Science.gov

Sample records for statistical multifragmentation regime

  1. The statistical multifragmentation model: Origins and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donangelo, R.; Souza, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    We review the Statistical Multifragmentation Model (SMM) which considers a generalization of the liquid-drop model for hot nuclei and allows one to calculate thermodynamic quantities characterizing the nuclear ensemble at the disassembly stage. We show how to determine probabilities of definite partitions of finite nuclei and how to determine, through Monte Carlo calculations, observables such as the caloric curve, multiplicity distributions, heat capacity, among others. Some experimental measurements of the caloric curve confirmed the SMM predictions of over 10 years before, leading to a surge in the interest in the model. However, the experimental determination of the fragmentation temperatures relies on the yields of different isotopic species, which were not correctly calculated in the schematic, liquid-drop picture, employed in the SMM. This led to a series of improvements in the SMM, in particular to the more careful choice of nuclear masses and energy densities, specially for the lighter nuclei. With these improvements the SMM is able to make quantitative determinations of isotope production. We show the application of SMM to the production of exotic nuclei through multifragmentation. These preliminary calculations demonstrate the need for a careful choice of the system size and excitation energy to attain maximum yields.

  2. The statistical multifragmentation model: Origins and recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Donangelo, R.; Souza, S. R.

    2016-07-07

    We review the Statistical Multifragmentation Model (SMM) which considers a generalization of the liquid-drop model for hot nuclei and allows one to calculate thermodynamic quantities characterizing the nuclear ensemble at the disassembly stage. We show how to determine probabilities of definite partitions of finite nuclei and how to determine, through Monte Carlo calculations, observables such as the caloric curve, multiplicity distributions, heat capacity, among others. Some experimental measurements of the caloric curve confirmed the SMM predictions of over 10 years before, leading to a surge in the interest in the model. However, the experimental determination of the fragmentation temperatures relies on the yields of different isotopic species, which were not correctly calculated in the schematic, liquid-drop picture, employed in the SMM. This led to a series of improvements in the SMM, in particular to the more careful choice of nuclear masses and energy densities, specially for the lighter nuclei. With these improvements the SMM is able to make quantitative determinations of isotope production. We show the application of SMM to the production of exotic nuclei through multifragmentation. These preliminary calculations demonstrate the need for a careful choice of the system size and excitation energy to attain maximum yields.

  3. Statistical multifragmentation model with discretized energy and the generalized Fermi breakup: Formulation of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, S. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.

    2013-07-01

    The generalized Fermi breakup model, recently demonstrated to be formally equivalent to the statistical multifragmentation model, if the contribution of excited states is included in the state densities of the former, is implemented. Because this treatment requires application of the statistical multifragmentation model repeatedly on hot fragments until they have decayed to their ground states, it becomes extremely computationally demanding, making its application to the systems of interest extremely difficult. Based on exact recursion formulas previously developed by Chase and Mekjian to calculate statistical weights very efficiently, we present an implementation which is efficient enough to allow it to be applied to large systems at high excitation energies. Comparison with the gemini++ sequential decay code and the Weisskopf-Ewing evaporation model shows that the predictions obtained with our treatment are fairly similar to those obtained with these more traditional models.

  4. Power law behavior of the isotope yield distributions in the multifragmentation regime of heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Wada, R.; Chen, Z.; Keutgen, T.; Kowalski, S.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Bottosso, C.; Materna, T.; Natowitz, J. B.; Qin, L.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Sahu, P. K.; Schmidt, K. J.; Wang, J.

    2010-11-01

    Isotope yield distributions in the multifragmentation regime were studied with high-quality isotope identification, focusing on the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) produced in semiviolent collisions. The yields were analyzed within the framework of a modified Fisher model. Using the ratio of the mass-dependent symmetry energy coefficient relative to the temperature, asym/T, extracted in previous work and that of the pairing term, ap/T, extracted from this work, and assuming that both reflect secondary decay processes, the experimentally observed isotope yields were corrected for these effects. For a given I=N-Z value, the corrected yields of isotopes relative to the yield of C12 show a power law distribution Y(N,Z)/Y(12C)~A-τ in the mass range 1⩽A⩽30, and the distributions are almost identical for the different reactions studied. The observed power law distributions change systematically when I of the isotopes changes and the extracted τ value decreases from 3.9 to 1.0 as I increases from -1 to 3. These observations are well reproduced by a simple deexcitation model, with which the power law distribution of the primary isotopes is determined to be τprim=2.4±0.2, suggesting that the disassembling system at the time of the fragment formation is indeed at, or very near, the critical point.

  5. Nuclear multifragmentation: Antiprotons versus photons and heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cugnon, J.

    1994-09-01

    Nuclear multifragmentation is the phenomenon by which a nucleus breaks into many pieces of intermediate size. It occurs in the excitation-energy regime, between the spallation + evaporation regime and the explosive fragmentation regime. The various models of multifragmentation are briefly reviewed and the possibility of critical behavior in the multifragmentation process is underlined. Unanswered problems are stated. It is shown, by model calculations, that antiproton annihilation is, in many respects, better suited than proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions for studying multifragmentation and, in other respects, complementary to these other tools. 36 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Statistical regimes of random laser fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Cavalieri, Stefano; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2007-06-15

    Statistical fluctuations of the light emitted from amplifying random media are studied theoretically and numerically. The characteristic scales of the diffusive motion of light lead to Gaussian or power-law (Levy) distributed fluctuations depending on external control parameters. In the Levy regime, the output pulse is highly irregular leading to huge deviations from a mean-field description. Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model which includes the population of the medium demonstrate the two statistical regimes and provide a comparison with dynamical rate equations. Different statistics of the fluctuations helps to explain recent experimental observations reported in the literature.

  7. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Subrata

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of eta/s exhibits behavior surprisingly similar to that of H{sub 2}O. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio eta/s reaches a minimum of depth comparable to that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on eta/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  8. Two characteristic volumes in thermal nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V.A.; Avdeyev, S.P.; Rodionov, V.K.; Kirakosyan, V.V.; Simonenko, A.V.; Rukoyatkin, P.A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Karcz, W.; Skwirczynska, I.; Kuzmin, E.A.; Chulkov, L.V.; Norbeck, E.; Botvina, A.S.

    2004-10-01

    The paper is devoted to the experimental determination of the space-time characteristics for the target multifragmentation in p(8.1 GeV)+Au collisions. The experimental data on the fragment charge distribution and kinetic energy spectra are analyzed within the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model. It is found that the partition of hot nuclei is specified after expansion of the target spectator to a volume equal to V{sub t}=(2.9{+-}0.2)V{sub o}, with V{sub o} as the volume at normal density. However, the freezeout volume is found to be V{sub f}=(11{+-}3)V{sub o}. At freezeout, all the fragments are well separated and only the Coulomb force should be taken into account. The results are in accordance with a scenario of spinodal disintegration of hot nuclei.

  9. Equilibration and multifragmentation in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peilert, G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Botvina, A.

    1993-09-01

    Modeling of multifragmentation measurements from heavy ion reactions generally requires separate treatment of the initial fast part of the reaction, during which energetic nucleons are emitted, and of a quasi-equilibrated system where sufficient degrees of freedom have been excited, so that statistical approaches may be applied. Some of the more sophisticated fast cascade models, e.g., Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), might also produce fragment yields, however, transport models have not yet been able to satisfactorily reproduce fragmentation properties of nuclear reactions. In this work we consider the interactions of {sup 36}Ar with {sup 197}Au at incident energies of 35 to 110 MeV{center_dot}A, which was investigated by de Souza et al. We will first look at two dynamic models which may be used to estimate the excitation remaining for quasi-equilibrated systems following the fast nucleonic cascade, specifically the Boltzmann master equation (BME) and Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) approaches. Using excitations from the BME model to estimate values for quasi-equilibrated nuclei, we will explore two approaches to statistical multifragmentation calculations, one of sequential binary decay, the other a simultaneous multifragmentation model (SMM). We will consider central collisions in our calculations, and experimental results gated on the highest total charged particle emissions -- those deduced to be central collisions.

  10. Angular distributions in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Klobuchar, R.L.; Haustein, P.E.; Virtes, G.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Loveland, W.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions are reported for {sup 37}Ar and {sup 127}Xe from 381-GeV {sup 28}Si+Au interactions and for products between {sup 24}Na and {sup 149}Gd from 28-GeV {sup 1}H+Au. Sideward peaking and forward deficits for multifragmentation products are significantly enhanced for heavy ions compared with protons. Projectile kinetic energy does not appear to be a satisfactory scaling variable. The data are discussed in terms of a kinetic-focusing model in which sideward peaking is due to transverse motion of the excited product from the initial projectile-target interaction.

  11. Statistical instability of barrier microdischarges operating in townsend regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nagorny, V. P.

    2007-01-15

    The dynamics of barrier microdischarges operating in a Townsend regime is studied analytically and via kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that statistical fluctuations of the number of charged particles in the discharge gap strongly influence the dynamics of natural oscillations of the discharge current and may even lead to a disruption of the discharge. Analysis of the statistical effects based on a simple model is suggested. The role of external sources in stabilizing microdischarges is clarified.

  12. Detector noise statistics in the non-linear regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shopbell, P. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The statistical behavior of an idealized linear detector in the presence of threshold and saturation levels is examined. It is assumed that the noise is governed by the statistical fluctuations in the number of photons emitted by the source during an exposure. Since physical detectors cannot have infinite dynamic range, our model illustrates that all devices have non-linear regimes, particularly at high count rates. The primary effect is a decrease in the statistical variance about the mean signal due to a portion of the expected noise distribution being removed via clipping. Higher order statistical moments are also examined, in particular, skewness and kurtosis. In principle, the expected distortion in the detector noise characteristics can be calibrated using flatfield observations with count rates matched to the observations. For this purpose, some basic statistical methods that utilize Fourier analysis techniques are described.

  13. Influence of the coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gulminelli, F; Chomaz, Ph; Raduta, Al H; Raduta, Ad R

    2003-11-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the observables space. A multicanonical formalism allows one to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the nonsaturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the Coulomb effect as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

  14. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  15. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  16. New Statistical Learning Methods for Estimating Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Qi; Zeng, Donglin; Laber, Eric B.; Kosorok, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes (DTRs) are sequential decision rules for individual patients that can adapt over time to an evolving illness. The goal is to accommodate heterogeneity among patients and find the DTR which will produce the best long term outcome if implemented. We introduce two new statistical learning methods for estimating the optimal DTR, termed backward outcome weighted learning (BOWL), and simultaneous outcome weighted learning (SOWL). These approaches convert individualized treatment selection into an either sequential or simultaneous classification problem, and can thus be applied by modifying existing machine learning techniques. The proposed methods are based on directly maximizing over all DTRs a nonparametric estimator of the expected long-term outcome; this is fundamentally different than regression-based methods, for example Q-learning, which indirectly attempt such maximization and rely heavily on the correctness of postulated regression models. We prove that the resulting rules are consistent, and provide finite sample bounds for the errors using the estimated rules. Simulation results suggest the proposed methods produce superior DTRs compared with Q-learning especially in small samples. We illustrate the methods using data from a clinical trial for smoking cessation. PMID:26236062

  17. New Statistical Learning Methods for Estimating Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Qi; Zeng, Donglin; Laber, Eric B; Kosorok, Michael R

    Dynamic treatment regimes (DTRs) are sequential decision rules for individual patients that can adapt over time to an evolving illness. The goal is to accommodate heterogeneity among patients and find the DTR which will produce the best long term outcome if implemented. We introduce two new statistical learning methods for estimating the optimal DTR, termed backward outcome weighted learning (BOWL), and simultaneous outcome weighted learning (SOWL). These approaches convert individualized treatment selection into an either sequential or simultaneous classification problem, and can thus be applied by modifying existing machine learning techniques. The proposed methods are based on directly maximizing over all DTRs a nonparametric estimator of the expected long-term outcome; this is fundamentally different than regression-based methods, for example Q-learning, which indirectly attempt such maximization and rely heavily on the correctness of postulated regression models. We prove that the resulting rules are consistent, and provide finite sample bounds for the errors using the estimated rules. Simulation results suggest the proposed methods produce superior DTRs compared with Q-learning especially in small samples. We illustrate the methods using data from a clinical trial for smoking cessation.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF REGIME SHIFTS IN TIME SERIES USING NEIGHBORHOOD STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of alternative dynamic regimes in ecological systems requires several lines of evidence. Previous work on time series analysis of dynamic regimes includes mainly model-fitting methods. We introduce two methods that do not use models. These approaches use state-...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF REGIME SHIFTS IN TIME SERIES USING NEIGHBORHOOD STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of alternative dynamic regimes in ecological systems requires several lines of evidence. Previous work on time series analysis of dynamic regimes includes mainly model-fitting methods. We introduce two methods that do not use models. These approaches use state-...

  20. Isospin and kinematical properties of heavy residues from the multifragmentation of neutron-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Botvina, A. S.; Keksis, A.; Martin, E.; Shetty, D. V.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-05-01

    The yields and velocity distributions of isotopically resolved projectile residues from the reactions of 86Kr(25MeV/nucleon) with 64Ni,58Ni,124Sn,112Sn and 208Pb, as well as 124Sn(20MeV/u) with 124Sn are studied in this work [1,2]. Special attention is given to residues produced at excitation energies near the multifragmentation threshold ( ˜2-3MeV/nucleon). Both the isospin and the kinematical properties of the observed residues are well described by a hybrid approach consisting of a deep inelastic transfer model for the dynamical stage of the collision and the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) for the de-excitation stage [3]. The present version of SMM features a fully microcanonically-based partition of fragmentation space and a detailed treatment of Coulomb interaction (including the interaction of fragments with target `spectators'). Apart from a nuclear reaction standpoint, the present study also addresses, both experimentally and theoretically, the practical issue of the production of very neutron-rich rare isotopes in multifragmentation of neutron-rich systems. [1] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Rev. C 68 024605 (2003). [2] G.A. Souliotis et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 204 166 (2003). [3] A.S. Botvina et al. Phys. Rev. C 65 044610 (2002) and references therein.

  1. Multifragmentation: Surface and Coulomb instabilities of sheets, bubbles, and donuts

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, Kin; Wozniak, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    Disks, bubbles, and donuts have been observed in dynamical calculations of heavy ion collisions. These shapes are subject to a variety of surface and Coulomb instabilities. These instabilities are identified and analyzed in terms of their relevance to multifragmentation.

  2. Multifragmentation and the phase transition: A systematic study of the multifragmentation of 1A GeV Au, La, and Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, B. K.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D. A.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M. L.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J. C.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lisa, M. A.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Müller, W. F.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Sann, H.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Symons, T. J.; Tincknell, M.; Tuvé, C.; Wang, S.; Warren, P.; Wieman, H. H.; Wienold, T.; Wolf, K.

    2002-05-01

    A systematic analysis of multifragmentation (MF) in fully reconstructed events from 1A GeV Au, La, and Kr collisions with C has been performed. These data are used to provide a definitive test of the variable volume version of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). A single set of SMM parameters directly determined by the data and the semi-empirical mass formula are used after the adjustable inverse level density parameter ɛ0 is determined by the fragment distributions. The results from SMM for second stage multiplicity, size of the biggest fragment, and the intermediate mass fragments are in excellent agreement with the data. Multifragmentation thresholds have been obtained for all three systems using SMM prior to secondary decay. The data indicate that both thermal excitation energy E*th and the isotope ratio temperature THe-DT decrease with increase in system size at the critical point. The breakup temperature obtained from SMM also shows the same trend as seen in the data. The SMM model is used to study the nature of the MF phase transition. The caloric curve for Kr exhibits back-bending (finite latent heat) while the caloric curves for Au and La are consistent with a continuous phase transition (nearly zero latent heat) and the values of the critical exponents τ, β, and γ, both from data and SMM, are close to those for a ``liquid-gas'' system for Au and La. We conclude that the larger Coulomb expansion energy in Au and La reduces the latent heat required for MF and changes the nature of the phase transition. Thus the Coulomb energy plays a major role in nuclear MF.

  3. Distinct metastable atmospheric regimes despite nearly Gaussian statistics: A paradigm model

    PubMed Central

    Majda, Andrew J.; Franzke, Christian L.; Fischer, Alexander; Crommelin, Daniel T.

    2006-01-01

    A controversial topic in the recent climate modeling literature is the fashion in which metastable low-frequency regimes in the atmosphere occur despite nearly Gaussian statistics for these planetary waves. Here a simple 57-mode paradigm model for such metastable atmospheric regime behavior is introduced and analyzed through hidden Markov model (HMM) analysis of the time series of suitable low-frequency planetary waves. The analysis of this paradigm model elucidates how statistically significant metastable regime transitions between blocked and zonal statistical states occur despite nearly Gaussian behavior in the associated probability distribution function and without a significant role for the low-order truncated nonlinear dynamics alone; turbulent backscatter onto the three-dimensional subspace of low-frequency modes is responsible for these effects. It also is demonstrated that suitable stochastic mode reduction strategies, which include both augmented cubic nonlinearity and multiplicative noise, are also capable of capturing the metastable low-frequency regime behavior through a single stochastic differential equation compared with the full turbulent chaotic 57-mode model. This feature is attractive for issues such as long-term weather predictability. Although there have been many applications of HMM in other sciences, this work presents a previously undescribed application of HMM analysis to atmospheric low-frequency variability and points the way for further applications including their use in extended range predictability. PMID:16714380

  4. A statistical analysis of avalanching heat transport in stationary enhanced core confinement regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, S.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-09-15

    We present a statistical analysis of heat transport in stationary enhanced confinement regimes obtained from flux-driven gyrofluid simulations. The probability density functions of heat flux in improved confinement regimes, characterized by the Nusselt number, show significant deviation from Gaussian, with a markedly fat tail, implying the existence of heat avalanches. Two types of avalanching transport are found to be relevant to stationary states, depending on the degree of turbulence suppression. In the weakly suppressed regime, heat avalanches occur in the form of quasi-periodic (QP) heat pulses. Collisional relaxation of zonal flow is likely to be the origin of these QP heat pulses. This phenomenon is similar to transient limit cycle oscillations observed prior to edge pedestal formation in recent experiments. On the other hand, a spectral analysis of heat flux in the strongly suppressed regime shows the emergence of a 1/f (f is the frequency) band, suggesting the presence of self-organized criticality (SOC)-like episodic heat avalanches. This episodic 1/f heat avalanches have a long temporal correlation and constitute the dominant transport process in this regime.

  5. Use of observational and model-derived fields and regime model output statistics in mesoscale forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.; Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Various empirical and statistical weather-forecasting studies which utilize stratification by weather regime are described. Objective classification was used to determine weather regime in some studies. In other cases the weather pattern was determined on the basis of a parameter representing the physical and dynamical processes relevant to the anticipated mesoscale phenomena, such as low level moisture convergence and convective precipitation, or the Froude number and the occurrence of cold-air damming. For mesoscale phenomena already in existence, new forecasting techniques were developed. The use of cloud models in operational forecasting is discussed. Models to calculate the spatial scales of forcings and resultant response for mesoscale systems are presented. The use of these models to represent the climatologically most prevalent systems, and to perform case-by-case simulations is reviewed. Operational implementation of mesoscale data into weather forecasts, using both actual simulation output and method-output statistics is discussed.

  6. Use of observational and model-derived fields and regime model output statistics in mesoscale forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.; Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Various empirical and statistical weather-forecasting studies which utilize stratification by weather regime are described. Objective classification was used to determine weather regime in some studies. In other cases the weather pattern was determined on the basis of a parameter representing the physical and dynamical processes relevant to the anticipated mesoscale phenomena, such as low level moisture convergence and convective precipitation, or the Froude number and the occurrence of cold-air damming. For mesoscale phenomena already in existence, new forecasting techniques were developed. The use of cloud models in operational forecasting is discussed. Models to calculate the spatial scales of forcings and resultant response for mesoscale systems are presented. The use of these models to represent the climatologically most prevalent systems, and to perform case-by-case simulations is reviewed. Operational implementation of mesoscale data into weather forecasts, using both actual simulation output and method-output statistics is discussed.

  7. Boundary between the thermal and statistical polarization regimes in a nuclear spin ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, B. E.; Cadeddu, D.; Xue, F.; Peddibhotla, P.; Poggio, M.

    2014-07-28

    As the number of spins in an ensemble is reduced, the statistical fluctuations in its polarization eventually exceed the mean thermal polarization. This transition has now been surpassed in a number of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, which achieve nanometer-scale detection volumes. Here, we measure nanometer-scale ensembles of nuclear spins in a KPF{sub 6} sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy. In particular, we investigate the transition between regimes dominated by thermal and statistical nuclear polarization. The ratio between the two types of polarization provides a measure of the number of spins in the detected ensemble.

  8. Collective effects and multifragmentation in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, B.; Barz, H. W.

    1995-02-01

    Central and semi-central Au + Au collisions at 150 and 250 A·MeV are investigated in the framework of a hybrid model with dynamical and statistical components. Starting from the BUU approach and ansatz for the Wigner function is made which describes thermal and collective motion of the nucleons and models the transition from the one-source to the two-source behavior. Anisotropic flow energies and temperatures as well as angular momenta are extracted. Nucleonic flow and pre-equilibrium emission reduce considerably the excitation energy of the matter. The cluster formation is described by the Copenhagen multifragmentation model. Charge spectra, energy spectra and two-particle correlations of the fragments are reproduced. Agreement with experiment can be improved by assuming a reduced transverse flow.

  9. Sideways-peaked angular distributions in hadron-induced multifragmentation: Shock waves, geometry, or kinematics?

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R.; Korteling, R.G.; Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J.; Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Breuer, H.; Morley, K.B.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Friedman, W.A.; Botvina, A.

    1998-07-01

    Exclusive studies of sideways-peaked angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana silicon sphere (ISiS) detector array. The effect becomes prominent for beam momenta above about 10thinspGeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward peaked to nearly isotropic as the fragment energy decreases. Fragment-fragment correlation studies show no evidence for a preferred angle that might signal a fast dynamic breakup mechanism. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest a possible kinematic origin arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the recoil nucleus during the fast cascade. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with the data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Full-counting statistics of energy transport of molecular junctions in the polaronic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gaomin; Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the full-counting statistics (FCS) of energy transport carried by electrons in molecular junctions for the Anderson-Holstein model in the polaronic regime. Using the two-time quantum measurement scheme, the generating function (GF) for the energy transport is derived and expressed as a Fredholm determinant in terms of Keldysh nonequilibrium Green’s function in the time domain. Dressed tunneling approximation is used in decoupling the phonon cloud operator in the polaronic regime. This formalism enables us to analyze the time evolution of energy transport dynamics after a sudden switch-on of the coupling between the dot and the leads towards the stationary state. The steady state energy current cumulant GF in the long time limit is obtained in the energy domain as well. Universal relations for steady state energy current FCS are derived under a finite temperature gradient with zero bias and this enabled us to express the equilibrium energy current cumulant by a linear combination of lower order cumulants. The behaviors of energy current cumulants in steady state under temperature gradient and external bias are numerically studied and explained. The transient dynamics of energy current cumulants is numerically calculated and analyzed. Universal scaling of normalized transient energy cumulants is found under both temperature gradient and external bias.

  11. Statistical analysis of electroconvection near an ion-selective membrane in the highly chaotic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzgalski, Clara; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We investigate electroconvection and its impact on ion transport in a model system comprised of an ion-selective membrane, an aqueous electrolyte, and an external electric field applied normal to the membrane. We develop a direct numerical simulation code to solve the governing Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions using a specialized parallel numerical algorithm and sufficient resolution to capture the high frequency and high wavenumber physics. We show a comprehensive statistical analysis of the transport phenomena in the highly chaotic regime. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D simulations include prediction of the mean concentration fields as well as the spectra of concentration, charge density, and velocity signals. Our analyses reveal a significant quantitative difference between 2D and 3D electroconvection. Furthermore, we show that high-intensity yet short-lived current density hot spots appear randomly on the membrane surface, contributing significantly to the mean current density. By examining cross correlations between current density on the membrane and other field quantities we explore the physical mechanisms leading to current hot spots. We also present analysis of transport fluxes in the context of ensemble-averaged equations. Our analysis reveals that in the highly chaotic regime the mixing layer (ML), which spans the majority of the domain extent, is governed by advective fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that in the ML the mean electromigration fluxes cancel out for positive and negative ions, indicating that the mean transport of total salt content within the ML can be represented via the electroneutral approximation. Finally, we present an assessment of the importance of different length scales in enhancing transport by computing the cross covariance of concentration and velocity fluctuations in the wavenumber space. Our analysis indicates that in the majority of the domain

  12. Isolating the thermal degree of freedom in nuclear multifragmentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Laforest, R.; Lefort, T.; Martin, E.; Pienkowski, L.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Remsberg, L. P.; Rowland, D.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V. E.; Winchester, E.; Yennello, S. J.

    1999-05-03

    Multifragmentation studies induced by GeV light-ion beams permit investigation of the influence of intrinsic thermal properties of hot nuclear matter, with minimal interference from the compression/decompression cycle and rotational instabilities. We summarize recent results obtained with {sup 3}He, proton and pion beams up to 15 GeV/c and present the initial results from a recent experiment with 8 GeV/c antiproton and pion beams. The results are compared with INC simulations coupled to EES and SMM models and the caloric curve for the {sup 3}He data will also be discussed.

  13. Statistics of vacuum breakdown in the high-gradient and low-rate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensch, Walter; Degiovanni, Alberto; Calatroni, Sergio; Korsbäck, Anders; Djurabekova, Flyura; Rajamäki, Robin; Giner-Navarro, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In an increasing number of high-gradient linear accelerator applications, accelerating structures must operate with both high surface electric fields and low breakdown rates. Understanding the statistical properties of breakdown occurrence in such a regime is of practical importance for optimizing accelerator conditioning and operation algorithms, as well as of interest for efforts to understand the physical processes which underlie the breakdown phenomenon. Experimental data of breakdown has been collected in two distinct high-gradient experimental set-ups: A prototype linear accelerating structure operated in the Compact Linear Collider Xbox 12 GHz test stands, and a parallel plate electrode system operated with pulsed DC in the kV range. Collected data is presented, analyzed and compared. The two systems show similar, distinctive, two-part distributions of number of pulses between breakdowns, with each part corresponding to a specific, constant event rate. The correlation between distance and number of pulses between breakdown indicates that the two parts of the distribution, and their corresponding event rates, represent independent primary and induced follow-up breakdowns. The similarity of results from pulsed DC to 12 GHz rf indicates a similar vacuum arc triggering mechanism over the range of conditions covered by the experiments.

  14. Statistical ensembles and fragmentation of finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.

    2017-09-01

    Statistical models based on different ensembles are very commonly used to describe the nuclear multifragmentation reaction in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. Canonical model results are more appropriate for finite nuclei calculations while those obtained from the grand canonical ones are more easily calculable. A transformation relation has been worked out for converting results of finite nuclei from grand canonical to canonical and vice versa. The formula shows that, irrespective of the particle number fluctuation in the grand canonical ensemble, exact canonical results can be recovered for observables varying linearly or quadratically with the number of particles. This result is of great significance since the baryon and charge conservation constraints can make the exact canonical calculations extremely difficult in general. This concept developed in this work can be extended in future for transformation to ensembles where analytical solutions do not exist. The applicability of certain equations (isoscaling, etc.) in the regime of finite nuclei can also be tested using this transformation relation.

  15. Six temperature and precipitation regimes of the contiguous United States between 1895 and 2010: a statistical inference study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Wied, Olaf; Weithmann, Alexander; Regele, Tobias; Bailey, Barbara A.; Lawrimore, Jay H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes six different temporal climate regimes of the contiguous United States (CONUS) according to interdecadal variations of surface air temperature (SAT) and precipitation using the United States Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) monthly data (Tmax, Tmin, Tmean, and precipitation) from 1895 to 2010. Our analysis is based on the probability distribution, mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, and Welch's t test. The relevant statistical parameters are computed from gridded monthly SAT and precipitation data. SAT variations lead to classification of four regimes: 1895-1930 (cool), 1931-1960 (warm), 1961-1985 (cool), and 1986-2010 (warm), while precipitation variations lead to a classification of two regimes: 1895-1975 (dry) and 1976-2010 (wet). The KS test shows that any two regimes of the above six are statistically significantly different from each other due to clear shifts of the probability density functions. Extremes of SAT and precipitation identify the ten hottest, coldest, driest, and wettest years. Welch's t test is used to discern significant differences among these extremes. The spatial patterns of the six climate regimes and some years of extreme climate are analyzed. Although the recent two decades are the warmest among the other decades since 1895 and many hottest years measured by CONUS Tmin and Tmean are in these two decades, the hottest year according to the CONUS Tmax anomalies is 1934 (1.37 °C), which is very close to the second Tmax hottest year 2006 (1.35 °C).

  16. Statistical dynamical downscaling of present day and future precipitation regimes in southern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, David; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim; Fink, Andreas; Massmeyer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Southeast Asia has been identified as one of the hot-spots of climate change. While the projected changes in annual precipitation are comparatively small, there is a clear tendency towards more rainfall in the dry season and an increase in extreme precipitation events. In this study, a statistical dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach is applied to obtain higher resolution and more robust regional climate change projections for tropical Southeast Asia with focus on Vietnam. First, a recent climate (RC) simulation with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM with a spatial resolution of ~50 km driven by ERA-Interim (1979-2008) is performed for the tropical region of Southeast Asia. For the SDD, six weather types (WTs) are selected for Vietnam during the wet season (April - October) using a k-means cluster analysis of daily zonal wind component in 850 hPa and 200 hPa from the RC run. For each calculated weather type, simulated representatives are selected from the RC run and are then further dynamically downscaled to a resolution of 0.0625° (7 km). By using historical WT frequencies, the simulated representatives are recombined to a high resolution rainfall climatology for the recent climate. It is shown that the SDD is generally able to capture the present day climatology and that the employment of the higher resolved simulated representatives enhances the performance of the SDD. However, an overestimation of rainfall at higher altitudes is found. To obtain future climate projections, an ensemble of eight CMIP5 model members are selected to study precipitation changes. For these projections, WT frequencies of future scenarios under two representative Concentration Pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) are taken into account for the mid-term scenario (2046-2065) and the long-term scenario (2081-2100). The strongest precipitation changes are found for the RCP8.5 scenario. Most of the models indicate a generally increase in precipitation amount in the wet period over Southeast

  17. Analysis of multifragmentation in a Boltzmann-Langevin approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Suraud, E.

    1995-06-01

    By using the Boltzmann-Langevin equation, which incorporates dynamical fluctuations beyond usual transport theories, we simulate the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca reaction system at different beam energies 20, 60, and 90 MeV/nucleon for different impact parameters. Dynamical fluctuations become larger and larger with increasing bombarding energy and the system can reach densities corresponding to the unstable region of the nuclear matter equation of state at energies above 60 MeV/nucleon. By coupling the Boltzmann-Langevin equation with a coalescence model in the late stages of the reaction, we obtain the distribution of the intermediate mass fragments in each event. From the correlation analysis of these fragments, we recover some trends of recent multifragmentation data. A critical behavior analysis is also provided.

  18. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation: The ISiS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, V. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Beaulieu, L.; Bracken, D. S.; Breuer, H.; Brzychczyk, J.; de Souza, R. T.; Ginger, D. S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Lefort, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Morley, K. B.; Legrain, R.; Pienkowski, L.; Pollacco, E. C.; Renshaw, E.; Ruangma, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Volant, C.; Wang, G.; Yennello, S. J.; Yoder, N. R.

    2006-11-01

    An extensive study of GeV light-ion-induced multifragmentation and its possible interpretation in terms of a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition has been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4π detector array. Measurements were performed with 5-15 GeV/ c p, pbar, and π- beams incident on 197Au and 2-5 GeV 3He incident on natAg and 197Au targets. Both the reaction dynamics and the subsequent decay of the heavy residues have been explored. The data provide evidence for a dramatic change in the reaction observables near an excitation energy of E*/A=4-5 MeV/residue nucleon. In this region, fragment multiplicities and energy spectra indicate emission from an expanded/dilute source on a very short time scale (20-50 fm/ c). These properties, along with caloric curve and scaling-law behavior, yield a pattern that is consistent with a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

  19. A New Global Policy Regime Founded on Invalid Statistics? Hanushek, Woessmann, PISA, and Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komatsu, Hikaru; Rappleye, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Several recent, highly influential comparative studies have made strong statistical claims that improvements on global learning assessments such as PISA will lead to higher GDP growth rates. These claims have provided the primary source of legitimation for policy reforms championed by leading international organisations, most notably the World…

  20. Comparing statistical and process-based flow duration curve models in ungauged basins and changing rain regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. F.; Thompson, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The prediction of flow duration curves (FDCs) in ungauged basins remains an important task for hydrologists given the practical relevance of FDCs for water management and infrastructure design. Predicting FDCs in ungauged basins typically requires spatial interpolation of statistical or model parameters. This task is complicated if climate becomes non-stationary, as the prediction challenge now also requires extrapolation through time. In this context, process-based models for FDCs that mechanistically link the streamflow distribution to climate and landscape factors may have an advantage over purely statistical methods to predict FDCs. This study compares a stochastic (process-based) and statistical method for FDC prediction in both stationary and non-stationary contexts, using Nepal as a case study. Under contemporary conditions, both models perform well in predicting FDCs, with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients above 0.80 in 75 % of the tested catchments. The main drivers of uncertainty differ between the models: parameter interpolation was the main source of error for the statistical model, while violations of the assumptions of the process-based model represented the main source of its error. The process-based approach performed better than the statistical approach in numerical simulations with non-stationary climate drivers. The predictions of the statistical method under non-stationary rainfall conditions were poor if (i) local runoff coefficients were not accurately determined from the gauge network, or (ii) streamflow variability was strongly affected by changes in rainfall. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that the streamflow regimes in catchments characterized by frequent wet-season runoff and a rapid, strongly non-linear hydrologic response are particularly sensitive to changes in rainfall statistics. In these cases, process-based prediction approaches are favored over statistical models.

  1. Fermion production from real-time lattice gauge theory in the classical-statistical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Berges, J.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the real-time dynamics of U(1) and SU(N) gauge theories coupled to fermions on a lattice. While real-time lattice gauge theory is not amenable to standard importance sampling techniques, for a large class of time-dependent problems the quantum dynamics can be accurately mapped onto a classical-statistical ensemble. We illustrate the genuine quantum contributions included in this description by giving a diagrammatic representation in a series expansion. The nonperturbative simulation method is then applied to electron-positron production in quantum electrodynamics in three spatial dimensions. We compare to analytic results for constant background field and demonstrate the importance of backreaction of the produced fermion pairs on the gauge fields.

  2. Some Probabilistic and Statistical Properties of the Seismic Regime of Zemmouri (Algeria) Seismoactive Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddari, Kamel; Bellalem, Fouzi; Baddari, Ibtihel; Makdeche, Said

    2016-10-01

    Statistical tests have been used to adjust the Zemmouri seismic data using a distribution function. The Pareto law has been used and the probabilities of various expected earthquakes were computed. A mathematical expression giving the quantiles was established. The extreme values limiting law confirmed the accuracy of the adjustment method. Using the moment magnitude scale, a probabilistic model was made to predict the occurrences of strong earthquakes. The seismic structure has been characterized by the slope of the recurrence plot γ, fractal dimension D, concentration parameter K sr, Hurst exponents H r and H t. The values of D, γ, K sr, H r, and H t diminished many months before the principal seismic shock ( M = 6.9) of the studied seismoactive zone has occurred. Three stages of the deformation of the geophysical medium are manifested in the variation of the coefficient G% of the clustering of minor seismic events.

  3. Postcollision multifragmentation in fullerene-surface impact: Microscopic insights via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Victor; Kolodney, Eli

    2016-07-01

    Postcollision multifragmentation which we have recently observed experimentally in C60 - -surface impact is the phenomenon of a delayed multiparticle breakup of a highly collisionally vibrationally excited large molecule/cluster (the precursor species) into several polyatomic fragments, after leaving the surface. In this paper, we show that the molecular dynamics simulations of near-grazing C60 collisions with a gold surface at 300 eV impact energy (very similar to the experimental conditions) successfully reproduce the experimentally observed characteristics of the postcollision multifragmentation process. The calculated mass resolved kinetic energy distributions and the time dependent yield curves of the Cn fragments revealed a precursor mediated, velocity correlated, delayed fragmentation event along the outgoing trajectory, far away from the surface. Most of the large fragments (n ≥ 5) are formed within a time window of 2-20 ps after leaving the surface, corresponding to the vertical distances of 3-30 nm from the surface. Analysis of delay times and actual time duration for multifragmentation reveal that a large part can be described as simultaneous postcollision (delayed) multifragmentation events. The delayed nature of the event seems to be due to an early sequence of structural transformations of the precursor.

  4. Using Poisson statistics to analyze supernova remnant emission in the low counts X-ray regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Quentin Jeffrey

    We utilize a Poisson likelihood in a maximum likelihood statistical analysis to analyze X-ray spectragraphic data. Specifically, we examine four extragalactic supernova remnants (SNR). IKT 5 (SNR 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4) which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants, and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not "classical" Type Ia SNR, but may be examples of so-called "prompt" Type Ia SNR. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest a new subclass of prompt Type Ia SNR, Fe-rich CC remnants. In addition, we examine IKT 18. This remnant is positionally coincident with the X-ray point source HD 5980. Due to an outburst in 1994, in which its brightness changed by 3 magnitudes (corrsponding to an increase in luminosity by a factor of 16) HD 5980 was classified as a luminous blue variable star. We examine this point source and the remnant IKT 18 in the X-ray, and find that its non-thermal photon index has decreased from 2002 to 2013, corresponding to a larger proportion of more energetic X-rays, which is unexpected.

  5. AC transport and full-counting statistics of molecular junctions in the weak electron-vibration coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, A.; Utsumi, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Aharony, A.

    2017-03-01

    The coupling of the charge carriers passing through a molecule bridging two bulky conductors with local vibrational modes of the molecule gives rise to distinct features in the electronic transport properties on one hand and to nonequilibrium features in the vibrations' properties, e.g., their population, on the other. Here we explore theoretically a generic model for a molecular junction biased by an arbitrary dc voltage in the weak-coupling regime. We succinctly summarize parts of our past work related to the signature of the electron-vibration interaction on the full-counting statistics of the current fluctuations (i.e., the cumulant generating-function of the current correlations). In addition, we provide a novel account of the response to an ac field exerted on the junction (on top of the dc bias voltage); in particular, we study the nonequilibrium distribution and the displacement fluctuations of the vibrational modes. Remarkably, we find a behavior pattern that cannot be accounted for by classical forced oscillations. The calculations use the technique of nonequilibrium Green's functions and treat the electron-vibration coupling in perturbation theory, within the random-phase approximation when required.

  6. Nuclear multifragmentation by 700–1500 MeV photons: New data of GRAAL experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nedorezov, V. G. Lapik, A. M.; Collaboration: GRAAL Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    The cross sections of carbon nucleus photodisintegration into protons and neutrons with high multiplicity for photon energies from 700 to 1500 MeV were measured. The experiment was performed at the tagged photon beam of the GRAAL setup using the wide-aperture detector LAGRANγE. It was shown that multifragmentation up to complete disintegration into separate nucleons is initiated by elementary reactions of meson photoproduction with a subsequent intranuclear cascade.

  7. Comparison of 1A GeV 197Au+C data with thermodynamics: The nature of the phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharenberg, R. P.; Srivastava, B. K.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D. A.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M. L.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J. C.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lisa, M. A.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Müller, W. F.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Sann, H.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Symons, T. J.; Tincknell, M.; Tuvé, C.; Wang, S.; Warren, P.; Wieman, H. H.; Wienold, T.; Wolf, K.

    2001-11-01

    Multifragmentation MF results from 1A GeV Au on C have been compared with the Copenhagen statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). The complete charge, mass, and momentum reconstruction of the Au projectile was used to identify high momentum ejectiles leaving an excited remnant of mass A, charge Z, and excitation energy E* which subsequently multifragments. Measurement of the magnitude and multiplicity (energy) dependence of the initial free volume and the breakup volume determines the variable volume parametrization of SMM. Very good agreement is obtained using SMM with the standard values of the SMM parameters. A large number of observables, including the fragment charge yield distributions, fragment multiplicity distributions, caloric curve, critical exponents, and the critical scaling function are explored in this comparison. The two stage structure of SMM is used to determine the effect of cooling of the primary hot fragments. Average fragment yields with Z>=3 are essentially unaffected when the excitation energy is <=7 MeV/nucleon. SMM studies suggest that the experimental critical exponents are largely unaffected by cooling and event mixing. The nature of the phase transition in SMM is studied as a function of the remnant mass and charge using the microcanonical equation of state. For light remnants A<=100, backbending is observed indicating negative specific heat, while for A>=170 the effective latent heat approaches zero. Thus for heavier systems this transition can be identified as a continuous thermal phase transition where a large nucleus breaks up into a number of smaller nuclei with only a minimal release of constituent nucleons. Z<=2 particles are primarily emitted in the initial collision and after MF in the fragment deexcitation process.

  8. Multifragmentation of Au induced by 14.6 GeV {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Grabez, B.; Dragic, A.

    2006-11-15

    The multifragmentation reaction channel was investigated in 14.6 GeV {sup 4}He+Au interactions. The experimental setup enabled event-by-event analysis. An internal correlation study suggests a nearly simultaneous emission of fragments. The velocities (V{sub c.m.}) of the center-of-mass system of correlated fragments were calculated. The transverse component of V{sub c.m.} with respect to the beam direction has higher values than the longitudinal one, which corresponds to large recoil angles of the source. The angular distributions of fragments are sideways peaked. The peak angle is dependent on the atomic number of fragment and multiplicity. Our results show that the heaviest fragment in one event corresponds, on average, to the largest emission angle, the second heaviest fragment corresponds to the second largest emission angle, and so on.

  9. Calibration of a rainfall-runoff model at regional scale by optimising river discharge statistics: Performance analysis for the average/low flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Laura; Toth, Elena; Castellarin, Attilio; Montanari, Alberto; Brath, Armando

    Traditional procedures for rainfall-runoff model calibration are generally based on the fit of individual values of simulated and observed hydrographs. We use here an alternative option that is carried out by matching, in the optimisation process, a set of streamflow statistics. Such an approach has the significant advantage to enable also a straightforward regional calibration of model parameters, based on the regionalisation of the selected statistics. The minimisation of the set of objective functions is carried out by using the AMALGAM algorithm, leading to the identification of behavioural parameter sets. The procedure is applied to a set of river basins located in central Italy: the basins are treated alternatively as gauged and ungauged and, as a term of comparison, the results obtained with a traditional time-domain calibration are also presented. With respect to previous applications of analogous procedures, we investigate here the identification of the target statistics depending on the purposes of the application, and in particular when the focus is on the reproduction of the low-flows. The results show that a suitable choice of the statistics to be optimised leads to interesting results in real world case studies as far as the reproduction of the different flow regimes is concerned.

  10. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy 129Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The 129Xe-induced reactions on natCu, 89Y, 165Ho, and 197Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the 129Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  11. Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Links to sources of cancer-related statistics, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER-Medicare datasets, cancer survivor prevalence data, and the Cancer Trends Progress Report.

  12. A Statistical Test for Identifying the Number of Creep Regimes When Using the Wilshire Equations for Creep Property Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A new parametric approach, termed the Wilshire equations, offers the realistic potential of being able to accurately lift materials operating at in-service conditions from accelerated test results lasting no more than 5000 hours. The success of this approach can be attributed to a well-defined linear relationship that appears to exist between various creep properties and a log transformation of the normalized stress. However, these linear trends are subject to discontinuities, the number of which appears to differ from material to material. These discontinuities have until now been (1) treated as abrupt in nature and (2) identified by eye from an inspection of simple graphical plots of the data. This article puts forward a statistical test for determining the correct number of discontinuities present within a creep data set and a method for allowing these discontinuities to occur more gradually, so that the methodology is more in line with the accepted view as to how creep mechanisms evolve with changing test conditions. These two developments are fully illustrated using creep data sets on two steel alloys. When these new procedures are applied to these steel alloys, not only do they produce more accurate and realistic looking long-term predictions of the minimum creep rate, but they also lead to different conclusions about the mechanisms determining the rates of creep from those originally put forward by Wilshire.

  13. Nonequilibrium quantum transport coefficients and transient dynamics of full counting statistics in the strong-coupling and non-Markovian regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrillo, Javier; Buser, Maximilian; Brandes, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Nonequilibrium transport properties of quantum systems have recently become experimentally accessible in a number of platforms in so-called full-counting experiments that measure transient and steady-state nonequilibrium transport dynamics. We show that the effect of the measurement back-action can be exploited to establish general relationships between transport coefficients in the transient regime which take the form of fluctuation-dissipation theorems in the steady state. This result becomes most conspicuous in the transient dynamics of open quantum systems under strong-coupling to non-Markovian environments in nonequilibrium settings. In order to explore this regime, a new simulation method based in a hierarchy of equations of motion has been developed. We instantiate our proposal with the study of energetic conductance between two baths connected via a few level system.

  14. A statistical-dynamical scheme for reconstructing ocean forcing in the Atlantic. Part I: weather regimes as predictors for ocean surface variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassou, Christophe; Minvielle, Marie; Terray, Laurent; Périgaud, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The links between the observed variability of the surface ocean variables estimated from reanalysis and the overlying atmosphere decomposed in classes of large-scale atmospheric circulation via clustering are investigated over the Atlantic from 1958 to 2002. Daily 500 hPa geopotential height and 1,000 hPa wind anomaly maps are classified following a weather-typing approach to describe the North Atlantic and tropical Atlantic atmospheric dynamics, respectively. The algorithm yields patterns that correspond in the extratropics to the well-known North Atlantic-Europe weather regimes (NAE-WR) accounting for the barotropic dynamics, and in the tropics to wind classes (T-WC) representing the alteration of the trades. 10-m wind and 2-m temperature (T2) anomaly composites derived from regime/wind class occurrence are indicative of strong relationships between daily large-scale atmospheric circulation and ocean surface over the entire Atlantic basin. High temporal correlation values are obtained basin-wide at low frequency between the observed fields and their reconstruction by multiple linear regressions with the frequencies of occurrence of both NAE-WR and T-WC used as sole predictors. Additional multiple linear regressions also emphasize the importance of accounting for the strength of the daily anomalous atmospheric circulation estimated by the combined distances to all regimes centroids in order to reproduce the daily to interannual variability of the Atlantic ocean. We show that for most of the North Atlantic basin the occurrence of NAE-WR generally sets the sign of the ocean surface anomaly for a given day, and that the inter-regime distances are valuable predictors for the magnitude of that anomaly. Finally, we provide evidence that a large fraction of the low-frequency trends in the Atlantic observed at the surface over the last 50 years can be traced back, except for T2, to changes in occurrence of tropical and extratropical weather classes. All together, our

  15. The decline of multifragmentation in {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at E/A = 100, 250 and 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M.B.

    1993-04-01

    Multifragmentation events have been measured in 4{pi} coverage for {sup 197}Au collisions at E/A = 100, 250 and 400 MeV using the Miniball/Wall, the Catania Silicon-CsI array and the Aladin Spectrometer. For E/A = 250 MeV and 400 MeV, there is monotonic relation between charge particle multiplicities, N{sub c} and bound charge particles from the projectile spectator, Z{sub bound}. At E/A = 100 MeV, the number of intermediate mass fragments (Z>3) produced increases monotonically with N{sub c} reaching values close to 10 fragments for the most central collisions. As the incident energy is increased, however, the multiplicity of fragments produced in central collisions decreases, consistent with an evolutionn of multifragmentation in the central collisions towards vaporization. At the highest energy, E/A = 400 MeV, multifragmentation becomes a phenomenon confined to intermediate impact parameters, consistent with an evolution towards peripheral collisions as the process evolves towards limiting fragmentation.

  16. Generalization of Darcy's law for Bingham fluids in porous media: from flow-field statistics to the flow-rate regimes.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Thibaud; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the statistical properties of the nonflowing areas of Bingham fluid in two-dimensional porous media. First, we demonstrate that the size probability distribution of the unyielded clusters follows a power-law decay with a large size cutoff. This cutoff is shown to diverge following a power law as the imposed pressure drop tends to a critical value. In addition, we observe that the exponents are almost identical for two different types of porous media. Finally, those scaling properties allow us to account for the quadratic relationship between the pressure gradient and velocity.

  17. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in α-Particle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Breus, Dimitry Eugene

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of α-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of α-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental α-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation theory is

  18. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  19. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  20. Prolonged instability prior to a regime shift.

    PubMed

    Spanbauer, Trisha L; Allen, Craig R; Angeler, David G; Eason, Tarsha; Fritz, Sherilyn C; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Nash, Kirsty L; Stone, Jeffery R

    2014-01-01

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of 'abrupt' change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia.

  1. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation.

  2. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV {bar p}-p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. Progress report, January 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Scharenberg, R.; Hirsch, A.; Tincknell, M.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses the Fermilab experiment E735 which is dedicated to the search for the quark-gluon plasma from proton-antiproton interactions; multifragmentation using the EOS-TPC; STAR R&D; silicon avalanche diodes as direct time-of-flight detectors; and soft photons at the AGS-E855.

  3. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of th...

  4. Arctic circulation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  5. Arctic circulation regimes.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Regimes of Helium Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Döring (ZND) detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of ~108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below ~107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~5×104 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction.

  7. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  8. Boundary-layer moisture regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1991-01-01

    Boundary-layer moisture fluctuations are estimated by analyzing HAPEX and FIFE data collected on 52 aircraft flight legs. Moisture fluctuations were given considerable attention in the HAPEX flights, which were 120 km long, and flew 150 m over one area of homogeneous terrain. The repetitions permit statistical consideration of motion characteristics on horizontal scales. Two prototypical boundary layer regimes are discovered: the entrainment-drying boundary layer, and the moistening boundary layer. The latter demonstrates positive moisture skewness close to the surface related to high surface evaporation. The former is characterized by boundary-layer instability, weak surface evaporation, and drier air aloft, leading to unexpected negative moisture skewness. It is noted that 10 km moisture variations with horizontal gradients are often found in narrow zones of horizontal convergence, called mesoscale moisture fronts. A negative moisture to temperature correlation, due to surface energy budget inhomogeneity, is shown to incur large mesoscale variations of relative humidity.

  9. Dispersive Regimes of the Dicke Model.

    PubMed

    Barberena, Diego; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2017-08-18

    We study two dispersive regimes of the Dicke model in the dynamics of N two-level atoms interacting with a bosonic mode for long interaction times. Firstly, we analyze the model for the regime in which the qubit frequencies are equal and smaller than the mode frequency, and for values of the coupling strength similar or larger than the mode frequency, namely, the deep strong coupling regime. Secondly, we address an interaction that is dependent on the photon number, where the coupling strength is comparable to the geometric mean of the qubit and mode frequencies. We show that the associated dynamics is analytically tractable and provide useful frameworks with which to analyze the system behavior. In the deep strong coupling regime, we unveil the structure of unexpected resonances for specific values of the coupling, present for N ≥ 2, and in the photon-number-dependent regime we demonstrate that all the nontrivial dynamical behavior occurs in the atomic degrees of freedom for a given Fock state. We verify these assertions with numerical simulations of the qubit population and photon-statistic dynamics.

  10. Using Decision Lists to Construct Interpretable and Parsimonious Treatment Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Laber, Eric B.; Tsiatis, Anastasios; Davidian, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Summary A treatment regime formalizes personalized medicine as a function from individual patient characteristics to a recommended treatment. A high-quality treatment regime can improve patient outcomes while reducing cost, resource consumption, and treatment burden. Thus, there is tremendous interest in estimating treatment regimes from observational and randomized studies. However, the development of treatment regimes for application in clinical practice requires the long-term, joint effort of statisticians and clinical scientists. In this collaborative process, the statistician must integrate clinical science into the statistical models underlying a treatment regime and the clinician must scrutinize the estimated treatment regime for scientific validity. To facilitate meaningful information exchange, it is important that estimated treatment regimes be interpretable in a subject-matter context. We propose a simple, yet flexible class of treatment regimes whose members are representable as a short list of if-then statements. Regimes in this class are immediately interpretable and are therefore an appealing choice for broad application in practice. We derive a robust estimator of the optimal regime within this class and demonstrate its finite sample performance using simulation experiments. The proposed method is illustrated with data from two clinical trials. PMID:26193819

  11. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  12. Scaling Fire Regimes in Space and Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability are important properties of the forest fire regimes of coniferous forests of southwestern North America. We use a variety of analytical techniques to examine scaling in a surface fire regime in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA, based on an original data set collected from Monument Canyon Research Natural Area (MCN). Spatio-temporal scale dependence in the fire regime can be analyzed quantitatively using statistical descriptors of the fire regime, such as fire frequency and mean fire interval. We describe a theory of the event-area (EA) relationship, an extension of the species-area relationship for events distributed in space and time; the interval-area (IA) relationship, is a related form for fire intervals. We use the EA and IA to demonstrate scale dependence in the MCN fire regime. The slope and intercept of these functions are influenced by fire size, frequency, and spatial distribution, and thus are potentially useful metrics of spatio-temporal synchrony of events in the paleofire record. Second, we outline a theory of fire interval probability, working from first principles in fire ecology and statistics. Fires are conditional events resulting from the interaction of multiple contingent factors that must be satisfied for an event to occur. Outcomes of this kind represent a multiplicative process for which a lognormal model is the limiting distribution. We examine the application of this framework to two probability models, the Weibull and lognormal distributions, which can be used to characterize the distribution of fire intervals over time. Lastly, we present a general model for the collector's curve, with application to the theory and effects of sample size in fire history. Sources of uncertainty in fire history can be partitioned into an error typology; analytical methods used in fire history (particularly the formation of composite fire records) are designed to minimize certain types of error in inference

  13. Early warnings of regime shifts: a whole-ecosystem experiment.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S R; Cole, J J; Pace, M L; Batt, R; Brock, W A; Cline, T; Coloso, J; Hodgson, J R; Kitchell, J F; Seekell, D A; Smith, L; Weidel, B

    2011-05-27

    Catastrophic ecological regime shifts may be announced in advance by statistical early warning signals such as slowing return rates from perturbation and rising variance. The theoretical background for these indicators is rich, but real-world tests are rare, especially for whole ecosystems. We tested the hypothesis that these statistics would be early warning signals for an experimentally induced regime shift in an aquatic food web. We gradually added top predators to a lake over 3 years to destabilize its food web. An adjacent lake was monitored simultaneously as a reference ecosystem. Warning signals of a regime shift were evident in the manipulated lake during reorganization of the food web more than a year before the food web transition was complete, corroborating theory for leading indicators of ecological regime shifts.

  14. Spectral classification of coupling regimes in the quantum Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossatto, Daniel Z.; Villas-Bôas, Celso J.; Sanz, Mikel; Solano, Enrique

    2017-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model is in the scientific spotlight due to the recent theoretical and experimental progress. Nevertheless, a full-fledged classification of its coupling regimes remains as a relevant open question. We propose a spectral classification dividing the coupling regimes into three regions based on the validity of perturbative criteria on the quantum Rabi model, which allows us the use of exactly solvable effective Hamiltonians. These coupling regimes are (i) the perturbative ultrastrong coupling regime which comprises the Jaynes-Cummings model, (ii) a region where nonperturbative ultrastrong and nonperturbative deep strong coupling regimes coexist, and (iii) the perturbative deep strong coupling regime. We show that this spectral classification depends not only on the ratio between the coupling strength and the natural frequencies of the unperturbed parts, but also on the energy to which the system can access. These regimes additionally discriminate the completely different behaviors of several static physical properties, namely the total number of excitations, the photon statistics of the field, and the cavity-qubit entanglement. Finally, we explain the dynamical properties which are traditionally associated with the deep strong coupling regime, such as the collapses and revivals of the state population, in the frame of the proposed spectral classification.

  15. Conditional heteroscedasticity as a leading indicator of ecological regime shifts.

    PubMed

    Seekell, David A; Carpenter, Stephen R; Pace, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Regime shifts are massive, often irreversible, rearrangements of nonlinear ecological processes that occur when systems pass critical transition points. Ecological regime shifts sometimes have severe consequences for human well-being, including eutrophication in lakes, desertification, and species extinctions. Theoretical and laboratory evidence suggests that statistical anomalies may be detectable leading indicators of regime shifts in ecological time series, making it possible to foresee and potentially avert incipient regime shifts. Conditional heteroscedasticity is persistent variance characteristic of time series with clustered volatility. Here, we analyze conditional heteroscedasticity as a potential leading indicator of regime shifts in ecological time series. We evaluate conditional heteroscedasticity by using ecological models with and without four types of critical transition. On approaching transition points, all time series contain significant conditional heteroscedasticity. This signal is detected hundreds of time steps in advance of the regime shift. Time series without regime shifts do not have significant conditional heteroscedasticity. Because probability values are easily associated with tests for conditional heteroscedasticity, detection of false positives in time series without regime shifts is minimized. This property reduces the need for a reference system to compare with the perturbed system.

  16. Water use regimes: Characterizing direct human interaction with hydrologic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, P.K.; Vogel, R.M.; Steeves, P.A.; Zarriello, P.J.; DeSimone, L.A.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The sustainability of human water use practices is a rapidly growing concern in the United States and around the world. To better characterize direct human interaction with hydrologic systems (stream basins and aquifers), we introduce the concept of the water use regime. Unlike scalar indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic stress in the literature, the water use regime is a two-dimensional, vector indicator that can be depicted on simple x-y plots of normalized human withdrawals (hout) versus normalized human return flows (hin). Four end-member regimes, natural-flow-dominated (undeveloped), human-flow-dominated (churned), withdrawal-dominated (depleted), and return-flow-dominated (surcharged), are defined in relation to limiting values of hout and hin. For illustration, the water use regimes of 19 diverse hydrologic systems are plotted and interpreted. Several of these systems, including the Yellow River Basin, China, and the California Central Valley Aquifer, are shown to approach particular end-member regimes. Spatial and temporal regime variations, both seasonal and long-term, are depicted. Practical issues of data availability and regime uncertainty are addressed in relation to the statistical properties of the ratio estimators hout and hin. The water use regime is shown to be a useful tool for comparative water resources assessment and for describing both historic and alternative future pathways of water resource development at a range of scales. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  18. Chapter 5. Borderlands fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Margot Wilkinson-Kaye; Thomas Swetnam; Christopher R. Baisan

    2006-01-01

    Fire is a keystone process in most natural, terrestrial ecosystems. The vital role that fire plays in controlling the structure of an ecosystem underscores the need for us to increase our knowledge of past and current fire regimes (Morgan and others 1994). Dendrochronological reconstructions of fire histories provide descriptions of past fire regimes across a range of...

  19. Histoplasmosis Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal ... Sources Diagnosis Treatment Statistics Healthcare Professionals More Resources Candida auris General Information about Candida auris Tracking Candida ...

  20. Nonequilibrium transient dynamics of photon statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Manirul; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the transient dynamics of photon statistics through two-time correlation functions for optical field coupled to a non-Markovian environment, described by the Fano-type Hamiltonian. We exactly solve the time-evolution of an initially nonclassical state which exhibits photon antibunching. We find that the transient correlations at different times t yield a smooth transition from antibunching to bunching photon statistics in the weak system-environment coupling regime. In the strong-coupling regime, the two-time correlations exhibit oscillations that persists both in the transient process and in the steady-state limit. The oscillatory behavior of photon statistics is a manifestation of strong non-Markovian memory dynamics where the system remains in nonequilibrium from its environment. We also find that the antibunching-to-bunching transition in the weak-coupling regime and the photon statistical oscillations in the strong-coupling regime are strongly influenced by the environment temperature.

  1. Descriptive statistics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; McLarty, Jerry W

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we introduced basic concepts of statistics, type of distributions, and descriptive statistics. A few examples were also provided. The basic concepts presented herein are only a fraction of the concepts related to descriptive statistics. Also, there are many commonly used distributions not presented herein, such as Poisson distributions for rare events and exponential distributions, F distributions, and logistic distributions. More information can be found in many statistics books and publications.

  2. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    As a branch of knowledge, Statistics is ubiquitous and its applications can be found in (almost) every field of human endeavour. In this article, the authors track down the possible source of the link between the "Siren song" and applications of Statistics. Answers to their previous five questions and five new questions on Statistics are presented.

  3. Statistical Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callamaras, Peter

    1983-01-01

    This buyer's guide to seven major types of statistics software packages for microcomputers reviews Edu-Ware Statistics 3.0; Financial Planning; Speed Stat; Statistics with DAISY; Human Systems Dynamics package of Stats Plus, ANOVA II, and REGRESS II; Maxistat; and Moore-Barnes' MBC Test Construction and MBC Correlation. (MBR)

  4. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  5. Harmonic statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-05-01

    The exponential, the normal, and the Poisson statistical laws are of major importance due to their universality. Harmonic statistics are as universal as the three aforementioned laws, but yet they fall short in their 'public relations' for the following reason: the full scope of harmonic statistics cannot be described in terms of a statistical law. In this paper we describe harmonic statistics, in their full scope, via an object termed harmonic Poisson process: a Poisson process, over the positive half-line, with a harmonic intensity. The paper reviews the harmonic Poisson process, investigates its properties, and presents the connections of this object to an assortment of topics: uniform statistics, scale invariance, random multiplicative perturbations, Pareto and inverse-Pareto statistics, exponential growth and exponential decay, power-law renormalization, convergence and domains of attraction, the Langevin equation, diffusions, Benford's law, and 1/f noise.

  6. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  7. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  8. Statistics of twinning in strained ferroelastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiangdong; Aktas, Oktay; Wang, Xiaofei; Li, Suzhi; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Libo; He, Xiaomei; Lookman, Turab; Saxena, Avadh; Sun, Jun

    2017-10-01

    In this review, we show that the evolution of the microstructure and kinetics of ferroelastic crystals under external shear can be explored by computer simulations of 2D model materials. We find that the nucleation and propagation of twin boundaries in ferroelastics depend sensitively on temperature. In the plastic regime, the evolution of the ferroelastic microstructure under strain deformation maintains a stick-and-slip mechanism in all temperature regimes, whereas the dynamic behavior changes dramatically from power-law statistics at low temperature to a Kohlrausch law at intermediate temperature, and then to a Vogel-Fulcher law at high temperature. In the yield regime, the distribution of jerk energies follows power-law statistics in all temperature regimes for a large range of strain rates. The non-spanning avalanches in the yield regime follow a parabolic temporal profile. The changes of twin pattern and twin boundaries density represent an important step towards domain boundary engineering.

  9. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors focus on hypothesis testing--that peculiarly statistical way of deciding things. Statistical methods for testing hypotheses were developed in the 1920s and 1930s by some of the most famous statisticians, in particular Ronald Fisher, Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who laid the foundations of almost all modern methods of…

  10. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cancer on the population and to develop strategies to address the challenges that cancer poses to the society at large. Statistical trends are also important for measuring the success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The ...

  11. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors focus on hypothesis testing--that peculiarly statistical way of deciding things. Statistical methods for testing hypotheses were developed in the 1920s and 1930s by some of the most famous statisticians, in particular Ronald Fisher, Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who laid the foundations of almost all modern methods of…

  12. Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Sergey; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Roebber, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We simulate the seasonal cycle of the Great Lakes' water temperature and lake ice using an idealized coupled lake-atmosphere-ice model. Under identical seasonally varying boundary conditions, this model exhibits more than one seasonally varying equilibrium solutions, which we associate with distinct regional climate regimes. Colder/warmer regimes are characterized by abundant/scarce amounts of wintertime ice and cooler/warmer summer temperatures, respectively. These regimes are also evident in the observations of the Great Lakes' climate variability over recent few decades, and are found to be most pronounced for Lake Superior, the deepest of the Great Lakes, consistent with model predictions. Multiple climate regimes of the Great Lakes also play a crucial role in the accelerated warming of the lakes relative to the surrounding land regions in response to larger-scale global warming. We discuss the physical origin and characteristics of multiple climate regimes over the lakes, as well as their implications for a longer-term regional climate variability.

  13. Statistics Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Foy, Millennia; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fiedler, James

    2014-01-01

    Do you have elevated p-values? Is the data analysis process getting you down? Do you experience anxiety when you need to respond to criticism of statistical methods in your manuscript? You may be suffering from Insufficient Statistical Support Syndrome (ISSS). For symptomatic relief of ISSS, come for a free consultation with JSC biostatisticians at our help desk during the poster sessions at the HRP Investigators Workshop. Get answers to common questions about sample size, missing data, multiple testing, when to trust the results of your analyses and more. Side effects may include sudden loss of statistics anxiety, improved interpretation of your data, and increased confidence in your results.

  14. Quick Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... population, or about 25 million Americans, has experienced tinnitus lasting at least five minutes in the past ... by NIDCD Epidemiology and Statistics Program staff: (1) tinnitus prevalence was obtained from the 2008 National Health ...

  15. Regime-Switching Bivariate Dual Change Score Model.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Grimm, Kevin J; Filteau, Guillaume; Dolan, Conor V; McArdle, John J

    2013-07-01

    Mixture structural equation model with regime switching (MSEM-RS) provides one possible way of representing over-time heterogeneities in dynamic processes by allowing a system to manifest qualitatively or quantitatively distinct change processes conditional on the latent "regime" the system is in at a particular time point. Unlike standard mixture structural equation models such as growth mixture models, MSEM-RS allows individuals to transition between latent classes over time. This class of models, often referred to as regime-switching models in the time series and econometric applications, can be specified as regime-switching mixture structural equation models when the number of repeated measures involved is not large. We illustrate the empirical utility of such models using one special case-a regime-switching bivariate dual change score model in which two growth processes are allowed to manifest regime-dependent coupling relations with one another. The proposed model is illustrated using a set of longitudinal reading and arithmetic performance data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 study (ECLS-K; U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2010).

  16. Land degradation and property regimes

    Treesearch

    Paul M. Beaumont; Robert T. Walker

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between property regimes and land degradation outcomes, in the context of peasant agriculture. We consider explicitly whether private property provides for superior soil resource conservation, as compared to common property and open access. To assess this we implement optimization algorithms on a supercomputer to address resource...

  17. A Regime Diagram for Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R.; Capitanio, F. A.; Schellart, W. P.

    2009-12-01

    Regime diagrams and associated scaling relations have profoundly influenced our understanding of planetary dynamics. Previous regime diagrams characterized the regimes of stagnant-lid, small viscosity contrast, transitional, and no-convection for temperature-dependent (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995), and non-linear power law rheologies (Solomatov and Moresi, 1997) as well as stagnant-lid, sluggish-lid, and mobile-lid regimes once the finite strength of rock was considered (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998). Scalings derived from such models have been the cornerstone for parameterized models of thermal evolution of rocky planets and icy moons for the past decade. While such a theory can predict the tectonic state of a planetary body, it is still rather incomplete in regards to predicting tectonics. For example, the mobile-lid regime is unspecific as to how continuous lithospheric recycling should occur on a terrestrial planet. Towards this goal, Gerya et al., (2008) advanced a new regime diagram aiming to characterize when subduction would manifest itself as a one-sided or two-sided downwelling and either symmetric or asymmetric. Here, we present a regime diagram for the case of a single-sided, asymmetric type of subduction (most Earth-like type). Using a 3-D numerical model of a free subduction, we describe a total of 5 different styles of subduction that can possibly occur. Each style is distinguished by its upper mantle slab morphology resulting from the sinking kinematics. We provide movies to illustrate the different styles and their progressive time-evolution. In each regime, subduction is accommodated by a combination of plate advance and slab rollback, with associated motions of forward plate velocity and trench retreat, respectively. We demonstrate that the preferred subduction mode depends upon two essential controlling factors: 1) buoyancy of the downgoing plate and 2) strength of plate in resisting bending at the hinge. We propose that a variety of subduction

  18. Regime Changes in California Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, E. C.; Kessomkiat, W.; Mauget, S.

    2008-12-01

    Annual and seasonal temperature trends are analyzed for California using surface data from the US Historical Climate Network and the larger COOP network. While trends in Tmax and Tmin both show warming over the last 50 years, the temporal and spatial structure of these trends is quite different. An analysis using Mann Whitney U statistics reveals that the patterns of warming and cooling from individual stations have a distinct temporal signature that differs between Tmax and Tmin. Significant cooling trends in Tmin are found between 1920-1958, while significant warming only starts after the 1970s. In contrast, Tmax trends show a more variable pattern of warming and cooling between 1920-1980, with California wide warming only occurring after 1980. These results suggest regime changes in California temperature trends that could only occur through large scale forcing. A discussion of the various forcing mechanisms contributing to California trends and their spatial and temporal variability will be presented.

  19. Statistical Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catley, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Following the announcement last year that there will be no more math coursework assessment at General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), teachers will in the future be able to devote more time to preparing learners for formal examinations. One of the key things that the author has learned when teaching statistics is that it makes for far…

  20. Statistics Revelations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicot, Katie; Holmes, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    The use, and misuse, of statistics is commonplace, yet in the printed format data representations can be either over simplified, supposedly for impact, or so complex as to lead to boredom, supposedly for completeness and accuracy. In this article the link to the video clip shows how dynamic visual representations can enliven and enhance the…

  1. Statistical Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shahjahan

    Often scientific information on various data generating processes are presented in the from of numerical and categorical data. Except for some very rare occasions, generally such data represent a small part of the population, or selected outcomes of any data generating process. Although, valuable and useful information is lurking in the array of scientific data, generally, they are unavailable to the users. Appropriate statistical methods are essential to reveal the hidden "jewels" in the mess of the row data. Exploratory data analysis methods are used to uncover such valuable characteristics of the observed data. Statistical inference provides techniques to make valid conclusions about the unknown characteristics or parameters of the population from which scientifically drawn sample data are selected. Usually, statistical inference includes estimation of population parameters as well as performing test of hypotheses on the parameters. However, prediction of future responses and determining the prediction distributions are also part of statistical inference. Both Classical or Frequentists and Bayesian approaches are used in statistical inference. The commonly used Classical approach is based on the sample data alone. In contrast, increasingly popular Beyesian approach uses prior distribution on the parameters along with the sample data to make inferences. The non-parametric and robust methods are also being used in situations where commonly used model assumptions are unsupported. In this chapter,we cover the philosophical andmethodological aspects of both the Classical and Bayesian approaches.Moreover, some aspects of predictive inference are also included. In the absence of any evidence to support assumptions regarding the distribution of the underlying population, or if the variable is measured only in ordinal scale, non-parametric methods are used. Robust methods are employed to avoid any significant changes in the results due to deviations from the model

  2. Statistical Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shahjahan

    Often scientific information on various data generating processes are presented in the from of numerical and categorical data. Except for some very rare occasions, generally such data represent a small part of the population, or selected outcomes of any data generating process. Although, valuable and useful information is lurking in the array of scientific data, generally, they are unavailable to the users. Appropriate statistical methods are essential to reveal the hidden “jewels” in the mess of the row data. Exploratory data analysis methods are used to uncover such valuable characteristics of the observed data. Statistical inference provides techniques to make valid conclusions about the unknown characteristics or parameters of the population from which scientifically drawn sample data are selected. Usually, statistical inference includes estimation of population parameters as well as performing test of hypotheses on the parameters. However, prediction of future responses and determining the prediction distributions are also part of statistical inference. Both Classical or Frequentists and Bayesian approaches are used in statistical inference. The commonly used Classical approach is based on the sample data alone. In contrast, increasingly popular Beyesian approach uses prior distribution on the parameters along with the sample data to make inferences. The non-parametric and robust methods are also being used in situations where commonly used model assumptions are unsupported. In this chapter,we cover the philosophical andmethodological aspects of both the Classical and Bayesian approaches.Moreover, some aspects of predictive inference are also included. In the absence of any evidence to support assumptions regarding the distribution of the underlying population, or if the variable is measured only in ordinal scale, non-parametric methods are used. Robust methods are employed to avoid any significant changes in the results due to deviations from the model

  3. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  4. [Descriptive statistics].

    PubMed

    Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Descriptive statistics is the branch of statistics that gives recommendations on how to summarize clearly and simply research data in tables, figures, charts, or graphs. Before performing a descriptive analysis it is paramount to summarize its goal or goals, and to identify the measurement scales of the different variables recorded in the study. Tables or charts aim to provide timely information on the results of an investigation. The graphs show trends and can be histograms, pie charts, "box and whiskers" plots, line graphs, or scatter plots. Images serve as examples to reinforce concepts or facts. The choice of a chart, graph, or image must be based on the study objectives. Usually it is not recommended to use more than seven in an article, also depending on its length.

  5. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Eason, Tarsha; Nelson, R. John; Angeler, David G.; Barichievy, Chris; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Graham, Nicholas A.J.; Granholm, Dean; Gunderson, Lance; Knutson, Melinda; Nash, Kirsty L.; Spanbauer, Trisha; Stow, Craig A.; Allen, Craig R.

    2017-01-01

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory-based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (U.S. Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps and multivariate analyses such as nMDS and cluster analysis. We successfully detected spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change.

  6. Statistical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Joseph W.

    2000-07-01

    The Wiley Classics Library consists of selected books that have become recognized classics in their respective fields. With these new unabridged and inexpensive editions, Wiley hopes to extend the life of these important works by making them available to future generations of mathematicians and scientists. Currently available in the Series: T. W. Anderson The Statistical Analysis of Time Series T. S. Arthanari & Yadolah Dodge Mathematical Programming in Statistics Emil Artin Geometric Algebra Norman T. J. Bailey The Elements of Stochastic Processes with Applications to the Natural Sciences Robert G. Bartle The Elements of Integration and Lebesgue Measure George E. P. Box & Norman R. Draper Evolutionary Operation: A Statistical Method for Process Improvement George E. P. Box & George C. Tiao Bayesian Inference in Statistical Analysis R. W. Carter Finite Groups of Lie Type: Conjugacy Classes and Complex Characters R. W. Carter Simple Groups of Lie Type William G. Cochran & Gertrude M. Cox Experimental Designs, Second Edition Richard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume I RIchard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume II Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume I Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume II D. R. Cox Planning of Experiments Harold S. M. Coxeter Introduction to Geometry, Second Edition Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Representation Theory of Finite Groups and Associative Algebras Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume I Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume II Cuthbert Daniel Fitting Equations to Data: Computer Analysis of Multifactor Data, Second Edition Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume I Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume 2 W. Edwards Deming Sample Design in Business Research

  7. Order Statistics and Nonparametric Statistics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Topics investigated include the following: Probability that a fuze will fire; moving order statistics; distribution theory and properties of the...problem posed by an Army Scientist: A fuze will fire when at least n-i (or n-2) of n detonators function within time span t. What is the probability of

  8. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  9. Meteorological regimes for the classification of aerospace air quality predictions for NASA-Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Sloan, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for developing a statistical air quality assessment for the launch of an aerospace vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center in terms of existing climatological data sets. The procedure can be refined as developing meteorological conditions are identified for use with the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) description. Classical climatological regimes for the long range analysis can be narrowed as the synoptic and mesoscale structure is identified. Only broad synoptic regimes are identified at this stage of analysis. As the statistical data matrix is developed, synoptic regimes will be refined in terms of the resulting eigenvectors as applicable to aerospace air quality predictions.

  10. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia. This manuscript explores various methods of assessing the transition between alternative states in an ecological system described by a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset.

  11. Characterization of fire regime in Sardinia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, V. M.; Salis, M.; Mastinu, S.; Masala, F.; Sirca, C.; Spano, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, a number of Authors highlighted the crucial role of forest fires within Mediterranean ecosystems, with impacts both negative and positive on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In Sardinia (Italy), the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, forest fires are perceived as one of the main environmental and social problems, and data are showing that the situation is worsening especially within the rural-urban peripheries and the increasing number of very large forest fires. The need for information concerning forest fire regime has been pointed out by several Authors (e.g. Rollins et al., 2002), who also emphasized the importance of understanding the factors (such as weather/climate, socio-economic, and land use) that determine spatial and temporal fire patterns. These would be used not only as a baseline to predict the climate change effect on forest fires, but also as a fire management and mitigation strategy. The main aim of this paper is, thus, to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of fire occurrence in Sardinia (Italy) during the last three decades (1980-2010). For the analyzed period, fire statistics were provided by the Sardinian Forest Service (CFVA - Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale), while weather data for eight weather stations were obtained from the web site www.tutiempo.it. For each station, daily series of precipitation, mean, maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity and wind speed were available. The present study firstly analyzed fire statistics (burned area and number of fires) according to the main fire regime characteristics (seasonality, fire return interval, fire incidence, fire size distribution). Then, fire and weather daily values were averaged to obtain monthly, seasonal and annual values, and

  12. Flow regimes during immiscible displacement

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Fractional ow of immiscible phases occurs at the pore scale where grain surfaces and phases interfaces obstruct phase mobility. However, the larger scale behavior is described by a saturation-dependent phenomenological relationship called relative permeability. As a consequence, pore-scale parameters, such as phase topology and/ or geometry, and details of the flow regime cannot be directly related to Darcy-scale flow parameters. It is well understood that relative permeability is not a unique relationship of wetting-phase saturation and rather depends on the experimental conditions at which it is measured. Herein we use fast X-ray microcomputed tomography to image pore-scale phase arrangements duringmore » fractional flow and then forward simulate the flow regimes using the lattice-Boltzmann method to better understand the underlying pore-scale flow regimes and their influence on Darcy-scale parameters. We find that relative permeability is highly dependent on capillary number and that the Corey model fits the observed trends. At the pore scale, while phase topologies are continuously changing on the scale of individual pores, the Euler characteristic of the nonwetting phase (NWP) averaged over a sufficiently large field of view can describe the bulk topological characteristics; the Euler characteristic decreases with increasing capillary number resulting in an increase in relative permeability. Lastly, we quantify the fraction of NWP that flows through disconnected ganglion dynamics and demonstrate that this can be a significant fraction of the NWP flux for intermediate wetting-phase saturation. Furthermore, rate dependencies occur in our homogenous sample (without capillary end effect) and the underlying cause is attributed to ganglion flow that can significantly influence phase topology during the fractional flow of immiscible phases.« less

  13. Overview of the regimes: CWC

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Chemical Weapons Convention`s (CWC) seeks to eradicate an entire category of catastrophic weapons and to ensure their continued non-production. Unlike the Non-Proliferation Treaty`s (NPT), the CWC requires disarmament. States Parties having chemical weapons (CW) must destroy them. The CWC has not adopted the NPT distinction between weapons and non-weapons states; the CWC`s prohibitions and obligations will apply identically to all States parties. In most other respects, the two treaties establish similar regimes with similar approaches. Included are objectives and primary obligations, legal bases, institutional oversight, trade restrictions, protection of information, penal consequences, and role of the United Nations.

  14. The New English Quality Assurance Regime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2011-01-01

    England is developing a new quality assurance regime that will come into effect in October 2011. A new funding regime will operate from the following year, together with new rules to ease the participation of private higher education providers. This article describes and analyses the new quality and funding regimes. It argues that the greater…

  15. The New English Quality Assurance Regime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2011-01-01

    England is developing a new quality assurance regime that will come into effect in October 2011. A new funding regime will operate from the following year, together with new rules to ease the participation of private higher education providers. This article describes and analyses the new quality and funding regimes. It argues that the greater…

  16. Deterministic-random separation in nonstationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Antoni, J.; Sieg-Zieba, S.; Eltabach, M.

    2016-02-01

    In rotating machinery vibration analysis, the synchronous average is perhaps the most widely used technique for extracting periodic components. Periodic components are typically related to gear vibrations, misalignments, unbalances, blade rotations, reciprocating forces, etc. Their separation from other random components is essential in vibration-based diagnosis in order to discriminate useful information from masking noise. However, synchronous averaging theoretically requires the machine to operate under stationary regime (i.e. the related vibration signals are cyclostationary) and is otherwise jeopardized by the presence of amplitude and phase modulations. A first object of this paper is to investigate the nature of the nonstationarity induced by the response of a linear time-invariant system subjected to speed varying excitation. For this purpose, the concept of a cyclo-non-stationary signal is introduced, which extends the class of cyclostationary signals to speed-varying regimes. Next, a "generalized synchronous average'' is designed to extract the deterministic part of a cyclo-non-stationary vibration signal-i.e. the analog of the periodic part of a cyclostationary signal. Two estimators of the GSA have been proposed. The first one returns the synchronous average of the signal at predefined discrete operating speeds. A brief statistical study of it is performed, aiming to provide the user with confidence intervals that reflect the "quality" of the estimator according to the SNR and the estimated speed. The second estimator returns a smoothed version of the former by enforcing continuity over the speed axis. It helps to reconstruct the deterministic component by tracking a specific trajectory dictated by the speed profile (assumed to be known a priori).The proposed method is validated first on synthetic signals and then on actual industrial signals. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on envelope-based diagnosis of bearings in variable

  17. Statistical Neurodynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Gregory Harold

    1982-03-01

    The primary objective of the thesis is to explore the dynamical properties of small nerve networks by means of the methods of statistical mechanics. To this end, a general formalism is developed and applied to elementary groupings of model neurons which are driven by either constant (steady state) or nonconstant (nonsteady state) forces. Neuronal models described by a system of coupled, nonlinear, first-order, ordinary differential equations are considered. A linearized form of the neuronal equations is studied in detail. A Lagrange function corresponding to the linear neural network is constructed which, through a Legendre transformation, provides a constant of motion. By invoking the Maximum-Entropy Principle with the single integral of motion as a constraint, a probability distribution function for the network in a steady state can be obtained. The formalism is implemented for some simple networks driven by a constant force; accordingly, the analysis focuses on a study of fluctuations about the steady state. In particular, a network composed of N noninteracting neurons, termed Free Thinkers, is considered in detail, with a view to interpretation and numerical estimation of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the constant of motion. As an archetypical example of a net of interacting neurons, the classical neural oscillator, consisting of two mutually inhibitory neurons, is investigated. It is further shown that in the case of a network driven by a nonconstant force, the Maximum-Entropy Principle can be applied to determine a probability distribution functional describing the network in a nonsteady state. The above examples are reconsidered with nonconstant driving forces which produce small deviations from the steady state. Numerical studies are performed on simplified models of two physical systems: the starfish central nervous system and the mammalian olfactory bulb. Discussions are given as to how statistical neurodynamics can be used to gain a better

  18. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  19. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  20. Sensitivity to spatial and temporal scale and fire regime inputs in deriving fire regime condition class

    Treesearch

    Linda Tedrow; Wendel J. Hann

    2015-01-01

    The Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) is a composite departure measure that compares current vegetation structure and fire regime to historical reference conditions. FRCC is computed as the average of: 1) Vegetation departure (VDEP) and 2) Regime (frequency and severity) departure (RDEP). In addition to the FRCC rating, the Vegetation Condition Class (VCC) and Regime...

  1. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of burnt areas time series in Mediterranean regions suggests that ecosystems characterising this area consist primarily of species highly vulnerable to the fire but highly resilient, as characterized by a significant regenerative capacity after the fire spreading. In a few years the area burnt may once again be covered by the same vegetation present before the fire. Similarly, Mediterranean conifer forests, which often refers to plantations made in order to reforest the areas most severely degraded with high erosion risk, regenerate from seed after the fire resulting in high resilience to the fire as well. Only rarely, and usually with negligible damages, fire affects the areas covered by climax species in relation with altitude and soil types (i.e, quercus, fagus, abies). On the basis of these results, this paper shows how the simple Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model is able to reproduce the forest fire regime in terms of number of fires and burned area, describing whit good accuracy the actual fire perimeters. The original Drossel-Schwabl model has been slightly modified in this work by introducing two parameters (probability of propagation and regrowth) specific for each different class of vegetation cover. Using model selection methods based on AIC, the model with the optimal number of classes with different fire behaviour was selected. Two different case studies are presented in this work: Regione Liguria and Regione Sardegna (Italy). Both regions are situated in the center of the Mediterranean and are characterized by a high number of fires and burned area. However, the two regions have very different fire regimes. Sardinia is affected by the fire phenomenon only in summer whilst Liguria is affected by fires also in winter, with higher number of fires and larger burned area. In addition, the two region are very different in vegetation cover. The presence of Mediterranean conifers, (Pinus Pinaster, Pinus Nigra, Pinus halepensis) is quite spread in

  2. A hierarchical fire frequency model to simulate temporal patterns of fire regimes in LANDIS

    Treesearch

    Jian Yang; Hong S. He; Eric J. Gustafson

    2004-01-01

    Fire disturbance has important ecological effects in many forest landscapes. Existing statistically based approaches can be used to examine the effects of a fire regime on forest landscape dynamics. Most examples of statistically based fire models divide a fire occurrence into two stages--fire ignition and fire initiation. However, the exponential and Weibull fire-...

  3. Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streepey, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2001-12-01

    Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes M. Streepey and C. Lithgow-Bertelloni Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Studies have shown that faults generally tend to reactivate over long histories of deformation, often in spite of less favorable orientations or changing stress regimes in the region. Reactivation of faults suggests that rheology is a key determining factor in the localization of intense deformation in orogenic belts. It is evident in these studies that stresses are preferentially partitioned into pre-existing weak zones of the crust. This is shown commonly in orogenic belts, where thrust faults reactivate as normal faults during syn- to post-orogenic extension. Therefore, the interaction of faults might be an important element in the deformation of the lithosphere during pre- and post-orogenic tectonics. On shorter timescales, it has been suggested that fault interactions are commonplace in areas of active seismicity, and that those interactions can be related to earthquake triggering and therefore may be critically important in assessing the behavior of the lithosphere during deformation. We investigate this problem concentrating on the time evolution of faults in extensional regimes. Geologic evidence in ancient orogenic belts shows periods of protracted normal fault motion over timescales of hundreds of millions of years after orogenesis. This motion is likely episodic rather than continuous; however, this is not constrained by field and geochronological studies. Fault evolution on these timescales is modeled using the finite element code ABAQUS. Our elastic results show, as expected from dislocation theory, that stress shadows produced by motion along faults can be linearly superposed and that faults do not have a high degree of interaction. We have constructed new models of two-dimensional finite elements that represent a block of crust under extensional stresses. Sited in these blocks are weak zones

  4. Stupid statistics!

    PubMed

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2008-01-01

    The method of least squares is probably the most powerful data analysis tool available to scientists. Toward a fuller appreciation of that power, this work begins with an elementary review of statistics fundamentals, and then progressively increases in sophistication as the coverage is extended to the theory and practice of linear and nonlinear least squares. The results are illustrated in application to data analysis problems important in the life sciences. The review of fundamentals includes the role of sampling and its connection to probability distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, and the importance of finite variance. Linear least squares are presented using matrix notation, and the significance of the key probability distributions-Gaussian, chi-square, and t-is illustrated with Monte Carlo calculations. The meaning of correlation is discussed, including its role in the propagation of error. When the data themselves are correlated, special methods are needed for the fitting, as they are also when fitting with constraints. Nonlinear fitting gives rise to nonnormal parameter distributions, but the 10% Rule of Thumb suggests that such problems will be insignificant when the parameter is sufficiently well determined. Illustrations include calibration with linear and nonlinear response functions, the dangers inherent in fitting inverted data (e.g., Lineweaver-Burk equation), an analysis of the reliability of the van't Hoff analysis, the problem of correlated data in the Guggenheim method, and the optimization of isothermal titration calorimetry procedures using the variance-covariance matrix for experiment design. The work concludes with illustrations on assessing and presenting results.

  5. Model for neural signaling leap statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos

    2011-03-01

    We present a simple model for neural signaling leaps in the brain considering only the thermodynamic (Nernst) potential in neuron cells and brain temperature. We numerically simulated connections between arbitrarily localized neurons and analyzed the frequency distribution of the distances reached. We observed qualitative change between Normal statistics (with T = 37.5°C, awaken regime) and Lévy statistics (T = 35.5°C, sleeping period), characterized by rare events of long range connections.

  6. Changes in cold region flood regimes inferred from long-record reference gauging stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, Donald H.; Whitfield, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    Variability and nonstationarity in flood regimes of cold regions are examined using data from hydrometric reference streamflow gauging stations from 27 natural watersheds in Canada and adjacent areas of the United States. Choosing stations from reference networks with nearly 100 years of data allows for the investigation of changes that span several phases of some of the atmospheric drivers that may influence flood behavior. The reference hydrologic networks include only stations considered to have good quality data and were screened to avoid the influences of regulation, diversions, or land use change. Changes and variations in flood regimes are complex and require a multifaceted approach to properly characterize the types of changes that have occurred and are likely to occur in the future. Peaks over threshold (POT) data are extracted from daily flow data for each watershed, and changes to the magnitude, timing, frequency, volume, and duration of threshold exceedences are investigated. Seasonal statistics are used to explore changes in the nature of the flood regime based on changes in the timing of flood threshold exceedences. A variety of measures are developed to infer flood regime shifts including from a nival regime to a mixed regime and a mixed regime to a more pluvial-dominated regime. The flood regime at many of the watersheds demonstrates increased prominence of rainfall floods and decreased prevalence of snowmelt contributions to flood responses. While some individual stations show a relationship between flood variables and climate indices, these relationships are generally weak.

  7. Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes*

    PubMed Central

    Karaivanov, Alexander; Townsend, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    We formulate and solve a range of dynamic models of constrained credit/insurance that allow for moral hazard and limited commitment. We compare them to full insurance and exogenously incomplete financial regimes (autarky, saving only, borrowing and lending in a single asset). We develop computational methods based on mechanism design, linear programming, and maximum likelihood to estimate, compare, and statistically test these alternative dynamic models with financial/information constraints. Our methods can use both cross-sectional and panel data and allow for measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity. We estimate the models using data on Thai households running small businesses from two separate samples. We find that in the rural sample, the exogenously incomplete saving only and borrowing regimes provide the best fit using data on consumption, business assets, investment, and income. Family and other networks help consumption smoothing there, as in a moral hazard constrained regime. In contrast, in urban areas, we find mechanism design financial/information regimes that are decidedly less constrained, with the moral hazard model fitting best combined business and consumption data. We perform numerous robustness checks in both the Thai data and in Monte Carlo simulations and compare our maximum likelihood criterion with results from other metrics and data not used in the estimation. A prototypical counterfactual policy evaluation exercise using the estimation results is also featured. PMID:25246710

  8. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas in the nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2006-06-15

    A field theory approach to transport phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas is presented. The thermodynamic field theory (TFT), previously developed for treating the generic thermodynamic system out of equilibrium, is applied to plasmas physics. Transport phenomena are treated here as the effect of the field linking the thermodynamic forces with their conjugate flows combined with statistical mechanics. In particular, the Classical and the Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes are analyzed by solving the thermodynamic field equations of the TFT in the weak-field approximation. We found that, the TFT does not correct the expressions of the ionic heat fluxes evaluated by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes. On the other hand, the fluxes of matter and electronic energy (heat flow) is further enhanced in the nonlinear Classical and Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes. These results seem to be in line with the experimental observations. The complete set of the electronic and ionic transport equations in the nonlinear Banana regime, is also reported. A paper showing the comparison between our theoretic results and the experimental observations in the JET machine is currently in preparation.

  9. Notes on the MUF-D statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Many aspects of the MUF-D statistic, used for verification of accountability data, have been examined in the safeguards literature. In this paper, basic MUF-D results are extended to more general environments than are usually considered. These environments include arbitrary measurement error structures, various sampling regimes that could be imposed by the inspectorate, and the attributes/variables framework.

  10. Using Clustering to Establish Climate Regimes from PCM Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F.; Oglesby, R.; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D.

    2002-12-01

    A multivariate statistical clustering technique--based on the k-means algorithm of Hartigan--has been used to extract patterns of climatological significance from 200 years of general circulation model (GCM) output. Originally developed and implemented on a Beowulf-style parallel computer constructed by Hoffman and Hargrove from surplus commodity desktop PCs, the high performance parallel clustering algorithm was previously applied to the derivation of ecoregions from map stacks of 9 and 25 geophysical conditions or variables for the conterminous U.S. at a resolution of 1 sq km. Now applied both across space and through time, the clustering technique yields temporally-varying climate regimes predicted by transient runs of the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Using a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and clustering four fields of significance to the global water cycle (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and snow depth) from 1871 through 2098, the authors' analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The patterns of cluster changes have been analyzed to understand the predicted variability in the water cycle on global and continental scales. In addition, representative climate regimes were determined by taking three 10-year averages of the fields 100 years apart for northern hemisphere winter (December, January, and February) and summer (June, July, and August). The result is global maps of typical seasonal climate regimes for 100 years in the past, for the present, and for 100 years into the future. Using three-dimensional data or phase space representations of these climate regimes (i.e., the cluster centroids), the authors demonstrate the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and

  11. Using Clustering to Establish Climate Regimes from PCM Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor); Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D.

    2002-01-01

    A multivariate statistical clustering technique--based on the k-means algorithm of Hartigan has been used to extract patterns of climatological significance from 200 years of general circulation model (GCM) output. Originally developed and implemented on a Beowulf-style parallel computer constructed by Hoffman and Hargrove from surplus commodity desktop PCs, the high performance parallel clustering algorithm was previously applied to the derivation of ecoregions from map stacks of 9 and 25 geophysical conditions or variables for the conterminous U.S. at a resolution of 1 sq km. Now applied both across space and through time, the clustering technique yields temporally-varying climate regimes predicted by transient runs of the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Using a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and clustering four fields of significance to the global water cycle (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and snow depth) from 1871 through 2098, the authors' analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The patterns of cluster changes have been analyzed to understand the predicted variability in the water cycle on global and continental scales. In addition, representative climate regimes were determined by taking three 10-year averages of the fields 100 years apart for northern hemisphere winter (December, January, and February) and summer (June, July, and August). The result is global maps of typical seasonal climate regimes for 100 years in the past, for the present, and for 100 years into the future. Using three-dimensional data or phase space representations of these climate regimes (i.e., the cluster centroids), the authors demonstrate the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time

  12. Using Clustering to Establish Climate Regimes from PCM Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor); Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D.

    2002-01-01

    A multivariate statistical clustering technique--based on the k-means algorithm of Hartigan has been used to extract patterns of climatological significance from 200 years of general circulation model (GCM) output. Originally developed and implemented on a Beowulf-style parallel computer constructed by Hoffman and Hargrove from surplus commodity desktop PCs, the high performance parallel clustering algorithm was previously applied to the derivation of ecoregions from map stacks of 9 and 25 geophysical conditions or variables for the conterminous U.S. at a resolution of 1 sq km. Now applied both across space and through time, the clustering technique yields temporally-varying climate regimes predicted by transient runs of the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Using a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and clustering four fields of significance to the global water cycle (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and snow depth) from 1871 through 2098, the authors' analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The patterns of cluster changes have been analyzed to understand the predicted variability in the water cycle on global and continental scales. In addition, representative climate regimes were determined by taking three 10-year averages of the fields 100 years apart for northern hemisphere winter (December, January, and February) and summer (June, July, and August). The result is global maps of typical seasonal climate regimes for 100 years in the past, for the present, and for 100 years into the future. Using three-dimensional data or phase space representations of these climate regimes (i.e., the cluster centroids), the authors demonstrate the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time

  13. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  14. Statistical Mechanics of Combinatorial Auctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias; Leone, Michele; Marsili, Matteo; Sellitto, Mauro; Weigt, Martin; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2006-09-01

    Combinatorial auctions are formulated as frustrated lattice gases on sparse random graphs, allowing the determination of the optimal revenue by methods of statistical physics. Transitions between computationally easy and hard regimes are found and interpreted in terms of the geometric structure of the space of solutions. We introduce an iterative algorithm to solve intermediate and large instances, and discuss competing states of optimal revenue and maximal number of satisfied bidders. The algorithm can be generalized to the hard phase and to more sophisticated auction protocols.

  15. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Leonardo; Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime. PMID:26726133

  16. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes.

    PubMed

    Novo, Leonardo; Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser

    2016-01-04

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime.

  17. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the ... Plastic Surgery Statistics 2005 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics Stats Report 2016 National Clearinghouse of ...

  18. Superfluid regimes in degenerate atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2005-05-05

    We give a brief overview of recent studies of quantum degenerate regimes in ultracold Fermi gases. The attention is focused on the regime of Bose-Einstein condensation of weakly bound molecules of fermionic atoms, formed at a large positive scattering length for the interspecies atom-atom interaction. We analyze remarkable collisional stability of these molecules and draw prospects for future studies.

  19. Regimes of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Scaling regimes for polymers confined to tubular channels are well established when the channel cross-sectional dimension is either very small (Odjik regime) or large (classic de Gennes regime) relative to the polymer Kuhn length. In the literature, there is no clear consensus regarding the intermediate region and if subregimes even exist to connect these two classic bounding regimes. The confluence of emerging single DNA mapping technologies and a resurged interest in the fundamental properties of confined polymers has led to extensive research in this area using DNA as a model system. Due to the DNA molecule's properties and limitations of nanofabrication, most experiments are performed in this intermediate regime with channel dimensions of a few Kuhn lengths. Here we use simulations and theory to reconcile conflicting theories and show that there are indeed extended de Gennes, partial alignment and hairpin regimes located between the two classic regimes. Simulations results for both chain extension and free energy support the existence of these regimes. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (CBET-1335938).

  20. FISHER INFORMATION AND ECOSYSTEM REGIME CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following Fisher’s work, we propose two different expressions for the Fisher Information along with Shannon Information as a means of detecting and assessing shifts between alternative ecosystem regimes. Regime shifts are a consequence of bifurcations in the dynamics of an ecosys...

  1. FISHER INFORMATION AND ECOSYSTEM REGIME CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following Fisher’s work, we propose two different expressions for the Fisher Information along with Shannon Information as a means of detecting and assessing shifts between alternative ecosystem regimes. Regime shifts are a consequence of bifurcations in the dynamics of an ecosys...

  2. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-01

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?ωpe: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  3. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-21

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  4. Characterizing Wildfire Regimes and Risk in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, B. D.; Millington, J. D.; Perry, G. L.

    2004-12-01

    Over the last decade, high profile wildfires have resulted in numerous fatalities and loss of infrastructure. Wildfires also have a significant impact on climate and ecosystems, with recent authors emphasizing the need for regional-level examinations of wildfire-regime dynamics and change, and the factors driving them. With implications for hazard management, climate studies, and ecosystem research, there is therefore significant interest in appropriate analysis of historical wildfire databases. Insightful studies using wildfire database statistics exist, but are often hampered by the low spatial and/or temporal resolution of their datasets. In this paper, we use a high-resolution dataset consisting of 88,855 USFS wildfires over the time period 1970--2000, and consider wildfire occurrence across the conterminous USA as a function of ecoregion (land units classified by climate, vegetation, and topography), ignition source (anthropogenic vs. lightning), and decade (1970--1979, 1980--1989, 1990--1999). We find that for the conterminous USA (a) wildfires exhibit robust frequency-area power-law behavior in 17 different ecoregions, (b) normalized power-law exponents may be used to compare the scaling of wildfire burned areas between regions, (c) power-law exponents change systematically from east to west, (d) wildfires in 75% of the conterminous USA (particularly the east) have higher power-law exponents for anthropogenic vs. lightning ignition sources, and (e) recurrence intervals for wildfires of a given burned area or larger for each ecoregion can be assessed, allowing for the classification of wildfire regimes for probabilistic hazard estimation in the same vein as is now used for earthquakes. By examining wildfire statistics in a spatially and temporally explicit manner, we are able to present resultant wildfire regime summary statistics and conclusions, along with a probabilistic hazard assessment of wildfire risk at the ecoregion division level across the

  5. Abrupt climate-independent fire regime changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires have played a determining role in distribution, composition and structure of many ecosystems worldwide and climatic changes are widely considered to be a major driver of future fire regime changes. However, forecasting future climatic change induced impacts on fire regimes will require a clearer understanding of other drivers of abrupt fire regime changes. Here, we focus on evidence from different environmental and temporal settings of fire regimes changes that are not directly attributed to climatic changes. We review key cases of these abrupt fire regime changes at different spatial and temporal scales, including those directly driven (i) by fauna, (ii) by invasive plant species, and (iii) by socio-economic and policy changes. All these drivers might generate non-linear effects of landscape changes in fuel structure; that is, they generate fuel changes that can cross thresholds of landscape continuity, and thus drastically change fire activity. Although climatic changes might contribute to some of these changes, there are also many instances that are not primarily linked to climatic shifts. Understanding the mechanism driving fire regime changes should contribute to our ability to better assess future fire regimes.

  6. MQSA National Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Standards Act and Program MQSA Insights MQSA National Statistics Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... but should level off with time. Archived Scorecard Statistics 2017 Scorecard Statistics 2016 Scorecard Statistics (Archived) 2015 ...

  7. Globalization, marine regime shifts and the Soviet Union

    PubMed Central

    Österblom, Henrik; Folke, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Regime shifts have been observed in marine ecosystems around the world, with climate and fishing suggested as major drivers of such shifts. The global and regional dynamics of the climate system have been studied in this context, and efforts to develop an analogous understanding of fishing activities are developing. Here, we investigate the timing of pelagic marine regime shifts in relation to the emergence of regional and global fishing activities of the Soviet Union. Our investigation of official catch statistics reflects that the Soviet Union was a major fishing actor in all large marine ecosystems where regime shifts have been documented, including in ecosystems where overfishing has been established as a key driver of these changes (in the Baltic and Black Seas and the Scotian Shelf). Globalization of Soviet Union fishing activities pushed exploitation to radically new levels and triggered regional and global governance responses for improved management. Since then, exploitation levels have remained and increased with new actors involved. Based on our exploratory work, we propose that a deeper understanding of the role of global fishing actors is central for improved management of marine ecosystems.

  8. Global impacts of the 1980s regime shift.

    PubMed

    Reid, Philip C; Hari, Renata E; Beaugrand, Grégory; Livingstone, David M; Marty, Christoph; Straile, Dietmar; Barichivich, Jonathan; Goberville, Eric; Adrian, Rita; Aono, Yasuyuki; Brown, Ross; Foster, James; Groisman, Pavel; Hélaouët, Pierre; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Kirby, Richard; Knight, Jeff; Kraberg, Alexandra; Li, Jianping; Lo, Tzu-Ting; Myneni, Ranga B; North, Ryan P; Pounds, J Alan; Sparks, Tim; Stübi, René; Tian, Yongjun; Wiltshire, Karen H; Xiao, Dong; Zhu, Zaichun

    2016-02-01

    Despite evidence from a number of Earth systems that abrupt temporal changes known as regime shifts are important, their nature, scale and mechanisms remain poorly documented and understood. Applying principal component analysis, change-point analysis and a sequential t-test analysis of regime shifts to 72 time series, we confirm that the 1980s regime shift represented a major change in the Earth's biophysical systems from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to the Antarctic, and occurred at slightly different times around the world. Using historical climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and statistical modelling of historical temperatures, we then demonstrate that this event was triggered by rapid global warming from anthropogenic plus natural forcing, the latter associated with the recovery from the El Chichón volcanic eruption. The shift in temperature that occurred at this time is hypothesized as the main forcing for a cascade of abrupt environmental changes. Within the context of the last century or more, the 1980s event was unique in terms of its global scope and scale; our observed consequences imply that if unavoidable natural events such as major volcanic eruptions interact with anthropogenic warming unforeseen multiplier effects may occur. © 2015 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Distinct Turbulence Saturation Regimes in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the complex 3D magnetic fields of stellarators, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence is shown to have two distinct saturation regimes, as revealed by petascale numerical simulations and explained by a simple turbulence theory. The first regime is marked by strong zonal flows and matches previous observations in tokamaks. The newly observed second regime, in contrast, exhibits small-scale quasi-two-dimensional turbulence, negligible zonal flows, and, surprisingly, a weaker heat flux scaling. Our findings suggest that key details of the magnetic geometry control turbulence in stellarators.

  10. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g., decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. To manage water resources in the future water managers will have to understand the joint hydrologic effects of natural climate variability and global warming. These joint effects may produce future hydrologic conditions that are unprecedented in both the instrumental and paleoclimatic records.

  11. Earth Regime Network Evolution Study (ERNESt)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  12. Prediction Rules for Regime Changes and Length in a New Regime for the Lorenz Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Yadav, Rama; Dwivedi, Suneet; Mittal, Ashok Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Lorenz model as a conceptual model for predictability studies in meteorology, only Evans et al. seem to have studied the prediction of occurrence of regime changes and their duration. In this paper, simpler rules are presented for forecasting regime changes and their lengths, with near-perfect forecasting accuracy. It is found that when |x(t)| is greater than a critical value xc, the current regime will end after it completes the current orbit. Moreover, the length n of the new regime increases monotonically with the maximum value xm of |x(t)| in the previous regime. A best-fit cubic expression provides a very good estimate of n for the next regime, given xm for the previous regime.Similar forecasting rules are also obtained for regime changes in the forced Lorenz model. This model was introduced by Palmer and used as a conceptual model to explore the effects of sea surface temperature on seasonal mean rainfall. It was found that for the forced Lorenz model, the critical value xc changed linearly with the forcing parameter providing bias to one of the regimes. Similar regime prediction rules have been found in some other two-regime attractors. It seems these forecasting rules are a generic property of a large class of two-regime attractors. Although as a conceptual model, the Lorenz model cannot be taken very literally, these results suggest a relationship between magnitudes of maximum anomaly in one regime, for example, the active spell, and duration of the subsequent break spell.

  13. Iranian Regime Reform: Opportunities and Consequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    formal political access to mitigate the adverse effects of . . . the deterioration of quality of life .”70 Three broad sets of factors outlined by...demanding changes in the Iranian regime that mesh with U.S.. national interests. However, the Green Movement may not be successful in effecting change...viable threat to the Iranian regime. This thesis used game theory as a tool because game theory outcomes very often reflect real- life outcomes

  14. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Identifying multiple coral reef regimes and their drivers across the Hawaiian archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Nyström, Magnus; Norström, Albert V.; Williams, Ivor D.; Wedding, Lisa M.; Kittinger, John N.; Williams, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of coral reef resilience can lead to dramatic changes in benthic structure, often called regime shifts, which significantly alter ecosystem processes and functioning. In the face of global change and increasing direct human impacts, there is an urgent need to anticipate and prevent undesirable regime shifts and, conversely, to reverse shifts in already degraded reef systems. Such challenges require a better understanding of the human and natural drivers that support or undermine different reef regimes. The Hawaiian archipelago extends across a wide gradient of natural and anthropogenic conditions and provides us a unique opportunity to investigate the relationships between multiple reef regimes, their dynamics and potential drivers. We applied a combination of exploratory ordination methods and inferential statistics to one of the most comprehensive coral reef datasets available in order to detect, visualize and define potential multiple ecosystem regimes. This study demonstrates the existence of three distinct reef regimes dominated by hard corals, turf algae or macroalgae. Results from boosted regression trees show nonlinear patterns among predictors that help to explain the occurrence of these regimes, and highlight herbivore biomass as the key driver in addition to effluent, latitude and depth.

  16. Predict! Teaching Statistics Using Informational Statistical Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makar, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Statistics is one of the most widely used topics for everyday life in the school mathematics curriculum. Unfortunately, the statistics taught in schools focuses on calculations and procedures before students have a chance to see it as a useful and powerful tool. Researchers have found that a dominant view of statistics is as an assortment of tools…

  17. Statistics Poker: Reinforcing Basic Statistical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Learning basic statistical concepts does not need to be tedious or dry; it can be fun and interesting through cooperative learning in the small-group activity of Statistics Poker. This article describes a teaching approach for reinforcing basic statistical concepts that can help students who have high anxiety and makes learning and reinforcing…

  18. Piping Regimes in Cohesive Mud Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Piping is commonly encountered in the highly saturated cohesive muds of estuarine and coastal environments, where tidal and wave action builds up excess pore water pressure. Once the built-up pressure is released, the upwelling pore water locally fluidizes and forms pipes through the mud layer. These pipes propagate through the mud layer and erupt at its surface. Herein, we investigate the mechanisms and conditions that promote piping in cohesive mud layers, which to date remain largely unknown, in parts because of the inherent difficulty in collecting field data. A fluidization column was carefully designed for replicating pipe formation in the laboratory by injecting pressurized water at the base of an overlaying kaolin mud layer through a nozzle. The kaolin mud concentration, C, and flow rate, q, through the nozzle were varied systematically to elucidate their effects on pipe formation. Localized pore water pressure measurements revealed that the pipe formation is accompanied by a pressure wave with magnitude comparable to the kaolin mud yield strength. Pressure measurements across the mud layer combined with visual observations indicated the presence of two fluidization regimes, dubbed advective and diffusive. Under the advective regime, a single vertical channel formed above the nozzle. In contrast, under the diffusive regime, a channel network formed within the mud layer and multiple channels erupted on the mud layer surface. The C and q conditions corresponding to each regime were delineated in a fluidization regime diagram. In parallel to the experiments, a numerical model was developed from a quasi-steady form of the 1D momentum equation, for predicting the flow velocity in the vertical pipe for the advective regime. Future work is focused on developing a probabilistic numerical model for predicting the pipe network configuration and hydraulics under the diffusive regime.

  19. Greenland Meltwater and Arctic Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Timmermans, M. L.; Myers, P. G.; Platov, G.

    2015-12-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, wind-driven components of ice drift and surface ocean currents experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability alternating between anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation regimes. During cyclonic regimes, low sea level atmospheric pressure dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean toward the sub-Arctic seas was intensified. During anticylonic circulation regimes, high sea level pressure dominated over the Arctic driving sea ice and ocean counter-clockwise; the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the sub-Arctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been dominated by an anticyclonic circulation regime with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for these regimes. Of essential importance is to discern the causes and consequences of the apparent break-down in the natural decadal variability of the Arctic climate system, and specifically: Why has the well-pronounced decadal variability observed in the 20th century been replaced by relatively weak interannual changes under anticyclonic circulation regime conditions in the 21st century? We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. In order to test this hypothesis, numerical experiments with several FAMOS (Forum for Arctic Modeling & Observational Synthesis) ice-ocean coupled models have been conducted. In these experiments, Greenland melt freshwater is tracked by passive tracers being constantly released along the Greenland coast. Propagation pathways and time scales of Greenland meltwater within the sub-Arctic seas are discussed.

  20. A holistic view of marine regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    Conversi, Alessandra; Dakos, Vasilis; Gårdmark, Anna; Ling, Scott; Folke, Carl; Mumby, Peter J.; Greene, Charles; Edwards, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten; Casini, Michele; Pershing, Andrew; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding marine regime shifts is important not only for ecology but also for developing marine management that assures the provision of ecosystem services to humanity. While regime shift theory is well developed, there is still no common understanding on drivers, mechanisms and characteristic of abrupt changes in real marine ecosystems. Based on contributions to the present theme issue, we highlight some general issues that need to be overcome for developing a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystem regime shifts. We find a great divide between benthic reef and pelagic ocean systems in how regime shift theory is linked to observed abrupt changes. Furthermore, we suggest that the long-lasting discussion on the prevalence of top-down trophic or bottom-up physical drivers in inducing regime shifts may be overcome by taking into consideration the synergistic interactions of multiple stressors, and the special characteristics of different ecosystem types. We present a framework for the holistic investigation of marine regime shifts that considers multiple exogenous drivers that interact with endogenous mechanisms to cause abrupt, catastrophic change. This framework takes into account the time-delayed synergies of these stressors, which erode the resilience of the ecosystem and eventually enable the crossing of ecological thresholds. Finally, considering that increased pressures in the marine environment are predicted by the current climate change assessments, in order to avoid major losses of ecosystem services, we suggest that marine management approaches should incorporate knowledge on environmental thresholds and develop tools that consider regime shift dynamics and characteristics. This grand challenge can only be achieved through a holistic view of marine ecosystem dynamics as evidenced by this theme issue.

  1. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-06

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  2. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  3. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  4. Dynamic treatment regimes: technical challenges and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Daniel J.; Qian, Min; Pelham, William E.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are of growing interest across the clinical sciences because these regimes provide one way to operationalize and thus inform sequential personalized clinical decision making. Formally, a dynamic treatment regime is a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of clinical intervention. Each decision rule maps up-to-date patient information to a recommended treatment. We briefly review a variety of approaches for using data to construct the decision rules. We then review a critical inferential challenge that results from nonregularity, which often arises in this area. In particular, nonregularity arises in inference for parameters in the optimal dynamic treatment regime; the asymptotic, limiting, distribution of estimators are sensitive to local perturbations. We propose and evaluate a locally consistent Adaptive Confidence Interval (ACI) for the parameters of the optimal dynamic treatment regime. We use data from the Adaptive Pharmacological and Behavioral Treatments for Children with ADHD Trial as an illustrative example. We conclude by highlighting and discussing emerging theoretical problems in this area. PMID:25356091

  5. Hydrological regime modifications induced by climate change in Mediterranean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, Dario; Caracciolo, Domenico; Viola, Francesco; Valerio Noto, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of river flow regimes has a capital importance for a variety of practical applications, in water resource management, including optimal and sustainable use. Hydrological regime is highly dependent on climatic factors, among which the most important is surely the precipitation, in terms of frequency, seasonal distribution and intensity of rainfall events. The streamflow frequency regime of river basins are often summarized by flow duration curves (FDCs), that offer a simple and comprehensive graphical view of the overall historical variability associated with streamflow, and characterize the ability of the basin to provide flows of various magnitudes. Climate change is likely to lead shifts in the hydrological regime, and, consequently, in the FDCs. Staring from this premise, the primary objective of the present study is to explore the effects of potential climate changes on the hydrological regime of some small Mediterranean basins. To this aim it is here used a recent hydrological model, the ModABa model (MODel for Annual flow duration curves assessment in ephemeral small BAsins), for the probabilistic characterization of the daily streamflows in small catchments. The model has been calibrated and successively validated in a unique small catchment, where it has shown a satisfactory accuracy in reproducing the empirical FDC starting from easily derivable parameters arising from basic ecohydrological knowledge of the basin and commonly available climatic data such as daily precipitation and temperatures. Thus, this work also represents a first attempt to apply the ModABa to basins different from that used for its preliminary design in order to testing its generality. Different case studies are selected within the Sicily region; the model is first calibrated at the sites and then forced by future climatic scenarios, highlighting the principal differences emerging from the current scenario and future FDCs. The future climate scenarios are generated using

  6. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, REPORTS), (*PROBABILITY, REPORTS), INFORMATION THEORY, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, STATISTICAL PROCESSES, STOCHASTIC PROCESSES, MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS, DISTRIBUTION THEORY , DECISION THEORY, MEASURE THEORY, OPTIMIZATION

  7. Stochastic Parametrisations and Regime Behaviour of Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Hannah; Moroz, Irene; Palmer, Tim

    2013-04-01

    The presence of regimes is a characteristic of non-linear, chaotic systems (Lorenz, 2006). In the atmosphere, regimes emerge as familiar circulation patterns such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Scandinavian Blocking events. In recent years there has been much interest in the problem of identifying and studying atmospheric regimes (Solomon et al, 2007). In particular, how do these regimes respond to an external forcing such as anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions? The importance of regimes in observed trends over the past 50-100 years indicates that in order to predict anthropogenic climate change, our climate models must be able to represent accurately natural circulation regimes, their statistics and variability. It is well established that representing model uncertainty as well as initial condition uncertainty is important for reliable weather forecasts (Palmer, 2001). In particular, stochastic parametrisation schemes have been shown to improve the skill of weather forecast models (e.g. Berner et al., 2009; Frenkel et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2009). It is possible that including stochastic physics as a representation of model uncertainty could also be beneficial in climate modelling, enabling the simulator to explore larger regions of the climate attractor including other flow regimes. An alternative representation of model uncertainty is a perturbed parameter scheme, whereby physical parameters in subgrid parametrisation schemes are perturbed about their optimal value. Perturbing parameters gives a greater control over the ensemble than multi-model or multiparametrisation ensembles, and has been used as a representation of model uncertainty in climate prediction (Stainforth et al., 2005; Rougier et al., 2009). We investigate the effect of including representations of model uncertainty on the regime behaviour of a simulator. A simple chaotic model of the atmosphere, the Lorenz '96 system, is used to study

  8. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-09

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile.

  9. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    SciTech Connect

    He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi

    2011-03-15

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  10. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-06

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts.

  11. Multiscale regime shifts and planetary boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Carpenter, Stephen; Rockström, Johan; Scheffer, Marten; Walker, Brian

    2013-07-01

    Life on Earth has repeatedly displayed abrupt and massive changes in the past, and there is no reason to expect that comparable planetary-scale regime shifts will not continue in the future. Different lines of evidence indicate that regime shifts occur when the climate or biosphere transgresses a tipping point. Whether human activities will trigger such a global event in the near future is uncertain, due to critical knowledge gaps. In particular, we lack understanding of how regime shifts propagate across scales, and whether local or regional tipping points can lead to global transitions. The ongoing disruption of ecosystems and climate, combined with unprecedented breakdown of isolation by human migration and trade, highlights the need to operate within safe planetary boundaries.

  12. Planning for regime change and its aftermath

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    countries’ governing regimes since 9/11–Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya–and U.S. policy at time of writing supports two more. Despite this experience...Iraq, and Libya–and U.S. policy at time of writing supports two more. Despite this experience, and the likely future need, the U.S. has no...time of writing , U.S. policy publicly supports regime change in Syria and North Korea. President Obama’s decision not to militarily intervene to

  13. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  14. Light focusing in the Anderson regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations.

  15. Atmospheric weather regimes over tropical South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Vickie S.; Garstang, Michael; Nolf, Scott R.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared radiance measurements by the GOES-6 satellite during April 1986 through April 1987 were used to characterize and identify distinct regimes of persistent large-scale cloudiness patterns over the Amazon Basin. It is suggested that the energetics of the tropical troposphere over the Amazon Basin can be directly related to the GOES large-scale cloudiness patterns. The geometry and persistence of the cloud patterns are influenced by shifts in general circulation features and are likely modulated by 4- to 5-day and 40- to 60-day waves. Diurnal forcing effects are more pronounced during weather regimes characterized by prominently clear skies over land areas.

  16. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Amet, F; Ke, C T; Borzenets, I V; Wang, J; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Deacon, R S; Yamamoto, M; Bomze, Y; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-05-20

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  17. On the regimes of charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2008-05-07

    Charge reversal of the planar electrical double layer is studied by means of a well known integral equation theory. By a numerical analysis, a diagram is constructed with the onset points of charge reversal in the space of the fundamental variables of the system. Within this diagram, two regimes of charge reversal are identified, which are referred to as oscillatory and nonoscillatory. We found that these two regimes can be distinguished through a simple formula. Furthermore, a symmetry between electrostatic and size correlations in charge reversal is exhibited. Agreement of our results with other theories and molecular simulations data is discussed.

  18. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Borzenets, I. V.; Wang, J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Deacon, R. S.; Yamamoto, M.; Bomze, Y.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-05-01

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  19. Comparative climatology of four marine stratocumulus regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    The climatology of marine stratocumulus (MSc) cloud regimes off the west coasts of California, Peru, Morocco, and Angola are examined. Long-term, annual averages are presented for several quantities of interest in the four MSc regimes. The climatologies were constructed using the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). A 40 year time series of observations was extracted for 32 x 32 deg analysis domains. The data were taken from the monthly-averaged, 2 deg product. The resolution of the analysis is therefore limited to scales of greater than 200 km with submonthly variability not resolved. The averages of total cloud cover, sea surface temperature, and surface pressure are presented.

  20. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  1. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  2. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  3. Thoroughbred blood serum inorganic phosphate concentrations in relation to feeding regime and racing performance.

    PubMed

    Denny, J E

    1987-06-01

    Horses receiving a pelleted or cubed dietary supplementation with roughage, have serum inorganic phosphate (SIP) concentrations consistently below an accepted mean of 1,032 mmol l-1 or 3, 1 mg dl-1. Further, it has been reported that the best eight, two-year-old Irish Thoroughbred track performers of 51 horses tested over a 10 month period, had significantly lower SIP concentrations than the worst eight track performers. In an endeavour to assess any nutritive effect on SIP concentrations and also to assess any effect of SIP concentrations on track performance, metabolic blood profiles from 303 horses in training at the Summerveld Training centre in Natal, were evaluated for various blood parameters over a two year period. Of these 303 profiles, 264 were analysed for SIP concentrations. These horses were on three known feeding regimes viz. Feed 1--cube feeding plus hay; Feed 2--oats, wheaten bran and greens plus hay; Feed 3--Mixed feeding regime of feeds 1 and 2; Feed 4--unknown regime. Dry matter intake varied between 2 and 2.5% of estimated bodymass and in the Feed 1 regime, the proportion of cubed supplement in the diet was increased from 30 to 70% as the training programme progressed. Statistical analysis of SIP concentrations showed that horses on the Feed 1 regime had significantly lower SIP concentrations than horses on the other feed regimes. Of the 303 profiles, 224 could be identified with actual races.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Late-life mortality in older Jews exposed to the Nazi regime.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the mortality risk associated with exposure to the Nazi regime 6 decades after the war. A national representative survey with 7-year follow-up data. A national representative survey of Israeli Jews aged 60 and older conducted in 1997 and 1998. Four thousand one hundred seventy-nine Israeli Jews participated in the study. To evaluate the mortality risk associated with exposure to the Nazi regime, Cox proportional-hazards models were used, controlling for age, sex, education, religiousness, mental health, sleep disturbance, and baseline health. A 7-year follow-up of all-cause mortality. Of the 4,179 Israeli Jews who participated in the study, 1,472 (35%) self-identified as being exposed to the Nazi regime, defined as having lived in a country that was under the Nazi occupation or directly ruled by the Nazi regime. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality rate between those exposed to the Nazi regime (29.8%) and those who were not (27.5%) (adjusted hazard ratio=1.01, 95% confidence interval=0.88-1.15). Israeli Jews who survived exposure to the Nazi regime are not at greater risk for death than the general population of Israeli Jews in later life. It is unclear whether these individuals represent a particularly resilient group or whether the risks of psychological trauma on mortality are mitigated over time.

  5. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  6. Influence of intra-event-based flood regime on sediment flow behavior from a typical agro-catchment of the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le-Tao; Li, Zhan-Bin; Wang, He; Xiao, Jun-Bo

    2016-07-01

    The pluvial erosion process is significantly affected by tempo-spatial patterns of flood flows. However, despite their importance, only a few studies have investigated the sediment flow behavior that is driven by different flood regimes. The study aims to investigate the effect of intra-event-based flood regimes on the dynamics of sediment exports at Tuanshangou catchment, a typical agricultural catchment (unmanaged) in the hilly loess region on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Measurements of 193 flood events and 158 sediment-producing events were collected from Tuanshangou station between 1961 and 1969. The combined methods of hierarchical clustering approach, discriminant analysis and One-Way ANOVA were used to classify the flood events in terms of their event-based flood characteristics, including flood duration, peak discharge, and event flood runoff depth. The 193 flood events were classified into five regimes, and the mean statistical features of each regime significantly differed. Regime A includes flood events with the shortest duration (76 min), minimum flood crest (0.045 m s-1), least runoff depth (0.2 mm), and highest frequency. Regime B includes flood events with a medium duration (274 min), medium flood crest (0.206 m s-1), and minor runoff depth (0.7 mm). Regime C includes flood events with the longest duration (822 min), medium flood crest (0.236 m s-1), and medium runoff depth (1.7 mm). Regime D includes flood events with a medium duration (239 min), large flood crest (4.21 m s-1), and large runoff depth (10 mm). Regime E includes flood events with a medium duration (304 min), maximum flood crest (8.62 m s-1), and largest runoff depth (25.9 mm). The sediment yield by different flood regimes is ranked as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime B > Regime C > Regime A. In terms of event-based average and maximum suspended sediment concentration, these regimes are ordered as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime C > Regime B > Regime A. Regimes D and E

  7. Statistical Reference Datasets

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Statistical Reference Datasets (Web, free access)   The Statistical Reference Datasets is also supported by the Standard Reference Data Program. The purpose of this project is to improve the accuracy of statistical software by providing reference datasets with certified computational results that enable the objective evaluation of statistical software.

  8. Life history theory predicts fish assemblage response to hydrologic regimes.

    PubMed

    Mims, Meryl C; Olden, Julian D

    2012-01-01

    The hydrologic regime is regarded as the primary driver of freshwater ecosystems, structuring the physical habitat template, providing connectivity, framing biotic interactions, and ultimately selecting for specific life histories of aquatic organisms. In the present study, we tested ecological theory predicting directional relationships between major dimensions of the flow regime and life history composition of fish assemblages in perennial free-flowing rivers throughout the continental United States. Using long-term discharge records and fish trait and survey data for 109 stream locations, we found that 11 out of 18 relationships (61%) tested between the three life history strategies (opportunistic, periodic, and equilibrium) and six hydrologic metrics (two each describing flow variability, predictability, and seasonality) were statistically significant (P < or = 0.05) according to quantile regression. Our results largely support a priori hypotheses of relationships between specific flow indices and relative prevalence of fish life history strategies, with 82% of all significant relationships observed supporting predictions from life history theory. Specifically, we found that (1) opportunistic strategists were positively related to measures of flow variability and negatively related to predictability and seasonality, (2) periodic strategists were positively related to high flow seasonality and negatively related to variability, and (3) the equilibrium strategists were negatively related to flow variability and positively related to predictability. Our study provides important empirical evidence illustrating the value of using life history theory to understand both the patterns and processes by which fish assemblage structure is shaped by adaptation to natural regimes of variability, predictability, and seasonality of critical flow events over broad biogeographic scales.

  9. Investigating Satellite Microwave observations of Precipitation in Different Climate Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave satellite remote sensing of precipitation over land is a challenging problem due to the highly variable land surface emissivity, which, if not properly accounted for, can be much greater than the precipitation signal itself, especially in light rain/snow conditions. Additionally, surfaces such as arid land, deserts and snow cover have brightness temperature characteristics similar to precipitation Ongoing work by GPM microwave radiometer team is constructing databases through a variety of means, however, there is much uncertainty as to what is the optimal information needed for the wide array of sensors in the GPM constellation, including examination of regional conditions. The original data sets will focus on stratification by emissivity class, surface temperature and total perceptible water. We'll perform sensitivity studies to determine the potential role of ancillary data (e.g., land surface temperature, snow cover/water equivalent, etc.) to improve precipitation estimation over land in different climate regimes, including rain and snow. In other words, what information outside of the radiances can help describe the background and subsequent departures from it that are active precipitating regions? It is likely that this information will be a function of the various precipitation regimes. Statistical methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) will be utilized in this task. Databases from a variety of sources are being constructed. They include existing satellite microwave measurements of precipitating and non-precipitating conditions, ground radar precipitation rate estimates, surface emissivity climatology from satellites, surface temperature and TPW from NWP reanalysis. Results from the analysis of these databases with respect to the microwave precipitation sensitivity to the variety of environmental conditions in different climate regimes will be discussed.

  10. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics.

  11. Drag-force regimes in granular impact.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T R Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences.

  12. Cross-scale analysis of fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Falk; Carol Miller; Donald McKenzie; Anne E. Black

    2007-01-01

    Cross-scale spatial and temporal perspectives are important for studying contagious landscape disturbances such as fire, which are controlled by myriad processes operating at different scales. We examine fire regimes in forests of western North America, focusing on how observed patterns of fire frequency change across spatial scales. To quantify changes in fire...

  13. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics. PMID:27761005

  14. Ignitability of materials in transitional heating regimes

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2004-01-01

    Piloted ignition behavior of materials, particularly wood products, during transitions between heating regimes is measured and modeled in a cone calorimetry (ISO 5660) heating environment. These include (1) effect of material thickness, density, moisture content, and paint coating variations on thermal response characteristics, (2) effect of fire retardant treatment...

  15. Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Matthew L. Brooks

    2008-01-01

    The alteration of fire regimes is one of the most significant ways that plant invasions can affect ecosystems (Brooks and others 2004; D'Antonio 2000; D'Antonio and Vitousek 1992; Vitousek 1990). The suites of changes that can accompany an invasion include both direct effects of invaders on native plants through competitive interference, and indirect effects...

  16. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  17. A Global Classification of Contemporary Fire Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S. P.; Kumar, J.; Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fire regimes provide a sensitive indicator of changes in climate and human use as the concept includes fire extent, season, frequency, and intensity. Fires that occur outside the distribution of one or more aspects of a fire regime may affect ecosystem resilience. However, global scale data related to these varied aspects of fire regimes are highly inconsistent due to incomplete or inconsistent reporting. In this study, we derive a globally applicable approach to characterizing similar fire regimes using long geophysical time series, namely MODIS hotspots since 2000. K-means non-hierarchical clustering was used to generate empirically based groups that minimized within-cluster variability. Satellite-based fire detections are known to have shortcomings, including under-detection from obscuring smoke, clouds or dense canopy cover and rapid spread rates, as often occurs with flashy fuels or during extreme weather. Such regions are free from preconceptions, and the empirical, data-mining approach used on this relatively uniform data source allows the region structures to emerge from the data themselves. Comparing such an empirical classification to expectations from climate, phenology, land use or development-based models can help us interpret the similarities and differences among places and how they provide different indicators of changes of concern. Classifications can help identify where large infrequent mega-fires are likely to occur ahead of time such as in the boreal forest and portions of the Interior US West, and where fire reports are incomplete such as in less industrial countries.

  18. Climatic regimes of tropical convection and rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bin )

    1994-07-01

    Annual distribution and phase propagation of tropical convection are delineated using harmonic and amplitude-phase characteristics analysis of climatological pentad mean outgoing longwave radiation and monthly frequencies of highly reflective cloud. An annual eastward propagation of peak rainy season along the equator from the central Indian Ocean (60[degrees]E) to Arafura Sea (130[degrees]E) is revealed. This indicates a transition from the withdrawal of the Indian summer monsoon to the onset of the Australian summer monsoon. Significant bimodal variations are found around major summer monsoon regions. These variations originate from the interference of two adjacent regimes. The convergence zones over the eastern North Pacific, the South Pacific, and the southwest Indian Ocean are identified as a marine monsoon regime that is characterized by a unimodal variation with a concentrated summer rainfall associated with the development of surface westerlies equatorward of a monsoon trough. Conversely, the central North Pacific and North Atlantic convergence zones between persistent northeast and southeast trades are classified as trade-wind convergence zones; which differ from the marine monsoon regime by their persistent rainy season and characteristic bimodal variation with peak rainy seasons occurring in late spring and fall. The roles of the annual march of sea surface temperature in the phase propagation and formation of various climatic regimes of tropical convection are also discussed. 34 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-25

    1984 OPCW U.N. Conference on Disarmament EAA, 1979 AECA, 1976 Biological Weapons Anti- Terrorism Act Chem- Bio Weapons Control Warfare...Deauville, France. They reaffirmed the goals set out at the 2010 Summit for future Global Partnership activities: nuclear and radiological security, bio ... herbicides and riot control agents. Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status Congressional Research Service 44 Author Contact

  20. Knowledge Regimes and Contradictions in Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Petter; Prøitz, Tine Sophie; Sandberg, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The article outlines a theoretical framework for understanding education policy and education reforms based on the concept of knowledge regimes. The concept refers to understandings and definitions of governance and procedural aspects, manners of governing and curriculum issues, thus it comprises contents, structures, and processes of education…

  1. Two-phase Flow Regime Identification Combining Conductivity Probe Signals and Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Leonor; Juliá, José Enrique; Chiva, Sergio; Paranjape, Sidharth; Ishii, Mamoru

    2007-06-01

    Important aspects of the hydrodynamics and thus, the correct identification of the flow regime could enhance safety and overall performance in multiphase flow systems. Several works on flow regime identification have been carried out in the past. Most of them consist, in a first stage, on measuring certain flow parameters that can be used as good flow regime indicators and, then, developing a flow regime map using these indicators. In this work, a vertical two-phase flow loop facility was used, whereby local conductivity signals were recorded and utilized for the development of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based method for the flow regime classification. The experimental database consists of a total number of 125 test cases covering a wide range of situations in the loop working area. Each experiment flow regime was identified by visual inspection, and classified into bubbly (B), cap-bubbly (CB), slug (S), churn turbulent (CT) or annular (A). The bubble chord length cumulative probability function (CPDF), calculated from the measured conductivity signals was selected as flow regime indicator. Different ANN configurations were designed, trained and optimized. The ANN types and the statistical parameters of the CPFD used as inputs were two of the four parameters varied in the ANN optimization process. The temporal length in the conductivity signal used to calculate the CPDF, was also modified during this study. The range of variation of the temporal signal was from 1 to 60 seconds. Together with this temporal variation, the number of training patterns (increasing with decreasing CPDF processing times or not) was also modified. The modification of all these variables allowed the identification of the ANN configuration that better fit the requirements of the specific study of flow regime classification.

  2. Impacts of different hydrodynamic regimes on flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro; Amoudry, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    A number of activities carried out in coastal zones and estuaries are affected by sediment transport. Therefore, good knowledge of the processes involved is necessary to adequately manage these areas. Flocculation is a key process on fine sediment dynamics, which affects the effective particle size and settling velocity. The process is further complicated under the combined effect of currents and waves. This research seeks to improve our understanding of the flocculation process under the combined effect of currents and waves. The study site is the Dee Estuary located in Liverpool Bay, United Kingdom. Measurements of volume concentration, grain size and current velocities near the sea bed were obtained from a mooring deployed between 12 February 2008 and 9 March 2008. Turbulent properties could also be calculated because of the fast sampling rate used for current velocities. Water samples were taken from a research vessel during the first two days of the study in order to calibrate moored instruments and convert volume to mass concentration. The observations almost covered two fortnightly periods and three different dynamic regimes can be distinguished: currents-only, combined waves and currents, and wave dominated. During the currents-only regime, floc aggregation and breakup coincide with periods of low and high turbulent stress respectively. The combination of waves and spring tide currents makes the second regime and the floc breakup is most dominant when waves are higher than one meter and small flocs are found even with low turbulent stress from both waves and currents. The third regime is identified as wave-dominant during neap tides with current speed less than 0.25 m/s and waves of 1-2 meters height. In this regime the wave effect takes large sediment into suspension at the same time as small particle sizes from floc breakup. In this case the median particle size is strongly related to the wave height which means that a slight particle aggregation is still

  3. Three Distinct Exoplanet Regimes Inferred From Host Star Metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2014-06-01

    The occurrence rate of exoplanets smaller than 4 Earth radii (RE) in short orbits is ~50%. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of planets populating this regime are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests the existence of a compositional range, from small high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick H/He gas envelopes. Understanding the transition from the gaseous planets to Earth-like rocky worlds is important to estimate the number of potentially habitable planets in our Galaxy and provide constraints on planet formation theories. Here, we report the abundances of heavy elements (metallicities) of over 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates discovered by the Kepler Mission and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct 4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (RP < 1.7 RE), gas-dwarf planets with rocky cores and H/He envelopes (1.7 < RP < 3.9 RE) and ice/gas-giant planets (RP > 3.9 RE). These transitions resonate well with those inferred from dynamical mass estimates, implying that host-star metallicity - a proxy for the initial solid inventory of the protoplanetary disk - is a key ingredient regulating the structure of planetary systems.

  4. Satellite laser ranging in the near-infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckl, Johann J.; Schreiber, K. Ulrich; Schüler, Torben

    2017-05-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging Systems typically operate on the second harmonic wavelength of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm. The absence of sufficiently sensitive photo-detectors with a reasonably large active area made it beneficial to trade the conversion loss of frequency doubling against the higher quantum efficiency of the detectors. Solid state silicon detectors in the near infra-red regime at λ = 1.064 µm also suffered from high thermal noise and slow signal rise times, which increased the scatter of the measurements by more than a factor of 3 over the operation at λ = 532 nm. With the availability of InGaAs/InP compound - Single Photon Avalanche Diodes the situation has changed considerably. Their quantum efficiency has reached 70% and the compound material of these diodes provides a response bandwidth, which is commensurate with high high speed detectors in the regime of 532 nm. We have investigated the properties of such a diode type Princeton Lightwave PGA-200-1064 for its suitability for SLR at the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength with respect to the quantum efficiency and their timing properties. The results are presented in this paper. Furthermore, we provide remarks to on the performance of the diode compared to state of the art detectors, that operate at the Nd:YAG second harmonic wavelength. Finally, we give an estimate of the photoelectron statistics in satellite laser ranging for different operational parameters of the Wettzell Laser Ranging System.

  5. Regime Dependant Microphysical Variability in Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, B.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lang, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Of utmost importance for global precipitation estimates from satellites such as TRMM and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is to understand processes that lead to variability in precipitation on sub-seasonal, seasonal, and climatological scales. Many studies have linked differences in rainfall characteristics such as mean diameter (D0) to sub-seasonal regime variability forced by large scale wind shifts, topography, and continental and maritime convection, across various regions of the globe. Several analyses have tied differences between regimes to differing microphysical processes that drive changes in the drop-size distributions occurring in convective rainfall. For example, decreased ice mass aloft and smaller mean diameters are indicative of warm rain processes, while vigorous ice formation leads to large, melting ice to create large drops. If the microphysical variability in different regimes is characterized and understood, the results could be used to improve satellite precipitation algorithms. The polarimetric, Doppler C-band radar, CPOL, located near Darwin, Australia provides a unique platform to study differences in microphysics between land and ocean, as well as variability between monsoon and break periods. The focus of this study is to examine the microphysical processes occurring in four distinct regimes around Darwin (monsoon-land, monsoon-ocean, break-land, break-ocean), using polarimetric data from CPOL. Analyses such as contoured frequency by altitude (CFADs) diagrams, cumulative distribution functions, and mean profiles of precipitation water mass, precipitation ice mass, reflectivity, differential reflectivity and specific differential phase will aide in understanding the physics of precipitation in these regimes. The formation of precipitation ice aloft, warm rain processes, and the contributions of warm rain and cold cloud processes including melting of ice into large drops, will be linked to differences in D0, rain

  6. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  7. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers.

  8. Estimation of metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers under different feeding regimes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, S V; Pandey, Priyanka; Kumar, Narendra; Hooda, O K

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was designed to estimate the metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries (Holstein-Friesian X Tharparkar) heifers under two different feeding regimes, i.e., feeding regime-1 as per the National Research Council (NRC) (2001) and feeding regime-2 having 15% higher energy (supplementation of molasses) than NRC (2001). Six (n = 6) healthy heifers of Sahiwal and Karan Fries with 18-24 months of age were selected from Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. An initial 15 days was maintained under feeding regime-1 and feeding regime-2 as adaptation period; actual experiment was conducted from 16(th) day onward for next 15 days. At the end of feeding regimes (on day 15(th) and 16(th)), expired air and volume were collected in Douglas bag for two consecutive days (morning [6:00 am] and evening [4:00 pm]). The fraction of methane and expired air volume were measured by methane analyzer and wet test meter, respectively. The oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured by iWorx LabScribe2. The heat production (kcal/day) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 as compared to feeding regimen-1 in both breeds. The heat production per unit metabolic body weight was numerically higher in feeding regime-1 than feeding regime-2; however, the values were found statistically non-significant (p>0.05). The energy loss as methane (%) from total heat production was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-1. The body weight (kg), metabolic body weight (W(0.75)), and basal metabolic rate (kcal/kg(0.75)) were significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 in both breeds. This study indicates that higher energy diet by supplementing molasses may reduce energy loss as methane and enhance the growth of Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers.

  9. Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal ... Sources Diagnosis Treatment Statistics Healthcare Professionals More Resources Candida auris General Information about Candida auris Tracking Candida ...

  10. Experiment in Elementary Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, P. C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory exercise in elementary statistics in which students verify empirically the various aspects of the Gaussian distribution. Sampling techniques and other commonly used statistical procedures are introduced. (CP)

  11. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  12. Mathematical and statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, A. Glen

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the mathematical and statistical analysis component of RICIS is to research, develop, and evaluate mathematical and statistical techniques for aerospace technology applications. Specific research areas of interest include modeling, simulation, experiment design, reliability assessment, and numerical analysis.

  13. Blood Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Learn About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  14. Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperature in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping stream thermal regimes, establishing reference conditions, predicting future impacts and identifying critical thermal refugia. Spatial statistical models have been developed to improve regression modeling techn...

  15. Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperature in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping stream thermal regimes, establishing reference conditions, predicting future impacts and identifying critical thermal refugia. Spatial statistical models have been developed to improve regression modeling techn...

  16. What can we learn from noise? - Mesoscopic nonequilibrium statistical physics.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic systems - small electric circuits working in quantum regime - offer us a unique experimental stage to explorer quantum transport in a tunable and precise way. The purpose of this Review is to show how they can contribute to statistical physics. We introduce the significance of fluctuation, or equivalently noise, as noise measurement enables us to address the fundamental aspects of a physical system. The significance of the fluctuation theorem (FT) in statistical physics is noted. We explain what information can be deduced from the current noise measurement in mesoscopic systems. As an important application of the noise measurement to statistical physics, we describe our experimental work on the current and current noise in an electron interferometer, which is the first experimental test of FT in quantum regime. Our attempt will shed new light in the research field of mesoscopic quantum statistical physics.

  17. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  18. Photoelectron circular dichroism in different ionization regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenhaupt, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) describes an asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) from photoionization of randomly oriented enantiomers with circularly polarized light. Beaulieu et al present a comprehensive set of measured PADs from multiphoton ionization of limonene and fenchone in different ionization regimes (multiphoton and tunneling) and analyze the resulting PECD (Beaulieu et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 102002). From their observations the authors conclude that the PECD is universal in the sense that the molecular chirality is encoded in the PAD independent of the ionization regime. The analysis is supplemented by a classical model based on electron scattering in a chiral potential. The paper presents beautiful data and is an important step towards a more complete physical picture of PECD. The results and their interpretation stimulate the ongoing vivid debate on the role of resonances in multiphoton PECD.

  19. Steady and transient regimes in hydropower plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajic, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydropower plant that has been in operation for about 30 years has to be reconstructed. They have already installed 12 Kaplan turbines, the largest in the world at that time. The existing CAM relationship was determined based on hydraulic model tests and checked by efficiency on-site tests. It was also tested based on turbine bearing vibrations. In order to discover vibrations and long cracks on stay vanes detailed on-site measurements were performed. Influence of the modification of the trailing edges on the dynamic stresses of the stay vanes is also shown. In order to improve power output transient regimes were analyzed, both experimentally and numerically. Reversible hydropower plant, a pioneer in Europe since it was the first Pump storage power plant constructed with the highest head pump-turbines in the world. Analyses of transient regimes discover some problems with S-shaped characteristics coupled with non-symmetrical penstock.

  20. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  1. Flamelet Regime Diagram for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Lee; Ihme, Matthias; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    The flamelet model has been widely used in numerical combustion investigations, particularly for the closure of large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. In most cases, the simulation results demonstrated good agreements with their experimental counterparts. However, a systematic analysis of the flamelet model's applicability, as well as its potential limitations, is seldom conducted, and the model performance is usually based only on a-posteriori comparisons. The objective of this work is to derive a metric that can formally quantify the suitability of the flamelet model in different flame configurations. For this purpose, a flamelet regime diagram has been developed and studied in the context of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent lifted jet flame. The implementation of the regime diagram in LES has been investigated through explicit filtering of the DNS results.

  2. Teaching Statistics Using SAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Garrett K.

    The Statistical Analysis System (SAS) is presented as the single most appropriate statistical package to use as an aid in teaching statistics. A brief review of literature in which SAS is compared to SPSS, BMDP, and other packages is followed by six examples which demonstrate features unique to SAS which have pedagogical utility. Of particular…

  3. Ethics in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenard, Christopher; McCarthy, Sally; Mills, Terence

    2014-01-01

    There are many different aspects of statistics. Statistics involves mathematics, computing, and applications to almost every field of endeavour. Each aspect provides an opportunity to spark someone's interest in the subject. In this paper we discuss some ethical aspects of statistics, and describe how an introduction to ethics has been…

  4. Statistical quality management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, Paul

    1992-10-01

    Some aspects of statistical quality management are discussed. Quality has to be defined as a concrete, measurable quantity. The concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM), Statistical Process Control (SPC), and inspection are explained. In most cases SPC is better than inspection. It can be concluded that statistics has great possibilities in the field of TQM.

  5. Minnesota Health Statistics 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    This document comprises the 1988 annual statistical report of the Minnesota Center for Health Statistics. After introductory technical notes on changes in format, sources of data, and geographic allocation of vital events, an overview is provided of vital health statistics in all areas. Thereafter, separate sections of the report provide tables…

  6. The nuclear non-proliferation treaty regime

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) regime, including national safeguards agreements and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Statute, embodies the international effort to ban illicit transfers of nuclear material and acquisition or transfer of nuclear weaponry. Included are objectives and primary obligations, legal bases, institutional oversight, trade restrictions, protection of information, penal consequences, and role of the United Nations. Regional agreements supplement the NPT.

  7. Maxwellian distribution in non-classical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; L. Helvey, Shannon; McCumber, Jeremy

    2002-12-01

    A molecular dynamics investigation shows that the assumption of molecular chaos remains valid in the non-classical regime. Consequently, the velocity distribution function of an extremely dense system of spinless particles relaxes into Maxwellian, even in the presence of arbitrary interactions between the particles of the system. Systems with densities exceeding 30 times solid densities are investigated using a soft Lennard-Jones interparticle potential energy function.

  8. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  9. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  10. Electron dynamics in an elliptical bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Atefeh; Sedaghatizadeh, Mahmoud; Kordbacheh, Amir Hossein Ahmadkhan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of the electron in an elliptical bubble regime is investigated. In this regime, a high intensity laser pulse in a plasma creates an electron cavity called the blow-out (bubble or cavitation) regime which is usually considered to be in a spherical shape at rest. Through balancing the ponderomotive potential of a non-plane laser pulse and bubble electrostatic potential, the shape of the bubble is analyzed to be elliptical in contrast to most available theories which indicate the spherical bubble. Thus, the present model introduces a different dynamics for the electron compared with the spherical one. The longitudinal electric field experienced by the electron and also the electron energy gain in the elliptical model is investigated to be more than that in the spherical model. Moreover, it is found that the shape of the bubble will influence the electron trapping range so that the electron is bounded more in the spherical bubble. As a result, it is crucially important to take the shape of the bubble influence on the electron acceleration process into account. The results indicate that the distribution of the electromagnetic fields inside the bubble in the ellipse model is more close to particle-in-cell simulation compared to the spherical one [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(11), 5256 (2004)].

  11. Dynamical Response of Continuum Regime Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, H. L.

    2009-11-01

    Probe dynamic response is sometimes used as a way to increase the amount of information obtained from Langmuir probes [1]. In this poster, the effects of frequency dependent probe capacitance and coupling of probe fields to damped Langmuir waves and damped ion acoustic waves are considered. In the continuum regime, with small Debye length to spherical probe radius ratio, the probe DC current vs. voltage characteristic displays a hard saturation at sufficiently large probe potential [2]. In this regime, the sheath thickness varies little with the applied voltage although the plasma response can still be measured. A goal of the present investigation is to show that the probe dynamical response is richer as a result of modulation of sheath thickness or shielding particularly in the larger Debye length to probe radius ratio regime. Inertia inhibits ion response at sufficiently high frequency and deviation from the DC characteristic is shown.[4pt] [1] D. N. Walker, R.F. Fernsler, D.D. Blackwell, and W.E. Amatucci, Phys. Plasmas 15, 123506 (2008).[0pt] [2] E. Baum and R.L. Chapkis, AIAA J. 8, 1073 (1970).

  12. Identifying Meteorological Regimes Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, N. D.; Norris, J. R.; Weaver, C. P.; Klein, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    We use a k-means clustering algorithm to group meteorological regimes with similar cloud properties retrieved from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES8). We attempt to link each cluster, dictated by cloud properties, to a dynamic regime associated with cool season extratropical cyclones. Meteorological data is then averaged over the times associated with each cloud cluster to ensure that the cloud regimes are physically consistent. The analysis is restricted to a single Global Climate Model-sized box over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program during the months of Jan-Mar, Nov-Dec of 2000. The ARM Continuous Forcing (ACF) Data Set is used to describe the meteorology of the single column over the ARM SGP site for each cluster and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) 40-km, isobaric Numerical Weather Prediction Analysis provides a representative picture of the mesoscale meteorology. We compare simulated cloudiness from a Single-Column Model (SCM) forced by ACF data to determine the sources for GCM parameterization deficiencies in predicting specific cloud types.

  13. Particle optics in the Rayleigh regime.

    PubMed

    Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick

    2009-09-01

    Light scattering and absorption by particles suspended in the atmosphere modifies the transfer of solar energy in the atmosphere, thereby influencing global and regional climate change and atmospheric visibility. Of particular interest are the optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime, where particles are small compared with the wavelength of the scattered or absorbed light, because these particles experience little gravitational settlement and may have long atmospheric lifetimes. Optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime are commonly derived from electromagnetic theory using Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. The size dependence of particle scattering and absorption are derived here from the most basic principles for coherent processes such as Rayleigh scattering (i.e., add amplitudes if in phase) and incoherent processes such as absorption (i.e., add cross sections), at the same time yielding understanding of the upper particle size limit for the Rayleigh regime. The wavelength dependence of Rayleigh scattering and absorption are also obtained by adding a basic scale invariance for particle optics. Simple consequences for particle single-scattering albedo ("whiteness") and the optical measurement of particle mass densities are explained. These alternative derivations complement the conventional understanding obtained from electromagnetic theory.

  14. Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Matthew W.; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    This monograph is the first to survey progress in realistic simulation in a strongly eddying regime made possible by recent increases in computational capability. Its contributors comprise the leading researchers in this important and constantly evolving field. Divided into three parts, • Oceanographic Processes and Regimes: Fundamental Questions • Ocean Dynamics and State: From Regional to Global Scale, and • Modeling at the Mesoscale: State of the Art and Future Directions the volume details important advances in physical oceanography based on eddy resolving ocean modeling. It captures the state of the art and discusses issues that ocean modelers must consider in order to effectively contribute to advancing current knowledge, from subtleties of the underlying fluid dynamical equations to meaningful comparison with oceanographic observations and leading-edge model development. It summarizes many of the important results which have emerged from ocean modeling in an eddying regime, for those interested broadly in the physical science. More technical topics are intended to address the concerns of those actively working in the field.

  15. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  16. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  17. Utilizing Surface Sensors to Identify Wake Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengying; Hemati, Maziar S.

    2016-11-01

    Marine swimmers often exploit external flow structures to reduce locomotive effort. To achieve this advantage, these swimmers utilize mechanosensory organs on the surface of their bodies to detect hydrodynamic signals from the surrounding fluid, which can then be used to inform the control task. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing similar flow sensing systems to achieve enhanced propulsive efficiency and maneuverability in human-engineered underwater vehicles. In particular, much attention has been given to the problem of wake sensing; however, these investigations have concentrated on a restricted class of wakes-i.e., Kármán-type vortex streets-whereas more complicated wake structures can arise in practice. In this talk, we will explore the possibility of identifying wake regimes through the use of surface sensors. Potential flow theory is adopted to simulate the interactions of various wakes with a fish-like body. Wakes in different dynamical regimes impart distinct hydrodynamic signatures on the body, which permits these regimes to be distinguished from one another in an automated fashion. Our results can provide guidance for improving flow sensing capabilities in human-engineered systems and hint at how marine swimmers may sense their hydrodynamic surroundings.

  18. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  19. Artificial intelligence and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book explores the possible applications of artificial intelligence in statistics and conversely, statistics in artificial intelligence. It is a collection of seventeen papers written by leaders in the field. Most of the papers were prepared for the Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics held in April 1985 and sponsored by ATandT Bell Laboratories. The book is divided into six parts: uncertainly propagation, clustering and learning, expert systems, environments for supporting statistical strategy, knowledge acquisition, and strategy. The editor ties the collection together in the first chapter by providing an overview of AI and statistics, discussing the Workshop, and exploring future research in the field.

  20. Statistical Methods for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, G. Jogesh

    Statistical methodology, with deep roots in probability theory, providesquantitative procedures for extracting scientific knowledge from astronomical dataand for testing astrophysical theory. In recent decades, statistics has enormouslyincreased in scope and sophistication. After a historical perspective, this reviewoutlines concepts of mathematical statistics, elements of probability theory,hypothesis tests, and point estimation. Least squares, maximum likelihood, andBayesian approaches to statistical inference are outlined. Resampling methods,particularly the bootstrap, provide valuable procedures when distributionsfunctions of statistics are not known. Several approaches to model selection andgoodness of fit are considered.

  1. How Fire History, Fire Suppression Practices and Climate Change Affect Wildfire Regimes in Mediterranean Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Brotons, Lluís; Aquilué, Núria; de Cáceres, Miquel; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Fall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Available data show that future changes in global change drivers may lead to an increasing impact of fires on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Yet, fire regime changes in highly humanised fire-prone regions are difficult to predict because fire effects may be heavily mediated by human activities We investigated the role of fire suppression strategies in synergy with climate change on the resulting fire regimes in Catalonia (north-eastern Spain). We used a spatially-explicit fire-succession model at the landscape level to test whether the use of different firefighting opportunities related to observed reductions in fire spread rates and effective fire sizes, and hence changes in the fire regime. We calibrated this model with data from a period with weak firefighting and later assess the potential for suppression strategies to modify fire regimes expected under different levels of climate change. When comparing simulations with observed fire statistics from an eleven-year period with firefighting strategies in place, our results showed that, at least in two of the three sub-regions analysed, the observed fire regime could not be reproduced unless taking into account the effects of fire suppression. Fire regime descriptors were highly dependent on climate change scenarios, with a general trend, under baseline scenarios without fire suppression, to large-scale increases in area burnt. Fire suppression strategies had a strong capacity to compensate for climate change effects. However, strong active fire suppression was necessary to accomplish such compensation, while more opportunistic fire suppression strategies derived from recent fire history only had a variable, but generally weak, potential for compensation of enhanced fire impacts under climate change. The concept of fire regime in the Mediterranean is probably better interpreted as a highly dynamic process in which the main determinants of fire are rapidly modified by changes in landscape, climate and

  2. How fire history, fire suppression practices and climate change affect wildfire regimes in Mediterranean landscapes.

    PubMed

    Brotons, Lluís; Aquilué, Núria; de Cáceres, Miquel; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Fall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Available data show that future changes in global change drivers may lead to an increasing impact of fires on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Yet, fire regime changes in highly humanised fire-prone regions are difficult to predict because fire effects may be heavily mediated by human activities We investigated the role of fire suppression strategies in synergy with climate change on the resulting fire regimes in Catalonia (north-eastern Spain). We used a spatially-explicit fire-succession model at the landscape level to test whether the use of different firefighting opportunities related to observed reductions in fire spread rates and effective fire sizes, and hence changes in the fire regime. We calibrated this model with data from a period with weak firefighting and later assess the potential for suppression strategies to modify fire regimes expected under different levels of climate change. When comparing simulations with observed fire statistics from an eleven-year period with firefighting strategies in place, our results showed that, at least in two of the three sub-regions analysed, the observed fire regime could not be reproduced unless taking into account the effects of fire suppression. Fire regime descriptors were highly dependent on climate change scenarios, with a general trend, under baseline scenarios without fire suppression, to large-scale increases in area burnt. Fire suppression strategies had a strong capacity to compensate for climate change effects. However, strong active fire suppression was necessary to accomplish such compensation, while more opportunistic fire suppression strategies derived from recent fire history only had a variable, but generally weak, potential for compensation of enhanced fire impacts under climate change. The concept of fire regime in the Mediterranean is probably better interpreted as a highly dynamic process in which the main determinants of fire are rapidly modified by changes in landscape, climate and

  3. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-12-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H2-air flames with an equivalence ratio ϕ =0.7 . It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P ,Q , and R ) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  4. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  5. Statistical Simulation of the Magnetorotational Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jonathan; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2015-02-01

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  6. FISHER INFORMATION OF DYNAMIC REGIME TRANSITIONS IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between multiple dynamic regimes (or steady states). As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or ?flip? into the neighborhood ...

  7. FISHER INFORMATION OF DYNAMIC REGIME TRANSITIONS IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between multiple dynamic regimes (or steady states). As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or ?flip? into the neighborhood ...

  8. Toward a dynamical understanding of planetary-scale flow regimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Molteni, F.

    1993-06-01

    A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting flow regimes that is firmly rooted in dynamical theory is presented and applied to the study of observed and modeled planetary-scale regimes of the wintertime circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. THE DYNAMIC REGIME CONCEPT FOR ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT AND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic regimes of ecosystems are multidimensional basis of attraction, characterized by particular species communities and ecosystems processes. Ecosystem patterns and processes rarely respond linerarly to disturbances, and the nonlinear cynamic regime concept offers a more real...

  10. Medical Library Statistics *

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Elizabeth L.

    1965-01-01

    Four compilations of medical library statistics have been published to date, namely those by Louise Darling in 1956, by the Medical Library Association in its 1959 Directory, by Harold Bloomquist in 1962, and by the author in 1964. In addition to these sources and to the annual statistics compiled by the Library Services Branch of the U. S. Office of Education, surveys of pharmacy, hospital, and medical society libraries have been completed recently. Standards for medical and special libraries are being considered by the Medical Library Association through its Guidelines Survey and by the Special Libraries Association through its Statistics Coordinating Project and its Standards Survey. To coordinate the collection of medical library statistics and to make the information readily available to the profession, it is suggested that the Medical Library Association support the collection and publication of statistics of representative medical libraries until such time as the Library Services Branch is able to implement fully its program of library statistics. PMID:14271113

  11. Potential vorticity regimes over East Asia during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenyu; Chen, Ruyan; Wang, Bin; Wright, Jonathon S.; Yang, Zifan; Ma, Wenqian

    2017-02-01

    Nine potential vorticity (PV) regimes over East Asia are identified by applying a Self-Organizing Map and Hierarchical Ascendant Classification regime analysis to the daily PV reanalysis fields on the 300 K isentropic surface for December-March 1948-2014. According to the surface temperature anomalies over East Asia, these nine regimes are further classified into three classes, i.e., cold class (three regimes), warm class (four regimes), and neutral class (two regimes). The PV-based East Asian winter monsoon index (EAWMI) is used to study the relationship between PV distributions and the temperature anomalies. The magnitude of cold (warm) anomalies over the land areas of East Asia increases (decreases) quasi-linearly with the EAWMI. Regression analysis reveals that cold temperature anomalies preferentially occur when the EAWMI exceeds a threshold at ˜0.2 PVU (where 1 PVU ≡ 10-6 m2 K kg-1 s-1). PV inversion uncovers the mechanisms behind the relationships between the PV regimes and surface temperature anomalies and reveals that cold (warm) PV regimes are associated with significant warming (cooling) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. On average, cold regimes have longer durations than warm regimes. Interclass transition probabilities are much higher for paths from warm/neutral regimes to cold regimes than for paths from cold regimes to warm/neutral regimes. Besides, intraclass transitions are rare within the warm or neutral regimes. The PV regime analysis provides insight into the causes of severe cold spells over East Asia, with blocking circulation patterns identified as the primary factor in initiating and maintaining these cold spells.

  12. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  13. River Flow Regimes and Effective Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, S.; Sprocati, R.; Frascati, A.; Marani, M.; Schirmer, M.; Botter, G.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of effective discharge is widespread in geomorphology and river engineering and restoration. For example, it is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Accordingly, the effective discharge has been the focus of countless empirical, theoretical and numerical studies, which found it to vary among catchments as a function of climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and of streamflow variability. The heterogeneity of the effective discharge values observed in different catchments challenges a thorough understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different geographic areas is still lacking. In the present work, the observed diversity is explained in terms of the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes, by linking effective discharge to attributes of the sediment rating curve and to streamflow variability, as resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. An analytic expression of the effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is provided, which captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States. The framework disentangles hydrologic and landscape controls on effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. Clusters of river catchments characterized by similar streamflow dynamics can be identified. The framework provides an opportunity for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different areas, based on the type of flow regime.

  14. Laboratory Exploration of Multiple Zonal Jet Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. A.; Speer, K. G.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus has classically been used to study wave interactions within a single, baroclinic jet. At high rotation rates, the baroclinic instability of the flow leads to a transition to a turbulent, eddy-dominated regime. In the presence of a topographic beta effect, the flow has been observed to produce multiple, meandering zonal jets that are qualitatively similar to those found in planetary atmospheres and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Our study builds on previous annulus experiments [1] by making observations further within this new regime. We observe with PIV and other techniques how the structure of the flow responds to changes in various parameters such as tank geometry, gradient in the Coriolis parameter, rotation rate, and differential thermal forcing. By not employing the more typical direct forcing of small scales, but by applying a large scale forcing over the annulus gap width, this study allows the varying effects of eddy scale selection, enstrophy cascade, etc. to naturally generate flow that more closely resembles planetary atmospheres and the ACC. We seek nondimensional parameters that significantly control zonation in a real fluid. These observations will provide a metric for the comparison of various theoretical models for multiple zonal jet formation. Other properties of the jets, such as their migration, meandering, bifurcation, and merging, can also be observed in an idealized situation and compared to numerical simulations. Ultimately, this will aid the testing and development of sub-grid-scale parameterizations for the multiple zonal jet regime that remain robust in the face of multiple forcing parameters. [1] Wordsworth, R. D., Read, P. L., & Yamazaki, Y. H. (2008). Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment Physics of Fluids, 20(12), 126602.Streak photograph of suspended particles visualizing the flow representative of multiple zonal jets

  15. Economic Performance and North Korean Regime Legitimacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    hope is lost . The caveat with this claim, however, is that while breaking the cycle is not impossible, it is also not easy. Political economists...clear that the move was political in nature and a way to regain strict control over society the regime had lost in the turmoil of the famine and...borders to trade would benefit the economy, but it would also make it near impossible to continue the façade that North Korea is the socialist paradise

  16. Imperfect relativistic mirrors in the quantum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2014-05-15

    The collective backscattering of intense laser radiation by energetic electron beams is considered in the relativistic quantum regime. Exact solutions for the radiation field are obtained, for arbitrary electron pulse shapes and laser intensities. The electron beams act as imperfect nonlinear mirrors on the incident laser radiation. This collective backscattering process can lead to the development of new sources of ultra-short pulse radiation in the gamma-ray domain. Numerical examples show that, for plausible experimental conditions, intense pulses of gamma-rays, due to the double Doppler shift of the harmonics of the incident laser radiation, can be produced using the available technology, with durations less than 1 as.

  17. Efficiency of Rectification: Reversible vs. Irreversible Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2002-11-01

    Both man-made locomotive devices and molecular motors use gears to transform a reciprocating motion into a directed one. One of the most common gears is a rectifier, a mechanically irreversible appliance. The maximal energetic efficiency of an isothermic gear is bounded by unity, as a consequence of the Second Law. However, approaching this ideal efficiency does not imply approaching reversibility. We discuss what properties of a rectifier mostly influence the transduction efficiency and show that an appliance which locks under backward force is just the one which can approach the ideal efficiency either in the reversible or in the irreversible regime.

  18. Ignition regimes in rapid compression machines

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Kevin p; Goldsborough, S. Scott; ihme, matthias

    2015-08-01

    A rapid compression machine is an experimental apparatus used to study ignition chemistry at conditions that are relevant to internal combustion engines and gas turbines. However, due to the operating characteristics of these devices, heat transfer effects and inhomogeneous ignition events can be encountered. Hence, this paper develops a combustion regime diagram, which incorporates these effects in order to better understand physical in uences on the measurements. This diagram employs familiar Damkohler number and Reynolds number scaling, and seeks to provide an operational guide for rapid compression machine experiments. This diagram is compared to experimental data and good agreement is found.

  19. Ultracold Molecules: Physics in the Quantum Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John

    2014-11-17

    Our research encompasses approaches to the trapping of diatomic molecules at low temperature plus the cooling and detection of polyatomic molecules in the kelvin temperature regime. We have cooled and trapped CaF and/or CaH molecules, loaded directly from a molecular beam. As part of this work, we are continuing to develop an important trapping technique, optical loading from a buffer-gas beam. This method was invented in our lab. We are also studying cold polyatomic molecules and their interactions with cold atoms.

  20. Intensive intravenous regime for acute severe colitis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Philip, Matthew; Bhatia, Shobna

    2014-08-01

    Acute severe exacerbation of ulcerative colitis is a potentially life threatening medical emergency. The management of acute severe ulcerative colitis depends on early recognition and prompt initiation of intensive intravenous treatment along with continuous objective monitoring for possible medical failure. The intensive regime is the accepted standard of care. This includes primarily a) intravenous corticosteroids, b) intravenous supportive management, and d) intravenous antibiotics in instances. This review discusses the timing, duration and dosage of the intensive intravenous treatment including the evidence based protocol for effective monitoring to enable timely escalation to second line therapy & colectomy.

  1. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  2. Global oscillation regime change by gated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Romeo, August; Supèr, Hans

    2016-10-01

    The role of sensory inputs in the modelling of synchrony regimes is exhibited by means of networks of spiking cells where the relative strength of the inhibitory interaction is controlled by the activation of a linear unit working as a gating variable. Adaptation to stimulus size is determined by the value of a changing length scale, modelled by the time-varying radius of a circular receptive field. In this set-up, 'consolidation' time intervals relevant to attentional effects are shown to depend on the dynamics governing the evolution of the introduced length scale.

  3. Minnesota forest statistics, 1977.

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes

    1980-01-01

    Presents highlights and statistics from the Fourth Minnesota Forest Inventory. Includes detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, net annual growth, timber removals, mortality, and timber products output.

  4. Statistical distribution sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Determining the distribution of statistics by sampling was investigated. Characteristic functions, the quadratic regression problem, and the differential equations for the characteristic functions are analyzed.

  5. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  6. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United Kingdom...

  7. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement among the United States, the United Kingdom, the...

  8. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United Kingdom...

  9. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  10. Landscape-scale forest disturbance regimes in southern Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Doreen S; Hill, Ross A; Hopkinson, Chris; Baker, Timothy R

    2013-10-01

    Landscape-scale gap-size frequency distributions in tropical forests are a poorly studied but key ecological variable. Currently, a scale gap currently exists between local-scale field-based studies and those employing regional-scale medium-resolution satellite data. Data at landscape scales but of fine resolution would, however, facilitate investigation into a range of ecological questions relating to gap dynamics. These include whether canopy disturbances captured in permanent sample plots (PSPs) are representative of those in their surrounding landscape, and whether disturbance regimes vary with forest type. Here, therefore, we employ airborne LiDAR data captured over 142.5 km2 of mature, swamp, and regenerating forests in southeast Peru to assess the landscape-scale disturbance at a sampling resolution of up to 2 m. We find that this landscape is characterized by large numbers of small gaps; large disturbance events are insignificant and infrequent. Of the total number of gaps that are 2 m2 or larger in area, just 0.45% were larger than 100 m2, with a power-law exponent (alpha) value of the gap-size frequency distribution of 2.22. However, differences in disturbance regimes are seen among different forest types, with a significant difference in the alpha value of the gap-size frequency distribution observed for the swamp/regenerating forests compared with the mature forests at higher elevations. Although a relatively small area of the total forest of this region was investigated here, this study presents an unprecedented assessment of this landscape with respect to its gap dynamics. This is particularly pertinent given the range of forest types present in the landscape and the differences observed. The coupling of detailed insights into forest properties and growth provided by PSPs with the broader statistics of disturbance events using remote sensing is recommended as a strong basis for scaling-up estimates of landscape and regional-scale carbon balance.

  11. Statistical mechanics of negative temperature states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.; Joyce, G.

    1973-01-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional interacting line vortices is identical to that of the two-dimensional electrostatic guiding center plasma. Both are Hamiltonian systems and are therefore susceptible to statistical mechanical treatments. The predictions of the microcanonical ensemble are explored for this system. Interest focuses primarily on the regime of total positive interaction energy, which should be above the Onsager negative temperature threshold. Calculations of the probability distribution for a component by means of the central limit theorem are carried out in the manner of Khinchin. The probability distribution of a component reduced to the usual Gibbs distribution in the regime of positive temperatures, and is still explicitly calculable for negative temperatures. The negative temperature states are neither quiescent nor spatially uniform. Expressions for the temperature are explicitly provided in terms of the total particle energy and particle number. A BBGKY hierarchy can be derived for both temperature regimes. Numerical simulations involving solutions of the equations of motion of 4008 particles are presented.

  12. Estimating the Natural Flow Regime of the Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, T.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Rio Grande is the fifth longest river in North America and is a critical water supply for millions of people in the U. S. and Mexico. It is essential that both governements understand the magnitude of transformation to the river's flow regime as the countries engage in bi-national discussion about restoring parts of the river's native ecosystem. Previous studies have focused on estimating changes in the statistical properties of floods, but no studies have estimated the magnitude of reduction of the total annual flow nor changes to the annual hydrograph. Significant reductions in flow on the Rio Grande date to the onset of increased irrigation development in the mid-1800s, and human disturbances precede gaging records. Since the late 1800s, the total annual stream flow has been reduced by 98%, and the snowmelt flood has been virtually eliminated. We used a systems analysis approach to analyze available mean daily discharge data throughout the watershed to estimate the natural unregulated flow regime of the northern branch of the Rio Grande upstream from the Rio Conchos. We specifically estimated what would have been the natural hydrograph of the northern branch if there were no diversions of water for irrigation or municipal water supply in each year between 1958 and 2008, based on evaluation of 34 gaging station records. In each year, we reconstructed hydrographs for successive pairs of gages using estimated unaltered flows as upstream inputs, routed flow as if existing impoundments did not exist, and we made corrections for irrigation diversions; we also evaluated historical flood records. We show that the total natural annual flow for the northern branch was more than 50 times greater than the actual measured flow for this 50-year period. The magnitude of the existing diversions has eliminated the ecological cues in which the native ecosystem evolved. This reduction of flow has shifted the river into fine sediment surplus and initiated widespread channel

  13. Modelling of Turbulent Scalar Fluxes in the Broken Reaction Zones Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Kasten, Christian; Arias, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The LES filtered species transport equation in turbulent reacting flow simulations contains the unclosed turbulent scalar flux that needs to be modelled. It is well known that the statistical behavior of this term and its alignment characteristics with resolved scalar gradient depend on the relative importance of heat release and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Counter-gradient transport has been reported in several earlier studies where the flames under investigation were located either in the corrugated flamelets or thin reaction zones regime of premixed turbulent combustion. Therefore it is useful to understand the statistical behavior of turbulent scalar fluxes if the flame represents the broken reaction zones regime (BRZR). The present analysis aims to provide improved understanding on this subject through an a-priori analysis of a detailed chemistry database consisting of three freely-propagating statistically planar turbulent H2-air premixed flames representing three different regimes of combustion. Results indicate that heat release effects weaken with increasing Karlovitz number, but that counter-gradient transport can still occur for large LES filter size in the BRZR. Furthermore the behaviour of the flux and in particular its sign are different for reactant and product species. KAUST, EPSRC, KAUST Supercomputing Lab, N8, Archer.

  14. Hall effect, edge states, and Haldane exclusion statistics in two-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, F.; Marchetti, P. A.; Su, Z. B.; Yu, L.

    2015-12-01

    We clarify the relation between two kinds of statistics for particle excitations in planar systems: the braid statistics of anyons and the Haldane exclusion statistics (HES). It is shown nonperturbatively that the HES exists for incompressible anyon liquid in the presence of a Hall response. We also study the statistical properties of a specific quantum anomalous Hall model with Chern-Simons term by perturbation in both compressible and incompressible regimes, where the crucial role of edge states to the HES is shown.

  15. Managing Disagreement: A Defense of "Regime Bias"

    PubMed

    Sabl, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Stein Ringen's theory of democratic purpose cannot do the work expected of it. Ringen's own criteria oscillate between being too vague to be useful (i.e. "freedom") or, when specified more fully, conflicting, so that almost all democracies will seem to be potentially at cross-purposes with themselves rather than their purposes or sub-purposes being mutually reinforcing. This reflects a bigger and more theoretical problem. Disagreement about the purpose of democracy is built into democracy itself. The whole point of many (perhaps all) of our democratic institutions is to arrive at conditionally legitimate decisions in spite of such disagreement. So-called regime bias, i.e. the tendency to assess democracies according to the form and stability of their institutions rather than their results or their ability to serve certain purposes, does not in fact arise from bias. It arises on the contrary from a determination to avoid the bias inherent in giving some-inevitably partisan-ideals of what democracies should do pride of place over others in a scheme of measurement or evaluation. And even a regime-based definition of democracy must itself make simplifying assumptions that elide possible normative controversies over how the democratic game is best played. Vindicating one's preferred set of democratic ideals against alternatives is a completely legitimate enterprise and lends richness to debates within and across democracies. But it is an inherently ideological and political enterprise, not a neutral or scholarly one.

  16. Revealing the quantum regime in tunnelling plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kevin J; Hawkeye, Matthew M; Esteban, Rubén; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-11-22

    When two metal nanostructures are placed nanometres apart, their optically driven free electrons couple electrically across the gap. The resulting plasmons have enhanced optical fields of a specific colour tightly confined inside the gap. Many emerging nanophotonic technologies depend on the careful control of this plasmonic coupling, including optical nanoantennas for high-sensitivity chemical and biological sensors, nanoscale control of active devices, and improved photovoltaic devices. But for subnanometre gaps, coherent quantum tunnelling becomes possible and the system enters a regime of extreme non-locality in which previous classical treatments fail. Electron correlations across the gap that are driven by quantum tunnelling require a new description of non-local transport, which is crucial in nanoscale optoelectronics and single-molecule electronics. Here, by simultaneously measuring both the electrical and optical properties of two gold nanostructures with controllable subnanometre separation, we reveal the quantum regime of tunnelling plasmonics in unprecedented detail. All observed phenomena are in good agreement with recent quantum-based models of plasmonic systems, which eliminate the singularities predicted by classical theories. These findings imply that tunnelling establishes a quantum limit for plasmonic field confinement of about 10(-8)λ(3) for visible light (of wavelength λ). Our work thus prompts new theoretical and experimental investigations into quantum-domain plasmonic systems, and will affect the future of nanoplasmonic device engineering and nanoscale photochemistry.

  17. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Suykens, J A K

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  18. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10-3-10-4 for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux ( 106 W/cm2), a typical surface temperature ( 3000 K), and a typical pulse duration ( 1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  19. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-15

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10{sup –3}–10{sup –4} for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux (~10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}), a typical surface temperature (~3000 K), and a typical pulse duration (~1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  20. Statistical significance test for transition matrices of atmospheric Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vautard, Robert; Mo, Kingtse C.; Ghil, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Low-frequency variability of large-scale atmospheric dynamics can be represented schematically by a Markov chain of multiple flow regimes. This Markov chain contains useful information for the long-range forecaster, provided that the statistical significance of the associated transition matrix can be reliably tested. Monte Carlo simulation yields a very reliable significance test for the elements of this matrix. The results of this test agree with previously used empirical formulae when each cluster of maps identified as a distinct flow regime is sufficiently large and when they all contain a comparable number of maps. Monte Carlo simulation provides a more reliable way to test the statistical significance of transitions to and from small clusters. It can determine the most likely transitions, as well as the most unlikely ones, with a prescribed level of statistical significance.

  1. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive…

  2. Deconstructing Statistical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Using a very complex statistical analysis and research method for the sake of enhancing the prestige of an article or making a new product or service legitimate needs to be monitored and questioned for accuracy. 1) The more complicated the statistical analysis, and research the fewer the number of learned readers can understand it. This adds a…

  3. Reform in Statistical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huck, Schuyler W.

    2007-01-01

    Two questions are considered in this article: (a) What should professionals in school psychology do in an effort to stay current with developments in applied statistics? (b) What should they do with their existing knowledge to move from surface understanding of statistics to deep understanding? Written for school psychologists who have completed…

  4. Statistics 101 for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Arash; Halpern, Elkan F; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic tests have wide clinical applications, including screening, diagnosis, measuring treatment effect, and determining prognosis. Interpreting diagnostic test results requires an understanding of key statistical concepts used to evaluate test efficacy. This review explains descriptive statistics and discusses probability, including mutually exclusive and independent events and conditional probability. In the inferential statistics section, a statistical perspective on study design is provided, together with an explanation of how to select appropriate statistical tests. Key concepts in recruiting study samples are discussed, including representativeness and random sampling. Variable types are defined, including predictor, outcome, and covariate variables, and the relationship of these variables to one another. In the hypothesis testing section, we explain how to determine if observed differences between groups are likely to be due to chance. We explain type I and II errors, statistical significance, and study power, followed by an explanation of effect sizes and how confidence intervals can be used to generalize observed effect sizes to the larger population. Statistical tests are explained in four categories: t tests and analysis of variance, proportion analysis tests, nonparametric tests, and regression techniques. We discuss sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and likelihood ratios. Measures of reliability and agreement, including κ statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman graphs and analysis, are introduced.

  5. On Statistical Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.

    An approach to statistical testing, which combines Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing and Fisher significance testing, is recommended. The use of P-values in this approach is discussed in some detail. The author also discusses some problems which are often found in introductory statistics textbooks. The problems involve the definitions of…

  6. Statistics and Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Croarkin, M. Carroll

    2001-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the Statistical Engineering Division (SED) has been instrumental in the success of a broad spectrum of metrology projects at NBS/NIST. This paper highlights fundamental contributions of NBS/NIST statisticians to statistics and to measurement science and technology. Published methods developed by SED staff, especially during the early years, endure as cornerstones of statistics not only in metrology and standards applications, but as data-analytic resources used across all disciplines. The history of statistics at NBS/NIST began with the formation of what is now the SED. Examples from the first five decades of the SED illustrate the critical role of the division in the successful resolution of a few of the highly visible, and sometimes controversial, statistical studies of national importance. A review of the history of major early publications of the division on statistical methods, design of experiments, and error analysis and uncertainty is followed by a survey of several thematic areas. The accompanying examples illustrate the importance of SED in the history of statistics, measurements and standards: calibration and measurement assurance, interlaboratory tests, development of measurement methods, Standard Reference Materials, statistical computing, and dissemination of measurement technology. A brief look forward sketches the expanding opportunity and demand for SED statisticians created by current trends in research and development at NIST. PMID:27500023

  7. Option Y, Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Arlene

    This guide outlines a one semester Option Y course, which has seven learner objectives. The course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the concerns and methods of statistics, and to equip them to deal with the many statistical matters of importance to society. Topics covered include graphs and charts, collection and…

  8. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive…

  9. Explorations in Statistics: Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This fifth installment of "Explorations in Statistics" revisits power, a concept fundamental to the test of a null hypothesis. Power is the probability that we reject the null hypothesis when it is false. Four…

  10. Deconstructing Statistical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Using a very complex statistical analysis and research method for the sake of enhancing the prestige of an article or making a new product or service legitimate needs to be monitored and questioned for accuracy. 1) The more complicated the statistical analysis, and research the fewer the number of learned readers can understand it. This adds a…

  11. Statistical Mapping by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utano, Jack J.

    The function of a statistical map is to provide readers with a visual impression of the data so that they may be able to identify any geographic characteristics of the displayed phenomena. The increasingly important role played by the computer in the production of statistical maps is manifested by the varied examples of computer maps in recent…

  12. Water Quality Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ted; Andersen, Lyle; Robison-Cox, Jim; Jones, Clain

    2004-01-01

    Water quality experiments, especially the use of macroinvertebrates as indicators of water quality, offer an ideal context for connecting statistics and science. In the STAR program for secondary students and teachers, water quality experiments were also used as a context for teaching statistics. In this article, we trace one activity that uses…

  13. Statistics and Measurements.

    PubMed

    Croarkin, M C

    2001-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the Statistical Engineering Division (SED) has been instrumental in the success of a broad spectrum of metrology projects at NBS/NIST. This paper highlights fundamental contributions of NBS/NIST statisticians to statistics and to measurement science and technology. Published methods developed by SED staff, especially during the early years, endure as cornerstones of statistics not only in metrology and standards applications, but as data-analytic resources used across all disciplines. The history of statistics at NBS/NIST began with the formation of what is now the SED. Examples from the first five decades of the SED illustrate the critical role of the division in the successful resolution of a few of the highly visible, and sometimes controversial, statistical studies of national importance. A review of the history of major early publications of the division on statistical methods, design of experiments, and error analysis and uncertainty is followed by a survey of several thematic areas. The accompanying examples illustrate the importance of SED in the history of statistics, measurements and standards: calibration and measurement assurance, interlaboratory tests, development of measurement methods, Standard Reference Materials, statistical computing, and dissemination of measurement technology. A brief look forward sketches the expanding opportunity and demand for SED statisticians created by current trends in research and development at NIST.

  14. Application Statistics, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto. Research Div.

    Summary statistics are presented for the fall of 1977 on application and registration patterns of applicants wishing to pursue full-time study in first-year places in Ontario universities. This is the fifth in a series of annual reports that began with admissions in the fall of 1973. Statistics deal only with applicants processed by the…

  15. [Statistics quantum satis].

    PubMed

    Pestana, Dinis

    2013-01-01

    Statistics is a privileged tool in building knowledge from information, since the purpose is to extract from a sample limited information conclusions to the whole population. The pervasive use of statistical software (that always provides an answer, the question being adequate or not), and the absence of statistics to confer a scientific flavour to so much bad science, has had a pernicious effect on some disbelief on statistical research. Would Lord Rutherford be alive today, it is almost certain that he would not condemn the use of statistics in research, as he did in the dawn of the 20th century. But he would indeed urge everyone to use statistics quantum satis, since to use bad data, too many data, and statistics to enquire on irrelevant questions, is a source of bad science, namely because with too many data we can establish statistical significance of irrelevant results. This is an important point that addicts of evidence based medicine should be aware of, since the meta analysis of two many data will inevitably establish senseless results.

  16. Understanding Undergraduate Statistical Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand undergraduate students' views of statistics. Results reveal that students with less anxiety have a higher interest in statistics and also believe in their ability to perform well in the course. Also students who have a more positive attitude about the class tend to have a higher belief in their…

  17. Teaching Statistics without Sadistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Five steps designed to take anxiety out of statistics for social work students are outlined. First, statistics anxiety is identified as an educational problem. Second, instructional objectives and procedures to achieve them are presented and methods and tools for evaluating the course are explored. Strategies for, and obstacles to, making…

  18. Water Quality Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ted; Andersen, Lyle; Robison-Cox, Jim; Jones, Clain

    2004-01-01

    Water quality experiments, especially the use of macroinvertebrates as indicators of water quality, offer an ideal context for connecting statistics and science. In the STAR program for secondary students and teachers, water quality experiments were also used as a context for teaching statistics. In this article, we trace one activity that uses…

  19. Statistics by Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz, A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment from a physical chemistry course that consists of a computer simulation of throwing dice and the statistics involved. The experiment is designed to improve students' understanding of statistical evaluation of experimental data and to introduce programming techniques. (DDR)

  20. Applied Statistics with SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizingh, Eelko K. R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Accessibly written and easy to use, "Applied Statistics Using SPSS" is an all-in-one self-study guide to SPSS and do-it-yourself guide to statistics. What is unique about Eelko Huizingh's approach is that this book is based around the needs of undergraduate students embarking on their own research project, and its self-help style is designed to…

  1. Advances in statistics

    Treesearch

    Howard Stauffer; Nadav Nur

    2005-01-01

    The papers included in the Advances in Statistics section of the Partners in Flight (PIF) 2002 Proceedings represent a small sample of statistical topics of current importance to Partners In Flight research scientists: hierarchical modeling, estimation of detection probabilities, and Bayesian applications. Sauer et al. (this volume) examines a hierarchical model...

  2. STATSIM: Exercises in Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David B.; And Others

    A computer-based learning simulation was developed at Florida State University which allows for high interactive responding via a time-sharing terminal for the purpose of demonstrating descriptive and inferential statistics. The statistical simulation (STATSIM) is comprised of four modules--chi square, t, z, and F distribution--and elucidates the…

  3. Explorations in Statistics: Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This fifth installment of "Explorations in Statistics" revisits power, a concept fundamental to the test of a null hypothesis. Power is the probability that we reject the null hypothesis when it is false. Four…

  4. Applied Statistics with SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizingh, Eelko K. R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Accessibly written and easy to use, "Applied Statistics Using SPSS" is an all-in-one self-study guide to SPSS and do-it-yourself guide to statistics. What is unique about Eelko Huizingh's approach is that this book is based around the needs of undergraduate students embarking on their own research project, and its self-help style is designed to…

  5. Overhead Image Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Vatsavai, Raju; Bright, Eddie A

    2008-01-01

    Statistical properties of high-resolution overhead images representing different land use categories are analyzed using various local and global statistical image properties based on the shape of the power spectrum, image gradient distributions, edge co-occurrence, and inter-scale wavelet coefficient distributions. The analysis was performed on a database of high-resolution (1 meter) overhead images representing a multitude of different downtown, suburban, commercial, agricultural and wooded exemplars. Various statistical properties relating to these image categories and their relationship are discussed. The categorical variations in power spectrum contour shapes, the unique gradient distribution characteristics of wooded categories, the similarity in edge co-occurrence statistics for overhead and natural images, and the unique edge co-occurrence statistics of downtown categories are presented in this work. Though previous work on natural image statistics has showed some of the unique characteristics for different categories, the relationships for overhead images are not well understood. The statistical properties of natural images were used in previous studies to develop prior image models, to predict and index objects in a scene and to improve computer vision models. The results from our research findings can be used to augment and adapt computer vision algorithms that rely on prior image statistics to process overhead images, calibrate the performance of overhead image analysis algorithms, and derive features for better discrimination of overhead image categories.

  6. Climate Regime Shifts and Streamflow Responses in the Merrimack Watershed, NH-MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, R.; Driscoll, C. T.; Chandler, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has frequently been related to alterations to the hydrologic cycle, especially for sites with winter snowpack and an annual snowmelt hydrograph. In the Northeast USA, changes in streamflow depend on both advanced timing of melt, typical of the sites with winter dominated precipitation, and increasing summer precipitation. In order to manage various demands for water, planners require robust metrics of change in flow quantity and timing for both wet and dry years. This study seeks appropriate metrics of hydrologic change, at several sites with different stream orders and levels of development within the Merrimack Watershed in the Northeast USA. The term "regime" is defined as variation in a parameter of interest. The regime change is a given expression to changes in statistical properties of data including mean, standard deviation, and skewness. Looking at long-term changes of a hydrological parameter without considering regime changes could result in over- or under-estimating trends. Trend evaluation over similar regime segment could be a more precise approach to study changes in hydroclimatological parameters. Regime shift point detection method developed by (Rodionov, 2004) is a sequential analysis which does not need pre-assumptions about timing of the shifts. The purpose of our research is to find regime shift points in hydroclimatological parameters at the study sites located within the Merrimack Watershed, NH-MA. Analysis of complete and partial annual streamflow records, by a combination of hydrologic flow classification (Genz and Luz, 2012) and regime shift point detection (Rodionov, 2004) provides insight into recent changes in streamflow regime. We try to identify the correlation between regime shifts in climate indices and observed trends in hydrologic variables in the Merrimack Watershed. The Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are the two climate indices related to sea surface temperature

  7. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  8. Option pricing with regime switching by trinomial tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Fei Lung; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-02-01

    We present a fast and simple tree model to price simple and exotic options in Markov Regime Switching Model (MRSM) with multi-regime. We modify the trinomial tree model of Boyle (1986) [12] by controlling the risk neutral probability measure in different regime states to ensure that the tree model can accommodate the data of all different regimes at the same time preserving its combining tree structure. In MRSM, the market might not be complete, therefore we provide some ideas and discussions on managing the regime switching risk in support of our results.

  9. Statistical approach of weakly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, J.; Masse, L.

    2005-06-15

    A weakly nonlinear model is proposed for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of ablation and thermal transport. The nonlinear effects for a single-mode disturbance are computed, included the nonlinear correction to the exponential growth of the fundamental modulation. Mode coupling in the spectrum of a multimode disturbance is thoroughly analyzed by a statistical approach. The exponential growth of the linear regime is shown to be reduced by the nonlinear mode coupling. The saturation amplitude is around 0.1{lambda} for long wavelengths, but higher for short instable wavelengths in the ablative regime.

  10. Effect of Coulombic friction on spatial displacement statistics.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2011-07-01

    The phenomenon of Coulombic friction enters the stochastic description of dry friction between two solids and the statistic characterization of vibrating granular media. Here we analyze the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation including both velocity and spatial components, exhibiting a formal connection to a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator in the presence of a delta potential. Numerical solutions for the resulting spatial displacement statistics show a crossover from exponential to Gaussian displacement statistics. We identify a transient intermediate regime that exhibits multiscaling properties arising from the contribution of Coulombic friction. The possible role of these effects during observations in diffusion experiments is briefly discussed.

  11. Passive scalar scaling regimes in a rapidly decorrelating turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Peter Roland

    This thesis is concerned with some issues pertaining to the small scale structure of a passive scalar field advected by a turbulent flow, and driven by external stochastic pumping and/or interaction with a background passive scalar gradient. We analyze and apply two previously developed simplified mathematical models: the Simple Shear Model of Andrew Majda and Marco Avellaneda, and the Rapid Decorrelation in Time (RDT) Model of Robert Kraichnan. The fundamental representation of the passive scalar statistics in these models is presented from a consideration of Lagrangian tracer trajectories. This permits an easy extension of the Simple Shear Model to incorporate driving, and an alternative derivation of the governing mathematical equations in the RDT Model. Using a Simple Shear Poisson Blob Model of Majda and Avellaneda, we provide an example in which the correlation time of the velocity field becomes very small, but the passive scalar statistics do not converge to those of the RDT model. The RDT Model therefore only describes passive scalar advection for a velocity field with short correlation time in a certain sense. We next apply the RDT Model to investigate scaling regimes in the spectral density of a random passive scalar field advected by a turbulent flow. First, we rigorously derive three scaling regimes, and test some physical theories against these exact results. We find most predictions to succeed, but indicate an apparent gap in the reasoning behind the inertial-diffusive theory of Carl Gibson. Next, motivated by a recent experimental controversy, we consider whether, in the RDT Model, anisotropies in the external pumping could disrupt the k-1 viscous- convective scaling law at high Schmidt number. We find that the k-1 law persists. Finally, we test two asymptotic procedures, the Intermediate Asymptotic (IA) approach as described by G. I. Barenblatt and the Renormalization Group (RG) method of Lin-Yuan Chen et al. on an exactly solvable ODE arising in

  12. Cointegration and causal linkages in fertilizer markets across different regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Cointegration and causal linkages among five different fertilizer markets are investigated during low and high market regimes. The database includes prices of rock phosphate (RP), triple super phosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), urea, and potassium chloride (PC). It is found that fertilizer markets are closely linked to each other during low and high regimes; and, particularly during high regime (after 2007 international financial crisis). In addition, there is no evidence of bidirectional linear relationship between markets during low and high regime time periods. Furthermore, all significant linkages are only unidirectional. Moreover, some causality effects have emerged during high regime. Finally, the effect of an impulse during high regime time period persists longer and is stronger than the effect of an impulse during low regime time period (before 2007 international financial crisis).

  13. Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American land

    Treesearch

    Amanda B. Stan; Peter Z. Fule; Kathryn B. Ireland; Jamie S. Sanderlin

    2014-01-01

    Forests on tribal lands in the western United States have seen the return of low-intensity surface fires for several decades longer than forests on non-tribal lands. We examined the surface fire regime in a ponderosa pinedominated (Pinus ponderosa) forest on the Hualapai tribal lands in the south-western United States. Using fire-scarred trees, we inferred temporal (...

  14. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part I: main content.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are set rules for sequential decision making based on patient covariate history. Observational studies are well suited for the investigation of the effects of dynamic treatment regimes because of the variability in treatment decisions found in them. This variability exists because different physicians make different decisions in the face of similar patient histories. In this article we describe an approach to estimate the optimal dynamic treatment regime among a set of enforceable regimes. This set is comprised by regimes defined by simple rules based on a subset of past information. The regimes in the set are indexed by a Euclidean vector. The optimal regime is the one that maximizes the expected counterfactual utility over all regimes in the set. We discuss assumptions under which it is possible to identify the optimal regime from observational longitudinal data. Murphy et al. (2001) developed efficient augmented inverse probability weighted estimators of the expected utility of one fixed regime. Our methods are based on an extension of the marginal structural mean model of Robins (1998, 1999) which incorporate the estimation ideas of Murphy et al. (2001). Our models, which we call dynamic regime marginal structural mean models, are specially suitable for estimating the optimal treatment regime in a moderately small class of enforceable regimes of interest. We consider both parametric and semiparametric dynamic regime marginal structural models. We discuss locally efficient, double-robust estimation of the model parameters and of the index of the optimal treatment regime in the set. In a companion paper in this issue of the journal we provide proofs of the main results.

  15. Statistics at a glance.

    PubMed

    Ector, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    I still remember my first book on statistics: "Elementary statistics with applications in medicine and the biological sciences" by Frederick E. Croxton. For me, it has been the start of pursuing understanding statistics in daily life and in medical practice. It was the first volume in a long row of books. In his introduction, Croxton pretends that"nearly everyone involved in any aspect of medicine needs to have some knowledge of statistics". The reality is that for many clinicians, statistics are limited to a "P < 0.05 = ok". I do not blame my colleagues who omit the paragraph on statistical methods. They have never had the opportunity to learn concise and clear descriptions of the key features. I have experienced how some authors can describe difficult methods in a well understandable language. Others fail completely. As a teacher, I tell my students that life is impossible without a basic knowledge of statistics. This feeling has resulted in an annual seminar of 90 minutes. This tutorial is the summary of this seminar. It is a summary and a transcription of the best pages I have detected.

  16. LED champing: statistically blessed?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo

    2015-06-10

    LED champing (smart mixing of individual LEDs to match the desired color and lumens) and color mixing strategies have been widely used to maintain the color consistency of light engines. Light engines with champed LEDs can easily achieve the color consistency of a couple MacAdam steps with widely distributed LEDs to begin with. From a statistical point of view, the distributions for the color coordinates and the flux after champing are studied. The related statistical parameters are derived, which facilitate process improvements such as Six Sigma and are instrumental to statistical quality control for mass productions.

  17. Informal Statistics Help Desk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, M.; Koslovsky, M.; Schaefer, Caroline M.; Feiveson, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Back by popular demand, the JSC Biostatistics Laboratory and LSAH statisticians are offering an opportunity to discuss your statistical challenges and needs. Take the opportunity to meet the individuals offering expert statistical support to the JSC community. Join us for an informal conversation about any questions you may have encountered with issues of experimental design, analysis, or data visualization. Get answers to common questions about sample size, repeated measures, statistical assumptions, missing data, multiple testing, time-to-event data, and when to trust the results of your analyses.

  18. Commentary: statistics for biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lovell, David P

    2012-05-01

    This short commentary discusses Biomarkers' requirements for the reporting of statistical analyses in submitted papers. It is expected that submitters will follow the general instructions of the journal, the more detailed guidance given by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, the specific guidelines developed by the EQUATOR network, and those of various specialist groups. Biomarkers expects that the study design and subsequent statistical analyses are clearly reported and that the data reported can be made available for independent assessment. The journal recognizes that there is continuing debate about different approaches to statistical science. Biomarkers appreciates that the field continues to develop rapidly and encourages the use of new methodologies.

  19. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-03

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 10(7)) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry-Perot resonator detects these modes' motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to -2.4 dB (-3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry-Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  20. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  1. Ponderomotive scaling in the radiative damping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Rishi R.; Ackad, Edward; d'Humieres, Emmanuel; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    The ponderomotive force for super intense laser matter interactions has been derived by taking into account the higher order terms of radiative damping. The ion acceleration via collisionless shock, generated by both the ponderomotive pressure of the intense laser pulse during the interaction and the electron acceleration, becomes less efficient due to the radiative damping. A new ponderomotive scaling has been derived by applying the force with the radiation reaction to the super intense laser regime, and it is benchmarked by a particle-in-cell simulation with the radiative damping terms included in equations of motion. We find good agreement between theoretical and simulation results in terms of shock velocity and accelerated ion energy.

  2. The Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Noriyuki

    For the last couple of decades, the Great Lakes have undergone rapid surface warming. In particular, the magnitude of the summer surface-warming trends of the Great Lakes have been much greater than those of surrounding land (Austin and Colman, 2007). Among the Great Lakes, the deepest Lake Superior exhibited the strongest warming trend in its annual, as well as summer surface water temperature. We find that many aspects of this behavior can be explained in terms of the tendency of deep lakes to exhibit multiple regimes characterized, under the same seasonally varying forcing, by the warmer and colder seasonal cycles exhibiting different amounts of wintertime lake-ice cover and corresponding changes in the summertime lake-surface temperatures. In this thesis, we address the problem of the Great Lakes' warming using one-dimensional lake modeling to interpret diverse observations of the recent lake behavior. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidtfelt Padkær Nielsen, William; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S.; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-01

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 107) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry–Perot resonator detects these modes’ motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to ‑2.4 dB (‑3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry–Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  4. Evolution of the water regime of Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Fanale, F.P.; Salvail, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    In the present model of Phobos water regime evolution, a time-dependent solar insolation is influenced by both decreasing solar output over geologic time and the Mars and Phobos cycles of eccentricity and obliquity, which vary over 100,000-1,000,000 year time scales. The results presented address model cases which assume (1) a homogeneous distribution of water ice, and (2) a driving of water ice toward the surface by the internal thermal gradient near the poles. A two-dimensional model is used to compute temperatures, heat and vapor fluxes, and ice removal/deposition rates, for the case of uniform ice distribution throughout Phobos. The results obtained indicate that a substantial amount of vapor is produced within 1 km of the surface. 15 refs.

  5. Dynamic Recrystallization: The Dynamic Deformation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Pizaña, C.

    2007-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (PD), especially involving high strain rates (>103 s 1), occurs through solid-state flow, which is accommodated by dynamic recrystallization (DRX), either in a continuous or discontinuous mode. This flow can be localized in shear instability zones (or adiabatic shear bands (ASBs)) with dimensions smaller than 5 μ, or can include large volumes with flow zone dimensions exceeding centimeters. This article illustrates these microstructural features using optical and electron metallography to examine a host of dynamic deformation examples: shaped charge jet formation, high-velocity and hypervelocity impact crater formation, rod penetration into thick targets (which includes rod and target DRX flow and mixing), large projectile-induced target plug formation and failure, explosive welding, and friction-stir welding and processing. The DRX is shown to be a universal mechanism that accommodates solid-state flow in extreme (or severe) PD regimes.

  6. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  7. Diffusive Transport Properties Across Coupling Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharuman, G.; Murillo, M. S.; Verboncoeur, J.; Christlieb, A.

    2014-10-01

    Transport properties are poorly known across coupling regimes, therefore understanding them is of importance for theoretical and practical reasons. A useful tool is an ultracold plasma system because of the experimental capability to tune the system to attain Coulomb coupling Γ ranging from 0.1 to 1 to 10 with the screening parameter κ ranging from 0 to 4 to 8, spanning the regions of the phase diagram from weak to moderate to strongly coupled and screened systems. Strong coupling is possible if Disorder Induced Heating is mitigated which requires a correlated initial ion state. Of particular interest is Rydberg blockaded gas of ultracold atoms where the local blockade effect results in correlations. Predictions of higher coupling in ultracold plasma created from a Rydberg blockaded gas have been reported. In this work we examine the diffusive transport properties of ultracold plasma system using molecular dynamics simulations for experimentally realizable values of Γ and κ as discussed above.

  8. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Measurements of Kanel et. al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. Failure (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study the authors have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  9. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael D.; Chhabildas, Lalit C.

    1998-07-10

    Measurements of Kanel et al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. 'Failure' (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  10. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of Kanel {ital et al.} [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. {open_quotes}Failure{close_quotes} (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Capillary underwater discharges in repetitive pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baerdemaeker, F.; Monte, M.; Leys, C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study a capillary underwater discharge, that is sustained with AC (50 Hz) voltages up to 7.5 kV, is investigated. In a capillary discharge scheme, the current is, at some point along its path between two submerged electrodes, flowing through a narrow elongated bore in a dielectric material. When the current density is sufficiently high, local boiling and subsequent vapour breakdown results in the formation of a plasma within this capillary. At the same time the capillary emits an intense jet of vapour bubbles. Time-dependent electrical current, voltage and light emission curves are recorded for discharges in solutions of NaCl in distilled water and reveal different discharge regimes, depending on the conductivity and the excitation voltage, ranging from repetitive microsecond discharge pulses to a quasi-continuous discharge with a glow-like voltage-current characteristic.

  12. Nonlinear regimes of forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Vekstein, G.; Kusano, K.

    2015-09-15

    This letter presents a self-consistent description of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection in Taylor's model of this process. If external boundary perturbation is strong enough, nonlinearity in the current sheet evolution becomes important before resistive effects come into play. This terminates the current sheet shrinking that takes place at the linear stage and brings about its nonlinear equilibrium with a finite thickness. Then, in theory, this equilibrium is destroyed by a finite plasma resistivity during the skin-time, and further reconnection proceeds in the Rutherford regime. However, realization of such a scenario is unlikely because of the plasmoid instability, which is fast enough to develop before the transition to the Rutherford phase occurs. The suggested analytical theory is entirely different from all previous studies and provides proper interpretation of the presently available numerical simulations of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection.

  13. Anomalous Transport in the Superfluid Fluctuation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Shun; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment in ultracold atoms [S. Krinner et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 113, 8144 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1601812113], we analyze transport of attractively interacting fermions through a one-dimensional wire near the superfluid transition. We show that in a ballistic regime where the conductance is quantized in the absence of interaction, the conductance is renormalized by superfluid fluctuations in reservoirs. In particular, the particle conductance is strongly enhanced, and the conductance plateau is blurred by emergent bosonic pair transport. For spin transport, in addition to the contact resistance, the wire itself is resistive, leading to a suppression of the measured spin conductance. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  14. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tso; Amet, François; Ke, Chung-Ting; Borzenets, Ivan; Wang, Jiyingmei; Watanabe, Keji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russell; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    Combining superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect is a promising route for creating new types of topological excitations. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the quantum Hall regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has so far eluded experimental observation. Here we demonstrate the existence of a novel type of Josephson coupling through a QH region at magnetic fields as high as 2 Tesla. The supercurrent is mediated by states encompassing QH edge channels, which are flowing on opposite sides of the sample. The edges are coupled together by the hybrid electron-hole modes at the interfaces between the QH region and the superconducting contacts. These chiral modes, which share some features with Majorana modes, are formed when electron and hole edge states are mixed by the superconductor.

  15. Simulations of two Arctic winter cloud regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, M. A.; Randall, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent analysis of observations from the Surface Heat Budget Experiment (SHEBA) provides evidence that in winter the Arctic exhibits two preferred and persistent states — a radiatively clear and a radiatively opaque state. These distinct regimes are influenced by the phase of the clouds, and affect the surface radiative fluxes. We explore the radiative and microphysical effects of these Arctic clouds in two present-day climate simulations. We compare simulations performed with a global coupled ocean- atmosphere model [the Community Earth System Model], and its superparameterized counterpart (SP-CESM). We find that the SP-CESM is able to better reproduce both of the preferred winter states, compared to CESM. We present an analysis of the mechanisms and processes behind these findings.

  16. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within Two Different Management Regimes: An Assessment-Based Accountability Regime and Regime without External Pressure on Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management…

  17. Cavity Optomechanics in the Quantum Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Thierry Claude Marc

    An exciting scientific goal, common to many fields of research, is the development of ever-larger physical systems operating in the quantum regime. Relevant to this dissertation is the objective of preparing and observing a mechanical object in its motional quantum ground state. In order to sense the object's zero-point motion, the probe itself must have quantum-limited sensitivity. Cavity optomechanics, the interactions between light and a mechanical object inside an optical cavity, provides an elegant means to achieve the quantum regime. In this dissertation, I provide context to the successful cavity-based optical detection of the quantum-ground-state motion of atoms-based mechanical elements; mechanical elements, consisting of the collective center-of-mass (CM) motion of ultracold atomic ensembles and prepared inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, were dispersively probed with an average intracavity photon number as small as 0.1. I first show that cavity optomechanics emerges from the theory of cavity quantum electrodynamics when one takes into account the CM motion of one or many atoms within the cavity, and provide a simple theoretical framework to model optomechanical interactions. I then outline details regarding the apparatus and the experimental methods employed, highlighting certain fundamental aspects of optical detection along the way. Finally, I describe background information, both theoretical and experimental, to two published results on quantum cavity optomechanics that form the backbone of this dissertation. The first publication shows the observation of zero-point collective motion of several thousand atoms and quantum-limited measurement backaction on that observed motion. The second publication demonstrates that an array of near-ground-state collective atomic oscillators can be simultaneously prepared and probed, and that the motional state of one oscillator can be selectively addressed while preserving the near-zero-point motion of

  18. Statistical-dynamical modeling of the cloud-to-ground lightning activity in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. F.; Fragoso, M.; Mendes, S.; Corte-Real, J.; Santos, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    The present study employs a dataset of cloud-to-ground discharges over Portugal, collected by the Portuguese lightning detection network in the period of 2003-2009, to identify dynamically coherent lightning regimes in Portugal and to implement a statistical-dynamical modeling of the daily discharges over the country. For this purpose, the high-resolution MERRA reanalysis is used. Three lightning regimes are then identified for Portugal: WREG, WREM and SREG. WREG is a typical cold-core cut-off low. WREM is connected to strong frontal systems driven by remote low pressure systems at higher latitudes over the North Atlantic. SREG is a combination of an inverted trough and a mid-tropospheric cold-core nearby Portugal. The statistical-dynamical modeling is based on logistic regressions (statistical component) developed for each regime separately (dynamical component). It is shown that the strength of the lightning activity (either strong or weak) for each regime is consistently modeled by a set of suitable dynamical predictors (65-70% of efficiency). The difference of the equivalent potential temperature in the 700-500 hPa layer is the best predictor for the three regimes, while the best 4-layer lifted index is still important for all regimes, but with much weaker significance. Six other predictors are more suitable for a specific regime. For the purpose of validating the modeling approach, a regional-scale climate model simulation is carried out under a very intense lightning episode.

  19. Hemophilia Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemophilia Women Healthcare Providers Partners Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... at a very young age. Based on CDC data, the median age at diagnosis is 36 months ...

  20. Playing at Statistical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Paul M.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of counting techniques of a sorting game to distributions and concepts in statistical mechanics. Included are the following distributions: Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and most probable. (RH)

  1. Purposeful Statistical Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Lorraine Day provides us with a great range of statistical investigations using various resources such as maths300 and TinkerPlots. Each of the investigations link mathematics to students' lives and provide engaging and meaningful contexts for mathematical inquiry.

  2. Cooperative Learning in Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Carolyn M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Formal use of cooperative learning techniques proved effective in improving student performance and retention in a freshman level statistics course. Lectures interspersed with group activities proved effective in increasing conceptual understanding and overall class performance. (11 references) (Author)

  3. How Statistics "Excel" Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Faith; Davis, James

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of Microsoft Excel software and provides examples of its use in an online statistics course at Golden Gate University in the areas of randomness and probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and regression analysis. (LRW)

  4. Statistics of the sagas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richfield, Jon; bookfeller

    2016-07-01

    In reply to Ralph Kenna and Pádraig Mac Carron's feature article “Maths meets myths” in which they describe how they are using techniques from statistical physics to characterize the societies depicted in ancient Icelandic sagas.

  5. Playing at Statistical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Paul M.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of counting techniques of a sorting game to distributions and concepts in statistical mechanics. Included are the following distributions: Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and most probable. (RH)

  6. Anaplasmosis: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tick Diseases transmitted by ticks Statistics and Epidemiology Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... Holman RC, McQuiston JH, Krebs JW, Swerdlow DL. Epidemiology of human ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis in the United ...

  7. Ehrlichiosis: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tick Diseases transmitted by ticks Statistics and Epidemiology Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... Holman RC, McQuiston JH, Krebs JW, Swerdlow DL. Epidemiology of human ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis in the United ...

  8. Elements of Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2016-05-01

    This chapter is devoted to two objectives. The first one is to answer the request expressed by attendees of the first Astrostatistics School (Annecy, October 2013) to be provided with an elementary vademecum of statistics that would facilitate understanding of the given courses. In this spirit we recall very basic notions, that is definitions and properties that we think sufficient to benefit from courses given in the Astrostatistical School. Thus we give briefly definitions and elementary properties on random variables and vectors, distributions, estimation and tests, maximum likelihood methodology. We intend to present basic ideas in a hopefully comprehensible way. We do not try to give a rigorous presentation, and due to the place devoted to this chapter, can cover only a rather limited field of statistics. The second aim is to focus on some statistical tools that are useful in classification: basic introduction to Bayesian statistics, maximum likelihood methodology, Gaussian vectors and Gaussian mixture models.

  9. Titanic: A Statistical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takis, Sandra L.

    1999-01-01

    Uses the available data about the Titanic's passengers to interest students in exploring categorical data and the chi-square distribution. Describes activities incorporated into a statistics class and gives additional resources for collecting information about the Titanic. (ASK)

  10. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  11. Titanic: A Statistical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takis, Sandra L.

    1999-01-01

    Uses the available data about the Titanic's passengers to interest students in exploring categorical data and the chi-square distribution. Describes activities incorporated into a statistics class and gives additional resources for collecting information about the Titanic. (ASK)

  12. Boosted Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Starting with the basic principles of Relativistic Quantum Mechanics, we give a rigorous, but completely elementary proof of the relation between fundamental observables of a statistical system, when measured within two inertial reference frames, related by a Lorentz transformation.

  13. How Statistics "Excel" Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Faith; Davis, James

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of Microsoft Excel software and provides examples of its use in an online statistics course at Golden Gate University in the areas of randomness and probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and regression analysis. (LRW)

  14. A Novel Method for Analyzing and Interpreting GCM Results Using Clustered Climate Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D. J.; Oglesby, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    A high-performance parallel clustering algorithm has been developed for analyzing and comparing climate model results and long time series climate measurements. Designed to identify biases and detect trends in disparate climate change data sets, this tool combines and simplifies large temporally-varying data sets from atmospheric measurements to multi-century climate model output. Clustering is a statistical procedure which provides an objective method for grouping multivariate conditions into a set of states or regimes within a given level of statistical tolerance. The groups or clusters--statistically defined across space and through time--possess centroids which represent the synoptic conditions of observations or model results contained in each state no matter when or where they occurred. The clustering technique was applied to five business-as-usual (BAU) scenarios from the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Three fields of significance (surface temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture) were clustered from 2000 through 2098. Our analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The same analysis subsequently applied to the ensemble as a whole demonstrates the consistency and variability of trends from each ensemble member. The patterns of cluster changes can be used to show predicted variability in climate on global and continental scales. Novel three-dimensional phase space representations of these climate regimes show the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time. Any single spot on the globe will exist in one of these climate regimes at any single point in time, and by incrementing time, that same spot will trace out a trajectory or orbit among these climate regimes in phase space. When a

  15. Spontaneous quasi single helicity regimes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, good progress toward a better understanding and control of the plasma performance in reversed-field pinch devices has been made. These improvements consist both of the discovery of spontaneous plasma regimes, termed the quasi single helicity (QSH) regime, in which part of the plasma core is no longer stochastic, and of the development of techniques for active control of plasma instabilities. In this paper, a systematic study of spontaneous QSH in the EXTRAP T2R device [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] is presented. In this device, QSH states can occur spontaneously and it is associated with magnetic and thermal structures. A statistical analysis to determine the most favorable experimental conditions to have a transition to the QSH regime will be presented. The results described here are useful to understand the underlying properties of QSH regimes in view of future applications of the QSH active control in EXTRAP T2R; they are also important to have a comparison with the QSH studied in other devices.

  16. Critical slowing down associated with regime shifts in the US housing market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, James Peng Lung; Cheong, Siew Siew Ann

    2014-02-01

    Complex systems are described by a large number of variables with strong and nonlinear interactions. Such systems frequently undergo regime shifts. Combining insights from bifurcation theory in nonlinear dynamics and the theory of critical transitions in statistical physics, we know that critical slowing down and critical fluctuations occur close to such regime shifts. In this paper, we show how universal precursors expected from such critical transitions can be used to forecast regime shifts in the US housing market. In the housing permit, volume of homes sold and percentage of homes sold for gain data, we detected strong early warning signals associated with a sequence of coupled regime shifts, starting from a Subprime Mortgage Loans transition in 2003-2004 and ending with the Subprime Crisis in 2007-2008. Weaker signals of critical slowing down were also detected in the US housing market data during the 1997-1998 Asian Financial Crisis and the 2000-2001 Technology Bubble Crisis. Backed by various macroeconomic data, we propose a scenario whereby hot money flowing back into the US during the Asian Financial Crisis fueled the Technology Bubble. When the Technology Bubble collapsed in 2000-2001, the hot money then flowed into the US housing market, triggering the Subprime Mortgage Loans transition in 2003-2004 and an ensuing sequence of transitions. We showed how this sequence of couple transitions unfolded in space and in time over the whole of US.

  17. Effect of snow on mountain river regimes: an example from the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Vallelado, Alba; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Alonso-González, Esteban; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize mountain river regimes in the Spanish Pyrenees and to assess the importance of snow accumulation and snowmelt on the timing of river flows. Daily streamflow data from 9 gauging stations in the Pyrenees were used to characterize river regimes. These data were analyzed by hydrological indices, with a focus on periods when snow accumulation and snowmelt occurred. These results were combined with data on Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) (from measurements of depth and density of snow in the main river basins and also simulated by a process-based hydrological model), snowmelting (simulated by a process-based hydrological model), precipitation (from observations), and temperature (from observations). Longitude and elevation gradients in the Pyrenees explain the transition of river regimes from those that mostly had low nival signals (in the west and at low elevations) to those that mostly had high nival signals (low winter runoff and late spring peakflow, in the east and at high elevations). Although trend analyses indicated no statistically significant changes, there was a trend of decreased nival signal over time in most of the analyzed rivers. Our results also demonstrated that snow processes cannot explain all of the interannual variability of river regimes, because the temporal distribution of liquid precipitation and temperature play key roles in hydrography.

  18. Effect of snow on mountain river regimes: an example from the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Vallelado, Alba; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Alonso-González, Esteban; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize mountain river regimes in the Spanish Pyrenees and to assess the importance of snow accumulation and snowmelt on the timing of river flows. Daily streamflow data from 9 gauging stations in the Pyrenees were used to characterize river regimes. These data were analyzed by hydrological indices, with a focus on periods when snow accumulation and snowmelt occurred. These results were combined with data on Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) (from measurements of depth and density of snow in the main river basins and also simulated by a process-based hydrological model), snowmelting (simulated by a process-based hydrological model), precipitation (from observations), and temperature (from observations). Longitude and elevation gradients in the Pyrenees explain the transition of river regimes from those that mostly had low nival signals (in the west and at low elevations) to those that mostly had high nival signals (low winter runoff and late spring peakflow, in the east and at high elevations). Although trend analyses indicated no statistically significant changes, there was a trend of decreased nival signal over time in most of the analyzed rivers. Our results also demonstrated that snow processes cannot explain all of the interannual variability of river regimes, because the temporal distribution of liquid precipitation and temperature play key roles in hydrography.

  19. Dynamical response of the Hodgkin-Huxley model in the high-input regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luccioli, Stefano; Kreuz, Thomas; Torcini, Alessandro

    2006-04-01

    The response of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal model subjected to stochastic uncorrelated spike trains originating from a large number of inhibitory and excitatory post-synaptic potentials is analyzed in detail. The model is examined in its three fundamental dynamical regimes: silence, bistability, and repetitive firing. Its response is characterized in terms of statistical indicators (interspike-interval distributions and their first moments) as well as of dynamical indicators (autocorrelation functions and conditional entropies). In the silent regime, the coexistence of two different coherence resonances is revealed: one occurs at quite low noise and is related to the stimulation of subthreshold oscillations around the rest state; the second one (at intermediate noise variance) is associated with the regularization of the sequence of spikes emitted by the neuron. Bistability in the low noise limit can be interpreted in terms of jumping processes across barriers activated by stochastic fluctuations. In the repetitive firing regime a maximization of incoherence is observed at finite noise variance. Finally, the mechanisms responsible for the different features appearing in the interspike-interval distributions (like multimodality and exponential tails) are clearly identified in the various regimes.

  20. On the Asymptotic Regimes and the Strongly Stratified Limit of Rotating Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.; Mahalov, A.; Nicolaenko, B.; Zhou, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Asymptotic regimes of geophysical dynamics are described for different Burger number limits. Rotating Boussinesq equations are analyzed in the asymptotic limit, of strong stratification in the Burger number of order one situation as well as in the asymptotic regime of strong stratification and weak rotation. It is shown that in both regimes horizontally averaged buoyancy variable is an adiabatic invariant for the full Boussinesq system. Spectral phase shift corrections to the buoyancy time scale associated with vertical shearing of this invariant are deduced. Statistical dephasing effects induced by turbulent processes on inertial-gravity waves are evidenced. The 'split' of the energy transfer of the vortical and the wave components is established in the Craya-Herring cyclic basis. As the Burger number increases from zero to infinity, we demonstrate gradual unfreezing of energy cascades for ageostrophic dynamics. The energy spectrum and the anisotropic spectral eddy viscosity are deduced with an explicit dependence on the anisotropic rotation/stratification time scale which depends on the vertical aspect ratio parameter. Intermediate asymptotic regime corresponding to strong stratification and weak rotation is analyzed where the effects of weak rotation are accounted for by an asymptotic expansion with full control (saturation) of vertical shearing. The regularizing effect of weak rotation differs from regularizations based on vertical viscosity. Two scalar prognostic equations for ageostrophic components (divergent velocity potential and geostrophic departure ) are obtained.

  1. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of LBA Convective Systems: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Stephen E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2002-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate convection that occurred during the TRMM LBA field experiment in Brazil. Convection in this region can be categorized into two different regimes. Low-level easterly flow results in moderate to high CAPE and a drier environment. Convection is more intense like that seen over continents. Low-level westerly flow results in low CAPE and a moist environment. Convection is weaker and more widespread characteristic of oceanic or monsoon-like systems. The GCE model has been used to study both regimes in order to provide cloud data sets that are representative of both environments in support of TRMM rainfall and heating algorithm development. Two different case are presented: Jan 26,1999, an easterly regime case, and Feb 23,1999, a westerly regime case. The Jan 26 case is an organized squall line and is initialized with a standard cold pool. The sensitivity to mid-level sounding moisture and wind shear will also be shown. The Feb 23 case is less-organized with only transient lines and is initialized with either warm bubbles or prescribed surface fluxes. Heating profiles, rainfall statistics and storm characteristics are compared and validated for the two cases against observations collected during the experiment.

  2. Social mobility and health in European countries: Does welfare regime type matter?

    PubMed

    Campos-Matos, Inês; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Health inequalities pose an important public health challenge in European countries, for which increased social mobility has been suggested as a cause. We sought to describe how the relationship between health inequalities and social mobility varies among welfare regime types in the European region. Data from six rounds of the European Social Survey was analyzed using multilevel statistical techniques, stratified by welfare regime type, including 237,535 individuals from 136 countries. Social mobility among individuals was defined according to the discrepancy between parental and offspring educational attainment. For each welfare regime type, the association between social mobility and self-rated health was examined using odds ratios and risk differences, controlling for parental education. Upwardly mobile individuals had between 23 and 44% lower odds of reporting bad or very bad self-rated health when compared to those who remained stable. On an absolute scale, former USSR countries showed the biggest and only significant differences for upward movement, while Scandinavian countries showed the smallest. Downward social mobility tended to be associated with worse health, but the results were less consistent. Upward social mobility is associated with worse health in all European welfare regime types. However, in Scandinavian countries the association of upward mobility was smaller, suggesting that the Nordic model is more effective in mitigating the impact of social mobility on health and/or of health on mobility.

  3. Changes in precipitation regime in the Baltic countries in 1966-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaagus, Jaak; Briede, Agrita; Rimkus, Egidijus; Sepp, Mait

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse trends and regime shifts in time series of monthly, seasonal and annual precipitation in the eastern Baltic countries (Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia) during 1966-2015. Data from 54 stations with nearly homogeneous series were used. The Mann-Kendall test was used for trend analysis and the Rodionov test for the analysis of regime shifts. Rather few statistically significant trends (p < 0.05) and regime shifts were determined. The highest increase (by approximately 10 mm per decade) was observed in winter precipitation when a significant trend was found at the large majority of stations. For monthly precipitation, increasing trends were detected at many stations in January, February and June. Weak negative trends revealed at few stations in April and September. Annual precipitation has generally increased, but the trend is mostly insignificant. The analysis of regime shifts revealed some significant abrupt changes, the most important of which were upward shifts in winter, in January and February precipitation at many stations since 1990 or in some other years (1989, 1995). A return shift in the time series of February precipitation occurred since 2003. The most significant increase in precipitation was determined in Latvia and the weakest increase in Lithuania.

  4. Statistical behavior of time dynamics evolution of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Santos, Iury A. X.; Nunes, Marcos G. P.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Barbosa, Anderson L. R.

    2017-09-01

    We use the tools of the random matrix theory (RMT) to investigate the statistical behavior of the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. By means of the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution we have identified four distinct regimes of the evolution of HIV infection. We verified that at the beginning of the so-called clinical latency phase the concentration of infected cells grows slowly and evolves in a correlated way. This regime is followed by another one in which the correlation is lost and that in turn leads the system to a regime in which the increase of infected cells is faster and correlated. In the final phase, the one in which acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is stablished, the system presents maximum correlation as demonstrated by GOE distribution.

  5. The water regime of the lake Kolon watersystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellei, L.; Tamás, E. A.; Sziebert, J.; Tóth, Sz.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Kolon is one of the important freshwater marshes of Hungary, with its extensive reedbeds, meadows and forests. The natural development process of the lake was interrupted in 1930. The events which happened later give a typical cross-section of Hungarian water management practices. The interventions started with draining a considerable part of the lake and taking it into agricultural usage. In order to get the waters of the Danube floodplains under control, the building of the Danube-Valley Channel started in 1912. The channel, which is 107 kms long, was ready in 1929, and the subordinated channel system was established in the beginning of the 1930's. Connected to these works, the lake Kolon was declared as an excess water reservoir after its draining in 1927-28. So the reservoir had to be kept on minimal waterlevel in order to be able to host the arriving waters any time. This kind of management has changed from 1987 to 1996 for a more preferable management which is ruled by the actual conditions in order to maintain the water resources. With the analysis of the water resources of the lake we showed that there is a significant supply from subsurface runoff, and we determined the statistical characteristics of the quantitative indices of the water regime. The high waterlevel which is favourable from the viewpoint of nature conservation has proven to be sustainable even if the receiver is in its design status.

  6. Precipitation Efficiency in the Tropical Deep Convective Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precipitation efficiency in the tropical deep convective regime is analyzed based on a 2-D cloud resolving simulation. The cloud resolving model is forced by the large-scale vertical velocity and zonal wind and large-scale horizontal advections derived from TOGA COARE for a 20-day period. Precipitation efficiency may be defined as a ratio of surface rain rate to sum of surface evaporation and moisture convergence (LSPE) or a ratio of surface rain rate to sum of condensation and deposition rates of supersaturated vapor (CMPE). Moisture budget shows that the atmosphere is moistened (dryed) when the LSPE is less (more) than 100 %. The LSPE could be larger than 100 % for strong convection. This indicates that the drying processes should be included in cumulus parameterization to avoid moisture bias. Statistical analysis shows that the sum of the condensation and deposition rates is bout 80 % of the sum of the surface evaporation rate and moisture convergence, which ads to proportional relation between the two efficiencies when both efficiencies are less han 100 %. The CMPE increases with increasing mass-weighted mean temperature and creasing surface rain rate. This suggests that precipitation is more efficient for warm environment and strong convection. Approximate balance of rates among the condensation, deposition, rain, and the raindrop evaporation is used to derive an analytical solution of the CMPE.

  7. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M. Barat, P.

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  8. Power-law statistics and universal scaling in the absence of criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, Jonathan; Destexhe, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Critical states are sometimes identified experimentally through power-law statistics or universal scaling functions. We show here that such features naturally emerge from networks in self-sustained irregular regimes away from criticality. In these regimes, statistical physics theory of large interacting systems predict a regime where the nodes have independent and identically distributed dynamics. We thus investigated the statistics of a system in which units are replaced by independent stochastic surrogates and found the same power-law statistics, indicating that these are not sufficient to establish criticality. We rather suggest that these are universal features of large-scale networks when considered macroscopically. These results put caution on the interpretation of scaling laws found in nature.

  9. Power-law statistics and universal scaling in the absence of criticality.

    PubMed

    Touboul, Jonathan; Destexhe, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Critical states are sometimes identified experimentally through power-law statistics or universal scaling functions. We show here that such features naturally emerge from networks in self-sustained irregular regimes away from criticality. In these regimes, statistical physics theory of large interacting systems predict a regime where the nodes have independent and identically distributed dynamics. We thus investigated the statistics of a system in which units are replaced by independent stochastic surrogates and found the same power-law statistics, indicating that these are not sufficient to establish criticality. We rather suggest that these are universal features of large-scale networks when considered macroscopically. These results put caution on the interpretation of scaling laws found in nature.

  10. Evidencing a regime shift in the North Sea using early-warning signals as indicators of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, N.; Dakos, V.; Edwards, M.; Serafim, M. P.; Valayer, P. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    One of the longest marine monitoring programs in the North Sea has been the spatiotemporal surveying of subsurface plankton since 1931. During this period a regime shift was detected in the late 1980s culminating in marked changes in phytoplankton, zooplankton and in the fisheries of horse mackerel. Here we used the phytoplankton colour index, a visual biomass estimate, from 1948 to 2010 and total diatom abundance from 1958 to 2010 to test whether the well-documented regime shift could have been anticipated by the recently developed Early-Warning Signals for critical transitions (EWS). We estimated EWS, namely autocorrelation and standard deviation, within moving windows along the time series prior to the regime shift. We found that both statistics increased revealing that the North Sea ecosystem was becoming progressively unstable prior to the regime shift. Moreover, this high-resolution time series permitted us to test for robustness, error and significance of the EWS. We did that by dividing the time series into independent blocks and estimating EWS after bootstrapping and randomising the blocks. This alternative approach confirmed the robustness of the EWS with limited associated errors. In particular, we found that the warning was significantly evident years before the onset of the regime shift. We conclude that EWS may provide robust and timely warning for upcoming regime shifts depending on the quality and quantity of recorded data in marine ecosystems.

  11. Comparison of primary vaccination regimes for equine influenza: working towards an evidence-based regime.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, A; Gildea, S; Weldon, E

    2014-11-01

    Vaccination is crucial to the control of equine influenza (EI). The study was conducted in an effort to lay the groundwork for achieving international harmonisation of regulatory requirements based on scientific evidence of performance of different vaccination regimes. To evaluate the effectiveness of 3 different primary vaccination regimes: vaccination with the minimal intervals permitted by the racing authorities; vaccination in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and vaccination with the longest intervals permitted by the racing authorities. Randomised, prospective clinical trial. The 55 seronegative unvaccinated horses in this study were subdivided by age and randomly allocated one of the 3 vaccination regimes. All groups were sampled each time a group was vaccinated and 3-5 weeks post vaccination. Horses were vaccinated with a subunit immune stimulating complex-based vaccine (Equip FT). Antibodies against EI were measured by single radial haemolysis. Lengthening the vaccination intervals increased the immunity gaps between first (V1) and second (V2) doses, and V2 and third dose (V3) but did not inhibit the response to V2 and V3. The response to V2 and V3 was similar irrespective of the regime. Poor responders to V1 were identified in all age groups included in this study but the greatest number of poor responders was among the yearlings. The 2- and 3-year-old horses responded better to vaccination than the weanlings or yearlings. Longer vaccination intervals permitted by racing authorities increase the periods of susceptibility to EI but they may facilitate strategic vaccination prior to times of increased risk of exposure to virus. The study provides the type of evidence-based data necessary to commence meaningful discussion of international harmonisation of EI vaccination requirements. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  13. New Combustion Regimes and Kinetic Studies of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of plasma assisted combustion Nov.6-7, 2012 MURI Plasma 3rd Yr Review Meeting MURI Topic #11: Chemical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of plasma assisted combustion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Flow reactor Species and kinetics (Ju) 1. New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of in situ plasma discharge in counterflow flames

  14. Evaluating temperature regimes for protection of brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armour, Carl L.

    1994-01-01

    Geographic distribution and population success of brown trout (Salmo trutta) are affected by temperature regimes. Concepts are presented for evaluating alternative temperature regimes for brown trout based on published temperature information and professional judgment. Temperature information from the literature is included for spawning runs, spawning, egg and larval development, growth, and other subjects. The objective is to aid biologists in evaluating alternative temperature regimes so as to select those that will protect and enhance environmental quality for brown trout.

  15. Structures and Lagrangian statistics of the Taylor-Green dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, H.; Ponty, Y.; Krstulovic, G.; Grauer, R.

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of a Taylor-Green forced magnetohydrodynamic system showing dynamo activity is analyzed via direct numerical simulations. The statistical properties of the velocity and magnetic fields in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates are found to change between the kinematic, nonlinear and saturated regime. Fluid element (tracer) trajectories change from chaotic quasi-isotropic (kinematic phase) to mean magnetic field aligned (saturated phase). The probability density functions (PDFs) of the magnetic field change from strongly non-Gaussian in the kinematic to quasi-Gaussian PDFs in the saturated regime so that their flatness give a precise handle on the definition of the limiting points of the three regimes. Also the statistics of the kinetic and magnetic fluctuations along fluid trajectories changes. All this goes along with a dramatic increase of the correlation time of the velocity and magnetic fields experienced by tracers, significantly exceeding one turbulent large-eddy turn-over time. A remarkable consequence is an intermittent scaling regime of the Lagrangian magnetic field structure functions at unusually long time scales.

  16. Shearing box simulations in the Rayleigh unstable regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability properties of Rayleigh unstable flows both in the purely hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for two different values of the shear q = 2.1, 4.2 (q = -dln Ω/dln r) and compare it with the Keplerian case q = 1.5. We find that the q > 2 regime is unstable both in the hydrodynamic and in the MHD limit (with an initially weak magnetic field). In this regime, the velocity fluctuations dominate the magnetic fluctuations. In contrast, in the q < 2 (magnetorotational instability (MRI)) regime the magnetic fluctuations dominate. This highlights two different paths to MHD turbulence implied by the two regimes, suggesting that in the q > 2 regime the instability produces primarily velocity fluctuations that cause magnetic fluctuations, with the causality reversed for the q < 2 MRI unstable regime. We also find that the magnetic field correlation is increasingly localized as the shear is increased in the Rayleigh unstable regime. In calculating the time evolution of spatial averages of different terms in the MHD equations, we find that the q > 2 regime is dominated by terms which are nonlinear in the fluctuations, whereas for q < 2, the linear terms play a more significant role.

  17. Film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Film thickness equations are provided for four fluid-film lubrication regimes found in elliptical contacts. These regimes are isoviscous-rigid; viscous-rigid; elastohydrodynamic lubrication of low-elastic-modulus materials (soft EHL), or isoviscous-elastic; and elastohydrodynamic lubrication of high-elastic-modulus materials (hard EHL), or viscous-elastic. The influence or lack of influence of elastic and viscous effects is the factor that distinguishes these regimes. The results are presented as a map of the lubrication regimes, with film thickness contours on a log-log grid of the viscosity and elasticity for three values of the ellipticity parameter.

  18. Suite versus composite statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balsillie, J.H.; Tanner, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Suite and composite methodologies, two statistically valid approaches for producing statistical descriptive measures, are investigated for sample groups representing a probability distribution where, in addition, each sample is probability distribution. Suite and composite means (first moment measures) are always equivalent. Composite standard deviations (second moment measures) are always larger than suite standard deviations. Suite and composite values for higher moment measures have more complex relationships. Very seldom, however, are they equivalent, and they normally yield statistically significant but different results. Multiple samples are preferable to single samples (including composites) because they permit the investigator to examine sample-to-sample variability. These and other relationships for suite and composite probability distribution analyses are investigated and reported using granulometric data.

  19. Perception in statistical graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderPlas, Susan Ruth

    There has been quite a bit of research on statistical graphics and visualization, generally focused on new types of graphics, new software to create graphics, interactivity, and usability studies. Our ability to interpret and use statistical graphics hinges on the interface between the graph itself and the brain that perceives and interprets it, and there is substantially less research on the interplay between graph, eye, brain, and mind than is sufficient to understand the nature of these relationships. The goal of the work presented here is to further explore the interplay between a static graph, the translation of that graph from paper to mental representation (the journey from eye to brain), and the mental processes that operate on that graph once it is transferred into memory (mind). Understanding the perception of statistical graphics should allow researchers to create more effective graphs which produce fewer distortions and viewer errors while reducing the cognitive load necessary to understand the information presented in the graph. Taken together, these experiments should lay a foundation for exploring the perception of statistical graphics. There has been considerable research into the accuracy of numerical judgments viewers make from graphs, and these studies are useful, but it is more effective to understand how errors in these judgments occur so that the root cause of the error can be addressed directly. Understanding how visual reasoning relates to the ability to make judgments from graphs allows us to tailor graphics to particular target audiences. In addition, understanding the hierarchy of salient features in statistical graphics allows us to clearly communicate the important message from data or statistical models by constructing graphics which are designed specifically for the perceptual system.

  20. Varying Inundation Regimes Differentially Affect Natural and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change is altering sea-level rise rates and precipitation patterns worldwide. Coastal wetlands are vulnerable to these changes. System responses to stressors are important for resource managers and environmental stewards to understand in order to best manage them. Thin layer sand or sediment application to drowning and eroding marshes is one approach to build elevation and resilience. The above- and below-ground structure, soil carbon dioxide emissions, and pore water constituents in vegetated natural marsh sediments and sand-amended sediments were examined at varying inundation regimes between mean sea level and mean high water (0.82 m NAVD88 to 1.49 m NAVD88) in a field experiment at Laws Point, part of the Plum Island Sound Estuary (MA). Significantly lower salinities, pH, sulfides, phosphates, and ammonium were measured in the sand-amended sediments than in the natural sediments. In natural sediments there was a pattern of increasing salinity with increasing elevation while in the sand-amended sediments the trend was reversed, showing decreasing salinity with increasing elevation. Sulfide concentrations generally increased from low to high inundation with highest concentrations at the highest inundation (i.e., at the lowest elevations). High pore water phosphate concentrations were measured at low elevations in the natural sediments, but the sand-amended treatments had mostly low concentrations of phosphate and no consistent pattern with elevation. A

  1. Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul Halim, M.F. )

    1994-07-01

    Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

  2. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous—the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world’s fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  3. TBT causes regime shift in shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Carl D; Hoare, Daniel J; Simpson, Gavin L; Henderson, Andrew C G; Liptrot, Eleanor R; Jackson, Michael J; Appleby, Peter G; Boyle, John F; Jones, I Iwan; Waldock, Mike J

    2006-09-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is an organotin compound used since the early 1960s as a biocide in boat antifouling paints. Its use has been linked to a host of negative effects in marine ecosystems including malformations and imposex in Mollusca and acute toxicity in many other aquatic animals. Yet, the consequences of TBT use in freshwaters are largely unknown. Here, for the first time we reveal that TBT may have caused hitherto unsuspected damage to freshwater ecosystems. Through an analysis of dated sediment cores collected from a system of recreationally boated, shallow lakes, we show that first evidence of TBT is associated with a dramatic loss of submerged vegetation and associated diverse animal communities. Cause and effect are difficult to unravel in our study. However, we hypothesize that TBT, through reducing populations of grazing organisms in lakes already affected by eutrophication, promoted the replacement of macrophytes by phytoplankton, ultimately leading to a regime shift in the ecosystem. Our findings may have parallels in freshwater ecosystems all over the world.

  4. RF Profile Control for Sustained Plasma Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Leblanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-11-01

    For advancing plasma operation regimes for AT tokamaks and steady state concepts, as well as for forming and sustaining alternate concepts, it is necessary to provide control of the spatial profiles for the important plasma parameters - pressure, current, etc.. RF techniques offer considerable promise for providing this control and should be further developed as rapidly as possible within the well established tokamak program for forming a basis for application to all confinement concepts. Notably, IBW promises to provide internal transport barrier control if the coupling physics can be understood and efficient antenna coupling to the Bernstein wave can be developed. We will review the IBW experience and discuss possible explanations and solutions for the coupling problems encountered. In particular, the competing roles of parametric decay instability and surface mode excitation will be examined in order to elucidate the increase in surface power losses for the larger devices DIII-D and TFTR. Also, issues which need to be understood for employing ICRF and LH techniques to best advantage, such as antenna bombardment and energetic electron excitation, respectively, will be outlined.

  5. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1990-05-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 3 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. The past year has been extremely productive especially in the area of interpretation theory, including the following two major break-throughs. One is the derivation of an integral equation for time-dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering (including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single and multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach) and offers more complete and economical solutions to the problems of seismic scattering and attenuation. The other is the new formula for synthetic seismograms for layered media with irregular interfaces, combining the T-matrix method for an arbitrary shaped inclusion and the method of global generalized reflection/transmission coefficients for layered media. Both breakthroughs will enable us to deal with seismic observations in complex earth structures more efficiently and accurately. In the area of experimental studies, we discovered seismic guided waves trapped in the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. 54 refs., 14 figs.

  6. On spinfoam models in large spin regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2014-01-01

    We study the semiclassical behavior of Lorentzian Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) spinfoam model, by taking into account the sum over spins in the large spin regime. We also employ the method of stationary phase analysis with parameters and the so-called, almost analytic machinery, in order to find the asymptotic behavior of the contributions from all possible large spin configurations in the spinfoam model. The spins contributing the sum are written as Jf = λjf, where λ is a large parameter resulting in an asymptotic expansion via stationary phase approximation. The analysis shows that at least for the simplicial Lorentzian geometries (as spinfoam critical configurations), they contribute the leading order approximation of spinfoam amplitude only when their deficit angles satisfy \\gamma \\mathring{\\Theta }_f\\le \\lambda ^{-1/2} mod 4\\pi {Z}. Our analysis results in a curvature expansion of the semiclassical low energy effective action from the spinfoam model, where the UV modifications of Einstein gravity appear as subleading high-curvature corrections.

  7. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  8. Two-Flavor Lattice-QCD Simulation in the γ Regime with Exact Chiral Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Chiu, T. W.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Matsufuru, H.; Noaki, J.; Ogawa, K.; Okamoto, M.; Onogi, T.; Yamada, N.

    2007-04-01

    We perform lattice simulations of two-flavor QCD using Neuberger’s overlap fermion, with which the exact chiral symmetry is realized at finite lattice spacings. The γ regime is reached by decreasing the light quark mass down to 3 MeV on a 163×32 lattice with a lattice spacing ˜0.11fm. We find a good agreement of the low-lying Dirac eigenvalue spectrum with the analytical predictions of the chiral random matrix theory, which reduces to the chiral perturbation theory in the γ regime. The chiral condensate is extracted as ΣMS¯(2GeV)=(251±7±11MeV)3, where the errors are statistical and an estimate of the higher order effects in the γ expansion.

  9. Controlling photon transport in the single-photon weak-coupling regime of cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Zhao; Cheng, Jiong; Liu, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Ling

    2015-06-01

    We study the photon statistics properties of few-photon transport in an optomechanical system where an optomechanical cavity couples to two empty cavities. By analytically deriving the one- and two-photon currents in terms of a zero-time-delayed two-order correlation function, we show that a photon blockade can be achieved in both the single-photon strong-coupling regime and the single-photon weak-coupling regime due to the nonlinear interacting and multipath interference. Furthermore, our systems can be applied as a quantum optical diode, a single-photon source, and a quantum optical capacitor. It is shown that this the photon transport controlling devices based on photon antibunching does not require the stringent single-photon strong-coupling condition. Our results provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation of optomechanics, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum circuit realization.

  10. Nonequilibrium work statistics of an Aharonov-Bohm flux.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Campisi, Michele

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the statistics of work performed on a noninteracting electron gas confined in a ring as a threaded magnetic field is turned on. For an electron gas initially prepared in a grand canonical state it is demonstrated that the Jarzynski equality continues to hold in this case, with the free energy replaced by the grand potential. The work distribution displays a marked dependence on the temperature. While in the classical (high-temperature) regime, the work probability density function follows a Gaussian distribution and the free energy difference entering the Jarzynski equality is null, the free energy difference is finite in the quantum regime, and the work probability distribution function becomes multimodal. We point out the dependence of the work statistics on the number of electrons composing the system.

  11. Covariance Between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds Within Atmospheric State Regimes at the Satellite Footprint Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  12. Architecture of collapse: regime shift and recovery in an hierarchically structured marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Georgi M; Boicenco, Laura; Grishin, Alexandre N; Lazar, Luminita; Mihneva, Vesselina; Shlyakhov, Vladislav A; Zengin, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    By the late 20th century, a series of events or 'natural experiments', for example the depletion of apex predators, extreme eutrophication and blooms of invasive species, had suggested that the Black Sea could be considered as a large ecosystem 'laboratory'. The events resulted in regime shifts cascading through all trophic levels, disturbing ecosystem functioning and damaging the water environment. Causal pathways by which the external (hydroclimate, overfishing) and internal (food web interactions) drivers provoke regime shifts are investigated. Statistical data analyses supported by an interpretative framework based on hierarchical ecosystem theory revealed mechanisms of hierarchical incorporation of environmental factors into the ecosystem. Evidence links Atlantic teleconnections to Black Sea hydroclimate, which together with fishing shapes variability in fish stocks. The hydroclimatic signal is conveyed through the food web via changes in productivity at all levels, to planktivorous fish. Fluctuating fish abundance is believed to induce a lagged change in competitor jelly plankton that cascades down to phytoplankton and influences water quality. Deprived of the stabilising role of apex predators, the Black Sea's hierarchical ecosystem organisation is susceptible to both environmental and anthropogenic stresses, and increased fishing makes fish stock collapses highly probable. When declining stocks are confronted with burgeoning fishing effort associated with the inability of fishery managers and decision-makers to adapt rapidly to changes in fish abundance, there is overfishing and stock collapse. Management procedures are ineffective at handling complex phenomena such as ecosystem regime shifts because of the shortage of suitable explanatory models. The proposed concepts and models reported here relate the hydroclimate, overfishing and invasive species to shifts in ecosystem functioning and water quality, unravelling issues such as the causality of ecosystem

  13. Covariance between Arctic sea ice and clouds within atmospheric state regimes at the satellite footprint level

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan‐Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice‐cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint‐level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A‐Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and midtropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest‐magnitude cloud‐sea ice covariance occurs between 500 m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near‐surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations. PMID:27818851

  14. Covariance Between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds Within Atmospheric State Regimes at the Satellite Footprint Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  15. Characterizing Past and Future Flood Regimes of California's Cosumnes River: A Hydroinformatic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, A. A.; Condon, L. E.; Viers, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the only major undammed river on the west slope of California's Sierra Nevada, with over 100 years of USGS streamflow data, and the location of several floodplain conservation and restoration efforts, the Cosumnes River offers a unique opportunity to study connections between a river's flow regime and floodplain functions. Flow regime, including frequency and magnitude of floods, and its interaction with the surrounding landscape are primary drivers of floodplain structure and ecosystem dynamics. However, these floodplain processes and functions are often altered by water management schemes, land uses, and hydroclimatic alteration induced by climate warming. Improved understanding of ecologically relevant aspects of flow regime and potential future alteration is central to managing floodplain ecosystems and their services. In order to describe the inundation regime of the lower Cosumnes River floodplain, California, this research moves beyond flood frequency analysis to examine other flood event characteristics and identify flood types using statistical cluster analysis. Floods are characterized using metrics of ecological relevance, such as magnitude, timing, duration, and total volume. To explore potential effects of climate change, non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value models are fit to historical floods based on temperature and precipitation at the monthly scale. Temperature and precipitation variables from downscaled Global Climate Models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase-5 are then applied to develop flood distributions for climate change scenarios. These results are used to adjust the magnitude of clustered flood events identified in the historical record, and the sensitivity of the inundation regime to these changes is assessed. This research provides useful scientific insights for management and restoration efforts within the Cosumnes watershed and demonstrates the utility of applying these methods to other floodplain systems.

  16. Challenges in the participatory assessment of sustainable management practices in dryland ecosystems under regime shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucker Riva, Matteo; Schwilch, Gudrun; Liniger, Hanspeter

    2015-04-01

    Regime shifts, defined as a radical and persistent reconfiguration of an ecosystem following a disturbance, have been acknowledged by scientists as a very important aspect of the dynamic of ecosystems. However, their consideration in land management planning remains marginal and limited to specific processes and systems. Current research focuses on mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of spatio-temporal data for specific environmental variables. These methods do not fulfill the needs of land managers, who are confronted with a multitude of processes and pressure types and require clear and simple strategies to prevent regime shift or to increase the resilience of their environment. The EU-FP7 CASCADE project is looking at regime shifts of dryland ecosystems in southern Europe and specifically focuses on rangeland and forest systems which are prone to various land degradation threats. One of the aims of the project is to evaluate the impact of different management practices on the dynamic of the environment in a participatory manner, including a multi-stakeholder evaluation of the state of the environment and of the management potential. To achieve this objective we have organized several stakeholder meetings and we have compiled a review of management practices using the WOCAT methodology, which enables merging scientific and land users knowledge. We highlight here the main challenges we have encountered in applying the notion of regime shift to real world socio-ecological systems and in translating related concepts such as tipping points, stable states, hysteresis and resilience to land managers, using concrete examples from CASCADE study sites. Secondly, we explore the advantages of including land users' knowledge in the scientific understanding of regime shifts. Moreover, we discuss useful alternative concepts and lessons learnt that will allow us to build a participatory method for the assessment of resilient management practices in specific socio

  17. Comprehensive assessment of dam impacts on flow regimes with consideration of interannual variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Zhao, Tongtiegang

    2017-09-01

    Assessing the impact of human intervention on flow regimes is important in policy making and resource management. Previous impact assessments of dam regulation on flow regimes have focused on long-term average patterns, but interannual variations, which are important characteristics to be considered, have been ignored. In this study, the entire signatures of hydrograph variations of Miyun Reservoir in northern China were described by forty flow regime metrics that incorporate magnitude, variability and frequency, duration, timing, and rate of change for flow events based on a long-term synchronous observation series of inflow and outflow. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to reduce the multidimensionality of the metrics and time and to determine impact patterns and their interannual shifts. Statistically significant driving factors of impact pattern variations were identified. We found that dam regulation resulted in four main impact classes on the flow regimes and that the regulated capacity was interannually attenuated from 1973 to 2010. The impact patterns alternated between the highly regulated class with extremely decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency and the slightly regulated class with extremely increasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency from 1973 to 1987 and then stabilized in the latter class from 1988 to 2001. After 2001, the pattern gradually changed from the moderately regulated class with moderately decreasing flow magnitude, extreme variability, and extreme intermittency to the slightly regulated class with slightly decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and no intermittency. Decreasing precipitation and increasing drought were the primary drivers for the interannual variations of the impact patterns, and inflow variability was the most significant factor affecting the patterns, followed by flow event frequency and duration, magnitude, and timing. This

  18. Detecting regime shifts in marine systems with limited biological data: An example from southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Frusher, Stewart D.; Dann, Peter; Tuck, Geoffrey N.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to detect ecological regime shifts in a data-limited setting was investigated, using southeast Australian ecosystems as a model. Community variability was summarized for 1968-2008 with the first two principal components (PCs) of recruitment estimates for six fish stocks and reproductive parameters for four seabird species; regional climate was summarized for 1953-2008 with the first two PCs for three parameters (sea surface temperature [SST], sea surface salinity, surface nitrate) measured at two stations; and basin-scale climate variability was summarized for 1950-2012 with mean South Pacific SST and the first two PCs of detrended South Pacific SST. The first two biology PCs explained 45% of total community variability. The first two PCs of basin-scale SST showed abrupt shifts similar to "regime" behavior observed in other ocean basins, and the first PC of basin-scale SST showed significant covariation with the first PC of regional climate. Together, these results are consistent with the strong community variability and decadal-scale red noise climatic variability associated with Northern Hemisphere regime shifts. However, statistical model selection showed that the first two PCs of regional climate and the first PC of biology time series all exhibited linear change, rather than abrupt shifts. This result is consistent with previous studies documenting rapid linear change in the climate and biology of southeast Australian shelf ecosystems, and we conclude that there is no evidence for regime shift behavior in the region's ecology. However, analysis of a large set of previously-published biological time series from the North Pacific (n = 64) suggests that studies using fewer than ∼30 biological time series, such as this one, may be unable to detect regime shifts. Thus we conclude that the nature of ecological variability in the region cannot be determined with available data. The development of additional long-term biological observations is needed

  19. Thermal regimes and effusive trends at Nyamuragira volcano (DRC) from MODIS infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, D.; Cigolini, C.

    2013-08-01

    Nyamuragira volcano is one of the most active African volcanoes. Eruptions have been occurring every 3-4 years throughout the last century. Here, we analyse satellite infrared data, collected by MODIS sensor to estimate the volcanic radiative power (VRP, in W) and energy (VRE; in J) released during the 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006-2007, 2010 and 2011-2012 eruptions. Based on the statistical distribution of VRP measurements, we found that thermal emissions at Nyamuragira fall into three distinct radiating regimes. The high-radiating regime occurs during the emplacement of poorly insulated lava flows and characterise most of the effusive activity. The moderate-radiating regime is associated with open-vent activity (Strombolian explosions and/or lava lake activity) eventually accompanied by the emplacement of short-lived and well-insulated flows. A third radiating regime (low-radiating regime) occurs during periods, which may last weeks to months, that follow each eruption and are associated with the cooling of the effused lava flows. By applying the radiant density approach to MODIS-derived VRP we also estimated the time-averaged lava discharge rates (TADR; in m3 s-1) and we analysed the effusive trends of the above eruptions. We found that the transition between the effusive and open-vent activity typically takes place when TADR reduces to low values (<5 m3 s-1) and marks a change in the eruptive style of the volcano. Finally, we observed a clear correlation between the volume of erupted lava and its cooling time. This suggests that the average thickness of the analysed lava flows is more variable than previously thought and sheds light on the uncertainty in calculating erupted volumes assuming that lava flow areas have uniform thickness.

  20. Covariance between Arctic sea ice and clouds within atmospheric state regimes at the satellite footprint level.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patrick C; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-12-27

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and midtropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500 m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  1. Whither Statistics Education Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the publication of a "National Statement on Mathematics for Australian Schools", which was the first curriculum statement this country had including "Chance and Data" as a significant component. It is hence an opportune time to survey the history of the related statistics education…

  2. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing…

  3. Quartiles in Elementary Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The calculation of the upper and lower quartile values of a data set in an elementary statistics course is done in at least a dozen different ways, depending on the text or computer/calculator package being used (such as SAS, JMP, MINITAB, "Excel," and the TI-83 Plus). In this paper, we examine the various methods and offer a suggestion for a new…

  4. ASURV: Astronomical SURVival Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, E. D.; Nelson, P. I.; Isobe, T.; LaValley, M.

    2014-06-01

    ASURV (Astronomical SURVival Statistics) provides astronomy survival analysis for right- and left-censored data including the maximum-likelihood Kaplan-Meier estimator and several univariate two-sample tests, bivariate correlation measures, and linear regressions. ASURV is written in FORTRAN 77, and is stand-alone and does not call any specialized libraries.

  5. NACME Statistical Report 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Luis A.; Ruiz, Esther

    This statistical report summarizes data on enrollment and graduation of minority students in engineering degree programs from 1974 to 1985. First, an introduction identifies major trends and briefly describes the Incentive Grants Program (IGP), the nation's largest privately supported source of scholarship funds available to minority engineering…

  6. General Aviation Avionics Statistics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 5" FAA-MS-80-7* a and. SubtitleDecember 1&80 "GENERAL AVIATION AVIONICS STATISTICS 0 6...Altimeter 8. Fuel gage 3. Compass 9. Landing gear 4. Tachometer 10. Belts 5. Oil temperature 11. Special equipment for 6. Emergency locator over water

  7. Probability and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bernis, Ed.; And Others

    This teacher's guide to probability and statistics contains three major sections. The first section on elementary combinatorial principles includes activities, student problems, and suggested teaching procedures for the multiplication principle, permutations, and combinations. Section two develops an intuitive approach to probability through…

  8. Application Statistics, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto. Research Div.

    Summary statistics on fall 1984 application and registration patterns of applicants wishing to pursue full-time study in first-year places in Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Each applicant was allowed to indicate up to three choices of universities and programs. Each choice was considered to be a distinct application, even though the…

  9. NACME Statistical Report 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Luis A.; Ruiz, Esther

    This statistical report summarizes data on enrollment and graduation of minority students in engineering degree programs from 1974 to 1985. First, an introduction identifies major trends and briefly describes the Incentive Grants Program (IGP), the nation's largest privately supported source of scholarship funds available to minority engineering…

  10. Selected Manpower Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense -- Comptroller (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This document contains summaries of basic manpower statistical data for the Department of Defense, with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force totals shown separately and collectively. Included are figures for active duty military personnel, civilian personnel, reserve components, and retired military personnel. Some of the data show…

  11. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing…

  12. Structurally Sound Statistics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Stephanie A.; Bostic, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core's Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP) call for all K-grade 12 students to develop expertise in the processes and proficiencies of doing mathematics. However, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010) as a whole addresses students' learning of not only mathematics but also statistics. This situation…

  13. Statistical Energy Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R. C.; Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.; Nygaard, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is powerful tool for estimating highfrequency vibration spectra of complex structural systems and incorporated into computer program. Basic SEA analysis procedure divided into three steps: Idealization, parameter generation, and problem solution. SEA computer program written in FORTRAN V for batch execution.

  14. Statistical origin of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2010-06-15

    Starting from the definition of entropy used in statistical mechanics we show that it is proportional to the gravity action. For a stationary black hole this entropy is expressed as S=E/2T, where T is the Hawking temperature and E is shown to be the Komar energy. This relation is also compatible with the generalized Smarr formula for mass.

  15. Statistical Reasoning over Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selmer, Sarah J.; Bolyard, Johnna J.; Rye, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Students in the 21st century are exposed daily to a staggering amount of numerically infused media. In this era of abundant numeric data, students must be able to engage in sound statistical reasoning when making life decisions after exposure to varied information. The context of nutrition can be used to engage upper elementary and middle school…

  16. Teaching Statistical Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrito, Patricia B.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that statistical literacy is a necessary component of a complete college education and important in combating growing innumeracy in American society, and describes a general education course at the University of Louisville (Kentucky) that includes it. Instruction focuses on societal issues, sometimes controversial, for which an…

  17. Statistics of mass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. L.; Gateley, Wilson Y.

    1993-05-01

    This paper summarizes the statistical quality control methods and procedures that can be employed in mass producing electronic parts (integrated circuits, buffers, capacitors, connectors) to reduce variability and ensure performance to specified radiation, current, voltage, temperature, shock, and vibration levels. Producing such quality parts reduces uncertainties in performance and will aid materially in validating the survivability of components, subsystems, and systems to specified threats.

  18. Education Statistics Quarterly, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marenus, Barbara; Burns, Shelley; Fowler, William; Greene, Wilma; Knepper, Paula; Kolstad, Andrew; McMillen Seastrom, Marilyn; Scott, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    This publication provides a comprehensive overview of work done across all parts of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Each issue contains short publications, summaries, and descriptions that cover all NCES publications and data products released in a 3-month period. Each issue also contains a message from the NCES on a timely…

  19. Forest statistics of Kentucky

    Treesearch

    The Forest Survey Organization. Central States Forest Experiment Station

    1952-01-01

    The Forest Survey is conducted in the various regions by the forest experiment stations of the Forest Service. In Kentucky the project is directed by the Central States Forest Experiment Station with headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. This Survey Release presents the more significant preliminary statistics on the forest area, timber volume, timber growth, and timber drain...

  20. Forest statistics of Indiana

    Treesearch

    The Forest Survey Organization. Central States Forest Experiment Station

    1953-01-01

    The Forest Survey is conducted in the various regions by the forest experiment stations of the Forest Service. In Indiana the project is directed by the Central States Forest Experiment Station with headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. This Survey Release presents the more significant preliminary statistics on the forest area timber volume, timber growth, and timber drain...

  1. Learning Statistical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akram, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Asim Jamal; Yasmeen, Farah

    2004-01-01

    In order to learn the concept of statistical techniques one needs to run real experiments that generate reliable data. In practice, the data from some well-defined process or system is very costly and time consuming. It is difficult to run real experiments during the teaching period in the university. To overcome these difficulties, statisticians…

  2. Selected Manpower Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense -- Comptroller (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This document contains summaries of basic manpower statistical data for the Department of Defense, with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force totals shown separately and collectively. Included are figures for active duty military personnel, civilian personnel, reserve components, and retired military personnel. Some of the data show…

  3. Statistically Valid Planting Trials

    Treesearch

    C. B. Briscoe

    1961-01-01

    More than 100 million tree seedlings are planted each year in Latin America, and at least ten time'that many should be planted Rational control and development of a program of such magnitude require establishing and interpreting carefully planned trial plantings which will yield statistically valid answers to real and important questions. Unfortunately, many...

  4. Analogies for Understanding Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocquette, Jean-Francois

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a simple way to explain the limitations of statistics to scientists and students to avoid the publication of misleading conclusions. Biologists examine their results extremely critically and carefully choose the appropriate analytic methods depending on their scientific objectives. However, no such close attention is usually…

  5. Lack of Statistical Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Kawano, Takuji

    2007-01-01

    Criticism has been leveled against the use of statistical significance testing (SST) in many disciplines. However, the field of school psychology has been largely devoid of critiques of SST. Inspection of the primary journals in school psychology indicated numerous examples of SST with nonrandom samples and/or samples of convenience. In this…

  6. Statistical Significance Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E., Ed.; Kaufman, Alan S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The controversy about the use or misuse of statistical significance testing has become the major methodological issue in educational research. This special issue contains three articles that explore the controversy, three commentaries on these articles, an overall response, and three rejoinders by the first three authors. They are: (1)…

  7. Minnesota forest statistics, 1990.

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Chung M. Chen

    1992-01-01

    The fifth inventory of Minnesota's forests reports 51.0 million acres of land, of which 16.7 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership.

  8. Kansas forest statistics, 1981.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile; John S. Jr. Spencer

    1984-01-01

    The third inventory of the timber resources of Kansas shows a 1.4% increase in commercial forest area and a 42% gain in growing-stock volume between 1965 and 1981. Highlights and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization and biomass.

  9. Iowa forest statistics

    Treesearch

    The Forest Survey Organization. Central States Forest Experiment Station

    1956-01-01

    This report contains forest area and timber volume statistics for the State of Iowa. The information presented here was gathered and compiled according to three different geographical units, the divisions being made on the basis of similar forest, soil, and economic conditions (frontispiece). So, for the benefit of those who might find such localized information useful...

  10. Michigan forest statistics, 1993.

    Treesearch

    Earl C. Leatherberry; John S. Jr. Spencer

    1996-01-01

    The fifth forest inventory of Michigan's forest reports 36.4 million acres of land, of which 19.3 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and biomass.

  11. Indiana forest statistics.

    Treesearch

    W. Brad Smith; Mark F. Golitz

    1988-01-01

    The third inventory of Indiana's timber resource shows that timberland area in Indiana climbed from 3.9 to 4.3 million acres between 1967 and 1986, an increase of more than 10%. During the same period growing-stock volume increased 43%. Highlights and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, and removals.

  12. Illinois forest statistics, 1985.

    Treesearch

    Jerold T. Hahn

    1987-01-01

    The third inventory of the timber resource of Illinois shows a 1% increase in commercial forest area and a 40% gain in growing-stock volume between 1962 and 1985. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  13. Structurally Sound Statistics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Stephanie A.; Bostic, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core's Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP) call for all K-grade 12 students to develop expertise in the processes and proficiencies of doing mathematics. However, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010) as a whole addresses students' learning of not only mathematics but also statistics. This situation…

  14. Michigan forest statistics, 1980.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile; W. Brad Smith

    1983-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Michigan shows a 7% decline in commercial forest area and a 27% gain in growing-stock volume between 1966 and 1980. Highlights and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  15. Wisconsin forest statistics, 1983.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile

    1983-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Wisconsin shows a 2% increase in commercial forest area and a 39% gain in growing-stock volume between 1968 and 1983. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  16. Mental Illness Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of benign genes ID’s ASD suspects More Additional Mental Health Information from NIMH Medications Statistics Clinical Trials Coping ... Finder Publicaciones en Español The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is part of the National Institutes of ...

  17. Statistical Energy Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R. C.; Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.; Nygaard, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is powerful tool for estimating highfrequency vibration spectra of complex structural systems and incorporated into computer program. Basic SEA analysis procedure divided into three steps: Idealization, parameter generation, and problem solution. SEA computer program written in FORTRAN V for batch execution.

  18. Graduate Statistics: Student Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Robert L.; Broadston, Pamela M.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes toward statistics of graduate students who used a computer program as part of the instruction, which allowed for an individualized, self-paced, student-centered, activity-based course. The twelve sections involved in this study were offered in the spring and fall 2001, spring and fall 2002, spring and fall…

  19. Statistical and operational summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disalvo, J.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical progress indicator forms are presented on the financial management of the research allocations. Promotional activities, conference participants, and services are tabulated. The staffing and activity levels are also discussed, as well as the fee schedule revision and the standard interest profile offerings.

  20. Library Research and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; St. Lifer, Evan; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee; Miller, Marilyn L.; Shontz, Marilyn L.

    2001-01-01

    These nine articles discuss research and statistics on libraries and librarianship, including libraries in the United States, Canada, and Mexico; acquisition expenditures in public, academic, special, and government libraries; price indexes; state rankings of public library data; library buildings; expenditures in school library media centers; and…

  1. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  2. Statistical fluctuations of radiation in quasi-Cherenkov generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2017-07-01

    In a nonstationary (self-modulation) regime, terahertz quasi-Cherenkov generators can operate at MHz-GHz repetition rates and megawatt power levels. Shot noise, intrinsic to electron beams, is the cause of statistical fluctuations of radiation in the generators. The shot-noise related spread of instability growth time imposes appreciable limitations on the possibility of coherent summation of electromagnetic oscillations from several quasi-Cherenkov generators operating in a nonstationary mode.

  3. Analysis of weather condition influencing fire regime in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, Valentina; Masala, Francesco; Salis, Michele; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Fires have a crucial role within Mediterranean ecosystems, with both negative and positive impacts on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In addition, several authors are in agreement suggesting that, during the past decades, changes on fire patterns have occurred, especially in terms of fire-prone areas expansion and fire season lengthening. Climate and weather are two of the main controlling agents, directly and indirectly, of fire regime influencing vegetation productivity, causing water stress, igniting fires through lightning, or modulating fire behavior through wind. On the other hand, these relationships could be not warranted in areas where most ignitions are caused by people (Moreno et al. 2009). Specific analyses of the driving forces of fire regime across countries and scales are thus still required in order to better anticipate fire seasons and also to advance our knowledge of future fire regimes. The objective of this work was to improve our knowledge of the relative effects of several weather variables on forest fires in Italy for the period 1985-2008. Meteorological data were obtained through the MARS (Monitoring Agricultural Resources) database, interpolated at 25x25 km scale. Fire data were provided by the JRC (Join Research Center) and the CFVA (Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale, Sardinia). A hierarchical cluster analysis, based on fire and weather data, allowed the identification of six homogeneous areas in terms of fire occurrence and climate (pyro-climatic areas). Two statistical techniques (linear and non-parametric models) were applied in order to assess if inter-annual variability in weather pattern and fire events had a significant trend. Then, through correlation analysis and multi-linear regression modeling, we investigated the

  4. Estimation of metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers under different feeding regimes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, S. V.; Pandey, Priyanka; Kumar, Narendra; Hooda, O. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was designed to estimate the metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries (Holstein-Friesian X Tharparkar) heifers under two different feeding regimes, i.e., feeding regime-1 as per the National Research Council (NRC) (2001) and feeding regime-2 having 15% higher energy (supplementation of molasses) than NRC (2001). Materials and Methods: Six (n = 6) healthy heifers of Sahiwal and Karan Fries with 18-24 months of age were selected from Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. An initial 15 days was maintained under feeding regime-1 and feeding regime-2 as adaptation period; actual experiment was conducted from 16th day onward for next 15 days. At the end of feeding regimes (on day 15th and 16th), expired air and volume were collected in Douglas bag for two consecutive days (morning [6:00 am] and evening [4:00 pm]). The fraction of methane and expired air volume were measured by methane analyzer and wet test meter, respectively. The oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured by iWorx LabScribe2. Results: The heat production (kcal/day) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 as compared to feeding regimen-1 in both breeds. The heat production per unit metabolic body weight was numerically higher in feeding regime-1 than feeding regime-2; however, the values were found statistically non-significant (p>0.05). The energy loss as methane (%) from total heat production was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-1. The body weight (kg), metabolic body weight (W0.75), and basal metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75) were significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 in both breeds. Conclusions: This study indicates that higher energy diet by supplementing molasses may reduce energy loss as methane and enhance the growth of Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers. PMID:27284226

  5. Dynamo beyond the regimed of MHD theory

    SciTech Connect

    Raskolnikov, I.; Mattor, N.

    1996-12-31

    Conservation of magnetic helicity K = {integral} dVA {circ} B, requires Ohm`s law to be valid, which can be rather restrictive. More generally, in fluid theory each charged species has its own helicity, where q{sub {alpha}} m{sub {alpha}}, and v{sub {alpha}} are the charge, mass and velocity of species a. The K{sub {alpha}} are conserved in the limit where {del}n{sub {alpha}} x {del}T{sub {alpha}} = 0; if this term does not vanish, then K{sub {alpha}} can be generated. For a neutral two-species plasma with low electron mass and a{Omega}{sub i} > v{sub i} (where a is a characteristic lengthscale of the magnetic field), it can be shown that K{sub e} conservation reduces to the the usual MHD conservation of K, and the difference K{sub i} - K{sub e} reduces to the usual conservation of cross helicity, {integral} dVv{sub i} {circ} B. This suggests that MHD dynamo theory can be generalized to any regime where fluid theory is valid. With K{sub e} {approx_equal} K for small m{sub e}, then the presence of {del}n{sub e} x {del}T{sub e} {ne} 0 can generate K, which can then generate large scale magnetic fields, as in the usual dynamo theory. Cross helicity can also be generated if {del}n{sub e} x {del}T{sub e} {ne} 0, which also affects the cascade dynamics.

  6. The seismology of geothermal regimes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have been developing seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in geothermal areas for a better understanding of the earth`s geothermal regimes. The questions the y have addressed in their research may be summarized as ``What is going on in the earth`s crust under tectonically active regions; what are the structures and processes responsible for such activities as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; and how can one capture their essence effectively by means of seismological studies?`` First, the authors found clear evidence for localization of scattered seismic energy in the deep magmatic system of the volcano on the island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean. The seismic coda of local earthquakes show concentrated energy in the intrusive zones as late as 30 to 40 seconds after the origin time. This offers a very effective method for defining a zone of strong heterogeneity on a regional scale, complementary to the high resolution study using trapped modes as pursued in the past project. Secondly, the authors identified about 700 long-period events with various frequencies and durations from the data collected during the past 5 years which included three episodes of eruption. They are applying a finite-element method to the simplest event with the longest period and the shortest duration in order to find the location, geometry and physical properties of their source deterministically. The preliminary result described here suggests that their sources may be a horizontally lying magma-filled crack at a shallow depth under the summit area. In addition to the above work on the Reunion data, they have continued the theoretical and observational studies of attenuation and scattering of seismic waves.

  7. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Seasonal forecast quality of the West African monsoon rainfall regimes by multiple forecast systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luis Ricardo Lage; García-Serrano, Javier; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2014-07-01

    A targeted methodology to study the West African monsoon (WAM) rainfall variability is considered where monthly rainfall is averaged over 10°W-10°E to take into account the latitudinal migration and temporal distribution of the WAM summer rainfall. Two observational rainfall data sets and a large number of quasi-operational forecast systems, among them two systems from the European Seasonal to Interannual Prediction initiative and six systems from the North American Multi-model Ensemble project, are used in this research. The two leading modes of the WAM rainfall variability, namely, the Guinean and Sahelian regimes, are estimated by applying principal component analysis (PCA) on the longitudinally averaged precipitation. The PCA is performed upon the observations and each forecast system and lead time separately. A statistical model based on simple linear regression using sea surface temperature indices as predictors is considered both as a benchmark and an additional forecast system. The combination of the dynamical forecast systems and the statistical model is performed using different methods of combination. It is shown that most forecast systems capture the main features associated with the Guinean regime, that is, rainfall located mainly south of 10°N and the northward migration of rainfall over the season. On the other hand, only a fraction of the forecast systems capture the characteristics of the rainfall signal north of 10°N associated with the Sahelian regime. A simple statistical model proves to be of great value and outperforms most state-of-the-art dynamical forecast systems when predicting the principal components associated with the Guinean and Sahelian regimes. Combining all forecast systems do not lead to improved forecasts when compared to the best single forecast system, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts System 4 (S4). In fact, S4 is far better than any forecast system when predicting the variability of the WAM rainfall

  9. The Influence of Atmospheric Transport Regimes on Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Concentrations Measured at Zeppelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubl, S.; Scheringer, M.; Hungerbuehler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of exclusively anthropogenic origin. PCBs are toxic, bioaccumulative and have a great potential of long-range transport. PCBs have been banned globally under the Stockholm convention on POPs since 2004. We analysed times series of 21 PCB congeners ranging from PCB 18 to PCB 187 that have been measured at Zeppelin (Spitsbergen) since 1993. Although primary PCB emissions have been steadily reduced, a strong decreasing trend is not observed in the PCB concentrations in the Arctic. In order to investigate the influence of atmospheric transport on the PCB concentrations and to identify the potential source regions of the PCBs, we calculated footprints for the Zeppelin measurement site using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. Footprints can be interpreted as potential source regions where PCBs may have been picked up. Based on various statistical analyses of the footprints (cluster analysis, k-medoid, silhouette), we identified the prevailing transport regimes for Zeppelin which were represented by 5 different clusters. Cluster 1 and 3 belong to transport regimes with highest residence times over Europe (cluster 1) and North-America (cluster 3); both transport regimes dominantly occur from late fall to early spring. Clusters 2 and 4 represent air masses with surface contact predominantly over the Atlantic Ocean (cluster 2), only occurring during the summer months, and the Arctic Ocean (cluster 4) mainly observed in spring and autumn, but also in summer. Cluster 5 is representative of air originating from the Pacific ocean and eastern Asia; this transport regime occurs mainly in spring and fall. We grouped the PCB concentrations measured at Zeppelin according to the 5 different clusters and calculated the median for each cluster and PCB congener. The median for medium to heavier PCBs is highest for cluster 1 and 3, which represent transport regimes over the continent, suggesting that

  10. Runoff Regime Prediction: a Water Balance Approach for High Elevation Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, E.; Allamano, P.; Claps, P.; Laio, F.

    2009-05-01

    Runoff regime, intended as the curve of the mean monthly runoff values, is a valuable information for the control of water management strategies. The increasing competition between different water uses and the recognized need for a sustainable resources exploitation require an improvement in the runoff prediction procedures also for regions, as the European Alps, historically characterized by abundant water resources. Moreover, threats of global temperature increase include specific modifications of the regime, that can affect water uses based on runoff regularity. For mountain catchments, however, runoff prediction is made complex by the topographic heterogeneities, the dynamics of snow accumulation and melt, and the high spatial precipitation variability, generally poorly described by the measurements networks. In this paper we present a parsimonious (i.e. characterized by a limited number of parameters) water balance model conceived for mountain basins that uses widely available input data (mean monthly temperature and precipitation). The model works on a monthly scale but we introduce a statistical representation of the within- month temperature variability to take into account the effects of the above- and below-zero frequency on the snow accumulation. In fact, the modeling scheme contains a specific snow accumulation and melt module that allows to partition precipitation into snow and rainfall and to assess snowmelt volumes based on a temperature threshold mechanism. Runoff is obtained as the sum of two contributes: net precipitation (rainfall minus evapotranspiration) and snowmelt. A parametric procedure to correct precipitation measurements due to snow undercatch is also proposed. To assess the performances of the model we apply it to a sample of catchments located in the Western Italian Alps and we compare the simulated and observed runoff regimes in terms of mean absolute error. The model proves able to describe the timing and shape of the regime for most

  11. An objective weather-regime-based verification of WRF-RTFDDA forecasts over the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Liu, Yubao; Pan, Linlin; Sheu, Rong-Shyang

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction in the eastern Mediterranean is very challenging because of the region's unique geography, which includes strong land-sea contrast, complex topography, highly varied vegetation, and mosaic of urban and desert areas. This geographic heterogeneity often results in complex and dramatically different mesoscale and microscale flows underdifferent synoptic situations. WRF-RTFDDA (Weather Research and Forecasting - Realtime four-dimensional data assimilation and forecasting system) is a WRF-based multi-scale 4-dimensional weather analysis and prediction system. It effectively assimilates diverse types of direct, retrieved and non-direct observations available at irregular time and locations using a hybrid Newtonian relaxation and 3DVar data assimilation procedure to initiate regional weather forecast. The hybrid data assimilation and forecasting system has been implemented in a triple-nested WRF configuration with 30, 10, and 3.3 km horizontal grid spacing over the eastern Mediterranean. Analysis and forecasts have been run for a one-year long period, covering four seasons that include a wide variety of synoptic weather regimes. Objective verification is conducted to study the model performance under different weather regime. The Alpert et al. (2001) weather-regime classification method is adopted to classify the synoptic weather into 19 classes according to daily surface synoptic flows that include cyclones, highs and troughs. The aim of this paper is to investigate the model skill under different synoptic weather regimes. Objective verification statistics including Bias, RMSE and MAE of main weather variables are calculated by comparing the model data with soundings and surface observations for each weather regime. Preliminary examination of the verification scores shows significant differences of model forecast accuracy under different weather situations. The RMSE of 24h forecasts of 2-m temperatures varies from 1.6 C to 2.3C among

  12. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  13. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    In this paper is provided the statistical generalization of the Fermi paradox. The statistics of habitable planets may be based on a set of ten (and possibly more) astrobiological requirements first pointed out by Stephen H. Dole in his book Habitable planets for man (1964). The statistical generalization of the original and by now too simplistic Dole equation is provided by replacing a product of ten positive numbers by the product of ten positive random variables. This is denoted the SEH, an acronym standing for “Statistical Equation for Habitables”. The proof in this paper is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics, stating that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable (Lyapunov form of the CLT). It is then shown that: 1. The new random variable NHab, yielding the number of habitables (i.e. habitable planets) in the Galaxy, follows the log- normal distribution. By construction, the mean value of this log-normal distribution is the total number of habitable planets as given by the statistical Dole equation. 2. The ten (or more) astrobiological factors are now positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be arbitrary. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into the SEH by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both astrobiologically realistic and useful for any further investigations. 3. By applying the SEH it is shown that the (average) distance between any two nearby habitable planets in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of NHab. This distance is denoted by new random variable D. The relevant probability density function is derived, which was named the "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies in

  14. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  15. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  16. Alternative characterization of forest fire regimes: incorporating spatial patterns

    Treesearch

    Brandon M. Collins; Jens T. Stevens; Jay D. Miller; Scott L. Stephens; Peter M. Brown; Malcolm P. North

    2017-01-01

    ContextThe proportion of fire area that experienced stand-replacing fire effects is an important attribute of individual fires and fire regimes in forests, and this metric has been used to group forest types into characteristic fire regimes. However, relying on proportion alone ignores important spatial characteristics...

  17. Maximizing vegetation response on management burns by identifying fire regimes

    Treesearch

    V. Thomas Parker

    1989-01-01

    Maintenance of vegetation is a central goal of watershed management. When prescribed burning of chaparral is included in management practice, then it is important for managers to understand and use the natural chaparral fire regime to maximize vegetation response. Variations from the natural fire regime in intensity, frequency, season, and environmental conditions at...

  18. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  19. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  20. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  1. Detection and Assessment of Ecosystem Regime Shifts from Fisher Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem regime shifts, which are long-term system reorganizations, have profound implications for sustainability. There is a great need for indicators of regime shifts, particularly methods that are applicable to data from real systems. We have developed a form of Fisher info...

  2. Extractive Regimes: Toward a Better Understanding of Indonesian Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of an extractive regime to understand Indonesia's developmental trajectory from 1966 to 1998. The concept contributes to world-systems, globalization, and commodity-based approaches to understanding peripheral development. An extractive regime is defined by its reliance on extraction of multiple natural resources…

  3. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  4. A Tale of Two Regimes: Instrumentality and Commons Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toly, Noah J.

    2005-01-01

    Technical developments have profound social and environmental impacts. Both are observed in the implications of regimes of instrumentality for commons access regimes. Establishing social, material, ecological, intellectual, and moral infrastructures, technologies are partly constitutive of commons access and may militate against governance…

  5. A neutral model of low-severity fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Don McKenzie; Amy E. Hessl

    2008-01-01

    Climate, topography, fuel loadings, and human activities all affect spatial and temporal patterns of fire occurrence. Because fire occurrence is a stochastic process, an understanding of baseline variability is necessary in order to identify constraints on surface fire regimes. With a suitable null, or neutral, model, characteristics of natural fire regimes estimated...

  6. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29 Section 120.29 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND... Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  7. Extractive Regimes: Toward a Better Understanding of Indonesian Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of an extractive regime to understand Indonesia's developmental trajectory from 1966 to 1998. The concept contributes to world-systems, globalization, and commodity-based approaches to understanding peripheral development. An extractive regime is defined by its reliance on extraction of multiple natural resources…

  8. Detection and Assessment of Ecosystem Regime Shifts from Fisher Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem regime shifts, which are long-term system reorganizations, have profound implications for sustainability. There is a great need for indicators of regime shifts, particularly methods that are applicable to data from real systems. We have developed a form of Fisher info...

  9. Plasma Physics Regimes in Tokamaks with Li Walls

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharo; N.N. Gorelenkov; R.B. White; S.I. Krasheninnikov; G.V. Pereverzev

    2003-08-21

    Low recycling regimes with a plasma limited by a lithium wall surface suggest enhanced stability and energy confinement, both necessary for tokamak reactors. These regimes could make ignition feasible in compact tokamaks. Ignited Spherical Tokamaks (IST), self-sufficient in the bootstrap current, are introduced as a necessary step for development of the physics and technology of power reactors.

  10. A Tale of Two Regimes: Instrumentality and Commons Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toly, Noah J.

    2005-01-01

    Technical developments have profound social and environmental impacts. Both are observed in the implications of regimes of instrumentality for commons access regimes. Establishing social, material, ecological, intellectual, and moral infrastructures, technologies are partly constitutive of commons access and may militate against governance…

  11. Fire scars reveal variability and dynamics of eastern fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Richard P. Guyette; Daniel C. Dey; Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2006-01-01

    Fire scar evidence in eastern North America is sparse and complex but shows promise in defining the dynamics of these fire regimes and their influence on ecosystems. We review fire scar data, methods, and limitations, and use this information to identify and examine the factors influencing fire regimes. Fire scar data from studies at more than 40 sites in Eastern North...

  12. Regime shifts driven by dynamic correlations in gene expression noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Yogita; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process that leads to regime shifts between alternative steady states among individual living cells, inducing phenotypic variability. The effects of white noise on the regime shift in bistable systems have been well characterized, however little is known about such effects of colored noise (noise with nonzero correlation time). Here, we show that noise correlation time, by considering a genetic circuit of autoactivation, can have a significant effect on the regime shift between distinct phenotypic states in gene expression. We demonstrate this theoretically, using stochastic potential, stationary probability density function, and first-passage time based on the Fokker-Planck description, where the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is used to model colored noise. We find that an increase in noise correlation time in the degradation rate can induce a regime shift from a low to a high protein concentration state and enhance the bistable regime, while an increase in noise correlation time in the basal rate retains the bimodal distribution. We then show how cross-correlated colored noises in basal and degradation rates can induce regime shifts from a low to a high protein concentration state, but reduce the bistable regime. We also validate these results through direct numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equation. In gene expression understanding the causes of regime shift to a harmful phenotype could improve early therapeutic intervention in complex human diseases.

  13. Global regime shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin overgrazing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, S. D.; Scheibling, R. E.; Rassweiler, A.; Johnson, C. R.; Shears, N.; Connell, S. D.; Salomon, A. K.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Hernández, J. C.; Clemente, S.; Blamey, L. K.; Hereu, B.; Ballesteros, E.; Sala, E.; Garrabou, J.; Cebrian, E.; Zabala, M.; Fujita, D.; Johnson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A pronounced, widespread and persistent regime shift among marine ecosystems is observable on temperate rocky reefs as a result of sea urchin overgrazing. Here, we empirically define regime-shift dynamics for this grazing system which transitions between productive macroalgal beds and impoverished urchin barrens. Catastrophic in nature, urchin overgrazing in a well-studied Australian system demonstrates a discontinuous regime shift, which is of particular management concern as recovery of desirable macroalgal beds requires reducing grazers to well below the initial threshold of overgrazing. Generality of this regime-shift dynamic is explored across 13 rocky reef systems (spanning 11 different regions from both hemispheres) by compiling available survey data (totalling 10 901 quadrats surveyed in situ) plus experimental regime-shift responses (observed during a total of 57 in situ manipulations). The emergent and globally coherent pattern shows urchin grazing to cause a discontinuous ‘catastrophic’ regime shift, with hysteresis effect of approximately one order of magnitude in urchin biomass between critical thresholds of overgrazing and recovery. Different life-history traits appear to create asymmetry in the pace of overgrazing versus recovery. Once shifted, strong feedback mechanisms provide resilience for each alternative state thus defining the catastrophic nature of this regime shift. Importantly, human-derived stressors can act to erode resilience of desirable macroalgal beds while strengthening resilience of urchin barrens, thus exacerbating the risk, spatial extent and irreversibility of an unwanted regime shift for marine ecosystems.

  14. Bargaining among Nations: Culture, History, and Perceptions in Regime Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschutz, Ronnie D.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of regimes (collective international schemes) for managing global problems depends on culture, history, and perceptions. The ways in which these elements affect bargaining among nations over issues of the global commons are discussed. Implications are reviewed for a regime to deal with atmospheric conditions and global warming. (SLD)

  15. Statistical physics of the symmetric group.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mobolaji

    2017-04-01

    Ordered chains (such as chains of amino acids) are ubiquitous in biological cells, and these chains perform specific functions contingent on the sequence of their components. Using the existence and general properties of such sequences as a theoretical motivation, we study the statistical physics of systems whose state space is defined by the possible permutations of an ordered list, i.e., the symmetric group, and whose energy is a function of how certain permutations deviate from some chosen correct ordering. Such a nonfactorizable state space is quite different from the state spaces typically considered in statistical physics systems and consequently has novel behavior in systems with interacting and even noninteracting Hamiltonians. Various parameter choices of a mean-field model reveal the system to contain five different physical regimes defined by two transition temperatures, a triple point, and a quadruple point. Finally, we conclude by discussing how the general analysis can be extended to state spaces with more complex combinatorial properties and to other standard questions of statistical mechanics models.

  16. Statistical physics of the symmetric group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mobolaji

    2017-04-01

    Ordered chains (such as chains of amino acids) are ubiquitous in biological cells, and these chains perform specific functions contingent on the sequence of their components. Using the existence and general properties of such sequences as a theoretical motivation, we study the statistical physics of systems whose state space is defined by the possible permutations of an ordered list, i.e., the symmetric group, and whose energy is a function of how certain permutations deviate from some chosen correct ordering. Such a nonfactorizable state space is quite different from the state spaces typically considered in statistical physics systems and consequently has novel behavior in systems with interacting and even noninteracting Hamiltonians. Various parameter choices of a mean-field model reveal the system to contain five different physical regimes defined by two transition temperatures, a triple point, and a quadruple point. Finally, we conclude by discussing how the general analysis can be extended to state spaces with more complex combinatorial properties and to other standard questions of statistical mechanics models.

  17. Magnetised Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Henri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Faganello, M.

    2012-07-15

    The understanding of the dynamics at play at the Earth's Magnetopause, the boundary separating the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind plasmas, is of primary importance for space plasma modeling. We focus our attention on the low latitude flank of the magnetosphere where the velocity shear between the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas is the energetic source of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. On the shoulder of the resulting vortex chain, different secondary instabilities are at play depending on the local plasma parameters and compete with the vortex pairing process. Most important, secondary instabilities, among other magnetic reconnection, control the plasma mixing as well as the entry of solar wind plasma in the magnetosphere. We make use of a two-fluid model, including the Hall term and the electron mass in the generalized Ohm's law, to study the 2D non-linear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetosheath-magnetosphere interface, in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes. We study the saturation mechanisms, depending on the density jump across the shear layer and the magnetic field strength in the plane. In the presence of a weak in-plane magnetic field, the dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz rolled-up vortices self-consistently generates thin current sheets where reconnection instability eventually enables fast reconnection to develop. Such a system enables to study guide field multiple-island collisionless magnetic reconnection as embedded in a large-scale dynamic system, unlike the classical static, ad hoc reconnection setups. In this regime, reconnection is shown to inhibit the vortex pairing process. This study provides a clear example of nonlinear, cross-scale, collisionless plasma dynamics.

  18. Statistical properties of chaotic dynamical systems which exhibit strange attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.V.; Oberman, C.R.

    1981-07-01

    A path integral method is developed for the calculation of the statistical properties of turbulent dynamical systems. The method is applicable to conservative systems which exhibit a transition to stochasticity as well as dissipative systems which exhibit strange attractors. A specific dissipative mapping is considered in detail which models the dynamics of a Brownian particle in a wave field with a broad frequency spectrum. Results are presented for the low order statistical moments for three turbulent regimes which exhibit strange attractors corresponding to strong, intermediate, and weak collisional damping.

  19. Transition from column to micropinch regime in Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, A.; Lebert, R.; Koshelev, K. N.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Gavrilescu, C.; Neff, W.

    1997-05-05

    Plasma focus and Z-pinches are known to be intensive sources of K-ion radiation. This radiation is observed in two different regimes of compression: column and micropinch. Appearance of these regimes depends on combination of discharge circuit parameter and element composition of plasma. Column regime is typical for low current discharges operating in low Z gases. Micropinch regime, which represents a development of ''neck'' type instabilities in a presence of strong radiation losses, is typical for heavy ion plasma, i.e. vacuum spark or plasma focus with admixture of heavy gases. Transition from column to micropinch mode has been investigated experimentally. It was found that appearance of either regime can be quantitatively described by a distinction parameter depending on pinch current, particle density and used element.

  20. Investigation of the regimes of mixing of superconducting tunneling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, K. V.; Artanov, A. A.; Filippenko, L. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    The regimes of operation of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction based on three-layer structures Nb/AlOx/Nb and Nb/AlN/NbN as a harmonic mixer (for frequencies of the order of 600 and 20 GHz, respectively) and a frequency up-converter (in the frequency range from 0.1 to 5.0 GHz) have been investigated experimentally. The quasiparticle and Josephson mixing regimes have been compared. It has been shown that, in some practical applications, such as the use of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction as a cryogenic harmonic phase detector, the Josephson mixing regime is more preferable, because it can provide a higher signal and a greater signal-to-noise ratio as compared to the quasiparticle mixing regime. It has also been demonstrated that the Josephson mixing regime is promising for the use in signal multiplexing systems for superconducting detectors.

  1. Peculiarities of Lake Baikal water level regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabaeva, Darima B.; Tsydypov, Bair Z.; Ayurzhanaev, Alexander A.; Andreev, Sergey G.; Garmaev, Yendon Zh

    2016-11-01

    A 15-year-old low-water period in the basin of Lake Baikal established an endurance record in the entire history of observations. It began in the mid 90s of the last century. With some probability it may continue in the following years. An analysis of meteorological series of air temperature and precipitation in the region is conducted. A statistically significant trend of increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall is revealed. Atmospheric precipitation affects the long-term fluctuations in the river run-off to a greater extent than the other elements of the water balance. An analysis of the inflow of water into Lake Baikal is performed. It is found that the water level of the lake almost directly depends on the water content of the Selenga River. The minimal run-off in dry periods, as well as the annual run-off, tends to decrease. It is a continuous series of low run-off, which provided the negative trend in the minimal run-off. A dendrochronological reconstruction of the Selenga River run-off is made. A statistically significant trend of decreasing Selenga River run-off is revealed in the recent decades, and an analysis of temperature and precipitation for the basin on the Russian side is made.

  2. Statistical evaluation of forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J.; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  3. Pain: A Statistical Account

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Michael A.; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2017-01-01

    Perception is seen as a process that utilises partial and noisy information to construct a coherent understanding of the world. Here we argue that the experience of pain is no different; it is based on incomplete, multimodal information, which is used to estimate potential bodily threat. We outline a Bayesian inference model, incorporating the key components of cue combination, causal inference, and temporal integration, which highlights the statistical problems in everyday perception. It is from this platform that we are able to review the pain literature, providing evidence from experimental, acute, and persistent phenomena to demonstrate the advantages of adopting a statistical account in pain. Our probabilistic conceptualisation suggests a principles-based view of pain, explaining a broad range of experimental and clinical findings and making testable predictions. PMID:28081134

  4. Statistical evaluation of forecasts.

    PubMed

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  5. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  6. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barbara; Kaufman, James

    Using methods drawn from physics we study the life cycle of viruses. We analyze a model of viral infection and evolution using the ``grand canonical ensemble'' and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we determine possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures-immune response and system temperature. We show the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature ``disordered'' phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. The approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution.

  7. Statistical modeling approach for detecting generalized synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Haslinger, Robert; Pipa, Gordon

    2012-05-01

    Detecting nonlinear correlations between time series presents a hard problem for data analysis. We present a generative statistical modeling method for detecting nonlinear generalized synchronization. Truncated Volterra series are used to approximate functional interactions. The Volterra kernels are modeled as linear combinations of basis splines, whose coefficients are estimated via l1 and l2 regularized maximum likelihood regression. The regularization manages the high number of kernel coefficients and allows feature selection strategies yielding sparse models. The method's performance is evaluated on different coupled chaotic systems in various synchronization regimes and analytical results for detecting m:n phase synchrony are presented. Experimental applicability is demonstrated by detecting nonlinear interactions between neuronal local field potentials recorded in different parts of macaque visual cortex.

  8. Statistics of intense turbulent vorticity events.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, L

    2004-08-01

    We investigate statistical properties of vorticity fluctuations in fully developed turbulence, which are known to exhibit a strong intermittent behavior. Taking as the starting point the Navier-Stokes equations with a random force term correlated at large scales, we obtain in the high Reynolds number regime a closed analytical expression for the probability distribution function of an arbitrary component of the vorticity field. The central idea underlying the analysis consists in the restriction of the velocity configurational phase-space to a particular sector where the rate of strain and the rotation tensors can be locally regarded as slow and fast degrees of freedom, respectively. This prescription is implemented along the Martin-Siggia-Rose functional framework, whereby instantons and perturbations around them are taken into account within a steepest-descent approach.

  9. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics and Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in ... Understanding the Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm ...

  10. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  11. Statistical Image Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-25

    of many global and local properties of the field. A characterization similar to the variogram is given by the auto- correlation function. However for...secmienta- tion, interyrretation as w~ell as inaqje encliancerient and. restoration. For many images in n-ractical a-prlications, statistical...modeling. An extensive list of references is provided to cover many publications in this important area. II. TFE CONTEXTURAL ANALYSIS Consider a digital

  12. Relativistic statistical arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander; Freer, Cameron

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in high-frequency financial trading have made light propagation delays between geographically separated exchanges relevant. Here we show that there exist optimal locations from which to coordinate the statistical arbitrage of pairs of spacelike separated securities, and calculate a representative map of such locations on Earth. Furthermore, trading local securities along chains of such intermediate locations results in a novel econophysical effect, in which the relativistic propagation of tradable information is effectively slowed or stopped by arbitrage.

  13. Relativistic statistical arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in high-frequency financial trading have made light propagation delays between geographically separated exchanges relevant. Here we show that there exist optimal locations from which to coordinate the statistical arbitrage of pairs of spacelike separated securities, and calculate a representative map of such locations on Earth. Furthermore, trading local securities along chains of such intermediate locations results in a novel econophysical effect, in which the relativistic propagation of tradable information is effectively slowed or stopped by arbitrage.

  14. Statistical Methods in Hydrology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-01-01

    necessary end Identify by block nmember) Statistical methods, h~ydrologic aspects, frequency analysis , correlation analysis , regression analysis 20...4mates based on analysis of hydrologic records that have been adjusted as required to conform with selected reference base conditions) " (3) A...O I",: ) Since publication of the original paper of this title in July 1952, the general concept of runoff frequiency analysis contained in the paper

  15. Fractional statistics from gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.M. ); Park, D.H. )

    1994-06-15

    We show that the solitons of the SO(3) nonlinear sigma model in 2+1 dimensions, when coupled to gravitation with the gravitational Chern-Simons interaction, become anyons in the absence of the Hopf term. In particular we calculate the fractional statistical factor of the gravitating anyons, and prove that the gravitational Chern-Simons term itself can be interpreted as the Hopf term of the topological current of [Pi][sub 2]([ital S][sup 2]).

  16. Statistical Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, L.

    2010-03-01

    The advent of large data-set in cosmology has meant that in the past 10 or 20 years our knowledge and understanding of the Universe has changed not only quantitatively but also, and most importantly, qualitatively. Cosmologists rely on data where a host of useful information is enclosed, but is encoded in a non-trivial way. The challenges in extracting this information must be overcome to make the most of a large experimental effort. Even after having converged to a standard cosmological model (the LCDM model) we should keep in mind that this model is described by 10 or more physical parameters and if we want to study deviations from it, the number of parameters is even larger. Dealing with such a high dimensional parameter space and finding parameters constraints is a challenge on itself. Cosmologists want to be able to compare and combine different data sets both for testing for possible disagreements (which could indicate new physics) and for improving parameter determinations. Finally, cosmologists in many cases want to find out, before actually doing the experiment, how much one would be able to learn from it. For all these reasons, sophisiticated statistical techniques are being employed in cosmology, and it has become crucial to know some statistical background to understand recent literature in the field. I will introduce some statistical tools that any cosmologist should know about in order to be able to understand recently published results from the analysis of cosmological data sets. I will not present a complete and rigorous introduction to statistics as there are several good books which are reported in the references. The reader should refer to those.

  17. Statistics in fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, D. H.

    1997-11-01

    Since the reasons for the variability in data from plasma experiments are often unknown or uncontrollable, statistical methods must be applied. Reliable interpretation and public accountability require full data sets. Two examples of data misrepresentation at PPPL are analyzed: Te >100 eV on S-1 spheromak.(M. Yamada, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1327 (1985); reports to DoE; etc.) The reported high values (statistical artifacts of Thomson scattering measurements) were selected from a mass of data with an average of 40 eV or less. ``Correlated'' spectroscopic data were meaningless. (2) Extrapolation to Q >=0.5 for DT in TFTR.(D. Meade et al., IAEA Baltimore (1990), V. 1, p. 9; H. P. Furth, Statements to U. S. Congress (1989).) The DD yield used there was the highest through 1990 (>= 50% above average) and the DT to DD power ratio used was about twice any published value. Average DD yields and published yield ratios scale to Q<0.15 for DT, in accord with the observed performance over the last 3 1/2 years. Press reports of outlier data from TFTR have obscured the fact that the DT behavior follows from trivial scaling of the DD data. Good practice in future fusion research would have confidence intervals and other descriptive statistics accompanying reported numerical values (cf. JAMA).

  18. Quantum U-statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Butucea, Cristina

    2010-10-15

    The notion of a U-statistic for an n-tuple of identical quantum systems is introduced in analogy to the classical (commutative) case: given a self-adjoint 'kernel' K acting on (C{sup d}){sup '}x{sup r} with rstatistics converges in moments to a linear combination of Hermite polynomials in canonical variables of a canonical commutation relation algebra defined through the quantum central limit theorem. In the special cases of nondegenerate kernels and kernels of order of 2, it is shown that the convergence holds in the stronger distribution sense. Two types of applications in quantum statistics are described: testing beyond the two simple hypotheses scenario and quantum metrology with interacting Hamiltonians.

  19. Statistical Challenges of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, G. Jogesh

    Digital sky surveys, data from orbiting telescopes, and advances in computation have increased the quantity and quality of astronomical data by several orders of magnitude in recent years. Making sense of this wealth of data requires sophisticated statistical and data analytic techniques. Fortunately, statistical methodologies have similarly made great strides in recent years. Powerful synergies thus emerge when astronomers and statisticians join in examining astrostatistical problems and approaches. The volume focuses on several themes: · The increasing power of Bayesian approaches to modeling astronomical data · The growth of enormous databases, leading an emerging federated Virtual Observatory, and their impact on modern astronomical research · Statistical modeling of critical datasets, such as galaxy clustering and fluctuations in the microwave background radiation, leading to a new era of precision cosmology · Methodologies for uncovering clusters and patterns in multivariate data · The characterization of multiscale patterns in imaging and time series data As in earlier volumes in this series, research contributions discussing topics in one field are joined with commentary from scholars in the other. Short contributed papers covering dozens of astrostatistical topics are also included.

  20. Identifying different regimes in eruptive activity: An application to Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, F.; Gasperini, P.; Tinti, S.

    1987-12-01

    The objective identification of different regimes in the eruptive time-history of a volcano is crucial to the understanding of its physics. While a problem well-known in statistical literature under the name of change-point or scan-point problem, no method of general applicability exists for the identification of different regimes in a time-series. In particular, the available techniques seem unsuitable to the volcanological case. We developed an original procedure based on two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics which offers satisfactory accuracy in a broad range of conditions with a minimum of assumptions and is expressly tailored to the study of geophysical phenomena. Our procedure requires neither the a priori knowledge of the number of regimes nor of the statistical distributions governing the whole process, which can be of different type. The parent distribution of each regime is inferred through a goodness-of-fit test, and this in turn allows the confidence intervals for each of the change-points identified to be estimated by numerical simulation. This procedure is applied to the eruptive history of Mount Etna volcano. Available data allow the analysis of flank eruptions in the period 1600-1980, while the total output (summit and flank activity) can be studied only in the period 1971-1981. Information on eruptive history can be therefore obtained at two different timescales. Since no univocally accepted catalog exists except for the last few decades, we use two different sets of data, which practically exhaust all the available information. The results are interpreted by a stability analysis, and only stable results are retained. Our analysis yields that: - The inter-event times of flank eruptions in the period 1600-1980 follow two regimes before and after year 1865, while the eruptive activity in the period 1971-1981 follows four different regimes. In each regime eruptions occur according to a Poisson process and Etna behaves as a random nonstationary