was associated with a pre- or postsynaptic failure, we analyzed paired-pulse facilitation and found that it too was significantly reduced in Atm(-/-) mice. This indicates a deficit in presynaptic function. As further evidence that these synaptic effects of ATM deficiency were presynaptic, we used stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction revealed that ATM is significantly more closely associated with Piccolo (a presynaptic marker) than with Homer1 (a postsynaptic marker). These results underline how, in addition to its nuclear functions, ATM plays an important functional role in the neuronal synapse where it participates in the regulation of presynaptic vesicle physiology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Invaginating Presynaptic Terminals in Neuromuscular Junctions, Photoreceptor Terminals, and Other Synapses of Animals.

    PubMed

    Petralia, Ronald S; Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2017-06-13

    Typically, presynaptic terminals form a synapse directly on the surface of postsynaptic processes such as dendrite shafts and spines. However, some presynaptic terminals invaginate-entirely or partially-into postsynaptic processes. We survey these invaginating presynaptic terminals in all animals and describe several examples from the central nervous system, including giant fiber systems in invertebrates, and cup-shaped spines, electroreceptor synapses, and some specialized auditory and vestibular nerve terminals in vertebrates. We then examine mechanoreceptors and photoreceptors, concentrating on the complex of pre- and postsynaptic processes found in basal invaginations of the cell. We discuss in detail the role of vertebrate invaginating horizontal cell processes in both chemical and electrical feedback mechanisms. We also discuss the common presence of indenting or invaginating terminals in neuromuscular junctions on muscles of most kinds of animals, and especially discuss those of Drosophila and vertebrates. Finally, we consider broad questions about the advantages of possessing invaginating presynaptic terminals and describe some effects of aging and disease, especially on neuromuscular junctions. We suggest that the invagination is a mechanism that can enhance both chemical and electrical interactions at the synapse.

  4. Presynaptic Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Kateri J.; Taylor, Jonathan K.; Osterberg, Valerie R.; Churchill, Madeline J.; Pollock, Eden; Moore, Cynthia; Meshul, Charles K.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies are associated with abnormal neuronal aggregation of α-synuclein. However, the mechanisms of aggregation and their relationship to disease are poorly understood. We developed an in vivo multiphoton imaging paradigm to study α-synuclein aggregation in mouse cortex with subcellular resolution. We used a green fluorescent protein-tagged human α-synuclein mouse line that has moderate overexpression levels mimicking human disease. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of labeled protein demonstrated that somatic α-synuclein existed primarily in an unbound, soluble pool. In contrast, α-synuclein in presynaptic terminals was in at least three different pools: (1) as unbound, soluble protein; (2) bound to presynaptic vesicles; and (3) as microaggregates. Serial imaging of microaggregates over 1 week demonstrated a heterogeneous population with differing α-synuclein exchange rates. The microaggregate species were resistant to proteinase K, phosphorylated at serine-129, oxidized, and associated with a decrease in the presynaptic vesicle protein synapsin and glutamate immunogold labeling. Multiphoton FRAP provided the specific binding constants for α-synuclein's binding to synaptic vesicles and its effective diffusion coefficient in the soma and axon, setting the stage for future studies targeting synuclein modifications and their effects. Our in vivo results suggest that, under moderate overexpression conditions, α-synuclein aggregates are selectively found in presynaptic terminals. PMID:24501346

  5. Presynaptic Mechanisms of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: The Findings, the Debate, and the Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Cenci, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) precursor l-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes with disease progression, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements) and motor fluctuations within a few years of l-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal DA transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large DA swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma l-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in DA transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the DA transporter, aberrant release of DA from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from DA) play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  6. A Presynaptic Role for FMRP during Protein Synthesis-Dependent Long-Term Plasticity in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Sally M.; Li, Hsiu-Ling; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Kandel, Eric R.; Choi, Yun-Beom

    2011-01-01

    Loss of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is associated with presumed postsynaptic deficits in mouse models of Fragile X syndrome. However, the possible presynaptic roles of FMRP in learning-related plasticity have received little attention. As a result, the mechanisms whereby FMRP influences synaptic function remain poorly…

  7. Presynaptic Protein Synthesis Is Required for Long-Term Plasticity of GABA Release.

    PubMed

    Younts, Thomas J; Monday, Hannah R; Dudok, Barna; Klein, Matthew E; Jordan, Bryen A; Katona, István; Castillo, Pablo E

    2016-10-19

    Long-term changes of neurotransmitter release are critical for proper brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. While protein synthesis is crucial for the consolidation of postsynaptic plasticity, whether and how protein synthesis regulates presynaptic plasticity in the mature mammalian brain remain unclear. Here, using paired whole-cell recordings in rodent hippocampal slices, we report that presynaptic protein synthesis is required for long-term, but not short-term, plasticity of GABA release from type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing axons. This long-term depression of inhibitory transmission (iLTD) involves cap-dependent protein synthesis in presynaptic interneuron axons, but not somata. Translation is required during the induction, but not maintenance, of iLTD. Mechanistically, CB1 activation enhances protein synthesis via the mTOR pathway. Furthermore, using super-resolution STORM microscopy, we revealed eukaryotic ribosomes in CB1-expressing axon terminals. These findings suggest that presynaptic local protein synthesis controls neurotransmitter release during long-term plasticity in the mature mammalian brain.

  8. Differential presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers on noradrenaline release in cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofol, R.M.; Rodriguez-Farre, E. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, the release of noradrenaline (NA) in brain tissue was analyzed using rat cerebral cortical slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-NA. {gamma}-HCH (lindane) 50 {mu}M significantly enhanced the ({sup 3}H)-NA release evoked by 15-25 mM K{sup +}. {alpha}- and {beta}-HCH did not produce any significant effect on K{sup +}-evoked ({sup 3}H)-NA release. {delta}-HCH induced a significant decrease of the 25 mM K{sup +}-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-NA. The effect of the {gamma}- and {delta}-HCH isomers on the presynaptic action of the {alpha}{sub 2}-agonist clonidine and the {alpha}{sub 2}-antagonist yohimbine was also studied. The presynaptic inhibitory effect of clonidine and the stimulatory effect of yohimbine on ({sup 3}H)-NA release was attenuated by lindane and {delta}-HCH, respectively. These results are consistent with a presynaptic action of the HCH isomers on noradrenergic release processes.

  9. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  10. Synaptic transmission in nucleus tractus solitarius is depressed by Group II and III but not Group I presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Ling, Erh-hsin; Horowitz, John M; Bonham, Ann C

    2002-01-01

    Presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) serve as autoreceptors throughout the CNS to inhibit glutamate release and depress glutamatergic transmission. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic mGluRs have been implicated in shaping autonomic signal transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). We sought to test the hypothesis that activation of presynaptic mGluRs depresses neurotransmission between primary autonomic afferent fibres and second-order NTS neurones. In second-order NTS neurones, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) synaptically evoked by stimulation of primary sensory afferent fibres in the tractus solitarius (ts) and currents postsynaptically evoked by α-amino-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) were studied in the presence and absence of mGluR agonists and antagonists. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) was used to determine whether the genes for the mGluR subtypes were expressed in the cell bodies of the primary autonomic afferent fibres. Agonist activation of Group II and III but not Group I mGluRs reduced the peak amplitude of synaptically (ts) evoked EPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner while having no effect on postsynaptically (AMPA) evoked currents recorded in the same neurones. At the highest concentrations, the Group II agonist, (2S,3S,4S)-CCG/(2S,1′S,2′S)-2-carboxycyclopropyl (l-CCG-I), decreased the amplitude of the ts-evoked EPSCs by 39 % with an EC50 of 21 μm, and the Group III agonist, l(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4), decreased the evoked EPSCs by 71 % with an EC50 of 1 mm. mRNA for all eight mGluR subtypes was detected in the autonomic afferent fibre cell bodies in the nodose and jugular ganglia. Group II and III antagonists ((2S,3S,4S)-2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (MCCG) and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP)), at concentrations that blocked the respective agonist-induced synaptic depression, attenuated the frequency

  11. Nonlinear closed loop optimal control: a modified state-dependent Riccati equation.

    PubMed

    Rafee Nekoo, S

    2013-03-01

    The state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE), as a controller, has been introduced and implemented since the 90s. In this article, the other aspects of this controller are declared which shows the capability of this technique. First, a general case which has control nonlinearities and time varying weighting matrix Q is solved with three approaches: exact solution (ES), online control update (OCU) and power series approximation (PSA). The proposed PSA in this paper is able to deal with time varying or state-dependent Q in nonlinear systems. As a result of having the solution of nonlinear systems with complex Q containing constraints, using OCU and proposed PSA, a method is introduced to prevent the collision of an end-effector of a robot and an obstacle which shows the adaptability of the SDRE controller. Two examples to support the idea are presented and conferred. Supplementing constraints to the SDRE via matrix Q, this approach is named a modified SDRE. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deficit of state-dependent risk attitude modulation in gambling disorder.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, A; Tsurumi, K; Kawada, R; Murao, T; Takeuchi, H; Murai, T; Takahashi, H

    2017-04-04

    Gambling disorder (GD) is often considered as a problem of trait-like risk preference. However, the symptoms of GD cannot be fully understood by this trait view. In the present study, we hypothesized that GD patients also had problem with a flexible control of risk attitude (state-dependent strategy optimization), and aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying abnormal risk-taking of GD. To address this issue, we tested GD patients without comorbidity (GD group: n=21) and age-matched healthy control participants (HC group: n=29) in a multi-step gambling task, in which participants needed to clear 'block quota' (required units to clear a block, 1000-7000 units) in 20 choices, and conducted a task-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. Behavioral analysis indeed revealed a less flexible risk-attitude change in the GD group; the GD group failed to avoid risky choice in a specific quota range (low-quota condition), in which risky strategy was not optimal to solve the quota. Accordingly, fMRI analysis highlighted diminished functioning of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), which has been heavily implicated in cognitive flexibility. To our knowledge, the present study provided the first empirical evidence of a deficit of state-dependent strategy optimization in GD. Focusing on flexible control of risk attitude under quota may contribute to a better understanding of the psychopathology of GDs.

  13. Jump locations of jump-diffusion processes with state-dependent rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher E.; Keener, James P.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a general framework for studying statistics of jump-diffusion systems driven by both Brownian noise (diffusion) and a jump process with state-dependent intensity. Of particular natural interest in many physical systems are the jump locations: the system evaluated at the jump times. As an example, this could be the voltage at which a neuron fires, or the so-called ‘threshold voltage’. However, the state-dependence of the jump rate provides direct coupling between the diffusion and jump components, making it difficult to disentangle the two to study individually. In this work, we provide an iterative map formulation of the sequence of distributions of jump locations. The distributions computed by this map can be used to elucidate other interesting quantities about the process, including statistics of the interjump times. Ultimately, the limit of the map reveals that knowledge of the stationary distribution of the full process is sufficient to recover (but not necessarily equal to) the distribution of jump locations. We propose two biophysical examples to illustrate the use of this framework to provide insight about a system. We find that a sharp threshold voltage emerges robustly in a simple stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal model. The interplay between the two sources of noise is also investigated in a stepping model of molecular motor in intracellular transport pulling a diffusive cargo.

  14. Allopregnanolone induces state-dependent fear via the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Acca, Gillian M; Mathew, Abel S; Jin, Jingji; Maren, Stephen; Nagaya, Naomi

    2017-03-01

    Gonadal steroids and their metabolites have been shown to be important modulators of emotional behavior. Allopregnanolone (ALLO), for example, is a metabolite of progesterone that has been linked to anxiety-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. In rodents, it has been shown to reduce anxiety in a number of behavioral paradigms including Pavlovian fear conditioning. We have recently found that expression of conditioned contextual (but not auditory) freezing in rats can be suppressed by infusion of ALLO into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). To further explore the nature of this effect, we infused ALLO into the BNST of male rats prior to both conditioning and testing. We found that suppression of contextual fear occurred when the hormone was present during either conditioning or testing but not during both procedures, suggesting that ALLO acts in a state-dependent manner within the BNST. A shift in interoceptive context during testing for animals conditioned under ALLO provided further support for this mechanism of hormonal action on contextual fear. Interestingly, infusions of ALLO into the basolateral amygdala produced a state-independent suppression of both conditioned contextual and auditory freezing. Altogether, these results suggest that ALLO can influence the acquisition and expression of fear memories by both state-dependent and state-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sea State Dependent Air-Sea Fluxes in Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, J.; Liu, B.; Kim, H. S. S.; Chawla, A.; Mehra, A.; Reichl, B. G.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.

    2016-12-01

    Air-sea fluxes of heat and momentum affect hurricane, tropical and extratropical storm intensities. Sea surface waves are an important processes to account for in modeling air-sea fluxes because wind stress and upper ocean mixing, through Langmuir turbulence and Stoke's drift, are sea-state dependent. We present a three-way coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model which accounts for sea-state dependent air/sea fluxes. The wave model, WAVEWATCH III, calculates the wind stress, which is highly dependent on the high-frequency part of the wave spectrum. The high frequency part of the wave spectrum or tail is chosen so that the drag coefficient is reduced for wind speeds greater than 20 m/s as in the FY2016 operational version of HWRF. To demonstrate the impact of including waves in the coupled model, we show results comparing the two-way coupled atmosphere-ocean model to the three way coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model for hurricane/tropical/extratropical storms. It is indicated that by including the reduced drag coefficients as well as other surface wave related coupling processes, storm intensities are better predicted in the three-way coupled HWRF system.

  16. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  17. The optimal solution of a non-convex state-dependent LQR problem and its applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xudan; Zhu, J Jim; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies a Non-convex State-dependent Linear Quadratic Regulator (NSLQR) problem, in which the control penalty weighting matrix [Formula: see text] in the performance index is state-dependent. A necessary and sufficient condition for the optimal solution is established with a rigorous proof by Euler-Lagrange Equation. It is found that the optimal solution of the NSLQR problem can be obtained by solving a Pseudo-Differential-Riccati-Equation (PDRE) simultaneously with the closed-loop system equation. A Comparison Theorem for the PDRE is given to facilitate solution methods for the PDRE. A linear time-variant system is employed as an example in simulation to verify the proposed optimal solution. As a non-trivial application, a goal pursuit process in psychology is modeled as a NSLQR problem and two typical goal pursuit behaviors found in human and animals are reproduced using different control weighting [Formula: see text]. It is found that these two behaviors save control energy and cause less stress over Conventional Control Behavior typified by the LQR control with a constant control weighting [Formula: see text], in situations where only the goal discrepancy at the terminal time is of concern, such as in Marathon races and target hitting missions.

  18. The Optimal Solution of a Non-Convex State-Dependent LQR Problem and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xudan; Zhu, J. Jim; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies a Non-convex State-dependent Linear Quadratic Regulator (NSLQR) problem, in which the control penalty weighting matrix in the performance index is state-dependent. A necessary and sufficient condition for the optimal solution is established with a rigorous proof by Euler-Lagrange Equation. It is found that the optimal solution of the NSLQR problem can be obtained by solving a Pseudo-Differential-Riccati-Equation (PDRE) simultaneously with the closed-loop system equation. A Comparison Theorem for the PDRE is given to facilitate solution methods for the PDRE. A linear time-variant system is employed as an example in simulation to verify the proposed optimal solution. As a non-trivial application, a goal pursuit process in psychology is modeled as a NSLQR problem and two typical goal pursuit behaviors found in human and animals are reproduced using different control weighting . It is found that these two behaviors save control energy and cause less stress over Conventional Control Behavior typified by the LQR control with a constant control weighting , in situations where only the goal discrepancy at the terminal time is of concern, such as in Marathon races and target hitting missions. PMID:24747417

  19. State-dependent memory effects using caffeine and placebo do not extend to metamemory.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, William L; Creeley, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of caffeine on human memory and predictions of memory (i.e., metamemory). On Day 1, 83 college students drank a sweetened beverage containing either caffeine (4 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo before they studied 40 pairs of words. While the participants studied, they predicted their future memory performance for each word pair. On Day 2, the participants again received caffeine or a placebo before the memory test. The participants who drank the same beverage on both days (either caffeine or a placebo) recalled more word pairs than did those who drank different beverages (caffeine on 1 day and a placebo on the other day). In contrast, memory predictions were more accurate when the beverages did not match on both days. These data provide evidence for state-dependent memory when caffeine is used, but not for state-dependent metamemory. People's memory and their predictions of memory can be influenced in different ways if they drink caffeine before they study or take a test.

  20. State-dependent and trait-related gray matter changes in nonrefractory depression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Liu, Li; Fang, Peng; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-21

    Behavioral evidence suggests functional remission or recovery in nonrefractory depressive disorder after successful antidepressant therapy, but the effect of treatment on brain structures remains unclear. It is possible that some specific structural changes are trait-related, in addition to some state-dependent anatomical regions that could be normalized by medications. In the current study, 32 treatment-naïve nonrefractory depressive disorder patients and 34 matched healthy controls underwent structural MRI scans and a subgroup including 16 patients underwent the second scans after clinical recovery with antidepressant treatment. The statistical analysis of gray matter images showed that the state-dependent regions mainly comprised the key regions within the lateral default, dorsal attention, and frontoparietal networks, whereas the trait-related regions included the medial prefrontal cortex, right anterior insula, thalamus, right parahippocampal gyrus, and right middle occipital gyrus. Moreover, the gray matter changes in the left orbitofrontal cortex, right middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, thalamus, left precentral gyrus, left precuneus, and right middle occipital gyrus were significantly positively correlated with the durations of the current depressive episode. The current findings may not only shed new light on the neuronal effect of antidepressant on depression but also provide potential evidence of the relapse risks for the clinically recovered patients after antidepressant treatment.

  1. State-dependent climate sensitivity in past warm climates and its implications for future climate projections

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Rodrigo; Huber, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Projections of future climate depend critically on refined estimates of climate sensitivity. Recent progress in temperature proxies dramatically increases the magnitude of warming reconstructed from early Paleogene greenhouse climates and demands a close examination of the forcing and feedback mechanisms that maintained this warmth and the broad dynamic range that these paleoclimate records attest to. Here, we show that several complementary resolutions to these questions are possible in the context of model simulations using modern and early Paleogene configurations. We find that (i) changes in boundary conditions representative of slow “Earth system” feedbacks play an important role in maintaining elevated early Paleogene temperatures, (ii) radiative forcing by carbon dioxide deviates significantly from pure logarithmic behavior at concentrations relevant for simulation of the early Paleogene, and (iii) fast or “Charney” climate sensitivity in this model increases sharply as the climate warms. Thus, increased forcing and increased slow and fast sensitivity can all play a substantial role in maintaining early Paleogene warmth. This poses an equifinality problem: The same climate can be maintained by a different mix of these ingredients; however, at present, the mix cannot be constrained directly from climate proxy data. The implications of strongly state-dependent fast sensitivity reach far beyond the early Paleogene. The study of past warm climates may not narrow uncertainty in future climate projections in coming centuries because fast climate sensitivity may itself be state-dependent, but proxies and models are both consistent with significant increases in fast sensitivity with increasing temperature. PMID:23918397

  2. Predicting behavioural responses to novel organisms: state-dependent detection theory.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Pete C; Ehlman, Sean M; Sih, Andrew

    2017-01-25

    Human activity alters natural habitats for many species. Understanding variation in animals' behavioural responses to these changing environments is critical. We show how signal detection theory can be used within a wider framework of state-dependent modelling to predict behavioural responses to a major environmental change: novel, exotic species. We allow thresholds for action to be a function of reserves, and demonstrate how optimal thresholds can be calculated. We term this framework 'state-dependent detection theory' (SDDT). We focus on behavioural and fitness outcomes when animals continue to use formerly adaptive thresholds following environmental change. In a simple example, we show that exposure to novel animals which appear dangerous-but are actually safe-(e.g. ecotourists) can have catastrophic consequences for 'prey' (organisms that respond as if the new organisms are predators), significantly increasing mortality even when the novel species is not predatory. SDDT also reveals that the effect on reproduction can be greater than the effect on lifespan. We investigate factors that influence the effect of novel organisms, and address the potential for behavioural adjustments (via evolution or learning) to recover otherwise reduced fitness. Although effects of environmental change are often difficult to predict, we suggest that SDDT provides a useful route ahead.

  3. Rotorcraft Trajectory Tracking Using the State-Dependent Riccati Equation Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Joo; Sung, Sang Kyung; Yang, Chang Deok; Yu, Yung Hoon

    This paper deals with the State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) method for designing a rotorcraft flight controller. It focuses on the design of the SDRE controller when a highly complex rotorcraft mathematical model is used. The requirements of the rotorcraft model are investigated to design the SDRE controller and to validate the final designs. Since the SDRE method can be applied to a deterministic system, adequate fidelity in the rotorcraft mathematical model is crucial to guarantee controller performance. However, a complex mathematical model generally prevents us from analytically deriving the State Dependent Coefficient (SDC) form of the system equations, which conforms to the basic structure of the SDRE method. This paper proposes a pure numerical procedure for SDC factorization of the motion equation. The numerical methods available to solve the algebraic Riccati equation are selected to cope with the inherent system instability and are applied to the trajectory tracking problems. The overall feature of the present approach is highlighted through analysis of a bob-up and turn maneuver. The results can be utilized as a guide for appropriate selection of rotorcraft mathematical models and numerical methods in designing a robust SDRE controller.

  4. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  5. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  6. Morphine and DAMGO produce an opposite effect on presynaptic glutamate release via different downstream pathways of μ opioid receptors in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinhui; Yang, Hualan; Du, Xiaowei; Ma, Qianqian; Song, Jiaojiao; Chen, Ming; Dong, Yi; Ma, Lan; Zheng, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that different opioids, while acting μ opioid receptors, can activate distinct downstream responses, a phenomenon termed functional selectivity or biased agonism. The present study designed experiments to test whether the μ receptor agonist morphine and D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO) had a different effect on presynaptic glutamate release in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and whether this difference was due to their biased agonism at μ receptors. The results showed that DAMGO markedly decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in pyramidal cells of BLA. The concentration-dependence experiment showed that DAMGO dose-dependently decreased the frequency of sEPSCs. Morphine markedly increased the frequency of sEPSCs in pyramidal cells of BLA. The concentration-dependence experiment showed that morphine dose-dependently increased the frequency of sEPSCs. We also used PPF of EPSC as another indicator of presynaptic glutamate release to confirm the opposite effect of morphine and DAMGO on the glutamate release. Further mechanism studies showed that the opposite effect of morphine and DAMGO on the glutamate release was via the activation of μ receptors, but the downstream signaling pathways of μ receptors were different: DAMGO inhibited the glutamate release via μ receptor-Gi protein- PLA2-AA signaling pathway, whereas morphine promoted the glutamate release via μ receptor-Gi protein-PKC-ERK1/2-synapsin I signaling pathway.

  7. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  8. Deficits in the activity of presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors contribute to altered neuronal excitability in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Yong; Chadchankar, Jayashree; Vien, Thuy N; Mighdoll, Michelle I; Hyde, Thomas M; Mather, Robert J; Deeb, Tarek Z; Pangalos, Menelas N; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Moss, Stephen J

    2017-04-21

    The behavioral and anatomical deficits seen in fragile X syndrome (FXS) are widely believed to result from imbalances in the relative strengths of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Although modified neuronal excitability is thought to be of significance, the contribution that alterations in GABAergic inhibition play in the pathophysiology of FXS are ill defined. Slow sustained neuronal inhibition is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors, which are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors constructed from R1a and R2 or R1b and R2 subunits. Via the activation of Gi/o, they limit cAMP accumulation, diminish neurotransmitter release, and induce neuronal hyperpolarization. Here we reveal that selective deficits in R1a subunit expression are seen in Fmr1 knock-out mice (KO) mice, a widely used animal model of FXS, but the levels of the respective mRNAs were unaffected. Similar trends of R1a expression were seen in a subset of FXS patients. GABAB receptors (GABABRs) exert powerful pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory effects on neurotransmission. R1a-containing GABABRs are believed to mediate presynaptic inhibition in principal neurons. In accordance with this result, deficits in the ability of GABABRs to suppress glutamate release were seen in Fmr1-KO mice. In contrast, the ability of GABABRs to suppress GABA release and induce postsynaptic hyperpolarization was unaffected. Significantly, this deficit contributes to the pathophysiology of FXS as the GABABR agonist (R)-baclofen rescued the imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission evident in Fmr1-KO mice. Collectively, our results provided evidence that selective deficits in the activity of presynaptic GABABRs contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Calcium-activated potassium channels in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, D K; Blaustein, M P

    1985-01-01

    86Rb efflux was examined in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from rat brain in a study designed to assess K permeability (PK) changes sensitive to alterations in internal Ca activity. Rb efflux from 86Rb-loaded synaptosomes into nominally Ca-free physiological saline (PSS) containing 5 mM-K was about 0.3-0.4%/s. Raising extracellular K concentration [( K]o), to depolarize the synaptosomes, stimulated the 86Rb efflux. Addition of Ca to the 5 mM-K PSS had no effect, but Ca did further stimulate 86Rb efflux into K-rich solutions. The effect of Ca was graded, with apparent half-maximal activation, KA approximately equal to 0.5 mM-Ca. These data fit the view that, during depolarization, Ca enters the terminals through voltage-regulated Ca channels, and that the rise in intracellular Ca concentration opens certain (Ca-activated) K channels. The Ca-dependent stimulation of 86Rb efflux was greatest during the initial seconds of incubation (component CT), and then declined to a much lower rate (component CS). Much of this change in rate could be attributed to inactivation of voltage-regulated Ca channels and reduced entry of Ca. The Ca-dependent increase in 86Rb efflux was completely inhibited by 100 microM-La. In the presence of Ca, but not in its absence, the Ca ionophore A23187 stimulated 86Rb efflux both in 5 and 100 mM-K PSS. The effect in 100 mM-K was quantitatively greater, perhaps because of the increased outward driving force on Rb in depolarized synaptosomes. When synaptosomes were suspended in media containing the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye, DiS-C3-(5) (1,1'-dipentyl-2,2'-thiocarbocyanine), the addition of Ca+ A23187 decreased the fluorescence intensity (= synaptosome hyperpolarization) when the media contained 5 mM-K but not 100 mM-K. This implies that in the presence of Ca + A23187, PK was increased, and the membrane potential moved closer to the K equilibrium potential, EK. Quinine sulphate, a blocker of Ca-activated K channels

  10. Exponential stability for a class of state-dependent delay equations via the Crandall-Liggett approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louihi, M.; Hbid, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the exponential asymptotic stability of the solution of a class of differential equations with state dependent delays. Our approach is based on the Crandall-Liggett approximation and the properties of semigroups.

  11. Rotational state dependence of fluorescence from S 1 pyrazine: evidence for the role of spin-orbit-orbital rotation interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazima, Masahide; Lim, E. C.

    1986-06-01

    Experimental and computer simulation studies of the "biexponential fluorescence" from jet-cooled S 1 pyrazine indicate that the rotational state dependence of the Afast/ Aslow ratio has its primary origin in the spin-orbit-orbital rotational interactions.

  12. State-dependent variability of neuronal responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Pasley, Brian N; Allen, Elena A; Freeman, Ralph D

    2009-04-30

    Electrical brain stimulation is a promising tool for both experimental and clinical applications. However, the effects of stimulation on neuronal activity are highly variable and poorly understood. To investigate the basis of this variability, we performed extracellular recordings in the visual cortex following application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Our measurements of spiking and local field potential activity exhibit two types of response patterns which are characterized by the presence or absence of spontaneous discharge following stimulation. This variability can be partially explained by state-dependent effects, in which higher pre-TMS activity predicts larger post-TMS responses. These results reveal the possibility that variability in the neural response to TMS can be exploited to optimize the effects of stimulation. It is conceivable that this feature could be utilized in real time during the treatment of clinical disorders.

  13. State-dependent variability of neuronal responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pasley, Brian N.; Allen, Elena A.; Freeman, Ralph D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Electrical brain stimulation is a promising tool for both experimental and clinical applications. However, the effects of stimulation on neuronal activity are highly variable and poorly understood. To investigate the basis of this variability, we performed extracellular recordings in the visual cortex following application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Our measurements of spiking and local field potential activity exhibit two types of response patterns which are characterized by the presence or absence of spontaneous discharge following stimulation. This variability can be partially explained by state-dependent effects, in which higher pre-TMS activity predicts larger post-TMS responses. These results reveal the possibility that variability in the neural response to TMS can be exploited to optimize the effects of stimulation. It is conceivable that this feature could be utilized in real-time during the treatment of clinical disorders. PMID:19409273

  14. Redox state dependence of axial ligand dynamics in Nitrosomonas europaea cytochrome c552.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Bren, Kara L

    2013-12-12

    Analysis of NMR spectra reveals that the heme axial Met ligand orientation and dynamics in Nitrosomonas europaea cytochrome c552 (Ne cyt c) are dependent on the heme redox state. In the oxidized state, the heme axial Met is fluxional, interconverting between two conformers related to each other by inversion through the Met δS atom. In the reduced state, there is no evidence of fluxionality, with the Met occupying one conformation similar to that seen in the homologous Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551. Comparison of the observed and calculated pseudocontact shifts for oxidized Ne cyt c using the reduced protein structure as a reference structure reveals a redox-dependent change in the structure of the loop bearing the axial Met (loop 3). Analysis of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and existing structural data provides further support for the redox state dependence of the loop 3 structure. Implications for electron transfer function are discussed.

  15. Boundary control of bidomain equations with state-dependent switching source functions in the ionic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamakuri, Nagaiah; Engwer, Christian; Kunisch, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Optimal control for cardiac electrophysiology based on the bidomain equations in conjunction with the Fenton-Karma ionic model is considered. This generic ventricular model approximates well the restitution properties and spiral wave behavior of more complex ionic models of cardiac action potentials. However, it is challenging due to the appearance of state-dependent discontinuities in the source terms. A computational framework for the numerical realization of optimal control problems is presented. Essential ingredients are a shape calculus based treatment of the sensitivities of the discontinuous source terms and a marching cubes algorithm to track iso-surface of excitation wavefronts. Numerical results exhibit successful defibrillation by applying an optimally controlled extracellular stimulus.

  16. A proteomic approach reveals integrin activation state-dependent control of microtubule cortical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Koper, Ewa J.; Warwood, Stacey; Choi, Colin K.; Stroud, Matthew J.; Chen, Christopher S.; Knight, David; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin activation, which is regulated by allosteric changes in receptor conformation, enables cellular responses to the chemical, mechanical and topological features of the extracellular microenvironment. A global view of how activation state converts the molecular composition of the region proximal to integrins into functional readouts is, however, lacking. Here, using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, we report the isolation of integrin activation state-dependent complexes and their characterization by mass spectrometry. Quantitative comparisons, integrating network, clustering, pathway and image analyses, define multiple functional protein modules enriched in a conformation-specific manner. Notably, active integrin complexes are specifically enriched for proteins associated with microtubule-based functions. Visualization of microtubules on micropatterned surfaces and live cell imaging demonstrate that active integrins establish an environment that stabilizes microtubules at the cell periphery. These data provide a resource for the interrogation of the global molecular connections that link integrin activation to adhesion signalling. PMID:25609142

  17. Dynamical properties induced by state-dependent delays in photonic systems

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Llinàs, Jade; Porte, Xavier; Soriano, Miguel C.; Colet, Pere; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    In many dynamical systems and complex networks time delays appear naturally in feedback loops or coupling connections of individual elements. Moreover, in a whole class of systems, these delay times can depend on the state of the system. Nevertheless, so far the understanding of the impact of such state-dependent delays remains poor with a particular lack of systematic experimental studies. Here we fill this gap by introducing a conceptually simple photonic system that exhibits dynamics of self-organised switching between two loops with two different delay times, depending on the state of the system. On the basis of experiments and modelling on semiconductor lasers with frequency-selective feedback mirrors, we characterize the switching between the states defined by the individual delays. Our approach opens new perspectives for the study of this class of dynamical systems and enables applications in which the self-organized switching can be exploited. PMID:26081000

  18. Synchronization Control of Neural Networks With State-Dependent Coefficient Matrices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zhao, Xudong; Huang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    This brief is concerned with synchronization control of a class of neural networks with state-dependent coefficient matrices. Being different from the existing drive-response neural networks in the literature, a novel model of drive-response neural networks is established. The concepts of uniformly ultimately bounded (UUB) synchronization and convex hull Lyapunov function are introduced. Then, by using the convex hull Lyapunov function approach, the UUB synchronization design of the drive-response neural networks is proposed, and a delay-independent control law guaranteeing the bounded synchronization of the neural networks is constructed. All present conditions are formulated in terms of bilinear matrix inequalities. By comparison, it is shown that the neural networks obtained in this brief are less conservative than those ones in the literature, and the bounded synchronization is suitable for the novel drive-response neural networks. Finally, an illustrative example is given to verify the validity of the obtained results.

  19. Dynamical properties induced by state-dependent delays in photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Llinàs, Jade; Porte, Xavier; Soriano, Miguel C.; Colet, Pere; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-06-01

    In many dynamical systems and complex networks time delays appear naturally in feedback loops or coupling connections of individual elements. Moreover, in a whole class of systems, these delay times can depend on the state of the system. Nevertheless, so far the understanding of the impact of such state-dependent delays remains poor with a particular lack of systematic experimental studies. Here we fill this gap by introducing a conceptually simple photonic system that exhibits dynamics of self-organised switching between two loops with two different delay times, depending on the state of the system. On the basis of experiments and modelling on semiconductor lasers with frequency-selective feedback mirrors, we characterize the switching between the states defined by the individual delays. Our approach opens new perspectives for the study of this class of dynamical systems and enables applications in which the self-organized switching can be exploited.

  20. Electrophysiological identification of the functional presynaptic nerve terminals on an isolated single vasopressin neurone of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, T; Yokoyama, T; Fujihara, H; Suzuki, H; Ueta, Y

    2010-05-01

    Release of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin from magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is under the control of glutamate-dependent excitation and GABA-dependent inhibition. The possible role of the synaptic terminals attached to SON neurones has been investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp recording in in vitro rat brain slice preparations. Recent evidence has provided new insights into the repercussions of glial environment modifications on the physiology of MNCs at the synaptic level in the SON. In the present study, excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic synaptic inputs were recorded from an isolated single SON neurone cultured for 12 h, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Neurones expressed an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in MNCs. In addition, native synaptic terminals attached to a dissociated AVP-eGFP neurone were visualised with synaptic vesicle markers. These results suggest that the function of presynaptic nerve terminals may be evaluated directly in a single AVP-eGFP neurone. These preparations would be helpful in future studies aiming to electrophysiologically distinguish between the functions of synaptic terminals and glial modifications in the SON neurones.

  1. State-dependent block of Na+ channels by articaine via the local anesthetic receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Calderon, Joanna; Jaw, Shiow-Jiin; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2009-05-01

    Articaine is widely used as a local anesthetic (LA) in dentistry, but little is known regarding its blocking actions on Na+ channels. We therefore examined the state-dependent block of articaine first in rat skeletal muscle rNav1.4 Na+ channels expressed in Hek293t cells. Articaine exhibited a weak block of resting rNav1.4 Na+ channels at -140 mV with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 378 +/- 26 microM (n = 5). The affinity was higher for inactivated Na+ channels measured at -70 mV with an IC50 value of 40.6 +/- 2.7 microM (n = 5). The open-channel block by articaine was measured using inactivation-deficient rNav1.4 Na+ channels with an IC50 value of 15.8 +/- 1.5 microM (n = 5). Receptor mapping demonstrated that articaine interacted strongly with a D4S6 phenylalanine residue, which is known to form a part of the LA receptor. Thus the block of rNav1.4 Na+ channels by articaine is via the conserved LA receptor in a highly state-dependent manner, with a ranking order of open (23.9x) > inactivated (9.3x) > resting (1x) state. Finally, the open-channel block by articaine was likewise measured in inactivation-deficient hNav1.7 and rNav1.8 Na+ channels, with IC(50) values of 8.8 +/- 0.1 and 22.0 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively (n = 5), indicating that the high-affinity open-channel block by articaine is indeed preserved in neuronal Na+ channel isoforms.

  2. In silico assessment of kinetics and state dependent binding properties of drugs causing acquired LQTS.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; Mann, Stefan A; Windley, Monique J; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Hill, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    The Kv11.1 or hERG potassium channel is responsible for one of the major repolarising currents (IKr) in cardiac myocytes. Drug binding to hERG can result in reduction in IKr, action potential prolongation, acquired long QT syndrome and fatal cardiac arrhythmias. The current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of drugs in development is based on the measurement of the drug concentration that causes 50% current block, i.e., IC50. However, drugs with the same apparent IC50 may have very different kinetics of binding and unbinding, as well as different affinities for the open and inactivated states of Kv11.1. Therefore, IC50 measurements may not reflect the true risk of drug induced arrhythmias. Here we have used an in silico approach to test the hypothesis that drug binding kinetics and differences in state-dependent affinity will influence the extent of cardiac action potential prolongation independent of apparent IC50 values. We found, in general that drugs with faster overall kinetics and drugs with higher affinity for the open state relative to the inactivated state cause more action potential prolongation. These characteristics of drug-hERG interaction are likely to be more arrhythmogenic but cannot be predicted by IC50 measurement alone. Our results suggest that the pre-clinical assessment of Kv11.1-drug interactions should include descriptions of the kinetics and state dependence of drug binding. Further, incorporation of this information into sophisticated in silico models should be able to better predict arrhythmia risk and therefore more accurately assess safety of new drugs in development.

  3. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V.; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca2+ cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca2+ re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100–200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50µM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100–200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  4. Pentylenetetrazol produces a state-dependent conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Chester, Julia A; Coon, Laran E

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal could be detected in mice using the place conditioning procedure and whether the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), would increase the aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal and increase the probability of detecting conditioned place aversion. Subjects were alcohol-naïve mice from a specific line selectively bred for low alcohol preference (LAP1; n=91) and were assigned to three groups: alcohol withdrawal, PTZ alone, and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal. On four trials, mice received either a 4.0 g/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (alcohol withdrawal, PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups) or saline (PTZ group) 8 h prior to being placed on a distinctive floor texture for a 30-min conditioning session. Five minutes before these sessions, mice in the PTZ and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups received PTZ (5.0 mg/kg; i.p.) and the alcohol withdrawal group received saline. On intervening days mice received two saline injections at the same time points prior to being placed on a different floor texture. Post-conditioning floor preference was assessed in two 60-min tests; the first test was drug-free and the second test was state-dependent. Neither alcohol withdrawal nor PTZ produced significant place conditioning. The PTZ+alcohol withdrawal group showed a significant place aversion during the state-dependent test. These data suggest that the combined stimulus properties of PTZ and alcohol withdrawal facilitated the expression of conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate-and state-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Dieterich, J.H., 1992. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate- and state-dependent strength. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 115-134. Faults with rate- and state-dependent constitutive properties reproduce a range of observed fault slip phenomena including spontaneous nucleation of slip instabilities at stresses above some critical stress level and recovery of strength following slip instability. Calculations with a plane-strain fault model with spatially varying properties demonstrate that accelerating slip precedes instability and becomes localized to a fault patch. The dimensions of the fault patch follow scaling relations for the minimum critical length for unstable fault slip. The critical length is a function of normal stress, loading conditions and constitutive parameters which include Dc, the characteristic slip distance. If slip starts on a patch that exceeds the critical size, the length of the rapidly accelerating zone tends to shrink to the characteristic size as the time of instability approaches. Solutions have been obtained for a uniform, fixed-patch model that are in good agreement with results from the plane-strain model. Over a wide range of conditions, above the steady-state stress, the logarithm of the time to instability linearly decreases as the initial stress increases. Because nucleation patch length and premonitory displacement are proportional to Dc, the moment of premonitory slip scales by D3c. The scaling of Dc is currently an open question. Unless Dc for earthquake faults is significantly greater than that observed on laboratory faults, premonitory strain arising from the nucleation process for earthquakes may by too small to detect using current observation methods. Excluding the possibility that Dc in the nucleation zone controls the magnitude of the subsequent earthquake, then the source dimensions of the smallest

  6. The involvement of dorsal hippocampus in dextromethorphan-induced state-dependent learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Ownegh, Vahid; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ownegh, Farid

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand the effect of dextromethorphan (DM; 3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan), a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on memory retrieval, male NMRI mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intra-CA1 injection of this drug before or after training and before testing in passive avoidance task. Pre-training i.p. (20mg/kg) or intra-CA1 (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse) administration of DM induced amnesia in a dose-dependent manner. Post-training i.p. (10 and 20mg/kg) or intra-CA administration of DM (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse) however, did not affect the memory retrieval. Moreover, memory retrieval was impaired in animals receiving either i.p. (20mg/kg) or intra-CA1 administration of DM (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse) prior to testing, suggesting the DM-induced amnesia. Interestingly, the amnestic effect of pre-training i.p. (20mg/kg) or intra-CA1 administration of DM (1 μg/mouse) was restored in mice receiving pre-test i.p. (5 and 10mg/kg) or intra-CA1 (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) administration of the drug, indicating DM-induced state-dependent learning. Taken together, it can be concluded that DM administration impairs memory retrieval in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, DM can induce state-dependent learning. Dorsal hippocampus appears to play an important role upon DM influence of learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain State-Dependent Closed-Loop Modulation of Paired Associative Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Royter, Vladislav; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI)-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects—sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD), and TMS-induced peripheral responses—motor-evoked potentials (MEP). However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold (RMT)) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) was controlled by beta-band (16–22 Hz) ERD during MI of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC) of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain state-dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied. Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation (PAS) in the context of neurorehabilitation. PMID

  8. Extinction-induced neuroplasticity attenuates stress-induced cocaine seeking: a state-dependent learning hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Self, David W; Choi, Kwang-Ho

    2004-09-01

    Chronic drug use weakens excitatory neocortical input to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We previously reported that extinction training, a form of inhibitory learning that progressively reduces cocaine-seeking behaviour when reward is withheld, reverses this deficit by up-regulating GluR1 and GluR2/3 subunits of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors in the NAc. The level of GluR1 up-regulation is positively associated with a reduction in cocaine seeking, suggesting that extinction-induced up-regulation in AMPA receptors in the NAc opposes motivational influences that maintain cocaine seeking. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that over-expression of GluR1 and GluR2 in the NAc facilitates extinction of cocaine self-administration. Furthermore, a single extinction training session conducted during GluR1 and GluR2 over-expression strongly and selectively attenuates the ability of an environmental stressor to trigger relapse to cocaine seeking long after GluR1 and GluR2 over-expression declines. These results could suggest that excitatory input to the NAc promotes extinction learning, but only when memory is recalled under stressful situations. Recent studies indicate that both environmental stress and the frustrative stress of withholding reward during extinction of drug self-administration induce similar neurochemical events in the NAc. These neurochemical events could impose a "state-dependency" on extinction learning such that subsequent exposure to stress acts as a cue to enhance retrieval of extinction memory. Our results suggest that extinction-induced up-regulation in NAc AMPA receptors acts reciprocally to facilitate state-dependent extinction learning, as stressful situations evoke extinction memories that exert powerful inhibitory control over drug-seeking behaviour. These results may have important therapeutic implications for behaviour-based approaches aimed at treating drug addiction.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  10. Regulation of presynaptic terminal organization by C. elegans RPM-1, a putative guanine nucleotide exchanger with a RING-H2 finger domain.

    PubMed

    Zhen, M; Huang, X; Bamber, B; Jin, Y

    2000-05-01

    Presynaptic terminals contain highly organized subcellular structures to facilitate neurotransmitter release. In C. elegans, the typical presynaptic terminal has an electron-dense active zone surrounded by synaptic vesicles. Loss-of-function mutations in the rpm-1 gene result in abnormally structured presynaptic terminals in GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), most often manifested as a single presynaptic terminal containing multiple active zones. The RPM-1 protein has an RCC1-like guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) domain and a RING-H2 finger. RPM-1 is most similar to the Drosophila presynaptic protein Highwire (HIW) and the mammalian Myc binding protein Pam. RPM-1 is localized to the presynaptic region independent of synaptic vesicles and functions cell autonomously. The temperature-sensitive period of rpm-1 coincides with the time of synaptogenesis. rpm-1 may regulate the spatial arrangement, or restrict the formation, of presynaptic structures.

  11. A Web of Drones: A 2040 Strategy to Reduce the United States Dependance on Space Based Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-17

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY A WEB OF DRONES: A 2040 STRATEGY TO REDUCE THE UNITED STATES DEPENDANCE ON SPACE BASED CAPABILITIES by...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Web Of Drones: A 2040 Strategy To Reduce The United States Dependance On Space Based...mission is to form an interconnected web over the battlefield will provide the critical warfighting services of precision navigation and timing (PNT

  12. Modulation of presynaptic action potential kinetics underlies synaptic facilitation of type B photoreceptors after associative conditioning in Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, C C; Matzel, L D

    2000-03-01

    -cell action potential by a reduction of I(A) was sufficient to account for the observed synaptic facilitation. The occlusion of the effects of 4-AP by paired training was not attributable to a saturation of the capacity of the B-cell for transmitter exocytosis, because it was observed that tetraethylammonium (TEA)-induced inhibition of the delayed voltage-dependent K(+) current induced both spike broadening and synaptic facilitation regardless of training history. Collectively, these results demonstrate that training-induced facilitation at B-cell synapses is attributable to the effects of a reduction of a presynaptic K(+) conductance on action potential kinetics and suggest another critical similarity between the cellular basis for learning in Hermissenda and other invertebrate systems.

  13. Dopamine D1 Receptors Are Not Critical for Opiate Reward but Can Mediate Opiate Memory Retrieval in a State-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Perez, Hector; George, Susan R.; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Although D1 receptor knockout mice demonstrate normal morphine place preferences, antagonism of basolateral amygdala (BLA) D1 receptors only during drug-naive rat conditioning has been reported to inhibit the expression of a morphine place preference. One possible explanation for this result is state-dependent learning. That is, the omission of the intra-BLA infusion cue during testing — which acts as a potent discriminative stimulus — may have prevented the recall of a morphine-environment association and therefore, the consequent expression of a morphine place preference. To examine this possibility, we tested whether intra-BLA infusion of the D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 during both training and testing might reveal a morphine place preference. Our results suggest that in previously drug-naive animals, D1 receptor antagonism during testing restores the opiate conditioned place preference that is normally absent when D1 receptors are blocked only during training, suggesting that BLA D1 receptors can mediate state-dependent memory retrieval. PMID:23538064

  14. Inhibition of noradrenaline release by lysergic acid diethylamide

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.

    1973-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) inhibits the release of labelled noradrenaline from the guinea-pig vas deferens during intramural nerve stimulation and causes a corresponding reduction in the contractions of the smooth muscle. These effects of LSD are most prominent at low stimulus frequencies and they are prevented by treatment with phentolamine. It is concluded that LSD inhibits noradrenaline release by interacting with presynaptic α-adrenoceptors. PMID:4788042

  15. DGKθ Catalytic Activity is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Hana L.; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.; Raben, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian central nervous system in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity and its byproduct, phosphatidic acid, at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Together these data suggest DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  16. Enhancement of presynaptic performance in transgenic Drosophila overexpressing heat shock protein Hsp70.

    PubMed

    Karunanithi, Shanker; Barclay, Jeffrey W; Brown, Ian R; Robertson, R Meldrum; Atwood, Harold L

    2002-04-01

    Prior heat shock confers protection to Drosophila synapses during subsequent heat stress by stabilizing quantal size and reducing the decline of quantal emission at individual synaptic boutons. The major heat shock protein Hsp70, which is strongly induced by high temperatures in Drosophila, may be responsible for this synaptic protection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated synaptic protection and stabilization at larval neuromuscular junctions of transgenic Drosophila which produce more than the normal amount of Hsp70 in response to heat shock. Overexpression of Hsp70 coincides with enhanced protection of presynaptic performance, assayed by measuring mean quantal content and percentage success of transmission. Quantal size was not selectively altered, indicating no effects of overexpression on postsynaptic performance. Thus, presynaptic mechanisms can be protected by manipulating levels of Hsp70, which would provide stability to neural circuits otherwise susceptible to heat stress. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A.; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C.; Hell, Stefan W.; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M.; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  18. Phencyclidine in low doses selectively blocks a presynaptic voltage-regulated potassium channel in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, D K; Blaustein, M P

    1986-01-01

    Phencylidine (PCP) is a major drug of abuse in the United States. It produces a toxic confusional psychosis in man. We show here that nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of PCP and behaviorally active congeners selectively block voltage-regulated noninactivating (or very slowly inactivating) presynaptic K channels in the brain. The rank order of potency for blockage of these K channels parallels both the relative ability of these agents to produce characteristic behavioral deficits in rats and their ability to displace [3H]PCP from its high-affinity binding sites in brain. In view of the enhanced voltage-gated Ca influx that would be expected to accompany blockage of presynaptic K channels, this mechanism could explain the excessive neurotransmitter release that is characteristic of PCP intoxication. PMID:2417237

  19. Presynaptic NMDA Receptors: Newly Appreciated Roles in Cortical Synaptic Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Corlew, Rebekah; Brasier, Daniel J.; Feldman, Daniel E.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2009-01-01

    Many aspects of synaptic development, plasticity, and neurotransmission are critically influenced by NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Moreover, dysfunction of NMDARs has been implicated in a broad array of neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, stroke, epilepsy, and neuropathic pain. Classically, NMDARs were thought to be exclusively postsynaptic. However, substantial evidence in the last 10 years demonstrates that NMDARs also exist presynaptically, and that presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) modulate synapse function and have critical roles in plasticity at many synapses. Here we review current knowledge of the role of preNMDARs in synaptic transmission and plasticity, focusing on the neocortex. We discuss the prevalence, function, and development of these receptors, and their potential modification by experience and in brain pathology. PMID:19029059

  20. Hippocampal long-term potentiation is not accompanied by presynaptic spike broadening, unlike synaptic potentiation by K+ channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Laerum, H; Storm, J F

    1994-02-21

    The expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is thought to be at least partly due to increased transmitter release. To test whether this increase is due to a broadening of the presynaptic action potential, we have compared the presynaptic fibre volley before and after LTP induction, or application of K+ channel blockers, in CA1 of rat hippocampal slices. Tetraethylammonium (TEA; 1 mM) induced a parallel increase in the fibre volley duration of the slope of the field EPSP, indicating that a presynaptic spike broadening underlying synaptic potentiation can be detected. In contrast, induction of LTP did not produce any measurable change in the fibre volley, although the average increase in the EPSP slope was larger than with TEA. These results indicate that LTP expression is not primarily due to a presynaptic spike broadening.

  1. Modulation of dopamine and noradrenaline release and of intracellular Ca2+ concentration by presynaptic glutamate receptors in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Malva, J O; Carvalho, A P; Carvalho, C M

    1994-12-01

    1. We studied the release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) from hippocampal synaptosomes induced by glutamate receptors and the associated Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ channels. The release of tritiated neurotransmitters was studied by use of superfusion system and the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined by a fluorimetric assay with Indo-1 as a probe for Ca2+. 2. Presynaptic glutamate receptor activation induced Ca(2+)-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-NA from rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Thus, L-glutamate induced the release of both neurotransmitters in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 = 5.62 microM), and the effect of 100 microM L-glutamate was inhibited by 83.8% in the presence of 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine (CNQX), but was not affected by 1 microM (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801). 3. Other glutamate receptor agonists also stimulated the Ca(2+)-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-NA as follows: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), at 200 microM, released 3.65 +/- 0.23% of the total 3H catecholamines, and this effect was inhibited by 81.2% in the presence of 1 microM MK-801; quisqualate (50 microM), S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionic acid (AMPA) (100 microM) or kainate (100 microM) released 1.57 +/- 0.26%, 1.93 +/- 0.17% and 2.09 +/- 0.22%, of the total 3H catecholamines, respectively. 4. The ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist, AMPA, induced an increase in the [Ca2+]i which was inhibited by 58.6% in the presence of 10 microM CNQX. In contrast, the increase in [Ca2+]i due to stimulation by glutamate was not sensitive to CNQX or MK-801.5. Nitrendipine, at I JAM, did not inhibit the neurotransmitter release induced by AMPA, but, both 0.5 micro M -conotoxin GVIA (w-CgTx) and 100 nM w-Aga IVA reduced catecholamine release to 49.03 +/- 3.79% and 46.06 +/- 10.51% of the control, respectively. In the presence of both toxins the release was

  2. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature. PMID:27630571

  3. Mechanism of Calcium Current Modulation Underlying Presynaptic Facilitation and Behavioral Sensitization in Aplysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marc; Kandel, Eric R.

    1980-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia is caused by presynaptic facilitation at the synapses of the mechanoreceptor sensory neurons of the reflex onto the motor neurons and interneurons. The presynaptic facilitation has been shown to be simulated by serotonin (the putative presynaptic facilitatory transmitter) and by cyclic AMP and to be accompanied by an increase in the Ca2+ current of sensory neuron cell bodies exposed to tetraethylammonium. This increase in the Ca2+ current could result from either a direct action on the Ca2+ channel or an action on an opposing K+ current. Here we report voltage clamp experiments which indicate that the increase in Ca2+ current associated with presynaptic facilitation results from a decrease in a K+ current. Stimulation of the connective (the pathway that mediates sensitization) or application of serotonin causes a decrease in a voltage-sensitive, steady-state outward current measured under voltage clamp as well as an increase in the transient net inward and a decrease in the transient outward currents elicited by brief depolarizing command steps. The reversal potential of the steady-state synaptic current is sensitive to extracellular K+ concentration, and both the steady-state synaptic current and the changes in the transient currents are blocked by K+ current blocking agents and by washout of K+. These results suggest that serotonin and the natural transmitter released by connective stimulation act to decrease a voltage-sensitive K+ current. The decrease in K+ current prolongs the action potential, and this in turn increases the duration of the inward Ca2+ current and thereby enhances transmitter release.

  4. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    of excitatory synaptic transmission onto dentate granule cells in slices from chronically epileptic rats, while no significant effect was detected...thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1) promoter, which drives expression of SpH in granule cells of dentate gyrus and their mossy fiber axons and presynaptic...the the Garrido-Sanabria laboratory to examine its importance to excitatory activation of dentate granule cells using whole-cell recordings (Task 2

  5. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0356 TITLE: New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target...Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0356 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a major long-term complication of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), which are often suffered by members of the Armed Forces

  6. Presynaptic localization of neprilysin contributes to efficient clearance of amyloid-beta peptide in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Nobuhisa; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Shirotani, Keiro; Takaki, Yoshie; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P; Gerard, Craig; Ozawa, Keiya; Saido, Takaomi C

    2004-01-28

    A local increase in amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is closely associated with synaptic dysfunction in the brain in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report on the catabolic mechanism of Abeta at the presynaptic sites. Neprilysin, an Abeta-degrading enzyme, expressed by recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, was axonally transported to presynaptic sites through afferent projections of neuronal circuits. This gene transfer abolished the increase in Abeta levels in the hippocampal formations of neprilysin-deficient mice and also reduced the increase in young mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. In the latter case, Abeta levels in the hippocampal formation contralateral to the vector-injected side were also significantly reduced as a result of transport of neprilysin from the ipsilateral side, and in both sides soluble Abeta was degraded more efficiently than insoluble Abeta. Furthermore, amyloid deposition in aged mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice was remarkably decelerated. Thus, presynaptic neprilysin has been demonstrated to degrade Abeta efficiently and to retard development of amyloid pathology.

  7. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry.

  8. Netrin and Frazzled regulate presynaptic gap junctions at a Drosophila giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brian O; Borgen, Melissa A; Caruccio, Phyllis M; Murphey, Rodney K

    2014-04-16

    Netrin and its receptor, Frazzled, dictate the strength of synaptic connections in the giant fiber system (GFS) of Drosophila melanogaster by regulating gap junction localization in the presynaptic terminal. In Netrin mutant animals, the synaptic coupling between a giant interneuron and the "jump" motor neuron was weakened and dye coupling between these two neurons was severely compromised or absent. In cases in which Netrin mutants displayed apparently normal synaptic anatomy, half of the specimens exhibited physiologically defective synapses and dye coupling between the giant fiber (GF) and the motor neuron was reduced or eliminated, suggesting that gap junctions were disrupted in the Netrin mutants. When we examined the gap junctions with antibodies to Shaking-B (ShakB) Innexin, they were significantly decreased or absent in the presynaptic terminal of the mutant GF. Frazzled loss of function mutants exhibited similar defects in synaptic transmission, dye coupling, and gap junction localization. These data are the first to show that Netrin and Frazzled regulate the placement of gap junctions presynaptically at a synapse.

  9. Mitochondrial support of persistent presynaptic vesicle mobilization with age-dependent synaptic growth after LTP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L; Bourne, Jennifer N; Cao, Guan; Chirillo, Michael A; Ostroff, Linnaea E; Watson, Deborah J; Harris, Kristen M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria support synaptic transmission through production of ATP, sequestration of calcium, synthesis of glutamate, and other vital functions. Surprisingly, less than 50% of hippocampal CA1 presynaptic boutons contain mitochondria, raising the question of whether synapses without mitochondria can sustain changes in efficacy. To address this question, we analyzed synapses from postnatal day 15 (P15) and adult rat hippocampus that had undergone theta-burst stimulation to produce long-term potentiation (TBS-LTP) and compared them to control or no stimulation. At 30 and 120 min after TBS-LTP, vesicles were decreased only in presynaptic boutons that contained mitochondria at P15, and vesicle decrement was greatest in adult boutons containing mitochondria. Presynaptic mitochondrial cristae were widened, suggesting a sustained energy demand. Thus, mitochondrial proximity reflected enhanced vesicle mobilization well after potentiation reached asymptote, in parallel with the apparently silent addition of new dendritic spines at P15 or the silent enlargement of synapses in adults. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15275.001 PMID:27991850

  10. Distinct circuit-dependent functions of presynaptic neurexin-3 at GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Jason; Földy, Csaba; Ilcus, Silviana Maria Ciurea; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    α- and β-neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules whose general importance for synaptic transmission is well documented. The specific functions of neurexins, however, remain largely unknown because no conditional neurexin knockouts are available, and because targeting all α- and β-neurexins produced by a particular gene is challenging. Using newly-generated constitutive and conditional knockout mice that target all neurexin-3α and -3β isoforms, we here show that neurexin-3 is differentially required for distinct synaptic functions in different brain regions. Specifically, we find that in cultured neurons and acute slices of the hippocampus, presynaptic neurexin-3 mediates trans-synaptic regulation of postsynaptic AMPA-receptors via its extracellular sequences. In cultured neurons and acute slices of the olfactory bulb, however, presynaptic neurexin-3 is selectively required for GABA release by a mechanism involving its intracellular sequences. Thus, our data demonstrate that neurexin-3 performs distinct essential pre- or postsynaptic functions in different brain regions by distinct mechanisms. PMID:26030848

  11. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    PubMed

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  12. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets.

  14. Kv1.1 channelopathy abolishes presynaptic spike width modulation by subthreshold somatic depolarization.

    PubMed

    Vivekananda, Umesh; Novak, Pavel; Bello, Oscar D; Korchev, Yuri E; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2017-02-28

    Although action potentials propagate along axons in an all-or-none manner, subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations at the soma affect neurotransmitter release from synaptic boutons. An important mechanism underlying analog-digital modulation is depolarization-mediated inactivation of presynaptic Kv1-family potassium channels, leading to action potential broadening and increased calcium influx. Previous studies have relied heavily on recordings from blebs formed after axon transection, which may exaggerate the passive propagation of somatic depolarization. We recorded instead from small boutons supplied by intact axons identified with scanning ion conductance microscopy in primary hippocampal cultures and asked how distinct potassium channels interact in determining the basal spike width and its modulation by subthreshold somatic depolarization. Pharmacological or genetic deletion of Kv1.1 broadened presynaptic spikes without preventing further prolongation by brief depolarizing somatic prepulses. A heterozygous mouse model of episodic ataxia type 1 harboring a dominant Kv1.1 mutation had a similar broadening effect on basal spike shape as deletion of Kv1.1; however, spike modulation by somatic prepulses was abolished. These results argue that the Kv1.1 subunit is not necessary for subthreshold modulation of spike width. However, a disease-associated mutant subunit prevents the interplay of analog and digital transmission, possibly by disrupting the normal stoichiometry of presynaptic potassium channels.

  15. Membrane lipids tune synaptic transmission by direct modulation of presynaptic potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Lanore, Frederic; Rebola, Nelson; Szabo, Zsolt; Da Silva, Silvia Viana; Lourenço, Joana; Verraes, Agathe; Nadler, André; Schultz, Carsten; Blanchet, Christophe; Mulle, Christophe

    2014-02-19

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are involved in action potential (AP) repolarization in excitable cells. Exogenous application of membrane-derived lipids, such as arachidonic acid (AA), regulates the gating of Kv channels. Whether membrane-derived lipids released under physiological conditions have an impact on neuronal coding through this mechanism is unknown. We show that AA released in an activity-dependent manner from postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells acts as retrograde messenger, inducing a robust facilitation of mossy fiber (Mf) synaptic transmission over several minutes. AA acts by broadening presynaptic APs through the direct modulation of Kv channels. This form of short-term plasticity can be triggered when postsynaptic cell fires with physiologically relevant patterns and sets the threshold for the induction of the presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal Mf synapses. Hence, direct modulation of presynaptic Kv channels by activity-dependent release of lipids serves as a physiological mechanism for tuning synaptic transmission.

  16. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07266.001 PMID:26159615

  17. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-07-10

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation.

  18. Lrp4 is a retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation at neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Norihiro; Kim, Natalie; Burden, Steven J

    2012-09-20

    Motor axons receive retrograde signals from skeletal muscle that are essential for the differentiation and stabilization of motor nerve terminals. Identification of these retrograde signals has proved elusive, but their production by muscle depends on the receptor tyrosine kinase, MuSK (muscle, skeletal receptor ty