Science.gov

Sample records for station service water

  1. Space Station Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Charles E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The manned Space Station will exist as an isolated system for periods of up to 90 days. During this period, safe drinking water and breathable air must be provided for an eight member crew. Because of the large mass involved, it is not practical to consider supplying the Space Station with water from Earth. Therefore, it is necessary to depend upon recycled water to meet both the human and nonhuman water needs on the station. Sources of water that will be recycled include hygiene water, urine, and cabin humidity condensate. A certain amount of fresh water can be produced by CO2 reduction process. Additional fresh water will be introduced into the total pool by way of food, because of the free water contained in food and the water liberated by metabolic oxidation of the food. A panel of scientists and engineers with extensive experience in the various aspects of wastewater reuse was assembled for a 2 day workshop at NASA-Johnson. The panel included individuals with expertise in toxicology, chemistry, microbiology, and sanitary engineering. A review of Space Station water reclamation systems was provided.

  2. Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying highcapacity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying high-capacity electrically driven water pumps for fire fighting service - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Booster Station, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Standardized Curriculum for Service Station Retailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for service station retailing was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all service station retailing programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for service station retailing I and II courses.…

  4. Servicing Capability for the Evolutionary Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, George; Corbo, Jim; Martin, Deborah; Levin, Lenny

    1990-01-01

    User servicing for Space Station Freedom (SSF) will span an evolutionary period paralleling that of the station's growth plan. This will include a baseline servicing configuration followed by a final growth phase in which all user servicing requirements are satisfied. Although the basic requirements for user servicing are not station configuration dependent, the emphasis placed on different aspects of servicing may change with the eventual SSF growth objectives. This paper will discuss the servicing requirements and how they will be satisfied by Freedom baseline and growth capabilities. The accomodation of the growth servicing elements will be addressed, including the required hooks and scars to implement these growth servicing capabilities.

  5. 47 CFR 80.123 - Service to stations on land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service to stations on land. 80.123 Section 80... Stations § 80.123 Service to stations on land. Marine VHF public coast stations, including AMTS coast stations, may provide service to stations on land in accordance with the following: (a) The public...

  6. Space Station solar water heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, D. C.; Somers, Richard E.; Haynes, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of directly converting solar energy for crew water heating on the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and other human-tended missions such as a geosynchronous space station, lunar base, or Mars spacecraft was investigated. Computer codes were developed to model the systems, and a proof-of-concept thermal vacuum test was conducted to evaluate system performance in an environment simulating the SSF. The results indicate that a solar water heater is feasible. It could provide up to 100 percent of the design heating load without a significant configuration change to the SSF or other missions. The solar heater system requires only 15 percent of the electricity that an all-electric system on the SSF would require. This allows a reduction in the solar array or a surplus of electricity for onboard experiments.

  7. 47 CFR 80.107 - Service of private coast stations and marine-utility stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service of private coast stations and marine... Operating Procedures-Land Stations § 80.107 Service of private coast stations and marine-utility stations. A private coast station or a marine-utility station is authorized to transmit messages necessary for...

  8. 47 CFR 80.107 - Service of private coast stations and marine-utility stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service of private coast stations and marine... Operating Procedures-Land Stations § 80.107 Service of private coast stations and marine-utility stations. A private coast station or a marine-utility station is authorized to transmit messages necessary for...

  9. NASA's Plum Brook Station Water Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puzak, Robert M.; Kimpton, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Plum Brook Station's water systems were built in the 1940s to support a World War II ordnance production complex. Because the systems had not been analyzed for current NASA usage, it was unknown if they could meet current requirements and codes or if they were efficient for current use. NASA wanted to determine what improvements would be needed or advisable to support its research projects, so it contracted a hydraulic analysis of the raw and domestic water systems. Burgess and Niple determined current water demands and water flow, developed and calibrated models of the two water systems, and evaluated efficiency improvements and cost-cutting options. They recommended replacing some water mains, installing a new service connection, and removing some high-maintenance items (an underground reservoir, some booster pumps, and a tower).

  10. Service Station Attendant. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, John

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 24 terminal objectives for a basic secondary level service station attendant course. The materials were developed for a two-semester course (2 and 3 hours daily). The specialized classroom and shop experiences are designed to enable the student…

  11. Regeneration of water at space stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, A. I.; Sinyak, Yu. E.; Samsonov, N. M.; Bobe, L. S.; Protasov, N. N.; Andreychuk, P. O.

    2011-05-01

    The history, current status and future prospects of water recovery at space stations are discussed. Due to energy, space and mass limitations physical/chemical processes have been used and will be used in water recovery systems of space stations in the near future. Based on the experience in operation of Russian space stations Salut, Mir and International space station (ISS) the systems for water recovery from humidity condensate and urine are described. A perspective physical/chemical system for water supply will be composed of an integrated system for water recovery from humidity condensate, green house condensate, water from carbon dioxide reduction system and condensate from urine system; a system for water reclamation from urine; hygiene water processing system and a water storage system. Innovative processes and new water recovery systems intended for Lunar and Mars missions have to be tested on the international space station.

  12. Robotic mobile servicing platform for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, S. H.; Vanerden, L.

    1987-01-01

    The semi-autonomous inspection and servicing of the Space Station's major thermal, electrical, mechanical subsystems are critical needs for the safe and reliable operation of the station. A conceptual design is presented of a self-intelligent, small and highly mobile robotic platform. Equipped with suitable inspection sensors (cameras, ammonia detectors, etc.), this system's primary mission is to perform routine, autonomous inspection of the Station's primary subsystems. Typical tasks include detection of leaks from thermal fluid or refueling lines, as well as detection of micro-meteroid damage to the primary structure. Equipped with stereo cameras and a dexterous manipulator, simple teleoperator repairs and small On-orbit Replacement Unit (ORU) changeout can also be accomplished. More difficult robotic repairs would be left to the larger, more sophisticated Mobile Remote Manipulator System (MRMS). An ancillary function is to ferry crew members and equipment around the station. The primary design objectives were to provide a flexible, but uncomplicated robotic platform, one which caused minimal impact to the design of the Station's primary structure but could accept more advanced telerobotic technology as it evolves.

  13. 18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view to the northeast. Note the circuit breaker switch on cart in left corner of photograph. This switch is part of the motor control center which has been temporarily removed from the slot marked with a tag that is visible at lower left end of control center. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  14. Solar water heater for NASA's Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Richard E.; Haynes, R. Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of using a solar water heater for NASA's Space Station is investigated using computer codes developed to model the Space Station configuration, orbit, and heating systems. Numerous orbit variations, system options, and geometries for the collector were analyzed. Results show that a solar water heater, which would provide 100 percent of the design heating load and would not impose a significant impact on the Space Station overall design is feasible. A heat pipe or pumped fluid radial plate collector of about 10-sq m, placed on top of the habitat module was found to be well suited for satisfying water demand of the Space Station. Due to the relatively small area required by a radial plate, a concentrator is unnecessary. The system would use only 7 to 10 percent as much electricity as an electric water-heating system.

  15. NASA Alternate Access to Station Service Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. D.; Crumbly, C.

    2002-01-01

    The evolving nature of the NASA space enterprise compels the agency to develop new and innovative space systems concepts. NASA, working with increasingly strained budgets and a declining manpower base, is attempting to transform from operational activities to procurement of commercial services. NASA's current generation reusable launch vehicle, the Shuttle, is in transition from a government owned and operated entity to a commercial venture to reduce the civil servant necessities for that program. NASA foresees its second generation launch vehicles being designed and operated by industry for commercial and government services. The "service" concept is a pioneering effort by NASA. The purpose the "service" is not only to reduce the civil servant overhead but will free up government resources for further research and enable industry to develop a space business case so that industry can sustain itself beyond government programs. In addition, NASA desires a decreased responsibility thereby decreasing liability. The Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program is implementing NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to enable industry to develop the launch vehicles of the future. The Alternate Access to Station (AAS) project office within this program is chartered with enabling industry to demonstrate an alternate access capability for the International Space Station (ISS). The project will not accomplish this by traditional government procurement methods, not by integrating the space system within the project office, or by providing the only source of business for the new capability. The project funds will ultimately be used to purchase a service to take re-supply cargo to the ISS, much the same as any business might purchase a service from FedEx to deliver a package to its customer. In the near term, the project will fund risk mitigation efforts for enabling technologies. AAS is in some ways a precursor to the 2nd Generation RLV. By accomplishing ISS resupply

  16. NASA Alternate Access to Station Service Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Michelle D.; Crumbly, Chris

    2001-01-01

    The evolving nature of the NASA space enterprise compels the agency to develop new and innovative space systems concepts. NASA, working with increasingly strained budgets and a declining manpower base, is attempting to transform from operational activities to procurement of commercial services. NASA's current generation reusable launch vehicle, the Shuttle, is in transition from a government owned and operated entity to a commercial venture to reduce the civil servant necessities for that program. NASA foresees its second generation launch vehicles being designed and operated by industry for commercial and government services. The "service" concept is a pioneering effort by NASA. The purpose the "service" is not only to reduce the civil servant overhead but will free up government resources for further research - and enable industry to develop a space business case so that industry can sustain itself beyond government programs. In addition, NASA desires a decreased responsibility thereby decreasing liability. The Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program is implementing NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to enable industry to develop the launch vehicles of the future. The Alternate Access to Station (AAS) project office within this program is chartered with enabling industry to demonstrate an alternate access capability for the International Space Station (ISS). The project will not accomplish this by traditional government procurement methods, not by integrating the space system within the project office, or by providing the only source of business for the new capability. The project funds will ultimately be used to purchase a service to take re-supply cargo to the ISS, much the same as any business might purchase a service from FedEx to deliver a package to its customer. In the near term, the project will fund risk mitigation efforts for enabling technologies. AAS is in some ways a precursor to the 2nd Generation RLV. By accomplishing ISS resupply

  17. Space station automation study-satellite servicing, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissinger, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Technology requirements for automated satellite servicing operations aboard the NASA space station were studied. The three major tasks addressed: (1) servicing requirements (satellite and space station elements) and the role of automation; (2) assessment of automation technology; and (3) conceptual design of servicing facilities on the space station. It is found that many servicing functions cloud benefit from automation support; and the certain research and development activities on automation technologies for servicing should start as soon as possible. Also, some advanced automation developments for orbital servicing could be effectively applied to U.S. industrial ground based operations.

  18. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) ELEVATIONS & SECTION - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  19. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) PLAN - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  20. Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original blueprint of Special Type Service Station in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1941 architectural drawings by Standard Oil Company Engineering Department of Louisville, KY) SITE PLAN - MacDill Air Force Base, Service Station, 7303 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  1. Residential proximity to gasoline service stations and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Huppé, Vicky; Kestens, Yan; Auger, Nathalie; Daniel, Mark; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2013-10-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a growing public health problem potentially associated with ambient air pollution. Gasoline service stations can emit atmospheric pollutants, including volatile organic compounds potentially implicated in PTB. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between residential proximity to gasoline service stations and PTB. Singleton live births on the Island of Montreal from 1994 to 2006 were obtained (n=267,478). Gasoline service station locations, presence of heavy-traffic roads, and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) were determined using a geographic information system. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the association between PTB and residential proximity to gasoline service stations (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 500 m), accounting for maternal covariates, neighborhood SES, and heavy-traffic roads. For all distance categories beyond 50 m, presence of service stations was associated with a greater odds of PTB. Associations were robust to adjustment for maternal covariates for distance categories of 150 and 200 m but were nullified when adjusting for neighborhood SES. In analyses accounting for the number of service stations, the likelihood of PTB within 250 m was statistically significant in unadjusted models. Associations were, however, nullified in models accounting for maternal covariates or neighborhood SES. Our results suggest that there is no clear association between residential proximity to gasoline service stations in Montreal and PTB. Given the correlation between proximity of gasoline service stations and SES, it is difficult to delineate the role of these factors in PTB.

  2. Pump station for radioactive waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Whitton, John P.; Klos, Dean M.; Carrara, Danny T.; Minno, John J.

    2003-11-18

    A pump station for transferring radioactive particle containing waste water, includes: (a.) an enclosed sump having a vertically elongated right frusto conical wall surface and a bottom surface and (b.) a submersible volute centrifugal pump having a horizontally rotating impeller and a volute exterior surface. The sump interior surface, the bottom surface and the volute exterior surface are made of stainless steel having a 30 Ra or finer surface finish. A 15 Ra finish has been found to be most cost effective. The pump station is used for transferring waste water, without accumulation of radioactive fines.

  3. Water turbine technology for small power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salovaara, T.

    1980-02-01

    The paper examines hydro-power stations and the efficiency and costs of using water turbines to run them. Attention is given to different turbine types emphasizing the use of Kaplan-turbines and runners. Hydraulic characteristics and mechanical properties of low head turbines and small turbines, constructed of fully fabricated steel plate structures, are presented.

  4. Space Station Water Processor Process Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, David

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the development program conducted under contract NAS8-38250-12 related to the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor (WP) Process Pump. The results of the Process Pumps evaluation conducted on this program indicates that further development is required in order to achieve the performance and life requirements for the ISSWP.

  5. LOCATING MONITORING STATIONS IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water undergoes changes in quality between the time it leaves the treatment plant and the time it reaches the customer's tap, making it important to select monitoring stations that will adequately monitor these changers. But because there is no uniform schedule or framework for ...

  6. Selection of combined water electrolysis and resistojet propulsion for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical rationale is presented for the configuration of the NASA Space Station's two-element propulsion system, and attention is given to the cost benefits accruing to this system over the Space Station's service life. The principal system element uses gaseous oxygen and hydrogen obtained through water electrolysis to furnish attitude control, backup attitude control, and contingency maneuvering. The secondary element uses resistojets to augment Space Station reboost through the acceleration of waste gases in the direction opposite the Station's flight path.

  7. The International Space Station As a Free Flyer Servicing Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Headley, David E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station will provide a multitude of opportunities for an expanding customer base to make use of this international resource. One such opportunity is servicing of various visiting vehicles that are in a similar orbit to the station. Servicing may include change-out of payloads, replenishment of consumables, repair, and refurbishment operations. Previous studies have been conducted in which "paper" free flyers have been assessed against the station s ability to accommodate them. Over the last several months though, an already flown free flyer, EURECA, was assessed as a real-life visiting free flyer design reference mission. Issues such as capture/berthing, servicing, logistics support, and stowage were assessed for station design and operational approaches. This paper will highlight critical visiting vehicle design considerations, identify station issues, and provide recommendations for accommodation of a wide range of visiting vehicle requirements of the future.

  8. International Space Station Water Balance Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Barry; Garr, John D., II; Erne, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS), which includes the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of water balance . In November of 2010, the Sabatier system, which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane, was brought on line. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water, which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification (spec) rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water, and drinking needs are well documented and used as the best guess planning rates when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent upon a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS from Mission Control in Houston. This paper reviews the various inputs to water planning, rate changes, and dynamic events, including but not limited to: crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water storage availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), Sabatier, and OGA capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints, and finally the operational challenges and means by which flight controllers

  9. Contamination control concepts for space station customer servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruya, K. A.; Ryan, L. E.; Rosales, L. A.; Medler, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    The customer servicing operations envisioned for the space station, which include instrument repair, orbital replacement unit (ORU) changeout, and fluid replenishment for free-flying and attached payloads, are expected to create requirements for a unique contamination control subsystem for the customer servicing facility (CSF). Both the core space station and the CSF users present unique requirements/sensitivities, not all of which are currently defined with common criteria. Preliminary results from an assessment of the effects of the CSF-induced contamination environment are reported. Strategies for a comprehensive contamination control approach and a description of specific hardware devices and their applicability are discussed.

  10. Space Station services and design features for users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurzhals, Peter R.; Mckinney, Royce L.

    1987-01-01

    The operational design features and services planned for the NASA Space Station will furnish, in addition to novel opportunities and facilities, lower costs through interface standardization and automation and faster access by means of computer-aided integration and control processes. By furnishing a basis for large-scale space exploitation, the Space Station will possess industrial production and operational services capabilities that may be used by the private sector for commercial ventures; it could also ultimately support lunar and planetary exploration spacecraft assembly and launch facilities.

  11. Customer exposure to gasoline vapors during refueling at service stations.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, M A; Saarinen, L H

    2000-09-01

    Gasoline is a volatile complex mixture of hydrocarbon compounds that is easily vaporized during handling under normal conditions. Modern reformulated gasoline also contains oxygenates to enhance octane number and reduce ambient pollution. This study measured the difference in the exposure of customers to gasoline and oxygenate vapors during refueling in service stations with and without vapor recovery systems. Field measurements were carried out at two self-service stations. One was equipped with Stage I and the other with Stage II vapor recovery systems. At Stage I stations there is vapor recovery only during delivery from road tanker, and at Stage II stations additional vapor recovery during refueling. The exposure of 20 customers was measured at both stations by collecting air samples from their breathing zone into charcoal tubes during refueling with 95-octane reformulated gasoline. Each sample represented two consecutive refuelings. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory by gas chromatography using mass-selective detection for vapor components. The Raid vapor pressure of gasoline was 70 kPa and an oxygen content 2 wt%. Oxygenated gasoline contained 7 percent methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) and 5 percent methyl tert-amyl ether (MtAE). The geometric mean concentrations of hydrocarbons (C3-C11) in the customers' breathing zone was 85 mg/m3 (range 2.5-531 mg/m3) at the Stage I service station and 18 mg/m3 (range < 0.2-129 mg/m3) at the Stage II service station. The geometric mean of the exposure of customers to MtBE during refueling at the Stage I service station was 15.3 mg/m3 (range 1.8-74 mg/m3), and at the Stage II service station 3.4 mg/m3 (range 0.2-16 mg/m3). The differences in exposure were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean refueling times were 57 seconds (range 23-207) at the Stage I and 66 seconds (range 18-120) at the Stage II station. The measurements were done on consecutive days at the various service stations. The temperature ranged

  12. Service station attendants' exposure to benzene and gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    McDermott, H J; Vos, G A

    1979-04-01

    Service station attendants' exposure to benzene, based on 85 TWA results at 7 stations, were well below 1 ppm except one exposure of 2.08 ppm. Short term exposures were 1.21 ppm or less over 15 minutes. Attendants' TWA exposures to total gasoline vapor were 114 ppm or less, with measured 15 minute exposures no higher than 100 ppm during actual filling operations. One station had vapor recovery nozzles; exposures here were below the detectable level (0.01 ppm benzene) on 10% more days than the next lowest station. Still, the magnitude of overall exposures and the degree of reduction indicate that vapor recovery is not needed to control exposures. Some attendants had consistently higher exposures than others. This is felt to be due to work practices, such as standing close to the fill opening, plus local wind conditions around the car as it is filled with gasoline.

  13. Service Station Attendant and Light Automotive Maintenance, Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Jack W.; And Others

    Prepared by instructors and curriculum specialists, this course of study was designed to meet the individual needs of the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth by providing training as a service station attendant and light automotive maintenance mechanic. The achievement level of each student is determined at entry, and small instructional…

  14. VIEW OF MILL FROM KALA ROAD. REAR OF SERVICE STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MILL FROM KALA ROAD. REAR OF SERVICE STATION IN LEFT FOREGROUND, AND AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR BUILDING TO THE RIGHT. STACK AND MILL IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE WEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  15. Food Service and Nutrition for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the Workshop on Food Service and Nutrition for the Space Station, held in Houston, Texas, on April 10 and 11, 1984 was given. The workshop was attended by experts in food technology from industry, government, and academia. Following a general definition of unique space flight requirements, oral presentations were made on state of the art food technology with the objective of using this technology to support the space flight requirements. Numerous areas are identified which in the opinion of the conferees, would have space flight application. But additional effort, evaluation, or testing to include Shuttle inflight testing will be required for the technology to be applied to the Space Station.

  16. Space Station Freedom regenerative water recovery system configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reysa, R.; Edwards, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) must recover water from various waste water sources to reduce 90 day water resupply demands for a four/eight person crew. The water recovery system options considered are summarized together with system configuration merits and demerits, resource advantages and disadvantages, and water quality considerations used to select the SSF water recovery system.

  17. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... stations. 73.809 Section 73.809 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.809 Interference protection to full service FM stations. (a) If a full service commercial or NCE FM facility application...

  18. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... stations. 73.809 Section 73.809 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.809 Interference protection to full service FM stations. (a) If a full service commercial or NCE FM facility application...

  19. 47 CFR 101.503 - Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.503 Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations. 10.6 GHz DEMS Nodal Stations may be... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Digital Electronic Message Service...

  20. 47 CFR 101.503 - Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.503 Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations. 10.6 GHz DEMS Nodal Stations may be... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Digital Electronic Message Service...

  1. 47 CFR 101.503 - Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.503 Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations. 10.6 GHz DEMS Nodal Stations may be... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Digital Electronic Message Service...

  2. 47 CFR 101.503 - Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.503 Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations. 10.6 GHz DEMS Nodal Stations may be... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Digital Electronic Message Service...

  3. 47 CFR 25.210 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service. (a) All space stations in the Fixed-Satellite...) All space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service in the 20/30 GHz band shall use either...

  4. 47 CFR 25.210 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service. (a) All space stations in the Fixed-Satellite...) All space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service in the 20/30 GHz band shall use either...

  5. Definition of satellite servicing technology development missions for early space stations. Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Early space station accommodation, build-up of space station manipulator capability, on-orbit spacecraft assembly test and launch, large antenna structure deployment, service/refurbish satellite, and servicing of free-flying materials processing platform are discussed.

  6. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  7. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  8. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  9. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  10. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  11. Space Station Environmental Health System water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincze, Johanna E.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the unique aspects of the Space Station is that it will be a totally encapsulated environment and the air and water supplies will be reclaimed for reuse. The Environmental Health System, a subsystem of CHeCS (Crew Health Care System), must monitor the air and water on board the Space Station Freedom to verify that the quality is adequate for crew safety. Specifically, the Water Quality Subsystem will analyze the potable and hygiene water supplies regularly for organic, inorganic, particulate, and microbial contamination. The equipment selected to perform these analyses will be commercially available instruments which will be converted for use on board the Space Station Freedom. Therefore, the commercial hardware will be analyzed to identify the gravity dependent functions and modified to eliminate them. The selection, analysis, and conversion of the off-the-shelf equipment for monitoring the Space Station reclaimed water creates a challenging project for the Water Quality engineers and scientists.

  12. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of stations in the land mobile radio... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6020 Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A...

  13. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of stations in the land mobile radio... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6020 Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A...

  14. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of stations in the land mobile radio... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6020 Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A...

  15. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of stations in the land mobile radio... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6020 Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A...

  16. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of stations in the land mobile radio... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6020 Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A...

  17. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.809 Interference protection to full service FM stations. (a) If a full service commercial or NCE FM facility application is... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference protection to full service...

  18. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.809 Interference protection to full service FM stations. (a) If a full service commercial or NCE FM facility application is... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference protection to full service...

  19. Gasoline and vapor exposures in service station and leaking underground storage tank scenarios.

    PubMed

    Guldberg, P H

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to gasoline and gasoline vapors from service station operations and leaking underground storage tanks is a major health concern. Six scenarios for human exposure were examined, based primarily on measured air and water concentrations of total hydrocarbons, benzene, xylenes, and toluene. Calculated mean and upper limit lifetime exposures provide a tool for assisting public health officials in assessing and managing gasoline-related health risks.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment of Military Service Station Privatization at Five AETC Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    cubic meter of air AAFES Army and Air Force Exchange Service AAQS Ambient Air Quality Standards ACM asbestos -containing material AETC Air Education...and endangered; ACM= asbestos -containing material; LBP=lead-based paint; MSS=Military Service Station(s) Description of the Proposed Action and...threatened and endangered; ACM= asbestos - containing material; LBP=lead-based paint; MSS=Military Service Station(s) Description of the Proposed

  1. A Water-Service Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to let students see the value of mathematics in design--and how mathematics lends perspective to problem solving. In this article, the author describes a water-service challenge which enables students to design a water utility system that uses surface runoff into an open reservoir as the potable water source. This challenge…

  2. Space Station Water Processor Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzarone, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the development testing conducted under this contract to the Space Station Water Processor (WP) Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS). The MLS units built and modified during this testing demonstrated acceptable air/water separation results in a variety of water conditions with inlet flow rates ranging from 60 - 960 LB/hr.

  3. 14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION FORCE MAINS, TREATED WATER PIPELINES, AND FILTRATION PLANT, SHEET 1 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  4. Supercritical water oxidation - Concept analysis for evolutionary Space Station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John B., Jr.; Brewer, Dana A.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) concept to reduce the number of processes needed in an evolutionary Space Station design's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), while reducing resupply requirements and enhancing the integration of separate ECLSS functions into a single Supercritical Water Oxidation process, is evaluated. While not feasible for an initial operational capability Space Station, the SCWO's application to the evolutionary Space Station configuration would aid the integration of eight ECLSS functions into a single one, thereby significantly reducing program costs.

  5. International Space Station Bacteria Filter Element Service Life Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses high-efficiency particulate air filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as bacteria filter elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. segment in the flight 4R assembly level. The preflight service life prediction of 1 yr for the BFEs is based upon engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS program resources. Testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are provided.

  6. 47 CFR 25.215 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service. In addition to § 25.148(f), space station antennas operating in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service must be designed...

  7. 47 CFR 25.215 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service. In addition to § 25.148(f), space station antennas operating in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service must be designed...

  8. 47 CFR 25.215 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service. In addition to § 25.148(f), space station antennas operating in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service must be designed...

  9. Water vent design for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Worden, Edson A.; Bedard, John E.; Lieu, Bing H.

    1992-07-01

    Space Stadon Freedom (SSF) will be required to vent water during non-quiescent periods. During Man Tended Configuration (MTC), before the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) water loop is closed, humidity condensate will be periodically vented. At Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), water will be vented on contingency if there is excess water on SSF. The thrust due to venting must be minimized to be considered non-propulsive. Also, ice formation and clogging of the vent nozzle must be avoided. Many aspects of the Space Shuttle water vent design were utilized in development of the preliminary SSF water vent design presented in this paper. Design modifications which improved the shuttle vent as well as those necessary for SSF are discussed. The exterior vent location, direction and environment on SSF are unique compared to previous space water vent designs. From data collected in the vent tests and analyses, a finalized SSF water vent design will be developed.

  10. Discharge data at water-quality monitoring stations in Arkansas, 1981 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Discharge data were computed for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology (ADPC and E). All stations in the network were visited by Geological Survey personnel. Discharges on days of sampling were determined for 83 of the sites. A summary table of those discharges for the water year 1981 is given. Several discharges at three stations for miscellaneous dates in the 1980 water year are shown. Several discharges at four stations for miscellaneous dates in the 1979 year are shown. Several discharges at one station for miscellaneous dates in the 1978 water year are also shown. The letter-digit station numbers and names were devised and assigned by the ADPC and E. The corresponding eight-digit numbers are assigned downstream-order station numbers as used by the Geological Survey. (USGS)

  11. 47 CFR 25.210 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Fixed-Satellite Service. 25.210 Section 25.210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.210 Technical requirements for space stations in the Fixed-Satellite Service. (a) All space stations in the...

  12. Digital services in the ANIK C Earth Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farell, E.

    The Digital Services in the ANIK C Earth Stations built for Telesat Canada are examined, with emphasis on the major requirements, design considerations, and the achieved performance. It is noted that a design compromise is required to optimize linear and nonlinear distortions, spectral regrowth interfering with the adjacent channels, and high-power amplifier output, since the operating bit error rate of the link depends on these parameters. The requirements related to this design compromise are reviewed, as are the long- and short-term stability problems arising from the frequency conversion processes. Some features of the system hardware are described with particular reference to digital terminal equipment filters and the carrier recovery circuit.

  13. Automation of servicibility of radio-relay station equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryev, A. G.; Mishkin, Y. I.; Itkis, G. Y.

    1985-03-01

    Automation of the serviceability of radio relay station equipment must ensure central gathering and primary processing of reliable instrument reading with subsequent display on the control panel, detection and recording of failures soon enough, advance enough warning based on analysis of detertioration symptoms, and correct remote measurement of equipment performance parameters. Such an inspection will minimize transmission losses while reducing nonproductive time and labor spent on documentation and measurement. A multichannel automated inspection system for this purpose should operate by a parallel rather than sequential procedure. Digital data processing is more expedient in this case than analog method and, therefore, analog to digital converters are required. Spepcial normal, above limit and below limit test signals provide means of self-inspection, to which must be added adequate interference immunization, stabilization, and standby power supply. Use of a microcomputer permits overall refinement and expansion of the inspection system while it minimizes though not completely eliminates dependence on subjective judgment.

  14. 78 FR 39200 - Federal Earth Stations-Non-Federal Fixed Satellite Service Space Stations; Spectrum for Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ...This document proposes to make spectrum allocation proposals for three different space related purposes. The Commission makes two alternative proposals to modify the Allocation Table to provide interference protection for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Mobile- Satellite Service (MSS) earth stations operated by Federal agencies under authorizations granted by the National Telecommunications......

  15. Bioburden control for Space Station Freedom's Ultrapure Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snodgrass, Donald W.; Rodgers, Elizabeth B.; Obenhuber, Don; Huff, Tim

    1991-01-01

    Bioburden control is one of the challenges for the Ultrapure Water System on Space Station Freedom. Bioburden control must enable the system to deliver water with a low bacterial count as well as maintain biological contamination at a manageable level, to permit continued production of quality water. Ozone has been chosen as the primary means of Bioburden control. Planned tests to determine the effectiveness of ozone on free-floating microbes and biofilms are described.

  16. Enhanced International Space Station Ku-Band Telemetry Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Andrew J.; Pitts, R. Lee; Welch, Steven J.; Bryan, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is in an operational configuration. To fully utilize the ISS and take advantage of the modern protocols and updated Ku-band access, the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has designed an approach to extend the Kuband forward link access for payload investigators to their on-orbit payloads. This dramatically increases the ground to ISS communications for those users. This access also enables the ISS flight controllers operating in the Payload Operations and Integration Center to have more direct control over the systems they are responsible for managing and operating. To extend the Ku-band forward link to the payload user community the development of a new command server is necessary. The HOSC subsystems were updated to process the Internet Protocol Encapsulated packets, enable users to use the service based on their approved services, and perform network address translation to insure that the packets are forwarded from the user to the correct payload repeating that process in reverse from ISS to the payload user. This paper presents the architecture, implementation, and lessons learned. This will include the integration of COTS hardware and software as well as how the device is incorporated into the operational mission of the ISS. Thus, this paper also discusses how this technology can be applicable to payload users of the ISS.

  17. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... of Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA) in the 14.0-14.5 GHz band from secondary to primary and... stations of the FSS on a primary basis in the 11.7-12.2 GHz band (space-to-Earth), on an unprotected...

  18. 78 FR 14920 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service... technical and licensing rules for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA), i.e., earth stations on aircraft...-11.2 GHz, 11.45-11.7 GHz, 11.7-12.2 GHz (space-to-Earth or downlink) and 14.0-14.5 GHz...

  19. 75 FR 52045 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental... Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS), Unit 3, located in Maricopa County, Arizona. Therefore... Statement for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, NUREG-0841, dated February 1982. Agencies...

  20. Solar repowering for electric generation. Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The conceptual design and evaluation of solar repowering and electric generating unit of Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) are described in detail. The solar addition would permit, at the design point, a 20% reduction of the fossil fuel consumed by PSO's 150 MWe Northeastern Station Unit 1. The proposed system comprises a tower focus power plant with a water/steam central receiver. This volume presents the trade studies, conceptual design, system performance, economic analysis, and development plan as well as a description of a test program to determine the magnitude of impact that environmental factors have on plant design and performance. (WHK)

  1. Evaluation of vapor recovery systems efficiency and personal exposure in service stations in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Núñez, Xochitl; Hernández-Solís, José M; Ruiz-Suárez, Luis G

    2003-06-20

    Results of a field study on the efficiency of vapor recovery systems currently used in gasoline service stations in Mexico City are presented. Nine gasoline stations were studied, representing the several technologies available in Mexico City. The test was applied to a fixed vehicular fleet of approximately 10 private and public service vehicles. Each one of the gasoline service stations tested reported efficiencies above 80% in the recovery of vapor losses from gasoline which is the minimum permissible value by Mexican regulations. Implications to the emissions inventory are discussed. A second goal of this study was to measure the potential exposure of service attendants to three important components of gasoline: benzene; toluene; and xylenes. The influence of spatial location of personnel within the service station was also evaluated by measuring levels of the three compounds both at the refueling area and in the service station office. Results are discussed and compared to a previous study.

  2. Towards viable drinking water services.

    PubMed

    Hukka, J J; Katko, T S

    1997-01-01

    This article offers a framework for developing viable drinking water services and institutional development in developing countries. The framework evolved from the authors' research and field experience in transition and developing economies. Viability is related to operative technology, appropriate organizations, and adequate cost recovery within the context of water resources, human and economic resources, sociocultural conditions, and other constraints. The ability of institutions to solve the problems of coordination and production depends upon player motivation, the complexity of the environment, and the ability of the players to control the environment. Third party enforcement of agreements are essential to reduce gains from opportunism, cheating, and shirking. Empirical research finds that per capita water production costs are 4 times higher in centralized systems and lowest in decentralized systems with coordination from a central party. Three-tiered systems of governments, regulators, and service providers are recommended. Management options must be consumer driven. The worst case scenario is consumer's reliance on vending and reselling with no alternative source of supply. Policies should have a strong focus on institutional reforms in the water sector, the development of a consumer driven water sector, facilitation of appropriate private-public partnerships, sound management of existing capital assets, a system for building viability into national strategies for the water sector, and financially self-sufficient and consumer responsible water supply organizations.

  3. Survey of fluoride levels in vended water stations.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Urvi G; Archarya, Bhavini S; Velasquez, Gisela M; Vance, Bradley J; Tate, Robert H; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to measure the fluoride concentration of water derived from vended water stations (VWS) and to identify its clinical implications, especially with regard to caries prevention and fluorosis. VWS and corresponding tap water samples were collected from 34 unique postal zip codes; samples were analyzed in duplicate for fluoride concentration. Average fluoride concentration in VWS water was significantly lower than that of tap water (P < 0.001). Fluoride concentration in the VWS water ranged from <0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm, with a mean concentration of 0.02 ppm (±0.02 ppm). Patients utilizing VWS as their primary source of drinking water may not be receiving optimal caries preventive benefits; thus dietary fluoride supplementation may be indicated. Conversely, to minimize the risk of fluorosis in infants consuming reconstituted infant formula, water from a VWS may be used.

  4. Water quality program elements for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Ramanathan, Raghupathy; Straub, John E.; Schultz, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A strategy is outlined for the development of water-quality criteria and standards relevant to recycling and monitoring the in-flight water for the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The water-reclamation subsystem of the SSF's ECLSS is described, and the objectives of the water-quality are set forth with attention to contaminants. Quality parameters are listed for potable and hygiene-related water including physical and organic parameters, inorganic constituents, bactericides, and microbial content. Comparisons are made to the quality parameters established for the Shuttle's potable water and to the EPA's current standards. Specific research is required to develop in-flight monitoring techniques for unique SSF contaminants, ECLSS microbial control, and on- and off-line monitoring. After discussing some of the in-flight water-monitoring hardware it is concluded that water reclamation and recycling are necessary and feasible for the SSF.

  5. 26. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC3W MST STATION 63 (TOP SERVICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC-3W MST STATION 63 (TOP SERVICE STATION FOR DELIVERY VEHICLE) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER SHOWING REMOVABLE SAFETY RAILS SURROUNDING CENTRAL OPENING, PULLEY AND WINCH SYSTEM FOR RAISING SERVICE PLATFORM, AND PLATFORM HINGES - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. A Study of Public Radio Stations' Educational Services, 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This second national survey of public radio stations' involvement in educational services to schools, colleges, and universities was conducted by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) for use by individual public radio stations, educational agencies, and other organizations interested and involved in planning public radio's services to…

  7. Definition of technology development missions for early space station satellite servicing, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of all aspects of the early space station satellite servicing study tasks are presented. These results include identification of servicing tasks (and locations), identification of servicing mission system and detailed objectives, functional/operational requirements analyses of multiple servicing scenarios, assessment of critical servicing technology capabilities and development of an evolutionary capability plan, design and validation of selected servicing technology development missions (TDMs), identification of space station satellite servicing accommodation needs, and the cost and schedule implications of acquiring both required technology capability development and conducting the selected TDMs.

  8. Definition of technology development missions for early Space Station satellite servicing. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Executive Summary volume 1, includes an overview of both phases of the Definition of Technology Development Missions for Early Space Station Satellite Servicing. The primary purpose of Phase 1 of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Satellite Servicing Phase 1 study was to establish requirements for demonstrating the capability of performing satellite servicing activities on a permanently manned Space Station in the early 1990s. The scope of Phase 1 included TDM definition, outlining of servicing objectives, derivation of initial Space Station servicing support requirements, and generation of the associated programmatic schedules and cost. The purpose of phase 2 of the satellite servicing study was to expand and refine the overall understanding of how best to use the manned space station as a test bed for demonstration of satellite servicing capabilities.

  9. Space Station Freedom Water Recovery test total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Michael W.; Slivon, Laurence; Sheldon, Linda; Traweek, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Water Recovery Test (WRT) addresses the concept of integrated hygiene and potable reuse water recovery systems baselined for Space Station Freedom (SSF). To assess the adequacy of water recovery system designs and the conformance of reclaimed water quality to established specifications, MSFC has initiated an extensive water characterization program. MSFC's goal is to quantitatively account for a large percentage of organic compounds present in waste and reclaimed hygiene and potable waters from the WRT and in humidity condensate from Spacelab missions. The program is coordinated into Phase A and B. Phase A's focus is qualitative and semi-quantitative. Precise quantitative analyses are not emphasized. Phase B's focus centers on a near complete quantitative characterization of all water types. Technical approaches along with Phase A and partial Phase B investigations on the compositional analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Accountability are presented.

  10. Atmosphere and water quality monitoring on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, William

    1990-01-01

    In Space Station Freedom air and water will be supplied in closed loop systems. The monitoring of air and water qualities will ensure the crew health for the long mission duration. The Atmosphere Composition Monitor consists of the following major instruments: (1) a single focusing mass spectrometer to monitor major air constituents and control the oxygen/nitrogen addition for the Space Station; (2) a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to detect trace contaminants; (3) a non-dispersive infrared spectrometer to determine carbon monoxide concentration; and (4) a laser particle counter for measuring particulates in the air. An overview of the design and development concepts for the air and water quality monitors is presented.

  11. 47 CFR 101.503 - Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital Electronic Message Service Nodal Stations. 101.503 Section 101.503 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic...

  12. Service functions of private community health stations in China: A comparison analysis with government-sponsored community health stations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wanli; Fan, Hong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Fang; Chai, Yun; Xu, Hancheng; Li, Yongbin; Liu, Liqun; Wang, Bin; Jin, Jianqiang; Lu, Zuxun

    2012-04-01

    In China, with the restructuring of health care system moving forward, private community health facilities have been playing a complementary but increasingly important role in providing public health and basic medical care services in urban areas. However, only limited evidence is available concerning the service functions of private community health facilities in China. The aim of this study was to explore the functions of private community health stations (PCHSs) to provide evidence-based recommendations for policy-making and practice in the development of urban community health services systems. A total of 818 PCHSs and 4320 government-sponsored community health stations (GCHSs) located in 28 cities of China were investigated in 2008. The percentages of stations that provided health services and the annual workload per community health worker (CHW) were compared between the two types of institutions. The results showed that the percentages of PCHSs providing public health services were significantly higher than those of GCHSs (P<0.05); but no significant differences were found in the percentages of basic medical services providing between PCHSs and GCHSs (P>0.05). The annual workloads of all the public health services and basic medical services per CHW in PCHSs were lighter than those in GCHSs (P<0.05), except for resident health records establishment and health education materials distribution (P>0.05). At present, the GCHSs are still the mainstream in urban China, which will last for a long period in future. However, our findings showed that the annual workloads of CHWs in PCHSs were no heavier than those in GCHSs, and the PCHSs were willing to provide public health services. In view of current inadequacy of health resources in China, it is feasible to further develop PCHSs under the guidance of the government, given that PCHSs can perform the basic functions of community health services, which is useful for the formation of public-private partnerships (PPP

  13. Index of stations: surface-water data-collection network of Texas, September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, Susan C.; Barbie, Dana L.

    1999-01-01

    As of September 30, 1998, the surface-water data-collection network of Texas (table 1) included 313 continuous-recording streamflow stations (D), 22 gage-height record only stations (G), 23 crest-stage partial-record stations (C), 39 flood-hydrograph partial-record stations (H), 25 low-flow partial-record stations (L), 1 continuous-recording temperature station (M1), 25 continuous-recording temperature and conductivity stations (M2), 3 continuous-recording temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen stations (M3), 13 continuous-recording temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH stations (M4), 5 daily chemical-quality stations (Qd), 133 periodic chemical-quality stations (Qp), 16 reservoir/lake surveys for water quality (Qs), and 70 continuous or daily reservoir-content stations (R). Plate 1 identifies the major river basins in Texas and shows the location of the stations listed in table 1.

  14. Evaluation of selected surface-water-quality stations in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, S.J.; DeLong, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, has conducted a surface-water-quality program in Wyoming since 1965. The purpose has been to determine the chemical quality of the water in terms of the major dissolved constituents (salinity). Changing agricultural techniques and energy development have stimulated a need for an expanded program involving additional types of data. This report determines the adequacy of the data collected thus far to describe the chemical quality. The sampling program was evaluated by determining how well the data describe the dissolved-solids load of the streams. Monthly mean loads were estimated at 16 stations throughout the network where daily streamflow and daily specific conductance were available. Monthly loads were then compared with loads estimated from daily streamflow and data derived from analyses of samples collected on a monthly basis at these same stations. Agreement was good. Solute-load hydrographs were constructed for 37 stations and from some reaches where streamflow records were available. Because stations where no discharge records are available are not amenable to this type of analysis, data collected at these stations are of limited usefulness. This report covers analyses of data for all qualifying sites in Wyoming except those in the Green River Basin, which were analyzed in U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations 77-103. The salinity in most of the streams evaluated is adequately described by the data collected. Reduced sampling is feasible, and time and money can be diverted to collecting other data. (USGS)

  15. Discharge data at water-quality monitoring stations in Arkansas, 1980 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Discharge data were computed for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology. Some of the sites are located at U.S. Geological Survey of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers daily-discharge stations, but most sites are at points where discharges are not regularly measured. (USGS)

  16. Discharge data at water-quality monitoring stations in Arkansas, 1977 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    Discharge data were computed for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology. Some of the sites are located at U.S. Geological Survey or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers daily-discharge stations, but most are at points where discharges are not measured regularly. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Index of stations: surface-water data-collection network of Texas, September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, Susan C.; Barbie, Dana L.

    2001-01-01

    As of September 30, 1999, the surface-water data-collection network of Texas (table 1) included 321 continuous-record streamflow stations (D), 20 continuous-record gage-height only stations (G), 24 crest-stage partial-record stations (C), 40 floodhydrograph partial-record stations (H), 25 low-flow partial-record stations (L), 1 continuous-record temperature station (M1), 25 continuous-record temperature and specific conductance stations (M2), 17 continuous-record temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH stations (M4), 4 daily water-quality stations (Qd), 115 periodic water-quality stations (Qp), 17 reservoir/lake surveys for water quality stations (Qs), 85 continuous or daily reservoircontent stations (R), and 10 daily precipitation stations (Pd). Plate 1 identifies the major river basins in Texas and shows the location of the stations listed in table 1. Table 1 shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of station, and office responsible for the collection of the data and maintenance of the record. An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for all gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering between two main-stem stations are listed between these two stations. A similar order is followed in listing stations by first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. The rank of any tributary, with respect to the stream to which it is an immediate tributary, is indicated by an indention in the table. Each indention represents one rank. This downstream order and system of indention shows which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated.

  18. Space water electrolysis: Space Station through advance missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Ronald J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Grigger, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) technology can satisfy the need for oxygen (O2) and Hydrogen (H2) in the Space Station Freedom and future advanced missions. The efficiency with which the SFE technology can be used to generate O2 and H2 is one of its major advantages. In fact, the SFE is baselined for the Oxygen Generation Assembly within the Space Station Freedom's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). In the conventional SFE process an alkaline electrolyte is contained within the matrix and is sandwiched between two porous electrodes. The electrodes and matrix make up a unitized cell core. The electrolyte provides the necessary path for the transport of water and ions between the electrodes, and forms a barrier to the diffusion of O2 and H2. A hydrophobic, microporous membrane permits water vapor to diffuse from the feed water to the cell core. This membrane separates the liquid feed water from the product H2, and, therefore, avoids direct contact of the electrodes by the feed water. The feed water is also circulated through an external heat exchanger to control the temperature of the cell.

  19. Space water electrolysis: Space Station through advance missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Ronald J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Grigger, David J.

    1991-09-01

    Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) technology can satisfy the need for oxygen (O2) and Hydrogen (H2) in the Space Station Freedom and future advanced missions. The efficiency with which the SFE technology can be used to generate O2 and H2 is one of its major advantages. In fact, the SFE is baselined for the Oxygen Generation Assembly within the Space Station Freedom's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). In the conventional SFE process an alkaline electrolyte is contained within the matrix and is sandwiched between two porous electrodes. The electrodes and matrix make up a unitized cell core. The electrolyte provides the necessary path for the transport of water and ions between the electrodes, and forms a barrier to the diffusion of O2 and H2. A hydrophobic, microporous membrane permits water vapor to diffuse from the feed water to the cell core. This membrane separates the liquid feed water from the product H2, and, therefore, avoids direct contact of the electrodes by the feed water. The feed water is also circulated through an external heat exchanger to control the temperature of the cell.

  20. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.; Rawson, Jack

    1986-01-01

    As of January 1, 1986, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas operated by the U.S. Geological Survey included 386 streamflow, 87 reservoir-contents, 33 stage, 10 crest-stage partial-record, 8 periodic discharge through range, 38 flood-hydrograph partial-record, 11 flood-profile partial-record , 36 low-flow partial-record 2 tide-level, 45 daily chemical-quality, 23 continuous-recording water-quality, 97 periodic biological, 19 lake surveys, 174 periodic organic- and (or) nutrient, 4 periodic insecticide, 58 periodic pesticide, 22 automatic sampler, 157 periodic minor elements, 141 periodic chemical-quality, 108 periodic physical-organic, 14 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 3 sediment, 39 periodic sediment, 26 continuous-recording temperature, and 37 national stream-quality accounting network stations were in operation. Tables describing the station location, type of data collected, and place where data are available are included, as well as maps showing the location of most of the stations. (USGS)

  1. Assessing HAP and VOC emissions from gasoline service stations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Gas stations are not specifically regulated under the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) or new source performance standards (NSPS) programs, and it is unlikely that a station would qualify as a major source by emitting 100 tons per year (tpy) or more of any single air pollutant. Determining gas stations` potential to emit VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) may become more important as the focus of the Part 70 program shifts from major sources to area (nonmajor) sources. HAP and VOC emissions from gas stations are generated primarily from four sources: (1) tank filling losses, (2) tank breathing losses, (3) automobile refueling displacement losses, and (4) gasoline spillage during dispensing. Each of these sources is discussed, and emission estimates are listed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. User assembly and servicing system for Space Station, an evolving architecture approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavigna, Thomas A.; Cline, Helmut P.

    1988-01-01

    On-orbit assembly and servicing of a variety of scientific and applications hardware systems is expected to be one of the Space Station's primary functions. The hardware to be serviced will include the attached payloads resident on the Space Station, the free-flying satellites and co-orbiting platforms brought to the Space Station, and the polar orbiting platforms. The requirements for assembly and servicing such a broad spectrum of missions have led to the development of an Assembly and Servicing System Architecture that is composed of a complex array of support elements. This array is comprised of US elements, both Space Station and non-Space Station, and elements provided by Canada to the Space Station Program. For any given servicing or assembly mission, the necessary support elements will be employed in an integrated manner to satisfy the mission-specific needs. The structure of the User Assembly and Servicing System Architecture and the manner in which it will evolved throughout the duration of the phased Space Station Program are discussed. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the requirements to be accommodated in each phase, and the development of a logical progression of capabilities to meet these requirements.

  3. Undergraduates' Implementations of Learning Stations as Their Service Learning among Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Service learning provides pre-service educators with a context for having hands-on field experience and also assists in understanding the theory and practice. This study discusses 7 undergraduates' implementations of learning stations as their service learning with 28 elementary school students. Through thematic data analysis of interviews,…

  4. 47 CFR 25.215 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service. 25.215 Section 25.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.215 Technical requirements for space stations in the Direct Broadcast Satellite Service. In addition to §...

  5. Video- Water Droplet Demonstration on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video clip, Dr. Pettit demonstrates a spilling phenomenon with films of water. After drawing a 100-200 micron thick film of pure water, which is impossible to do on Earth, Dr. Pettit oscillates the film back and forth like a drum head, forcing the water droplets to spill off. He observes that although the phenomenon looks much like drops of water that are ejected from the surface of a pool when a rock is dropped in, the underlying physics are very different.

  6. 47 CFR 95.424 - (CB Rule 24) How do I have my CB station transmitter serviced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know § 95.424 (CB Rule 24) How do I have my CB station transmitter serviced? (a) You...

  7. 47 CFR 95.424 - (CB Rule 24) How do I have my CB station transmitter serviced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know § 95.424 (CB Rule 24) How do I have my CB station transmitter serviced? (a) You...

  8. 77 FR 42768 - Central Vermont Public Service Corporation, Millstone Power Station, Unit 3; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... COMMISSION Central Vermont Public Service Corporation, Millstone Power Station, Unit 3; Notice of.... NPF-49) for the Millstone Power Station, Unit 3 (MPS3) resulting from a subsequent restructuring in.... subsidiary Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP). The Commission is also considering amending the...

  9. Title V Operating Permit: QEP Field Services Company - Wonsits Valley Compressor Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Response to public comments and the Title V Operating Permit for the QEP Field Services Company, Wonsits Valley Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, Utah.

  10. Title V Operating Permit: QEP Field Services Company - Coyote Wash Compressor Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Response to public comments and the Title V Operating Permit for the QEP Field Services Company, Coyote Wash Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, Utah.

  11. International Space Station Potable Water Characterization for 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, John E. II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Schultz, John R..; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    In this post-construction, operational phase of International Space Station (ISS) with an ever-increasing emphasis on its use as a test-bed for future exploration missions, the ISS crews continue to rely on water reclamation systems for the majority of their water needs. The onboard water supplies include US Segment potable water from humidity condensate and urine, Russian Segment potable water from condensate, and ground-supplied potable water, as reserve. In 2013, the cargo returned on the Soyuz 32-35 flights included archival potable water samples collected from Expeditions 34-37. The Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center continued its long-standing role of performing chemical analyses on ISS return water samples to verify compliance with potable water quality specifications. This paper presents and discusses the analytical results for potable water samples returned from Expeditions 34-37, including a comparison to ISS quality standards. During the summer of 2013, the U.S. Segment potable water experienced an anticipated temporary rise and fall in total organic carbon (TOC) content, as the result of organic contamination breaking through the water system's treatment process. Analytical results for the Expedition 36 archival samples returned on Soyuz 34 confirmed that dimethylsilanediol was once again the responsible contaminant, just as it was for comparable TOC rises in 2010 and 2012. Discussion herein includes the use of the in-flight Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) as a key monitoring tool for tracking these TOC rises and scheduling appropriate remediation action.

  12. International Space Station Potable Water Characterization for 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Schultz, John R.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    In this post-construction, operational phase of International Space Station (ISS) with an ever-increasing emphasis on its use as a test-bed for future exploration missions, the ISS crews continue to rely on water reclamation systems for the majority of their water needs. The onboard water supplies include U.S. Segment potable water from humidity condensate and urine, Russian Segment potable water from condensate, and ground-supplied potable water, as reserve. In 2013, the cargo returned on the Soyuz 32-35 flights included archival potable water samples collected from Expeditions 34-37. The former Water and Food Analytical Laboratory (now Toxicology and Evironmental Chemistry Laboratory) at the NASA Johnson Space Center continued its long-standing role of performing chemical analyses on ISS return water samples to verify compliance with potable water quality specifications. This paper presents and discusses the analytical results for potable water samples returned from Expeditions 34-37, including a comparison to ISS quality standards. During the summer of 2013, the U.S. Segment potable water experienced a third temporary rise and fall in total organic carbon (TOC) content, as the result of organic contamination breaking through the water system's treatment process. Analytical results for the Expedition 36 archival samples returned on Soyuz 34 confirmed that dimethylsilanediol was once again the responsible contaminant, just as it was for the previous comparable TOC rises in 2010 and 2012. Discussion herein includes the use of the in-flight total organic carbon analyzer (TOCA) as a key monitoring tool for tracking these TOC rises and scheduling appropriate remediation.

  13. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  14. Human factors issues in telerobotic systems for Space Station Freedom servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Thomas B.; Permenter, Kathryn E.

    1990-01-01

    Requirements for Space Station Freedom servicing are described and the state-of-the-art for telerobotic system on-orbit servicing of spacecraft is defined. The projected requirements for the Space Station Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) are identified. Finally, the human factors issues in telerobotic servicing are discussed. The human factors issues are basically three: the definition of the role of the human versus automation in system control; the identification of operator-device interface design requirements; and the requirements for development of an operator-machine interface simulation capability.

  15. U.S. Space Station platform - Configuration technology for customer servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezio, Joseph A.; Walton, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    Features of the Space Station coorbiting and polar orbiting platforms (COP and POP, respectively) are described that will allow them to be configured optimally to meet mission requirements and to be assembled, serviced, and modified on-orbit. Both of these platforms were designed to permit servicing at the Shuttle using the remote manipulator system with teleoperated end effectors; EVA was planned as a backup and for unplanned payload failure modes. Station-based servicing is discussed as well as expendable launch vehicle-based servicing concepts.

  16. Index of Stations - Surface-Water Data-Collection Network of Texas, September 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    reservoir -content, and partial-record stations maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, September...stations (Qd), 115 periodic water-quality stations (Qp), 17 reservoir /lake surveys for water quality stations (Qs), 85 continuous or daily reservoir ...automatic samplers to facilitate the collection of multiple samples during storm runoff. Reservoir /lake surveys for water quality (Qs) are surveys of

  17. International Space Station (ISS) Water Transfer Hardware Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shkedi, Brienne D.

    2006-01-01

    Water transferred from the Space Shuttle to the International Space Station (ISS) is generated as a by-product from the Shuttle fuel cells, and is generally preferred over the Progress which has to launch water from the ground. However, launch mass and volume are still required for the transfer and storage hardware. Some of these up-mass requirements have been reduced since ISS assembly began due to changes in the storage hardware (CWC). This paper analyzes the launch mass and volume required to transfer water from the Shuttle and analyzes the up-mass savings due to modifications in the CWC. Suggestions for improving the launch mass and volume are also provided.

  18. A comparison of the Shuttle remote manipulator system and the Space Station Freedom mobile servicing center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edith C.; Ross, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System is a mature system which has successfully completed 18 flights. Its primary functional design driver was the capability to deploy and retrieve payloads from the Orbiter cargo bay. The Space Station Freedom Mobile Servicing Center is still in the requirements definition and early design stage. Its primary function design drivers are the capabilities: to support Space Station construction and assembly tasks; to provide external transportation about the Space Station; to provide handling capabilities for the Orbiter, free flyers, and payloads; to support attached payload servicing in the extravehicular environment; and to perform scheduled and un-scheduled maintenance on the Space Station. The differences between the two systems in the area of geometric configuration, mobility, sensor capabilities, control stations, control algorithms, handling performance, end effector dexterity, and fault tolerance are discussed.

  19. Locations of Sampling Stations for Water Quality Monitoring in Water Distribution Networks.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Shweta; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-04-01

    Water quality is required to be monitored in the water distribution networks (WDNs) at salient locations to assure the safe quality of water supplied to the consumers. Such monitoring stations (MSs) provide warning against any accidental contaminations. Various objectives like demand coverage, time for detection, volume of water contaminated before detection, extent of contamination, expected population affected prior to detection, detection likelihood and others, have been independently or jointly considered in determining optimal number and location of MSs in WDNs. "Demand coverage" defined as the percentage of network demand monitored by a particular monitoring station is a simple measure to locate MSs. Several methods based on formulation of coverage matrix using pre-specified coverage criteria and optimization have been suggested. Coverage criteria is defined as some minimum percentage of total flow received at the monitoring stations that passed through any upstream node included then as covered node of the monitoring station. Number of monitoring stations increases with the increase in the value of coverage criteria. Thus, the design of monitoring station becomes subjective. A simple methodology is proposed herein which priority wise iteratively selects MSs to achieve targeted demand coverage. The proposed methodology provided the same number and location of MSs for illustrative network as an optimization method did. Further, the proposed method is simple and avoids subjectivity that could arise from the consideration of coverage criteria. The application of methodology is also shown on a WDN of Dharampeth zone (Nagpur city WDN in Maharashtra, India) having 285 nodes and 367 pipes.

  20. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Laura A.; Barreda, Jose L.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Russian Segment currently provides potable water dispensing capability for crewmember food and beverage rehydration. All ISS crewmembers rehydrate Russian and U.S. style food packages from this location. A new United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) is under development. This unit will provide additional potable water dispensing capability to support an onorbit crew of six. The PWD is designed to provide incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to U.S. style food packages. It will receive iodinated water from the Fuel Cell Water Bus in the U.S. Laboratory element. The unit will provide potable-quality water, including active removal of biocidal iodine prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit will be able to supply up to 2.0 liters of hot water (65 to 93oC) every thirty minutes. This quantity will allow three to four crewmembers to rehydrate their food and beverages from this location during a single meal. The unit is designed to remain functional for up to ten years with replacement of limited life items such as filters. It will be the size of two stacked Shuttle Middeck lockers (approximately the size of two small suitcases) and integrated into a science payload rack in the U.S. Laboratory element. Providing potable-quality water at the proper temperature for food and beverage reconstitution is critical to maintaining crew health and well-being. The numerous engineering challenges as well as human factors and safety considerations during the concept, design, and prototyping are outlined in this paper.

  1. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1995 services catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Timme, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, required containers, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples.

  2. Urine pretreatment for waste water processing systems. [for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E.; Verostko, C. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1983-01-01

    Recovery of high quality water from urine is an essential part of life support on a Space Station to avoid costly launch and resupply penalties. Water can be effectively recovered from urine by distillation following pretreatment by a chemical agent to inhibit microorganism contamination and fix volatile ammonia constituents. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of several pretreatment chemicals which were tested at several concentration levels in combination with sulfuric acid in urine. The optimum pretreatment formulation was then evaluated with urine in the Hamilton Standard Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES). Over 2600 hours of test time was accumulated. Results of these laboratory and system tests are presented in this paper.

  3. A Demonstration Training Program for Potential School Dropouts. A Service Station Training School for Dropout-Prone Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rull, Marvin H.; Moore, Richard O.

    One phase of the curriculum demonstration program sponsored jointly by the Quincy Public Schools and Southern Illinois University is the Service Station Training School described within this report. The Service Station Training School was one of several sheltered work stations which were developed to provide preemployment experiences and training…

  4. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  5. The Context for Food Service and Nutrition in the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial activities in space represent diverse markets where international competitors will be motivated by economic, technical and political considerations. These considerations are given and discussed. The space station program, industrial participation and the potential benefits of commercial activities in space are described. How food service and nutrition affects habitability, effects on physical condition, dietary goals, food preparation and meal service are detailed.

  6. SCaN Network Ground Station Receiver Performance for Future Service Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Lee, Dennis; Cheng, Michael; Lau, Chi-Wung

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Examine the impact of providing the newly standardized CCSDS Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes to the SCaN return data service on the SCaN SN and DSN ground stations receivers: SN Current Receiver: Integrated Receiver (IR). DSN Current Receiver: Downlink Telemetry and Tracking (DTT) Receiver. Early Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) prototype of the SN User Service Subsystem Component Replacement (USS CR) Narrow Band Receiver. Motivate discussion of general issues of ground station hardware design to enable simple and cheap modifications for support of future services.

  7. Service Members Permanent Change of Station Relief Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2011-03-03

    03/03/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1223) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. IPTV based on IP network and streaming media service station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jifeng; Gao, Songbo

    2007-11-01

    IPTV can be a new service performed on the Internet in that network transmission and streaming media technologies are getting mature. In this paper, IPTV system infrastructure of UTStarcom, key technologies deployed, and applications will be discussed and evaluated. The key technologies to achieve IPTV services include 1) codec and compression; 2) streaming media; and 3) broadband networks and access to such networks. The implementation of Media Switch IPTV system in Harbin CNC city network is also discussed.

  9. Quantifying The Water Quality Services Of Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands are well recognized for their potential for providing a wide range of important ecological services including their ability to provide water quality protection. Watershed-scale water quality trading could create market driven incentives to restore and construct wetlands...

  10. Discharge data at water-quality monitoring stations in Arkansas, 1976 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    Streamflow data are presented for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology. Discharge on days of sampling was determined for about 75 of the sites. A summary of those discharges for the water year 1976 is tabulated. Several discharges for miscellaneous dates in the 1974 and 1975 water years are shown also. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. The flight telerobotic servicer (FTS): A focus for automation and robotics on the space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkal, S. W.; Andary, J. F.; Watzin, J. G.; Provost, D. E.

    NASA has committed to the design and implementation of a robotic device to assist the astronauts in assembly, maintenance, servicing and inspection tasks in the unpressurized environment of the Space Station, substantially reducing the time required for crew extra vehicular activity (EVA). This system introduces into the Space Station program a "telerobot" adaptable to a variety of tasks and worksites. The term "telerobot" is used to indicate the combined attributes of an autonomous robot and a teleoperated manipulator. Design requirements for the telerobot are driven by a detailed analysis of the tasks which are required on the Space Station and its associated free-flying platforms. The Space Station will have several kilometers of truss structure to which are attached numerous scientific payloads, as well as functional elements and utilities of the Space Station itself. Scientific payloads require servicing of different levels of complexity. Free-flying spacecraft will be brought into the hangar-like servicing facility for repair. There will be maintenance and inspection tasks of the Space Station elements, as well as initial Space Station assembly tasks. A step-by-step analysis of candidate tasks has led to a design envelope for the telerobot. Since the telerobot is an extension or telepresence of the astronaut at the remote worksite, design of the workstation in the pressurized module has to give careful consideration to the man/machine interface, as well as the constrained volume in the pressurized modules. The flight telerobotic servicer (FTS) is designed for future growth toward more autonomy. By a careful selection of the functional architecture, and a modular approach to the hardware and software design, the FTS can accept developments in artificial intelligence and newer, more advanced sensors, such as machine vision and collision avoidance. The FTS is a focus for automation and robotics on the Space Station, as well as a baseline from which visionary

  12. IET. Coupling station (TAN620) and service room section and details. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Coupling station (TAN-620) and service room section and details. Interior electrical features inside coupling station. Cable terminal assembly for patch panel for plug. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-620-E 401. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0620-10-693-106958 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    This index shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of data collected, and the office principally responsible for the data collection (table 1). An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering above a main-stem station are listed before that station. A tributary entering between two main-stem stations is listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations on first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. To indicate the rank of any tributary on which a gaging station is situated and the stream to which it is an immediate tributary, each indention in the listing of gaging stations represent one rank. This downstream order and system of indention show which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated. On plates 1 and 2, the 8-digit station number is abbreviated because of space limitation.

  14. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    This index shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of data collected, and the office principally responsible for the data collection (table 1). An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering above a main-stem station are listed before that station. A tributary entering between two main-stem stations is listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations on first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. To indicate the rank of any tributary on which a gaging station is situated and the stream to which it is an immediate tributary, each indention in the listing of gaging stations represent one rank. This downstream order and system of indention show which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated. On plates 1 and 2 the 8-digit station number is abbreviated because of space limitation.

  15. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.; Rawson, Jack

    1984-01-01

    This index shows the station number -and name, latitude and longitude, type of data collected, and the office principally responsible for the data collection (table 1). An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering above a main-stem station are listed before that station. A tributary entering between two main-stem stations is listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations on first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. To indicate the rank of any tributary on which a gaging station is situated and the stream to which it is an immediate tributary, each indention in the listing of gaging stations represent one rank. This downstream order and system of indention show which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated. On plates 1 and 2, the 8-digit station number is abbreviated because of space limitation.

  16. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    This index shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of data collected, and the office principally responsible for the data collection (table 1). An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering above a main-stem station are listed before that station. A tributary entering between two main-stem stations is listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations on first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. To indicate the rank of any tributary on which a gaging station is situated and the stream to which it is an immediate tributary, each indention in the listing of gaging stations represent one rank. This downstream order and system of indention show which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated. On plates 1 and 2, the 8-digit station number is abbreviated because of space limitation.

  17. The Space Station Freedom Flight Telerobotic Servicer - The design and evolution of a dexterous space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Harry G.; Andary, James F.; Hewitt, Dennis R.; Haley, Dennis C.

    1990-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) will provide a telerobotic capability to the Space Station in the early assembly phases of the program and will be used for assembly, maintenance, and inspection throughout the lifetime of the Station. Here, the FTS design approach to the development of autonomous capabilities is discussed. The FTS telerobotic workstations for the Shuttle and Space Station, and facility for on-orbit storage are examined. The rationale of the FTS with regard to ease of operation, operational versatility, maintainability, safety, and control is discussed.

  18. Discharge data at water-quality monitoring stations in Arkansas, 1978 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Discharge data were computed for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated throughout Arkansas by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology. Each site is numbered and described. Some of the sites are located at U.S. Geological Survey or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers daily-discharge stations, but most are at points where discharges are not regularly measured. Data were obtained as follows: (1) For sites located at gaging stations, discharges were obtained from Geological Survey and Corps of Engineers annual publications; (2) for sites not too distant from gaging stations, discharges were estimated by using gaging-station records; and (3) for other sites, a series of discharge measurements were made at each site to define a stage-discharge curve from which discharge was computed. Discharges on days of sampling were determined for about 90 of the sites. A tabular summary for the water year 1978 is given. Several discharges for miscellaneous dates in the 1977 water year are shown. (Kosco-USGS)

  19. Integrated water management system - Description and test results. [for Space Station waste water processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elden, N. C.; Winkler, H. E.; Price, D. F.; Reysa, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Water recovery subsystems are being tested at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center for Space Station use to process waste water generated from urine and wash water collection facilities. These subsystems are being integrated into a water management system that will incorporate wash water and urine processing through the use of hyperfiltration and vapor compression distillation subsystems. Other hardware in the water management system includes a whole body shower, a clothes washing facility, a urine collection and pretreatment unit, a recovered water post-treatment system, and a water quality monitor. This paper describes the integrated test configuration, pertinent performance data, and feasibility and design compatibility conclusions of the integrated water management system.

  20. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene among service station attendants and operators.

    PubMed

    Hartle, R

    1993-12-01

    Concerns for atmospheric pollution from auto exhaust have led to the blending of "oxygenates" with motor fuels. The most common oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently required within several metropolitan areas (Denver and Phoenix) in the range of 12% of the motor fuel. Amendments to the Clean Air Act may expand this requirement to as many as 44 other areas of the United States in the near future. In consideration of the magnitude of potential uncontrolled exposures from its extensive use and a related concern involving the potential influence of MTBE blending on exposures to other constituents of gasoline (particularly benzene), an evaluation of exposures among service station attendants and operators was undertaken at the request, and in cooperation with, the American Petroleum Institute during the latter part of 1990. For application of the survey results to a broad audience, three categories or types of service stations were identified with regard to MTBE use and exposure potential: a) service stations that do not use MTBE or use it only as an octane enhancer, b) service stations with seasonal requirements to use 12-15% MTBE (the Denver, Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan areas), and c) service stations equipped with stage II (active) vapor recovery systems (several coastal areas, most notably Southern California). At the two sampled service stations that use only minimal amounts of MTBE (less than 1%), only 1 of 32 personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples from attendants was above the analytical limit of detection, reported at 0.16 ppm. The geometric mean concentration of benzene among this same population (n = 32) was 0.04 ppm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. EXPRESS Service to the International Space Station: EXPRESS Pallet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primm, Lowell; Bergmann, Alan

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will be the ultimate scientific accomplishment in the history of NASA, with its primary objective of providing unique scientific investigation opportunities. This objective is the basis for the creation of the EXPRESS Pallet System (ExPs). The EXPRESS Pallet will provide extremal/unpressurized accommodations for a wide variety of external users. The payload developers represent many science disciplines, including earth observation, communications, solar and deep space viewing, long-term exposure, and many others. The EXPRESS Pallet will provide a mechanism to maximum utilization of the limited ISS unpressurized payload volume, standard physical payload interfaces for users, a standard integration template for users and the capability to changeout payloads on-orbit. The EXPRESS Pallet provides access to Ram, Wake, Starboard, Port, Nadir, Zenith and Earth Limb for exposure and viewing. 'Me ExPs consists of the Pallet structure, payload Adapters, and a subsystem assembly which includes data controller, power distribution and conversion, and Extra Vehicular Robotics/Extra-Vehicular Activity systems.

  2. Rapid toxicity detection in water quality control utilizing automated multispecies biomonitoring for permanent space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, E. L.; Young, R. C.; Smith, M. D.; Eagleson, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate proposed design characteristics and applications of automated biomonitoring devices for real-time toxicity detection in water quality control on-board permanent space stations. Simulated tests in downlinking transmissions of automated biomonitoring data to Earth-receiving stations were simulated using satellite data transmissions from remote Earth-based stations.

  3. Definition of technology development missions for early Space Station satellite servicing. Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Diewald, C. A.; Hills, T. C.; Parmentier, T. J.; Spencer, R. A.; Stone, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Volume 2 contains the Technical Report of the approach and results of the Phase 2 study. The phase 2 servicing study was initiated in June 1983, and is being reported in this document. The scope of the contract was to: (1) define in detail five selected technology development missions (TDM); (2) conduct a design requirement analysis to refine definitions of satellite servicing requirements at the space station; and (3) develop a technology plan that would identify and schedule prerequisite precursor technology development, associated. STS flight experiments and space station experiments needed to provide onorbit validation of the evolving technology.

  4. June 2013 Meteotsunami Captured by NOAA/NOS Coastal Water Level Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, K.; DiVeglio, C.; Welty, A.

    2014-12-01

    On June 13, 2013, a north-south oriented, long formation of strong storms passed eastward over the New Jersey coast. Three hours later, while the weather was calm, a sudden runup of water along the New Jersey and New England coasts was witnessed despite no nearby seismic activity. Post-event analysis revealed that a rare meteotsunami impacted the East Coast of the United States. The strong pressure jump associated with the storms generated an ocean wave that became amplified when the speed of the storms reached the speed of the wave, creating resonance. The wave approached the Mid-Atlantic shelf break and reflected back, explaining the time lag between the passing storms and the incoming wave. The National Water Level Observing Network (NWLON) stations maintained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) measured strong water level oscillations at several stations along the eastern seaboard. The detided one-minute data show the tsunami signal with maximum amplitudes ranging from 0.16 m at Nantucket Island, MA to 0.61 m. at Newport, RI. The Narragansett Bay stations captured the meteotsunami wave propagating northward and diminishing towards the innermost part of the Bay. The Atlantic City, NJ station captured the 3.2-mb pressure jump in the six-minute barometer data from the passing storms as well as the incoming wave that hit three hours later with a maximum amplitude of 0.47 m. Along the U.S. coast, harbor shape and orientation contributed to the strength of the tsunami wave, and some stations that were in shadowed areas did not measure a strong signal despite being in an area of measurable impact. Meteotsunamis pose a threat to the U.S. coastline, and without high-resolution observations and models these events cannot be quantitatively forecasted. NOAA does not currently have an operational warning system but the June 2013 meteotsunami provides an

  5. Regenerative water supply for an interplanetary space station: The experience gained on the space stations “Salut”, “Mir”, ISS and development prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobe, Leonid; Samsonov, Nikoly; Gavrilov, Lev; Novikov, Vladimir; Tomashpolskiy, Mihail; Andreychuk, Peter; Protasov, Nikoly; Synjak, Yury; Skuratov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Based on the experience in operation of Russian space stations Salut, Mir and International space station ISS the station's water balance data, parameters and characteristics of the systems for water recovery have been obtained. Using the data design analysis an integrated water supply system for an interplanetary space station has been performed. A packaged physical/chemical system for water supply is composed of an integrated system for water recovery from humidity condensate, green house condensate, water from carbon dioxide reduction system and condensate from urine system; a system for water reclamation from urine; hygiene water processing system and a water storage system. The take off mass of the packaged water supply system (including expendables, redundancy hardware, equivalent mass of power consumption and of thermal control) is appropriate for Mars missions. The international space station is indispensable for verifying innovative processes and new water recovery systems intended for missions to Mars.

  6. Exposure to volatile organic compounds in an ethanol and gasoline service station.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, K M P G; Martins, E M; Arbilla, G; Gatti, L V

    2007-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the VOCs concentrations in a service station located in a residential and commercial area in the city of Rio de Janeiro. This is, to our knowledge, the first published determination in Brazil, where both ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline are used. Electro polished, stainless steel, evacuated canisters were used for sampling. The analysis was performed by gaschromatography with flame ionization detection (CG-FID) and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CG-MS). A total of 80 and 56 compounds were determined in samples collected at the service station and control location, respectively. The most abundant compounds at the service station were in order of decreasing concentration (units: microg m(-3)): 2-methylbutane (1,715.7), 2-methylbut-1-ene (1,043.2), isobutene (758.8), 2-methylprop-1-ene (703.7), 2-methylpentane (492.1), pentadi-1,3-ene (189.7), toluene (157.0), benzene (144.5), but-2-ene (126.3) and m,p-xylene (123.2). A mean concentration of 144.5 microg m(-3) was determined for benzene, this value is about ten times the concentration determined in the control location in this work and about 70 times the value determined in other locations of Rio de Janeiro using charcoal cartridges for the sampling. The mean benzene/toluene ratios are 0.92 and 0.31 in the service station and control location, respectively. Since in Brazil service station workers are employed to fill customer's cars (self-service is not commonly used) the possible risk of cancer of these workers should be evaluated in a future study.

  7. Design Drivers of Water Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2008-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is being developed as a geographically distributed network of hydrologic data sources and functions that are integrated using web services so that they function as a connected whole. The core of the HIS service-oriented architecture is a collection of water web services, which provide uniform access to multiple repositories of observation data. These services use SOAP protocols communicating WaterML (Water Markup Language). When a client makes a data or metadata request using a CUAHSI HIS web service, these requests are made in standard manner, following the CUAHSI HIS web service signatures - regardless of how the underlying data source may be organized. Also, regardless of the format in which the data are returned by the source, the web services respond to requests by returning the data in a standard format of WaterML. The goal of WaterML design has been to capture semantics of hydrologic observations discovery and retrieval and express the point observations information model as an XML schema. To a large extent, it follows the representation of the information model as adopted by the CUASHI Observations Data Model (ODM) relational design. Another driver of WaterML design is specifications and metadata adopted by USGS NWIS, EPA STORET, and other federal agencies, as it seeks to provide a common foundation for exchanging both agency data and data collected in multiple academic projects. Another WaterML design principle was to create, in version 1 of HIS in particular, a fairly rigid and simple XML schema which is easy to generate and parse, thus creating the least barrier for adoption by hydrologists. WaterML includes a series of elements that reflect common notions used in describing hydrologic observations, such as site, variable, source, observation series, seriesCatalog, and data values. Each of the three main request methods in the water web services - GetSiteInfo, GetVariableInfo, and GetValues - has a

  8. 77 FR 59679 - Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (Millstone Power Station, Unit 3); Order Approving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    .... (DNC), Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS) and Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWE) (collectively ``the licensees'' or ``DNC, Inc., et al.'') are the co-holders of the Renewed... Power Station, Unit 3 (MPS3). CVPS is a non-operating owner of a 1.7303% interest in MPS3. DNC is...

  9. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... proposed rule that appeared in the Federal Register of March 8, 2013. The document proposed rules for...

  10. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101... Operational Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave radio stations may share the use of their facilities on a...

  11. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101... Operational Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave radio stations may share the use of their facilities on a...

  12. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101... Operational Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave radio stations may share the use of their facilities on a...

  13. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101... Operational Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave radio stations may share the use of their facilities on a...

  14. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101... Operational Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave radio stations may share the use of their facilities on a...

  15. A resource-saving technology for purifying oil-contaminated effluent waters from thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodai, E. N.; Nikolaeva, L. A.; Laptev, A. G.

    2011-07-01

    A modified resource-saving scheme for purifying effluent waters produced at thermal stations from petroleum products is described taking the Kazan TETs-3 cogeneration station as an example, in which the sludge from chemical water treatment is used as adsorbent.

  16. Characterization and monitoring of microbial species in the international space station drinking water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duc, M. T. La; Vankateswaran, K.; Sumner, R.; Pierson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this study is to develop procedures to characterize the microbial quality of the drinking water for the International Space Station (ISS) and shuttle at various stages of water treatment.

  17. Solar repowering for electric generation. Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The Department of Energy contracted for Black and Veatch to develop a conceptual design for solar repowering Northeastern Station Unit 1 (NES 1) of the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO). NES 1 is located about 50 km (30 miles) northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This plant was selected because it is representative of candidate plants for repowering and for solar-fossil hybrid operation; it is located in a moderate insolation region, utilizes an efficient reheat cycle with steam conditions characteristic of modern power plants, and has sufficient land for repowering. NES 1 has a subcritical, single reheat turbine-generator and a gas-fired steam generator. The basic repowering configuration was established through a series of trade studies and the criterion that proven technology be used. The system selected has a water/steam receiver which supplies superheated steam to the turbine at a design point flow rate sufficient to displace 20 percent of the unit's fossil fuel consumption. This volume contains the appendices: (A) system requirements specification, and (B) daily insolation profiles. (WHK)

  18. Solar repowering for electric generation: Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The Department of Energy contracted for Black and Veatch to develop a conceptual design for solar repowering Northeastern Station Unit 1 (NES 1) of the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO). NES 1 is located about 50 km (30 miles) northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This plant was selected because it is representative of candidate plants for repowering and for solar-fossil hybrid operation; it is located in a moderate insolation region, utilizes an efficient reheat cycle with steam conditions characteristic of modern power plants, and has sufficient land for repowering. NES 1 has a subcritical, single reheat turbine-generator and a gas-fired steam generator. The basic repowering configuration was established through a series of trade studies and the criterion that proven technology be used. The system selected has a water/steam receiver which supplies superheated steam to the turbine at a design point flow rate sufficient to displace 20 per cent of the unit's fossil fuel consumption. The hybrid nature of the plant's operation eliminates the need for costly thermal storage. A brief overview of the design, performance, and economics is given. (WHK)

  19. Writing the history of water services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katko, Tapio S.; Juuti, Petri S.; Rajala, Riikka P.

    This paper analyses the experiences acquired through several research projects on the history of water and sanitation services by two multidisciplinary teams. Challenges have been faced in identifying feasible objectives, realistic resources, time allocations and unexpected external factors. Water history can preserve cultural heritage, promote reputation management, record vanishing knowledge, and discover new facts.

  20. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations orbit transfer vehicle serving. Phase 2, task 1: Space station support of operational OTV servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Representative space based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), ground based vehicle turnaround assessment, functional operational requirements and facilities, mission turnaround operations, a comparison of ground based versus space based tasks, activation of servicing facilities prior to IOC, fleet operations requirements, maintenance facilities, OTV servicing facilities, space station support requirements, and packaging for delivery are discussed.

  1. Ecosystem services in urban water investment.

    PubMed

    Kandulu, John M; Connor, Jeffery D; MacDonald, Darla Hatton

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, water agencies and utilities have an obligation to consider the broad environmental impacts associated with investments. To aid in understanding water cycle interdependencies when making urban water supply investment decisions, an ecosystem services typology was augmented with the concept of integrated water resources management. This framework is applied to stormwater harvesting in a case study catchment in Adelaide, South Australia. Results show that this methodological framework can effectively facilitate systematic consideration and quantitative assessment of broad environmental impacts of water supply investments. Five ecosystem service impacts were quantified including provision of 1) urban recreational amenity, 2) regulation of coastal water quality, 3) salinity, 4) greenhouse gas emissions, and 5) support of estuarine habitats. This study shows that ignoring broad environmental impacts can underestimate ecosystem service benefits of water supply investments by a value of up to A$1.36/kL, or three times the cost of operating and maintenance of stormwater harvesting. Rigorous assessment of the public welfare impacts of water infrastructure investments is required to guide long-term optimal water supply investment decisions. Numerous challenges remain in the quantification of broad environmental impacts of a water supply investment including a lack of peer-reviewed studies of environmental impacts, aggregation of incommensurable impacts, potential for double-counting errors, uncertainties in available impact estimates, and how to determine the most suitable quantification technique.

  2. Service offerings and interfaces for the ACTS network of earth stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.; Dobyns, T. R.; Chitre, D. M.; Lindstrom, R.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) will use a network of about 20 earth stations to operate as a Mode 1 network. This network will support two ACTS program objectives: to verify the technical performance of ACTS Mode 1 operation in GEO and to demonstrate the types and quality of services that can be provided by an ACTS Mode 1 communications system. The terrestrial interface design is a critical element in assuring that these network earth stations will meet the objectives. In this paper, the applicable terrestrial interface design requirements, the resulting interface specifications, and the associated terrestrial input/output hardware are discussed. A functional block diagram of a network earth station is shown.

  3. FLUORIDE CONCENTRATION IN WATER AT THE AREA SUPPLIED BY THE WATER TREATMENT STATION OF BAURU, SP

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Carolina Simonetti; Ramires, Irene; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bastos, José Roberto de Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the fluoride concentration in the public water supply at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru and classify the samples as acceptable or unacceptable according to the fluoride concentration. Material and methods: samples were collected from 30 areas at two periods, October 2002 and March 2003. The fluoride concentration in the samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion sensitive electrode (Orion 9609) connected to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720). Samples with fluoride concentration ranging from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L were considered acceptable, and those whose concentration was outside this range as unacceptable. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: the fluoride concentration of the water samples varied between 0.31 and 2.01 mg F/L. Nearly 56% of the samples were classified as acceptable. Conclusion: the variations in fluoride concentration at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station reinforce the need of constant monitoring for maintenance of adequate fluoride levels in the public water supply. PMID:19089059

  4. Water-quality data for selected stations in the East Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1981-01-01

    The results of water-quality samples collected from April 1978 through April 1980 from three canal stations, four marsh stations, and two ground-water stations within the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida, are tabulated in 37 tables. The major categories of parameters analyzed are field measurements, physical characteristics, macronutrients (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus), major ions, trace elements, and algae. Chemical data for bulk-precipitation stations within and adjacent to the East Everglades are also given. The parameters analyzed include macronutrients, major ions, and trace elements. The period of record for these stations is October 1977 through April 1980. Bottom material at the canal and marsh stations was collected twice during the investigation. These data include analyses for macronutrients, trace elements, and chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides. (USGS)

  5. Completion of One-Year Bioventing Test, Vandenberg AFB BX Service Station and Facility 6454

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AECEE) one-year bioventing test and evaluation projects at the BX Service Station and Facility... bioventing is cost-effectively remediating fuel contamination in a reasonable time-frame. We recommend its application throughout the Air Force and at other...sites on your installation using the criteria in the AFCEE Test Plan and Technical Protocol for a Field Treatability Test for Bioventing , May 1992

  6. Extended Bioventing Testing Results at the BX Service Station Site, Patrick AFB, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. (Parsons ES) is pleased to submit the results of the extended bioventing testing at the BX Service Station Site at...injection bioventing , and 1 year of full-scale air injection bioventing . The purpose of this letter is to summarize site and remediation activities to...and three tables are attached. The as-built bioventing system and sampling/respiration testing locations are illustrated on Figure 1. Table 1

  7. Elementary and Secondary Educational Services of Public Television Grantees: Highlights from the 1997 Station Activities Survey. CPB Research Notes, No. 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This report provides a summary of K-12 educational services offered by Corporation for Public Broadcasting-supported television stations from CPB's annual Station Activities Survey. Stations are broken into cohorts by license type and budget size. The 1997 Station Activities Survey asked public television stations whether they provided…

  8. International space station mobile servicing system robotic workstation displays and overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Susan H.

    1997-07-01

    The International Space Station (ISSP) currently under development is equipped with robotic workstations to perform and provide information on the mobile servicing system robotic functions in use. The workstations include conventional and special developed hardware, software displays, and control software configurations. The robotic activities are critical to the ISSP during assembly and maintenance activities resulting in detailed crew interface requirements. Operational scenarios were used to develop the requirements of the ISSP Robotic activities resulting in the specification and configuration of the Mobile Servicing System Robotic Workstation.

  9. Trade study comparing specimen chamber servicing methods for the Space Station Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvisi, Michael L.; Sun, Sidney C.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen Chamber Service Unit, a component of the Space Station Centrifuge Facility, must provide a clean enclosure on a continuing basis for the facility's plant, rodent and primate specimens. The specimen chambers can become soiled and can require periodic servicing to maintain a clean environment for the specimens. Two methods of servicing the specimen chambers are discussed: washing the chambers with an on-board washer, or disposing of the soiled chambers and replacing them with clean ones. Many of these issues are addressed by developing several servicing options, using either cleaning or replacement as the method of providing clean specimen chambers, and then evaluating each option according to a set of established quantitative and qualitative criteria. Disposing and replacing the Specimen Chambers is preferable to washing them.

  10. Mature data transport and command management services for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The duplex space/ground/space data services for the Space Station are described. The need to separate the uplink data service functions from the command functions is discussed. Command management is a process shared by an operation control center and a command management system and consists of four functions: (1) uplink data communications, (2) management of the on-board computer, (3) flight resource allocation and management, and (4) real command management. The new data service capabilities provided by microprocessors, ground and flight nodes, and closed loop and open loop capabilities are studied. The need for and functions of a flight resource allocation management service are examined. The system is designed so only users can access the system; the problems encountered with open loop uplink access are analyzed. The procedures for delivery of operational, verification, computer, and surveillance and monitoring data directly to users are reviewed.

  11. Automation and robotics and related technology issues for Space Station customer servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Helmut P.

    1987-01-01

    Several flight servicing support elements are discussed within the context of the Space Station. Particular attention is given to the servicing facility, the mobile servicing center, and the flight telerobotic servicer (FTS). The role that automation and robotics can play in the design and operation of each of these elements is discussed. It is noted that the FTS, which is currently being developed by NASA, will evolve to increasing levels of autonomy to allow for the virtual elimination of routine EVA. Some of the features of the FTS will probably be: dual manipulator arms having reach and dexterity roughly equivalent to that of an EVA-suited astronaut, force reflection capability allowing efficient teleoperation, and capability of operating from a variety of support systems.

  12. Service Life Extension of the Propulsion System of Long-Term Manned Orbital Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, Ulhas; Kuznetsov, Sergei; Shaevich, Sergey; Spencer, Victor

    2014-01-01

    One of the critical non-replaceable systems of a long-term manned orbital station is the propulsion system. Since the propulsion system operates beginning with the launch of station elements into orbit, its service life determines the service life of the station overall. Weighing almost a million pounds, the International Space Station (ISS) is about four times as large as the Russian space station Mir and about five times as large as the U.S. Skylab. Constructed over a span of more than a decade with the help of over 100 space flights, elements and modules of the ISS provide more research space than any spacecraft ever built. Originally envisaged for a service life of fifteen years, this Earth orbiting laboratory has been in orbit since 1998. Some elements that have been launched later in the assembly sequence were not yet built when the first elements were placed in orbit. Hence, some of the early modules that were launched at the inception of the program were already nearing the end of their design life when the ISS was finally ready and operational. To maximize the return on global investments on ISS, it is essential for the valuable research on ISS to continue as long as the station can be sustained safely in orbit. This paper describes the work performed to extend the service life of the ISS propulsion system. A system comprises of many components with varying failure rates. Reliability of a system is the probability that it will perform its intended function under encountered operating conditions, for a specified period of time. As we are interested in finding out how reliable a system would be in the future, reliability expressed as a function of time provides valuable insight. In a hypothetical bathtub shaped failure rate curve, the failure rate, defined as the number of failures per unit time that a currently healthy component will suffer in a given future time interval, decreases during infant-mortality period, stays nearly constant during the service

  13. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  14. Evaluation of river water quality monitoring stations by principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ying

    2005-07-01

    The development of a surface water monitoring network is a critical element in the assessment, restoration, and protection of stream water quality. This study applied principal component analysis (PCA) and principal factor analysis (PFA) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the surface water quality-monitoring network in a river where the evaluated variables are monitoring stations. The objective was to identify monitoring stations that are important in assessing annual variations of river water quality. Twenty-two stations used for monitoring physical, chemical, and biological parameters, located at the main stem of the lower St. Johns River in Florida, USA, were selected for the purpose of this study. Results show that 3 monitoring stations were identified as less important in explaining the annual variance of the data set, and therefore could be the non-principal stations. In addition, the PFA technique was also employed to identify important water quality parameters. Results reveal that total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, dissolved nitrate and nitrite, orthophosphate, alkalinity, salinity, Mg, and Ca were the parameters that are most important in assessing variations of water quality in the river. This study suggests that PCA and PFA techniques are useful tools for identification of important surface water quality monitoring stations and parameters.

  15. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  16. Optimization of maneuvers and resources for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Jacques; Canu, Richard; Joulot, Antoine

    Addressing the generation of flight scenarios for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station, solutions in terms of sequences of maneuvers shall be found that meet a generally complex set of mission constraints while optimizing the needed resources. For the optimization of maneuvers and resources during rendezvous, this paper describes a methodology based on the parametric optimization of a sequence of genetic non-impulsional thrust maneuvers which are defined by the user from a standard catalog, allowing to cope with both translations and rotations. The method uses a reduced gradient algorithm to find an optimal trajectory that meet every mission constraint. Most attention has been paid to the standard of realism in the modeling of the chaser and target dynamics, and in the formalization of the constraints on the approach trajectories; these last ones are defined as the terminal position, the attitude and kinematic capture conditions for berthing or docking, the maximal duration allocated to the approach, path constraints, the propulsive capacities of the chaser and a `safety' constraint, which in other words means that any failure on the chaser during the approach shall result in collision avoiding trajectories or in a mechanical contract to the station within safe limits. The criterion for scenarios optimization can be minimization of propellant consumption or phase duration, or a weighed combination of both. For illustration purpose, example results are given for the final approach of a servicing vehicle to an Earth-pointed space station.

  17. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio... the purpose of its use by one or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication services under...

  18. 75 FR 13606 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3... Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 (PVNGS, Units 1, 2, and 3), located...

  19. 76 FR 24064 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-528, 50-529, 50-530; NRC-2009-0012 Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde... of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 (PVNGS). Renewed Facility Operating... Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station,'' issued January 2011, discusses the Commission's...

  20. 75 FR 8149 - Arizona Public Service Company, et al. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, et al. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3... Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS, the facility), Units 1, 2, and 3, respectively, located in... different resources than those previously considered in the Final Environmental Statement for the Palo...

  1. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey; Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  2. Breadth of Scientific Activities and Network Station Specifications in the International GPS Service (IGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. W.; Neilan, R. E.; Springer, T. A.; Reigber, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    A strong multipurpose aspect of the International GPS Service (IGS) is revealed by a glance at the titles of current projects and working groups within the IGS: IGS/BIPM Time Transfer Project; Ionosphere Working Group; Troposphere Working Group; International GLONASS Experiment; Working Group on Low-Earth Orbiter Missions; and Tide Gauges, CGPS, and the IGS. The IGS network infrastructure, in large part originally commissioned for geodynamical investigations, has proved to be a valuable asset in developing application-oriented subnetworks whose requirements overlap the characteristics of existing IGS stations and future station upgrades. Issues encountered thus far in the development of multipurpose or multitechnique IGS projects as well as future possibilities will be reviewed.

  3. Ground-water flow in the shallow aquifer system at the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Directorate of the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia, is concerned about possible contamination of ground water at the Station. Ground water at the Station flows through a shallow system of layered aquifers and leaky confining units. The units of the shallow aquifer system are the Columbia aquifer, the Cornwallis Cave confining unit, the Cornwallis Cave aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer. The Eastover-Calvert confining unit separates the shallow aquifer system from deeper confined aquifers beneath the Station. A three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was used to simulate steady-state ground-water flow of the shallow aquifer system in and around the Station. The model simulated ground-water flow from the peninsular drainage divide that runs across the Lackey Plain near the southern end of the Station north to King Creek and the York River and south to Skiffes Creek and the James River. The model was calibrated by minimizing the root mean square error between 4 7 measured and corresponding simulated water levels. The calibrated model was used to determine the ground-water budget and general directions of ground-water flow. A particle-tracking routine was used with the calibrated model to estimate groundwater flow paths, flow rates, and traveltimes from selected sites at the Station. Simulated ground-water flow velocities of the Station-area model were small beneath the interstream areas of the Lackey Plain and Croaker Flat, but increased outward toward the streams and rivers where the hydraulic gradients are larger. If contaminants from the land surface entered the water table at or near the interstream areas of the Station, where hydraulic gradients are smaller, they would migrate more slowly than if they entered closer to the streams or the shores of the rivers where gradients commonly are larger. The ground-water flow simulations indicate that some ground water leaks downward from

  4. High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

  5. Station descriptions and availability of discharge and water-quality data through 1985 for eastern Montana stream sites not included in the National Water Data Exchange Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groskinsky Link, B. L.; Cary, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Stations were selected to monitor water discharge and water quality of streams in eastern Montana. This report describes the stations and indicates the availability of hydrologic data through 1985. Included are stations that are operated by organizations that do not belong to the National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX) program operated by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each station description contains a narration of the station 's history including location, drainage area, elevation, operator, period of record, type of equipment and instruments used at the station, and data availability. The data collected at each station have been identified according to type: water discharge, chemical quality, and suspended sediment. Descriptions are provided for 113 stations. These data have potential uses in characterizing small hydrologic basins, as well as other uses. A map of eastern Montana shows the location of the stations selected. (USGS)

  6. International Space Station Bacteria Filter Element Post-Flight Testing and Service Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; von Jouanne, R. G.; Turner, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station uses high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as Bacteria Filter Elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. Segment. The pre-flight service life prediction of 1 year for the BFEs is based upon performance engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS Program resources. Thus testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are discussed. Recommendations for realizing significant savings to the ISS Program are presented.

  7. Estimation of the discharges of the multiple water level stations by multi-objective optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Mamoru; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Tsuda, Morimasa; Yanami, Hitoshi; Anai, Hirokazu; Iwami, Yoichi

    2016-04-01

    This presentation shows two aspects of the parameter identification to estimate the discharges of the multiple water level stations by multi-objective optimization. One is how to adjust the parameters to estimate the discharges accurately. The other is which optimization algorithms are suitable for the parameter identification. Regarding the previous studies, there is a study that minimizes the weighted error of the discharges of the multiple water level stations by single-objective optimization. On the other hand, there are some studies that minimize the multiple error assessment functions of the discharge of a single water level station by multi-objective optimization. This presentation features to simultaneously minimize the errors of the discharges of the multiple water level stations by multi-objective optimization. Abe River basin in Japan is targeted. The basin area is 567.0km2. There are thirteen rainfall stations and three water level stations. Nine flood events are investigated. They occurred from 2005 to 2012 and the maximum discharges exceed 1,000m3/s. The discharges are calculated with PWRI distributed hydrological model. The basin is partitioned into the meshes of 500m x 500m. Two-layer tanks are placed on each mesh. Fourteen parameters are adjusted to estimate the discharges accurately. Twelve of them are the hydrological parameters and two of them are the parameters of the initial water levels of the tanks. Three objective functions are the mean squared errors between the observed and calculated discharges at the water level stations. Latin Hypercube sampling is one of the uniformly sampling algorithms. The discharges are calculated with respect to the parameter values sampled by a simplified version of Latin Hypercube sampling. The observed discharge is surrounded by the calculated discharges. It suggests that it might be possible to estimate the discharge accurately by adjusting the parameters. In a sense, it is true that the discharge of a water

  8. Evaluation of environmental levels of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline service stations by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Periago, J F; Zambudio, A; Prado, C

    1997-08-22

    The volume of gasoline sold in refuelling operations and the ambient temperature, can increase significantly the environmental levels of aromatic hydrocarbon vapours and subsequently, the occupational risk of gasoline service station attendants, specially in the case of benzene. We have evaluated the occupational exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons by means of personal-breathing-zone samples of gasoline vapours in a service station attendant population. This evaluation was carried out using diffusive samplers, in two periods at quite different temperatures (March and July). A significant relationship between the volume of gasoline sold during the shift and the ambient concentration of benzene, toluene, and xylenes was found for each worker sampled. Furthermore a significant difference was found between the time-weighted average concentration of aromatic compounds measured in March, with ambient temperatures of 14-15 degrees C and July, with temperatures of 28-30 degrees C. In addition, 20% of the population sampled in the last period were exposed to a time-weighted average concentration of benzene above the proposed Threshold Limit Value of 960 micrograms/m(3) of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

  9. A methodology for automation and robotics evaluation applied to the space station telerobotic servicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Gyanfi, Max; Volkmer, Kent; Zimmerman, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    The efforts of a recent study aimed at identifying key issues and trade-offs associated with using a Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) to aid in Space Station assembly-phase tasks is described. The use of automation and robotic (A and R) technologies for large space systems would involve a substitution of automation capabilities for human extravehicular or intravehicular activities (EVA, IVA). A methodology is presented that incorporates assessment of candidate assembly-phase tasks, telerobotic performance capabilities, development costs, and effect of operational constraints (space transportation system (STS), attached payload, and proximity operations). Changes in the region of cost-effectiveness are examined under a variety of systems design assumptions. A discussion of issues is presented with focus on three roles the FTS might serve: (1) as a research-oriented testbed to learn more about space usage of telerobotics; (2) as a research based testbed having an experimental demonstration orientation with limited assembly and servicing applications; or (3) as an operational system to augment EVA and to aid the construction of the Space Station and to reduce the programmatic (schedule) risk by increasing the flexibility of mission operations.

  10. Service Life Extension of the Propulsion System of Long-Term Manned Orbital Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, Ulhas; Kuznetsov, Sergei; Spencer, Victor

    2014-01-01

    One of the critical non-replaceable systems of a long-term manned orbital station is the propulsion system. Since the propulsion system operates beginning with the launch of station elements into orbit, its service life determines the service life of the station overall. Weighing almost a million pounds, the International Space Station (ISS) is about four times as large as the Russian space station Mir and about five times as large as the U.S. Skylab. Constructed over a span of more than a decade with the help of over 100 space flights, elements and modules of the ISS provide more research space than any spacecraft ever built. Originally envisaged for a service life of fifteen years, this Earth orbiting laboratory has been in orbit since 1998. Some elements that have been launched later in the assembly sequence were not yet built when the first elements were placed in orbit. Hence, some of the early modules that were launched at the inception of the program were already nearing the end of their design life when the ISS was finally ready and operational. To maximize the return on global investments on ISS, it is essential for the valuable research on ISS to continue as long as the station can be sustained safely in orbit. This paper describes the work performed to extend the service life of the ISS propulsion system. A system comprises of many components with varying failure rates. Reliability of a system is the probability that it will perform its intended function under encountered operating conditions, for a specified period of time. As we are interested in finding out how reliable a system would be in the future, reliability expressed as a function of time provides valuable insight. In a hypothetical bathtub shaped failure rate curve, the failure rate, defined as the number of failures per unit time that a currently healthy component will suffer in a given future time interval, decreases during infant-mortality period, stays nearly constant during the service

  11. The Space Station Freedom Flight Telerobotic Servicer: the design and evolution of a dexterous space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCain, H. G.; Andary, J. F.; Hewitt, D. R.; Haley, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an advanced telerobotic system to assist in and reduce crew extravehicular activity (EVA) for Space Station) Freedom (SSF). The FTS will provide a telerobotic capability to the Freedom Station in the early assembly phases of the program and will be employed for assembly, maintenance, and inspection applications throughout the lifetime of the space station. Appropriately configured elements of the FTS will also be employed for robotic manipulation in remote satellite servicing applications and possibly the Lunar/Mars Program. In mid-1989, the FTS entered the flight system design and implementation phase (Phase C/D) of development with the signing of the FTS prime contract with Martin Marietta Astronautics Group in Denver, Colorado. The basic FTS design is now established and can be reported on in some detail. This paper will describe the FTS flight system design and the rationale for the specific design approaches and component selections. The current state of space technology and the nature of the FTS task dictate that the FTS be designed with sophisticated teleoperation capabilities for its initial primary operating mode. However, there are technologies, such as advanced computer vision and autonomous planning techniques currently in research and advanced development phases which would greatly enhance the FTS capabilities to perform autonomously in less structured work environments. Therefore, a specific requirement on the initial FTS design is that it has the capability to evolve as new technology becomes available. This paper will describe the FTS design approach for evolution to more autonomous capabilities. Some specific task applications of the FTS and partial automation approaches of these tasks will also be discussed in this paper.

  12. Engineering factors influencing Corbicula fouling in nuclear-service water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H.; Johnson, K.I.; Page, T.L.

    1983-06-01

    Corbicula fouling is a continuing problem in nuclear-service water systems. More knowledge of biological and engineering factors is needed to develop effective detection and control methods. A data base on Corbicula fouling was compiled from nuclear and non-nuclear power stations and industries using raw water. This data base was used in an analysis to identify systems and components which are conducive to fouling by Corbicula. Bounds on several engineering parameters such as velocity and temperature which support Corbicula growth are given. Service water systems found in BWR and PWR reactors are listed and those that show fouling are identified. Possible safety implications of Corbicula fouling are discussed for specific service water systems. Several effective control methods in current use include backflushing with heated water, centrifugal strainers, and continuous chlorination during spawning seasons.

  13. Bacteriological and physicochemical studies on Tigris River near the water purification stations within Baghdad Province.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayatti, Khalid K; Al-Arajy, Kadhum H; Al-Nuaemy, Seba Hussain

    2012-01-01

    We studied the physical, chemical, and microbiological factors that influence drinking water quality processed from River Tigris, and of the three main drinking water purification stations located at different parts of Tigris River, along with evaluation of drinking water of Al-Shula region in Baghdad city. Water samples were taken monthly from December 2009 to September 2010. Physical and chemical analyses of water included determination of temperature, pH, turbidity, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and biological oxygen demand. The results of water before and after purification indicated values within the international allowable levels. Microbial analyses included estimation of the number of total viable microbial counts, total coliform, total fecal E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and other pathogenic bacteria that might be present in the water of the three stations and of the Tigris River, and also the tap water from Al-Shula houses. The results indicated that the types and proportions of various bacterial species isolated from different water sources were almost similar. This indicates inefficient purification procedures in all the stations studied, which exceeded the internationally allowable level of pathogens in potable water. Also, this explains the high incidence rate of children diarrheal reported in Al-Shula region.

  14. Waste Water Handling Proof of Concepts at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-17

    5 2.2.3 McMurdo Waste Water Treatment Plant...Compound WWTP Waste Water Treatment Plant ERDC/CRREL TR-14-17 vii Unit Conversion Factors Multiply By To Obtain British thermal units (International...transportation of waste back to the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) at McMurdo Station via a vacuum tank. After three seasons of testing both the

  15. 10 CFR 434.518 - Service water heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service water heating. 434.518 Section 434.518 Energy... RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.518 Service water heating. 518.1The service water loads for Prototype and Reference Buildings are defined in terms of Btu/h per person...

  16. 10 CFR 434.518 - Service water heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Service water heating. 434.518 Section 434.518 Energy... RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.518 Service water heating. 518.1 The service water loads for Prototype and Reference Buildings are defined in terms of Btu/h per person...

  17. 10 CFR 434.518 - Service water heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Service water heating. 434.518 Section 434.518 Energy... RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.518 Service water heating. 518.1The service water loads for Prototype and Reference Buildings are defined in terms of Btu/h per person...

  18. 10 CFR 434.518 - Service water heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Service water heating. 434.518 Section 434.518 Energy... RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.518 Service water heating. 518.1The service water loads for Prototype and Reference Buildings are defined in terms of Btu/h per person...

  19. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support Systems: An Update on Waste Water Reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferner, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Since the mid-1980's, work has been ongoing In the development of the various environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for the space station. Part of this effort has been focused on the development of a new subsystem to reclaim waste water that had not been previously required for shuttle missions. Because of the extended manned missions proposed, reclamation of waste water becomes imperative to avoid the weight penalties associated with resupplying a crew's entire water needs for consumption and daily hygiene. Hamilton Standard, under contract to Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, has been designing the water reclamation system for space station use. Since June of 1991, Hamilton Standard has developed a combined water processor capable of reclaiming potable quality water from waste hygiene water, used laundry water, processed urine, Shuttle fuel cell water, humidity condensate and other minor waste water sources. The system was assembled and then tested with over 27,700 pounds of 'real' waste water. During the 1700 hours of system operation required to process this waste water, potable quality water meeting NASA and Boeing specifications was produced. This paper gives a schematic overview of the system, describes the test conditions and test results and outlines the next steps for system development.

  20. The impact of integrated water management on the Space Station propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The water usage of elements in the Space Station integrated water system (IWS) is discussed, and the parameters affecting the overall water balance and the water-electrolysis propulsion-system requirements are considered. With nominal IWS operating characteristics, extra logistic water resupply (LWR) is found to be unnecessary in the satisfaction of the nominal propulsion requirements. With the consideration of all possible operating characteristics, LWR will not be required in 65.5 percent of the cases, and for 17.9 percent of the cases LWR can be eliminated by controlling the stay time of theShuttle Orbiter orbiter.

  1. Problems in water recycling for Space Station Freedom and long duration life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, D. S.; Crump, W. J.; Macler, B. A.; Wydeven, T., Jr.; Sauer, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    A biologically-enhanced, physical/chemical terminal water treatment testbed for the Space Station Freedom is proposed. Recycled water requirements for human, animal, plant and/or combined crews for long duration space missions are discussed. An effective terminal treatment method for recycled water reclamation systems that is based on using granular activated carbon as the principal active agent and the controls of microbial contamination and growth within recycled water systems are examined. The roles of plants in water recycling within CELSS is studied.

  2. Service offerings and interfaces for the ACTS network of Earth stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Satellite (ACTS) is capable of two modes of communication. Mode 1 is a mesh network of Earth stations using baseband-switched, time-division multiple-access (BBS-TDMA) and hopping beams. Mode 2 is a mesh network using satellite-switched, time-division multiple-access (SS-TDMA) and fixed (or hopping) beams. The purpose of this paper is to present the functional requirements and the design of the ACTS Mode 1 Earth station terrestrial interface. Included among the requirements are that: (1) the interface support standard telecommunications service offerings (i.e., voice, video and data at rates ranging from 9.6 kbps to 44 Mbps); (2) the interface support the unique design characteristics of the ACTS communications systems (e.g., the real time demand assignment of satellite capacity); and (3) the interface support test hardware capable of validating ACTS communications processes. The resulting interface design makes use of an appropriate combination of T1 or T3 multiplexers and a small central office (maximum capacity 56 subscriber lines per unit).

  3. Effects of tunnel and station size on the costs and service of subway transit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayman, B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of less spacious, less costly underground rail mass transit system designs is studied. The major cost saving expected from alternative tunnel designs results from using precast concrete segment liners in place of steel. The saying expected for a two-foot decrease in the diameter of twin, single track tunnels is about two million dollars per route mile from 13 million dollars for precast concrete segment liners (a saving of about 16%). The cost per route-mile of a double track tunnel appears to be 15 to 25% higher than for the twin, single track tunnels. The effective cost saving expected from stations with four-car train capability instead of the usual eight-car trains is nearly 25% or seven million dollars per route mile. The saving in station costs can be obtained while improving service to the user (lower transit time and less waiting for trains) up to a capacity of 36,000 riders per hour in each direction.

  4. Packaging's Contribution for the Effectiveness of the Space Station's Food Service Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Storage limitations will have a major effect on space station food service. For example: foods with low bulk density such as ice cream, bread, cake, standard type potato chips and other low density snacks, flaked cereals, etc., will exacerbate the problem of space limitations; package containers are inherently volume consuming and refuse creating; and the useful observation that the optimum package is no package at all leads to the tentative conclusion that the least amount of packaging per unit of food, consistent with storage, aesthetics, preservation, cleanliness, cost and disposal criteria, is the most practical food package for the space station. A series of trade offs may have to be made to arrive at the most appropriate package design for a particular type of food taking all the criteria into account. Some of these trade offs are: single serve vs. bulk; conventional oven vs. microwave oven; nonmetallic aseptically vs. non-aseptically packaged foods; and comparison of aseptic vs. nonaseptic food packages. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  5. Toxicity assessment of water and sediment elutriates from fixed-station ambient water quality network stations, 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1991-02-01

    Toxicity biomonitoring of water column and sediment toxicity was conducted at six fixed network stations from 1986 through 1989. Stations were located on the Holston River, Bear Creek (Pickwick Reservoir), Hiwassee River, Emory River, Nolichucky River, and French Broad River at locations chosen to represent those sub-basins. Tests evaluated acute and chronic responses of larval fathead minnow survival and growth and Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction to water and sediment elutriates collected from these sites. Samples were collected once each year during summer. Neither water nor sediment elutriates from the French Broad River were toxic during the study period. Water column toxicity (chronic) occurred in Bear Creek in 1986 and in the Nolichucky River in 1987. Sediment elutriate toxicity occurred once during the study period in the Emory (1987) and Nolichucky (1988) Rivers. Sediments from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers were toxic two times each. Hiwassee River sediment exhibited >1.3 chronic toxicity units in 1987 and 1989 (were toxic at the lowest dilution tested). Holston River sediment toxicity occurred during the most recent two years of testing. Results from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers may indicate a toxics problem in the sub-basin. No acute toxicity occurred during the study. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Meteorological data for water years 1988-94 from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, A.L.; Davies, W.J.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes meteorological data collected from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from as early as April 1987 through September 1994. The measurements include solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind vector magnitude, wind direction, wind vector direction, barometric pressure, and precipitation. Measurements were made very 10 seconds and averaged every 15 minutes. The data were collected as part of the geologic and hydrologic site-characterization studies of Yucca Mountain, a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. Precipitation at the site ranged from a low of 12 millimeters total for water year 1989 to a high of 312 millimeters total for water year 1993. Air temperature ranged from a low of 15.1 degrees Celsius in December 1990 (water year 1991) to a high of 41.9 degrees Celsius in July 1989 (water year 1989). The weather station network also provides information on the spatial variability of precipitation and temperature.

  7. Status of the Space Station water reclamation and management subsystem design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, R. M.; Mortazavi, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    A development status report is presented for the NASA Space Station's water reclamation and management (WRM) system, for which the candidate phase change-employing processing technologies are an air evaporation subsystem, a thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem, and the vapor compression distillation subsystem. These WRM candidates employ evaporation to effect water removal from contaminants, but differ in their control of the vapor/liquid interface in zero-gravity and in the recovery of the latent heat of vaporization.

  8. Microwave radiometer observations of interannual water vapor variability and vertical structure over a tropical station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renju, R.; Suresh Raju, C.; Mathew, Nizy; Antony, Tinu; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2015-05-01

    The intraseasonal and interannual characteristics and the vertical distribution of atmospheric water vapor from the tropical coastal station Thiruvananthapuram (TVM) located in the southwestern region of the Indian Peninsula are examined from continuous multiyear, multifrequency microwave radiometer profiler (MRP) measurements. The accuracy of MRP for precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation, particularly during a prolonged monsoon period, has been demonstrated by comparing with the PWV derived from collocated GPS measurements based on regression model between PWV and GPS wet delay component which has been developed for TVM station. Large diurnal and intraseasonal variations of PWV are observed during winter and premonsoon seasons. There is large interannual PWV variability during premonsoon, owing to frequent local convection and summer thunderstorms. During monsoon period, low interannual PWV variability is attributed to the persistent wind from the ocean which brings moisture to this coastal station. However, significant interannual humidity variability is seen at 2 to 6 km altitude, which is linked to the monsoon strength over the station. Prior to monsoon onset over the station, the specific humidity increases up to 5-10 g/kg in the altitude region above 5 km and remains consistently so throughout the active spells.

  9. Water management requirements for animal and plant maintenance on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Rasmussen, D.; Curran, G.

    1987-01-01

    Long-duration Space Station experiments that use animals and plants as test specimens will require increased automation and advanced technologies for water management in order to free scientist-astronauts from routine but time-consuming housekeeping tasks. The three areas that have been identified as requiring water management and that are discusseed are: (1) drinking water and humidity condensate of the animals, (2) nutrient solution and transpired water of the plants, and (3) habitat cleaning methods. Automation potential, technology assessment, crew time savings, and resupply penalties are also discussed.

  10. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  11. Space Station water degradation study covering the first 24 months of exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcright, P. S.; Roman, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the MSFC space station water degradation study (WDS) and presents interim results from the first 24 months of testing. The WDS simulates the stagnant storage of water in distribution lines before the activation of the space station's water processor by storing processed water at ambient temperature in valved sections of 1-in stainless steel and titanium tube. The WDS seeks to determine whether the water quality will degrade unacceptably and whether microbial growth will proceed to an unmanageable extent during extended stagnation. During the first 24 months, significant changes have occurred. Although iodine, which is used as a biocide, was nearly depleted within the first 6 months of testing, microbial growth has been minimal. This report describes the decrease in iodine concentration and the results of microbial and biofilm analyses. Increases in total organic carbon, iodide, chloride, nickel, iron, and chromium concentrations are presented and discussed. The observed increase in conductivity and the decreases in pH and turbidity are also presented. The authors conclude that, with proper preparation, potable water can be stored under stagnant conditions without unmanageable degradation in water quality; a flushing operation and subsequent processing of the degraded water should render the water system ready for use.

  12. Definition of technology development missions for early space station, orbit transfer vehicle servicing. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) servicing study scope, propellant transfer, storage and reliquefaction technology development missions (TDM), docking and berthing TDM, maintenance TDM, OTV/payload integration TDM, combined TDMS design, summary space station accomodations, programmatic analysis, and TDM equipment operational usage are discussed.

  13. Health risk assessment of ambient air concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) in service station environments.

    PubMed

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2014-06-18

    A comprehensive evaluation of the adverse health effects of human exposures to BTX from service station emissions was carried out using BTX exposure data from the scientific literature. The data was grouped into different scenarios based on activity, location and occupation and plotted as Cumulative Probability Distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. HQ50 and HQ95 > 1 were obtained with benzene in the scenario for service station attendants and mechanics repairing petrol dispensing pumps indicating a possible health risk. The risk was minimized for service stations using vapour recovery systems which greatly reduced the benzene exposure levels. HQ50 and HQ95 < 1 were obtained for all other scenarios with benzene suggesting minimal risk for most of the exposed population. However, HQ50 and HQ95 < 1 was also found with toluene and xylene for all scenarios, suggesting minimal health risk. The lifetime excess Cancer Risk (CR) and Overall Risk Probability for cancer on exposure to benzene was calculated for all Scenarios and this was higher amongst service station attendants than any other scenario.

  14. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the satellite digital audio radio service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214... Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio.... The term “frequency assignment” refers to the authorization given by the Commission for a...

  15. 76 FR 7847 - Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... interfering with radio communications; (b) To determine whether Glenn A. Baxter willfully and/or repeatedly... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN...

  16. 75 FR 9623 - Arizona Public Service Company, et al.; Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, et al.; Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3... Facility Operating License Nos. NPF-41, NPF-51, and NPF- 74, which authorize operation of the Palo...

  17. 75 FR 15745 - Arizona Public Service Company, et al. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, et al. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3... Operating License Nos. NPF-41, NPF-51, and NPF-74, which authorize operation of the Palo Verde...

  18. GEOSS Water Services for Data and Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, David; Maidment, David

    2014-05-01

    Finding and accessing data in most countries of the world about local, regional and national water resources (streamflow discharge, gauge depth, soil moisture, etc.) has been complicated by a number of issues, from concerns of local and national security, to lack of suitable conventions and standards for data exchange that could be reasonably implemented and enforced at the national and international levels. These issues are now starting to be addressed, thanks to recently adopted standards for hydrologic data exchange, and growing acceptance of community standards for web services to perform such data exchange. This presentation reviews recent work in this area, in particular from an international initiative for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to federate regional water data into national pictures for Italy, New Zealand, Canada, and a growing number of countries in Latin America. This builds on previous similar work by the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI) with the U.S. Geological Survey and several other U.S. national agencies. The ability to discover and access such important data should improve the awareness and responsiveness of policy- and decision-makers in the event of natural disasters from storms, flooding and drought.

  19. Analysis of fixed-station water-quality data in the Umpqua River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    An appraisal of surface water quality in the Umpqua River basin was made using existing monthly data collected by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Douglas County Water Resources Survey. This appraisal was limited to interpretation of instantaneous monthly water quality data collected in the Umpqua River basin from water years 1974 to 1983. These data were used to compare water quality conditions throughout the basin and to determine if data collected from the NASQAN (National Stream Quality Accounting network) station are representative of upstream basin conditions. In general, data collected at the NASQAN station represent a composite of water quality from the North and South Umpqua Rivers. These river basins account for 82 % of the NASQAN station drainage. Water quality concentrations, loads, yields, and trends were statistically described and related to point source effluent loads and basin characteristics including geohydrology, hydrology, population, land use, and water use. Available point-and nonpoint-source data provided minimal information for determining cause-effect relations and for explaining observed trends in water quality; however, the data did indicate that the largest effluent discharges are located in the South Umpqua River basin in the Roseburg-Winston area. Instantaneous and annual flow weighted levels of specific conductance, phosphorus, organic plus ammonia nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, and fecal coliform bacteria are generally highest in the South Umpqua River near Roseburg. These high levels generally occur during the summer months when river flow is extremely low relative to flow in the North Umpqua River. The North Umpqua River has among the lowest constituent concentrations observed in the basin. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Characterization of bottom-sediment, water, and elutriate chemistry at selected stations at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    To better-understand and predict the potential effect of dredging on water quality at Reelfoot Lake, chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water. Chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water collected at five stations in the lake during November 1988. Lake water was of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of 120 milligrams per liter. Trace constituents were present in bottom sediments at concentrations representative of their average relative abundance in the earth?s crust. Elutriate waters prepared by mixing bottom sediment and lake water had suspended-solids concentrations as high as 2,000 milligrams per liter which exerted significant oxygen demand Trace constituents in the unfiltered elutriate waters were elevated with respect to lake water; elevated concentrations were attributable to the increased suspended-solids concentrations. Concentrations of total-recoverable copper, lead., and zinc in many elutriate waters exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s water-quality criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The toxicity of elutriate waters, as measured by a 48-hour bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia, was low.

  1. Optimization models for siting water quality monitoring stations in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Hu, Wen-Shin

    2012-01-01

    A water quality monitoring network (WQMN) must be designed so as to adequately protect the water quality in a catchment. Although a simulated annealing (SA) method was previously applied to design a WQMN, the SA method cannot ensure the solution it obtained is the global optimum. Therefore, two new linear optimization models are proposed in this study to minimize the deviation of the cost values expected to identify the possible pollution sources based on uniform cost (UC) and coverage elimination uniform cost (CEUC) schemes. The UC model determines the expected cost values by considering each sub-catchment being covered by which station, while the CEUC model determines the coverage of each station by eliminating the area covered by any upstream station. The proposed models are applied to the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Results show that the global optimal WQMN can be effectively determined by using the UC or CEUC model, for which both results are better than those from the SA method, especially when the number of stations becomes large.

  2. Power Station Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Kuljian Corporation provides design engineering and construction management services for power generating plants in more than 20 countries. They used WASP (Calculating Water and Steam Properties), a COSMIC program to optimize power station design. This enabled the company to substantially reduce lead time and software cost in a recent design project.

  3. Inter- annual variability of water vapor over an equatorial coastal station using Microwave Radiometer observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renju, Ramachandran Pillai; Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Mathew, Nizy; Raju C, Suresh

    The south-western region of the Indian peninsula is the gateway of Indian summer monsoon. This region experiences continuous monsoon rain for a longer period of about six months from June to November. The amount of water vapor variability is one of the important parameters to study the onset, active and break phases of the monsoon. Keeping this in view, a multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) has been made operational for continuous measurements of water vapor over an equatorial coastal station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5(°) N, 76.9(°) E) since April 2010. The MRP estimated precipitable water vapor (PWV) for different seasons including monsoon periods have been evaluated by comparing with the collocated GPS derived water vapor and radiosonde measurements. The diurnal, seasonal and inter annual variation of water vapor has been studied for the last four years (2010-2013) over this station. The significant diurnal variability of water vapor is found only during the winter and pre-monsoon periods (Dec -April). The vertical distribution of water vapour is studied in order to understand its variability especially during the onset of monsoon. During the building up of south-west monsoon, the specific humidity increases to ˜ 10g/kg in the altitude range of 4-6 km and consistently maintained it throughout the active spells and reduces to below 2g/kg during break spells of monsoon. The instrument details and the results will be presented.

  4. High precision mobile location framework and its service based on virtual reference station of GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Sun, Liangyu; Yao, Lianbi

    2008-10-01

    The wireless communication technology and space technology are synchronously developed in recent years, which bring up the development of location based service (LBS). At present, many location technology methods were developed. However, all these methods can only provide a relative poor location precision and depend on high cost. The technology of Virtual Reference Station (VRS) of GPS is then involved in this paper. One of the objective in this paper is aim to give the LBS position structure to improve the mobile location position when a mobile position instrument is connected with VRS network. The cheaper GPS built-in Personal Designer Aid (PDA) is then used to achieve a higher precision by using RTCM data from existing VRS network. In order to obtain a high precision position when using the low-cost GPS receiver as a rover, the infrusture of the mobile differential correction system is then put forward. According to network transportation of RTCM via internet protocol (NTRIP), the message is communicated through wireless network, such as GPRS, CDMA and so on. The rough coordinate information is sent to VRS control center continuously, and then the VRS correction information is replied to rover in the data format of RTCM3.1. So the position will be updated based on mathematic solution after the decoding of RTCM3.1 data. The thought of LBS position can improve the precision, and can speed the LBS.

  5. Assessment of biofilm formation in the International Space Station Water Recovery and Management system.

    PubMed

    Roman, M C; Minton-Summers, S

    1998-01-01

    Tests are being conducted at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center with the purpose of assessing possible water quality changes and potential biofilm formation in the water distribution system of the International Space Station (ISS) Water Recovery and Management (WRM) System. The Biofilm Life Test and Water Degradation Study (WDS) will be discussed in this article. The Biofilm Life Test examines the potential for biofilm formation in the ISS water distribution plumbing and storage tanks. The test has two independent loops; one simulates the waste water prior to the processing by the ISS Water Processor (WP), and the other simulates the processed (clean) water after the ISS WP. The test setup design incorporates tube lengths and angles, material types, flow rates, and recommended hardware that represent the ISS water distribution system. The WDS purpose is to assess changes in water quality (chemical and microbiological) during stagnant, long-term storage in distribution lines. Test results demonstrate that prior to the operation of the ISS WP, water can be stored in the ISS water distribution lines.

  6. Relocation of Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer 1 to Deep Space Station 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, J.; Riley, L.; Hubbard, A.; Rosenberger, H.; Tanner, A.; Keihm, S.; Jacobs, C.; Lanyi, G.; Naudet, C.

    2005-01-01

    In June of 2004, the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) unit no. 1 was relocated to the Deep Space Station (DSS) 55 site in Madrid, Spain, from DSS 25 in Goldstone, California. This article summarizes the relocation activity and the subsequent operation and data acquisition. This activity also relocated the associated Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) and Surface Meteorology (SurfMET) package that collectively comprise the Cassini Media Calibration System (MCS).

  7. Relocation of Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer 1 to Deep Space Station 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, J.; Riley, L.; Hubbard, A.; Rosenberger, H.; Tanner, A.; Keihm, S.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Lanyi. G. E.; Naudet, C. J.

    2005-11-01

    In June of 2004, the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) unit no. 1 was relocated to the Deep Space Station (DSS) 55 site in Madrid, Spain, from DSS 25 in Goldstone, California. This article summarizes the relocation activity and the subsequent operation and data acquisition. This activity also relocated the associated Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) and Surface Meteorology (SurfMET) package that collectively comprise the Cassini Media Calibration System (MCS).

  8. Video- Astronauts Don Pettit and Ken Bowersox Paint Water Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. Science begets art in this video as Dr. Pettit and commander Ken Bowersox demonstrate two dimensional diffusion using food coloring in a film of water when they created an intriguing birdlike image. Dr. Pettit wonders aloud 'It makes us wonder what Matisse could do with a medium like this.'

  9. Video-A Bottle of Water And Bubbles Rotate on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video, Pettit performs a demonstration in which he shook up a bottle that was half full of water, half full of air, so that bubbles formed, then spun it real fast to see what would happen to the bubbles. Watch the video to see the outcome.

  10. Video- Making a Film of Water Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video, Dr. Pettit demonstrates how to make films of pure water. Watch the video to see how he does it, see his two-dimensional beaker, and marvel along with him at how tenacious the films are.

  11. Trends in Surface-Water Quality at Selected Ambient-Monitoring Network Stations in Kentucky, 1979-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.; Martin, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly complex water-management decisions require water-quality monitoring programs that provide data for multiple purposes, including trend analyses, to detect improvement or deterioration in water quality with time. Understanding surface-water-quality trends assists resource managers in identifying emerging water-quality concerns, planning remediation efforts, and evaluating the effectiveness of the remediation. This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet-Kentucky Division of Water, to analyze and summarize long-term water-quality trends of selected properties and water-quality constituents in selected streams in Kentucky's ambient stream water-quality monitoring network. Trends in surface-water quality for 15 properties and water-quality constituents were analyzed at 37 stations with drainage basins ranging in size from 62 to 6,431 square miles. Analyses of selected physical properties (temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, hardness, and suspended solids), for major ions (chloride and sulfate), for selected metals (iron and manganese), for nutrients (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate), and for fecal coliform were compiled from the Commonwealth's ambient water-quality monitoring network. Trend analyses were completed using the S-Plus statistical software program S-Estimate Trend (S-ESTREND), which detects trends in water-quality data. The trend-detection techniques supplied by this software include the Seasonal Kendall nonparametric methods for use with uncensored data or data censored with only one reporting limit and the Tobit-regression parametric method for use with data censored with multiple reporting limits. One of these tests was selected for each property and water-quality constituent and applied to all station records so that results of the trend procedure could be compared among

  12. Network hydraulics inclusion in water quality event detection using multiple sensor stations data.

    PubMed

    Oliker, Nurit; Ostfeld, Avi

    2015-09-01

    Event detection is one of the current most challenging topics in water distribution systems analysis: how regular on-line hydraulic (e.g., pressure, flow) and water quality (e.g., pH, residual chlorine, turbidity) measurements at different network locations can be efficiently utilized to detect water quality contamination events. This study describes an integrated event detection model which combines multiple sensor stations data with network hydraulics. To date event detection modelling is likely limited to single sensor station location and dataset. Single sensor station models are detached from network hydraulics insights and as a result might be significantly exposed to false positive alarms. This work is aimed at decreasing this limitation through integrating local and spatial hydraulic data understanding into an event detection model. The spatial analysis complements the local event detection effort through discovering events with lower signatures by exploring the sensors mutual hydraulic influences. The unique contribution of this study is in incorporating hydraulic simulation information into the overall event detection process of spatially distributed sensors. The methodology is demonstrated on two example applications using base runs and sensitivity analyses. Results show a clear advantage of the suggested model over single-sensor event detection schemes.

  13. Microbiological Tests Performed During the Design of the International Space Station ECLSS: Part 1, Bulk Phase Water and Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Mittelman, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation summarizes the studies performed to assess the bulk phase microbial community during the Space Station Water Recover Tests (WRT) from 1990-1998. These tests show that it is possible to recycle water from different sources including urine, and produce water that can exceed the quality of municpally produced tap water.

  14. Studies on Anthropogenic Impact on Water Quality in Hilo (Hawaii) Bay and Mapping the Study Stations Using Geospatial Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, A. J.; Williams, M. S.; Adolf, J.; Sriharan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hilo Bay has uncharacteristically brown waters compared to other waters found in Hawai'i. The majority of the freshwater entering Hilo Bay is from storm and surface water runoff. The anthropogenic impact on water quality at Hilo Bay is due to sediment entrance, cesspools (Bacteria), and invasive species (Albizia). This poster presentation will focus on the water quality and phytoplankton collected on a weekly basis at a buoy positioned one meter from the shore of Hilo Bay, preserving the phytoplankton intact, concentrating and dehydrating the sample with ethanol, and viewing the phytoplankton with a scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-3400NII). The GPS (Global Positioning System) points were collected at the sampling stations. Three transects on three separate dates were performed in Hilo Bay with salinity, percent dissolved oxygen, turbidity, secchi depth, temperature, and chlorophyll fluorescence data collected at each sampling station. A consistent trend observed in all transects was as distance from the river increased turbidity decreased and salinity increased. The GPS data on June 30, 2015 showed a major correlation between stations and their distance from shore. There is a decrease in the turbidity but not the temperature for these stations. The GPS points collected on July 7, 2015 at thirteen stations starting with station one being at the shore to the water, showed that the salinity concentration fluctuate noticeably at the first 6 stations. As we proceed further away from the shore, the salinity concentration increases from stations seven through thirteen. The water temperature shows little variation throughout the thirteen stations. The turbidity level was high at the shore and shows a noticeable drop at station thirteen.

  15. Video-Bubbles Inserted Into a Floating Drop of Water on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. Inserting a bubble into a floating ball of water in space is difficult, as Pettit demonstrates in this video. Blowing the bubble is the easy part. Getting it to stay in the center of the ball of water is much more difficult. Watch the video to see the technique Dr. Pettit finally uses and see the resulting visual surprise offered by the ensuing optical properties.

  16. Space Station propulsion - Advanced development testing of the water electrolysis concept at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lee W.; Bagdigian, Deborah R.

    1989-01-01

    The successful demonstration at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that the water electrolysis concept is sufficiently mature to warrant adopting it as the baseline propulsion design for Space Station Freedom is described. In particular, the test results demonstrated that oxygen/hydrogen thruster, using gaseous propellants, can deliver more than two million lbf-seconds of total impulse at mixture ratios of 3:1 to 8:1 without significant degradation. The results alao demonstrated succcessful end-to-end operation of an integrated water electrolysis propulsion system.

  17. The Use of Water During the Crew 144, Mars Desert Research Station, Utah Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Well. from November 29th to December 14th, 2014, the author conducted astrobiological and geological surveys, as analog astronaut member of the international Crew 144, at the site of the Mars Society's Mars Desert Research Station, located at a remote location in the Utah desert, United States. The use of water for drinking, bathing, cleaning, etc., in the crew was a major issue for consideration for a human expedition to the planet Mars in the future. The author would like to tell about the factors of the rationalized use of water.

  18. More than a drop in the bucket: decentralized membrane-based drinking water refill stations in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Sima, Laura C; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-07-16

    Decentralized membrane-based water treatment and refill stations represent a viable and growing business model in Southeast Asia, which rely upon the purchase of water from refill stations by consumers. This feature article discusses these water treatment and refill stations, including the appropriateness of the technology, the suitability of the business models employed, and the long-term environmental and operational sustainability of these systems. We also provide an outlook for the sector, highlighting key technical challenges that need to be addressed in order to improve the capacity of these systems, such that they can become an effective and financially viable solution.

  19. 10 CFR 434.518 - Service water heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Service water heating. 434.518 Section 434.518 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.518 Service water heating....

  20. Test results on re-use of reclaimed shower water: Summary. [space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Garcia, R.; Sauer, R.; Linton, A. T.; Elms, T.; Reysa, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    A microgravity whole body shower (WBS) and waste water recovery systems (WWRS) were evaluated in three separate closed loop tests. Following a protocol similar to that anticipated for the U.S. Space Station, test subjects showered in a prototype whole body shower. The WWRS processes evaluated during the test series were phase change and reverse osmosis (RO). A preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Hollow Fiber Membrane Evaporation Subsystem phase change process was used for the initial test with chemical pretreatment of the shower water waste input. The second and third tests concentrated on RO technologies. The second test evaluated a dynamic RO membrane consisting of zirconium oxide polyacrylic acid (ZOPA) membranes deposited on the interior diameter of 316L porous stainless steel tubes while the final test employed a thin semipermeable RO membrane deposited on the interior surface of polysulfone hollow fibers. All reclaimed water was post-treated for purity using ion exchange and granular activated carbon beds immediately followed by microbial control treatment using both heat and iodine. The test hardware, controls exercised for whole body showering, types of soaps evaluated, shower subject response to reclaimed water showering, and shower water collection and chemical pretreatment (if required) for microbial control are described. The WWRS recovered water performance and the effectiveness of the reclaimed water post-treatment techniques used for maintaining water purity and microorganism control are compared. Results on chemical and microbial impurity content of the water samples obtained from various locations in the shower water reuse system are summarized.

  1. 75 FR 42774 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Services Division, Bureau of... amendatory contract actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses...

  2. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Digital signal regeneration (i.e., DTV signal demodulation, decoding, error processing, encoding... signals of DTV broadcast stations may be retransmitted to areas in which direct reception of such DTV... paragraph (f) of this section, a digital TV translator station may be used only to receive the signals of...

  3. 47 CFR 73.809 - Interference protection to full service FM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... protected against any condition of interference to the direct reception of its signal caused by such LPFM... station that is predicted to receive at least a 1 mV/m (60 dBu) signal. Predicted interference shall be... a regularly used signal is impaired by the signal radiated by the LPFM station. (b) An LPFM...

  4. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Digital signal regeneration (i.e., DTV signal demodulation, decoding, error processing, encoding... signals of DTV broadcast stations may be retransmitted to areas in which direct reception of such DTV... paragraph (f) of this section, a digital TV translator station may be used only to receive the signals of...

  5. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Digital signal regeneration (i.e., DTV signal demodulation, decoding, error processing, encoding... signals of DTV broadcast stations may be retransmitted to areas in which direct reception of such DTV... paragraph (f) of this section, a digital TV translator station may be used only to receive the signals of...

  6. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Digital signal regeneration (i.e., DTV signal demodulation, decoding, error processing, encoding... signals of DTV broadcast stations may be retransmitted to areas in which direct reception of such DTV... paragraph (f) of this section, a digital TV translator station may be used only to receive the signals of...

  7. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Digital signal regeneration (i.e., DTV signal demodulation, decoding, error processing, encoding... signals of DTV broadcast stations may be retransmitted to areas in which direct reception of such DTV... paragraph (f) of this section, a digital TV translator station may be used only to receive the signals of...

  8. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  9. Diagram of the Water Recovery and Management for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This diagram shows the flow of water recovery and management in the International Space Station (ISS). The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the regenerative ECLSS hardware, as well as providing technical support for the rest of the system. The regenerative ECLSS, whose main components are the Water Recovery System (WRS), and the Oxygen Generation System (OGS), reclaims and recycles water oxygen. The ECLSS maintains a pressurized habitation environment, provides water recovery and storage, maintains and provides fire detection/ suppression, and provides breathable air and a comfortable atmosphere in which to live and work within the ISS. The ECLSS hardware will be located in the Node 3 module of the ISS.

  10. Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Naohiko; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Nakamura, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor were conducted with the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) in July, September, and November 2013 at Syowa Station (69.0oS, 39.6oE) in the Antarctic. High-precision and high vertical resolution data of water vapor concentration up to an altitude of about 28 km were obtained successfully except for a contamination in the observation of July 2013. A comparison between the CFH and coincident satellite (i.e., Aura/MLS) observations showed a good agreement within their uncertainty. A position of Syowa Station relative to the stratospheric polar vortex edge varied depending on both the observation date and altitude. Temperature and pressure histories of the observed air parcels were examined by 10-day backward trajectories. These analyses clearly demonstrated that most air parcels observed in the lower stratosphere above Syowa Station experienced final dehydration inside the polar vortex. On the other hand, a clear signature of rehydration or incomplete dehydration was also observed around a 25 hPa pressure level in the observation of July 2013.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  12. Experimental investigations of overvoltages in 6kV station service cable networks of thermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Vukelja, P.I.; Naumov, R.M.; Drobnjak, G.V.; Mrvic, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigations of overvoltages on 6kV isolated neutral station service cable networks of thermal power plants. The overvoltages were recorded with capacitive voltage measurement systems made at the Nikola Tesla Institute. Wideband capacitive voltage measurement systems recorded a flat response from below power frequencies to 10MHz. Investigations of overvoltages were performed for appearance and interruption of metal earth faults, intermittent earth faults, switching operation of HV motors switchgear, switching operation of transformers switchgear, and transfer of the network supply from one transformer to another. On the basis of these investigations, certain measures are proposed for limiting overvoltages and for the reliability of station service of thermal power plants.

  13. Design and implementation of CUAHSI WaterML and WaterOneFlow Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.; Maidment, D.

    2007-12-01

    WaterOneFlow is a term for a group of web services created by and for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) community. CUAHSI web services facilitate the retrieval of hydrologic observations information from online data sources using the SOAP protocol. CUAHSI Water Markup Language (below referred to as WaterML) is an XML schema defining the format of messages returned by the WaterOneFlow web services. \

  14. Starting the water treatment system of the 410-MW combined-cycle plant at the Krasnodar cogeneration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, A. A.; Zhadan, A. V.; Gromov, S. L.; Tropina, D. V.; Arkhipova, O. V.

    2012-07-01

    The process diagram of a water treatment plant constructed on the basis of integrated membrane technologies with the use of two-stage reverse osmosis for the PGU-410 power unit at the Krasnodar cogeneration station is presented.

  15. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Water Separator On-Orbit Operation, Failure, and Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.; Shaw, Laura A.; Laliberte, Yvon

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The Water Separator (WS) pulls in air and water from the CHX, and centrifugally separates the mixture, sending the water to the condensate bus and the air back into the CHX outlet airstream. Two distinct early failures of the CCAA Water Separator in the Quest Airlock forced operational changes and brought about the re-design of the Water Separator to improve the useful life via modification kits. The on-orbit operational environment of the Airlock presented challenges that were not foreseen with the original design of the Water Separator. Operational changes were instituted to prolong the life of the third installed WS, while waiting for newly designed Water Separators to be delivered on-orbit. The modification kit design involved several different components of the Water Separator, including the innovative use of a fabrication technique to build the impellers used in Water Separators out of titanium instead of aluminum. The technique allowed for the cost effective production of the low quantity build. This paper will describe the failures of the Water Separators in the Quest Airlock, the operational constraints that were implemented to prolong the life of the installed Water Separators throughout the USOS, and the innovative re-design of the CCAA Water Separator.

  16. Acoustic and optical methods to infer water transparency at Time Series Station Spiekeroog, Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Anne-Christin; Badewien, Thomas H.; Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P.; Zielinski, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Water transparency is a primary indicator of optical water quality that is driven by suspended particulate and dissolved material. A data set from the operational Time Series Station Spiekeroog located at a tidal inlet of the Wadden Sea was used to perform (i) an inter-comparison of observations related to water transparency, (ii) correlation tests among these measured parameters, and (iii) to explore the utility of both acoustic and optical tools in monitoring water transparency. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler was used to derive the backscatter signal in the water column. Optical observations were collected using above-water hyperspectral radiometers and a submerged turbidity metre. Bio-fouling on the turbidity sensors optical windows resulted in measurement drift and abnormal values during quality control steps. We observed significant correlations between turbidity collected by the submerged metre and that derived from above-water radiometer observations. Turbidity from these sensors was also associated with the backscatter signal derived from the acoustic measurements. These findings suggest that both optical and acoustic measurements can be reasonable proxies of water transparency with the potential to mitigate gaps and increase data quality in long-time observation of marine environments.

  17. 7. Unit 3 Service Water System Valves, view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Unit 3 Service Water System Valves, view to the east. These pipes and valves supply water from the draft chest for cooling the generator barrels. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  18. Definition of technology development missions for early space station, orbit transfer vehicle servicing, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Propellant transfer, storage, and reliquefaction TDM; docking and berthing technology development mission; maintenance technology development mission; OTV/payload integration, space station interface/accommodations; combined TDM conceptual design; programmatic analysis; and TDM equipment usage are discussed.

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis system development. [to generate oxygen for manned space station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology used in a water electrolysis system (WES) to generate oxygen and hydrogen for manned space station applications was investigated. A four-man rated, low pressure breadboard water electrolysis system with the necessary instrumentation and controls was fabricated and tested. A six man rated, high pressure, high temperature, advanced preprototype WES was developed. This configuration included the design and development of an advanced water electrolysis module, capable of operation at 400 psig and 200 F, and a dynamic phase separator/pump in place of a passive phase separator design. Evaluation of this system demonstrated the goal of safe, unattended automated operation at high pressure and high temperature with an accumulated gas generation time of over 1000 hours.

  20. Water recovery and management test support modeling for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1990-01-01

    The water-recovery and management (WRM) subsystem proposed for the Space Station Freedom program is outlined, and its computerized modeling and simulation based on a Computer Aided System Engineering and Analysis (CASE/A) program are discussed. A WRM test model consisting of a pretreated urine processing (TIMES), hygiene water processing (RO), RO brine processing using TIMES, and hygiene water storage is presented. Attention is drawn to such end-user equipment characteristics as the shower, dishwasher, clotheswasher, urine-collection facility, and handwash. The transient behavior of pretreated-urine, RO waste-hygiene, and RO brine tanks is assessed, as well as the total input/output to or from the system. The model is considered to be beneficial for pretest analytical predictions as a program cost-saving feature.

  1. The key to superior water chemistry at a PWR nuclear station

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, R.; Miller, L.K.; Olejar, L.L.; Salem, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how a condensate polishing unit can be successfully used to treat the feedwater for circulating-type pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water chemistry at the Salem Generating Station, a two-unit, four-loop Westinghouse PWR located in New Jersey, is discussed. Topics considered include a plant description and the history of early operation, the role of constant surveillance, makeup water quality, the effect of freezing on gel-type anion exchange resin, a total organic carbon (TOC) survey, steam generator chemistry, steam generator inspection, condensate polisher operation, and management philosophy. The SEPREX condensate polishing process, in which the complete separation of the anion exchange resin from the cation exchange resin is achieved by flotation separation, is examined. It is concluded that the utilization of a condensate polishing process such as SEPREX provides the operating personnel at the plant with the necessary means to maintain the minimum desired level of contaminants within the steam generator.

  2. Evaluation of available analytical techniques for monitoring the quality of space station potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    To assure the quality of potable water (PW) on the Space Station (SS) a number of chemical and physical tests must be conducted routinely. After reviewing the requirements for potable water, both direct and indirect analytical methods are evaluated that could make the required tests and improvements compatible with the Space Station operation. A variety of suggestions are made to improve the analytical techniques for SS operation. The most important recommendations are: (1) the silver/silver chloride electrode (SB) method of removing I sub 2/I (-) biocide from the water, since it may interfere with analytical procedures for PW and also its end uses; (2) the orbital reactor (OR) method of carrying out chemistry and electrochemistry in microgravity by using a disk shaped reactor on an orbital table to impart artificial G force to the contents, allowing solution mixing and separation of gases and liquids; and (3) a simple ultra low volume highly sensitive electrochemical/conductivity detector for use with a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus. It is also recommended, since several different conductivity and resistance measurements are made during the analysis of PW, that the bipolar pulse measuring circuit be used in all these applications for maximum compatibility and redundancy of equipment.

  3. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality Versus Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmember food and drinking packages. There is one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. Shuttle mission STS-126 delivered the USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) to ISS on ULF2; subsequent activation occurred on November 2008. The PWD is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six, but nominally supplies only half this crew size. The PWD design provides incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US food and beverage packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Water Recovery System (WRS) Fuel Cell Water Bus, which feeds from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 L of hot water (65 to 93 ?C) every 30 min. During a single meal, this quantity of water supports three to four crewmembers? food rehydration and beverages. The unit design has a functional life expectancy of 10 years, with replacement of limited life items, such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance is acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there were several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is discussed for the following key areas: 1) microbial contamination, 2) no-dispense and water leakage scenarios, and 3) under-dispense scenarios.

  4. 76 FR 44948 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-18980] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract Actions AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior... Kelly, Water and Environmental Services Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O. Box 25007,...

  5. 75 FR 82066 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...-82069] [FR Doc No: 2010-32751] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract Actions AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Services Division, Bureau...

  6. [Exposure to benzene of service station employees and composition of benzene].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Fuselli, S; Iavarone, I; Vanacore, N; Carere, A

    1994-01-01

    . This estimation could be used to quantify the expected reduction in benzene exposure levels in service station attendants following a reduction in the benzene content of gasoline.

  7. A low cost micro-station to monitor soil water potential for irrigation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannutelli, Edoardo; Masseroni, Daniele; Facchi, Arianna; Gandolfi, Claudio; Renga, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    The RISPArMiA project (which stands for "reduction of water wastage through the continuous monitoring of agri-environmental parameters") won in 2013 the contest called "LINFAS - The New Ideas Make Sustainable Agriculture" and sponsored by two Italian Foundations (Fondazione Italiana Accenture and Fondazione Collegio Università Milanesi). The objective of the RISPArMiA project is to improve the irrigation efficiency at the farm scale, by providing the farmer with a valuable decision support system for the management of irrigation through the use of low-cost sensors and technologies that can easily be interfaced with Mobile devices. Through the installation of tensiometric sensors within the cropped field, the soil water potential can be continuously monitored. Using open hardware electronic platforms, a data-logger for storing the measured data will be built. Data will be then processed through a software that will allow the conversion of the monitored information into an irrigation advice. This will be notified to the farmer if the measured soil water potential exceed literature crop-specific tensiometric thresholds. Through an extrapolation conducted on the most recent monitored data, it will be also possible to obtain a simple soil water potential prevision in absence of rain events. All the information will be sent directly to a virtual server and successively on the farmer Mobile devices. Each micro-station is completely autonomous from the energy point of view, since it is powered by batteries recharged by a solar panel. The transmission modulus consists of a GSM apparatus with a SIM card. The use of free platforms (Arduino) and low cost sensors (Watermark 200SS tensiometers and soil thermocouples) will significantly reduce the costs of construction of the micro-station which are expected to be considerably lower than those required for similar instruments on the market today . Six prototype micro-stations are actually under construction. Their field testing

  8. Zooplankton of the waters adjacent to the C. P. Crane generating station. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.C.; Womack, C.J.; Olney, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    Zooplankton population in the Gunpowder River and its tributaries were sampled monthly from July, 1979-March, 1980 in a continuation of similar studies begun in March, 1979. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of the present once-through cooling system of the Crane Power Plant. The principal effect of the C.P. Crane generating station on zooplankton of the area is a displacement of an original freshwater community through the pumping of cooling water from Seneca Creek to Saltpeter Creek.

  9. International Space Station (ISS) Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Beverage Adapter (BA) Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerly, Rachel; Benoit, Jace; Shindo, David

    2011-01-01

    The Potable Water Dispenser used on the International Space Station (ISS) interfaces with food and drink packages using the Beverage Adapter and Needle. Unexpected leakage has been seen in this interface. The Beverage Adapter used on-orbit was returned to the ground for Test, Teardown, and Evaluation. The results of that investigation prompted a redesign of the Beverage Adapter and Needle. The Beverage Adapter materials will be changed to be more corrosion resistant, and the Needle will be redesigned to preclude leakage. The redesigns have been tested and proven.

  10. International Space Station (ISS) Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Beverage Adapter (BA) Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerly, Rachel; Benoit, Jace; Shindo, David

    2012-01-01

    The Potable Water Dispenser used on the International Space Station (ISS) interfaces with food and drink packages using the Beverage Adapter and Needle. Unexpected leakage has been seen in this interface. The Beverage Adapter used on ]orbit was returned to the ground for Test, Teardown, and Evaluation. The results of that investigation prompted a redesign of the Beverage Adapter and Needle. The Beverage Adapter materials were changed to be more corrosion resistant, and the Needle was redesigned to preclude leakage. The redesigns have been tested and proven.

  11. Environmental Assessment Relocation of the Aircraft Oil/Water Separator and Lift Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    CES/CEV),600 Chevron Ave,Dover AFB,DE,19902 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 ...Purpose of Contact: ERP information 10 8.0 REFERENCES "Dover Air Force Base, Cultural Resources Management Plan", October 2000 "Biological and...HEADQUARTERS 436TH AIRLIFf WING (AMC) MEMORANDUM FOR 436 MSG/CC FROM: 436 AW/JA SUBJECT: FONSI for Relocation of Oil/Water Separator and Lift Station 10 May

  12. Assessing rural small community water supply in Limpopo, South Africa: water service benchmarks and reliability.

    PubMed

    Majuru, Batsirai; Jagals, Paul; Hunter, Paul R

    2012-10-01

    Although a number of studies have reported on water supply improvements, few have simultaneously taken into account the reliability of the water services. The study aimed to assess whether upgrading water supply systems in small rural communities improved access, availability and potability of water by assessing the water services against selected benchmarks from the World Health Organisation and South African Department of Water Affairs, and to determine the impact of unreliability on the services. These benchmarks were applied in three rural communities in Limpopo, South Africa where rudimentary water supply services were being upgraded to basic services. Data were collected through structured interviews, observations and measurement, and multi-level linear regression models were used to assess the impact of water service upgrades on key outcome measures of distance to source, daily per capita water quantity and Escherichia coli count. When the basic system was operational, 72% of households met the minimum benchmarks for distance and water quantity, but only 8% met both enhanced benchmarks. During non-operational periods of the basic service, daily per capita water consumption decreased by 5.19l (p<0.001, 95% CI 4.06-6.31) and distances to water sources were 639 m further (p ≤ 0.001, 95% CI 560-718). Although both rudimentary and basic systems delivered water that met potability criteria at the sources, the quality of stored water sampled in the home was still unacceptable throughout the various service levels. These results show that basic water services can make substantial improvements to water access, availability, potability, but only if such services are reliable.

  13. Electromembrane recycling of highly mineralized alkaline blowdown water from evaporative water treatment plants at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Lyapin, A. I.; Minibaev, A. I.; Silov, I. Yu.; Tolmachev, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal power stations (TPS) are the main source of highly mineralized effluents affecting the environment. An analysis of their water systems demonstrates that alkaline effluents prevail at TPSs. Extraction of an alkali from highly mineralized effluents can make the recycling of effluents economically feasible. A method is proposed of electromembrane recycling of liquid alkaline highly mineralized wastes from TPSs. The process includes electromembrane apparatuses of two types, namely, a diffusion dialysis extractor (DDE) intended for extraction of the alkali from a highly mineralized solution having a complex composition and an electrodialysis concentrator for increasing the concentration of the extracted solution to a value suitable for use in water treatment plants at TPSs. For implementation of the first process (i.e. the extraction of alkali from alkaline-salt solution) various membranes from various manufacturers were studied: CM-PAD and AM-PAD (Ralex, Czechia), MK-40, MA-40, MA-41, MA-414, and MB-2 (OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot", Russia), AR103-QDF and CR61-CMP (Ionies Inc., USA). The experiments demonstrate that the acceptable degree of separation of the alkali and the salt is achieved in a pair of cation-exchange membranes with the efficiency of separation being higher without an electric field. The highest efficiency was attained with Russian-made membranes (MK-40, OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot"). A full scale experiment on recycling of highly-mineralized blowdown water from the evaporating water treatment system at the Kazan cogeneration power station No. 3 (TETs-3) was performed in a pilot unit consisting of two electromembrane apparatuses made by UAB "Membraninės Technologijos LT". In the experiments every ton of blowdown water yielded 0.1 t of concentrated alkaline solution with an alkali content of up to 4 wt % and 0.9 t of the softened salt solution suitable for the reuse in the TPS cycle. The power rate is 6 kWh / ton of blowdown water.

  14. Bringing ecosystem services into integrated water resources management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Crossman, Neville D; Nolan, Martin; Ghirmay, Hiyoba

    2013-11-15

    In this paper we propose an ecosystem service framework to support integrated water resource management and apply it to the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin have been over-allocated for irrigation use with the consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. In line with integrated water resource management principles, Australian Government reforms are reducing the amount of water diverted for irrigation to improve ecosystem health. However, limited understanding of the broader benefits and trade-offs associated with reducing irrigation diversions has hampered the planning process supporting this reform. Ecosystem services offer an integrative framework to identify the broader benefits associated with integrated water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin, thereby providing support for the Government to reform decision-making. We conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis for ranking regional potentials to provide ecosystem services at river basin scale. We surveyed the wider public about their understanding of, and priorities for, managing ecosystem services and then integrated the results with spatially explicit indicators of ecosystem service provision. The preliminary results of this work identified the sub-catchments with the greatest potential synergies and trade-offs of ecosystem service provision under the integrated water resources management reform process. With future development, our framework could be used as a decision support tool by those grappling with the challenge of the sustainable allocation of water between irrigation and the environment.

  15. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  16. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  17. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  18. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  19. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  20. 76 FR 28983 - Media Bureau Seeks Comment on the Economic Impact of Low-Power FM Stations on Full-Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... commercial FM radio. \\1\\ Local Community Radio Act of 2010, Public Law 111-371, 124 Stat. 4072 (2011). 2. As... COMMISSION Media Bureau Seeks Comment on the Economic Impact of Low-Power FM Stations on Full-Service Commercial FM Stations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice; solicitation of...

  1. Mitigation of Damage to the International Space Station (ISS) from Water Dumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidl, William; Visentine, James T.; Mikatarian, Ron

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) and Orbiter dump water overboard. This water is from the ISS condensate system, and from the Orbiter s fuel cell (supply side) and wastewater (urine and condensate) systems. Water dumped from either the ISS or Orbiter is a possible source of damage. When water is dumped into a vacuum, some of it flashes into a vapor. The expanding vapor bursts the liquid stream into vapor, and small and large liquid/ice particles. The large liquid/ice particles are approximately 2 mm in diameter and have nominal velocities of approximately 31 Wsec (U.S. Lab) and 50 Wsec (Orbiter). As these liquid/ice particles impact, they can cause mechanical damage due to erosion/pitting of sensitive surfaces, including solar array or radiator surfaces. Solar arrays are of particular concern because of the thin optical coatings on the surface of the cells. The thickness of these coatings is in the range of 1300 to 44000 angstroms. Damage to these coatings can cause degradation of the cells optical characteristics. To mitigate damage from water dumps, the characteristics of the water dumps were studied and an impact code was used to study damage to sensitive surfaces. The results were used to develop the constraints needed to mitigate damage to ISS hardware from Orbiter and U.S. Lab dumps.

  2. "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view looking NW across ATSF railyard. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  3. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Kentucky River Basin, Kentucky; fixed-station network and selected water-quality data, April 1987 through August 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, M.S.; Martin, G.R.; White, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes selected data-collection activities and the associated data collected during the Kentucky River Basin pilot study of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data are intended to provide a nationally consistent description and improved understanding of current water quality in the basin. The data were collected at seven fixed stations that represent stream cross sections where constituent transport and water-quality trends can be evaluated. The report includes descriptions of (1) the basin; (2) the design of the fixed-station network; (3) the fixed-station sites; (4) the physical and chemical measurements; (5) the methods of sample collection, processing, and analysis; and (6) the quality-assurance and quality-control procedures. Water-quality data collected at the fixed stations during routine periodic sampling and supplemental high-flow sampling from April 1987 to August 1991 are presented.

  4. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality vs Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmembers food and drinking packages with one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. The USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) was delivered to ISS on ULF2, Shuttle Mission STS-126, and was subsequently activated in November 2008. The PWD activation on ISS is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six but nominally supplies only half the crew. The PWD is designed to provide incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US style food packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Laboratory Fuel Cell Water Bus, which is fed from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 liters of hot water (65 to 93oC) every thirty minutes. This quantity supports three to four crewmembers to rehydrate their food and beverages from this location during a single meal. The unit is designed to remain functional for up to ten years with replacement of limited life items such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance has been acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there have been several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is outlined for the following key areas: microbiology, PWD to food package water leakage, no-dispense scenarios, under-dispense scenarios, and crewmember feedback on actual on-orbit use.

  5. [Water-soluble anions of atmosphere on Tianwan nuclear power station].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng-Qiang; He, Ying; Zheng, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Fa-Rong; Pang, Shi-Ping; Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2010-11-01

    Three major water-soluble anions (Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3-) in the atmosphere of the Tianwan nuclear power station in Lianyungang were determined by ion chromatography from June 2005 to May 2006. The results showed that the annual average concentration of Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3- in the atmosphere of Tianwan nuclear power station was (33.12 +/- 53.63) microg x m(-3), (53.34 +/- 30.34) microg x m(-3) and (8.34 +/- 4.47) microg x m(-3), respectively. The concentrations of the three water-soluble anions showed evident trend of seasonal variation. The concentrations of Cl-, SO4(2-) reached the highest level in summer and the lowest level in winter, while the concentration of NO3- in autumn and winter was higher than those in summer and spring. Meteorological parameters such as wind direction, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity were studied and showed definite influence to the anions concentration of the atmosphere. This is the first simultaneous monitoring of corrosive anions in the atmosphere of Chinese coastal nuclear power plant, and it will provide basis for the prevention of marine atmospheric corrosion, which will ensure the safely operating of our nuclear power industry.

  6. Recent developments in water quality monitoring for Space Station reclaimed wastewaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, John W.; Verostko, Charles E.; Linton, Arthur T.; Burchett, Ray

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments in water quality monitoring for Space Station reclaimed wastewaters. A preprototype unit that contains an ultraviolet absorbance organic carbon monitor integrated with pH and conductivity sensors is presented. The preprototype has provisions for automated operation and is a reagentless flow-through system without any gas/liquid interfaces. The organic carbon monitor detects by utraviolet absorbance the organic impurities in reclaimed wastewater which may be correlated to the organic carbon content of the water. A comparison of the preprototype organic carbon detection values with actual total organic carbon measurements is presented. The electrolyte double junction concept for the pH sensor and fixed electrodes for both the pH and conductivity sensors are discussed. In addition, the development of a reagentless organic carbon analyzer that incorporates ultraviolet oxidation and infrared detection is presented. Detection sensitivities, hardware development, and operation are included.

  7. The development of a volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodek, Itamar; Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Stolki, Thomas J.; Valentine, James R.; Trabanino, Rudy; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard concept of a volatile organics concentrator (VOC) is manufactured and tested for optimized water-quality analysis in a space environment. The VOC system is attached to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to analyze the volatile chemicals relevant to the operation of Space Station Freedom. The preliminary tests include: (1) comparisons with analyses based on direct on-column injections of standards; (2) analyses of iodinated volatile organics; (3) comparisons of nitrogen vs helium as the chromatography carrier gas; and (4) measurements of collection efficiency. The VOC can analyze EPA method-624 analytes at comparable detection using flame-ionization detection and can analyze volatile iodinated compounds. The breadboard has good reproducibility and can use nitrogen as a carrier gas; good results are noted for the collection and concentration levels and for water removal.

  8. Status of the International Space Station Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Cloud, Dale

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA and PSM are developed in- house by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The assemblies have completed the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of testing and integration into the flight racks. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2005 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  9. Application of biocatalysts to Space Station ECLSS and PMMS water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Bagdigian, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized enzyme reactors have been developed and tested for potential water reclamation applications in the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and Process Materials Management System (PMMS). The reactors convert low molecular weight organic contaminants found in ECLSS and PMMS wastewaters to compounds that are more efficiently removed by existing technologies. Demonstration of the technology was successfully achieved with two model reactors. A packed bed reactor containing immobilized urease was found to catalyze the complete decomposition of urea to by-products that were subsequently removed using conventional ion exchange results. A second reactor containing immobilized alcohol oxidase showed promising results relative to its ability to convert methanol and ethanol to the corresponding aldehydes for subsequent removal. Preliminary assessments of the application of biocatalysts to ECLSS and PMMS water reclamation sytems are presented.

  10. Optimal design and operation of booster chlorination stations layout in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Ohar, Ziv; Ostfeld, Avi

    2014-07-01

    This study describes a new methodology for the disinfection booster design, placement, and operation problem in water distribution systems. Disinfectant residuals, which are in most cases chlorine residuals, are assumed to be sufficient to prevent growth of pathogenic bacteria, yet low enough to avoid taste and odor problems. Commonly, large quantities of disinfectants are released at the sources outlets for preserving minimum residual disinfectant concentrations throughout the network. Such an approach can cause taste and odor problems near the disinfectant injection locations, but more important hazardous excessive disinfectant by-product formations (DBPs) at the far network ends, of which some may be carcinogenic. To cope with these deficiencies booster chlorination stations were suggested to be placed at the distribution system itself and not just at the sources, motivating considerable research in recent years on placement, design, and operation of booster chlorination stations in water distribution systems. The model formulated and solved herein is aimed at setting the required chlorination dose of the boosters for delivering water at acceptable residual chlorine and TTHM concentrations for minimizing the overall cost of booster placement, construction, and operation under extended period hydraulic simulation conditions through utilizing a multi-species approach. The developed methodology links a genetic algorithm with EPANET-MSX, and is demonstrated through base runs and sensitivity analyses on a network example application. Two approaches are suggested for dealing with water quality initial conditions and species periodicity: (1) repetitive cyclical simulation (RCS), and (2) cyclical constrained species (CCS). RCS was found to be more robust but with longer computational time.

  11. Microbial Surveillance of Potable Water Sources of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Rebekah J.; Ott, C. Mark; Skuratov, Vladimir M.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2005-01-01

    To mitigate risk to the crew, the microbial surveillance of the quality of potable water sources of the International Space Station (ISS) has been ongoing since before the arrival of the first permanent crew. These water sources have included stored ground-supplied water, water produced by the shuttle fuel cells during flight, and ISS humidity condensate that is reclaimed and processed. Monitoring was accomplished using a self-contained filter designed to allow bacterial growth and enumeration during flight. Upon return to earth, microbial isolates were identified using 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. While the predominant isolates were common Gramnegative bacteria including Ralstonia eutropha, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, and Spingomonas paucimobilis, opportunistic pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were also isolated. Results of in-flight enumeration have indicated a fluctuation of bacterial counts above system design specifications. Additional in-flight monitoring capability for the specific detection of coliforms was added in 2004; no coliforms have been detected from any potable water source. Neither the bacterial concentrations nor the identification of the isolates recovered from these samples has suggested a threat to crew health.

  12. Meet the Maximally Exposed Member of the Public: The Service Station Attendant for Spent Nuclear Fuel Going to Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. E.; Gathers, R.; Halstead, R. J.

    2002-02-28

    According to the 1999 Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site, members of the public along transportation routes by which spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is shipped will receive annual radiation doses less than 100 mrem/yr, the international (ICRP) and national (Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission) radiation limit for members of the public. For the ''Mostly Truck'' national transportation scenario, the DEIS specifically concludes that the maximally exposed member of the public, a service station attendant along the primary shipping route will receive no more than 100 mrem/yr, or 2.4 rem over 24 years. Based on the assumptions in the DEIS scenarios, however, it is highly likely that service station attendants along shipping routes will be called upon to fuel and service the rigs carrying SNF and HLW to Yucca Mountain. After reevaluating the DEIS, and making realistic alternative assumptions where necessary, the authors conclude that these attendants are likely to receive substantially more than 100 mrem/yr external dose, and perhaps several times that dose (up to 500 mrem/yr), unless mitigating measures are adopted. This is particularly true in Western states where refueling opportunities are limited, and the distances between fuel sources in rural areas may be up to 100 miles.

  13. Army Air Force Exchange Service Service (AAFES) Station Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida Final Tiered Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    Management, No ise, Land Use, Air Quali ty, Earth Resources, Biological Resources, Cultural Resources, Water Resources, Hazardous Materials and Wastes ...Resources, Biological Resources, Cultural Resources, Water Resources, Hazardous Materials and Wastes , Safety, Infrastructure and Util ities, Socioeconomic...No impacts to floodpl ai ns. Storm water permit ----:- ---- would be required. _ ____ _ l lazardous Materia ls and Wastes No negative short- or

  14. Index of stations; surface-water data-collections network of Texas, September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Table 1 shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of station, and the office principally responsible for collection of the data. An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for all gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering between two main-stem stations are listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations by first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. The rank of any tributary with respect to the stream to which it is an immediate tributary is indicated by an indention in the table. Each indention represents one rank. This downstream order and system of indention shows which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated.

  15. Index of stations; surface-water data-collection network of Texas, September 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Table 1 shows the station number and name, latitude and longitude, type of station, and the office responsible for the collection of the data and the record. An 8-digit permanent numerical designation for all gaging stations has been adopted on a nationwide basis; stations are numbered and listed in downstream order. In the downstream direction along the main stem, all stations on a tributary entering between two main-stem stations are listed between them. A similar order is followed in listing stations by first rank, second rank, and other ranks of tributaries. The rank of any tributary with respect to the stream to which it is an immediate tributary is indicated by an indention in the table. Each indention represents one rank. This downstream order and system of indention shows which gaging stations are on tributaries between any two stations on a main stem and the rank of the tributary on which each gaging station is situated.

  16. Development of the International Space Station (ISS) Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Anna L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a Fine Water Mist Portable Fire Extinguisher for use on the International Space Station. The International Space Station presently uses two different types of fire extinguishers: a water foam extinguisher in the Russian Segment, and a carbon dioxide extinguisher in the US Segment and Columbus and Kibo pressurized elements. Changes in emergency breathing equipment make Fine Water Mist operationally preferable. Supplied oxygen breathing systems allow for safe discharge of a carbon dioxide fire extinguisher, without concerns of the crew inhaling unsafe levels of carbon dioxide. But the Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA) offers no more than 15 minutes of capability, and continued use of hose based supplied oxygen system increases the oxygen content in a fire situation. NASA has developed a filtering respirator cartridge for use in a fire environment. It is qualified to provide up to 90 minutes of capability, and because it is a filtering respirator it does not add oxygen to the environment. The fire response respirator cartridge does not filter carbon dioxide (CO2), so a crew member discharging a CO2 fire extinguisher while wearing this filtering respirator would be at risk of inhaling unsafe levels of CO2. Fine Water Mist extinguishes a fire without creating a large volume of air with reduced oxygen and elevated CO2. From a flight hardware design perspective, the fine water mist fire extinguisher has two major elements: (1) the nozzle and crew interface, and (2) the tank. The nozzle and crew interface has been under development for several years. It has gone through several design iterations, and has been part of more than 400 fire challenge and spray characterizations. The crew and vehicle interface aspects of the design will use the heritage of the CO2 based Portable Fire Extinguisher, to minimize the disruption to the crew and integration impacts to the ISS. The microgravity use environment of the system poses a set of unique design requirements

  17. Sustainable Urban Water and Wastewater Services: The TRUST Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The TRUST (Transitions to the Urban Water Services of Tomorrow) Project is a research program funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme. The overall objective of TRUST is to help water and wastewater authorities and utilities across Europe to formulate and impleme...

  18. Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

    2007-09-01

    The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  19. 76 FR 73674 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract... region in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water... for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers of general circulation in...

  20. 76 FR 60527 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract... region in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water... for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers of general circulation in...

  1. 78 FR 21969 - Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water- Related Contract... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Resources Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O... contract actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers...

  2. Corrosion of Butterfly Valves in Sea Water Service.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    as stagnant sea water trapped in the crevice between the disc assembly and the Buna N rubber seat of the butterfly valves , pitting may develop. A...AD-A095 b42 DEFENCE RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT ATLANTIC DARTMOUTH (NO--ETC F/6 13/11 CORROSION OF BUTTERFLY VALVES IN SEA WATER SERVICE.IU) SEP 80 D R... BUTTERFLY VALVES IN SEA WATER SERVICE D. R. Lenard L. C. MacLeod September 1980 Approved by J. R. Brown A/ Director / Technology Division DISTRIBUTION

  3. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Anderson, Molly; Adams, Niklas; Vega, Leticia; Botkin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant for the International Space Station (ISS) is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle Program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems that do not require regular up-mass dependencies. Throughout the course of a year, four different electrochemical systems were investigated as a possible biocide for potable water on the ISS. Research has indicated that a wide variability exists with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants; therefore, baseline efficacy values were established. This paper describes a series of tests performed to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Results of the testing determined whether these electrochemical disinfection systems are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on the ISS.

  4. An Evaluation of Technology to Remove Problematic Organic Compounds from the International Space Station Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Metselaar, Carol; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John; Michalek, William; Bowman, Elizabeth; Wilson, Mark; Gazda, Daniel; Carter, Layne

    2014-01-01

    Since activation of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) on the International Space Station (ISS) in November of 2008, there have been three events in which the TOC (Total Organic Carbon) in the product water has increased to approximately 3 mg/L and has subsequently recovered. Analysis of the product water in 2010 identified the primary component of the TOC as dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). An investigation into the fate of DMSD in the WPA ultimately determined that replacement of both Multifiltration (MF) Beds is the solution to recovering product water quality. The MF Beds were designed to ensure that ionic breakthrough occurs before organic breakthrough. However, DMSD saturated both MF Beds in the series, requiring removal and replacement of both MF Beds with significant life remaining. Analysis of the MF Beds determined that the adsorbent was not effectively removing DMSD, trimethylsilanol, various polydimethylsiloxanes, or dimethylsulfone. Coupled with the fact that the current adsorbent is now obsolete, the authors evaluated various media to identify a replacement adsorbent as well as media with greater capacity for these problematic organic contaminants. This paper provides the results and recommendations of this collaborative study.

  5. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vega, Leticia; Aber, Gregory; Adam, Niklas; Clements, Anna; Modica, Catherine; Younker, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems which are less dependent on hardware that would need to be launched on a regular basis. Three systems for electrochemical production of potable water disinfectants are being assessed for use on the International Space Station (ISS). Since there is a wide variability in the literature with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants, there is a need to establish baseline efficacy values. This paper describes a series of tests performed in order to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria and to determine whether these electrochemical disinfection devices are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on ISS.

  6. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Anderson, Molly; Anderson, Molly; Adam, Niklas; Vega, Leticia; Modica, Catherine; Bodkin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant for the International Space Station (ISS) is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems that do not require regular up ]mass dependencies. Throughout the course of a year, four different electrochemical systems were investigated as a possible biocide for potable water on the ISS. Research has indicated that there is a wide variability with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants, therefore baseline efficacy values were established. This paper describes a series of tests performed in order to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Results of the testing determined whether these electrochemical disinfection systems are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on ISS.

  7. The development of water services and their interaction with water resources in European and Brazilian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Nogueira de Paiva Britto, A. L.

    2008-08-01

    The extension and complexity of large cities creates "urban water" and a related issue: public water services, including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and storm water control, had previously become a policy sector separate from water resource allocation issues thanks to water transport and treatment technologies. Large metropolitan areas today cannot take nature for granted anymore, and they need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water services in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, placing the technological developments in their geographic, socio-economic and political contexts. Our frame is to follow the successive contributions of civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm allowed to mobilise water in and out of the city, and up the hills or the floors; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitary engineering paradigm, water treatment gave more freedom to cities to take water from rivers closer to them, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; lastly, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  8. Development of the International Space Station (ISS) Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher ICES Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Anna L.; Carlile, Christie; Graf, John; Young, Gina

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher (PFE) for use on the International Space Station. The International Space Station presently uses two different types of fire extinguishers: a water foam extinguisher in the Russian Segment, and a carbon dioxide extinguisher in the US Segment and Columbus and Kibo pressurized elements. Changes in emergency breathing equipment make Fine Water Mist operationally preferable. Supplied oxygen breathing systems allow for safe discharge of a carbon dioxide fire extinguisher, without concerns of the crew inhaling unsafe levels of carbon dioxide. But the Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA) offers no more than 15 minutes of capability, and continued use of hose based supplied oxygen system increases the oxygen content in a fire situation. NASA has developed a filtering respirator cartridge for use in a fire environment. It is qualified to provide up to 90 minutes of capability, and because it is a filtering respirator it does not add oxygen to the environment. The fire response respirator cartridge does not filter carbon dioxide (CO2), so a crew member discharging a CO2 fire extinguisher while wearing this filtering respirator would be at risk of inhaling unsafe levels of CO2. FWM extinguishes a fire without creating a large volume of air with reduced oxygen and elevated CO2. The following paper will discuss the unique functional and performance requirements that have been levied on the FWM PFE. In addition, the NASA ISS specific fire standards will be described which were developed to establish acceptable extinguisher performance. The paper will also discuss the flight hardware design. The fin e water mist fire extinguisher has two major elements: (1) the nozzle and crew interface, and (2) the tank. The nozzle and crew interface have been under development for several years. They have gone through several design iterations, and have been part of more than 400 fire challenge and spray characterizations. The

  9. Spatial pattern assessment of river water quality: implications of reducing the number of monitoring stations and chemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeuh-Bin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Pei-Yu; Lee, Jin-Jing

    2014-03-01

    The Tamsui River basin is located in Northern Taiwan and encompasses the most metropolitan city in Taiwan, Taipei City. The Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) has established 38 water quality monitoring stations in the Tamsui River basin and performed regular river water quality monitoring for the past two decades. Because of the limited budget of the Taiwan EPA, adjusting the monitoring program while maintaining water quality data is critical. Multivariate analysis methods, such as cluster analysis (CA), factor analysis (FA), and discriminate analysis (DA), are useful tools for the statistically spatial assessment of surface water quality. This study integrated CA, FA, and DA to evaluate the spatial variance of water quality in the metropolitan city of Taipei. Performing CA involved categorizing monitoring stations into three groups: high-, moderate-, and low-pollution areas. In addition, this categorization of monitoring stations was in agreement with that of the assessment that involved using the simple river pollution index. Four latent factors that predominantly influence the river water quality of the Tamsui River basin are assessed using FA: anthropogenic pollution, the nitrification process, seawater intrusion, and geological and weathering processes. We plotted a spatial pattern using the four latent factor scores and identified ten redundant monitoring stations near each upstream station with the same score pattern. We extracted five significant parameters by using DA: total organic carbon, total phosphorus, As, Cu, and nitrate, with spatial variance to differentiate them from the polluted condition of the group obtained by using CA. Finally, this study suggests that the Taiwan EPA can adjust the surface water-monitoring program of the Tamsui River by reducing the monitoring stations to 28 and the measured chemical parameters to five to lower monitoring costs.

  10. Comparison of MELCOR modeling techniques and effects of vessel water injection on a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    A fully qualified, best-estimate MELCOR deck has been prepared for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station and has been run using MELCOR 1.8.3 (1.8 PN) for a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout severe accident. The same severe accident sequence has been run with the same MELCOR version for the same plant using the deck prepared during the NUREG-1150 study. A third run was also completed with the best-estimate deck but without the Lower Plenum Debris Bed (BH) Package to model the lower plenum. The results from the three runs have been compared, and substantial differences have been found. The timing of important events is shorter, and the calculated source terms are in most cases larger for the NUREG-1150 deck results. However, some of the source terms calculated by the NUREG-1150 deck are not conservative when compared to the best-estimate deck results. These results identified some deficiencies in the NUREG-1150 model of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. Injection recovery sequences have also been simulated by injecting water into the vessel after core relocation started. This marks the first use of the new BH Package of MELCOR to investigate the effects of water addition to a lower plenum debris bed. The calculated results indicate that vessel failure can be prevented by injecting water at a sufficiently early stage. No pressure spikes in the vessel were predicted during the water injection. The MELCOR code has proven to be a useful tool for severe accident management strategies.

  11. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout Caused by External Flooding Using the RISMC Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis; Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the application of a RISMC detailed demonstration case study for an emergent issue using the RAVEN and RELAP-7 tools. This case study looks at the impact of a couple of challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a power uprate, (2) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (3) and earthquake induces station-blackout, and (4) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  13. 47 CFR 74.1281 - Station records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1281 Station records. (a) The licensee of a station...

  14. 47 CFR 74.1281 - Station records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1281 Station records. (a) The licensee of a station...

  15. 47 CFR 80.519 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.519 Station identification. (a...) Marine utility stations, private coast stations, and associated hand-held radios, when...

  16. A metabolism perspective on alternative urban water servicing options using water mass balance.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Tauheed A; Renouf, Marguerite A; Kenway, Steven J

    2016-12-01

    Urban areas will need to pursue new water servicing options to ensure local supply security. Decisions about how best to employ them are not straightforward due to multiple considerations and the potential for problem shifting among them. We hypothesise that urban water metabolism evaluation based a water mass balance can help address this, and explore the utility of this perspective and the new insights it provides about water servicing options. Using a water mass balance evaluation framework, which considers direct urban water flows (both 'natural' hydrological and 'anthropogenic' flows), as well as water-related energy, we evaluated how the use of alternative water sources (stormwater/rainwater harvesting, wastewater/greywater recycling) at different scales influences the 'local water metabolism' of a case study urban development. New indicators were devised to represent the water-related 'resource efficiency' and 'hydrological performance' of the urban area. The new insights gained were the extent to which alternative water supplies influence the water efficiency and hydrological performance of the urban area, and the potential energy trade-offs. The novel contribution is the development of new indicators of urban water resource performance that bring together considerations of both the 'anthropogenic' and 'natural' water cycles, and the interactions between them. These are used for the first time to test alternative water servicing scenarios, and to provide a new perspective to complement broader sustainability assessments of urban water.

  17. Evidence of pathogenic microbes in the International Space Station drinking water: reason for concern?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Sumner, Randall; Pierson, Duane; Venkat, Parth; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analyses were carried out on four preflight and six postflight International Space Station (ISS)-associated potable water samples at various stages of purification, storage, and transport, to ascertain their associated microbial diversities and overall microbial burdens. Following DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and molecular cloning procedures, rDNA sequences closely related to pathogenic species of Acidovorax, Afipia, Brevundimonas, Propionibacterium, Serratia, and others were recovered in varying abundance. Retrieval of sequences arising from the iodine (biocide)-reducing Delftia acidovorans in postflight waters is also of concern. Total microbial burdens of ISS potable waters were derived from data generated by an ATP-based enumeration procedure, with results ranging from 0 to 4.9 x 10(4) cells/ml. Regardless of innate biases in sample collection and analysis, such circumstantial evidence for the presence of viable, intact pathogenic cells should not be taken lightly. Implementation of new cultivation approaches and/or viability-based assays are requisite to confirm such an occurrence.

  18. Outbreak of legionnaires' disease from a cooling water system in a power station.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, S; Bartlett, C L; Bibby, L F; Hutchinson, D N; Dyer, J V; Dennis, P J

    1986-01-01

    In September and October 1981 six cases of pneumonia occurred among men working in a power station under construction. Three were identified as cases of legionella pneumonia and two others had serology suggestive of legionella infection. In a sample of 92 men from the site 10 had low levels of antibodies to legionella; a similar sample of men working on an adjacent site showed none with positive serology. In a case control study it was found that cases of pneumonia were more likely than controls to have worked on a part of the site where four small capacity cooling towers were located. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the water systems of these four towers but was not found in samples from any other cooling towers or hot or cold water outlets on the site. It would appear that there was airborne spread of the organism from these cooling water systems which had not received conventional treatment to inhibit corrosion and organic growth. This is the first outbreak of legionnaires' disease to be recorded in an industrial setting in the United Kingdom. No cases of legionella infection have occurred on the site since the introduction of control measures. PMID:3756116

  19. The future of urban water services in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Wade, Jeffry S

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, problems with the provision of drinking water and sanitation services around the world have increasingly been addressed by attempts at privatisation, recasting clean water as an essentially economic, rather than public, good. This approach gained particular acceptance in Latin America, but with limited success. In order to address the full range of social, economic and environmental values necessary to sustain water resources over time, public and governmental involvement in establishing integrated water management, pursuing ‘soft path’ approaches, assuring stakeholder input and setting policy will be essential to the process.

  20. Combined Raman Lidar and DIAL Sounding of Water Vapour and Temperature at the NDACC Station Zugspitze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klanner, Lisa; Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2010-05-01

    The primary greenhouse gas water vapour has moved into the focus of lidar sounding within the Network for the Detection of Atmosperhic Compostion Change (NDACC). Lidar systems with an operating range reaching at least the tropopause region are asked for, with some future extension into the stratosphere. As a first step, we installed in 2003 a powerful differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) at the Schneefernerhaus high-altitude station next to the Zugspitze summit (Germany) [Vogelmann and Trickl, 2008]. This lidar system, located at 2675 m a.s.l., provides water-vapour profiles in the entire free troposphere above 3 km with high vertical resolution and an accuracy of about 5 % up to 8 km without observable bias. Most importantly, due to the high sensitivity of the DIAL technique this wide operating range is also achieved during daytime and under dry conditions. In a parallel contribution we present examples from the routine measurements of this lidar system during the past three years. The results reflect the extreme variability of the free-tropospheric water-vapour concentration, caused by the rich tropospheric dynamics. The system is capable of quantititatively detecting relative humidities of 0 to 2 % in layers of stratospheric origin even just 300 m wide. Due to the very low stratospheric water-vapour mixing ratio of about 5 ppm an extension of the lidar sounding of H2O into the stratosphere is a highly demanding task. Our solution is a particularly big Raman lidar system, which is currently under development at the Schneefernerhaus. By using a 350-W xenon-chloride laser system and a 1.5-m-diameter receiver we hope to extend for the first time the humidity measurements to almost 30 km during nighttime (as extrapolated from results by Leblanc et al. [2004], Whiteman et al. [2008]). We expect that this system is going to fill the existing gap for accurate vertically resolved ground-based routine measurements of water vapour in the lower stratosphere. At the same

  1. Quality of reproductive health services at commune health stations in Viet Nam: implications for national reproductive health care strategy.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Anh D; Hill, Peter S

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study conducted in 2009 of provider and patient perceptions of primary level reproductive health services provided by commune health stations (CHSs), and the implications for Viet Nam's 2011-2020 National Strategy for Reproductive Health Care. In the three provinces of Thai Nguyen, Thua Thien Hue, and Vinh Long, we interviewed the heads of CHSs, held focus group discussions with midwives and women patients, and observed facilities. Half the 30 CHSs visited were in poor physical condition; the rest were newly renovated. However, the model of service delivery was largely unchanged from ten years before. Many appeared to fall short in meeting patient expectations in terms of modern medical equipment and technology, range of drug supplies, and levels of staff expertise. As a result, many women were turning to private doctors and public hospitals, at least in urban areas, or seeking medication from pharmacies. To make CHS clinics sustainable, promotion of access to reproductive health services should be undertaken concurrently with quality improvement. A responsive payment scheme must also be developed to generate revenues. Efforts should be made to reduce the unnecessary use of more costly services from private clinics and higher level public facilities.

  2. Water for Life: The Impact of the Privatization of Water Services on Child Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galiani, Sebastian; Gertler, Paul; Schargrodsky, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    While most countries are committed to increasing access to safe water and thereby reducing child mortality, there is little consensus on how to actually improve water services. One important proposal under discussion is whether to privatize water provision. In the 1990s Argentina embarked on one of the largest privatization campaigns in the world,…

  3. Adequate Compensation for a Permanent Change of Station Move: A Study Comparing the Policies of the Military, Civil Service, and Private Sector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    home for five days while their household goods are packed and picked up, the house is cleaned by a professional cleaning service, and a final inspection ...OF THE MILITARY, CIVIL SERVICE, AND PRIVATE SECTOR by Gregory Lee Hansen __. and __ Dwight Warner Handforth March 1980 L LJ Thesis Advisor: EA. Finnkp...Change o Masr esis Station Mrove: A Study cmpaing the Policiesarh1 of the Military, Civil Service, and Private a. PROMISNG 00G. REPORT uU6860 6. CONTRACT

  4. Development of the International Space Station (ISS) Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Graf, John; Carlile, Christie; Young, GIna

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher (PFE) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS presently uses two different types of fire extinguishers: a water foam extinguisher in the Russian Segment, and a carbon dioxide extinguisher in the United States Orbital Segments, which include Columbus and Kibo pressurized elements. Currently, there are operational concerns with the emergency breathing equipment and the carbon dioxide extinguisher. The toxicity of the carbon dioxide requires the crew members to have an oxygen supply present during a fire event, therefore inherently creating an unsafe environment. The FWM PFE extinguishes a fire without creating a hazardous breathing environment for crew members. The following paper will discuss the unique functional and performance requirements that have been levied on the FWM PFE, identify unique microgravity design considerations for liquid and gas systems, as well as discuss the NASA ISS specific fire standards that were developed to establish an acceptable portable fire extinguisher s performance.

  5. Development of the International Space Station Fine Water Mist Portable Fire Extinguisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Young, GIna

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a Fine Water Mist (FWM) Portable Fire Extinguisher (PFE) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS presently uses two different types of fire extinguishers: a water foam extinguisher in the Russian Segments, and a carbon dioxide extinguisher in the United States Orbital Segments, which include Columbus and Kibo pressurized elements. Currently, there are operational and compatibility concerns with the emergency breathing equipment and the carbon dioxide extinguisher. ISS emergency response breathing equipment does not filter carbon dioxide; therefore, crew members are required to have an oxygen supply present during a fire event since the carbon dioxide PFE creates an unsafe breathing environment. The ISS program recommended a nontoxic fire extinguisher to mitigate this operational risk. The FWM PFE can extinguish a fire without creating a hazardous breathing environment for crewmembers. This paper will discuss the unique functional and performance requirements that have been levied on the FWM PFE, identify unique microgravity design considerations for liquid and gas systems, and discuss the NASA ISS specific fire standards that were developed to establish an acceptable portable fire extinguisher s performance.

  6. Ubiquitous Total Station Development using Smartphone, RSSI and Laser Sensor providing service to Ubi-GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, M. A.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, H.

    2014-10-01

    The growing trend in technological advances and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has targeted for intelligent human lives. Accordingly, Ubiquitous Computing Approach was proposed by Mark Weiser. This paper proposes an ubiquitous surveying solution in Geometrics and surveying field. Ubiquitous Surveying provides cost-effective, smart and available surveying techniques while traditional surveying equipment are so expensive and have small availability specially in indoor and daily surveying jobs. In order to have a smart surveying instrument, different information technology methods and tools like Triangle method, Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) method and laser sensor are used. These new ways in combine with surveying equations introduces a modern surveying equipment called Ubi-Total Station that also employed different sensors embedded in smartphone and mobile stand. RSSI-based localization and Triangle method technique are easy and well known methods to predict the position of an unknown node in indoor environments whereas additional measures are required for a sufficient accuracy. In this paper the main goal is to introduce the Ubiquitous Total Station as a development in smart and ubiquitous GIS. In order to public use of the surveying equipment, design and implementation of this instrument has been done. Conceptual model of Smartphone-based system is designed for this study and based on this model, an Android application as a first sample is developed. Finally the evaluations shows that absolute errors in X and Y calculation are 0.028 and 0.057 meter respectively. Also RMSE of 0.26 was calculated in RSSI method for distance measurement. The high price of traditional equipment and their requirement for professional surveyors has given way to intelligent surveying. In the suggested system, smartphones can be used as tools for positioning and coordinating geometric information of objects.

  7. Black carbon in cloud-water and rain water during monsoon season at a high altitude station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhavant, K. B.; Rao, P. S. P.; Safai, P. D.; Leck, C.; Rodhe, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of measurements of black carbon (BC) from ground-based wet-only rainwater (RW) and cloud-water (CW) sampling at a mountain field station, Sinhagad, situated in south western India during the period from June 2008 to October 2010. The amount of BC in the sample was determined by photometry at a wavelength of 528 nm after a procedure including the filtration through a 0.4 μm polycarbonate membrane filter. Water soluble concentrations of major anions in RW and CW were also determined. The average concentration of BC in RW (16 μmol dm-3) is higher by at least a factor 2 than that found in similar studies reported from other parts of the world. On the other hand, the average concentration of BC in CW (47 μmol dm-3) is lower by about a factor of 2 than that found at other sites. The ratio between the average concentrations in CW and RW varies from 2 (K+) to 7 (SO42-). The ratio for BC was about 3. No significant difference was observed for pH. Analysis of air mass back trajectories and of correlations between the various components indicates that long range transport of pollutants and dust from East Africa and Southern part of the Arabian peninsula might contribute to the high concentrations of BC and some of the ionic constituents at Sinhagad during the monsoon season.

  8. ANNUAL CYCLE OF PERIPHYTON, ZOOPLANKTON, AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS ALONG A 5 STATION TRANSECT OF ESCAMBIA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton, zooplankton and water quality parameters were monitored monthly along a 5-station transect in Escambia Bay (Pensacola, FL) from fall 1999 to fall 2000. To provide insight into nutrient processing in Escambia Bay and effects of grazers on phytoplankton community st...

  9. Total nutrient and sediment loads, trends, yields, and nontidal water-quality indicators for selected nontidal stations, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, 1985–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Blomquist, Joel D.; Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth; Chanat, Jeffrey G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) partners, routinely reports long-term concentration trends and monthly and annual constituent loads for stream water-quality monitoring stations across the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This report documents flow-adjusted trends in sediment and total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations for 31 stations in the years 1985–2011 and for 32 stations in the years 2002–2011. Sediment and total nitrogen and phosphorus yields for 65 stations are presented for the years 2006–2011. A combined nontidal water-quality indicator (based on both trends and yields) indicates there are more stations classified as “improving water-quality trend and a low yield” than “degrading water-quality trend and a high yield” for total nitrogen. The same type of 2-way classification for total phosphorus and sediment results in equal numbers of stations in each indicator class.

  10. The analytical control program for the NASA Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Water Recovery Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatara, James D.; Minton, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has striven to maximize quality assurance and quality control measures in the course of Water Recovery Test (WRT) development for the Space Station Freedom ECLSS. The WRT was subjected to an independent analytical control program that is governed by the Analytical Control Test Plan and the Microbiological Methods for Water Recovery Testing Plan. Attention is given to analysis results for volatiles, sodium, and conductivity.

  11. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  12. A Services-Oriented Architecture for Water Observations Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.; Tarboton, D. G.; Whitenack, T.; Whiteaker, T.; Hooper, R.; Kirschtel, D.

    2009-04-01

    Water observations data are time series of measurements made at point locations of water level, flow, and quality and corresponding data for climatic observations at point locations such as gaged precipitation and weather variables. A services-oriented architecture has been built for such information for the United States that has three components: hydrologic information servers, hydrologic information clients, and a centralized metadata cataloging system. These are connected using web services for observations data and metadata defined by an XML-based language called WaterML. A Hydrologic Information Server can be built by storing observations data in a relational database schema in the CUAHSI Observations Data Model, in which case, web services access to the data and metadata is automatically provided by query functions for WaterML that are wrapped around the relational database within a web server. A Hydrologic Information Server can also be constructed by custom-programming an interface to an existing water agency web site so that responds to the same queries by producing data in WaterML as do the CUAHSI Observations Data Model based servers. A Hydrologic Information Client is one which can interpret and ingest WaterML metadata and data. We have two client applications for Excel and ArcGIS and have shown how WaterML web services can be ingested into programming environments such as Matlab and Visual Basic. HIS Central, maintained at the San Diego Supercomputer Center is a repository of observational metadata for WaterML web services which presently indexes 342 million data measured at 1.75 million locations. This is the largest catalog water observational data for the United States presently in existence. As more observation networks join what we term "CUAHSI Water Data Federation", and the system accommodates a growing number of sites, measured parameters, applications, and users, rapid and reliable access to large heterogeneous hydrologic data repositories

  13. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-23

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  14. The space station assembly phase: Flight telerobotic servicer feasibility. Volume 2: Methodology and case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Gyamfi, Max A.; Volkmer, Kent; Zimmerman, Wayne F.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology is described for examining the feasibility of a Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) using two assembly scenarios, defined at the EVA task level, for the 30 shuttle flights (beginning with MB-1) over a four-year period. Performing all EVA tasks by crew only is compared to a scenario in which crew EVA is augmented by FTS. A reference FTS concept is used as a technology baseline and life-cycle cost analysis is performed to highlight cost tradeoffs. The methodology, procedure, and data used to complete the analysis are documented in detail.

  15. Total suspended solids concentrations and yields for water-quality monitoring stations in Gwinnett County, Georgia, 1996-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources, established a water-quality monitoring program during late 1996 to collect comprehensive, consistent, high-quality data for use by watershed managers. As of 2009, continuous streamflow and water-quality data as well as discrete water-quality samples were being collected for 14 watershed monitoring stations in Gwinnett County. This report provides statistical summaries of total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations for 730 stormflow and 710 base-flow water-quality samples collected between 1996 and 2009 for 14 watershed monitoring stations in Gwinnett County. Annual yields of TSS were estimated for each of the 14 watersheds using methods described in previous studies. TSS yield was estimated using linear, ordinary least-squares regression of TSS and explanatory variables of discharge, turbidity, season, date, and flow condition. The error of prediction for estimated yields ranged from 1 to 42 percent for the stations in this report; however, the actual overall uncertainty of the estimated yields cannot be less than that of the observed yields (± 15 to 20 percent). These watershed yields provide a basis for evaluation of how watershed characteristics, climate, and watershed management practices affect suspended sediment yield.

  16. Evaluating the Impact of the Summit Station, Greenland Radiosonde Program on Science and Forecast Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, C. J.; Starkweather, S.; Cox, C. J.; Solomon, A.; Shupe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiosondes are balloon-borne meteorological sensors used to acquire profiles of temperature and humidity. Radiosonde data are essential inputs for numerical weather prediction models and are used for climate research, particularly in the creation of reanalysis products. However, radiosonde programs are costly to maintain, in particular in the remote regions of the Arctic (e.g., $440,000/yr at Summit, Greenland), where only 40 of approximately 1000 routine global launches are made. The climate of this data-sparse region is poorly understood and forecast data assimilation procedures are designed for global applications. Thus, observations may be rejected from the data assimilation because they are too far from the model expectations. For the most cost-efficient deployment of resources and to improve forecasting methods, analyses of the effectiveness of individual radiosonde programs are necessary. Here, we evaluate how radiosondes launched twice daily (0 and 12 UTC) from Summit Station, Greenland, (72.58⁰N, 38.48⁰W, 3210 masl) influence the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) operational forecasts from June 2013 through May of 2015. A statistical analysis is conducted to determine the impact of the observations on the forecast model and the meteorological regimes that the model fails to reproduce are identified. Assimilation rates in the inversion layer are lower than any other part of the troposphere. Above the inversion, assimilation rates range from 85%-100%, 60%-98%, and > 99% for temperature, humidity, and wind, respectively. The lowest assimilation rates are found near the surface, possibly associated with biases in the representation of the temperature inversion by the ECMWF model at Summit. Consequently, assimilation rates are lower near the surface during winter when strong temperature inversions are frequently observed. Our findings benefit the scientific community who uses this information for climatological analysis of the

  17. Evaluating the Impact of the Summit Station, Greenland Radiosonde Program on Data Modelers and Forecast Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, C. J.; Starkweather, S.; Cox, C. J.; Solomon, A.; Shupe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiosondes are balloon-borne meteorological sensors used to acquire profiles of temperature and humidity. Radiosonde data are essential inputs for numerical weather prediction models and are used for climate research, particularly in the creation of reanalysis products. However, radiosonde programs are costly to maintain, in particular in the remote regions of the Arctic (e.g., $440,000/yr at Summit, Greenland), where only 40 of approximately 1000 routine global launches are made. The climate of this data-sparse region is poorly understood and forecast data assimilation procedures are designed for global applications. Thus, observations may be rejected from the data assimilation because they are too far from the model expectations. For the most cost-efficient deployment of resources and to improve forecasting methods, analyses of the effectiveness of individual radiosonde programs are necessary. Here, we evaluate how radiosondes launched twice daily (0 and 12 UTC) from Summit Station, Greenland, (72.58⁰N, 38.48⁰W, 3210 masl) influence the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) operational forecasts from June 2013 through May of 2015. A statistical analysis is conducted to determine the impact of the observations on the forecast model and the meteorological regimes that the model fails to reproduce are identified. Assimilation rates in the inversion layer are lower than any other part of the troposphere. Above the inversion, assimilation rates range from 85%-100%, 60%-98%, and > 99% for temperature, humidity, and wind, respectively. The lowest assimilation rates are found near the surface, possibly associated with biases in the representation of the temperature inversion by the ECMWF model at Summit. Consequently, assimilation rates are lower near the surface during winter when strong temperature inversions are frequently observed. Our findings benefit the scientific community who uses this information for climatological analysis of the

  18. Radiation Monitoring System in Service Module of International Space Station. Eight Years of Functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benghin, Victor; Petrov, Vladislav; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Volkov, Aleksey; Nikolaev, Igor; Nechaev, Oleg; Lishnevskii, Andrey; Tel, Mikhail

    Radiation monitoring system (RMS) installed on board the Russian module (RM) of the In-ternational Space Station (ISS) is an important part of radiation safety system of a spacecraft. RMS function practically continuously beginning from 1 August 2001 year. Integration the RMS with other systems of RM permits to transmit measured values to the Earth by the telemetry and to reflect the radiation environment data directly to crew by the personal com-puter. There is a possibility to correct the RMS software directly on board the ISS. It permits improve greatly a confidence, reliability and validity of an information obtaining. The report presents the data about the equipment functioning and results of dose rate measurements during the period from the August of 2001 up to the August of 2009 both for normal radiation environ-ment and during solar particle events (SPE). Comparison of an absorbed dose rate measured by the detectors located in various points of the RM showed that difference of doses measured in low and high shielded areas of the RM at undisturbed radiation conditions is notably stable and not exceeds a factor of 2. At the same time during the disturbances caused by SPE it can reach of 30. This fact confirms the efficiency of a crew passage in the high-shielded area for decreasing SCR dose. Comparison data obtained with the RMS silicon detectors with the R-16 ionizing chamber data showed that for equal shielding conditions the measured values coincide with accuracy rather then 20On the whole the dose rate dynamics for various solar cycle periods and during the SPE demonstrates reasonably high regularity of crewmembers dose. But it is clear that onboard and personal dosimetric control is necessary for implementation of ALARA principle and minimization of the crewmembers personal doses.

  19. Understanding the economic impacts of disruptions in water service.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Colleen; Jensen, Jennifer; Miller, Kathleen

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much attention focused on community readiness for catastrophic emergency events, such as major natural disasters or terrorist attacks. However, though the economic costs associated with experiencing such an event are high, the probability of such events occurring is quite low. At the same time, less catastrophic events that temporarily disrupt essential services to local areas, such as water and electricity, are quite common. However, there is little research that documents residents' actual economic costs when their water service is disrupted. In this paper, we contribute to the growing literature assigning economic value to residential water service by documenting the economic costs residents report from routine, small-scale water disruptions through focus groups and in-person interviews. We find that residential impacts ranged from over $1400 in savings (from working more hours than usual and eating out less than usual) to a cost of over $1000, with an overall average of $93.96. These costs, particularly when multiplied over a substantial population, become quite significant and demonstrate the importance of studying the economic costs of such events.

  20. An evaluation of water-quality data obtained at four streamflow daily-record stations in Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyer, Kenneth L.

    1973-01-01

    Chemical data for four stream-gaging stations in Idaho, each having 6 to 22 years of available records, were analyzed to determine functional relations between concentrations of the major inorganic constituents, specific conductance, and stream discharge. Three of the four stations had sufficient available record for assessing changes in constituent relations with time. The records for each long-term station were subdivided into segments of approximately 5 years each. Plots and regression equations were derived for each record segment to show the relations of each major constituent value to levels of specific conductance and stream discharge. At only one stations, Boise River at Notus, was there was an apparent significant change in chemical characteristics with time. Between 1940 and 1951, the percentages of chloride and sulfate in solution at this station declined appreciably and were largely replaced by bicarbonate. In general, there were highly significant correlations between the major inorganic ions and specific conductance, although those observed at Bear River at Border were distinctly poorer than those observed for the other stations. Corresponding correlations between the major ions and discharge were almost always less significant than those observed between the same ions and specific conductance. The common ion-discharge relations observed on the Snake River near Heise were more highly correlated before 1957 than thereafter--probably because of changes induced by the construction of Palisades Dam. A similar decline in correlation of common ion-discharge relations was observed at the Snake River at King Hill station after 1957, and this also might be attributable to changes in water regulation at various upstream impoundments.

  1. Q-PCR based bioburden assessment of drinking water throughout treatment and delivery to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcombe, David; Stuecker, Tara; La Duc, Myron; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies indicated evidence of opportunistic pathogens samples obtained during missions to the International Space Station (ISS). This study utilized TaqMan quantitative PCR to determine specific gene abundance in potable and non-potable ISS waters. Probe and primer sets specific to the small subunit rRNA genes were used to elucidate overall bacterial rRNA gene numbers. while those specific for Burkholderia cepacia and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were optimized and used to probe for the presence of these two opportunistic pathogens. This research builds upon previous microbial diversity studies of ISS water and demonstrates the utility of Q-PCR tool to examine water quality.

  2. Apparent chlorofluorocarbon age of ground water of the shallow aquifer system, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Yorktown, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow,, George E.; Brockman, Allen R.

    2001-01-01

    Apparent ages of ground water are useful in the analysis of various components of flow systems, and results of this analysis can be incorporated into investigations of potential pathways of contaminant transport. This report presents the results of a study in 1997 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Base Civil Engineer, Environmental Directorate, to describe the apparent age of ground water of the shallow aquifer system at the Station. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), tritium (3H), dissolved gases, stable isotopes, and water-quality field properties were measured in samples from 14 wells and 16 springs on the Station in March 1997. Nitrogen-argon recharge temperatures range from 5.9?C to 17.3?C with a median temperature of 10.9?C, which indicates that ground-water recharge predominantly occurs in the cold months of the year. Concentrations of excess air vary depending upon geohydrologic setting (recharge and discharge areas). Apparent ground-water ages using a CFC-based dating technique range from 1 to 48 years with a median age of 10 years. The oldest apparent CFC ages occur in the upper parts of the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer, whereas the youngest apparent ages occur in the Columbia aquifer and the upper parts of the discharge area setting, especially springs. The vertical distribution of apparent CFC ages indicates that groundwater movement between aquifers is somewhat retarded by the leaky confining units, but the elapsed time is relatively short (generally less than 35 years), as evidenced by the presence of CFCs at depth. The identification of binary mixtures by CFC-based dating indicates that convergence of flow lines occurs not only at the actual point of discharge, but also in the subsurface. The CFC-based recharge dates are consistent with expected 3H concentrations measured in the water samples from the Station. The concentration of 3H in ground water ranges from below the USGS laboratory minimum

  3. Design and the parametric testing of the space station prototype integrated vapor compression distillation water recovery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, W. F.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water for the Space Station Prototype life support system is generated by the vapor compression technique of vacuum distillation. A description of a complete three-man modular vapor compression water renovation loop that was built and tested is presented; included are all of the pumps, tankage, chemical post-treatment, instrumentation, and controls necessary to make the loop representative of an automatic, self-monitoring, null gravity system. The design rationale is given and the evolved configuration is described. Presented next are the results of an extensive parametric test during which distilled water was generated from urine and urinal flush water with concentration of solids in the evaporating liquid increasing progressively to 60 percent. Water quality, quantity and production rate are shown together with measured energy consumption rate in terms of watt-hours per kilogram of distilled water produced.

  4. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  5. A comparison of Frequency Domain Multiple Access (FDMA) and Time Domain Multiple Access (TDMA) approaches to satellite service for low data rate Earth stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G.

    1983-01-01

    A technological and economic assessment is made of providing low data rate service to small earth stations by satellite at Ka-band. Various Frequency Domain Multiple Access (FDMA) and Time Domain Multiple Access (TDMA) scenarios are examined and compared on the basis of cost to the end user. Very small stations (1 to 2 meters in diameter) are found not to be viable alternatives to available terrestrial services. However, medium size (3 to 5 meters) earth stations appear to be very competitive if a minimum throughput of about 1.5 Mbs is maintained. This constrains the use of such terminals to large users and shared use by smaller users. No advantage was found to the use of FDMA. TDMA had a slight advantage from a total system viewpoint and a very significant advantage in the space segment (about 1/3 the required payload weight for an equivalent capacity).

  6. Integrated Modeling Approach for Verifying Water Storage Services for a Payment for Environmental Service Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, G.; Shukla, S.; Guzha, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic models have been used for improved understanding of how an ecosystem's hydrologic response to human intervention and may provide substantial insight into the viability of payment for environmental services (PES) programs. Little is currently known about how hydrologic models can contribute to the design and evaluation of PES programs. Increased water storage is a desired environmental service (ES) for the Florida Everglades' watershed to reduce nutrient loads and excessive flows to lakes and estuaries in the region. We present monitoring and modeling results to verify the water storage PES for two ranch sites (wetland and watershed scales) located in the Northern Everglades region located north of the Lake Okeechobee (LO). Verification of the water storage PES using at least 3 years of hydrologic data was inconclusive due to variable rainfall during pre- and post-PES periods. An integrated surface and groundwater model, MIKE-SHE/MIKE11, was used to help verify the water storage service as well as predict ecological responses for different water storage scenarios (different levels of storage). The hydrological model was calibrated and validated using field measurements and was able to effectively simulate the surface and groundwater levels for the watershed (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, NSE = 0.54 to 0.82) and for surface water levels within wetlands (NSE = 0.54 to 0.84). Scenario analyses for storage levels showed an inverse relationship between board heights for water control structures and flows at the watershed outlet. Changes in flow were marginal when board heights approached a maximum indicating movement of water into subsurface storage. Combining simulation results with field measurements showed reduced flows and increased subsurface storage (2 cm/yr.), a desired outcome for protecting LO and estuarine systems from excessive flows. Simulated wetland water levels were combined with LIDAR-based topography to predict inundation for wetlands at the two

  7. Associations between perceptions of drinking water service delivery and measured drinking water quality in rural Alabama.

    PubMed

    Wedgworth, Jessica C; Brown, Joe; Johnson, Pauline; Olson, Julie B; Elliott, Mark; Forehand, Rick; Stauber, Christine E

    2014-07-18

    Although small, rural water supplies may present elevated microbial risks to consumers in some settings, characterizing exposures through representative point-of-consumption sampling is logistically challenging. In order to evaluate the usefulness of consumer self-reported data in predicting measured water quality and risk factors for contamination, we compared matched consumer interview data with point-of-survey, household water quality and pressure data for 910 households served by 14 small water systems in rural Alabama. Participating households completed one survey that included detailed feedback on two key areas of water service conditions: delivery conditions (intermittent service and low water pressure) and general aesthetic characteristics (taste, odor and color), providing five condition values. Microbial water samples were taken at the point-of-use (from kitchen faucets) and as-delivered from the distribution network (from outside flame-sterilized taps, if available), where pressure was also measured. Water samples were analyzed for free and total chlorine, pH, turbidity, and presence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Of the 910 households surveyed, 35% of participants reported experiencing low water pressure, 15% reported intermittent service, and almost 20% reported aesthetic problems (taste, odor or color). Consumer-reported low pressure was associated with lower gauge-measured pressure at taps. While total coliforms (TC) were detected in 17% of outside tap samples and 12% of samples from kitchen faucets, no reported water service conditions or aesthetic characteristics were associated with presence of TC. We conclude that consumer-reported data were of limited utility in predicting potential microbial risks associated with small water supplies in this setting, although consumer feedback on low pressure-a risk factor for contamination-may be relatively reliable and therefore useful in future monitoring efforts.

  8. Associations between Perceptions of Drinking Water Service Delivery and Measured Drinking Water Quality in Rural Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Wedgworth, Jessica C.; Brown, Joe; Johnson, Pauline; Olson, Julie B.; Elliott, Mark; Forehand, Rick; Stauber, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Although small, rural water supplies may present elevated microbial risks to consumers in some settings, characterizing exposures through representative point-of-consumption sampling is logistically challenging. In order to evaluate the usefulness of consumer self-reported data in predicting measured water quality and risk factors for contamination, we compared matched consumer interview data with point-of-survey, household water quality and pressure data for 910 households served by 14 small water systems in rural Alabama. Participating households completed one survey that included detailed feedback on two key areas of water service conditions: delivery conditions (intermittent service and low water pressure) and general aesthetic characteristics (taste, odor and color), providing five condition values. Microbial water samples were taken at the point-of-use (from kitchen faucets) and as-delivered from the distribution network (from outside flame-sterilized taps, if available), where pressure was also measured. Water samples were analyzed for free and total chlorine, pH, turbidity, and presence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Of the 910 households surveyed, 35% of participants reported experiencing low water pressure, 15% reported intermittent service, and almost 20% reported aesthetic problems (taste, odor or color). Consumer-reported low pressure was associated with lower gauge-measured pressure at taps. While total coliforms (TC) were detected in 17% of outside tap samples and 12% of samples from kitchen faucets, no reported water service conditions or aesthetic characteristics were associated with presence of TC. We conclude that consumer-reported data were of limited utility in predicting potential microbial risks associated with small water supplies in this setting, although consumer feedback on low pressure—a risk factor for contamination—may be relatively reliable and therefore useful in future monitoring efforts. PMID:25046635

  9. Issues of drinking water quality of small scale water services towards climate change.

    PubMed

    Delpla, I; Baures, E; Jung, A V; Clement, M; Thomas, O

    2011-01-01

    As climate change could impact water quantity and quality, important concerns are related to water quality degradation in small scale water services (SSWS). SSWS using surface waters resources (rivers and lakes) for drinking water production are particularly vulnerable to short term transient events due to their low adaptation capacity and their lack of support and technical knowledge compared to major centralized systems. Based on weather and water quality databases, a case study was conducted on a SSWS in Brittany (France) pumping from surface water. Results show an important vulnerability in treatment efficiency related to the lowest and highest river flows and provide first assumptions about the impacts of an increase in extreme weather events with climate change on drinking water quality.

  10. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  11. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  12. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  13. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  14. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  15. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in... Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio... licensee is potentially affected if it is authorized to operate a base station in the 2305-2315 MHz or...

  16. Water productivity mapping using Landsat 8 satellite together with weather stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Renato A. M.; Hernandez, Fernando B. T.; de C. Teixeira, Antônio H.; Leivas, Janice Freitas; Coaguila, Daniel Noe; Neale, Christopher M.

    2016-10-01

    The use of remote sensing satellite in conjunction with models and meteorological data enable the mapping of biophysical properties of agroecosystems with satisfactory accuracy. The main goal of this research was to determine the spatial-temporal agro-ecological indicators of water productivity in watersheds with different types of land use and occupation, using Landsat 8 images, agro-meteorological stations and application of Monteith and SAFER (Simple Algorithm for Retrieving Evapotranspiration) models to estimate the production biomass (BIO) and the actual evapotranspiration (ET), respectively. Incident global solar radiation (RS ↓) is observed seasonality of radiation during the year. Higher RS ↓levels happen during the first and the last four months, when the Sun is around its zenith positions in the study region. During the natural dry period in the region, the RS↓ is lower because winter solstice time for the Southern Hemisphere, this condition it is verified the reducing in the values of ET and BIO. Average values of biophysical properties for the study period were 0.54, 0.16 and 301 K for Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, albedo and surface temperature, respectively. The highest value of BIO was 105 kg ha-1d-1 and occurred in July 2013. The lowest value was 15.9 kg ha-1d-1 and occurred in October 2014. ET showed a value of 1.65 mm d-1 in the rainy period and 0.64 during the dry period in the study area. The highest average ET occurred in the irrigated area (June 2014), with a value of 1.89 mm d-1 and a maximum of 2.46 mm d-1. WP average for the evaluated period was 3.06 Kg m-3, with the largest value of 4.91 Kg m-3 in June 2013 and a minimum value of 2.45 Kg m-3 in September 2013.

  17. Analysis of water from the Space Shuttle and Mir Space Station by ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Orta, D; Mudgett, P D; Ding, L; Drybread, M; Schultz, J R; Sauer, R L

    1998-04-24

    Drinking water and condensate samples collected from the US Space Shuttle and the Russian Mir Space Station are analyzed routinely at the NASA-Johnson Space Center as part of an ongoing effort to verify water quality and monitor the environment of the spacecraft. Water quality monitoring is particularly important for the Mir water supply because approximately half of the water consumed is recovered from humidity condensate. Drinking water on Shuttle is derived from the fuel cells. Because there is little equipment on board the spacecraft for monitoring the water quality, samples collected by the crew are transported to Earth on Shuttle or Soyuz vehicles, and analyzed exhaustively. As part of the test battery, anions and cations are measured by ion chromatography, and carboxylates and amines by capillary electrophoresis. Analytical data from Shuttle water samples collected before and after several missions, and Mir condensate and potable recovered water samples representing several recent missions are presented and discussed. Results show that Shuttle water is of distilled quality, and Mir recovered water contains various levels of minerals imparted during the recovery processes as designed. Organic ions are rarely detected in potable water samples, but were present in humidity condensate samples.

  18. Analysis of water from the Space Shuttle and Mir Space Station by ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orta, D.; Mudgett, P. D.; Ding, L.; Drybread, M.; Schultz, J. R.; Sauer, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    Drinking water and condensate samples collected from the US Space Shuttle and the Russian Mir Space Station are analyzed routinely at the NASA-Johnson Space Center as part of an ongoing effort to verify water quality and monitor the environment of the spacecraft. Water quality monitoring is particularly important for the Mir water supply because approximately half of the water consumed is recovered from humidity condensate. Drinking water on Shuttle is derived from the fuel cells. Because there is little equipment on board the spacecraft for monitoring the water quality, samples collected by the crew are transported to Earth on Shuttle or Soyuz vehicles, and analyzed exhaustively. As part of the test battery, anions and cations are measured by ion chromatography, and carboxylates and amines by capillary electrophoresis. Analytical data from Shuttle water samples collected before and after several missions, and Mir condensate and potable recovered water samples representing several recent missions are presented and discussed. Results show that Shuttle water is of distilled quality, and Mir recovered water contains various levels of minerals imparted during the recovery processes as designed. Organic ions are rarely detected in potable water samples, but were present in humidity condensate samples.

  19. Assessment of juvenile flounder catches at the cordemais power station water intake in the Loire estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Jean-Paul

    A comprehensive sampling exercise was carried out at Cordemais Power Station during 1988 in order to evaluate the number of 0-group flounder, Platichthys flesus, removed from the Loire Estuary by the water intakes. Larvae drawn through the cooling system and juveniles impinged on the drumscreens were both taken into account. Statistical confidence limits of the estimates (which are useful for comparisons with the effect of other human activities) were estimated using non-linear regression and Monte-Carlo techniques. The method was developed for one of the two similar units working during the April-June period of high flounder abundance in the cooling water. For this unit 16.5 million fish were drawn through the cooling system and 1.13 million were trapped on the drumscreen. The effect of the Power Station is discussed in connection with small-meshed fisheries and assessments of the estuarine juvenile stock.

  20. Procedural Guide for International Gauging Stations on Boundary Waters Between Canada and the United States of America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huberman, S.; Slater, James; Condes, A.

    1985-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1909, the United States of America (U.S.A.) and Canada have employed a system of monitoring stream-flow and water levels for shared waters based upon professionalism, trust and goodwill. This document has been prepared in considerable detail for use by managers and field officers at all levels of government in Canada and the United States. Its purpose is to serve as a guide in attaining uniform procedures in the designation and operation of International Gauging Stations. For special situations where these procedures do not apply, specific mention is made in appropriate sections of the guide. This guide supersedes that of November 4, 1969, and the guide entitled 'The Procedural Guide for Operation of International Gauging Stations, St. Mary- Milk Rivers,' dated March 12, 1979.

  1. International Space Station Atmosphere Control and Supply, Atmosphere Revitalization, and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem - Verification for Node 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 ACS, AR, and WRM design and detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for Node 1.

  2. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Classification of decommissioning wastes. Addendum 3

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.S.

    1984-09-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning of the reference pressurized water reactor power station are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. The 17,885 cubic meters of waste from DECON are classified as follows: Class A, 98.0%; Class B, 1.2%; Class C, 0.1%. About 0.7% (133 cubic meters) of the waste would be generally unacceptable for disposal using near-surface disposal methods.

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Classification of decommissioning wastes. Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.S.

    1984-09-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning of the reference boiling water reactor power station are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. The 18,949 cubic meters of waste from DECON are classified as follows: Class A, 97.5%; Class B, 2.0%; Class C, 0.3%. About 0.2% (47 cubic meters) of the waste would be generally unacceptable for disposal using near-surface disposal methods.

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  5. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service

    PubMed Central

    Keys, Patrick W.; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line J.

    2016-01-01

    An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results into a generalized

  6. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service.

    PubMed

    Keys, Patrick W; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line J

    2016-01-01

    An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results into a generalized

  7. Water supply for the Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Richard Arden

    1972-01-01

    The Nuclear Rocket Development Station, in Jackass Flats, occupies about 123 square miles in the southwestern part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site. Jackass Flats, an intermontane valley bordered by highlands on all sides except for a drainage outlet in the southwestern corner, has an average annual rainfall of 4 inches. Jackass Flats is underlain by alluvium, colluvium, and volcanic rocks of Cenozoic age and, at greater depth, by sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The alluvium and the colluvium lie above the saturated zone throughout nearly all of Jackass Flats. The Paleozoic sedimentary rocks contain limestone and dolomite units that are excellent water producers elsewhere ; however, these units are too deep in Jackass Flats to be economic sources of water. The only important water-producing unit known in the vicinity of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is a welded-tuff aquifer, the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, which receives no significant recharge. This member contains about 500 feet of highly fractured rock underlying an area 11 miles long and 3 miles wide in western Jackass Flats. Permeability of the aquifer is derived mostly from joints and fractures; however, some permeability may be derived from gas bubbles in the upper part of the unit. Transmissivity, obtained from pumping tests, ranges from 68,000 to 488,000 gallons per day per foot. Volume of the saturated part of the aquifer is about 3.5 cubic miles, and the average specific yield probably ranges from 1 to 5 percent. The volume of ground water in storage is probably within the range of 37-187 billion gallons. This large amount of water should be sufficient to supply the needs of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station for many years. Water at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is used for public supply, construction, test-cell coolant, exhaust cooling, and thermal shielding during nuclear reactor and engine testing, and washdown. Present (1967) average

  8. 47 CFR 80.519 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.519 Station identification. (a) Stations must identify transmissions by announcing in the English language the station's assigned call sign...) Marine utility stations, private coast stations, and associated hand-held radios, when...

  9. Hydrogeologic setting, water levels, and quality of water from supply wells at the US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, O.B.; Daniel, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Marine Corps Air Station is located in the Coastal Plain province of North Carolina. Four freshwater aquifers of sand and limestone underlie the area to a depth of about 500 feet. Saline water occurs below this depth. The aquifers are separated by three confining units that are thin and discontinuous in the southern part. Water supply is obtained from 195- to 330 feet wells in the Castle Hayne aquifer. Many wells are near landfills that have received hazardous wastes. Groundwater withdrawals have reduced hydraulic heads in the Castle Hayne some 20 feet around active production wells, creating potential for downward movement of contaminated water from the surface and for upward movement of saline water that occurs at depth. Chemical analyses of water from the Castle Hayne aquifer indicate median concentrations of iron and manganese are 0.78 and 0.08 milligrams per liter, respectively, and lead and (or) nickel exceed drinking water standards in three wells. Chloride increased from 10 to more than 40 milligrams per liter in the deepest operating well over a 45-year period. Benzene concentrations range from 0.5 to 1.9 milligrams per liter in the southern part of the Air Station but were below the 5 milligrams per liter maximum contaminant level for drinking water. Fatty acids were found in concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter in water from wells in an area centered around the intersection of Roosevelt Boulevard and Slocum Road. Resampling is needed to verify all constituents that indicate contamination.

  10. Estimate of Interference from the Aeronautical Mobile Services of the Cities of Glendale and Pasadena to Goldstone Radio Astronomy Stations at 4.9 Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; Sue, M.; Manshadi, F.

    2006-05-01

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently allocated the 4.9-GHz band to public safety telecommunications services. Radio Astronomy Services (RAS) also has been using this frequency. NASA will primarily use Deep Space Station 28 (DSS 28) at Goldstone, California, for radio astronomy services that are sensitive to radio-frequency interference (RFI). This study is to determine the RFI potential of airborne transmission from two cities to radio astronomy sites in Goldstone. Propagation losses over the terrain between both cities and Goldstone are estimated using the Trans-Horizon Interference Propagation Loss (THIPL) software recently developed at JPL and high-resolution terrain data. The necessary coordination area for protecting the Goldstone radio astronomy station has been defined based on the minimum propagation loss required. Study results and suggestions for modification to the airborne areas proposed by both cities' police departments are presented.

  11. 47 CFR 74.1283 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1283 Station identification. (a) The call sign of an FM...

  12. 47 CFR 74.1283 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1283 Station identification. (a) The call sign of an FM...

  13. Trends in surface-water quality at selected National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations, in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syed, Atiq U.; Fogarty, Lisa R.

    2005-01-01

    To demonstrate the value of long-term, water-quality monitoring, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), initiated a study to evaluate potential trends in water-quality constituents for selected National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations in Michigan. The goal of this study is to assist the MDEQ in evaluating the effectiveness of water-pollution control efforts and the identification of water-quality concerns. The study included a total of nine NASQAN stations in Michigan. Approximately 28 constituents were analyzed for trend tests. Station selection was based on data availability, land-use characteristics, and station priority for the MDEQ Water Chemistry Monitoring Project. Trend analyses were completed using the uncensored Seasonal Kendall Test in the computer program Estimate Trend (ESTREND), a software program for the detection of trends in water-quality data. The parameters chosen for the trend test had (1) at least a 5-year period of record (2) about 5 percent of the observations censored at a single reporting limit, and (3) 40 percent of the values within the beginning one-fifth and ending one-fifth of the selected period. In this study, a negative trend indicates a decrease in concentration of a particular constituent, which generally means an improvement in water quality; whereas a positive trend means an increase in concentration and possible degradation of water quality. The results of the study show an overall improvement in water quality at the Clinton River at Mount Clemens, Manistee River at Manistee, and Pigeon River near Caseville. The detected trend for these stations show decreases in concentrations of various constituents such as nitrogen compounds, conductance, sulfate, fecal coliform bacteria, and fecal streptococci bacteria. The negative trend may indicate an overall improvement in agricultural practices, municipal and industrial wastewater

  14. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  15. 47 CFR 80.17 - Administrative classes of stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.17 Administrative classes of stations. (a) Stations in the Maritime Mobile Service are licensed according to class of station as follows.... (5) Marine utility stations. (b) Stations on land in the Maritime Radiodetermination Service...

  16. 47 CFR 80.17 - Administrative classes of stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.17 Administrative classes of stations. (a) Stations in the Maritime Mobile Service are licensed according to class of station as follows.... (5) Marine utility stations. (b) Stations on land in the Maritime Radiodetermination Service...

  17. 47 CFR 22.313 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES... of each station in the Public Mobile Services must ensure that the transmissions of that station are... authorizations. (b) For all other stations in the Public Mobile Services, station identification must...

  18. Comparing Simulation Results with Traditional PRA Model on a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhegang Ma; Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    A previous study used RELAP and RAVEN to conduct a boiling water reactor station black-out (SBO) case study in a simulation based environment to show the capabilities of the risk-informed safety margin characterization methodology. This report compares the RELAP/RAVEN simulation results with traditional PRA model results. The RELAP/RAVEN simulation run results were reviewed for their input parameters and output results. The input parameters for each simulation run include various timing information such as diesel generator or offsite power recovery time, Safety Relief Valve stuck open time, High Pressure Core Injection or Reactor Core Isolation Cooling fail to run time, extended core cooling operation time, depressurization delay time, and firewater injection time. The output results include the maximum fuel clad temperature, the outcome, and the simulation end time. A traditional SBO PRA model in this report contains four event trees that are linked together with the transferring feature in SAPHIRE software. Unlike the usual Level 1 PRA quantification process in which only core damage sequences are quantified, this report quantifies all SBO sequences, whether they are core damage sequences or success (i.e., non core damage) sequences, in order to provide a full comparison with the simulation results. Three different approaches were used to solve event tree top events and quantify the SBO sequences: “W” process flag, default process flag without proper adjustment, and default process flag with adjustment to account for the success branch probabilities. Without post-processing, the first two approaches yield incorrect results with a total conditional probability greater than 1.0. The last approach accounts for the success branch probabilities and provides correct conditional sequence probabilities that are to be used for comparison. To better compare the results from the PRA model and the simulation runs, a simplified SBO event tree was developed with only four

  19. Outsourcing of cooling water services ... A challenge or an opportunity?

    SciTech Connect

    Thatte, D.V.

    1998-12-31

    There is a growing trend of outsourcing a number of services. Cooling water treatment and monitoring are no exception. Outsourcing means different things to different organizations. This paper deals with various types of outsourcing set-ups and their technical and economic impact on both suppliers and users. It highlights the multifarious challenges faced by the suppliers as well as the users. It suggests actions to be taken by both parties in order to make such arrangements a success. This is then substantiated by interesting case histories illustrating these points.

  20. Verification of shielding effect by the water-filled materials for space radiation in the International Space Station using passive dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Tolochek, R. V.; Ambrozova, I.; Kawashima, H.; Yasuda, N.; Kurano, M.; Kitamura, H.; Uchihori, Y.; Kobayashi, I.; Hakamada, H.; Suzuki, A.; Kartsev, I. S.; Yarmanova, E. N.; Nikolaev, I. V.; Shurshakov, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    The dose reduction effects for space radiation by installation of water shielding material ("protective curtain") of a stack board consisting of the hygienic wipes and towels have been experimentally evaluated in the International Space Station by using passive dosimeters. The averaged water thickness of the protective curtain was 6.3 g/cm2. The passive dosimeters consisted of a combination of thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs). Totally 12 passive dosimeter packages were installed in the Russian Service Module during late 2010. Half of the packages were located at the protective curtain surface and the other half were at the crew cabin wall behind or aside the protective curtain. The mean absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates are measured to be 327 μGy/day and 821 μSv/day for the unprotected packages and 224 μGy/day and 575 μSv/day for the protected packages, respectively. The observed dose reduction rate with protective curtain was found to be 37 ± 7% in dose equivalent, which was consistent with the calculation in the spherical water phantom by PHITS. The contributions due to low and high LET particles were found to be comparable in observed dose reduction rate. The protective curtain would be effective shielding material for not only trapped particles (several 10 MeV) but also for low energy galactic cosmic rays (several 100 MeV/n). The properly utilized protective curtain will effectively reduce the radiation dose for crew living in space station and prolong long-term mission in the future.

  1. Summary of water-surface-elevation data for 116 U.S. Geological Survey lake and reservoir stations in Texas and comparison to data for water year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with numerous Federal, State, municipal, and local agencies, currently (2007) collects data for more than 120 lakes and reservoirs in Texas through a realtime, data-collection network. The National Water Information System that processes and archives water-resources data for the Nation provides a central source for retrieval of real-time as well as historical data. This report provides a brief description of the real-time, data-collection network and graphically summarizes the period-of-record daily mean water-surface elevations for 116 active and discontinued USGS lake and reservoir stations in Texas. The report also graphically depicts selected statistics (minimum, maximum, and mean) of daily mean water-surface-elevation data. The data for water year 2006 are compared to the selected statistics.

  2. Improvements to water use and water stress estimates with the addition of IR and net radiometers to weather stations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is often estimated with the Penman-Monteith (P-M) equation. Net radiation (Rn) is a major component of the surface energy balance and an input to the P-M equation, but it is challenging and expensive to measure accurately. For these reasons, most weather stations do not inclu...

  3. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lisle, John T; Smith, James J; Edwards, Diane D; McFeters, Gordon A

    2004-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  4. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, J.T.; Smith, J.J.; Edwards, D.D.; McFeters, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  5. 47 CFR 73.6018 - Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6018 Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations. Digital Class A TV stations must protect the DTV service...

  6. 47 CFR 73.6018 - Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6018 Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations. Digital Class A TV stations must protect the DTV service...

  7. 47 CFR 73.6018 - Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6018 Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations. Digital Class A TV stations must protect the DTV service...

  8. 47 CFR 73.6018 - Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6018 Digital Class A TV station protection of DTV stations. Digital Class A TV stations must protect the DTV service...

  9. Application of neural networks to channel assignment for cellular CDMA networks with multiple services and mobile base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1996-03-01

    of channels to each cell such that these constraints are satisfied. This study applies and extends the Hopfield-Tank neural network models to the channel assignment problem for both uniform and non-homogeneous cellular CDMA network topologies. These models are shown to be applicable to future networks that provide multiple types of service, dynamic demand, and mobile base stations. The derived algorithms minimize energy functions representing interference constraints and traffic demand based on local data at the cell sites. The primary objectives of the approach are to increase the forward and reverse link capacities and to distribute selected management tasks at the Mobile Telecommunications Switching Office to the cell sites. The structure of the resulting neural network algorithms have the advantage of inherent parallelism and the potential for extension to a wide range of interference criteria. Two cases are considered. In the first case, traffic demands are uniform over the radio cells, while the radio cells are assumed to be a fixed hexagonal pattern. The second case corresponds to an urban cellular radio environment, where the location of the radio cells are not homogeneous and the spatial distribution of traffic demand are non-uniform.

  10. A water vapor Raman lidar as part of the Swiss meteorology service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinoev, T.; Arshinov, Y.; Bobrovnikov, S.; Ristori, P.; Calpini, B.; van den Bergh, H.; Parlange, M. B.; Simeonov, V.

    2009-09-01

    Vertical water vapor profiles with high time resolution are necessary for improved numerical weather prediction (NWP). Meteorological services rely, in part, on NWP models for short to mid-term weather forecasting. Typically vertical water vapor profiles are acquired from twice a day radiosonde observations which have time resolution insufficient to resolve rapidly changing meteorological phenomena. New operational instruments with near real-time sampling of the water vapor field are needed. Raman LIDARs can provide vertical humidity profiles within the troposphere with time and range resolution suitable for NWP model assimilation and validation. That is why in 2004 the Swiss meteo-service (MeteoSwiss), the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), initiated a project to build an automated Raman lidar for day and night vertical profiling of tropospheric water vapor and aerosol properties. Currently RALMO (Raman Lidar for meteorological observations) is operational at MeteoSwiss aerological station at Payerne. It is fully automated, self-contained, eye-safe instrument for day and night-time vertical profiling of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, and extinction within the troposphere. The lidar profiles of water vapor mixing ratio have vertical resolution from 15 m (boundary layer) to 100-450 m (free troposphere) and time resolution of 2 min (boundary layer) to 30 min (free troposphere). The range resolved aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are measured with similar resolution. The lidar operational range is from ~50 m to 5 km during daytime (detection limit of 0.2 g/kg), and from ~50 m to 10 km night-time. LabView based software allows continuous fully automated operation. Automated data treatment software reads the accumulated lidar data, derives vertical profiles of water vapor mixing ratio (grams per kilogram of dry air) estimates statistical error, and stores the result

  11. Land use impact on water quality: valuing forest services in terms of the water supply sector.

    PubMed

    Fiquepron, Julien; Garcia, Serge; Stenger, Anne

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to quantify the impact of the forest on raw water quality within the framework of other land uses. On the basis of measurements of quality parameters that were identified as being the most problematic (i.e., pesticides and nitrates), we modeled how water quality is influenced by land uses. In order to assess the benefits provided by the forest in terms of improved water quality, we used variations of drinking water prices that were determined by the operating costs of water supply services (WSS). Given the variability of links between forests and water quality, we chose to cover all of France using data observed in each administrative department (France is divided into 95 départements), including a description of WSS and information on land uses. We designed a model that describes the impact of land uses on water quality, as well as the operation of WSS and prices. This bioeconomic model was estimated by the generalized method of moments (GMM) to account for endogeneity and heteroscedasticity issues. We showed that the forest has a positive effect on raw water quality compared to other land uses, with an indirect impact on water prices, making them lower for consumers.

  12. Microbial biofilm studies of the environmental control and life support system water recovery test for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Huff, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is developing a water recovery system (WRS) for Space Station Freedom to reclaim human waste water for reuse by astronauts as hygiene or potable water. A water recovery test (WRT) currently in progress investigates the performance of a prototype of the WRS. Analysis of biofilm accumulation, the potential for microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the WRT, and studies of iodine disinfection of biofilm are reported. Analysis of WRT components indicated the presence of organic deposits and biofilms in selected tubing. Water samples for the WRT contained acid-producing and sulfate-reducing organisms implicated in corrosion processes. Corrosion of an aluminum alloy was accelerated in the presence of these water samples; however, stainless steel corrosion rates were not accelerated. Biofilm iodine sensitivity tests using an experimental laboratory scale recycled water system containing a microbial check valve (MCV) demonstrated that an iodine concentration of 1 to 2 mg/L was ineffective in eliminating microbial biofilm. For complete disinfection, an initial concentration of 16 mg/L was required, which was gradually reduced by the MCV over 4 to 8 hours to 1 to 2 mg/L. This treatment may be useful in controlling biofilm formation.

  13. International Senior Design Service Learning Project: Creating a Water System for Kuna Nega in Panama City, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, Dan

    2013-11-01

    International service-learning projects are an effective educational tool for universities striving to meet the ABET engineering criterion, while also providing transformational experiences to their students and a service to needy populations in the world. This student poster discusses the benefits of an international service-learning project in Panama City, Panama. The presentation will discuss the design and installation of a water distribution system including a two pressure system, two ground storage tanks, a pump station and the various control systems to fill the tanks. To meet the water demand with the limited supply additional individual rain water collection systems were also installed at individual houses to provide a gray water system for bathing. The year-long process of development design and construction will be described and how it fits within the Swanson School of Engineering Department of Civil Engineering senior design course. This project was a collaboration between the senior design course, and a local chapter of Engineers Without Borders.

  14. 47 CFR 90.425 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... stations. (4) It is any type of radiopositioning or radar station authorized in a service other than the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station identification. 90.425 Section 90.425... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.425 Station identification. Stations licensed...

  15. The shallow water equations as a hybrid flow model for the numerical and experimental analysis of hydro power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermann, Lars; Seidel, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The numerical analysis of hydro power stations is an important method of the hydraulic design and is used for the development and optimisation of hydro power stations in addition to the experiments with the physical submodel of a full model in the hydraulic laboratory. For the numerical analysis, 2D and 3D models are appropriate and commonly used.The 2D models refer mainly to the shallow water equations (SWE), since for this flow model a large experience on a wide field of applications for the flow analysis of numerous problems in hydraulic engineering already exists. Often, the flow model is verified by in situ measurements. In order to consider 3D flow phenomena close to singularities like weirs, hydro power stations etc. the development of a hybrid fluid model is advantageous to improve the quality and significance of the global model. Here, an extended hybrid flow model based on the principle of the SWE is presented. The hybrid flow model directly links the numerical model with the experimental data, which may originate from physical full models, physical submodels and in-situ measurements. Hence a wide field of application of the hybrid model emerges including the improvement of numerical models and the strong coupling of numerical and experimental analysis.

  16. A model for predicting contaminant removal by adsorption within the International Space Station water processor: 1. Multicomponent equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, J L; Hand, D W; Crittenden, J C

    1998-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is developed to predict adsorption equilibrium in the International Space Station water processor's multifiltration beds. The model predicts multicomponent adsorption equilibrium behavior using single-component isotherm parameters and fictitious components representing the background matrix. The fictitious components are determined by fitting total organic carbon and tracer isotherms with the ideal adsorbed solution theory. Multicomponent isotherms using a wastewater with high surfactant and organic compound concentrations are used to validate the equilibrium description on a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC), coal-based GAC, and a polymeric adsorbent.

  17. Video-Puff of Air Hits Ball of Water in Space Onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video clip, Dr. Pettit demonstrates the phenomenon of a puff of air hitting a ball of water that is free floating in space. Watch the video to see why Dr. Pettit remarks 'I'd hate think that our planet would go through these kinds of gyrations if it got whacked by a big asteroid'.

  18. International Space Station United States Laboratory Module Water Recovery Management Subsystem Verification from Flight 5A to Stage ULF2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Labuda, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system comprises of seven subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), Vacuum System (VS), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), and Waste Management (WM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the United States (U.S.) Laboratory Module WRM design and detailed element methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase of the U.S. Laboratory Module prior to launch and the Qualification of all of the modification kits added to it from Flight 5A up and including Stage ULF2.

  19. Ecosystem Services Insights into Water Resources Management in China: A Case of Xi’an City

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingya; Li, Jing; Gao, Ziyi; Yang, Min; Qin, Keyu; Yang, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    Global climate and environmental changes are endangering global water resources; and several approaches have been tested to manage and reduce the pressure on these decreasing resources. This study uses the case study of Xi’an City in China to test reasonable and effective methods to address water resource shortages. The study generated a framework combining ecosystem services and water resource management. Seven ecosystem indicators were classified as supply services, regulating services, or cultural services. Index values for each indicator were calculated, and based on questionnaire results, each index’s weight was calculated. Using the Likert method, we calculated ecosystem service supplies in every region of the city. We found that the ecosystem’s service capability is closely related to water resources, providing a method for managing water resources. Using Xi’an City as an example, we apply the ecosystem services concept to water resources management, providing a method for decision makers. PMID:27886137

  20. 23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator Tanks, view to the south. One of the two large station air compressor units used for depressing the draft tube water level is visible atop a concrete pedestal on the left side of photograph (the second identical compressor is located in an adjacent room). Two of the six station air accumulator tanks are visible in the background. The smaller station service air compressor is visible in right foreground of the photograph was installed in the early 1980s, and replaced the original station service air compressor. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  1. Chemical composition of the inorganic fraction of cloud-water at a high altitude station in West India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhavant, K. B.; Rao, P. S. P.; Safai, P. D.; Granat, L.; Rodhe, H.

    2014-05-01

    Data from a ground-based cloud-water collection system intercepting water from clouds at a mountain field station, Sinhagad near Pune in India are presented. This study was part of an Indo-Swedish Collaboration Project on Atmospheric Brown Cloud-Asia (ABC-A). Cloud-water and rainwater (wet-only) samples were collected during June 2007-Dec. 2010. Concentrations of major anions and cations were determined. Ion concentrations were generally higher (NO3-, about 8 times; SO42- and K+, 5 times; NH4+, 4 times and Cl-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ 3 times) in cloud-water samples than in rainwater samples collected during the same days. The average pH of cloud-water samples was 6.0 with about 20% of the values below 5.6 and only 4% less than 5.0. Despite high concentrations of SO42- and NO3- the cloud water samples were on average not more acidic than rainwater samples. This is different from most of the other studies of cloud-water composition which have noted a substantially higher acidity (i.e. lower pH) in cloud-water than in rainwater. The slightly alkaline (pH > 5.6) nature of the cloud-water samples is mainly due to the presence of soil derived calcium carbonate in quantities more than enough to neutralize the acids or their precursors. A separation of the cloud-water data into trajectory groups showed that samples in air-masses having spent the last few days over the Indian sub-continent were in general more acidic (due to anthropogenic emissions) than those collected during days with air-masses of marine origin. A high correlation mutually between Ca2+, Na+, NO3- and SO42- makes it difficult to estimate the contribution to SO42- from different sources. Anthropogenic SO2-emissions and soil dust may both give important contributions.

  2. Stream water quality in the context of payments for environmental services in Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, M. C.; Reis, L. D. C.; Figueiredo, R. D. O.; Camargo, P. B. D.; Costa, C. F. G. D.; Zuccari, M. L.; Green, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Public policy of payment for environmental services (PES) was established in 2007 to face the challenge of recuperatingwater resources at one of the headwater areas of the Jaguari River Basin, which supplies an important reservoir for the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. Such effort consists of reforestation of riparian zones and spring lands at the hills of selected catchments, including the Ribeirão das Posses (RP) catchment. Since 2012 the University of São Paulo has developed research at RP to monitor the benefits of these practices on stream water quality, and identified a few parameters as good indicators to follow up the results of this PES program. The present study has the objective to show results of the monthly monitoring in2015,including 13 sampling stations at RP catchment distributed as follows: one in a spring forested area, three in spring areas of different ages of reforestation (3, 5 and 8 years), and nine at reaches of RP streamlocated in a way to contemplate the effects of the first order streams that comes from the studied spring areas entering RP. We established two additional stations at the Jaguari River, upstream and downstream of RP outlet. In situ measurements include temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC) and dissolved oxygen (DO), and collect water samples to bring to the laboratory for analyses of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC), total nitrogen (TN) and alkalinity. Also, sediments (fine fraction: >0.45 μm; and coarse fraction: >63 μm) are collected for isotopic carbon analyses. Preliminary results show pH values ranging from 5.5 to 7.8, while DO ranges from 5.8 to 8.9 mg L-1. As for EC, the mean at the spring forested station was 34.6 μS cm-1, while at spring areas of 3, 6 and 8 years of reforestation they were 53.3, 73.8 and 34.8 μS cm-1, respectively. We expected that by the end of this annual monitoring the benefits of reforestation will be affirmed.

  3. Evaluation of a Gas Chromatograph-Differential Mobility Spectrometer for Potential Water Monitoring on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental monitoring for manned spaceflight has long depended on archival sampling, which was sufficient for short missions. However, the longer mission durations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have shown that enhanced, real-time monitoring capabilities are necessary in order to protect both the crewmembers and the spacecraft systems. Over the past several years, a number of real-time environmental monitors have been deployed on the ISS. Currently, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the station air are monitored by the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), a small, lightweight gas chromatograph-differential mobility spectrometer. For water monitoring, real-time monitors are used for total organic carbon (TOC) and biocide analysis. No information on the actual makeup of the TOC is provided presently, however. An improvement to the current state of environmental monitoring could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for VOCs in air samples, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. The major hurdle for this effort lies in the liberation of the target analytes from the water matrix. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target VOCs at the concentrations at which they are routinely detected in archival water samples from the ISS. We will compare the results of these studies with those obtained from the instrumentation routinely used to analyze archival water samples.

  4. Compilation of water-resources data and hydrogeologic setting for four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of North Carolina, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Brad A.; Pfeifle, Cassandra A.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Campbell, Ted R.; Geddes, Donald J.; Pippin, Charles G.

    2006-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from September 2000 through September 2004 are presented in this report. The locations and periods of data collection are as follows: the Lake Wheeler Road research station (Raleigh) from April 2001 to September 2004, the Langtree Peninsula research station (Mooresville) from September 2000 to September 2004, the Upper Piedmont research station (Reidsville) from March 2002 to September 2004, and the Bent Creek research station (Asheville) from July 2002 to September 2004. Data presented in this report include well-construction characteristics for 110 wells, periodic ground-water-level measurements for 96 wells, borehole geophysical logs for 23 wells, hourly ground-water-level measurements for 12 wells, continuous-stage measurements for 2 streams, continuous water-quality measurements for 8 wells and 2 streams, periodic water-quality samples for 57 wells and 6 stream sites, slug-test results for 38 wells, and shallow ground-water-flow maps. In addition, the geology and hydrogeology at each site are summarized.

  5. 47 CFR 97.119 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.119 Station identification. (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 97.119 Section...

  6. 47 CFR 97.119 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.119 Station identification. (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station identification. 97.119 Section...

  7. 47 CFR 97.119 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.119 Station identification. (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station identification. 97.119 Section...

  8. 47 CFR 97.119 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.119 Station identification. (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station identification. 97.119 Section...

  9. 47 CFR 97.119 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.119 Station identification. (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station identification. 97.119 Section...

  10. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2350-2360 MHz bands in the same Major Economic Area (MEA) as that in which a SDARS terrestrial repeater... boundary of an MEA or REAG in which the WCS licensee is authorized to operate a WCS base station....

  11. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2350-2360 MHz bands in the same Major Economic Area (MEA) as that in which a SDARS terrestrial repeater... boundary of an MEA or REAG in which the WCS licensee is authorized to operate a WCS base station....

  12. Production of demineralized water for use in thermal power stations by advanced treatment of secondary wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Gkotsis, Petros; Castellana, Massimo; Cartechini, Fabricio; Zouboulis, Anastasios I

    2017-04-01

    The operation and efficiency of a modern, high-tech industrial full-scale water treatment plant was investigated in the present study. The treated water was used for the supply of the boilers, producing steam to feed the steam turbine of the power station. The inlet water was the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant of the city of Bari (Italy). The treatment stages comprised (1) coagulation, using ferric chloride, (2) lime softening, (3) powdered activated carbon, all dosed in a sedimentation tank. The treated water was thereafter subjected to dual-media filtration, followed by ultra-filtration (UF). The outlet of UF was subsequently treated by reverse osmosis (RO) and finally by ion exchange (IX). The inlet water had total organic carbon (TOC) concentration 10-12 mg/L, turbidity 10-15 NTU and conductivity 3500-4500 μS/cm. The final demineralized water had TOC less than 0.2 mg/L, turbidity less than 0.1 NTU and conductivity 0.055-0.070 μS/cm. Organic matter fractionation showed that most of the final DOC concentration consisted of low molecular weight neutral compounds, while other compounds such as humic acids or building blocks were completely removed. It is notable that this plant was operating under "Zero Liquid Discharge" conditions, implementing treatment of any generated liquid waste.

  13. [Transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of nuclear power station in closed water body].

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zong-Xue

    2012-07-01

    The transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of Xianning nuclear power station in the closed water body Fushui Reservoir are simulated using the EFDC model. Six nuclides concentration distribution with different half-lives in the reservoir are analyzed under the condition of 97% guarantee rate incoming water and four-running nuclear power units. The results show that the nuclides concentration distribution is mainly affected by the flow field of the reservoir and the concentration is decided by the half-lives of nuclide and the volume of incoming water. In addition, the influence region is enlarged as increasing of half-life and tends to be stable when the half-life is longer than 5 years. Moreover, the waste water discharged from the outlet of the nuclear power plant has no effect on the water-intake for the outlet located at the upstream of the water-intake and the flow field flows to the dam of the reservoir.

  14. Sorption-membrane technologies for preparing makeup water at coastal thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, K. M.; Agamaliev, M. M.; Malakhov, I. A.; Kosmodamianskii, V. E.; Askerniya, A. A.; Dadasheva, O. O.

    2008-04-01

    Technologies of preparing makeup water for boilers are considered, central to which is combined use of ion-exchange and reverse-osmosis methods for treatment of seawater and ocean water. It is shown that the concentrate produced by reverse-osmosis plants can be used as preferred material for regenerating filters at the stages during which source water and water at the outlet from the reverse-osmosis plant are treated with Na-and Mg-Na-cation exchange resins.

  15. TWRS privatization phase I - raw and potable water service

    SciTech Connect

    Shord, A.L.

    1996-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy has chosen to accomplish the Tank Waste Remediation System disposal mission via privatization. The disposal mission has been divided into two phases. Phase 1, a `proof of concept` phase, will establish and demonstrate the technical, commercial, and procurement capabilities necessary for privatization to proceed. Once established on this relatively small scale, privatization will be expanded, through a second competition, in the form of a second phase (Phase II) to dispose of the remainder of the tank waste. The Phase I privatization site will be located in the former Grout Disposal Site area. To prepare the site for use for the private contractors, utilities must be extended from the 200 East Area infrastructure. This study evaluates and recommends the systems to supply raw, fire suppression, and sanitary (potable) water services to the boundary of the area to be assigned to each private contractor.

  16. Development of a System to Generate Near Real Time Tropospheric Delay and Precipitable Water Vapor in situ at Geodetic GPS Stations, to Improve Forecasting of Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. W.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Laber, J. L.; Morris, T.; Offield, D. G.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a system under development for generating ultra-low latency tropospheric delay and precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates in situ at a prototype network of geodetic GPS sites in southern California, and demonstrating their utility in forecasting severe storms commonly associated with flooding and debris flow events along the west coast of North America through infusion of this meteorological data at NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). The first continuous geodetic GPS network was established in southern California in the early 1990s and much of it was converted to real-time (latency <1s) high-rate (1Hz) mode over the following decades. GPS stations are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV using collocated pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology (Bevis et al. 1992, 1994; Duan et al. 1996) as implemented by NOAA with a nationwide distribution of about 300 GPS-Met stations providing PW estimates at subhourly resolution currently used in operational weather forecasting in the U.S. We improve upon the current paradigm of transmitting large quantities of raw data back to a central facility for processing into higher-order products. By operating semi-autonomously, each station will provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of the narrow communications bandwidth that often occurs in the aftermath of natural disasters. The onsite ambiguity-resolved precise point positioning solutions are enabled by a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS and a low-cost MEMS meteorological sensor package. The decreased latency (~5 minutes) PW estimates will provide the detailed knowledge of the distribution and magnitude of PW that NWS forecasters require to monitor and predict severe winter

  17. 78 FR 46365 - Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Resources Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O... contract actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers...

  18. 78 FR 27256 - Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related... CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Resources Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O. Box 25007... actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers of...

  19. 78 FR 72111 - Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Resources Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O... amendatory contract actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses...

  20. 78 FR 72109 - Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related Contract Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Quarterly Status Report of Water Service, Repayment, and Other Water-Related... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Kelly, Water and Environmental Resources Division, Bureau of Reclamation, P.O... contract actions for any contract for the delivery of project water for authorized uses in newspapers...

  1. A diagnostic prototype of the potable water subsystem of the Space Station Freedom ECLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukefahr, Brenda D.; Rochowiak, Daniel M.; Benson, Brian L.; Rogers, John S.; Mckee, James W.

    1989-01-01

    In analyzing the baseline Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) command and control architecture, various processes are found which would be enhanced by the use of knowledge based system methods of implementation. The most suitable process for prototyping using rule based methods are documented, while domain knowledge resources and other practical considerations are examined. Requirements for a prototype rule based software system are documented. These requirements reflect Space Station Freedom ECLSS software and hardware development efforts, and knowledge based system requirements. A quick prototype knowledge based system environment is researched and developed.

  2. Video- Demonstration of Tea and Sugar in Water Onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. Imagine what would happen if a collection of loosely attractive particles were confined in a relatively small region in the floating environment of space. Would they self organize into a compact structure, loosely organize into a fractal, or just continue to float around in their container? In this video clip, Dr. Pettit explored the possibilities. At one point he remarks, 'These things look like pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope.' Watch the video and see what happens!

  3. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  4. Fish mortality by impingement on the cooling-water intake screens of Britain's largest direct-cooled power station.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M F D

    2008-04-01

    An estimated 5.66 x 10(7) fish (summed quarterly 95% confidence intervals: 3.01 x 10(7)-1.07 x 10(8)) weighing 258.4 t (143.2-467.9 t) were killed on the cooling-water intake screens of the 2400 MW Longannet Power Station (Forth estuary) in January 1999--December 2000. Abundance and number of species (40) collected were close to predictions for a power station of this size and latitude. Potential losses of equivalent adult whiting (Merlangius merlangus), cod (Gadus morhua), and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) through deaths of juveniles were estimated at 353.1 t (208.0-603.2 t) worth approximately euro 429,266 (euro 246,592-752,765) in 1999--2000. Fish catch-per-trawl in the estuary was generally not noticeably greater during a year of low water withdrawal (coal miners' strike of 1984--1985) when compared to other years from 1982 to 2001, except for gobies (Pomatoschistus spp.). A fish-return system is being tested at Longannet to reduce mortality.

  5. The development and testing of a volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodek, Itamar; Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Stolki, Thomas J.; Trabanino, Rudy; Hinsdale, Lloyd; Webb, Johanna; Sauer, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    The Volatile Organics Concentrator (VOC) system, designed to attach to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) for the analyses of volatile organic compounds in water on Space Station Freedom, is described. Organic volatiles are collected and concentrated in the VOC by means of two primary solid sorbent tubes and desorbed into the GC/MS system. The paper describes the results of testing the VOC breadboard using a GC/MS system. Evaluations performed on 39 organic compounds recovered from water samples were compared with data for these compounds using direct injection/GC/MS and purge and trap/GC/MS procedures. The results demonstrate that the VOC/GC/MS system's detection limits for the 39 compounds analyzed are comparable to those of the EPA Method 524.2, and for many compounds reaching a factor of 5 lower.

  6. Data from the Woodland land-subsidence monitoring station, Yolo County, California, water years 1988-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    A land-subsidence monitoring study was initiated in 1985 for the purpose of collecting data in Sacramento Valley, California, to document land-surface subsidence and to measure sediment compaction in response to ground-water pumping. Lithologic and geophysical logs obtained from the deeper of two boreholes drilled in 1987 near Woodland, California, are presented. The results of geotechnical and hydraulic laboratory tests on four sediment core samples extracted at 137, 151, 301, and 474 feet below land surface from a third borehole, drilled in 1990, are also reported. Construction of the extensometer well and the piezometer wells and equipment installed in the boreholes are described and illustrated. Data measured or recorded at the Woodland land- subsidence monitoring station from December 1987 through September 1992 are presented in tabular and graphic formats. These data include water levels from five piezometers, barometric pressure, and cumulative net sediment compaction.

  7. TransWatL - Crowdsourced water level transmission via short message service within the Sondu River Catchment, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeser, Björn; Jacobs, Suzanne; Breuer, Lutz; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Rufino, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    The fast economic development in East African countries causes an increasing need of water and farmland. Ongoing changes in land use and climate may affect the function of water tower areas such as the Mau Forest complex as an important water source and tropical montane forest in Kenya. Reliable models and predictions are necessary to ensure a sustainable and adequate water resource management. The calibration and validation process of these models requires solid data, based on widespread monitoring in both space and time, which is a time consuming and expensive exercise. Countries with merging economies often do not have the technical capacity and resources to operate monitoring networks, although both the government and citizens are aware of the importance of sustainable water management. Our research focus on the implementation and testing of a crowdsourced database as a low-cost method to assess the water quantity within the Sondu river catchment in Kenya. Twenty to 30 water level gauges will be installed and equipped with instructional signage. Citizens are invited to read and transmit the water level and the station number to the database using a simple text message and their cell phone. The text message service is easy to use, stable, inexpensive and an established way of communication in East African countries. The simplicity of the method ensures a broad access for interested citizens and integration of locals in water monitoring all over the catchment. Furthermore, the system allows a direct and fast feedback to the users, which likely increases the awareness for water flow changes in the test region. A raspberry pi 2 Model B equipped with a mobile broadband modem will be used as a server receiving and storing incoming text messages. The received raw data will be quality checked and formatted by a python script and afterwards written back in a database. This ensures flexible and standardized access for postprocessing and data visualization, for which a

  8. Getting into hot water Problematizing hot water service demand: The case of Old Cairo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culhane, Thomas Henry

    This dissertation analyzes hot water demand and service infrastructure in two neighboring but culturally distinct communities of the urban poor in the inner-city area of central Cairo. The communities are the Historic Islamic Cairo neighborhood of Darb Al Ahmar at the foot of Al-Azhar park, and the Zurayib neighborhood of Manshiyat Nasser where the Coptic Zabaleen Recyclers live. The study focuses on the demand side of the hot water issue and involves consideration of built-environment infrastructures providing piped water, electricity, bottled gas, sewage, and the support structures (wiring and plumbing) for consumer durables (appliances such as hot water heaters, stoves, refrigerators, air conditioners) as well as water pumps and water storage tanks. The study asks the questions "How do poor communities in Cairo value hot water" and "How do cost, infrastructure and cultural preferences affect which attributes of hot water service are most highly preferred?". To answer these questions household surveys based primarily on the World Bank LSMS modules were administered by professional survey teams from Darb Al Ahmar's Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Zabaleen's local NGO "Spirit of Youth" in their adjacent conununities in and surrounding historic Cairo. In total 463 valid surveys were collected, (231 from Darb Al Ahmar, 232 from the Zabaleen). The surveys included a contingent valuation question to explore Willingness to Pay for improved hot water service; the surveys queried household assets as proxies for income. The dissertation's findings reveal that one quarter of the residents of Darb Al Ahmar and two-thirds of the residents of Manshiyet Nasser's Zabaleen lack conventional water heating service. Instead they employ various types of stoves and self-built contraptions to heat water, usually incurring considerable risk and opportunity costs. However the thesis explores the notion that this is rational "satisficing" behavior; despite the shortcomings of such self

  9. The impact of social franchising on the use of reproductive health and family planning services at public commune health stations in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Service franchising is a business model that involves building a network of outlets (franchisees) that are locally owned, but act in coordinated manner with the guidance of a central headquarters (franchisor). The franchisor maintains quality standards, provides managerial training, conducts centralized purchasing and promotes a common brand. Research indicates that franchising private reproductive health and family planning (RHFP) services in developing countries improves quality and utilization. However, there is very little evidence that franchising improves RHFP services delivered through community-based public health clinics. This study evaluates behavioral outcomes associated with a new approach - the Government Social Franchise (GSF) model - developed to improve RHFP service quality and capacity in Vietnam's commune health stations (CHSs). Methods The project involved networking and branding 36 commune health station (CHS) clinics in two central provinces of Da Nang and Khanh Hoa, Vietnam. A quasi-experimental design with 36 control CHSs assessed GSF model effects on client use as measured by: 1) clinic-reported client volume; 2) the proportion of self-reported RHFP service users at participating CHS clinics over the total sample of respondents; and 3) self-reported RHFP service use frequency. Monthly clinic records were analyzed. In addition, household surveys of 1,181 CHS users and potential users were conducted prior to launch and then 6 and 12 months after implementing the GSF network. Regression analyses controlled for baseline differences between intervention and control groups. Results CHS franchise membership was significantly associated with a 40% plus increase in clinic-reported client volumes for both reproductive and general health services. A 45% increase in clinic-reported family planning service clients related to GSF membership was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Self-reported frequency of RHFP service use increased by 20% from

  10. An integrated representation of the services provided by global water resources.

    PubMed

    Curmi, Elizabeth; Richards, Keith; Fenner, Richard; Allwood, Julian M; Kopec, Grant M; Bajželj, Bojana

    2013-11-15

    Water is essential not only to maintain the livelihoods of human beings but also to sustain ecosystems. Over the last few decades several global assessments have reviewed current and future uses of water, and have offered potential solutions to a possible water crisis. However, these have tended to focus on water supply rather than on the range of demands for all water services (including those of ecosystems). In this paper, a holistic global view of water resources and the services they provide is presented, using Sankey diagrams as a visualisation tool. These diagrams provide a valuable addition to the spatial maps of other global assessments, as they track the sources, uses, services and sinks of water resources. They facilitate comparison of different water services, and highlight trade-offs amongst them. For example, they reveal how increasing the supply of water resources to one service (crop production) can generate a reduction in provision of other water services (e.g., to ecosystem maintenance). The potential impacts of efficiency improvements in the use of water are also highlighted; for example, reduction in soil evaporation from crop production through better farming practices, or the results of improved treatment and re-use of return flows leading to reduction of delivery to final sinks. This paper also outlines the measures needed to ensure sustainable water resource use and supply for multiple competing services in the future, and emphasises that integrated management of land and water resources is essential to achieve this goal.

  11. Hydrogeologic Setting, Ground-Water Flow, and Ground-Water Quality at the Langtree Peninsula Research Station, Iredell County, North Carolina, 2000-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pippin, Charles G.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.; Heller, Matthew J.; Schelgel, Melissa E.

    2008-01-01

    A 6-year intensive field study (2000-2005) of a complex, regolith-fractured bedrock ground-water system was conducted at the Langtree Peninsula research station on the Davidson College Lake Campus in Iredell County, North Carolina. This research station was constructed as part of the Piedmont and Mountains Resource Evaluation Program, a cooperative study being conducted by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey. Results of the study characterize the distinction and interaction of a two-component ground-water system in a quartz diorite rock type. The Langtree Peninsula research station includes 17 monitoring wells and 12 piezometers, including 2 well transects along high to low topographic settings, drilled into separate parts of the ground-water-flow system. The location of the research station is representative of a metaigneous intermediate (composition) regional hydrogeologic unit. The primary rock type is mafic quartz diorite that has steeply dipping foliation. Primary and secondary foliations are present in the quartz diorite at the site, and both have an average strike of about N. 12 degree E. and dip about 60 degree in opposite directions to the southeast (primary) and the northwest (secondary). This rock is cut by granitic dikes (intrusions) ranging in thickness from 2 to 50 feet and having an average strike of N. 20 degree W. and an average dip of 66 degree to the southwest. Depth to consolidated bedrock is considered moderate to deep, ranging from about 24 to 76 feet below land surface. The transition zone was delineated and described in each corehole near the well clusters but had a highly variable thickness ranging from about 1 to 20 feet. Thickness of the regolith (23 to 68 feet) and the transition zone do not appear to be related to topographic setting. Delineated bedrock fractures are dominantly low angle (possibly stress relief), which were observed to be open to partially open at depths of

  12. Monitoring surface-water quality in Arizona: the fixed-station network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tadayon, Saeid

    2000-01-01

    Arizona is an arid State in which economic development is influenced largely by the quantity and quality of water and the location of adequate water supplies. In 1995, surface water supplied about 58 percent of total withdrawals in Arizona. Of the total amount of surface water used in 1995, about 89 percent was for agriculture, 10 percent for public supply, and 1 percent for industrial supply (including mining and thermoelectric; Solley and others, 1998). As a result of rapid population growth in Arizona, historic agricultural lands in the Phoenix (Maricopa County) and Tucson (Pima County) areas are now being developed for residential and commercial use; thus, the amount of water used for public supply is increasing. The Clean Water Act was established by U.S. Congress (1972) in response to public concern about water-pollution control. The act defines a process by which the United States Congress and the citizens are informed of the Nation’s progress in restoring and maintaining the quality of our waters. The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) is the State-designated agency for this process and, as a result, has developed a monitoring program to assess water quality in Arizona. The ADEQ is required to submit a water-quality assessment report to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) every 2 years. The USEPA summarizes the reports from each State and submits a report to the Congress characterizing water quality in the United States. These reports serve to inform Congress and the public of the Nation’s progress toward the restoration and maintenance of water quality in the United States (Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, 1998).

  13. A Computer Program for Optimal Control of Water Supply Pump Stations: Development and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Control of Distributed Parameter Systems. Toulouse, France (1982). Cembrano, et al., "Optimization of a Multi-Reservoir Water Network Using a Conjugate...Informatique et en Automatique, Antibes, France, 1988); B. Coulbeck, "Optimal Operations in Non-Linear Water Networks ," Optimal Control Applications and Methods...Brdys, J. Quevedo, B. Coulbeck, and C. H. Orr, "Optimization of a Multi-Reservoir Water Network Using a Conjugate Gradient Technique. A Case Study," 8th

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Minton, John M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time environmental monitoring on ISS is necessary to provide data in a timely fashion and to help ensure astronaut health. Current real-time water TOC monitoring provides high-quality trending information, but compound-specific data is needed. The combination of ETV with the AQM showed that compounds of interest could be liberated from water and analyzed in the same manner as air sampling. Calibration of the AQM using water samples allowed for the quantitative analysis of ISS archival samples. Some calibration issues remain, but the excellent accuracy of DMSD indicates that ETV holds promise for as a sample introduction method for water analysis in spaceflight.

  15. Validation of the new HelioClim-3 version 4 real-time and short-term forecast service using 14 BSRN stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire; Saboret, Laurent; Wey, Etienne; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-07-01

    Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite images acquired every 15 min during daytime are currently processed by the Heliosat-2 method every night to generate the HelioClim-3 (HC3) database of the surface solar irradiation for the day before. A new service is proposed based on version 4 of HC3 (HC3v4) that offers real-time and forecasted irradiation for horizons up to a few hours. The service is based on a local persistence of the clear-sky index. Its results were compared to coincident high quality 15 min global irradiations measured in fourteen stations belonging to the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). For forecasts for a temporal horizon of 15 min ahead, the relative bias and root mean square error (RMSE) range respectively from 0 to 2 %, and 20 to 23 % for most stations. The correlation coefficient ranges from 0.94 to 0.95. These performances are similar to HC3v4 for the same stations. Expectedly, the quality of the forecasts degrades as the temporal horizon increases. For 1 h ahead forecasts of 15 min irradiation, the relative bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient range respectively from -3 to 1 %, 30 to 37 %, and 0.90 to 0.91.

  16. Analysis of water-quality trends at two discharge stations; one within Big Cypress National Preserve and one near Biscayne Bay; southern Florida, 1966-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of water-quality trends was made at two U.S. Geological Survey daily discharge stations in southern Florida. The ESTREND computer program was the principal tool used for the determination of water-quality trends at the Miami Canal station west of Biscayne Bay in Miami and the Tamiami Canal station along U.S. Highway 41 in the Big Cypress National Preserve in Collier County. Variability in water quality caused by both seasonality and streamflow was compensated for by applying the nonparametric Seasonal Kendall trend test to unadjusted concentrations or flow-adjusted concentrations (residuals) determined from linear regression analysis. Concentrations of selected major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics; pH and dissolved oxygen; suspended sediment; nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon species; trace metals; and bacteriological and biological characteristics were determined at the Miami and Tamiami Canal stations. Median and maximum concentrations of selected constituents were compared to the Florida Class III freshwater standards for recreation, propagation, and maintenance of a healthy, well-balanced population of fish and wildlife. The median concentrations of the water-quality constituents and characteristics generally were higher at the Miami Canal station than at the Tamiami Canal station. The maximum value for specific conductance at the Miami Canal station exceeded the State standard. The median and maximum concentrations for ammonia at the Miami and Tamiami Canal stations exceeded the State standard, whereas median dissolved-oxygen concentrations at both stations were below the State standard. Trend results were indicative of either improvement or deterioration in water quality with time. Improvement in water quality at the Miami Canal station was reflected by downward trends in suspended sediment (1987-94), turbidity, (1970-78), total ammonia (1971-94), total phosphorus (1987-94), barium (1978-94), iron (1969-94), and fecal coliform

  17. A volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Bodek, Itamar; Valentine, James R.; Trabanino, Rudy; Vincze, Johanna E.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    The process used to identify, select, and design an approach to the isolation and concentration of volatile organic compounds from a water sample prior to chemical analysis in a microgravity environment is discerned. The trade analysis leading to the recommended volatile organics concentrator (VOC) concept to be tested in a breadboard device is presented. The system covers the areas of gases, volatile separation from water, and water removal/gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer interface. Five options for potential use in the VOC and GC/MS system are identified and ranked, and also nine options are presented for separation of volatiles from the water phase. Seven options for use in the water removal/GC column and MS interface are also identified and included in the overall considerations. A final overall recommendation for breadboard VOC testing is given.

  18. International water and steam quality standards for thermal power station drum-type and waste heat recovery boilers with the treatment of boiler water with phosphates and NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, T. I.; Orlov, K. A.; Dooley, R. B.

    2017-01-01

    One of the ways for improving the operational reliability and economy of thermal power station equipment, including combined-cycle equipment, is to decrease the rates of the corrosion of constructional materials and the formation of scales in the water-steam circuit. These processes can be reduced to a minimum via the use of water with a minimum content of admixtures and the correction treatment of a heat-transfer fluid. The International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS), which unites specialists from every country of the world, has developed water and steam quality standards for power station equipment of different types on the basis of theoretical studies and long-term experience in the operation of power plants in 21 countries. Different water chemistry regimes are currently used at conventional and combined-cycle thermal power stations. This paper describes the conditions for the implementation of water chemistry regimes with the use of sodium salts of phosphoric acid and NaOH for the quality correction of boiler water. Water and steam quality standards and some recommendations for their maintenance under different operational conditions are given for each of the considered water chemistry regimes. The standards are designed for the water-steam circuit of conventional and combined-cycle thermal power stations. It is pointed out that the quality control of a heat-transfer fluid must be especially careful at combined-cycle thermal power stations with frequent startups and shutdowns.

  19. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  20. Waste water processing technology for Space Station Freedom - Comparative test data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Shah, Burt H.; Mcgriff, Cindy F.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative tests were conducted to choose the optimum technology for waste water processing on SSF. A thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation (TIMES) subsystem and a vapor compression distillation subsystem (VCD) were built and tested to compare urine processing capability. Water quality, performance, and specific energy were compared for conceptual designs intended to function as part of the water recovery and management system of SSF. The VCD is considered the most mature and efficient technology and was selected to replace the TIMES as the baseline urine processor for SSF.

  1. 47 CFR 73.6016 - Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of TV...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6016 Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations. Digital Class A TV stations must...

  2. 47 CFR 73.6016 - Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of TV...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6016 Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations. Digital Class A TV stations must...

  3. 47 CFR 73.6016 - Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of TV...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6016 Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations. Digital Class A TV stations must...

  4. 47 CFR 73.6016 - Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Digital Class A TV station protection of TV...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6016 Digital Class A TV station protection of TV broadcast stations. Digital Class A TV stations must...

  5. Water immersion facility general description, spacecraft design division, crew station branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Water Immersion Facility provides an accurate, safe, neutral buoyancy simulation of zero gravity conditions for development of equipment and procedures, and the training of crews. A detailed description is given of some of the following systems: (1) water tank and support equipment; (2) communications systems; (3) environmental control and liquid cooled garment system (EcS/LCG); (4) closed circuit television system; and (5) medical support system.

  6. Linking water quality and well-being for improved assessment and valuation of ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Bonnie L; Polasky, Stephen; Brauman, Kate A; Johnson, Kris A; Finlay, Jacques C; O'Neill, Ann; Kovacs, Kent; Dalzell, Brent

    2012-11-06

    Despite broad recognition of the value of the goods and services provided by nature, existing tools for assessing and valuing ecosystem services often fall short of the needs and expectations of decision makers. Here we address one of the most important missing components in the current ecosystem services toolbox: a comprehensive and generalizable framework for describing and valuing water quality-related services. Water quality is often misrepresented as a final ecosystem service. We argue that it is actually an important contributor to many different services, from recreation to human health. We present a valuation approach for water quality-related services that is sensitive to different actions that affect water quality, identifies aquatic endpoints where the consequences of changing water quality on human well-being are realized, and recognizes the unique groups of beneficiaries affected by those changes. We describe the multiple biophysical and economic pathways that link actions to changes in water quality-related ecosystem goods and services and provide guidance to researchers interested in valuing these changes. Finally, we present a valuation template that integrates biophysical and economic models, links actions to changes in service provision and value estimates, and considers multiple sources of water quality-related ecosystem service values without double counting.

  7. Parabolic stationing method application to intertidal shellfish (Sinonovacula constricta) and growing waters microbiological monitoring in Yueqing Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Liu, Huan; Xu, Dan; Gu, Beiqiao

    2016-12-28

    This study reported microbiological monitoring by parabolic stationing method for S. constricta and their growing waters, and application for the first time in Yueqing Bay, China. The results indicated that numbers of Escherichia coli and aerobic colony count in S. constricta flesh showed an approximate 'parabola' distribution across the whole shellfish bed. Numbers of faecal coliform in seawater samples were significantly higher in the top of the bay, and lower in the lower half of the bay, whilst higher located in the edge of the bay than the center in contrast to three sampling sites on the same latitude. Numbers of total bacterial count were not significantly correlated with faecal coliform in seawater samples. Finally, the shellfish production areas were classified based on three batches of E. coli monitoring.

  8. Recreational Water Contact and Fish Consumption Assessment to Inform Risk Estimates and Evaluate Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Surface waters provide invaluable ecosystem services, including drinking water, food, waste water disposal, and recreation. The nature and frequency of recreational contact with surface waters is a critical consideration in evaluating benefits to human well-being (e.g...

  9. A novel reverse-osmosis wash water recycle system for manned space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Babcock, W. C.; Barss, R. P.; Andrews, T. A.; Lachapelle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    The preliminary development of a wash water recycle system utilizing an inside-skinned hollow-fiber membrane is described. This module configuration is based on tube-side feed and is highly resistant to fouling with a minimum of pretreatment. During an ongoing research program for NASA, these modules were operated on actual wash waters with no significant fouling for a period of 40 days. Due to the tube-side-feed flow in these hollow-fiber membranes, the fibers themselves become the pressure vessels, allowing the development of extremely lightweight membrane modules. During the NASA research program, a pre-prototype membrane module capable of processing 6 gallons per day of wash water at 97 percent recovery was developed that can be dry-stored and that weighs 120 g.

  10. Hydraulic model of the proposed Water Recovery and Management system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Charles E.; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) system utilizing SINDA '85/FLUINT to determine its hydraulic operation characteristics, and to verify the design flow and pressure drop parameters is presented. The FLUINT analysis package is employed in the model to determine the flow and pressure characteristics when each of the different loop components is operational and contributing to the overall flow pattern. The water is driven in each loop by storage tanks pressurized with cabin air, and is routed through the system to the desired destination.

  11. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis preprototype subsystem. [oxygen production for life support systems on space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and controls developed for an electrolysis demonstration unit for use with the life sciences payload program and in NASA's regenerative life support evaluation program are described. Components discussed include: the electrolysis module; power conditioner; phase separator-pump and hydrogen differential regulator; pressure regulation of O2, He, and N2; air-cooled heat exchanger; water accumulator; fluid flow sight gage assembly; catalytic O2/H2 sensor; gas flow sensors; low voltage power supply; 100 Amp DC contactor assembly; and the water purifier design.

  12. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Station, Kansas City, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy heating and hot water system installed at the Kansas City Fire Station, Number 24, 2309 Hardesty Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1428 cubic feet of 1/2 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71 1/2 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120-gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30-kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation. This project is part of the Department of Energy PON-1 Solar Demonstration Program with DOE cost sharing $154,282 of the $174,372 solar system cost. The Final Design Review was held March 1977, the system became operational March 1979 and acceptance test was completed in September 1979.

  13. Microbiological Characterization of the International Space Station Water Processor Assembly External Filter Assembly S/N 01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Natalee; Wilson, Mark; Yoets, Airan; Yoets, Airan; Molina, Thomas; Bruce, Rebekah; Sitler, Glenn; Carter, Layne

    2012-01-01

    The External Filter Assembly (EFA) S/N 01 is a mesh screen filter with a pore size of approximately 300 micron that was installed in the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) between the Waste Tank and the Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS) on February 11, 2010 to protect clearances in the MLS solenoid valve SV_1121_3. A removal & replacement of the EFA Filter was performed on March 22, 2011 in response to increasing pressure across the Waste Tank solenoid valve SV_1121_1 and the EFA Filter. The EFA Filter was returned on ULF6 and received in the Boeing Huntsville Laboratory on June 13, 2011. The filter was aseptically removed from the housing, and the residual water was collected for enumeration and identification of bacteria and fungi. Swab samples of the filter surface were also collected for microbiological enumeration and identification. Sample analyses were performed by Boeing Huntsville Laboratory and NASA Johnson Space Center Microbiology for comparison. Photographic documentation of the EFA filter was performed using a stereo microscope and environmental scanning electron microscope. This paper characterizes the amount and types of microorganisms on the filter surface and in the residual water from the filter housing following 1 year of utilization in the ISS WPA.

  14. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-21

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  15. A Guide to the Common Diatoms at Water Pollution Surveillance System Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Cornelius I.

    This guide was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a taxonomic reference for the identification of diatoms. The taxonomic information included consists of a generic key to the common genera of diatoms, a section illustrating 164 diatom species representing 43 common genera found at the Water Pollution…

  16. Effect of water chemistry upsets on the dynamics of corrective reagent dosing systems at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, V. N.; Yegoshina, O. V.; Bolshakova, N. A.; Yarovoi, V. O.; Latt, Aie Min

    2016-12-01

    Typical disturbances in the dynamics of a corrective reagent dosing system under unsteady-state conditions during the unsatisfactory operation of a chemical control system with some water chemistry upsets at thermal and nuclear power stations are considered. An experimental setup representing a physical model for the water chemistry control system is described. The two disturbances, which are most frequently encountered in water chemistry control practice, such as a breakdown or shutdown of temperature compensation during pH measurement and an increase in the heat-transfer fluid flow rate, have been modeled in the process of study. The study of the effect produced by the response characteristics of chemical control analyzers on the operation of a reagent dosing system under unsteady-state conditions is important for the operative control of a water chemistry regime state. The effect of temperature compensation during pH measurement on the dynamics of an ammonia-dosing system in the manual and automatic cycle chemistry control modes has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the reading settling time of a pH meter in the manual ammonia- dosing mode grows with a breakdown in temperature compensation and a simultaneous increase in the temperature of a heat-transfer fluid sample. To improve the efficiency of water chemistry control, some systems for the quality control of a heat-transfer fluid by a chemical parameter with the obligatory compensation of a disturbance in its flow rate have been proposed for use. Experimental results will possibly differ from industrial data due to a great length of sampling lines. For this reason, corrective reagent dosing systems must be adapted to the conditions of a certain power-generating unit in the process of their implementation.

  17. Microbial community profile of a lead service line removed from a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    White, Colin; Tancos, Matthew; Lytle, Darren A

    2011-08-01

    A corroded lead service line was removed from a drinking water distribution system, and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rRNA gene techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of a biofilm on the surface of a corroded lead drinking water service line. The majority of phylotypes have been linked to heavy-metal-contaminated environments.

  18. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System▿

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin; Tancos, Matthew; Lytle, Darren A.

    2011-01-01

    A corroded lead service line was removed from a drinking water distribution system, and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rRNA gene techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of a biofilm on the surface of a corroded lead drinking water service line. The majority of phylotypes have been linked to heavy-metal-contaminated environments. PMID:21652741

  19. 7 CFR 612.6 - Application for water supply forecast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application for water supply forecast service. 612.6 Section 612.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY...

  20. 7 CFR 612.6 - Application for water supply forecast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application for water supply forecast service. 612.6 Section 612.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY...

  1. 7 CFR 612.6 - Application for water supply forecast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application for water supply forecast service. 612.6 Section 612.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY...

  2. 7 CFR 612.6 - Application for water supply forecast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application for water supply forecast service. 612.6 Section 612.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY...

  3. 7 CFR 612.6 - Application for water supply forecast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application for water supply forecast service. 612.6 Section 612.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY...

  4. 47 CFR 63.601 - Contents of applications for authority to reduce the hours of service of public coast stations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... address) Present hours: Monday through Friday Saturday Sunday Proposed hours: Monday through Friday... location Operated by Hours of service Monday thru Friday Saturday Sunday Request for Designation as...

  5. Acceptability and use of portable drinking water and hand washing stations in health care facilities and their impact on patient hygiene practices, Western kenya.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sarah D; Otieno, Ronald; Ayers, Tracy L; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H; Quick, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Many health care facilities (HCF) in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS) and drinking water stations (DWS), and trained healthcare workers (HCW) on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01) and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01). Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01), perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01), and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01); the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14). The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs.

  6. Acceptability and Use of Portable Drinking Water and Hand Washing Stations in Health Care Facilities and Their Impact on Patient Hygiene Practices, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Ronald; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H.

    2015-01-01

    Many health care facilities (HCF) in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS) and drinking water stations (DWS), and trained healthcare workers (HCW) on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01) and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01). Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01), perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01), and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01); the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14). The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs. PMID:25961293

  7. Orbiter Capability for Providing Water to the International Space Station according to the Most Probable Flight Attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunaway, Brian; Edeen, Marybeth

    2000-01-01

    Water to be generated by, delivered to, and processed by the International Space Station (ISS) is a critical Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) element, especially for the early ISS missions. A significant portion of the water required by the ISS shall be provided by the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) Orbiter. The balance of water generated by the Orbiter Fuel Cells (FC), minus that water consumed by the Orbiter Flash Evaporator System (FES) and crew, is available for transfer to the ISS. During later missions, crew respired and perspired water, as well as effluent water from the Orbiter LiOH canisters, will be collected as condensate and available for transfer to the ISS. Orbiter radiator performance provides the most variance in determining the amount of net Orbiter water available for transfer to the ISS. As radiator performance decreases, the dependence upon the FES (and FC water) increases for rejecting Orbiter waste heat. Generally, radiator performance decreases as the ISS assembly size increases (especially as solar arrays are added), and also as beta angle increases. ISS solar array deployment necessitates the use of models with articulating solar arrays (for Earth local-vertical attitudes), as array position dramatically affects Orbiter radiator performance. Recent developments in the relaxation of beta angle limitations have also increased the complexity and difficulty of providing water to the ISS. Other factors that may hinder the ability to transfer water are the number of empty Contingency Water Containers (CWCs) available, duration of open-hatch time, crew activity timeline, and full CWC storage capability. A parametric study has been accomplished that provides a quick-reference table for determining expected water generation rates for ISS missions 2A.2 through 7A.1. An hourly Orbiter water generation rate is reported according to a matrix that consists of: (1) (six) significant changes in ISS assembly configuration; (2) (four) beta

  8. [The significance of enviromental and biological monitoring in workers employed in service stations after the elimitation of tetraethyl lead from gasoline].

    PubMed

    Ghittori, S; Ferrari, M; Maestri, L; Negri, S; Zadra, P; Gremita, C; Imbriani, M

    2005-01-01

    The chemical risk in service stations may be due to toxic compounds present in fuel (particularly benzene and additives) and to the emission of exhausts and fine particulate from vehicles. Owing to the elimination of lead (Pb) from fuel and to the necessity of lowering CO emission, several oxygenated additives have been added to fuel, in particular methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), whose toxic properties are at present under investigation. The introduction of reformulated gasoline (RFG) and the use of catalytic converters (with possible release of platinum (Pt) in the environment) may have modified the risks for workers employed in service stations. The paper shows data collected from 26 subjects (divided into three specific tasks, namely: fuel dispenser, "self-service" attendant and controller, and cashier) to estimate the actual chemical risk and to compare it with the previous data taken from literature. For this purpose, besides performing the usual medical surveillance, we measured the environmental concentrations of benzene, MTBE and formaldehyde, the urinary levels of benzene metabolites S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and t,t-muconic acid (MA) and of unmodified MTBE, and the blood concentrations of Pb and Pt for each subject. Mean values of these compounds were, respectively: 38.81 microg/m3; 174.04 microg/m3; 10.38 microg/m3; 2.36 microg/g creatinine; 96.57 microg/g creatinine; 1.41 microg/L; 7.00 microg/100 mL; 0.0738 ng/ml. The above values were much lower than the corresponding limit values reported by ACGIH and DFG. In particular, after the introduction of vapour recycle systems and the widespread use of "self-service" systems, airborne benzene concentration dropped from 300/400 microg/m3 to lower than 100 microg/m3, without noticeable increasing of exposure to formaldehyde. The disappearing of Pb from gasoline leads to a progressive lowering of its blood levels, while the possible risks due to the very low amounts of Pt released from catalytic

  9. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  10. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    DOE PAGES

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; ...

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code calledmore » NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.« less

  11. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  12. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at...

  13. 47 CFR 73.210 - Station classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station classes. 73.210 Section 73.210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.210 Station classes. (a) The rules applicable to a particular station,...

  14. 47 CFR 73.210 - Station classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station classes. 73.210 Section 73.210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.210 Station classes. (a) The rules applicable to a particular station,...

  15. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few ..mu..g/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 ..mu..g/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  16. Efficient method for optimal placing of water quality monitoring stations for an ungauged basin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhyoun; Paik, Kyungrock; Yoo, Do Guen; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    A core problem in monitoring water quality of a river basin is identifying an optimal positioning of a limited number of water-sampling sites. Various optimality criteria have been suggested for this selection process in earlier studies. However, the search for sets of sampling sites that satisfy such criteria poses a challenging optimization problem, especially for a large basin. Here, we show that for particular types of objective functions, the optimization procedure can be dramatically simplified via an analogy with the formulation of Shannon entropy. On this basis, we propose an efficient algorithm that can easily determine the optimal location of water quality sampling sites in a river network. The proposed algorithm can be used standalone or in conjunction with a heuristic optimization algorithm such as a genetic algorithm. For the latter, the proposed algorithm filters only competitive candidates and makes a contribution to reducing the problem size significantly. The superior performance of the proposed method is demonstrated via its application to actual river networks examined in earlier studies, in which the proposed method determines more optimal solutions in a shorter computation time. The idea presented in this study can also be applied to other problems in which the objective function can be formulated in a similar functional form.

  17. Expert Water Quality Panel Review of Responses to the NASA Request for Information for the International Space Station On-Board Environmental Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Julianna L.; Mudgett, Paul D.; Packham, Nigel J.; Schultz, John R.; Straub, John E., II

    2005-01-01

    On August 9, 2003, NASA, with the cooperative support of the Vehicle Office of the International Space Station Program, the Advanced Human Support Technology Program, and the Johnson Space Center Habitability and Environmental Factors Office released a Request for Information, or RFI, to identify next-generation environmental monitoring systems that have demonstrated ability or the potential to meet defined requirements for monitoring air and water quality onboard the International Space Station. This report summarizes the review and analysis of the proposed solutions submitted to meet the water quality monitoring requirements. Proposals were to improve upon the functionality of the existing Space Station Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and monitor additional contaminants in water samples. The TOCA is responsible for in-flight measurement of total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, total carbon, pH, and conductivity in the Space Station potable water supplies. The current TOCA requires hazardous reagents to accomplish the carbon analyses. NASA is using the request for information process to investigate new technologies that may improve upon existing capabilities, as well as reduce or eliminate the need for hazardous reagents. Ideally, a replacement for the TOCA would be deployed in conjunction with the delivery of the Node 3 water recovery system currently scheduled for November 2007.

  18. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Space station. 97.207 Section 97.207... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.207 Space station. (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to...

  19. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Space station. 97.207 Section 97.207... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.207 Space station. (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to...

  20. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Space station. 97.207 Section 97.207... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.207 Space station. (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to...

  1. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point. (b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at...

  2. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point. (b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at...

  3. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point. (b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at...

  4. 47 CFR 97.209 - Earth station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Earth station. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth station. (a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to...

  5. 47 CFR 97.209 - Earth station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Earth station. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth station. (a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to...

  6. 47 CFR 97.209 - Earth station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Earth station. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth station. (a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to...

  7. 47 CFR 97.209 - Earth station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Earth station. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth station. (a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to...

  8. 47 CFR 97.209 - Earth station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Earth station. 97.209 Section 97.209... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.209 Earth station. (a) Any amateur station may be an Earth station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of an Earth station, subject to...

  9. 47 CFR 97.109 - Station control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station control. 97.109 Section 97.109... SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.109 Station control. (a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point. (b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at...

  10. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Space station. 97.207 Section 97.207... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.207 Space station. (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to...

  11. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Space station. 97.207 Section 97.207... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.207 Space station. (a) Any amateur station may be a space station. A holder of any class operator license may be the control operator of a space station, subject to...

  12. Space Station operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An evaluation of the success of the Space Station will be based on the service provided to the customers by the Station crew, the productivity of the crew, and the costs of operation. Attention is given to details regarding Space Station operations, a summary of operational philosophies and requirements, logistics and resupply operations, prelaunch processing and launch operations, on-orbit operations, aspects of maintainability and maintenance, habitability, and questions of medical care. A logistics module concept is considered along with a logistics module processing timeline, a habitability module concept, and a Space Station rescue mission.

  13. Comparing two tools for ecosystem service assessments regarding water resources decisions.

    PubMed

    Dennedy-Frank, P James; Muenich, Rebecca Logsdon; Chaubey, Indrajeet; Ziv, Guy

    2016-07-15

    We present a comparison of two ecohydrologic models commonly used for planning land management to assess the production of hydrologic ecosystem services: the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) annual water yield model. We compare these two models at two distinct sites in the US: the Wildcat Creek Watershed in Indiana and the Upper Upatoi Creek Watershed in Georgia. The InVEST and SWAT models provide similar estimates of the spatial distribution of water yield in Wildcat Creek, but very different estimates of the spatial distribution of water yield in Upper Upatoi Creek. The InVEST model may do a poor job estimating the spatial distribution of water yield in the Upper Upatoi Creek Watershed because baseflow provides a significant portion of the site's total water yield, which means that storage dynamics which are not modeled by InVEST may be important. We also compare the ability of these two models, as well as one newly developed set of ecosystem service indices, to deliver useful guidance for land management decisions focused on providing hydrologic ecosystem services in three particular decision contexts: environmental flow ecosystem services, ecosystem services for potable water supply, and ecosystem services for rainfed irrigation. We present a simple framework for selecting models or indices to evaluate hydrologic ecosystem services as a way to formalize where models deliver useful guidance.

  14. 9. (Credit CBF) The McNeil Street Station from the northwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. (Credit CBF) The McNeil Street Station from the northwest, March 1913. The low service pump room is on the right, the clear water well (installed c1900) and filter house are on the left. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  15. A fosmid cloning strategy for detecting the widest possible spectrum of microbes from the international space station drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangdun; Chang, Mi Sook; Stuecker, Tara; Chung, Christine; Newcombe, David A; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-12-01

    In this study, fosmid cloning strategies were used to assess the microbial populations in water from the International Space Station (ISS) drinking water system (henceforth referred to as Prebiocide and Tank A water samples). The goals of this study were: to compare the sensitivity of the fosmid cloning strategy with that of traditional culture-based and 16S rRNA-based approaches and to detect the widest possible spectrum of microbial populations during the water purification process. Initially, microbes could not be cultivated, and conventional PCR failed to amplify 16S rDNA fragments from these low biomass samples. Therefore, randomly primed rolling-circle amplification was used to amplify any DNA that might be present in the samples, followed by size selection by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The amplified high-molecular-weight DNA from both samples was cloned into fosmid vectors. Several hundred clones were randomly selected for sequencing, followed by Blastn/Blastx searches. Sequences encoding specific genes from Burkholderia, a species abundant in the soil and groundwater, were found in both samples. Bradyrhizobium and Mesorhizobium, which belong to rhizobia, a large community of nitrogen fixers often found in association with plant roots, were present in the Prebiocide samples. Ralstonia, which is prevalent in soils with a high heavy metal content, was detected in the Tank A samples. The detection of many unidentified sequences suggests the presence of potentially novel microbial fingerprints. The bacterial diversity detected in this pilot study using a fosmid vector approach was higher than that detected by conventional 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  16. A Fosmid Cloning Strategy for Detecting the Widest Possible Spectrum of Microbes from the International Space Station Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sangdun; Chang, Mi Sook; Stuecker, Tara; Chung, Christine; Newcombe, David A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-01-01

    In this study, fosmid cloning strategies were used to assess the microbial populations in water from the International Space Station (ISS) drinking water system (henceforth referred to as Prebiocide and Tank A water samples). The goals of this study were: to compare the sensitivity of the fosmid cloning strategy with that of traditional culture-based and 16S rRNA-based approaches and to detect the widest possible spectrum of microbial populations during the water purification process. Initially, microbes could not be cultivated, and conventional PCR failed to amplify 16S rDNA fragments from these low biomass samples. Therefore, randomly primed rolling-circle amplification was used to amplify any DNA that might be present in the samples, followed by size selection by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The amplified high-molecular-weight DNA from both samples was cloned into fosmid vectors. Several hundred clones were randomly selected for sequencing, followed by Blastn/Blastx searches. Sequences encoding specific genes from Burkholderia, a species abundant in the soil and groundwater, were found in both samples. Bradyrhizobium and Mesorhizobium, which belong to rhizobia, a large community of nitrogen fixers often found in association with plant roots, were present in the Prebiocide samples. Ralstonia, which is prevalent in soils with a high heavy metal content, was detected in the Tank A samples. The detection of many unidentified sequences suggests the presence of potentially novel microbial fingerprints. The bacterial diversity detected in this pilot study using a fosmid vector approach was higher than that detected by conventional 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:23346038

  17. 47 CFR 73.1201 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES.... Broadcast station identification announcements shall be made: (1) At the beginning and ending of each time... offerings. Television and Class A television broadcast stations may make these announcements visually...

  18. 47 CFR 25.258 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Stations and GSO FSS services in the 29.25-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) Operators of NGSO MSS feeder link earth stations and GSO FSS earth stations in the band 29.25 to... MSS feeder link earth station complexes, that will minimize instances of unacceptable interference to the GSO FSS space stations. Earth station licensees operating with GSO FSS systems shall be capable...

  19. 47 CFR 25.258 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Stations and GSO FSS services in the 29.25-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (a) Operators of NGSO MSS feeder link earth stations and GSO FSS earth stations in the band 29.25 to... MSS feeder link earth station complexes, that will minimize instances of unacceptable interference to the GSO FSS space stations. Earth station licensees operating with GSO FSS systems shall be capable...

  20. 47 CFR 25.258 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Stations and GSO FSS services in the 29.25-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... (a) Operators of NGSO MSS feeder link earth stations and GSO FSS earth stations in the band 29.25 to... MSS feeder link earth station complexes, that will minimize instances of unacceptable interference to the GSO FSS space stations. Earth station licensees operating with GSO FSS systems shall be capable...