Science.gov

Sample records for steady-state tokamak operation

  1. Realizing steady-state tokamak operation for fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Continuous operation of a tokamak for fusion energy has clear engineering advantages but requires conditions beyond those sufficient for a burning plasma. The fusion reactions and external sources must support both the pressure and the current equilibrium without inductive current drive, leading to demands on stability, confinement, current drive, and plasma-wall interactions that exceed those for pulsed tokamaks. These conditions have been met individually, and significant progress has been made in the past decade to realize scenarios where the required conditions are obtained simultaneously. Tokamaks are operated routinely without disruptions near pressure limits, as needed for steady-state operation. Fully noninductive sustainment with more than half of the current from intrinsic currents has been obtained for a resistive time with normalized pressure and confinement approaching those needed for steady-state conditions. One remaining challenge is handling the heat and particle fluxes expected in a steady-state tokamak without compromising the core plasma performance.

  2. Operating tokamaks with steady-state toroidal current

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-04-01

    Continuous operation of a tokamak requires, among other things, a means of continuously providing the toroidal current. Various methods have been proposed to provide this current including methods which utilize radio-frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Here we elaborate on the prospects of incorporating these current-drive techniques in tokamak reactors, concentrating on the theoretical minimization of the power requirements.

  3. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments.

  4. Progress toward steady-state tokamak operation exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Q. L.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gong, X. Z.; Holcomb, C. T.; Lao, L. L.; McKee, G. R.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Qian, J. P.; Solomon, W. M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Holland, C.; Guo, W. F.; Ding, S. Y.; Pan, C. K.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have increased the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Improved understanding of scenario stability has led to the achievement of very high values of βp and βN , despite strong internal transport barriers. Good confinement has been achieved with reduced toroidal rotation. These high βp plasmas challenge the energy transport understanding, especially in the electron energy channel. A new turbulent transport model, named TGLF-SAT1, has been developed which improves the transport prediction. Experiments extending results to long pulse on EAST, based on the physics basis developed at DIII-D, have been conducted. More investigations will be carried out on EAST with more additional auxiliary power to come online in the near term.

  5. Progress Toward Steady State Tokamak Operation Exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Q.

    2015-11-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have advanced the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Fully noninductive plasmas with extremely high values of the poloidal beta, βp >= 4 , have been sustained at βT >= 2 % for long durations with excellent energy confinement quality (H98y,2 >= 1 . 5) and internal transport barriers (ITBs) generated at large minor radius (>= 0 . 6) in all channels (Te, Ti, ne, VTf). Large bootstrap fraction (fBS ~ 80 %) has been obtained with high βp. ITBs have been shown to be compatible with steady state operation. Because of the unusually large ITB radius, normalized pressure is not limited to low βN values by internal ITB-driven modes. βN up to ~4.3 has been obtained by optimizing the plasma-wall distance. The scenario is robust against several variations, including replacing some on-axis with off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI), adding electron cyclotron (EC) heating, and reducing the NBI torque by a factor of 2. This latter observation is particularly promising for extension of the scenario to EAST, where maximum power is obtained with balanced NBI injection, and to a reactor, expected to have low rotation. However, modeling of this regime has provided new challenges to state-of-the-art modeling capabilities: quasilinear models can dramatically underpredict the electron transport, and the Sauter bootstrap current can be insufficient. The analysis shows first-principle NEO is in good agreement with experiments for the bootstrap current calculation and ETG modes with a larger saturated amplitude or EM modes may provide the missing electron transport. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA

  6. Advances in multi-megawatt lower hybrid technology in support of steady-state tokamak operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpech, L.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Artaud, J. F.; Bae, Y. S.; Belo, J. H.; Berger-By, G.; Bouquey, F.; Cho, M. H.; Corbel, E.; Decker, J.; Do, H.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A.; Garibaldi, P.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, G. T.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H.; Kwak, J. G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Na, Y. S.; Namkung, W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, S.; Park, H.; Peysson, Y.; Poli, S.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Yang, H. L.; The Tore Supra Team

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems play a crucial role for steady-state tokamak operation, owing to their high current drive (CD) efficiency and hence their capability to reduce flux consumption. This paper describes the extensive technology programmes developed for the Tore Supra (France) and the KSTAR (Korea) tokamaks in order to bring continuous wave (CW) LHCD systems into operation. The Tore Supra LHCD generator at 3.7 GHz is fully CW compatible, with RF power PRF = 9.2 MW available at the generator to feed two actively water-cooled launchers. On Tore Supra, the most recent and novel passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher has sustained 2.7 MW (corresponding to its design value of 25 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) for a 78 s flat-top discharge, with low reflected power even at large plasma-launcher gaps. The fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher has reached 3.8 MW of coupled power (24 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) with the new TH2103C klystrons. By combining both the PAM and FAM launchers, 950 MJ of energy, using 5.2 MW of LHCD and 1 MW of ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating), was injected for 160 s in 2011. The 3.7 GHz CW LHCD system will be a key element within the W (for tungsten) environment in steady-state Tokamak (WEST) project, where the aim is to test ITER technologies for high heat flux components in relevant heat flux density and particle fluence conditions. On KSTAR, a 2 MW LHCD system operating at 5 GHz is under development. Recently the 5 GHz prototype klystron has reached 500 kW/600 s on a matched load, and studies are ongoing to design a PAM launcher. In addition to the studies of technology, a combination of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations have been performed to evaluate the driven current and the power deposition due to LH waves, and to optimize the N∥ spectrum for the future launcher design. Furthermore, an LHCD system at 5 GHz is being considered for a future upgrade of the ITER

  7. Steady State Tokamak Equilibria without Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    Steady state tokamak equilibria without current drive are found. This is made possible by including the potato bootstrap current close to the magnetic axis. Tokamaks with this class of equilibria do not need seed current or current drive, and are intrinsically steady state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Steady state self-induced current in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gott, Yu. V.; Yurchenko, E. I.

    2009-11-15

    A model, which may make it possible to self-consistently calculate the self-driven current in tokamaks taking into account asymmetry and bootstrap currents, is presented. It is shown that the described self-driven current can provide steady-state tokamak operation without the seed current produced with the help of additional methods. The total self-consistent, self-driven current does not depend on magnetic field magnitude and is proportional to the square root from plasma pressure. The experimental data obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment are satisfactorily described by this model.

  9. A non-inductively driven steady state tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Devoto, R.S.; Bulmer, R.H.; Lee, J.D.; Miller, J.R.; Schultz, J.

    1988-09-20

    The physics and engineering guidelines for the ITER device are shown to lead to viable and attractive operating points for a steady state tokamak power reactor. Non-inductive current drive is provided in steady state by high energy neutral beam injection in the plasma core, lower hybrid slow waves in the outer regions of the plasma and bootstrap current. Plasma gain Q (/equivalent to/fusion power/input power) in excess of 20 and average neutron wall loading, approx. 2.0 MW/m/sup 2/ are predicted in a device with major radius, R/sub 0/ = 7.5 m and minor radius, a = 2.8 m. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Long pulse and steady state operation activities at KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young-Soon; KSTAR Team; KAERI Collaboration; JAEA Collaboration; PPPL Collaboration; SNU Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is to develop a steady state capable advanced tokamak (AT) operation. The original AT operation mode at KSTAR is a reversed shear scenario with the plasma current of 2 MA, the toroidal magnetic field of 3.5 T, βN of 5, safety factor q95 of 3.7. Recently, the stationary long pulse H-mode discharge is sustained for maximum pulse duration of 20 s using heating of 2.5-MW NBI and 0.7-MW, X3 170 GHz ECH with low density level ~ 0.3 × 1020/m3. The main activities of long pulse and steady state operation in KSTAR are the density feedback control, optimization of plasma shape and vertical control, real-time β control, and steady state capable heating upgrade. For the longer pulse H-mode discharge at the increased plasma current upcoming KSTAR campaign, there have been improvements in plasma control system and upgraded heating systems. Meanwhile, steady state operation scenario in KSTAR next 4-year is being investigated using time-dependent integrated transport simulation code with possible heating upgrade-schemes. The promising steady state scenario near future is a reversed shear using a new 4 MW off-axis neutral beam injector for broad pressure profile peaked at off-axis, and using ECH for local current profile control aiming at βN > 3 with Ip ~ 1 MA. This paper present activities and plan for steady state operation in KSTAR as well as the long pulse H-mode discharge results in the recent KSTAR campaign.

  11. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janos, A. C.; Jardin, S. C.; Yamada, M.

    1985-02-01

    The inductively formed spheromak configuration (S-1) can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. The method described eliminates the restriction to pulsed spheromak plasmas or the use of electrodes for steady-state operation, and, therefore, is a reactor-relevant formation and sustainment method.

  12. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOEpatents

    Janos, Alan C.; Jardin, Stephen C.; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The inductively formed spheromak plasma can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. Steady-state operation is obtained by forming the plasma in the linked mode, then oscillating the poloidal and toroidal fields such that they have different phases. Preferably, the poloidal and magnetic fields are 90.degree. out of phase.

  13. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOEpatents

    Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Yamada, M.

    1985-02-20

    The inductively formed spheromak configuration (S-1) can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. The method described eliminates the restriction to pulsed spheromak plasmas or the use of electrodes for steady-state operation, and, therefore, is a reactor-relevant formation and sustainment method.

  14. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N. Li, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  15. New steady-state quiescent high-confinement plasma in an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Guo, H Y; Li, J G; Wan, B N; Wang, H Q; Ding, S Y; Xu, G S; Liang, Y F; Mansfield, D K; Maingi, R; Zou, X L; Wang, L; Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Zhang, L; Duan, Y M; Shi, T H; Hu, L Q

    2015-02-01

    A critical challenge facing the basic long-pulse high-confinement operation scenario (H mode) for ITER is to control a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, known as the edge localized mode (ELM), which leads to cyclical high peak heat and particle fluxes at the plasma facing components. A breakthrough is made in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak in achieving a new steady-state H mode without the presence of ELMs for a duration exceeding hundreds of energy confinement times, by using a novel technique of continuous real-time injection of a lithium (Li) aerosol into the edge plasma. The steady-state ELM-free H mode is accompanied by a strong edge coherent MHD mode (ECM) at a frequency of 35-40 kHz with a poloidal wavelength of 10.2 cm in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, providing continuous heat and particle exhaust, thus preventing the transient heat deposition on plasma facing components and impurity accumulation in the confined plasma. It is truly remarkable that Li injection appears to promote the growth of the ECM, owing to the increase in Li concentration and hence collisionality at the edge, as predicted by GYRO simulations. This new steady-state ELM-free H-mode regime, enabled by real-time Li injection, may open a new avenue for next-step fusion development.

  16. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-06-19

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  17. Steady-state hollow electron temperature profiles in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.; Oomens, A.A.; Barth, C.J.; Beurskens, M.N.; Chu, C.C.; van Gelder, J.F.; Lok, J.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Pijper, F.J.; Polman, R.W.; Rommers, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project steady-state hollow electron temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital e}}) profiles have been sustained with strong off-axis electron cyclotron heating, creating a region of reversed magnetic shear. In this region the effective electron thermal diffusivity ({chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}}) is close to neoclassical in high density plasmas. For medium density, {chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}} is lower than neoclassical and may even be negative, indicating that off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix drive an electron heat flux up the {ital T}{sub {ital e}} gradient. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Long Pulse Operation on Tore-Supra: Towards Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Brosset, C.; Dufour, E.; Loarer, T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Basiuk, V.; Bremond, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hertout, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Kazarian, F.; Mazon, D.

    2006-01-15

    The experimental programme of Tore Supra is devoted to the study of technology and physics issues associated to long-duration high performance discharges. This new domain of operation requires simultaneously and in steady state: heat removal capability, particle exhaust, fully non-inductive current drive, advanced technology integration and real time plasma control. The long discharge allows for addressing new time scale physic such as the wall particle retention and erosion. Moreover, the physics of fully non-inductive discharges is full of novelty, namely: the MHD stability, the slow spontaneous oscillation of the central electron temperature or the outstanding inward particle pinch.

  19. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bécoulet, A.; Hoang, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  20. An Operational Definition of the Steady State in Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnsley, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Briggs-Haldane assumption is used as the basis for the development of a kinetic model for enzyme catalysis. An alternative definition of the steady state and examples of realistic mechanisms are provided. (KR)

  1. Combined magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak steady state scenarios based on semi-empirical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Artaud, J. F.; Ferron, J. R.; Holcomb, C. T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Liu, F.; Luce, T. C.; Park, J. M.; Prater, R.; Turco, F.; Walker, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper shows that semi-empirical data-driven models based on a two-time-scale approximation for the magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak (AT) scenarios can be advantageously identified from simulated rather than real data, and used for control design. The method is applied to the combined control of the safety factor profile, q(x), and normalized pressure parameter, βN, using DIII-D parameters and actuators (on-axis co-current neutral beam injection (NBI) power, off-axis co-current NBI power, electron cyclotron current drive power, and ohmic coil). The approximate plasma response model was identified from simulated open-loop data obtained using a rapidly converging plasma transport code, METIS, which includes an MHD equilibrium and current diffusion solver, and combines plasma transport nonlinearity with 0D scaling laws and 1.5D ordinary differential equations. The paper discusses the results of closed-loop METIS simulations, using the near-optimal ARTAEMIS control algorithm (Moreau D et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 063020) for steady state AT operation. With feedforward plus feedback control, the steady state target q-profile and βN are satisfactorily tracked with a time scale of about 10 s, despite large disturbances applied to the feedforward powers and plasma parameters. The robustness of the control algorithm with respect to disturbances of the H&CD actuators and of plasma parameters such as the H-factor, plasma density and effective charge, is also shown.

  2. Steady-State Operation Scenarios with a Central Current Hole for JT-60SC

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shinichi; Kurita, Gen-Ichi; Shirai, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Sakurai, Shinji; Matsukawa, Makoto; Sakasai, Akira

    2004-06-15

    A 1.5-dimensional time-dependent transport analysis has been carried out to investigate steady-state operation scenarios with a central current hole by off-axis current drive schemes consistent with a high bootstrap current fraction for the JT-60SC large superconducting tokamak. A steady-state operation scenario with HH{sub y2} = 1.4 and {beta}{sub N} = 3.7 has been obtained at I{sub p} = 1.5 MA, B{sub t} = 2 T, and q{sub 95} = 5, where noninductive currents are developed during the discharge to form a current hole with beam-driven currents by tangential off-axis beams in combination with bootstrap currents by additional on-axis perpendicular beams. The bootstrap fraction increases up to {approx}75% of the plasma current, and the current hole region is enlarged up to {approx}30% of the minor radius at 35 s from the discharge initiation. The current hole is confirmed to be sustained afterward for a long duration of 60 s. The present transport simulation shows that heating equipment designed for JT-60SC is capable of forming and sustaining the current hole only by using off-axis beam-driven currents and bootstrap currents. The stability analysis shows that the beta limit with the conducting wall can be {approx}{beta}{sub N} = 4.5, which is substantially above the no-wall ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit.

  3. Advanced fueling system for steady-state operation of a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.

    2008-07-15

    Steady-state Advanced Tokamak scenarios rely on optimized density and pressure profiles to maximize the bootstrap current fraction. Under this mode of operation, the fuelling system must deposit small amounts of fuel where it is needed, and as often as needed, so as to compensate for fuel losses, but not to adversely alter the established density and pressure profiles. A precision fuelling system has the capability for controlling the fusion burn by maintaining the required pressure profile to maximize the bootstrap current fraction. An advanced fuelling system based on Compact Toroid (CT) injection has the potential to meet these needs while simultaneously simplifying the requirements of the tritium handling systems. Simpler engineering systems would reduce reactor construction and maintenance cost through increased reliability. A CT fueling system is described together with the associated tritium handling requirements. (authors)

  4. DIII-D research towards resolving key issues for ITER and steady-state tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. N.; the DIII-D Team

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D research program is addressing key ITER research needs and developing the physics basis for future steady-state tokamaks. Pellet pacing edge-localized mode (ELM) control in the ITER configuration reduces ELM energy loss in proportion to 1/fpellet by inducing ELMs at up to 12× the natural ELM rate. Complete suppression of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations has been extended to the q95 expected for ITER baseline scenario discharges, and long-duration ELM-free QH-mode discharges have been produced with ITER-relevant co-current neutral-beam injection (NBI) using external n = 3 coils to generate sufficient counter-Ip torque. ITER baseline discharges at βN ˜ 2 and scaled NBI torque have been maintained in stationary conditions for more than four resistive times using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) for tearing mode suppression and disruption avoidance; active tracking with steerable launchers and feedback control catch these modes at small amplitude, reducing the ECCD power required to suppress them. Massive high-Z gas injection into disruption-induced 300-600 kA 20 MeV runaway electron (RE) beams yield dissipation rates ˜10× faster than expected from e-e collisions and demonstrate the possibility of benign dissipation of such REs should they occur in ITER. Other ITER-related experiments show measured intrinsic plasma torque in good agreement with a physics-based model over a wide range of conditions, while first-time main-ion rotation measurements show it to be lower than expected from neoclassical theory. Core turbulence measurements show increased temperature fluctuations correlated with sharply enhanced electron transport when \

  5. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  6. Aspects of steady-state operation of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, J.; Wolf, R. C.; Beidler, C.; Cardella, A.; Chlechowitz, E.; Erckmann, V.; Gantenbein, G.; Hathiramani, D.; Hirsch, M.; Kasparek, W.; Kißlinger, J.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Laqua, H. P.; Lechte, C.; Lore, J.; Lumsdaine, A.; Maaßberg, H.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Michel, G.; Otte, M.; Peacock, A.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Thumm, M.; Turkin, Y.; Werner, A.; Zhang, D.

    2012-12-17

    The objective of Wendelstein 7-X is to demonstrate steady-state operation at -values of up to 5%, at ion temperatures of several keV and plasma densities of up to 2 1020 m 3. The second operational phase foresees a fully steady-state high heat flux (HHF) divertor. Preparations are underway to cope with residual bootstrap currents, either by electron cyclotron current drive or by HHF protection elements. The main steady-state heating system is an electron cyclotron resonance heating facility. Various technical improvements of the gyrotrons have been implemented recently. They enable a reliable operation at the 1MW power level. Some of the technical issues preparing plasma diagnostics for steady-state operation are exemplified. This includes the protection against non-absorbed microwave radiation.

  7. Diagnostics and control for the steady state and pulsed tokamak DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsitto, F. P.; Villari, R.; Moro, F.; Todd, T. N.; Lilley, S.; Jenkins, I.; Felton, R.; Biel, W.; Silva, A.; Scholz, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Duran, I.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Morlock, C.; Federici, G.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper is devoted to a first assessment of the DEMO diagnostics systems and controls in the context of pulsed and steady state reactor design under study in Europe. In particular, the main arguments treated are: (i) The quantities to be measured in DEMO and the requirements for the measurements; (ii) the present capability of the diagnostic and control technology, determining the most urgent gaps, and (iii) the program and strategy of the research and development (R&D) needed to fill the gaps. Burn control, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and basic machine protection require improvements to the ITER technology, and moderated efforts in R&D can be dedicated to infrared diagnostics (reflectometry, electron cyclotron emission, polarimetry) and neutron diagnostics. Metallic Hall sensors appear to be a promising candidate for magnetic measurements in the high neutron fluence and long/steady state discharges of DEMO.

  8. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  9. Multiple steady state and instability in distillation. Implications for operation and control

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, E.W.; Skogestad, S.

    1995-12-01

    The fact that distillation columns, even in the ideal binary case, may display multiple steady states and unstable operating points has only recently been recognized. This article addresses some implications of these phenomena for the operation and control of distillation columns. Under manual operation, the multiplicity and instability will result in ability to reach separations corresponding to unstable operating points and may furthermore cause abrupt changes and hysteresis in operating conditions. It is shown that an unstable operating point may be stabilized by feedback control of a single product composition or tray temperature (one-point control). The steady-state multiplicity does, in this case, not represent any severe limitation in operation, but if the control is not sufficient tight, the column may settle in sustained oscillations (stable limit cycle). Finally, the impact of open-loop instability on the achievable closed-loop performance with both product compositions under feedback control is discussed.

  10. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

  11. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, R.D.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators. 6 figs.

  12. High internal inductance for steady-state operation in ITER and a reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferron, J. R.; Holcomb, C. T.; Luce, T. C.; Park, J. M.; Kolemen, E.; La Haye, R. J.; Solomon, W. M.; Turco, F.

    2015-07-01

    Increased confinement and ideal stability limits at relatively high values of the internal inductance ({{\\ell}i} ) have enabled an attractive scenario for steady-state tokamak operation to be demonstrated in DIII-D. Normalized plasma pressure in the range appropriate for a reactor has been achieved in high elongation and triangularity double-null divertor discharges with {β\\text{N}}≈ 5 at {{\\ell}i}≈ 1.3 , near the ideal n=1 kink stability limit calculated without the effect of a stabilizing vacuum vessel wall, with the ideal-wall limit still higher at {β\\text{N}}>5.5 . Confinement is above the H-mode level with {{H}98≤ft(\\text{y,2\\right)}}≈ 1.8 . At {{q}95}≈ 7.5 , the current is overdriven, with bootstrap current fraction {{f}\\text{BS}}≈ 0.8 , noninductive current fraction {{f}\\text{NI}}>1 and negative surface voltage. For ITER (which has a single-null divertor shape), operation at {{\\ell}i}≈ 1 is a promising option with {{f}\\text{BS}}≈ 0.5 and the remaining current driven externally near the axis where the electron cyclotron current drive efficiency is high. This scenario has been tested in the ITER shape in DIII-D at {{q}95}=4.8 , so far reaching {{f}\\text{NI}}=0.7 and {{f}\\text{BS}}=0.4 at {β\\text{N}}≈ 3.5 with performance appropriate for the ITER Q=5 mission, {{H}89}{β\\text{N}}/q952≈ 0.3 . Modeling studies explored how increased current drive power for DIII-D could be applied to maintain a stationary, fully noninductive high {{\\ell}i} discharge. Stable solutions in the double-null shape are found without the vacuum vessel wall at {β\\text{N}}=4 , {{\\ell}i}=1.07 and {{f}\\text{BS}}=0.5 , and at {β\\text{N}}=5 with the vacuum vessel wall.

  13. Semiclassical theory of dye lasers: the single-frequency and multifrequency steady states of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Haken, H.

    1988-05-01

    A semiclassical theory of dye lasers is presented in which the relevant energy-level diagram of a dye molecule is assumed to consist of a bandlike ground state with many sublevels and an excited single state. This theory not only describes the single-frequency operation, which has a low instability threshold, but also describes the two-frequency and multifrequency steady states of operation and the transitions between the different steady states. The general solution of a multifrequency operation is given explicitly and differs essentially from the well-known Rabi oscillation. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with recent experiments done by Hillman et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1605 (1984)), which cannot be explained by the conventional Maxwell--Bloch laser theory derived from two-level atoms.

  14. Compatible operation of the power system for steady state and pulse modes in a magnetic torus KT-5D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Zhi-jiang; Xu, Min; Zhu, Zhen-hua; Lu, Rong-hua; Wen, Yi-zhi; Yu, Chang-xuan; Wan, Shu-de; Liu, Wan-dong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiao-yuan; Hu, Ling-ying

    2006-12-01

    Compatible operation of steady state mode and pulse mode is realized in the KT-5D device. New power supplies with the operation control systems for the steady state toroidal magnetic field as well as for the vertical field are added, and the rf wave injection systems for sustaining steady state plasmas are upgraded. After the modification, the device now can work not only as a tokomak with pulsed plasma currents as it was but also as a simple magnetized torus with steady state plasma discharges. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental researches on the magnetically confined plasmas to be carried on in the same device.

  15. Compatible operation of the power system for steady state and pulse modes in a magnetic torus KT-5D

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yi; Wang Zhijiang; Xu Min; Zhu Zhenhua; Lu Ronghua; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Wang Jun; Xu Xiaoyuan; Hu Lingying

    2006-12-15

    Compatible operation of steady state mode and pulse mode is realized in the KT-5D device. New power supplies with the operation control systems for the steady state toroidal magnetic field as well as for the vertical field are added, and the rf wave injection systems for sustaining steady state plasmas are upgraded. After the modification, the device now can work not only as a tokomak with pulsed plasma currents as it was but also as a simple magnetized torus with steady state plasma discharges. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental researches on the magnetically confined plasmas to be carried on in the same device.

  16. Compatibility of internal transport barrier with steady-state operation in the high bootstrap fraction regime on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Gong, X.; Grierson, B. A.; Ren, Q.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Meneghini, O.; Smith, S. P.; Staebler, G. M.; Wan, B.; Bravenec, R.; Budny, R. V.; Ding, S.; Hanson, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Lao, L. L.; Li, G.; Pan, C.; Petty, C. C.; Qian, J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Xu, G.

    2015-11-01

    Recent EAST/DIII-D joint experiments on the high poloidal beta tokamak regime in DIII-D have demonstrated fully noninductive operation with an internal transport barrier (ITB) at large minor radius, at normalized fusion performance increased by  ⩾30% relative to earlier work (Politzer et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 417). The advancement was enabled by improved understanding of the ‘relaxation oscillations’, previously attributed to repetitive ITB collapses, and of the fast ion behavior in this regime. It was found that the ‘relaxation oscillations’ are coupled core-edge modes amenable to wall-stabilization, and that fast ion losses which previously dictated a large plasma-wall separation to avoid wall over-heating, can be reduced to classical levels with sufficient plasma density. By using optimized waveforms of the plasma-wall separation and plasma density, fully noninductive plasmas have been sustained for long durations with excellent energy confinement quality, bootstrap fraction  ⩾80%, {β\\text{N}}≤slant 4 , {β\\text{P}}≥slant 3 , and {β\\text{T}}≥slant 2% . These results bolster the applicability of the high poloidal beta tokamak regime toward the realization of a steady-state fusion reactor.

  17. Quantitative, steady-state properties of Catania's computational model of the operant reserve.

    PubMed

    Berg, John P; McDowell, J J

    2011-05-01

    Catania (2005) found that a computational model of the operant reserve (Skinner, 1938) produced realistic behavior in initial, exploratory analyses. Although Catania's operant reserve computational model demonstrated potential to simulate varied behavioral phenomena, the model was not systematically tested. The current project replicated and extended the Catania model, clarified its capabilities through systematic testing, and determined the extent to which it produces behavior corresponding to matching theory. Significant departures from both classic and modern matching theory were found in behavior generated by the model across all conditions. The results suggest that a simple, dynamic operant model of the reflex reserve does not simulate realistic steady state behavior.

  18. Quantitative, steady-state properties of Catania's computational model of the operant reserve.

    PubMed

    Berg, John P; McDowell, J J

    2011-05-01

    Catania (2005) found that a computational model of the operant reserve (Skinner, 1938) produced realistic behavior in initial, exploratory analyses. Although Catania's operant reserve computational model demonstrated potential to simulate varied behavioral phenomena, the model was not systematically tested. The current project replicated and extended the Catania model, clarified its capabilities through systematic testing, and determined the extent to which it produces behavior corresponding to matching theory. Significant departures from both classic and modern matching theory were found in behavior generated by the model across all conditions. The results suggest that a simple, dynamic operant model of the reflex reserve does not simulate realistic steady state behavior. PMID:21238552

  19. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, T. Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ii, T.; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G.; Shinya, T.

    2015-12-10

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}.

  20. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; , T., Ii; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G.; Shinya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 1019 m-3, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 1019 m-3.

  1. Steady-state operation of a large-area high-power RF ion source for the neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Park, Min; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul

    2014-10-01

    A large-area high-power RF-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive (H&CD) of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion devices such as an the ITER and the DEMO. The first and the second long-pulse ion sources (LPIS-1 and LPIS-2) have been successfully developed with a magnetic-bucket plasma generator, including a filament heating structure for the first NBI (NBI-1) system of the KSTAR tokamak. A development plan exists for a large-area high-power RF ion source for steady-state operation (more than 300 seconds) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to extract positive ions, which can be used for the NBI heating and current drive systems, and to extract negative ions for future fusion devices such as a Fusion Neutron Source and Korea — DEMO. The RF ion source consists of a driver region, including a helical antenna and a discharge chamber, and an expansion region (magnetic bucket of the prototype LPIS-1). RF power can be transferred at up to 10 kW with a fixed frequency of 2 MHz through an optimized RF matching system. An actively water-cooled Faraday shield is located inside the driver region of the ion source for stable and steady-state operation of the RF discharge. The uniformities of the plasma parameters are measured at the lowest area of the expansion bucket by using two RF-compensated electrostatic probes along the directions of the short and the long dimensions of the expansion region.

  2. Exterior integrability: Yang-Baxter form of non-equilibrium steady-state density operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Ilievski, Enej; Popkov, Vladislav

    2013-07-01

    A new type of quantum transfer matrix, arising as a Cholesky factor for the steady-state density matrix of a dissipative Markovian process associated with the boundary-driven Lindblad equation for the isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg (XXX) chain, is presented. The transfer matrix forms a commuting family of non-Hermitian operators depending on the spectral parameter, which is essentially the strength of dissipative coupling at the boundaries. The intertwining of the corresponding Lax and monodromy matrices is performed by an infinitely dimensional Yang-Baxter R-matrix, which we construct explicitly and is essentially different from the standard 4 × 4 XXX R-matrix. We also discuss a possibility to construct Bethe ansatz for the spectrum and eigenstates of the non-equilibrium steady-state density operator. Furthermore, we indicate the existence of a deformed R-matrix in the infinite dimensional auxiliary space for the anisotropic XXZ spin-1/2 chain, which in general provides a sequence of new, possibly quasi-local, conserved quantities of the bulk XXZ dynamics.

  3. Heating and current drive requirements towards steady state operation in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Kessel, C. E.; Gorelenkova, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Batchelor, D. B.; Harvey, B.; Petrov, Y.

    2014-02-12

    Steady state scenarios envisaged for ITER aim at optimizing the bootstrap current, while maintaining sufficient confinement and stability to provide the necessary fusion yield. Non-inductive scenarios will need to operate with Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) in order to reach adequate fusion gain at typical currents of 9 MA. However, the large pressure gradients associated with ITBs in regions of weak or negative magnetic shear can be conducive to ideal MHD instabilities, reducing the no-wall limit. The E × B flow shear from toroidal plasma rotation is expected to be low in ITER, with a major role in the ITB dynamics being played by magnetic geometry. Combinations of H/CD sources that maintain weakly reversed magnetic shear profiles throughout the discharge are the focus of this work. Time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the EC equatorial and upper launcher, the formation and sustainment of quasi-steady state ITBs could be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration. However, with proper constraints from peeling-ballooning theory on the pedestal width and height, the fusion gain and the maximum non-inductive current are below the ITER target. Upgrades of the heating and current drive system in ITER, like the use of Lower Hybrid current drive, could overcome these limitations, sustaining higher non-inductive current and confinement, more expanded ITBs which are ideal MHD stable.

  4. Application of a non-steady-state orbit-following Monte-Carlo code to neutron modeling in the MAST spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Shinohara, K.; Oikawa, T.; Tsutsui, H.; McClements, K. G.; Akers, R. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Suzuki, M.; Ide, S.; Kusama, Y.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2016-11-01

    As part of the verification and validation of a newly developed non-steady-state orbit-following Monte-Carlo code, application studies of time dependent neutron rates have been made for a specific shot in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) using 3D fields representing vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) and toroidal field (TF) ripples. The time evolution of density, temperature and rotation rate in the application of the code to MAST are taken directly from experiment. The calculation results approximately agree with the experimental data. It is also found that a full orbit-following scheme is essential to reproduce the neutron rates in MAST.

  5. Extending unified-theory-of-reinforcement neural networks to steady-state operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Calvin, Olivia L; McDowell, J J

    2016-06-01

    The unified theory of reinforcement has been used to develop models of behavior over the last 20 years (Donahoe et al., 1993). Previous research has focused on the theory's concordance with the respondent behavior of humans and animals. In this experiment, neural networks were developed from the theory to extend the unified theory of reinforcement to operant behavior on single-alternative variable-interval schedules. This area of operant research was selected because previously developed neural networks could be applied to it without significant alteration. Previous research with humans and animals indicates that the pattern of their steady-state behavior is hyperbolic when plotted against the obtained rate of reinforcement (Herrnstein, 1970). A genetic algorithm was used in the first part of the experiment to determine parameter values for the neural networks, because values that were used in previous research did not result in a hyperbolic pattern of behavior. After finding these parameters, hyperbolic and other similar functions were fitted to the behavior produced by the neural networks. The form of the neural network's behavior was best described by an exponentiated hyperbola (McDowell, 1986; McLean and White, 1983; Wearden, 1981), which was derived from the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974). In post-hoc analyses the addition of a baseline rate of behavior significantly improved the fit of the exponentiated hyperbola and removed systematic residuals. The form of this function was consistent with human and animal behavior, but the estimated parameter values were not. PMID:27018201

  6. Extending unified-theory-of-reinforcement neural networks to steady-state operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Calvin, Olivia L; McDowell, J J

    2016-06-01

    The unified theory of reinforcement has been used to develop models of behavior over the last 20 years (Donahoe et al., 1993). Previous research has focused on the theory's concordance with the respondent behavior of humans and animals. In this experiment, neural networks were developed from the theory to extend the unified theory of reinforcement to operant behavior on single-alternative variable-interval schedules. This area of operant research was selected because previously developed neural networks could be applied to it without significant alteration. Previous research with humans and animals indicates that the pattern of their steady-state behavior is hyperbolic when plotted against the obtained rate of reinforcement (Herrnstein, 1970). A genetic algorithm was used in the first part of the experiment to determine parameter values for the neural networks, because values that were used in previous research did not result in a hyperbolic pattern of behavior. After finding these parameters, hyperbolic and other similar functions were fitted to the behavior produced by the neural networks. The form of the neural network's behavior was best described by an exponentiated hyperbola (McDowell, 1986; McLean and White, 1983; Wearden, 1981), which was derived from the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974). In post-hoc analyses the addition of a baseline rate of behavior significantly improved the fit of the exponentiated hyperbola and removed systematic residuals. The form of this function was consistent with human and animal behavior, but the estimated parameter values were not.

  7. A Data Filter for Identifying Steady-State Operating Points in Engine Flight Data for Condition Monitoring Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that automatically identifies and extracts steady-state engine operating points from engine flight data. It calculates the mean and standard deviation of select parameters contained in the incoming flight data stream. If the standard deviation of the data falls below defined constraints, the engine is assumed to be at a steady-state operating point, and the mean measurement data at that point are archived for subsequent condition monitoring purposes. The fundamental design of the steady-state data filter is completely generic and applicable for any dynamic system. Additional domain-specific logic constraints are applied to reduce data outliers and variance within the collected steady-state data. The filter is designed for on-line real-time processing of streaming data as opposed to post-processing of the data in batch mode. Results of applying the steady-state data filter to recorded helicopter engine flight data are shown, demonstrating its utility for engine condition monitoring applications.

  8. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    SciTech Connect

    Attaya, H.

    1994-06-01

    Different mathematical methods are used to calculate the nuclear transmutation in steady-state and pulsed neutron irradiation. These methods are the Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation of the matrix exponential function. In the case of the linear decay chain approximation, a simple algorithm is used to evaluate the transition matrices.

  9. Experimental test of the system of vertical and longitudinal lithium limiters on T-11M tokamak as a prototype of plasma facing components of a steady-state fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S. V.; Belov, A. M.; Djigailo, N. T.; Dzhurik, A. S.; Kravchuk, S. I.; Lazarev, V. B.; Lyublinski, I. E.; Vertkov, A. V.; Zharkov, M. Yu.; Shcherbak, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    A new functional model of the prototype of closed Li circuit for protection of the chamber wall was tested in T-11M tokamak by simultaneous use of the vertical Li limiter as an emitter of Li and a new longitudinal Li limiter as its collector. Such technological scheme can be suggested for the steady-state fusion neutron source on the tokamak basis. During plasma shots the cryogenic target of T-11M collected Li flow emitted by the vertical capillary Li limiter almost completely (up to 80%). These Li and hydrogen isotopes were captured and extracted outside the tokamak vacuum chamber without venting of the vessel which is a key requirement for the use of Li in the steady-state tokamak reactor.

  10. Steady-state operation and high energy particle production of MeV energy in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Kubo, S.; Takeiri, Y.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyazawa, J.; Shoji, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Osakabe, M.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Oka, Y.; Chikaraishi, H.; Funaba, H.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Inagaki, S.; Narihara, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Tanaka, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Nishiura, M.; Ozaki, T.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Kwak, J. G.; Murakami, S.; Okada, H.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Kaneko, O.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.

    2007-09-01

    Achieving steady-state plasma operation at high plasma temperatures is one of the important goals of worldwide magnetic fusion research. High temperatures of approximately 1-2 keV, and steady-state plasma sustainment operations have been reported. Recently the steady-state operation regime was greatly extended in the Large Helical Device (LHD). A high-temperature plasma was created and maintained for 54 min with 1.6 GJ in the 2005FY experimental programme. The three-dimensional heat-deposition profile of the LHD helical divertor was modified, and during long-pulse discharges it effectively dispersed the heat load using a magnetic axis swing technique developed at the LHD. A sweep of only 3 cm in the major radius of the magnetic axis position (less than 1% of the major radius of the LHD) was enough to disperse the divertor heat load. The steady-state plasma was heated and sustained mainly by hydrogen minority ion heating using ion cyclotron range of frequencies and partially by electron cyclotron of fundamental resonance frequency. By accumulating the small flux of charge-exchanged neutral particles during the long-pulse operation, a high energy ion tail which extended up to 1.6 MeV was observed. This is the first experimental evidence of high energetic ion confinement of MeV range in helical devices. The long-pulse operations lasted until a sudden increase in radiation loss occurred, presumably because of metal wall flakes dropping into the plasma. The sustained line-averaged electron density and temperature were approximately 0.8 × 1019 m-3 and 2 keV, respectively, at a 1.3 GJ discharge (#53776) and 0.4 × 1019 m-3 and 1 keV at a 1.6 GJ discharge (#66053). The average input power was 680 kW and 490 kW, and the plasma duration was 32 min and 54 min, respectively. These successful long operations show that the heliotron configuration has a high potential as a steady-state fusion reactor.

  11. Detecting divertor damage during steady state operation of Wendelstein 7-X from thermographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Rodatos, A; Greuner, H; Jakubowski, M W; Boscary, J; Wurden, G A; Pedersen, T S; König, R

    2016-02-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) aims to demonstrate the reactor capability of the stellarator concept, by creating plasmas with pulse lengths of up to 30 min at a heating power of up to 10 MW. The divertor plasma facing components will see convective steady state heat flux densities of up to 10 MW/m(2). These high heat flux target elements are actively cooled and are covered with carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) as plasma facing material. The CFC is bonded to the CuCrZr cooling structure. Over the life time of the experiment this interface may weaken and cracks can occur, greatly reducing the heat conduction between the CFC tile and the cooling structure. Therefore, there is not only the need to monitor the divertor to prevent damage by overheating but also the need to detect these fatigue failures of the interface. A method is presented for an early detection of fatigue failures of the interface layer, solely by using the information delivered by the IR-cameras monitoring the divertor. This was developed and validated through experiments made with high heat flux target elements prior to installation in W7-X. PMID:26931848

  12. Detecting divertor damage during steady state operation of Wendelstein 7-X from thermographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodatos, A.; Greuner, H.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Boscary, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; König, R.

    2016-02-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) aims to demonstrate the reactor capability of the stellarator concept, by creating plasmas with pulse lengths of up to 30 min at a heating power of up to 10 MW. The divertor plasma facing components will see convective steady state heat flux densities of up to 10 MW/m2. These high heat flux target elements are actively cooled and are covered with carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) as plasma facing material. The CFC is bonded to the CuCrZr cooling structure. Over the life time of the experiment this interface may weaken and cracks can occur, greatly reducing the heat conduction between the CFC tile and the cooling structure. Therefore, there is not only the need to monitor the divertor to prevent damage by overheating but also the need to detect these fatigue failures of the interface. A method is presented for an early detection of fatigue failures of the interface layer, solely by using the information delivered by the IR-cameras monitoring the divertor. This was developed and validated through experiments made with high heat flux target elements prior to installation in W7-X.

  13. Design criteria of the bolometer diagnostic for steady-state operation of the W7-X stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Burhenn, R.; Koenig, R.; Giannone, L.; Grodzki, P. A.; Klein, B.; Grosser, K.; Baldzuhn, J.; Ewert, K.; Erckmann, V.; Hirsch, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2010-10-15

    A bolometric diagnostic system with features necessary for steady-state operation in the superconducting stellarator W7-X was designed. During a pulse length of 1800 s with an ECRH (electron cyclotron resonance heating) power of 10 MW, the components suffer not only from a large thermal load but also from stray radiation of the nonabsorbed isotropic microwaves. This paper gives an overview of the technical problems encountered during the design work and the solutions to individual problems to meet the special requirements in W7-X, e.g., component thermal protection, detector offset thermal drift suppression, as well as a microwave shielding technique.

  14. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    SciTech Connect

    Attaya, H.

    1994-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Report (ITER) is expected to operate in a pulsed operational mode. Accurate radioactivity calculations, that take into account this mode of operation, are required in order to determine precisely the different safety aspects of ITER. The authors previous examined analytically the effect of pulsed operation in ITER and showed how it depends on the burn time, the dwell time, and the half-lives. That analysis showed also that for ITER`s low duty factor, using the continuous operation assumption would considerably overestimate the radioactivities, for a wide range of half-lives. At the same time, the large improvements in the quality and the quantity of the decay and the cross-section data libraries has considerably increased the computation times of the radioactivity calculations. For both reasons it is imperative to seek different methods of solution that reduce the computational time and can be easily adopted to the treatment of the pulsed operation. In this work, they have developed algorithms based on several mathematical methods that were chosen based on their generality, reliability, stability, accuracy, and efficiency. These methods are the matrix Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential functions.

  15. Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-12-01

    The lumen depreciation and color shift of 38 different lamps (32 LED, 2 CFL, 1 ceramic metal halide [CMH], 3 halogen) were monitored in a specially developed automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA2) for nearly 14,000 hours. Five samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at a target ambient temperature between 44°C and 45°C.

  16. Development of steady-state operation using ion cyclotron heating in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, R.; Kumazawa, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Ueda, Y.; Tokitani, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Shoji, M.; Wakatsuki, T.; Kamio, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, S.; Tamura, N.; Suzuki, C.; Yamada, H.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-06-01

    Using a handshake shape (HAS) antenna phasing dipole for ion cyclotron heating (ICH), the heating efficiency was higher than that using a previous poloidal array antenna in the Large Helical Device. In order to sustain the dipole operation, real-time feedback for impedance matching and maintaining the same phase and power was adopted during long-pulse discharge. The HAS antenna was designed to reduce parasitic losses associated with energetic particle and radio-frequency (RF) sheath effects by field-aligned current concentration on the midplane. Local hot spots and the inhomogeneity of the diverter heat profile in the toroidal direction were reduced. The long-pulse discharge with an electron density (ne0) of 1 × 1019 m-3, center electron temperature (Te0) of 2.5 keV, a plasma duration time (td) of 19 min, and RF heating power (PRF) of 1 MW was achieved by ICH and electron cyclotron heating.

  17. Evaluation of performance of a BLSS model in long-term operation in dynamic and steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Jean-Bernard; Tikhomirov, Alex; Ushakova, Sofya; Velitchko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lasseur, Christophe

    Evaluation of performance of a BLSS model, including higher plants for food production and biodegradation of human waste, in long-term operation in dynamic and steady states was performed. The model system was conceived for supplying vegetarian food and oxygen to 0.07 human. The following data were obtained in steady-state operating conditions. Average rate of wheat, chufa, radish, lettuce and Salicornia edible biomass accumulation were 8.7, 5.5, 0.6, 0.6 and metricconverterProductID2.5 g2.5 g per day respectively. Thus, to mimic the vegetarian edible biomass consumption by a human it was necessary to withdraw 17.9 g/d from total mass ex-change. Simultaneously, human mineralized exometabolites (artificial mineralized urine, AMU) in the amount of approximately 7% of a daily norm were introduced into the nutrient solu-tion for irrigation of the plants cultivated on a neutral substrate (expanded clay aggregate). The estimated value of 5.8 g/d of wheat and Salicornia inedible biomass was introduced in the soil-like substrate (SLS) to fully meet the plants need in nitrogen. The rest of wheat and Salicornia inedible biomass, 5.7 g/d, was stored. Thus in all, 23.6g of vegetarian dry matter had been stored. Assuming edible biomass is eaten up by the human, the closure coefficient of the vegetarian biomass inclusion into matter recycling amounted to 88%. The analysis of the long-term model operation showed that the main factors limiting increase of recycling processes were the following: a) Partly unbalanced mineral composition of daily human waste with daily needs of plants culti-` vated in the system. Thus, when fully satisfied with respect to nitrogen, the plants experienced a lack of macro elements such as P, Mg and Ca by more than 50%; b) Partly unbalanced mineral composition of edible biomass of the plants cultivated in the SLS with that of inedible biomass of the plants cultivated by hydroponic method on neutral substrate introduced in the SLS; c) Accumulation of

  18. Continuous tokamak operation with an internal transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1982-10-01

    A large improvement in efficiency of current drive in a tokamak can be obtained using neutral beam injection to drive the current in a plasma which has low density and high resistivity. The current established under such conditions acts as the primary of a transformer to drive current in an ignited high-density plasma. In the context of a model of plasma confinement and fusion reactor costs, it is shown that such transformer action has substantial advantages over strict steady-state current drive. It is also shown that cycling plasma density and fusion power is essential for effective operation of an internal transformer cycle. Fusion power loading must be periodically reduced for intervals whose duration is comparable to the maximum of the particle confinement and thermal inertia timescales for plasma fueling and heating. The design of neutron absorption blankets which can tolerate reduced power loading for such short intervals is identified as a critical problem in the design of fusion power reactors.

  19. Steady state recycling chromatography with solvent removal-effect of solvent removal constraints on process operation under ideal conditions.

    PubMed

    Siitonen, Jani; Sainio, Tuomo

    2014-05-01

    Steady state recycling chromatography (SSR) offers a means to reduce eluent consumption and increase productivity in preparative and production scale chromatographic separations. Even better performance is obtained with an integrated process by coupling solvent removal unit to the chromatographic separation unit. Here a design method for SSR with an integrated solvent removal unit (SSR-SR) is presented. The method is more practical than previous work as the effect of physical constraints, such as solubility or viscosity, imposed on the amount of solvent removed is included. The method holds under ideal conditions for binary systems with competitive Langmuir isotherm model. The design equations allow calculation of the regions of feasible operating parameters when either the maximum concentrations in the solvent removal unit or of the solution fed into the chromatographic column is restricted. The method was applied to analyze the performance of different SSR-SR configurations in two case studies: the separation of mandelic acid enantiomers and the separation of EMD 53986 enantiomers. The benefits of SSR-SR are relatively small under ideal conditions but the design method developed here can give a good starting point for designing SSR-SR processes under non-ideal conditions.

  20. REAL-TIME EMISSION CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC AIR TOXIC POLLUTANTS DURING STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT OPERATION OF A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-line monitoring method, jet resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) was used to measure emissions of organic air toxics from a medium-duty (60 kW)diesel generator during transient and steady state operations. Emission...

  1. Optimizing stability, transport, and divertor operation through plasma shaping for steady-state scenario development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C T; Ferron, J R; Luce, T C; Petrie, T W; Politzer, P A; Rhodes, T L; Doyle, E J; Makowski, M A; Kessel, C; DeBoo, J C; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Greenfield, C M; La Haye, R J; Murakami, M; Hyatt, A W; Challis, C; Prater, R; Jackson, G L; Park, J; Reimerdes, H; Turnbull, A D; McKee, G R; Shafer, M W; Groth, M; Porter, G D; West, W P

    2008-12-19

    Recent studies on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have elucidated key aspects of the dependence of stability, confinement, and density control on the plasma magnetic configuration, leading to the demonstration of nearly noninductive operation for >1 s with pressure 30% above the ideal no-wall stability limit. Achieving fully noninductive tokamak operation requires high pressure, good confinement, and density control through divertor pumping. Plasma geometry affects all of these. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics modeling of external kink stability suggests that it may be optimized by adjusting the shape parameter known as squareness ({zeta}). Optimizing kink stability leads to an increase in the maximum stable pressure. Experiments confirm that stability varies strongly with {zeta}, in agreement with the modeling. Optimization of kink stability via {zeta} is concurrent with an increase in the H-mode edge pressure pedestal stability. Global energy confinement is optimized at the lowest {zeta} tested, with increased pedestal pressure and lower core transport. Adjusting the magnetic divertor balance about a double-null configuration optimizes density control for improved noninductive auxiliary current drive. The best density control is obtained with a slight imbalance toward the divertor opposite the ion grad(B) drift direction, consistent with modeling of these effects. These optimizations have been combined to achieve noninductive current fractions near unity for over 1 s with normalized pressure of 3.5<{beta}{sub N}<3.9, bootstrap current fraction of >65%, and a normalized confinement factor of H{sub 98(y,2)}{approx}1.5.

  2. Steady-State Thermodynamics of Langevin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Takahiro; Sasa, Shin-Ichi

    2001-04-01

    We study Langevin dynamics describing nonequilibirum steady states. Employing the phenomenological framework of steady-state thermodynamics constructed by Oono and Paniconi [Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 130, 29 (1998)], we find that the extended form of the second law which they proposed holds for transitions between steady states and that the Shannon entropy difference is related to the excess heat produced in an infinitely slow operation. A generalized version of the Jarzynski work relation plays an important role in our theory.

  3. R&D around a photoneutralizer-based NBI system (Siphore) in view of a DEMO Tokamak steady state fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, A.; Achard, Jocelyn; Achkasov, K.; Bechu, S.; Baudouin, C.; Baulaigue, O.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fiorucci, D.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Futtersack, R.; Garibaldi, P.; Gicquel, A.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph.; Hagelaar, G.; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Lemoine, D.; Lepetit, B.; Minea, T.; Odic, E.; Revel, A.; Soliman, B. A.; Teste, P.

    2015-11-01

    Since the signature of the ITER treaty in 2006, a new research programme targeting the emergence of a new generation of neutral beam (NB) system for the future fusion reactor (DEMO Tokamak) has been underway between several laboratories in Europe. The specifications required to operate a NB system on DEMO are very demanding: the system has to provide plasma heating, current drive and plasma control at a very high level of power (up to 150 MW) and energy (1 or 2 MeV), including high performances in term of wall-plug efficiency (η  >  60%), high availability and reliability. To this aim, a novel NB concept based on the photodetachment of the energetic negative ion beam is under study. The keystone of this new concept is the achievement of a photoneutralizer where a high power photon flux (~3 MW) generated within a Fabry-Perot cavity will overlap, cross and partially photodetach the intense negative ion beam accelerated at high energy (1 or 2 MeV). The aspect ratio of the beam-line (source, accelerator, etc) is specifically designed to maximize the overlap of the photon beam with the ion beam. It is shown that such a photoneutralized based NB system would have the capability to provide several tens of MW of D0 per beam line with a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. A feasibility study of the concept has been launched between different laboratories to address the different physics aspects, i.e. negative ion source, plasma modelling, ion accelerator simulation, photoneutralization and high voltage holding under vacuum. The paper describes the present status of the project and the main achievements of the developments in laboratories.

  4. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines lumen depreciation and color shift of 17 different A lamps in steady-state conditions (15 LED, 1 CFL, 1 halogen). The goal of this investigation was to examine the long-term performance of complete LED lamps relative to benchmark halogen and CFL lamps—in this case, A lamps emitting approximately 800 lumens operated continuously at a relatively high ambient temperature of 45°C.

  5. Investigations of the radial propagation of blob-like structure in a non-confined electron cyclotron resonance heated plasma on Q-shu University Experiment with a Steady-State Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, R.; Liu, H. Q.; Ishiguro, M.; Ikeda, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nishino, N.; Collaboration: QUEST Group

    2011-09-15

    A study of radial propagation and electric fields induced by charge separation in blob-like structures has been performed in a non-confined cylindrical electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma on Q-shu University Experiment with a Steady-State Spherical Tokamak using a fast-speed camera and a Langmuir probe. The radial propagation of the blob-like structures is found to be driven by E x B drift. Moreover, these blob-like structures were found to have been accelerated, and the property of the measured radial velocities agrees with the previously proposed model [C. Theiler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 065001 (2009)]. Although the dependence of the radial velocity on the connection length of the magnetic field appeared to be different, a plausible explanation based on enhanced short-circuiting of the current path can be proposed.

  6. RF-driven tokamak reactor with sub-ignited, thermally stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Harten, L.P.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    A Radio-Frequency Driven Tokamak Reactor (RFDTR) can use RF-power, programmed by a delayed temperature measurement, to thermally stabilize a power equilibrium below ignition, and to drive a steady state current. We propose the parameters for such a device generating approx. = 1600 MW thermal power and operating with Q approx. = 40 (= power out/power in). A one temperature zero-dimensional model allows simple analytical formulation of the problem. The relevance of injected impurities for locating the equilibrium is discussed. We present the results of a one-dimensional (radial) code which includes the deposition of the supplementary power, and compare with our zero-dimensional model.

  7. NACA research on combustors for aircraft gas turbines I : effects of operating variables on steady-state performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Walter T; Childs, J Howard

    1950-01-01

    Some of the systematic research conducted by the NACA on aircraft gas-turbine combustors is reviewed. Trends depicting the effect of inlet-air pressure, temperature, and velocity and fuel-air ratio on performance characteristics, such as combustion efficiency, maximum temperature rise attainable, pressure loss, and combustor-outlet temperature distribution are described for a variety of turbojet combustors of the liquid-fuel type. These trends are further discussed as effects significant to the turbojet engine, such as altitude operational limits, specific fuel consumption, thrust, acceleration, and turbine life.

  8. Borehole modelling: a comparison between a steady-state model and a novel dynamic model in a real ON/OFF GSHP operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, M.; Ruiz-Calvo, F.; Corberán, J. M.; Montagud, C.; Tagliafico, L. A.

    2014-11-01

    The correct design and optimization of complex energy systems requires the ability to reproduce the dynamic thermal behavior of each system component. In ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems, modelling the borehole heat exchangers (BHE) dynamic response is especially relevant in the development of control strategies for energy optimization purposes. Over the last years, several models have been developed but most of them are based on steady- state approaches, which makes them unsuitable for short-term simulation purposes. In fact, in order to accurately predict the evolution of the fluid temperatures due to the ON/OFF cycles of the heat pump, it is essential to correctly characterize the dynamic response of BHE for very short time periods. The aim of the present paper is to compare the performance of an analytical steady-state model, available in TRNSYS environment (Type 557), with a novel short-term dynamic model. The new dynamic model is based on the thermal-network approach coupled with a vertical discretization of the borehole which takes into account both the advection due to the fluid circulating along the U-tube, and the heat transfer in the borehole and in the ground. These two approaches were compared against experimental data collected from a real GSHP system installed at the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia. The analysis was performed comparing the outlet temperature profiles predicted by both models during daily standard ON/OFF operating conditions, both in heating and cooling mode, and the between both approaches were highlighted. Finally, the obtained results have been discussed focusing on the potential impact that the differences found in the prediction of the temperature evolution could have in design and optimization of GSHP systems.

  9. HHFW Current Drive and Heating for Spherical Tokamak Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, T. K.; Chiu, S. C.

    1997-11-01

    High-harmonic fast waves (HHFW) can play useful roles in various operating phases of a spherical tokamak (ST). At steady state, it provides current profile tailoring in the mid-plasma region with the launched N_||-spectrum as a control knob. In the lower-β startup phase, it penetrates the inner core of the plasma, and provides auxiliary heating and current ramp-up. In this paper, we report results of studies of the effectiveness of the HHFW in fulfilling these roles in ST plasmas ranging from present devices (e.g., NSTX) to power plant designs (e.g., ARIES-ST). Modeling is carried out using the CURRAY ray tracing code that was recently upgraded to address issues specific to ST plasmas(S. C. Chiu, et al., submitted to Nucl. Fusion) (1997).. Extending a previous study(T. K. Mau, S. C. Chiu, 12th Top. Conf. on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas), Savannah, GA (1997)., HHFW current drive on reference NSTX equilibria will be studied, and the issues of thermal and beam ion damping will be addressed in detail. The use of HHFW power in the ARIES-ST power plant design is under investigation, and results on heating and current ramp-up during startup will be reported.

  10. Temperature in a J47-25 Turbojet-engine Combustor and Turbine Sections During Steady-state and Transient Operation in a Sea-level Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, C R; Johnston, J R

    1955-01-01

    In order to determine the conditions of engine operation causing the most severe thermal stresses in the hot parts of a turbojet engine, a J47-25 engine was instrumented with thermocouples and operated to obtain engine material temperatures under steady-state and transient conditions. Temperatures measured during rated take-off conditions of nozzle guide vanes downstream of a single combustor differed on the order of 400 degrees F depending on the relation of the blades position to the highest temperature zone of the burner. Under the same operation conditions, measured midspan temperatures in a nozzle guide vane in the highest temperature zone of a combustor wake ranged from approximately 1670 degrees F at leading and trailing edges to 1340 degrees F at midchord on the convex side of the blade. The maximum measured nozzle-guide-vane temperature of 1920degrees at the trailing edge occurred during a rapid acceleration from idle to rated take-off speed following which the tail-pipe gas temperature exceeded maximum allowable temperature by 125 degrees F.

  11. Multiple steady states in heterogeneous azeotropic distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Bekiaris, N.; Meski, G.A.; Morari, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this article, the authors study multiple steady states in ternary heterogeneous azeotropic distillation. They show that in the case of infinite reflux and an infinite number of trays, one can construct bifurcation diagrams on physical grounds with the distillate flow as the bifurcation parameter. Multiple steady states exist when the distillate flow varies nonmonotonically along the continuation path of the bifurcation diagram. The authors show how the distillate and bottom product paths can be located for tray or packed columns, with or without decanter and with different types of condenser and reboiler. They derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of these multiple steady states based on the geometry of the product paths. They also locate in the composition triangle the feed compositions that lead to these multiple steady states. They show that the prediction of the existence of multiple steady states in the case of infinite reflux and an infinite number of trays has relevant implications for columns operating at finite reflux and with a finite number of trays.

  12. Quantum computing with steady state spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Brian M.

    Many approaches to quantum computing use spatially confined qubits in the presence of dynamic fields to perform computation. These approaches are contrasted with proposals using mobile qubits in the presence of static fields. In this thesis, steady state quantum computing using mobile electrons is explored using numerical modeling. Firstly, a foundational introduction to the case of spatially confined qubits embodied via quantum dots is provided. A collection of universal gates implemented with dynamic fields is described using simulations. These gates are combined to implement a five-qubit Grover search to provide further insight on the time-dependent field approach. Secondly, the quantum dot description is contrasted with quantum computing using steady state spin currents. Leveraging the Non-Equilibrium Greens Function formalism to perform numerical simulations, the quantum aspects of steady state spin currents are explored by revisiting the Stern-Gerlach experiment using spin-polarized contacts on a one-dimensional channel. After demonstrating the quantum nature of mobile electrons at steady state, arbitrary single qubit operations using static fields are explored. The model is further extended to incorporate two-qubit interactions to realize the square root of SWAP gate. The two-qubit CNOT gate is used to prepare a Bell state, which is read via quantum state tomography. Finally, Grover's search is revisited to explore the performance benefits of steady state quantum computing. The described multi-particle model is applicable to mobile qubit quantum computing proposals leveraging synchronized electron transport in static fields to perform quantum computing.

  13. Steady-state temperature distribution within a Brayton rotating unit operating in a power conversion system using helium-xenon gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R. L.; Namkoong, D.; Edkin, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The Brayton rotating unit (BRU), consisting of a turbine, an alternator, and a compressor, was tested as part of a Brayton cycle power conversion system over a side range of steady state operating conditions. The working fluid in the system was a mixture of helium-xenon gases. Turbine inlet temperature was varied from 1200 to 1600 F, compressor inlet temperature from 60 to 120 F, compressor discharge pressure from 20 to 45 psia, rotative speed from 32 400 to 39 600 rpm, and alternator liquid-coolant flow rate from 0.01 to 0.27 pound per second. Test results indicated that the BRU internal temperatures were highly sensitive to alternator coolant flow below the design value of 0.12 pound per second but much less so at higher values. The armature winding temperature was not influenced significantly by turbine inlet temperature, but was sensitive, up to 20 F per kVA alternator output, to varying alternator output. When only the rotational speed was changed (+ or - 10% of rated value), the BRU internal temperatures varied directly with the speed.

  14. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the Space Launch System Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle.

  15. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the RSRMV Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle

  16. Steady State Dense Gas Dispersion

    1995-03-01

    SLAB-LLNL is a steady-state one-dimensional program which calculates the atmospheric dispersion of a heavier than air gas that is continuously released at ground level. The model is based on the steady-state crosswind-averaged conservation equations of species, mass, energy, and momentum. It uses the air entrainment concept to account for the turbulent mixing of the gas cloud with the surrounding atmosphere and similarity profiles to determine the crosswind dependence.

  17. Pedestal and Transport Properties of Steady-state I-mode Plasmas over Expanded Operational Space in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmar, Earl

    2011-10-01

    I-mode operation on Alcator C-Mod combines a strong edge thermal transport barrier with L-mode levels of particle and impurity transport, allowing access to very high performance discharges with low pedestal collisionality and central temperatures up to 8 keV, and without large ELMs or other intermittent edge instabilities. In recent campaigns, C-Mod I-modes have been extended to quasi-steady-state, with access in both favorable and unfavorable ion drift directions and typical normalized energy confinement quality factor H98 ~ 1.0 to 1.2. Adding ICRF mode-conversion flow-drive enhances toroidal flow shear near the plasma edge and confinement is further enhanced. I-mode has been maintained with input power up to nearly 2x the I-mode threshold power, with the largest accessible range in closed divertor geometry at modest triangularity. Simple extrapolations at fixed field imply that ITER in unfavorable drift could access I-mode with available power, and stay in I-mode with alpha-dominant heating. Detailed pedestal fluctuation measurements reveal changes in the turbulence, with decreases in the power at some frequencies and size scales, and growth of a weakly coherent mode (WCM) (kθ ~ 1.5 cm-1, δf/f ~.3) which propagates in the electron diamagnetic direction in the plasma frame. The WCM, which has density, temperature and magnetic signatures, appears to play a key role in pedestal density and impurity regulation, and detailed experimental results and associated modeling are presented. The distribution of divertor exhaust power depends on ion drift direction; new measurements of I-mode heat flux footprints on the outer divertor are compared with those in H-mode. Pedestal stability analyses will be shown for I-modes, including some which exhibited small ELMs. Supported by USDOE Award DE-FC02-99-ER54512.

  18. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study RRL3.2 Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Tucker, Joseph C.

    2014-12-01

    The lumen depreciation and color shift of 17 different A lamps (15 LED, 1 CFL, 1 halogen) was monitored in the automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA) for more than 7,500 hours. Ten samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at an ambient temperature of 45°C (-1°C). Importantly, the steady-state test conditions were not optimized for inducing catastrophic failure for any of the lamp technologies—to which thermal cycling is a strong contributor— and are not typical of normal use patterns—which usually include off periods where the lamp cools down. Further, the test conditions differ from those used in standardized long-term test methods (i.e., IES LM-80, IES LM-84), so the results should not be directly compared. On the other hand, the test conditions are similar to those used by ENERGY STAR (when elevated temperature testing is called for). Likewise, the conditions and assumptions used by manufacturers to generated lifetime claims may vary; the CALiPER long-term data is informative, but cannot necessarily be used to discredit manufacturer claims. The test method used for this investigation should be interpreted as one more focused on the long-term effects of elevated temperature operation, at an ambient temperature that is not uncommon in luminaires. On average, the lumen maintenance of the LED lamps monitored in the ALTA was better than benchmark lamps, but there was considerable variation from lamp model to lamp model. While three lamp models had average lumen maintenance above 99% at the end of the study period, two products had average lumen maintenance below 65%, constituting a parametric failure. These two products, along with a third, also exhibited substantial color shift, another form of parametric failure. While none of the LED lamps exhibited catastrophic failure—and all of the benchmarks did—the early degradation of performance is concerning, especially with a

  19. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  20. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  1. Recovery of optical cross-section perturbations in dense-scattering media by transport-theory-based imaging operators and steady-state simulated data.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Graber, H L; Barbour, R L; Aronson, R

    1996-07-10

    We present a useful strategy for imaging perturbations of the macroscopic absorption cross section of dense-scattering media using steady-state light sources. A perturbation model based on transport theory is derived, and the inverse problem is simplified to a system of linear equations, WΔμ = ΔR, where W is the weight matrix, Δμ is a vector of the unknown perturbations, and ΔR is the vector of detector readings. Monte Carlo simulations compute the photon flux across the surfaces of phantoms containing simple or complex inhomogeneities. Calculation of the weight matrix is also based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Three reconstruction algorithms-conjugate gradient descent, projection onto convex sets, and the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique, with or without imposed positivity constraints-are used for image reconstruction. A rescaling technique that improves the conditioning of the weight matrix is also developed. Results show that the analysis of time-independent data by a perturbation model is capable of resolving the internal structure of a dense-scattering medium. Imposition of positivity constraints improves image quality at the cost of a reduced convergence rate. Use of the rescaling technique increases the initial rate of convergence, resulting in accurate images in a smaller number of iterations.

  2. High-beta, steady-state hybrid scenario on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, C. C.; Kinsey, J. E.; Holcomb, C. T.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Murakami, M.; Politzer, P. A.; Reimerdes, H.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of the hybrid scenario (first developed as an advanced inductive scenario for high fluence) as a regime for high-beta, steady-state plasmas is demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. These experiments show that the beneficial characteristics of hybrids, namely safety factor  ⩾1 with low central magnetic shear, high stability limits and excellent confinement, are maintained when strong central current drive (electron cyclotron and neutral beam) is applied to increase the calculated non-inductive fraction to  ≈100% (≈50% bootstrap current). The best discharges achieve normalized beta of 3.4, IPB98(y,2) confinement factor of 1.4, surface loop voltage of 0.01 V, and nearly equal electron and ion temperatures at low collisionality. A 0D physics model shows that steady-state hybrid operation with Qfus ~ 5 is feasible in FDF and ITER. The advantage of the hybrid scenario as an advanced tokamak regime is that the external current drive can be deposited near the plasma axis where the efficiency is high; additionally, good alignment between the current drive and plasma current profiles is not necessary as the poloidal magnetic flux pumping self-organizes the current density profile in hybrids with an m/n=3/2 tearing mode.

  3. High-beta, steady-state hybrid scenario on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Petty, C. C.; Kinsey, J. E.; Holcomb, C. T.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; et al

    2015-12-17

    The potential of the hybrid scenario (first developed as an advanced inductive scenario for high fluence) as a regime for high-beta, steady-state plasmas is demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. Our experiments show that the beneficial characteristics of hybrids, namely safety factor ≥ 1 with low central magnetic shear, high stability limits and excellent confinement, are maintained when strong central current drive (electron cyclotron and neutral beam) is applied to increase the calculated non-inductive fraction to ≈ 100% (≈ 50% bootstrap current). Moreover, the best discharges achieve normalized beta of 3.4, IPB98(y,2) confinement factor of 1.4, surface loop voltage of 0.01more » V, and nearly equal electron and ion temperatures at low collisionality. A 0D physics model shows that steady-state hybrid operation with Qfus ~ 5 is feasible in FDF and ITER. One advantage of the hybrid scenario as an advanced tokamak regime is that the external current drive can be deposited near the plasma axis where the efficiency is high; additionally, good alignment between the current drive and plasma current profiles is not necessary as the poloidal magnetic flux pumping self-organizes the current density profile in hybrids with an m/n = 3/2 tearing mode.« less

  4. High-beta, steady-state hybrid scenario on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C. C.; Kinsey, J. E.; Holcomb, C. T.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Murakami, M.; Politzer, P. A.; Reimerdes, H.

    2015-12-17

    The potential of the hybrid scenario (first developed as an advanced inductive scenario for high fluence) as a regime for high-beta, steady-state plasmas is demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. Our experiments show that the beneficial characteristics of hybrids, namely safety factor ≥ 1 with low central magnetic shear, high stability limits and excellent confinement, are maintained when strong central current drive (electron cyclotron and neutral beam) is applied to increase the calculated non-inductive fraction to ≈ 100% (≈ 50% bootstrap current). Moreover, the best discharges achieve normalized beta of 3.4, IPB98(y,2) confinement factor of 1.4, surface loop voltage of 0.01 V, and nearly equal electron and ion temperatures at low collisionality. A 0D physics model shows that steady-state hybrid operation with Qfus ~ 5 is feasible in FDF and ITER. One advantage of the hybrid scenario as an advanced tokamak regime is that the external current drive can be deposited near the plasma axis where the efficiency is high; additionally, good alignment between the current drive and plasma current profiles is not necessary as the poloidal magnetic flux pumping self-organizes the current density profile in hybrids with an m/n = 3/2 tearing mode.

  5. Venusian hydrology: Steady state reconsidered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinspoon, David H.

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, Grinspoon proposed that the data on hydrogen abundance, isotopic composition, and escape rate were consistent with the hypothesis that water on Venus might be in steady state rather than monotonic decline since the dawn of time. This conclusion was partially based on a derived water lifetime against nonthermal escape of approximately 10(exp 8) yr. De Bergh et al., preferring the earlier Pioneer Venus value of 200 ppm water to the significantly lower value detected by Bezard et al., found H2O lifetimes of greater than 10(exp 9) yr. Donahue and Hodges derived H2O lifetimes of 0.4-5 x 10 (exp 9) yr. Both these analyses used estimates of H escape flux between 0.4 x 10(exp 7) and 1 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from Rodriguez et al. Yet in more recent Monte Carlo modeling, Hodges and Tinsley found an escape flux due to charge exchange with hot H(+) of 2.8 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). McElroy et al. estimated an escape flux of 8 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from collisions with hot O produced by dissociative recombination of O2(+). Brace et al. estimated an escape flux of 5 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from ion escape from the ionotail of Venus. The combined estimated escape flux from all these processes is approximately 4 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The most sophisticated analysis to date of near-IR radiation from Venus' nightside reveals a water mixing ratio of approximately 30 ppm, suggesting a lifetime against escape for water of less than 10(exp 8) yr. Large uncertainties remain in these quantities, yet the data point toward a steady state. Further evaluation of these uncertainties, and new evolutionary modeling incorporating estimates of the outgassing rate from post-Magellan estimates of the volcanic resurfacing rate are presented.

  6. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D. S.; Diem, S. J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ferron, J. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Garstka, G. D.; Gates, D A; Gray, T.; Grisham, L. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K. W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J. H.; Kissick, M. W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. G.; Lewicki, B. T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T. K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C. N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H. K.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Peng, Y-K M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P. H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R. J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Sontag, A. C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K. L.; Unterberg, E. A.; Halle, A. Von.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J. M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Carter, M. D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Hatcher, R. E.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L. L.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, N. C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W. R.; Wurden, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (β), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values βT of up to 35% with a near unity central βT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where βT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction (~ 60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX to

  7. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G; Kugel, W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Kissick, M. W.; Bourdelle, C.; Kim, J.H; Gray, T.; Garstka, G. D.; Fonck, R. J.; Doerner, R.; Diem, S.J.; Pacella, D.; Nishino, N.; Ferron, J. R.; Skinner, C. H.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Mau, T.K.; Bell, Michael G.; Raman, R.; Peng, Y-K. M.; Ono, M.; Park, W.; Hoffman, D.; Maqueda, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kaita, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Hill, K.W.; Heidbrink, W.; Spaleta, J.; Sontag, A.C; Seraydarian, R.; Schooff, R.J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Menard, J.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K.; LeBlanc, B.; Probert, P. H.; Blanchard, W.; Wampler, William R.; Swain, D. W.; Ryan, P.M.; Rosenberg, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Phillips, C.K.; Park, H.K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Paoletti, F.; Medley, S. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kessel, C. E.; Stevenson, T.; Darrow, D. S.; Majeski, R.; Bitter, M.; Neumeyer, C.; Nelson, B.A.; Paul, S. F.; Manickam, J.; Ostrander, C. N.; Mueller, D.; Lewicki, B.T; Luckhardt, S.; Johnson, D.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Kubota, Shigeru; Gates, D.A.; Bush, C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Schaffer, M.; Boedo, J.; Maingi, R.; Redi, M.; Pinsker, R.; Bigelow, T.; Bell, R. E.

    2004-06-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta ({beta}), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values {beta}{sub T} of up to 35% with a near unity central {beta}{sub T} have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where {beta}{sub T} up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX

  8. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; W. Blanchard; J. Boedo; C. Bourdelle; C. Bush; W. Choe; J. Chrzanowski; D.S. Darrow; S.J. Diem; R. Doerner; P.C. Efthimion; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Fonck; E.D. Fredrickson; G.D. Garstka; D.A. Gates; T. Gray; L.R. Grisham; W. Heidbrink; K.W. Hill; D. Hoffman; T.R. Jarboe; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; C. Kessel; J.H. Kim; M.W. Kissick; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; K. Lee; S.G. Lee; B.T. Lewicki; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; J. Manickam; R. Maqueda; T.K. Mau; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B.A. Nelson; C. Neumeyer; N. Nishino; C.N. Ostrander; D. Pacella; F. Paoletti; H.K. Park; W. Park; S.F. Paul; Y.-K. M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; P.H. Probert; S. Ramakrishnan; R. Raman; M. Redi; A.L. Roquemore; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; R.J. Schooff; R. Seraydarian; C.H. Skinner; A.C. Sontag; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; T. Stevenson; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; X. Tang; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; K.L. Tritz; E.A. Unterberg; A. Von Halle; J. Wilgen; M. Williams; J.R. Wilson; X. Xu; S.J. Zweben; R. Akers; R.E. Barry; P. Beiersdorfer; J.M. Bialek; B. Blagojevic; P.T. Bonoli; M.D. Carter; W. Davis; B. Deng; L. Dudek; J. Egedal; R. Ellis; M. Finkenthal; J. Foley; E. Fredd; A. Glasser; T. Gibney; M. Gilmore; R.J. Goldston; R.E. Hatcher; R.J. Hawryluk; W. Houlberg; R. Harvey; S.C. Jardin; J.C. Hosea; H. Ji; M. Kalish; J. Lowrance; L.L. Lao; F.M. Levinton; N.C. Luhmann; R. Marsala; D. Mastravito; M.M. Menon; O. Mitarai; M. Nagata; G. Oliaro; R. Parsells; T. Peebles; B. Peneflor; D. Piglowski; G.D. Porter; A.K. Ram; M. Rensink; G. Rewoldt; P. Roney; K. Shaing; S. Shiraiwa; P. Sichta; D. Stotler; B.C. Stratton; R. Vero; W.R. Wampler; G.A. Wurden

    2003-10-02

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been

  9. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  10. Multiple steady states in coupled flow tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Kottalam, J.; Hatlee, Michael D.; Ross, John

    1992-05-01

    Coupling between continuous-flow, stirred tank reactors (CSTR's), each having multiple steady states, can produce new steady states with different concentrations of the chemical species in each of the coupled tanks. In this work, we identify a kinetic potential ψ that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors, when the reaction mechanism permits a single-variable description of the states of the individual tanks; examples include the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, a cubic model suggested by Noyes, and two quintic models. Stable steady states correspond to minima of ψ, and unstable steady states to maxima or saddle points; marginally stable states typically correspond to saddle-node points. We illustrate the variation in ψ due to changes in the rate constant for external material intake (k0) and for exchange between tanks (kx). For fixed k0 values, we analyze the changes in numbers and types of steady states as kx increases from zero. We show that steady states disappear by pairwise coalescence; we also show that new steady states may appear with increasing kx, when the reaction mechanism is sufficiently complex. For fixed initial conditions, the steady state ultimately reached in a mixing experiment may depend on the exchange rate constant as a function of time, kx(t) : Adiabatic mixing is obtained in the limit of slow changes in kx(t) and instantaneous mixing in the limit as kx(t)→∞ while t remains small. Analyses based on the potential ψ predict the outcome of mixing experiments for arbitrary kx(t). We show by explicit counterexamples that a prior theory developed by Noyes does not correctly predict the instability points or the transitions between steady states of coupled tanks, to be expected in mixing experiments. We further show that the outcome of such experiments is not connected to the relative stability of steady states in individual tank reactors. We find that coupling may effectively stabilize the tanks. We provide

  11. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  12. Superconducting magnet system for the TPX Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Chaplin, M.R.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-09-15

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will be the first Tokamak using superconducting magnets for both the poloidal and toroidal field. It is designed for advanced Tokamak physics experiments in steady-state and long-pulse operation. The TPX superconducting magnets use an advanced cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to that developed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The toroidal field magnets provide 4.0 T at 2.25 m with a stored energy of 1.05 GJ. The poloidal field magnets provide 18.0 V-s to ohmically start and control long burns of a 2.0 MA plasma.

  13. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells.

  14. Experimental study of multiple steady states in homogeneous azeotropic distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Guettinger, T.E.; Dorn, C.; Morari, M.

    1997-03-01

    Bekiaris et al. (1993) explained the existence of multiple steady states in homogeneous ternary azeotropic distillation, on the basis of the analysis of the case of infinite reflux and infinite column length (infinite number of trays). They showed that the predictions of multiple steady states for such infinite columns have relevant implications for columns of finite length operated at finite reflux. In this article, experiments are described for the ternary homogeneous system methanol-methyl butyrate-toluene which demonstrate the existence of multiple steady states (output multiplicities) caused by the vapor-liquid-equilibrium. The experiments on an industrial pilot column show two stable steady states for the same feed flow rate and composition and the same set of operating parameters. The measurements are in excellent agreement with the predictions obtained for infinite columns using the {infinity}/{infinity} analysis tool as well as with stage-by-stage simulation results. These experiments represent the first published study reporting evidence for the predictions and simulations by various researchers showing that type of output multiplicities in distillation.

  15. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described.

  16. Operation of a tokamak reactor in the radiative improved mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Mavrin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a nuclear fusion reactor has been simulated within a model based on experimental results obtained at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and other facilities in which quasistationary regimes were achieved with long confinement times, high densities, and absence of the edge-localized mode. The radiative improved mode of confinement studied in detail at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak is the most interesting such regime. One of the most important problems of modern tokamaks is the problem of a very high thermal load on a divertor (or a limiter). This problem is quite easily solved in the radiative improved mode. Since a significant fraction of the thermal energy is reemitted by an impurity, the thermal loading is significantly reduced. As the energy confinement time τ E at high densities in the indicated mode is significantly larger than the time predicted by the scaling of ITERH-98P(y, 2), ignition can be achieved in a facility much smaller than the ITER facility at plasma temperatures below 20 keV. The revealed decrease in the degradation of the confinement time τ E with an increase in the introduced power has been analyzed.

  17. Steady state response of unsymmetrically laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Kenji; Kawashima, Katsuya; Sakata, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A numerical approach for analyzing the forced vibration problem of a symmetrically laminated FRP (fiber reinforced plastic) composite plate was proposed by the authors. In the present paper, this approach is modified for application to an unsymmetrically laminated FRP composite plate. Numerical calculations are carried out for the clamped antisymmetrically laminated rectangular and elliptical plates which are a kind of unsymmetrically laminated plate. Then,, the effects of the lamina material and the fiber orientation angle on the steady state response are discussed. Furthermore, it is investigated that what structural damping factor is most influenced on the steady state response of an antisymmetrically laminated plate.

  18. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; De Angeli, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bykov, I.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Brochard, F.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization in fusion devices under steady state conditions are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions—direct lift-up, sliding, rolling—are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  19. CA_OPPUSST - Cantera OPUS Steady State

    2005-03-01

    The Cantera Opus Steady State (ca-opusst) applications solves steady reacting flow problems in opposed-flow geometries. It is a 1-0 application that represents axisymmetnc 3-0 physical systems that can be reduced via a similarity transformation to a 1-0 mathematical representation. The code contain solutions of the general dynamic equations for the particle distribution functions using a sectional model to describe the particle distribution function. Operators for particle nucleation, coagulation, condensation (i.e., growth/etching via reactions with themore » gas ambient), internal particle reactions. particle transport due to convection and due to molecular transport, are included in the particle general dynamics equation. Heat transport due to radiation exchange of the environment with particles in local thermal equilibrium to the surrounding gas will be included in the enthalpy conservation equation that is solved for the coupled gas! particle system in an upcoming version of the code due in June 2005. The codes use Cantera , a C++ Cal Tech code, for determination of gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics physical properties and source terms. The Codes use the Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package, a general library for aerosol modeling, to calculate properties and source terms for the aerosol general dynamics equation, including particle formation from gas phase reactions, particle surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, particle transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis, and thermal radiative transport involving particles. Also included are post-processing programs, cajost and cajrof, to extract ascii data from binary output files to produce plots.« less

  20. Thermodynamics of Stability of Nonequilibrium Steady States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastogi, R. P.; Shabd, Ram

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a concise and critical account of developments in nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion for stability of nonequilibrium steady states is critically examined for consecutive and monomolecular triangular reactions, autocatalytic reactions, auto-inhibited reactions, and the Lotka-Volterra model. (JN)

  1. The Politics of the Steady State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Charles

    1978-01-01

    A steady state society has limits pertaining to population size, non-renewable resources, and production which emits heat or substances into soil, water, or the atmosphere. Respecting these limits means renouncing exponential quantitative growth and accepting a universally available consumption standard. (SW)

  2. Steady-State Axial Temperature and Flow Velocity in Triga Channel.

    2007-02-28

    Version 00 TRISTAN-IJS is a computer program for calculating steady-state axial temperature distribution and flow velocity through a vertical coolant channel in low power TRIGA reactor core, cooled by natural circulation. It is designed for steady-state thermohydraulic analysis of TRIGA research reactors operating at a low power level of 1-2 MW.

  3. Plasma Physics found in JT-60 Tokamak over the Last 20 years

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.

    2009-07-07

    This paper summarizes major plasma physics obtained during the period of JT-60 operation for 23 years with special emphasis on research towards steady-state operation of tokamak. Topics included are observation of large bootstrap current fraction, negative shear scenario, demonstration of efficient beam and EC current drive, discovery of current hole, stabilization of the RWM, discovery of ITB (internal transport barrier).

  4. Ideal MHD Stability of ITER Steady State Scenarios with ITBs

    SciTech Connect

    F.M. Poli, C.E. Kessel, S. Jardin, J. Manickam, M. Chance, J. Chen

    2011-07-27

    One of ITER goals is to demonstrate feasibility of continuous operations using non-inductive current drive. Two main candidates have been identified for advanced operations: the long duration, high neutron fluency hybrid scenario and the steady state scenario, both operating at a plasma current lower than the reference ELMy scenario [1][2] to minimize the required current drive. The steady state scenario targets plasmas with current 7-10 MA in the flat-top, 50% of which will be provided by the self-generated, pressure-driven bootstrap current. It has been estimated that, in order to obtain a fusion gain Q > 5 at a current of 9 MA, it should be ΒN > 2.5 and H > 1.5 [3]. This implies the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). This work discusses how the stability of steady state scenarios with ITBs is affected by the external heating sources and by perturbations of the equilibrium profiles.

  5. Estimation of the reaction times in tasks of varying difficulty from the phase coherence of the auditory steady-state response using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator analysis.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yusuke; Igarashi, Yasuhiko; Okada, Masato; Naruse, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of the workload in the brain is an important factor for helping to predict the behavior of humans. The reaction time when performing a difficult task is longer than that when performing an easy task. Thus, the reaction time reflects the workload in the brain. In this study, we employed an N-back task in order to regulate the degree of difficulty of the tasks, and then estimated the reaction times from the brain activity. The brain activity that we used to estimate the reaction time was the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) evoked by a 40-Hz click sound. Fifteen healthy participants participated in the present study and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) responses were recorded using a 148-channel magnetometer system. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), which is a type of sparse modeling, was employed to estimate the reaction times from the ASSR recorded by MEG. The LASSO showed higher estimation accuracy than the least squares method. This result indicates that LASSO overcame the over-fitting to the learning data. Furthermore, the LASSO selected channels in not only the parietal region, but also in the frontal and occipital regions. Since the ASSR is evoked by auditory stimuli, it is usually large in the parietal region. However, since LASSO also selected channels in regions outside the parietal region, this suggests that workload-related neural activity occurs in many brain regions. In the real world, it is more practical to use a wearable electroencephalography device with a limited number of channels than to use MEG. Therefore, determining which brain areas should be measured is essential. The channels selected by the sparse modeling method are informative for determining which brain areas to measure. PMID:26737821

  6. Visualization of Steady-State Ionic Concentration Profiles Formed in Electrolytes during Li-Ion Battery Operation and Determination of Mass-Transport Properties by in Situ Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Bazak, J David; Werhun, Peter; Balcom, Bruce J; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R

    2016-06-29

    Accurate modeling of Li-ion batteries performance, particularly during the transient conditions experienced in automotive applications, requires knowledge of electrolyte transport properties (ionic conductivity κ, salt diffusivity D, and lithium ion transference number t(+)) over a wide range of salt concentrations and temperatures. While specific conductivity data can be easily obtained with modern computerized instrumentation, this is not the case for D and t(+). A combination of NMR and MRI techniques was used to solve the problem. The main advantage of such an approach over classical electrochemical methods is its ability to provide spatially resolved details regarding the chemical and dynamic features of charged species in solution, hence the ability to present a more accurate characterization of processes in an electrolyte under operational conditions. We demonstrate herein data on ion transport properties (D and t(+)) of concentrated LiPF6 solutions in a binary ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC) 1:1 v/v solvent mixture, obtained by the proposed technique. The buildup of steady-state (time-invariant) ion concentration profiles during galvanostatic experiments with graphite-lithium metal cells containing the electrolyte was monitored by pure phase-encoding single point imaging MRI. We then derived the salt diffusivity and Li(+) transference number over the salt concentration range 0.78-1.27 M from a pseudo-3D combined PFG-NMR and MRI technique. The results obtained with our novel methodology agree with those obtained by electrochemical methods, but in contrast to them, the concentration dependences of salt diffusivity and Li(+) transference number were obtained simultaneously within the single in situ experiment.

  7. Visualization of Steady-State Ionic Concentration Profiles Formed in Electrolytes during Li-Ion Battery Operation and Determination of Mass-Transport Properties by in Situ Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Bazak, J David; Werhun, Peter; Balcom, Bruce J; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R

    2016-06-29

    Accurate modeling of Li-ion batteries performance, particularly during the transient conditions experienced in automotive applications, requires knowledge of electrolyte transport properties (ionic conductivity κ, salt diffusivity D, and lithium ion transference number t(+)) over a wide range of salt concentrations and temperatures. While specific conductivity data can be easily obtained with modern computerized instrumentation, this is not the case for D and t(+). A combination of NMR and MRI techniques was used to solve the problem. The main advantage of such an approach over classical electrochemical methods is its ability to provide spatially resolved details regarding the chemical and dynamic features of charged species in solution, hence the ability to present a more accurate characterization of processes in an electrolyte under operational conditions. We demonstrate herein data on ion transport properties (D and t(+)) of concentrated LiPF6 solutions in a binary ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC) 1:1 v/v solvent mixture, obtained by the proposed technique. The buildup of steady-state (time-invariant) ion concentration profiles during galvanostatic experiments with graphite-lithium metal cells containing the electrolyte was monitored by pure phase-encoding single point imaging MRI. We then derived the salt diffusivity and Li(+) transference number over the salt concentration range 0.78-1.27 M from a pseudo-3D combined PFG-NMR and MRI technique. The results obtained with our novel methodology agree with those obtained by electrochemical methods, but in contrast to them, the concentration dependences of salt diffusivity and Li(+) transference number were obtained simultaneously within the single in situ experiment. PMID:27250238

  8. AC operation and runaway electron behaviour in HT-7 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong-Wei; Hu, Li-Qun; Zhou, Rui-Jie; Lin, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Shao-Feng; Chen, Kai-Yun; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Ji-Zong; Ling, Bi-Li; Mao, Song-Tao; Duan, Yan-Min

    2010-06-01

    Operation of HT-7 tokamak in a multicycle alternating square wave plasma current regime is reported. A set of AC operation experiments, including LHW heating to enhance plasma ionization during the current transition and current sustainment, is described. The behaviour of runaway electrons is analysed by four HXR detectors tangentially viewing the plasma in the equatorial plane, within energy ranges 0.3-1.2 MeV and 0.3-7 MeV, separately. High energy runaway electrons (~MeV) are found to circulate predominantly in the opposite direction to the plasma current, while the number of low energy runaway electrons (~tens to hundreds of keV) circulating along the plasma current is comparable to that in the direction opposite to the plasma current. AC operation with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is observed to have an additional benefit of suppressing the runaway electrons if the drop of the loop voltage is large enough.

  9. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  10. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  11. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.E.; Fan, W.C.P.; Bratton, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions.

  12. On Typicality in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Denis J.; Williams, Stephen R.; Searles, Debra J.; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-08-01

    From the statistical mechanical viewpoint, relaxation of macroscopic systems and response theory rest on a notion of typicality, according to which the behavior of single macroscopic objects is given by appropriate ensembles: ensemble averages of observable quantities represent the measurements performed on single objects, because " almost all" objects share the same fate. In the case of non-dissipative dynamics and relaxation toward equilibrium states, " almost all" is referred to invariant probability distributions that are absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure. In other words, the collection of initial micro-states (single systems) that do not follow the ensemble is supposed to constitute a set of vanishing, phase space volume. This approach is problematic in the case of dissipative dynamics and relaxation to nonequilibrium steady states, because the relevant invariant distributions attribute probability 1 to sets of zero volume, while evolution commonly begins in equilibrium states, i.e., in sets of full phase space volume. We consider the relaxation of classical, thermostatted particle systems to nonequilibrium steady states. We show that the dynamical condition known as Ω T-mixing is necessary and sufficient for relaxation of ensemble averages to steady state values. Moreover, we find that the condition known as weak T-mixing applied to smooth observables is sufficient for ensemble relaxation to be independent of the initial ensemble. Lastly, we show that weak T-mixing provides a notion of typicality for dissipative dynamics that is based on the (non-invariant) Lebesgue measure, and that we call physical ergodicity.

  13. Driven-current tokamak (DCT) scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The present Department of Energy (DOE) plan calls for the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) that is to be the last major experimental fusion device prior to the commercialization of fusion power. The plasma driver of the ETR is to be either a long-pulse tokamak or a tandem mirror machine. The possibility of using the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) facility to consolidate the physics and technology database for the tokamak version of the ETR has been considered. This paper addresses two of the options being considered: (1) a superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil-hydrogen plasma alternative, and (2) a superconducting or hybrid TF coil-high Q alternative. Both options assume essentially steady-state operation through the application of rf current drive. The options are evaluated on the basis of performance and cost determined by application of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak System Code.

  14. Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, H.-S.; Wolf, R. C.; Andreeva, T.; Cardella, A; Erckmann, V.; Gantenbein, G; Hathiramani, D; Kasparek, W; Klinger, T.; Koenig, R; Kornejew, P; Laqua, H P; Lechte, C; Michel, G; Peacock, A.; Sunn Pedersen, T; Thumm, M; Turkin, Yu.; Wegener, Lutz; Werner, A.; Zhang, D; Beidler, C.; Bozhenkov, S.; Brown, T.; Geiger, J.; Harris, Jeffrey H; Heitzenroeder, P.; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Maassberg, H.; Marushchenko, N B; Neilson, G. H.; Otte, M; Rummel, Thomas; Spong, Donald A; Tretter, Jorg

    2013-01-01

    The next step in the Wendelstein stellarator line is the large superconducting device Wendelstein 7-X, currently under construction in Greifswald, Germany. Steady-state operation is an intrinsic feature of stellarators, and one key element of the Wendelstein 7-X mission is to demonstrate steady-state operation under plasma conditions relevant for a fusion power plant. Steady-state operation of a fusion device, on the one hand, requires the implementation of special technologies, giving rise to technical challenges during the design, fabrication and assembly of such a device. On the other hand, also the physics development of steady-state operation at high plasma performance poses a challenge and careful preparation. The electron cyclotron resonance heating system, diagnostics, experiment control and data acquisition are prepared for plasma operation lasting 30 min. This requires many new technological approaches for plasma heating and diagnostics as well as new concepts for experiment control and data acquisition.

  15. Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, H.-S.; Wolf, R. C.; Andreeva, T.; Baldzuhn, J.; Birus, D.; Bluhm, T.; Bräuer, T.; Braune, H.; Bykov, V.; Cardella, A.; Durodié, F.; Endler, M.; Erckmann, V.; Gantenbein, G.; Hartmann, D.; Hathiramani, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinemann, B.; Hennig, C.; Hirsch, M.; Holtum, D.; Jagielski, J.; Jelonnek, J.; Kasparek, W.; Klinger, T.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Kroiss, H.; Krom, J. G.; Kühner, G.; Laqua, H.; Laqua, H. P.; Lechte, C.; Lewerentz, M.; Maier, J.; McNeely, P.; Messiaen, A.; Michel, G.; Ongena, J.; Peacock, A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Riedl, R.; Riemann, H.; Rong, P.; Rust, N.; Schacht, J.; Schauer, F.; Schroeder, R.; Schweer, B.; Spring, A.; Stäbler, A.; Thumm, M.; Turkin, Y.; Wegener, L.; Werner, A.; Zhang, D.; Zilker, M.; Akijama, T.; Alzbutas, R.; Ascasibar, E.; Balden, M.; Banduch, M.; Baylard, Ch.; Behr, W.; Beidler, C.; Benndorf, A.; Bergmann, T.; Biedermann, C.; Bieg, B.; Biel, W.; Borchardt, M.; Borowitz, G.; Borsuk, V.; Bozhenkov, S.; Brakel, R.; Brand, H.; Brown, T.; Brucker, B.; Burhenn, R.; Buscher, K.-P.; Caldwell-Nichols, C.; Cappa, A.; Cardella, A.; Carls, A.; Carvalho, P.; Ciupiński, Ł.; Cole, M.; Collienne, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Czymek, G.; Dammertz, G.; Dhard, C. P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Dinklage, A.; Drevlak, M.; Drotziger, S.; Dudek, A.; Dumortier, P.; Dundulis, G.; Eeten, P. v.; Egorov, K.; Estrada, T.; Faugel, H.; Fellinger, J.; Feng, Y.; Fernandes, H.; Fietz, W. H.; Figacz, W.; Fischer, F.; Fontdecaba, J.; Freund, A.; Funaba, T.; Fünfgelder, H.; Galkowski, A.; Gates, D.; Giannone, L.; García Regaña, J. M.; Geiger, J.; Geißler, S.; Greuner, H.; Grahl, M.; Groß, S.; Grosman, A.; Grote, H.; Grulke, O.; Haas, M.; Haiduk, L.; Hartfuß, H.-J.; Harris, J. H.; Haus, D.; Hein, B.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Helander, P.; Heller, R.; Hidalgo, C.; Hildebrandt, D.; Höhnle, H.; Holtz, A.; Holzhauer, E.; Holzthüm, R.; Huber, A.; Hunger, H.; Hurd, F.; Ihrke, M.; Illy, S.; Ivanov, A.; Jablonski, S.; Jaksic, N.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Jensen, H.; Jenzsch, H.; Kacmarczyk, J.; Kaliatk, T.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kamionka, U.; Karaleviciu, R.; Kern, S.; Keunecke, M.; Kleiber, R.; Knauer, J.; Koch, R.; Kocsis, G.; Könies, A.; Köppen, M.; Koslowski, R.; Koshurinov, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krampitz, R.; Kravtsov, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Krzesinski, G.; Ksiazek, I.; Kubkowska, M.; Kus, A.; Langish, S.; Laube, R.; Laux, M.; Lazerson, S.; Lennartz, M.; Li, C.; Lietzow, R.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Louche, F.; Lubyako, L.; Lumsdaine, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Maaßberg, H.; Marek, P.; Martens, C.; Marushchenko, N.; Mayer, M.; Mendelevitch, B.; Mertens, Ph.; Mikkelsen, D.; Mishchenko, A.; Missal, B.; Mizuuchi, T.; Modrow, H.; Mönnich, T.; Morizaki, T.; Murakami, S.; Musielok, F.; Nagel, M.; Naujoks, D.; Neilson, H.; Neubauer, O.; Neuner, U.; Nocentini, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nührenberg, C.; Obermayer, S.; Offermanns, G.; Oosterbeek, H.; Otte, M.; Panin, A.; Pap, M.; Paquay, S.; Pasch, E.; Peng, X.; Petrov, S.; Pilopp, D.; Pirsch, H.; Plaum, B.; Pompon, F.; Povilaitis, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Prinz, O.; Purps, F.; Rajna, T.; Récsei, S.; Reiman, A.; Reiter, D.; Remmel, J.; Renard, S.; Rhode, V.; Riemann, J.; Rimkevicius, S.; Riße, K.; Rodatos, A.; Rodin, I.; Romé, M.; Roscher, H.-J.; Rummel, K.; Rummel, Th.; Runov, A.; Ryc, L.; Sachtleben, J.; Samartsev, A.; Sanchez, M.; Sano, F.; Scarabosio, A.; Schmid, M.; Schmitz, H.; Schmitz, O.; Schneider, M.; Schneider, W.; Scheibl, L.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, G.; Schröder, M.; Schruff, J.; Schumacher, H.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.; Shoji, M.; Siegl, G.; Skodzik, J.; Smirnow, M.; Speth, E.; Spong, D. A.; Stadler, R.; Sulek, Z.; Szabó, V.; Szabolics, T.; Szetefi, T.; Szökefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Tereshchenko, A.; Thomsen, H.; Thumm, M.; Timmermann, D.; Tittes, H.; Toi, K.; Tournianski, M.; Toussaint, U. v.; Tretter, J.; Tulipán, S.; Turba, P.; Uhlemann, R.; Urban, J.; Urbonavicius, E.; Urlings, P.; Valet, S.; Van Eester, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Viebke, H.; Vilbrandt, R.; Vrancken, M.; Wauters, T.; Weissgerber, M.; Weiß, E.; Weller, A.; Wendorf, J.; Wenzel, U.; Windisch, T.; Winkler, E.; Winkler, M.; Wolowski, J.; Wolters, J.; Wrochna, G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Yamada, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Zacharias, D.; Zajac, J.; Zangl, G.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zeplien, H.; Zoletnik, S.; Zuin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The next step in the Wendelstein stellarator line is the large superconducting device Wendelstein 7-X, currently under construction in Greifswald, Germany. Steady-state operation is an intrinsic feature of stellarators, and one key element of the Wendelstein 7-X mission is to demonstrate steady-state operation under plasma conditions relevant for a fusion power plant. Steady-state operation of a fusion device, on the one hand, requires the implementation of special technologies, giving rise to technical challenges during the design, fabrication and assembly of such a device. On the other hand, also the physics development of steady-state operation at high plasma performance poses a challenge and careful preparation. The electron cyclotron resonance heating system, diagnostics, experiment control and data acquisition are prepared for plasma operation lasting 30 min. This requires many new technological approaches for plasma heating and diagnostics as well as new concepts for experiment control and data acquisition.

  16. Intensity fluctuations in steady-state superradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-06-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow optical transitions enable superradiance in steady state. The emitted light promises to have an unprecedented stability with a linewidth as narrow as a few millihertz. In order to evaluate the potential usefulness of this light source as an ultrastable oscillator in clock and precision metrology applications, it is crucial to understand the noise properties of this device. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the intensity fluctuations by means of Monte Carlo simulations and semiclassical approximations. We find that the light exhibits bunching below threshold, is to a good approximation coherent in the superradiant regime, and is chaotic above the second threshold.

  17. Steady state stresses in ribbon parachute canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, W. L.; Wu, K. Y.; Muramoto, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of the steady state stresses in model ribbon parachute canopies is presented. The distribution of circumferential stress was measured in the horizontal ribbons of two parachutes using Omega sensors. Canopy pressure distributions and overall drag were also measured. Testing was conducted in the University of Minnesota Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at dynamic pressures ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 inches of water. The stresses in the parachute canopies were calculated using the parachute structural analysis code, CANO. It was found that the general shape of the measured and calculated stress distributions was fairly similar; however, the measured stresses were somewhat less than the calculated stresses.

  18. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  19. Tokamak startup: problems and scenarios related to the transient phases of ignited tokamak operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    During recent years improvements have been made to tokamak startup procedures, which are important to the optimization of ignited tokamaks. The use of rf-assisted startup and noninductive current drive has led to substantial reduction and even complete elimination of the volt-seconds used during startup, relaxing constraints on poloidal coil, vacuum vessel, and structure design. This paper reviews these and other improvements and discusses the various bulk heating techniques that may be used to ignite a D-T plasma.

  20. Steady-state FRC Maintenance using RMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Houyang; Hoffman, Alan; Brooks, Bob; Pietrzyk, Adam

    2001-10-01

    For the first time, steady state, flux confined FRCs have been produced at TCS using non-inductive RMF current drive. Up to 60 kA toroidal current has been generated with an RMF vacuum field strength of about 60 G. These experiments differ from steady-state rotamaks in that the FRCs are similar to those formed in theta-pinch devices, that is elongated and confined inside a flux conserver. Experimental results from initial high RMF frequency ( ω = 10^6 rad/s) experiments have relatively low ratio of equilibrium line current, I'_rev = 2 B_e/μ0 to possible synchronous current, I'_sync = 0.5 n_eeωr_s^2, and the current is primarily edge driven, resulting in relatively low current drive efficiency and unsteady behavior. When the RMF frequency was lowered to ω = 0.5x10^6 rad/s, the parameter ζ = I'_rev /I'_sync increased, allowing higher density (up to 3x10^19 m-3) FRCs to be produced. The plasma temperature cannot be increased much above 50 eV in these purely RMF formed FRCs, and the cross-field resistivity is high. Future experiments will start with hot, relatively low resistivity, theta pinch formed FRCs to explore RMF current drive in a more interesting regime.

  1. ECH tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M.A.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    A small steady-state tokamak capable of producing power in the 100 to 300 MWe range and relying on electron cyclotron RF heating (ECH) for both heating and current drive is described. Working in the first MHD stability regime for tokamaks, the approach adheres to the recently discovered maximum beta limit. An appropriate figure of merit is the ratio of the fusion power to absorbed RF power. Efficient devices are feasible at both small and large values of fusion power, thereby pointing to a development path for an attractive commercial fusion reactor.

  2. An Intuitive Approach to Steady-State Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raines, Ronald T.; Hansen, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to provide an intuitive understanding of steady state kinetics. Discusses the meaning of steady state and uses free energy profiles to illustrate and follow complex kinetic and thermodynamic relationships. Provides examples with explanations. (MVL)

  3. Density limits investigation and high density operation in EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xingwei; Li, Jiangang; Hu, Jiansheng; Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Wang, Shouxin; Li, Jiahong; Duan, Yanming; Li, Miaohui; Li, Yongchun; Zhang, Ling; Ye, Yang; Yang, Qingquan; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Yingjie; Xu, Jichan; Wang, Liang; Xu, Liqing; Zhao, Hailin; Wang, Fudi; Lin, Shiyao; Wu, Bin; Lyu, Bo; Xu, Guosheng; Gao, Xiang; Shi, Tonghui; He, Kaiyang; Lan, Heng; Chu, Nan; Cao, Bin; Sun, Zhen; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Zhuang, Huidong; Li, Changzheng; Yuan, Xiaolin; Yu, Yaowei; Wang, Houyin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jinhua; EAST Team

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the density in a tokamak is limited by the so-called density limit, which is generally performed as an appearance of disruption causing loss of plasma confinement, or a degradation of high confinement mode which could further lead to a H  →  L transition. The L-mode and H-mode density limit has been investigated in EAST tokamak. Experimental results suggest that density limits could be triggered by either edge cooling or excessive central radiation. The L-mode density limit disruption is generally triggered by edge cooling, which leads to the current profile shrinkage and then destabilizes a 2/1 tearing mode, ultimately resulting in a disruption. The L-mode density limit scaling agrees well with the Greenwald limit in EAST. The observed H-mode density limit in EAST is an operational-space limit with a value of 0.8∼ 0.9{{n}\\text{GW}} . High density H-mode heated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are analyzed, respectively. The constancy of the edge density gradients in H-mode indicates a critical limit caused perhaps by e.g. ballooning induced transport. The maximum density is accessed at the H  →  L transition which is generally caused by the excessive core radiation due to high Z impurities (Fe, Cu). Operating at a high density (>2.8× {{10}19} {{\\text{m}}-3} ) is favorable for suppressing the beam shine through NBI. High density H-mode up to 5.3× {{10}19}{{\\text{m}}-3}~≤ft(∼ 0.8{{n}\\text{GW}}\\right) could be sustained by 2 MW 4.6 GHz LHCD alone, and its current drive efficiency is studied. Statistics show that good control of impurities and recycling facilitate high density operation. With careful control of these factors, high density up to 0.93{{n}\\text{GW}} stable H-mode operation was carried out heated by 1.7 MW LHCD and 1.9 MW ion cyclotron resonance heating with supersonic molecular beam injection fueling.

  4. Steady State Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Facility With Automated Calibration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field designed and developed a steady state vacuum ultraviolet automated (SSVUVa) facility with in situ VUV intensity calibration capability. The automated feature enables a constant accelerated VUV radiation exposure over long periods of testing without breaking vacuum. This test facility is designed to simultaneously accommodate four isolated radiation exposure tests within the SSVUVa vacuum chamber. Computer-control of the facility for long, term continuous operation also provides control and recording of thermocouple temperatures, periodic recording of VUV lamp intensity, and monitoring of vacuum facility status. This paper discusses the design and capabilities of the SSVUVa facility.

  5. Steady State Performance Characteristics of a Single Pad Externally Adjustable Fluid Film Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Satish B.; Pai, Raghuvir

    The steady state performance characteristics of centrally loaded 60 degree single pad externally adjustable partial arc bearing is studied theoretically. Principal feature of the bearing is the facility to control its radial clearance and circumferential film thickness gradient, during operation. The bearing has aspect ratios of 1.0, 0.5 and 0.25 and operates over a wide range of eccentricity ratios and adjustments. Steady state performance characteristics of the bearing are presented in terms of attitude angle, load carrying capacity, oil flow and friction variable. The steady state form of Reynolds equation in two dimensions is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The effect of tilt and the radial adjustments on the steady state performance characteristics are presented in the form of plots. A comparative study predicts that negative radial and negative tilt adjustment results in better load carrying capacity with reduced oil flow and friction.

  6. Exploration of steady-state scenarios for the Fusion Development Facility (FDF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Choi, M.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Snyder, P. B.; St. John, H. E.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2011-10-01

    A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) has to operate at 105 times longer duration than that of present tokamak discharges. The scalability of plasma sustainment to such a long time is an issue that needs to be resolved by scientific understanding. We carry out steady-state (SS) scenario development of the FDF (a candidate for FNSF-AT) using an iterative process toward a self-consistent solution via alternating temperature profiles and current profile evolution. The temperature profile evolves according to a physics-based transport model GLF23. SS requires large off-axis current drive (CD). To achieve this with no NBI is highly challenging. It however simplifies tritium containment, increases area for tritium breeding, and avoids costly negative-ion NBI technology. We find that with ECH/ECCD only, too much power is required. A SS baseline equilibrium is found by adding LHCD: Qfus ~ 4 , H98 y 2 ~ 1 . 2 , fBS ~ 70 %, Pfus ~ 260 MW, PEC = 35 MW, PLH = 21 MW. The GATO ideal MHD code finds the equilibrium stable to n = 1 internal kink at κ = 2 . 3 . Work supported by General Atomics internal funds.

  7. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W. X.; Tang, W. M.

    2007-12-20

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers.

  8. A closed-loop control scheme for steering steady states of glycolysis and glycogenolysis pathway.

    PubMed

    Panja, Surajit; Patra, Sourav; Mukherjee, Anirban; Basu, Madhumita; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Dutta, Pranab K

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical networks normally operate in the neighborhood of one of its multiple steady states. It may reach from one steady state to other within a finite time span. In this paper, a closed-loop control scheme is proposed to steer states of the glycolysis and glycogenolysis (GG) pathway from one of its steady states to other. The GG pathway is modeled in the synergism and saturation system formalism, known as S-system. This S-system model is linearized into the controllable Brunovsky canonical form using a feedback linearization technique. For closed-loop control, the linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) and the linear-quadratic gaussian (LQG) regulator are invoked to design a controller for tracking prespecified steady states. In the feedback linearization technique, a global diffeomorphism function is proposed that facilitates in achieving the regulation requirement. The robustness of the regulated GG pathway is studied considering input perturbation and with measurement noise.

  9. NASA Lewis Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mi, Ye; Tower, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed the LERCHP code. The PC-based LERCHP code can be used to predict the steady-state performance of heat pipes, including the determination of operating temperature and operating limits which might be encountered under specified conditions. The code contains a vapor flow algorithm which incorporates vapor compressibility and axially varying heat input. For the liquid flow in the wick, Darcy s formula is employed. Thermal boundary conditions and geometric structures can be defined through an interactive input interface. A variety of fluid and material options as well as user defined options can be chosen for the working fluid, wick, and pipe materials. This report documents the current effort at GRC to update the LERCHP code for operating in a Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Corporation) environment. A detailed analysis of the model is presented. The programming architecture for the numerical calculations is explained and flowcharts of the key subroutines are given

  10. Computational complexity of nonequilibrium steady states of quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzolino, Ugo; Prosen, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We study nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) of spin chains with boundary Markovian dissipation from the computational complexity point of view. We focus on X X chains whose NESS are matrix product operators, i.e., with coefficients of a tensor operator basis described by transition amplitudes in an auxiliary space. Encoding quantum algorithms in the auxiliary space, we show that estimating expectations of operators, being local in the sense that each acts on disjoint sets of few spins covering all the system, provides the answers of problems at least as hard as, and believed by many computer scientists to be much harder than, those solved by quantum computers. We draw conclusions on the hardness of the above estimations.

  11. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  12. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  13. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  14. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  15. Experimental investigations of multiple steady states in aerobic continuous cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lei, Frede; Olsson, Lisbeth; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-06-30

    The steady-state behavior of a glucose-limited, aerobic, continuous cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D was investigated around the critical dilution rate. Oxido-reductive steady states were obtained at dilution rates up to 0.09 h(-1) lower than the critical dilution rate by operating the bioreactor as a productostat, where the dilution rate was controlled on the basis of an ethanol measurement. Thus, the experimental investigations revealed that multiple steady states exist in a region of dilution rates below the critical dilution rate. The existence of multiple steady states was attributed to two distinct physiological effects occurring when growth changed from oxidative to oxido-reductive: (i) a decrease in the efficiency of ATP production and utilization (at ethanol concentrations below 3 g/L) and (ii) repression of the oxidative metabolism (at higher ethanol concentrations). The first effect was best observed at low ethanol concentrations, where multiple steady states were observed even when no repression of the oxidative metabolism was evident, i.e., the oxidative capacity was constant. However, at higher ethanol concentrations repression of the oxidative metabolism was observed (the oxidative capacity decreased), and this resulted in a broader range of dilution rates where multiple steady states could be found.

  16. Steady state volcanism - Evidence from eruption histories of polygenetic volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1982-01-01

    Cumulative volcano volume curves are presented as evidence for steady-state behavior at certain volcanoes and to develop a model of steady-state volcanism. A minimum criteria of five eruptions over a year was chosen to characterize a steady-state volcano. The subsequent model features a constant head of magmatic pressure from a reservoir supplied from depth, a sawtooth curve produced by the magma arrivals or discharge from the subvolcanic reservoir, large volume eruptions with long repose periods, and conditions of nonsupply of magma. The behavior of Mts. Etna, Nyamuragira, and Kilauea are described and show continuous levels of plasma output resulting in cumulative volume increases. Further discussion is made of steady-state andesitic and dacitic volcanism, long term patterns of the steady state, and magma storage, and the lack of a sufficient number of steady-state volcanoes in the world is taken as evidence that further data is required for a comprehensive model.

  17. Operation of a tangential bolometer on the PBX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.F.; Fonck, R.J.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1987-04-01

    A compact 15-channel bolometer array that views plasma emission tangentially across the midplane has been installed on the PBX tokamak to supplement a 19-channel poloidal array which views the plasma perpendicular to the toroidal direction. By comparing measurements from these arrays, poloidal asymmetries in the emission profile can be assessed. The detector array consists of 15 discrete 2-mm x 2-mm Thinistors, a mixed semiconductor material whose temperature coefficient of resistance is relatively high. The accumulated heat incident on a detector gives rise to a change in the resistance in each active element. Operated in tandem with an identical blind detector, the resistance in each pair is compared in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The variation in voltage resulting from the change in resistance is amplified, stored on a CAMAC transient recorder during the plasma discharge, and transferred to a VAX data acquisition computer. The instantaneous power is obtained by digitally smoothing and differentiating the signals in time, with suitable compensation for the cooling of the detector over the course of a plasma discharge. The detectors are ''free standing,'' i.e., they are supported only by their electrical leads. Having no substrate in contact with the detector reduces the response time and increases the time it takes for the detector to dissipate its accumulated heat, reducing the compensation for cooling required in the data analysis. The detectors were absolutely calibrated with a tungsten-halogen filament lamp and were found to vary by +-3%. The irradiance profiles are inverted to reveal the radially resolved emitted power density from the plasma, which is typically in the 0.1 to 0.5 W/cm/sup 3/ range.

  18. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  19. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; et al

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reducesmore » the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.« less

  20. Fast-ion transport in q min > 2 , high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-01

    Results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high- q min confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing β N and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with q min > 2 that target the typical range of q 95 = 5-7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. In contrast, similar plasmas except with q min just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take q min > 3 plasmas to higher β P with q 95 = 11-12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high- q min scenario, the high β P cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇ β fast , and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, β N , and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower- q 95 , high- q min plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  1. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  2. The steady-state assumption in oscillating and growing systems.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Alexandra-M; Reimers, Arne C

    2016-10-01

    The steady-state assumption, which states that the production and consumption of metabolites inside the cell are balanced, is one of the key aspects that makes an efficient analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks possible. It can be motivated from two different perspectives. In the time-scales perspective, we use the fact that metabolism is much faster than other cellular processes such as gene expression. Hence, the steady-state assumption is derived as a quasi-steady-state approximation of the metabolism that adapts to the changing cellular conditions. In this article we focus on the second perspective, stating that on the long run no metabolite can accumulate or deplete. In contrast to the first perspective it is not immediately clear how this perspective can be captured mathematically and what assumptions are required to obtain the steady-state condition. By presenting a mathematical framework based on the second perspective we demonstrate that the assumption of steady-state also applies to oscillating and growing systems without requiring quasi-steady-state at any time point. However, we also show that the average concentrations may not be compatible with the average fluxes. In summary, we establish a mathematical foundation for the steady-state assumption for long time periods that justifies its successful use in many applications. Furthermore, this mathematical foundation also pinpoints unintuitive effects in the integration of metabolite concentrations using nonlinear constraints into steady-state models for long time periods.

  3. The steady-state assumption in oscillating and growing systems.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Alexandra-M; Reimers, Arne C

    2016-10-01

    The steady-state assumption, which states that the production and consumption of metabolites inside the cell are balanced, is one of the key aspects that makes an efficient analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks possible. It can be motivated from two different perspectives. In the time-scales perspective, we use the fact that metabolism is much faster than other cellular processes such as gene expression. Hence, the steady-state assumption is derived as a quasi-steady-state approximation of the metabolism that adapts to the changing cellular conditions. In this article we focus on the second perspective, stating that on the long run no metabolite can accumulate or deplete. In contrast to the first perspective it is not immediately clear how this perspective can be captured mathematically and what assumptions are required to obtain the steady-state condition. By presenting a mathematical framework based on the second perspective we demonstrate that the assumption of steady-state also applies to oscillating and growing systems without requiring quasi-steady-state at any time point. However, we also show that the average concentrations may not be compatible with the average fluxes. In summary, we establish a mathematical foundation for the steady-state assumption for long time periods that justifies its successful use in many applications. Furthermore, this mathematical foundation also pinpoints unintuitive effects in the integration of metabolite concentrations using nonlinear constraints into steady-state models for long time periods. PMID:27363728

  4. Steady states and stability in metabolic networks without regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleksandr; van der Schaft, Arjan; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-07-21

    Metabolic networks are often extremely complex. Despite intensive efforts many details of these networks, e.g., exact kinetic rates and parameters of metabolic reactions, are not known, making it difficult to derive their properties. Considerable effort has been made to develop theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks that are valid for any values of parameters. General results on uniqueness of steady states and their stability have been derived with specific assumptions on reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and network topology. For example, deep results have been obtained under the assumptions of mass-action reaction kinetics, continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR), concordant reaction networks and others. Nevertheless, a general theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks is still missing. Here we make a step further in the quest for such a theory. Specifically, we study properties of steady states in metabolic networks with monotonic kinetics in relation to their stoichiometry (simple and general) and the number of metabolites participating in every reaction (single or many). Our approach is based on the investigation of properties of the Jacobian matrix. We show that stoichiometry, network topology, and the number of metabolites that participate in every reaction have a large influence on the number of steady states and their stability in metabolic networks. Specifically, metabolic networks with single-substrate-single-product reactions have disconnected steady states, whereas in metabolic networks with multiple-substrates-multiple-product reactions manifolds of steady states arise. Metabolic networks with simple stoichiometry have either a unique globally asymptotically stable steady state or asymptotically stable manifolds of steady states. In metabolic networks with general stoichiometry the steady states are not always stable and we provide conditions for their stability. In order to demonstrate the biological

  5. Steady states and stability in metabolic networks without regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleksandr; van der Schaft, Arjan; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-07-21

    Metabolic networks are often extremely complex. Despite intensive efforts many details of these networks, e.g., exact kinetic rates and parameters of metabolic reactions, are not known, making it difficult to derive their properties. Considerable effort has been made to develop theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks that are valid for any values of parameters. General results on uniqueness of steady states and their stability have been derived with specific assumptions on reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and network topology. For example, deep results have been obtained under the assumptions of mass-action reaction kinetics, continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR), concordant reaction networks and others. Nevertheless, a general theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks is still missing. Here we make a step further in the quest for such a theory. Specifically, we study properties of steady states in metabolic networks with monotonic kinetics in relation to their stoichiometry (simple and general) and the number of metabolites participating in every reaction (single or many). Our approach is based on the investigation of properties of the Jacobian matrix. We show that stoichiometry, network topology, and the number of metabolites that participate in every reaction have a large influence on the number of steady states and their stability in metabolic networks. Specifically, metabolic networks with single-substrate-single-product reactions have disconnected steady states, whereas in metabolic networks with multiple-substrates-multiple-product reactions manifolds of steady states arise. Metabolic networks with simple stoichiometry have either a unique globally asymptotically stable steady state or asymptotically stable manifolds of steady states. In metabolic networks with general stoichiometry the steady states are not always stable and we provide conditions for their stability. In order to demonstrate the biological

  6. A new hybrid inductive scenario for a nearly steady-state Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.

    2007-11-01

    Steady-state current sustainment is challenging for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). The current magnitude is large, while the pressure-driven (bootstrap) current is small, even at the RFP's high beta >20%. In the TITAN (RFP) system study [1], the current was designed steady-state using Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), i.e., steady magnetic helicity injection using phased AC induction. Experiments and theory for OFCD are so far promising, but OFCD's reliance on magnetic relaxation could turn out incompatible with energy confinement requirements. Meanwhile inductive current profile control has demonstrated tokamak-like confinement in the RFP. Such control is inherently not steady-state. A hybrid scheme is proposed using OFCD to ramp the current, followed by a pulsed-burn during which inductive profile control maintains high confinement. The current is not constant but never goes to zero (sawtooth-like waveform). The current drive (and profile control) is efficient induction, simply applied at the plasma surface. The pulsed-burn phases could be separated by only a few seconds. Optimization of the hybrid cycle and other issues will be discussed. [1] http://aries.ucsd.edu/LIB/REPORT/TITAN/final.shtml

  7. Economic analyses of alpha channeling in tokamak power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1998-09-17

    The hot-ion-mode of operation [1] has long been thought to offer optimized performance for long-pulse or steady-state magnetic fusion power plants. This concept was revived in recent years when theoretical considerations suggested that nonthermal fusion alpha particles could be made to channel their power density preferentially to the fuel ions [2,3]. This so-called anomalous alpha particle slowing down can create plasmas with fuel ion temperate T{sub i} somewhat larger than the electron temperature T{sub e}, which puts more of the beta-limited plasma pressure into the useful fuel species (rather than non-reacting electrons). As we show here, this perceived benefit may be negligible or nonexistent for tokamaks with steady state current drive. It has likewise been argued [2,3] that alpha channeling could be arranged such that little or no external power would be needed to generate the steady state toroidal current. Under optimistic assumptions we show that such alpha-channeling current drive would moderately improve the economic performance of a first stability tokamak like ARIES-I [4], however a reversed-shear (advanced equilibrium) tokamak would likely not benefit since traditional radio-wave (rf) electron-heating current drive power would already be quite small.

  8. Assessment of the LH wave for demo in pulsed and steady state scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Barbato, E.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Marinucci, M.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Panaccione, L.; Santini, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) has been analysed in DEMO tokamak plasma in the 'pulsed and steady state regime' considering two plasma scenarios characterized, respectively, by flat density profile and peaked density profiles. We have obtained LH deposition profiles in cases of neglecting the effect of spectral broadening produced by PI at the edge. By comparing the Power Deposition Profiles for both DEMO scenarios ('flat' and 'peaked'), the SOL of DEMO does not play any role in the absorption of the LH wave. In all cases the deposition is localized inside the separatrix layer r/a≤1. By lowering the parallel wave-number peak of the power spectrum from 1.8 to 1.5, the accessibility condition in both case prevents the power from reaching the deposition layer apart from a small fraction which pertains to the higher n∥ of the power spectrum. The spectrum centred at 1.8 is suggested to be useful in DEMO. More realistically, as supported by available data of LHCD in a wide range of operating densities, the effect of parametric decay instability (PDI) can produce a spectral broadening which should be included in the simulations. Further studies would be necessary for assessing the temperature profiles in the SOL at reactor-graded conditions. This is because, if the SOL temperature is at least of the order of 50 to 100 eV, the effect of PDI broads the spectrum up to n∥≤10, and the deposition profile is slightly wider but not much shifted outwards.

  9. Edge Thomson scattering diagnostic on COMPASS tokamak: Installation, calibration, operation, improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, P. Bilkova, P.; Melich, R.; Sestak, D.; Weinzettl, V.; Stockel, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.; Mikulin, O.; Scannell, R.; Naylor, G.; Frassinetti, L.; Fassina, A.; Walsh, M. J.

    2014-11-15

    The core Thomson scattering diagnostic (TS) on the COMPASS tokamak was put in operation and reported earlier. Implementation of edge TS, with spatial resolution along the laser beam up to ∼1/100 of the tokamak minor radius, is presented now. The procedure for spatial calibration and alignment of both core and edge systems is described. Several further upgrades of the TS system, like a triggering unit and piezo motor driven vacuum window shutter, are introduced as well. The edge TS system, together with the core TS, is now in routine operation and provides electron temperature and density profiles.

  10. Edge Thomson scattering diagnostic on COMPASS tokamak: installation, calibration, operation, improvements.

    PubMed

    Bohm, P; Aftanas, M; Bilkova, P; Stefanikova, E; Mikulin, O; Melich, R; Janky, F; Havlicek, J; Sestak, D; Weinzettl, V; Stockel, J; Hron, M; Panek, R; Scannell, R; Frassinetti, L; Fassina, A; Naylor, G; Walsh, M J

    2014-11-01

    The core Thomson scattering diagnostic (TS) on the COMPASS tokamak was put in operation and reported earlier. Implementation of edge TS, with spatial resolution along the laser beam up to ∼1/100 of the tokamak minor radius, is presented now. The procedure for spatial calibration and alignment of both core and edge systems is described. Several further upgrades of the TS system, like a triggering unit and piezo motor driven vacuum window shutter, are introduced as well. The edge TS system, together with the core TS, is now in routine operation and provides electron temperature and density profiles.

  11. Enhanced control of saddle steady states of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Tamaševičius, Arūnas; Tamaševičiūtė, Elena; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Bumelienė, Skaidra

    2013-09-01

    An adaptive feedback technique for stabilizing a priori unknown saddle steady states of dynamical systems is described. The method is based on an unstable low-pass filter combined with a stable low-pass filter. The cutoff frequencies of both filters can be set relatively high. This allows considerable increase in the rate of convergence to the steady state. We demonstrate numerically and experimentally that the technique is robust to the influence of unknown external forces, which change the position of the steady state in the phase space. Experiments have been performed using electrical circuits imitating the damped Duffing-Holmes and chaotic Lindberg systems. PMID:24125322

  12. Steady-state rate analysis: application to biological transport.

    PubMed

    Wagg, J; Chapman, J B

    1995-05-01

    A novel method for defining the steady-state unidirectional rates of complex reactions has previously been developed (Wagg, 1988 Ph.D. Thesis, Monash University, Australia). This methodology is based upon the method of Wagg (1987, J. theor. Biol. 128, 375-385) for defining the steady-state unidirectional fluxes of chemical species through branched chemical, osmotic and chemiosmotic reactions. It offers a number of distinct advantages over existing approaches to steady-state rate analysis: it is relatively simple to apply to complex reactions and is readily amenable to computer-based application. The method is demonstrated by direct application to a number of hypothetical models for biological transport phenomena.

  13. A Note on Equations for Steady-State Optimal Landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2010-06-15

    Based on the optimality principle (that the global energy expenditure rate is at its minimum for a given landscape under steady state conditions) and calculus of variations, we have derived a group of partial differential equations for describing steady-state optimal landscapes without explicitly distinguishing between hillslopes and channel networks. Other than building on the well-established Mining's equation, this work does not rely on any empirical relationships (such as those relating hydraulic parameters to local slopes). Using additional constraints, we also theoretically demonstrate that steady-state water depth is a power function of local slope, which is consistent with field data.

  14. Steady-state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of a linear time-invariant multivariable system is presented. This criterion consists of a set of inequalities which, when satisfied, will cause the steady states of a system to be decoupled. Stability analysis and a new design technique for such systems are given. A new and simple connection between single-loop and multivariable cases is found. These results are then applied to the compensation design for NASA STOL C-8A aircraft. Both steady-state decoupling and stability are justified through computer simulations.

  15. Current Control in ITER Steady State Plasmas With Neutral Beam Steering

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2009-09-10

    Predictions of quasi steady state DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The plasma temperatures, densities, boundary shape, and total current (9 - 10 MA) anticipated for ITER steady state plasmas are specified. Current drive by negative ion neutral beam injection, lower-hybrid, and electron cyclotron resonance are calculated. Four modes of operation with different combinations of current drive are studied. For each mode, scans with the NNBI aimed at differing heights in the plasma are performed to study effects of current control on the q profile. The timeevolution of the currents and q are calculated to evaluate long duration transients. Quasi steady state, strongly reversed q profiles are predicted for some beam injection angles if the current drive and bootstrap currents are sufficiently large.

  16. Discrimination of steady state and transient state of dither extremum seeking control via sinusoidal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Baojie; Li, Yaoyu; Seem, John E.

    2016-08-01

    A major class of extremum seeking control (ESC) is based on the use of periodic dither perturbation of plant input for extracting the gradient information. Presence of the dither input into the steady state operation is undesirable in practice due to the possible excessive wear of actuators. It is thus beneficial to stop the dithering action after the ESC reaches its steady state. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically discriminating between the steady state and the transient state modes of extremum seeking control process using the sinusoidal detection techniques. Some design guidelines are proposed for the parameter selection of the relevant sinusoidal detection scheme. The proposed scheme is validated with simulation study on dynamic virtual plant of two building HVAC systems.

  17. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  18. Phase Space Analysis of a Gravitationally-Induced, Steady-State Nonequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, D. P.; Glick, J.; Duncan, T.; Langton, J. A.; Gagliardi, M.; Tobe, R.

    Recently a new type of pressure gradient was introduced, a gravitationally-induced, dynamically-maintained, steady-state pressure gradient (GDSPG) [D. P. Sheehan and J. Glick, Physica Scripta 61, 635 (2000)]. In this paper, three dimensional numerical test particle simulations detail its phase space structure. These verify the underlying physical mechanism originally hypothesized for its operation and support key assumptions upon which it is based. The GDSPG appears to be a member of a more general class of steady-state nonequilibrium systems that arise under extreme thermodynamic conditions [D. P. Sheehan, Phys. Rev. E57, 6660 (1998)].

  19. Steady-state simulations using weighted ensemble path sampling.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Divesh; Zhang, Bin W; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2010-07-01

    We extend the weighted ensemble (WE) path sampling method to perform rigorous statistical sampling for systems at steady state. A straightforward steady-state implementation of WE is directly practical for simple landscapes, but not when significant metastable intermediates states are present. We therefore develop an enhanced WE scheme, building on existing ideas, which accelerates attainment of steady state in complex systems. We apply both WE approaches to several model systems, confirming their correctness and efficiency by comparison with brute-force results. The enhanced version is significantly faster than the brute force and straightforward WE for systems with WE bins that accurately reflect the reaction coordinate(s). The new WE methods can also be applied to equilibrium sampling, since equilibrium is a steady state.

  20. Steady-state differential calorimeter measures gamma heating in reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, D.; Talboy, J. H.

    1968-01-01

    Steady-state differential calorimeter, which displays good accuracy and reproducibility of results, is used to measure gamma heating in a reactor environment. The calorimeter has a long life expectancy since it is virtually unharmed by the reactor environment.

  1. TRANSIENT AND STEADY STATE STUDY OF PURE AND MIXED REFRIGERANTS IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the transient and steady state performance of a residential air-conditioning/heat pump (AC/HP) operating with different refrigerants. (NOTE: The project was motivated by environmental concerns related to...

  2. Measuring the steady state of pedestrian flow in bottleneck experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Weichen; Tordeux, Antoine; Seyfried, Armin; Chraibi, Mohcine; Drzycimski, Kevin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ying

    2016-11-01

    Experiments with pedestrians could depend strongly on initial conditions. Comparisons of the results of such experiments require to distinguish carefully between transient state and steady state. Thus a modified version of the Cumulative Sum Control Chart algorithm is proposed to robustly detect steady states from density and speed time series of bottleneck experiments. The threshold of the detection parameter in the algorithm is calibrated using an autoregressive model. Comparing the detected steady states with manually selected ones, the modified algorithm gives robust and reproducible results. For the applications, three groups of bottleneck experiments are analysed and the steady states are detected. The results reconfirm that the specific flow is constant as bottleneck width changes. Moreover, we proposed a criterion to judge the difference between the flows in all states and in steady states, which is the ratio of pedestrian number to bottleneck width. The critical value of the ratio is found to be approximately 115 persons/m. This conclusion applies not only for the analysis of existing bottleneck experiments but also for the design of new bottleneck experiments and the validation of evacuation models. Furthermore, the range of steady state in time series of pedestrian characteristics could be effectively controlled by adjusting the value of the ratio.

  3. Steady State Analysis of Small Molten Salt Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahisa; Mitachi, Koshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a thermal neutron reactor with graphite moderation and operates on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The feature of the MSR is that fuel salt flows inside the reactor during the nuclear fission reaction. In the previous study, the authors developed numerical model with which to simulate the effects of fuel salt flow on the reactor characteristics. In this study, we apply the model to the steady-state analysis of a small MSR system and estimate the effects of fuel flow. The model consists of two-group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, transport equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors and energy conservation equations for fuel salt and the graphite moderator. The following results are obtained: (1) in the rated operation condition, the peaks of the neutron fluxes slightly move toward the bottom from the center of the reactor and the delayed neutron precursors are significantly carried by the fuel salt flow, and (2) the extension of residence time in the external-loop system and the rise of the fuel inflow temperature show weak negative reactivity effects, which decrease the neutron multiplication factor of the small MSR system.

  4. On the time to steady state: insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, L.; Willett, S.; McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.

    2013-12-01

    How fast do fluvial landscapes approach steady state after an application of tectonic or climatic perturbation? While theory and some numerical models predict that the celerity of the advective wave (knickpoint) controls the response time for perturbations, experiments and other landscape evolution models demonstrate that the time to steady state is much longer than the theoretically predicted response time. We posit that the longevity of transient features and the time to steady state are controlled by the stability of the topology and geometry of channel networks. Evolution of a channel network occurs by a combination of discrete capture events and continuous migration of water divides, processes, which are difficult to represent accurately in landscape evolution models. We therefore address the question of the time to steady state using the DAC landscape evolution model that solves accurately for the location of water divides, using a combination of analytical solution for hillslopes and low-order channels together with a numerical solution for higher order channels. DAC also includes an explicit capture criterion. We have tested fundamental predictions from DAC and show that modeled networks reproduce natural network characteristics such as the Hack's exponent and coefficient and the fractal dimension. We define two steady-state criteria: a topographic steady state, defined by global, pointwise steady elevation, and a topological steady state defined as the state in which no further reorganization of the drainage network takes place. Analyzing block uplift simulations, we find that the time to achieve either topographic or topological steady state exceeds by an order of magnitude the theoretical response time of the fluvial network. The longevity of the transient state is the result of the area feedback, by which, migration of a divide changes the local contributing area. This change propagates downstream as a slope adjustment, forcing further divide migrations

  5. Soil residence time: A window into landscape morphologic steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, P. C.; Roering, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    For a landscape in true morphologic steady state the erosion rate and the average residence time of the debris mantle regolith (including the soils) are everywhere equal. Where other factors influencing soil properties such as climate, organisms and parent material are relatively invariant the degree of weathering and extent of pedological development in the debris mantle regolith should be spatially invariant. The corollary to this argument, commonly exploited in soil-geomorphic analysis, is that variation in debris mantle regolith development in a landscape reflects inheritance of older geomorphic surfaces and hence departure from steady state, at least over some time and space scale. The Oregon Coast Range (OCR) experiences a constant rate of rock uplift and has escaped the effects of Pleistocene glacial and periglacial processes. Furthermore, rock uplift and denudation rates have been shown to be approximately in balance, and consequently the OCR is promoted as being a good candidate for a (flux) steady state landscape. This is, however, not a sufficient condition for morphologic steady state, which is often assumed in numerical landscape simulations. The rock underlying the OCR is relatively homogeneous turbidites of the Tyee formation, and climatic and vegetation factors are relatively uniform over large areas. The degree of weathering and pedological development of the regolith on hillslopes should therefore dominantly reflect variation in regolith residence time, such that significant variation implies non-morphologic-steady state conditions. Indeed, spatial variation in soil/regolith age indicates the extent of departure from morphologic steady state. We have observed ubiquitous but localised deep, highly weathered regoliths and soils on ridge tops in the OCR. The extent, depth, geometry and elevational distribution of these deep regolith patches combined with relative measures of their age derived from total element and meteoric 10Be inventory will enable

  6. NASA Lewis steady-state heat pipe code users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Tower, L.K.; Baker, K.W.; Marks, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    The NASA Lewis heat pipe code has been developed to predict the performance of heat pipes in the steady state. The code can be used as a design tool on a personal computer or, with a suitable calling routine, as a subroutine for a mainframe radiator code. A variety of wick structures, including a user input option, can be used. Heat pipes with multiple evaporators, condensers, and adiabatic sections in series and with wick structures that differ among sections can be modeled. Several working fluids can be chosen, including potassium, sodium, and lithium, for which the monomer-dimer equilibrium is considered. The code incorporates a vapor flow algorithm that treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. This code facilitates the determination of heat pipe operating temperatures and heat pipe limits that may be encountered at the specified heat input and environment temperature. Data are input to the computer through a user-interactive input subroutine. Output, such as liquid and vapor pressures and temperatures, is printed at equally spaced axial positions along the pipe as determined by the user.

  7. NASA Lewis steady-state heat pipe code users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.; Baker, Karl W.; Marks, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis heat pipe code was developed to predict the performance of heat pipes in the steady state. The code can be used as a design tool on a personal computer or with a suitable calling routine, as a subroutine for a mainframe radiator code. A variety of wick structures, including a user input option, can be used. Heat pipes with multiple evaporators, condensers, and adiabatic sections in series and with wick structures that differ among sections can be modeled. Several working fluids can be chosen, including potassium, sodium, and lithium, for which monomer-dimer equilibrium is considered. The code incorporates a vapor flow algorithm that treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. This code facilitates the determination of heat pipe operating temperatures and heat pipe limits that may be encountered at the specified heat input and environment temperature. Data are input to the computer through a user-interactive input subroutine. Output, such as liquid and vapor pressures and temperatures, is printed at equally spaced axial positions along the pipe as determined by the user.

  8. Modeling biofiltration of VOC mixtures under steady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Baltzis, B.C.; Wojdyla, S.M.; Zarook, S.M.

    1997-06-01

    Treatment of air streams contaminated with binary volatile organic compound (VOC) mixtures in classical biofilters under steady-state conditions of operation was described with a general mathematical model. The model accounts for potential kinetic interactions among the pollutants, effects of oxygen availability on biodegradation, and biomass diversification in the filter bed. While the effects of oxygen were always taken into account, two distinct cases were considered for the experimental model validation. The first involves kinetic interactions, but no biomass differentiation, used for describing data from biofiltration of benzene/toluene mixtures. The second case assumes that each pollutant is treated by a different type of biomass. Each biomass type is assumed to form separate patches of biofilm on the solid packing material, thus kinetic interference does not occur. This model was used for describing biofiltration of ethanol/butanol mixtures. Experiments were performed with classical biofilters packed with mixtures of peat moss and perlite (2:3, volume:volume). The model equations were solved through the use of computer codes based on the fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique for the gas-phase mass balances and the method of orthogonal collocation for the concentration profiles in the biofilms. Good agreement between model predictions and experimental data was found in almost all cases. Oxygen was found to be extremely important in the case of polar VOCs (ethanol/butanol).

  9. Exploration of ITER Steady-State Scenarios Using FASTRAN/IPS Integrated Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Batchelor, D. B.; Diem, S. J.; Elwasif, W. R.; Sontag, A. C.; DIII-D Team

    2013-10-01

    ITER steady-state (SS) scenarios are examined using an iterative steady-state (d / dt = 0) solution procedure using FASTRAN solver implemented in Integrated Plasma Simulator framework, self-consistently with heating and current drive (H&CD), MHD equilibrium, and transport models. The objective of the exercise is to understand the range of steady-state solutions using theory-based transport models with the ITER Day-1 H&CD and proposed upgrades (EC launcher modifications). ITER operation performances (fusion gain Q and noninductive fraction fNI and steady burn duration) are compared using different transport models (TGLF, GLF23, CDBM, MMM7.1) based on the edge profiles scaled from recent DIII-D ITER Steady State Demo discharges as well as from the existing pedestal models (EPED). Sensitivities of the operation spaces are studied using different density peaking and plasma current. Reducing Ip increases achievable fNI while peaking density increases Q but limited by MHD stability. Optimization of Day-1 H&CD mixes is discussed toward the ITER goal (Q = 5 and fNI = 1 for 3000 s). Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Garcia, J.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.

    2009-05-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  11. The generalized Balescu-Lenard collision operator: A unifying concept for tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1987-08-01

    The generalization of the Balescu-Lenard collision operator to its fully electromagnetic counterpart in Kaufman's action-angle formalism is derived and its properties investigated. The general form may be specialized to any particular geometry where the unperturbed particle motion is integrable, and thus includes cylindrical plasmas, inhomogeneous slabs with nonuniform magnetic fields, tokamaks, and the particularly simple geometry of the standard operator as special cases. The general form points to the commonality between axisymmetric, turbulent, and ripple transport, and implies properties (e.g., intrinsic ambipolarity) which should be shared by them, under appropriate conditions. Along with a turbulent ''anomalous diffusion coefficient'' calculated for tokamaks in previous work, an ''anomalous pinch'' term of closely related structure and scaling is also implied by the generalized operator. 20 refs. (LSP)

  12. Proteome analysis of the Escherichia coli heat shock response under steady-state conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Svenja; Fallet, Claas; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    In this study a proteomic approach was used to investigate the steady-state response of Escherichia coli to temperature up-shifts in a cascade of two continuously operated bioreactors. The first reactor served as cell source with optimal settings for microbial growth, while in the second chemostat the cells were exposed to elevated temperatures. By using this reactor configuration, which has not been reported to be used for the study of bacterial stress responses so far, it is possible to study temperature stress under well-defined, steady-state conditions. Specifically the effect on the cellular adaption to temperature stress using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was examined and compared at the cultivation temperatures of 37°C and 47.5°C. As expected, the steady-state study with the double bioreactor configuration delivered a different protein spectrum compared to that obtained with standard batch experiments in shaking flasks and bioreactors. Setting a high cut-out spot-to-spot size ratio of 5, proteins involved in defence against oxygen stress, functional cell envelope proteins, chaperones and proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, the energy metabolism and the amino acid biosynthesis were found to be differently expressed at high cultivation temperatures. The results demonstrate the complexity of the stress response in a steady-state culture not reported elsewhere to date. PMID:19772559

  13. Molecular control of steady-state dendritic cell maturation and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Gianna Elena; Ma, Averil

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized sentinels responsible for coordinating adaptive immunity. This function is dependent upon coupled sensitivity to environmental signs of inflammation and infection to cellular maturation-the programmed alteration of DC phenotype and function to enhance immune cell activation. Although DCs are thus well equipped to respond to pathogens, maturation triggers are not unique to infection. Given that immune cells are exquisitely sensitive to the biological functions of DCs, we now appreciate that multiple layers of suppression are required to restrict the environmental sensitivity, cellular maturation, and even life span of DCs to prevent aberrant immune activation during the steady state. At the same time, steady-state DCs are not quiescent but rather perform key functions that support homeostasis of numerous cell types. Here we review these functions and molecular mechanisms of suppression that control steady-state DC maturation. Corruption of these steady-state operatives has diverse immunological consequences and pinpoints DCs as potent drivers of autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  14. DYNGEN: A program for calculating steady-state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. F.; Daniele, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The DYNGEN, a digital computer program for analyzing the steady state and transient performance of turbojet and turbofan engines, is described. The DYNGEN is based on earlier computer codes (SMOTE, GENENG, and GENENG 2) which are capable of calculating the steady state performance of turbojet and turbofan engines at design and off-design operating conditions. The DYNGEN has the combined capabilities of GENENG and GENENG 2 for calculating steady state performance; to these the further capability for calculating transient performance was added. The DYNGEN can be used to analyze one- and two-spool turbojet engines or two- and three-spool turbofan engines without modification to the basic program. A modified Euler method is used by DYNGEN to solve the differential equations which model the dynamics of the engine. This new method frees the programmer from having to minimize the number of equations which require iterative solution. As a result, some of the approximations normally used in transient engine simulations can be eliminated. This tends to produce better agreement when answers are compared with those from purely steady state simulations. The modified Euler method also permits the user to specify large time steps (about 0.10 sec) to be used in the solution of the differential equations. This saves computer execution time when long transients are run. Examples of the use of the program are included, and program results are compared with those from an existing hybrid-computer simulation of a two-spool turbofan.

  15. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bers, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  16. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  17. Impurity shielding criteria for steady state hydrogen plasmas in the LHD, a heliotron-type device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Yoshimura, S.; Tamura, N.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tanaka, K.; Suzuki, C.; Peterson, B. J.; Sakamoto, R.; Morisaki, T.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-07-01

    Impurity behavior has so far been investigated in steady state hydrogen plasmas in the Large Helical Device, which is a heliotron-type device and excellent for steady state operation. There was always found to be an impurity accumulation window, as observed before (Nakamura et al 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 2121, Nakamura et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 219). To clarify the boundary conditions, the dependences of impurity transport on edge plasma parameters are investigated with a database of steady state hydrogen discharges, and the boundary conditions for the impurity accumulation window are discussed. It is found that two different types of impurity screening effects are essential for preventing intrinsic impurities from entering the core plasma. One of them is due to positive radial electric field at the plasma edge on the low collisionality side and the other is impurity retention caused by friction force in the ergodic layer on the high collisionality side. The classification of steady state discharges on n-T space shows that the impurity behavior can be predicted by the impurity shielding criteria based on each empirical scaling.

  18. Integrated modelling of DEMO-FNS current ramp-up scenario and steady-state regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Kuteev, B. V.; Bykov, A. S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Sychugov, D. Yu.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    An approach to the integrated modelling of plasma regimes in the projected neutron source DEMO-FNS based on different codes is developed. The consistency check of the steady-state regime is carried out, namely, the possibility of the plasma current ramp-up, acceptance of growth rates of MHD modes in the steady-state regime, heat loads to the wall and divertor plates and neutron yield value. The following codes are employed for the integrated modelling. ASTRA transport code for calculation of plasma parameters in the steady-state regime, NUBEAM Monte Carlo code for NBI incorporated into the ASTRA code, DINA free boundary equilibrium and evolution code, SPIDER free boundary equilibrium and equilibrium reconstruction code, KINX ideal MHD stability code, TOKSTAB rigid shift vertical stability code, edge and divertor plasma B2SOLPS5.2 code and Semi-analytic Hybrid Model (SHM) code for self-consistent description of the core, edge and divertor plasmas based on the experimental scaling laws. The consistent steady-state regime for the DEMO-FNS plasma and the plasma current ramp-up scenario are developed using the integrated modelling approach. Passive copper coils are suggested to reduce the plasma vertical instability growth rate to below ˜30 s-1.The outer divertor operation in the ‘high-recycling’ regime is numerically demonstrated with a maximal heat flux density of 7-9 MW m-2 that is technically acceptable.

  19. Quantum quasi-steady states in current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Zwolak, Michael; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    We investigate quasi-steady state solutions to transport in quantum systems by finding states which at some time minimize the change in density throughout all space and have a given current density flowing from one part of the system to another [1]. Contrary to classical dynamics, in a quantum mechanical system there are many states with a given energy and particle number which satisfy this minimization criterion. Taking as an example spinless fermions on a one-dimensional lattice, we explicitly show the phase space of a class of quasi-steady states. We also discuss the possibility of coherent and incoherent mixing of these steady state solutions leading to a new type of noise in quantum transport. [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004).

  20. Evaluation of a steady state MPD thruster test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.; Doss, E.D.; Kilgore, O.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of multimegawatt MPD thrusters depends, to a great extent, on testing them under steady state high altitude space conditions. Steady state testing is required to provide thermal characteristics, life cycle, erosion, and other essential data. the major technical obstacle for ground testing of MPD thrusters in a space simulation facility is the inability of state-of-the-art vacuum systems to handle the tremendous pumping speeds required for multimegawatt MPD thrusters. This is true for other types of electric propulsion devices as well. This paper discusses the results of the first phase of an evaluation of steady state MPD thruster test facilities. The first phase addresses the conceptual design of vacuum systems required to support multimegawatt MPD thruster testing. Three advanced pumping system concepts were evaluated and are presented here.

  1. Status of and prospects for advanced tokamak regimes from multi-machine comparisons using the 'International Tokamak Physics Activity' database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaudon, X.; Barbato, E.; Bécoulet, A.; Doyle, E. J.; Fujita, T.; Gohil, P.; Imbeaux, F.; Sauter, O.; Sips, G.; ITPA Group on Transport; Internal ITB Physics; Connor, J. W.; Doyle, E. J.; Esipchuk, Yu; Fujita, T.; Fukuda, T.; Gohil, P.; Kinsey, J.; Kirneva, N.; Lebedev, S.; Litaudon, X.; Mukhovatov, V.; Rice, J.; Synakowski, E.; Toi, K.; Unterberg, B.; Vershkov, V.; Wakatani, M.; International ITB Database Working Group; Aniel, T.; Baranov, Yu F.; Barbato, E.; Bécoulet, A.; Behn, R.; Bourdelle, C.; Bracco, G.; Budny, R. V.; Buratti, P.; Doyle, E. J.; Esipchuk, Yu; Esposito, B.; Ide, S.; Field, A. R.; Fujita, T.; Fukuda, T.; Gohil, P.; Gormezano, C.; Greenfield, C.; Greenwald, M.; Hahm, T. S.; Hoang, G. T.; Hobirk, J.; Hogeweij, D.; Ide, S.; Isayama, A.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Kamada, Y.; Kinsey, J.; Kirneva, N.; Litaudon, X.; Luce, T. C.; Murakami, M.; Parail, V.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Ryter, F.; Sakamoto, Y.; Shirai, H.; Sips, G.; Suzuki, T.; Synakowski, E.; Takenaga, H.; Takizuka, T.; Tala, T.; Wade, M. R.; Weiland, J.

    2004-05-01

    Advanced tokamak regimes obtained in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, FT-U, JET, JT-60U, TCV and Tore Supra experiments are assessed both in terms of their fusion performance and capability for ultimately reaching steady-state using data from the international internal transport barrier database. These advanced modes of tokamak operation are characterized by an improved core confinement and a modified current profile compared to the relaxed Ohmically driven one. The present results obtained in these experiments are studied in view of their prospect for achieving either long pulses ('hybrid' scenario with inductive and non-inductive current drive) or ultimately steady-state purely non-inductive current drive operation in next step devices such as ITER. A new operational diagram for advanced tokamak operation is proposed where the figure of merit characterizing the fusion performances and confinement, H\\times \\beta _{\\rm N}/q^{2}_{95} , is drawn versus the fraction of the plasma current driven by the bootstrap effect. In this diagram, present day advanced tokamak regimes have now reached an operational domain that is required in the non-inductive ITER current drive operation with typically 50% of the plasma current driven by the bootstrap effect (Green et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 587). In addition, the existence domain of the advanced mode regimes is also mapped in terms of dimensionless plasmas physics quantities such as normalized Larmor radius, normalized collisionality, Mach number and ratio of ion to electron temperature. The gap between present day and future advanced tokamak experiments is quantitatively assessed in terms of these dimensionless parameters. A preliminary version of this study was presented in the 29th EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. and Control. Fusion (Montreux, Switzerland, 17 21 June 2002) [1].

  2. Maximum efficiency of steady-state heat engines at arbitrary power.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Artem; Holubec, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the efficiency of a heat engine operating in a nonequilibrium steady state maintained by two heat reservoirs. Within the general framework of linear irreversible thermodynamics we derive a universal upper bound on the efficiency of the engine operating at arbitrary fixed power. Furthermore, we show that a slight decrease of the power below its maximal value can lead to a significant gain in efficiency. The presented analysis yields the exact expression for this gain and the corresponding upper bound.

  3. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H.; Anderson, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During `` time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems.

  4. Development on JET of advanced tokamak operations for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, A. A.; Crisanti, F.; Litaudon, X.; Baranov, Yu. F.; Becoulet, A.; Becoulet, M.; Bertalot, L.; Castaldo, C.; Challis, C. D.; Cesario, R.; DeBaar, M. R.; de Vries, P. C.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Gorini, G.; Gormezano, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hobirk, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Lomas, P. J.; Mailloux, J.; Mantica, P.; Mantsinen, M. J.; Mazon, D.; Moreau, D.; Murari, A.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Rimini, F.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sozzi, C.; Tudisco, O.; Van Eester, D.; Zastrow, K.-D.; work-programme contributors, JET-EFDA

    2006-02-01

    Recent research on advanced tokamak in JET has focused on scenarios with both monotonic and reversed shear q-profiles having plasma parameters as relevant as possible for extrapolation to ITER. Wide internal transport barriers (ITBs), r/a ~ 0.7, are formed at ITER relevant triangularity δ ~ 0.45 and moderate plasma current, IP = 1.5-2.5 MA, with ne/nG ~ 60% when ELMs are moderated by Ne injection. At higher current (IP <= 3.5 MA, δ ~ 0.25) wide ITBs sitting at r/a >= 0.5, in the positive shear region, have been developed. Generally MHD events terminate these barriers otherwise limited in strength by power availability. ITBs with core density close to Greenwald value, Te ~ Ti and low toroidal rotation (4 times lower than standard ITBs) are obtained in plasma target preformed by opportune timing of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), pellet injection and a small amount of NBI power. Wide ITBs, r/a ~ 0.6, of moderate strength, can be sustained without impurities accumulation for a time close to neoclassical resistive time in 3 T/1.8 MA discharges that exhibit reversed magnetic shear profiles and type-III ELMy edge. These discharges have been extended to the maximum duration allowed by JET subsystems (20 s) bringing to the record of injected energy in a JET discharge: E ~ 330 MJ. Portability of ITB physics has been addressed through dedicated similarity experiments. The ITB is identified as a layer of reduced diffusivity studying the propagation of the heat wave generated by modulating the ICRF mode conversion (MC) electron heating. Impressive results, QDT ~ 0.25, are obtained in these deuterium discharges with 3He minority when the MC layer is located in the core. The ion behaviour has been investigated in pure LHCD electron ITBs optimizing the 3He minority concentration for direct ion heating. Preliminary results of particle transport, studied via injection of a trace of tritium and an Ar-Ne mixture, will be presented.

  5. TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

  6. Prospects of steady state magnetic diagnostic of fusion reactors based on metallic Hall sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďuran, I.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Kovařík, K.; Viererbl, L.

    2012-06-01

    Employment of sensors based on Hall effect (Hall sensors) is one of the candidate approaches to detection of almost steady state magnetic fields in future fusion reactors based on magnetic confinement (tokamaks, stellarators etc.), and also in possible fusion-fission hybrid systems having these fusion reactors as a neutron source and driver. This contribution reviews the initial considerations concerning application of metallic Hall sensors in fusion reactor harsh environment that include high neutron loads (>1018 cm-2) and elevated temperatures (>200°C). In particular, the candidate sensing materials, candidate technologies for sensors production, initial analysis of activation and transmutation of sensors under reactor relevant neutron loads and the tests of the the first samples of copper Hall sensors are presented.

  7. An Insightful Steady-State Performance of a Squirrel Cage Induction Generator Enhanced with STATCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Olorunfemi; Khayamy, Mehdy; Bule, Mehari

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the regulation of the terminal voltage and reactive power of a grid-connected squirrel cage induction generator. A shunt connected voltage source inverter (VSI) with a capacitor in the DC side operating as a Static Compensator (STATCOM) and a shunt capacitor are used for regulating the generator terminal voltage and limit the reactive power demand from the grid. Simulation results for steady-state operation for a wide variation of speed in the super-synchronous region are presented as well as the dynamic stability of the system. Closed-form steady-state characteristics equations for the system are used to determine key variables and to demonstrate how the operation of the system depends on various parameters. This characteristics curve which contains all of the equations of the system provides the all in one insightful view to the inherent characteristics of the system and the effect of the parameter variation on the terminal voltage plane.

  8. Steady state model for polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    A model is presented for the steady state operation of polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs). An LEC consists of a luminescent and ionically conducting polymer, with an ionic salt added to provide ions necessary for p-type and n-type doping, sandwiched between two electrodes. Upon applying a sufficiently large voltage bias, the ions are spatially separated forming an electrical junction. Electrons injected from the n-type side of the junction recombine with holes injected from the p-type side of the junction emitting light. We first describe the LEC at zero bias in which electric fields may occur in charge double layers near the contacts but in which there is a charge neutral, field free region in the device center which has an equal density of anions and cations and essentially no electrons or holes. A threshold voltage for junction formation is found, which depends on the polymer energy gap, the dissociation free energy of the salt, and the added salt density. It is generally somewhat smaller than the polymer energy gap. Below threshold, an applied bias changes the electric fields in the double charge layers near the contacts but the device center remains field free and essentially no current flows. Above threshold, the ions become spatially separated, a junction forms, and current begins to flow. Part of the applied voltage, above threshold, falls in the contact region and is necessary to establish the junction by electrochemical doping and part of the applied voltage falls across the junction. We describe the structure of the junction, which is quite different from that of a conventional p-n junction, including the spatial profiles of the electrons, holes, and ions, and the electrostatic potential. We discuss the current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics of the LECs and show how they depend on the material parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. A steady-state model of the lunar ejecta cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Apostolos

    2014-05-01

    Every airless body in the solar system is surrounded by a cloud of ejecta produced by the impact of interplanetary meteoroids on its surface [1]. Such ``dust exospheres'' have been observed around the Galilean satellites of Jupiter [2,3]. The prospect of long-term robotic and human operations on the Moon by the US and other countries has rekindled interest on the subject [4]. This interest has culminated with the - currently ongoing - investigation of the Moon's dust exosphere by the LADEE spacecraft [5]. Here a model is presented of a ballistic, collisionless, steady state population of ejecta launched vertically at randomly distributed times and velocities and moving under constant gravity. Assuming a uniform distribution of launch times I derive closed form solutions for the probability density functions (pdfs) of the height distribution of particles and the distribution of their speeds in a rest frame both at the surface and at altitude. The treatment is then extended to particle motion with respect to a moving platform such as an orbiting spacecraft. These expressions are compared with numerical simulations under lunar surface gravity where the underlying ejection speed distribution is (a) uniform (b) a power law. I discuss the predictions of the model, its limitations, and how it can be validated against near-surface and orbital measurements.[1] Gault, D. Shoemaker, E.M., Moore, H.J., 1963, NASA TN-D 1767. [2] Kruger, H., Krivov, A.V., Hamilton, D. P., Grun, E., 1999, Nature, 399, 558. [3] Kruger, H., Krivov, A.V., Sremcevic, M., Grun, E., 2003, Icarus, 164, 170. [4] Grun, E., Horanyi, M., Sternovsky, Z., 2011, Planetary and Space Science, 59, 1672. [5] Elphic, R.C., Hine, B., Delory, G.T., Salute, J.S., Noble, S., Colaprete, A., Horanyi, M., Mahaffy, P., and the LADEE Science Team, 2014, LPSC XLV, LPI Contr. 1777, 2677.

  10. Convergence to steady state of solutions of Burgers' equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreiss, G.; Kreiss, H. O.

    1985-01-01

    Consider the initial boundary value problem for Burgers' equation. It is shown that its solutions converge, in time, to a unique steady state. The speed of the convergence depends on the boundary conditions and can be exponentially slow. Methods to speed up the rate of convergence are also discussed.

  11. Is There More than One Steady State for Nox?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakas, G.

    1985-01-01

    The study of alternative steady states for nitrogen oxides is discussed: The production of these oxides and the reactions they undergo in the atmosphere are described. The computerized modelling of the atmosphere using a one dimensional time dependent photochemical model is attempted.

  12. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  13. HSC Contribution in Making Steady-State Blood.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Frenette, Paul S

    2016-09-20

    In homeostasis, whether blood cells are derived from committed progenitor or mutipotent stem cell activity remains controversial. In this issue of Immunity, Sawai et al. (2016) describe murine HSCs as the major contributor to the maintenance of multilineage hematopoiesis, both in the steady state and during cytokine response. PMID:27653597

  14. Acceleration to a steady state for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-stage Runge-Kutta method is analyzed for solving the Euler equations exterior to an airfoil. Highly subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows are evaluated. Various techniques for accelerating the convergence to a steady state are introduced and analyzed.

  15. Equilibrium Binding and Steady-State Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, H. Brian

    1984-01-01

    Points out that equilibrium binding and steady-state enzyme kinetics have a great deal in common and that related equations and error analysis can be cast in identical forms. Emphasizes that if one type of problem solution is taught, the other is also taught. Various methods of data analysis are evaluated. (JM)

  16. Steady-State Multiplicity Features of Chemically Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luss, Dan

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes steady-state multiplicity in chemical reactors, focusing on the use of two mathematical tools, namely, the catastrophe theory and the singularity theory with a distinguished parameter. These tools can be used to determine the maximum number of possible solutions and the different types of bifurcation diagrams. (JN)

  17. Density Functional Theory for Steady-State Nonequilibrium Molecular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuanglong; Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) for steady-state nonequilibrium quantum systems such as molecular junctions under a finite bias. Based on the steady-state nonequilibrium statistics that maps nonequilibrium to an effective equilibrium, we show that ground-state DFT (GS-DFT) is not applicable in this case and two densities, the total electron density and the density of current-carrying electrons, are needed to uniquely determine the properties of the corresponding nonequilibrium system. A self-consistent mean-field approach based on two densities is then derived. The theory is implemented into SIESTA computational package and applied to study nonequilibrium electronic/transport properties of a realistic carbon-nanotube (CNT)/Benzene junction. Results obtained from our steady-state DFT (SS-DFT) are compared with those of conventional GS-DFT based transport calculations. We show that SS-DFT yields energetically more stable nonequilibrium steady state, predicts significantly lower electric current, and is able to produce correct electronic structures in local equilibrium under a limiting case. PMID:26472080

  18. HSC Contribution in Making Steady-State Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Keisuke; Frenette, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    In homeostasis, whether blood cells are derived from committed progenitor or mutipotent stem cell activity remains controversial. In this issue of Immunity, Sawai et al. (2016) describe murine HSCs as the major contributor to the maintenance of multilineage hematopoiesis, both in the steady state and during cytokine response. PMID:27653597

  19. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  20. CONTROL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY STEADY-STATE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale experiments have been performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment to control Cryptosporidium oocysts under steady-state conditions. The work was performed with a pilot plant that was designed to minimize flow rates and, as a result, the number of oocyst...

  1. Kinematic Cosmology & a new ``Steady State'' Model of Continued Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Mogens

    2006-03-01

    Only a new "steady state" model justifies the observations of fully mature galaxies at ever increasing distances. The basic idea behind the world model presented here, which is a synthesis of the cosmologies of Parmenides and Herakleitos, is that the invariant structure of the infinite contents of a universe in flux may be depicted as a finite hyperbolic pseudo-sphere.

  2. Steady State Load Characterization Fact Sheet: 2012 Chevy Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Don Scoffield

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet characterizes the steady state charging behavior of a 2012 Chevy Volt. Both level 1 charging (120 volt) and level 2 charging (208 volts) is investigated. This fact sheet contains plots of efficiency, power factor, and current harmonics as vehicle charging is curtailed. Prominent current harmonics are also displayed in a histogram for various charge rates.

  3. Steady States of the Parametric Rotator and Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouzas, Antonio O.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the…

  4. Gas and liquid transport in steady-state aqueous foam.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, K; Durian, D J

    2008-07-01

    Experiments are performed on the transport of gas and liquid in a column of aqueous foam maintained in steady state by a constant gas flux at the bottom. We measure vertical profiles of the bubble velocities, the bubble radii, and the liquid fraction, for four different gas fluxes. In steady state the bubbles move upwards with constant speed equal to the measured gas flux, which accounts for all transport of gas. The bubbles also coarsen by gas diffusion at a rate that depends on liquid fraction. Away from the bottom, the Plateau border radii are constant. Therefore capillary effects are negligible and the steady-state liquid-fraction profile is set chiefly by the balance of viscous forces and gravity. The flow within the Plateau borders may be modeled with a no-slip boundary condition for our system. These findings provide a simple description of steady-state foams via the coarsening and drainage equations, which can be combined and solved analytically for bubble radius and liquid-fraction profiles.

  5. Steady-state canopy gas exchange: system design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a commercial growth chamber for canopy photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration measurements. The system was designed to measure transpiration via water vapor fluxes, and the importance of this measurement is discussed. Procedures for continuous measurement of root-zone respiration are described, and new data is presented to dispel myths about sources of water vapor interference in photosynthesis and in the measurement of CO2 by infrared gas analysis. Mitchell (1992) has described the fundamentals of various approaches to measuring photosynthesis. Because our system evolved from experience with other types of single-leaf and canopy gas-exchange systems, it is useful to review advantages and disadvantages of different systems as they apply to various research objectives.

  6. Steady-state canopy gas exchange: system design and operation.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the use of a commercial growth chamber for canopy photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration measurements. The system was designed to measure transpiration via water vapor fluxes, and the importance of this measurement is discussed. Procedures for continuous measurement of root-zone respiration are described, and new data is presented to dispel myths about sources of water vapor interference in photosynthesis and in the measurement of CO2 by infrared gas analysis. Mitchell (1992) has described the fundamentals of various approaches to measuring photosynthesis. Because our system evolved from experience with other types of single-leaf and canopy gas-exchange systems, it is useful to review advantages and disadvantages of different systems as they apply to various research objectives.

  7. Tokamak operation with safety factor q95 < 2 via control of MHD stability.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, P; Hanson, J M; Martin, P; Navratil, G A; Turco, F; Bialek, J; Ferraro, N M; La Haye, R J; Lanctot, M J; Okabayashi, M; Paz-Soldan, C; Strait, E J; Turnbull, A D; Zanca, P; Baruzzo, M; Bolzonella, T; Hyatt, A W; Jackson, G L; Marrelli, L; Piron, L; Shiraki, D

    2014-07-25

    Magnetic feedback control of the resistive-wall mode has enabled the DIII-D tokamak to access stable operation at safety factor q(95) = 1.9 in divertor plasmas for 150 instability growth times. Magnetohydrodynamic stability sets a hard, disruptive limit on the minimum edge safety factor achievable in a tokamak, or on the maximum plasma current at a given toroidal magnetic field. In tokamaks with a divertor, the limit occurs at q(95) = 2, as confirmed in DIII-D. Since the energy confinement time scales linearly with current, this also bounds the performance of a fusion reactor. DIII-D has overcome this limit, opening a whole new high-current regime not accessible before. This result brings significant possible benefits in terms of fusion performance, but it also extends resistive-wall mode physics and its control to conditions never explored before. In present experiments, the q(95) < 2 operation is eventually halted by voltage limits reached in the feedback power supplies, not by intrinsic physics issues. Improvements to power supplies and to control algorithms have the potential to further extend this regime.

  8. Predictive two-dimensional scrape-off layer plasma transport modeling of phase-I operations of tokamak SST-1 using SOLPS5

    SciTech Connect

    Himabindu, M.; Tyagi, Anil; Sharma, Devendra; Deshpande, Shishir P.; Bonnin, Xavier

    2014-02-15

    Computational analysis of coupled plasma and neutral transport in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) region of the Steady-State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is done using SOLPS for Phase-I of double-null divertor plasma operations. An optimum set of plasma parameters is explored computationally for the first phase operations with the central objective of achieving an effective control over particle and power exhaust. While the transport of plasma species is treated using a fluid model in the B2.5 code, a full kinetic description is provided by the EIRENE code for the neutral particle transport in a realistic geometry. Cases with and without external gas puffing are analyzed for finding regimes where an effective control of plasma operations can be exercised by controlling the SOL plasma conditions over a range of heating powers. In the desired parameter range, a reasonable neutral penetration across the SOL is observed, capable of causing a variation of up to 15% of the total input power, in the power deposited on the divertors. Our computational characterization of the SOL plasma with input power 1 MW and lower hybrid current drive, for the separatrix density up to 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, indicates that there will be access to high recycling operations producing reduction in the temperature and the peak heat flux at the divertor targets. This indicates that a control of the core plasma density and temperature would be achievable. A power balance analysis done using the kinetic neutral transport code EIRENE indicates about 60%-75% of the total power diverted to the targets, providing quantitative estimates for the relative power loading of the targets and the rest of the plasma facing components.

  9. Steady state volcanism: Evidence from eruption histories of polygenetic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Wadge, G.

    1982-05-10

    Some volcanoes erupt magma at average rates which are constant over periods of many years, even through this magma may appear in a complex series of eruptions. This constancy of output is tested by construction of a curve of cumulative volume of erupted magma, which is linear for steady state volcanism, and whose gradient defines the steady state rate Q/sub s/s. The assumption is made that Q/sub s/s is the rate at which magma is supplied to these polygenetic volcanoes. Five general types of eruptive behavior can be distinguished from the cumulative volume studied. These types are interpreted in terms of a simple model of batches of magma rising buoyantly through the crust and interacting with a small-capacity subvolcanic magma reservoir. Recognition of previous steady state behavior at a volcano may enable the cumulative volume curve to be used empirically as a constraint on the timing and volume of the next eruption. The steady state model thus has a limited predictive capability. With the exception of Kilauea (O/sub s/s = 4m/sup 3/ s/sup -1/) all the identified steady state volcanoes have values of Q/sub s/s of a few tenths of one cubic meter per second. These rates are consistent with the minimum flux rates required by theoretical cooling models of batches of magma traversing the crust. The similarity of these Q/sub s/s values of volcanoes (producing basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas) in very different tectonic settings suggests that the common factors of crustal buoyancy forces and the geotherm-controlled cooling rates control the dynamics of magma supply through the crust. Long-term dormancy at active volcanoes may be a manifestation of the steady accumulation of magma in large crustal reservoirs, a process that complements the intermittent periods of steady state output at the surface. This possibility has several implications, the most important of which is that it provides a constraint on the supply rate of new magma to the bases of plutons.

  10. Study of the DEF Feedback Control System in AC Operation of Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Luo, Jiarong; Yuan, Qiping; Xu, Congdong

    2007-02-01

    AC operation with multiple full cycles has been successfully performed on the superconducting tokamak HT-7. In the experiment, it was discovered that the saturation of the transformer magnetic flux with DEF, a signal name, was one of key aspects that affected the AC operation. The conditions of DEF were examined through the DEF feedback control system. By controlling the working patterns of the subsystems, namely the poloidal field control system and density control system, it was guaranteed that DEF would remain in the non-saturated status.

  11. Fast-ion transport in q{sub min}>2, high-β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Bass, E. M.; Luce, T. C.; Pace, D. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Podesta, M.; Gong, X.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Turco, F.

    2015-05-15

    Results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-q{sub min} confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing β{sub N} and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with q{sub min}>2 that target the typical range of q{sub 95}= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable β{sub N}. In contrast, similar plasmas except with q{sub min} just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take q{sub min}>3 plasmas to higher β{sub P} with q{sub 95}= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-q{sub min} scenario, the high β{sub P} cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇β{sub fast}, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, β{sub N}, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q{sub 95}, high-q{sub min} plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  12. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operation.

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Hillis, D L; Bucalossi, J; Douai, D; Oddon, P; Vartanian, S; Colas, L; Manenc, L; Pégourié, B

    2010-10-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This "diagnostic RGA" has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H(2)/D(2) isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H(2) injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H(2) could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  13. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C. C.; Hillis, D. L.; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; Oddon, P.; Vartanian, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pegourie, B.

    2010-10-15

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This ''diagnostic RGA'' has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H{sub 2} injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H{sub 2} could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  14. Residual Gas Analysis for Long-Pulse, Advanced Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Hillis, Donald Lee; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; OddonCEA, IRFM, P.; VartanianCEA-Cadarach, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pegourie, B.

    2010-01-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer RGA system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This diagnostic RGA has been used in long-pulse up to 6 min discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H2 /D2 isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H2 injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses 4 min absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H2 could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Dynamic relaxation of a levitated nanoparticle from a non-equilibrium steady state.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Jan; Quidant, Romain; Dellago, Christoph; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuation theorems are a generalization of thermodynamics on small scales and provide the tools to characterize the fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium nanoscale systems. They are particularly important for understanding irreversibility and the second law in fundamental chemical and biological processes that are actively driven, thus operating far from thermal equilibrium. Here, we apply the framework of fluctuation theorems to investigate the important case of a system relaxing from a non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. Using a vacuum-trapped nanoparticle, we demonstrate experimentally the validity of a fluctuation theorem for the relative entropy change occurring during relaxation from a non-equilibrium steady state. The platform established here allows non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to be studied experimentally for arbitrary steady states and can be extended to investigate quantum fluctuation theorems as well as systems that do not obey detailed balance.

  16. Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Rotor With Auxiliary Support From a Clearance Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Feng, Li; Lawrence, Charles T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, clearance, support stiffness and damping is studied. Bifurcation diagrams are used as a tool to examine the dynamic behavior of this system as a function of the afore mentioned parameters. The harmonic balance method is also employed for synchronous response cases. The observed dynamical responses is discussed and some insights into the behavior of such systems are presented.

  17. Master equation based steady-state cluster perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuss, Martin; Dorn, Gerhard; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    A simple and efficient approximation scheme to study electronic transport characteristics of strongly correlated nanodevices, molecular junctions, or heterostructures out of equilibrium is provided by steady-state cluster perturbation theory. In this work, we improve the starting point of this perturbative, nonequilibrium Green's function based method. Specifically, we employ an improved unperturbed (so-called reference) state ρ̂S, constructed as the steady state of a quantum master equation within the Born-Markov approximation. This resulting hybrid method inherits beneficial aspects of both the quantum master equation as well as the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. We benchmark this scheme on two experimentally relevant systems in the single-electron transistor regime: an electron-electron interaction based quantum diode and a triple quantum dot ring junction, which both feature negative differential conductance. The results of this method improve significantly with respect to the plain quantum master equation treatment at modest additional computational cost.

  18. Theory of minimum dissipation of energy for the steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic configuration of an inductively driven steady-state plasma bounded by a surface (or two adjacent surfaces) on which B{center dot}n = 0 is force-free: {del}{times}B = 2{alpha}B, where {alpha} is a constant, in time and in space. {alpha} is the ratio of the Poynting flux to the magnetic helicity flux at the boundary. It is also the ratio of the dissipative rates of the magnetic energy to the magnetic helicity in the plasma. The spatial extent of the configuration is noninfinitesimal. This global constraint is a result of the requirement that, for a steady-state plasma, the rate of change of the vector potential, {partial derivative}A/{partial derivative}t, is constant in time and uniform in space.

  19. Theory of minimum dissipation of energy for the steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic configuration of an inductively driven steady-state plasma bounded by a surface (or two adjacent surfaces) on which B{center_dot}n = 0 is force-free: {del}{times}B = 2{alpha}B, where {alpha} is a constant, in time and in space. {alpha} is the ratio of the Poynting flux to the magnetic helicity flux at the boundary. It is also the ratio of the dissipative rates of the magnetic energy to the magnetic helicity in the plasma. The spatial extent of the configuration is noninfinitesimal. This global constraint is a result of the requirement that, for a steady-state plasma, the rate of change of the vector potential, {partial_derivative}A/{partial_derivative}t, is constant in time and uniform in space.

  20. Analysis of slow transitions between nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dibyendu; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Transitions between nonequilibrium steady states obey a generalized Clausius inequality, which becomes an equality in the quasistatic limit. For slow but finite transitions, we show that the behavior of the system is described by a response matrix whose elements are given by a far-from-equilibrium Green–Kubo formula, involving the decay of correlations evaluated in the nonequilibrium steady state. This result leads to a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the mean and variance of the nonadiabatic entropy production, Δ {{s}\\text{na}} . Furthermore, our results extend—to nonequilibrium steady states—the thermodynamic metric structure introduced by Sivak and Crooks for analyzing minimal-dissipation protocols for transitions between equilibrium states.

  1. Analysis of slow transitions between nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dibyendu; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Transitions between nonequilibrium steady states obey a generalized Clausius inequality, which becomes an equality in the quasistatic limit. For slow but finite transitions, we show that the behavior of the system is described by a response matrix whose elements are given by a far-from-equilibrium Green-Kubo formula, involving the decay of correlations evaluated in the nonequilibrium steady state. This result leads to a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the mean and variance of the nonadiabatic entropy production, Δ {{s}\\text{na}} . Furthermore, our results extend—to nonequilibrium steady states—the thermodynamic metric structure introduced by Sivak and Crooks for analyzing minimal-dissipation protocols for transitions between equilibrium states.

  2. Extending Molecular Theory to Steady-State Diffusing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    FRINK,LAURA J. D.; SALINGER,ANDREW G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.

    1999-10-22

    Predicting the properties of nonequilibrium systems from molecular simulations is a growing area of interest. One important class of problems involves steady state diffusion. To study these cases, a grand canonical molecular dynamics approach has been developed by Heffelfinger and van Swol [J. Chem. Phys., 101, 5274 (1994)]. With this method, the flux of particles, the chemical potential gradients, and density gradients can all be measured in the simulation. In this paper, we present a complementary approach that couples a nonlocal density functional theory (DFT) with a transport equation describing steady-state flux of the particles. We compare transport-DFT predictions to GCMD results for a variety of ideal (color diffusion), and nonideal (uphill diffusion and convective transport) systems. In all cases excellent agreement between transport-DFT and GCMD calculations is obtained with diffusion coefficients that are invariant with respect to density and external fields.

  3. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  4. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  5. Task-specific stability of multifinger steady-state action.

    PubMed

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The authors explored task-specific stability during accurate multifinger force production tasks with different numbers of instructed fingers. Subjects performed steady-state isometric force production tasks and were instructed not to interfere voluntarily with transient lifting-and-lowering perturbations applied to the index finger. The main results were (a) intertrial variance in the space of finger modes at steady states was larger within the subspace that had no effect on the total force (the uncontrolled manifold [UCM]); (b) perturbations caused large deviations of finger modes within the UCM (motor equivalence); and (c) deviations caused by the perturbation showed larger variance within the UCM. No significant effects of the number of task fingers were noted in any of the 3 indicators. The results are discussed within the frameworks of the UCM and referent configuration hypotheses. The authors conclude, in particular, that all the tasks were effectively 4-finger tasks with different involvement of task and nontask fingers. PMID:25565327

  6. Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-11-01

    Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers.

  7. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  8. Transitional steady states of exchange dynamics between finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Euijin; Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2016-08-01

    We examine energy and particle exchange between finite-sized quantum systems and find a new form of nonequilibrium state. The exchange rate undergoes stepwise evolution in time, and its magnitude and sign dramatically change according to system size differences. The origin lies in interference effects contributed by multiply scattered waves at system boundaries. Although such characteristics are utterly different from those of true steady state for infinite systems, Onsager's reciprocal relation remains universally valid. PMID:27627275

  9. MUTATION RATES OF BACTERIA IN STEADY STATE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Maurice S.

    1955-01-01

    The breeder and the chemostat have been used to measure mutation rates for two mutations under a variety of steady state growth conditions. These rates have been found to be higher in complex medium than in minimal (F) medium. The effects of changes in nutritional conditions on these high rates have been described. In addition, the mutation rates at short generation times, in complex medium, have been shown to decrease with increasing generation time. PMID:13271726

  10. Analysis of steady-state characteristics of bistable laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Lichen; Guo Yili

    1987-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the steady-state characteristics of bistable semiconductor laser diode (BILD). A simple model for optical output of BILD is obtained using nonlinear rate equations for electron and photon densities. This model emphasizes the physical mechanisms and parameters responsible for the bistability, gives the state equation and explains the main features of BILD. Bistability with a very large hysteresis in P/sub 0/-P/sub 4/ characteristics is a distinctive feature of BILD.

  11. Transitional steady states of exchange dynamics between finite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Euijin; Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2016-08-01

    We examine energy and particle exchange between finite-sized quantum systems and find a new form of nonequilibrium state. The exchange rate undergoes stepwise evolution in time, and its magnitude and sign dramatically change according to system size differences. The origin lies in interference effects contributed by multiply scattered waves at system boundaries. Although such characteristics are utterly different from those of true steady state for infinite systems, Onsager's reciprocal relation remains universally valid.

  12. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  13. Analytical determination of transition time between transient and steady state water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The hydraulic characterization of soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to the modelling of flow in the vadose zone. Since many years, numerous methods were developed to determine soil hydraulic properties. Many of these methods rely on water infiltration experiments and their analysis using analytical or numerical models. At the beginning, most models were developed for water infiltration at steady state. These models had the advantage to be easy to develop from a theoretical point of view. Yet, many drawbacks remain including the need to wait for a long time, leading to time-consuming experiments, the risk to infiltrate water in large volumes of soil, leading to a response affected by soil variability, and the uncertainty regarding the attainment of steady state (i.e. constant infiltration rate). More recently, infiltration models and mathematical developments addressed the case of consecutive transient and steady states. Yet, one main problem remain. In the field, the operator is never sure about the state of water infiltration data. This paper present analytical formulations for the estimation of a transition time. We consider the model developed by Haverkamp et al. (1994) linking 1D infiltration flux to cumulative infiltration and related approximated expansions. An analytical method based on scaling is proposed to define transition time values in terms of both scaled cumulative infiltration and times. Dimensional times are then calculated for a large variety of soils and initial conditions. These time database can be considered as a relevant tool for the guidance for operators who conduct water infiltration experiments and wants to know when to stop and also for modelers who want to know how to select the data to fit transient or steady state models. Haverkamp, R., Ross, P. J., Smetten, K. R. J., Parlange, J. Y. (1994), Three-dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc infiltrometer: 2 Physically based infiltration equation. Water Resour. Res

  14. STEADY-STATE MODEL OF SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.

    2015-10-20

    In a recent paper, Kim et al. put forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The model assumed local equilibrium between the halo electrons, characterized by an intermediate energy range, and the whistler-range fluctuations. The basic wave–particle interaction is assumed to be the cyclotron resonance. Similarly, it was assumed that a dynamical steady state is established between the highly energetic superhalo electrons and high-frequency Langmuir fluctuations. Comparisons with the measured solar wind electron velocity distribution function (VDF) during quiet times were also made, and reasonable agreements were obtained. In such a model, however, only the steady-state solution for the Fokker–Planck type of electron particle kinetic equation was considered. The present paper complements the previous analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the model halo and superhalo electron VDFs, as well as the assumed wave intensity spectra for the whistler and Langmuir fluctuations, approximately satisfy the quasi-linear wave kinetic equations in an approximate sense, thus further validating the local equilibrium model constructed in the paper by Kim et al.

  15. Nonequilibrium Steady State Thermodynamics and Fluctuations for Stochastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tooru; Cohen, E. G. D.

    2008-02-01

    We use the work done on and the heat removed from a system to maintain it in a nonequilibrium steady state for a thermodynamic-like description of such a system as well as of its fluctuations. Based on an extended Onsager-Machlup theory for nonequilibrium steady states we indicate two ambiguities, not present in an equilibrium state, in defining such work and heat: one due to a non-uniqueness of time-reversal procedures and another due to multiple possibilities to separate heat into work and an energy difference in nonequilibrium steady states. As a consequence, for such systems, the work and heat satisfy multiple versions of the first and second laws of thermodynamics as well as of their fluctuation theorems. Unique laws and relations appear only to be obtainable for concretely defined systems, using physical arguments to choose the relevant physical quantities. This is illustrated on a number of systems, including a Brownian particle in an electric field, a driven torsion pendulum, electric circuits and an energy transfer driven by a temperature difference.

  16. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  17. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermin, Christophe; Rain, Pascal; Rowe, Stephen W.

    2006-02-01

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature Tg = 65 °C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm-1 with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above Tg, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below Tg, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm-1 have been measured.

  18. A unified theory of tokamak transport via the generalized Balescu--Lenard collision operator

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Duvall, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    A unified basis from which to study the transport of tokamaks at low collisionality is provided by specializing the ''generalized Balescu--Lenard'' collision operator to toridal geometry. Explicitly evaluating this operator, ripple, turbulent, and neoclassical transport coefficients are obtained, simply by further specializing the single operator to different particular classes of fluctuation wavelength and mode structure. For each class of fluctuations, the operator possesses a diffusive, test-particle contribution D, and in addition a dynamic drag term F, which makes the operator self-consistent, and whose presence is accordingly essential for the resultant fluxes to possess the appropriate conservation laws and symmetrics. These properties, well-known for axisymmetric transport, are demonstrated for one type of turbulent transport, chosen for definiteness, by explicit evaluation of both ''anomalous diffusion'' term arising from D, as well as the closely related test particle calculations, but is shown to have an important impact on the predicted fluxes. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Plasma-material Interaction Studies On Lithium And Lithiated Substrates During Compact Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.; Allain, J. P.; Hassanein, A.; Titov, V.; Hendricks, M.; Gray, T.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.

    2006-12-04

    The role of lithium on the modification of recycling regimes in fusion reactors has renewed interest of previous lithium supershot experiments carried out in TFTR. There is a need to understand the interaction between edge plasmas and lithiated plasma-facing components (PFCs), which have the potential of enabling fusion reactors to operate at low-recycling regimes. The Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility at Argonne National Laboratory is currently collaborating with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to conduct lithiated surface studies for the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) and the Current Drive eXperiment - Upgrade (CDX-U). IMPACT has the necessary tools to perform experiments that diagnose the surface dynamics of lithium thin films on metallic and non-metallic substrates, and can be monitored with multiple in-situ techniques (LEISS, AES, QMS and XPS) capturing real-time surface dynamics. Therefore, these techniques are available during He+ and D+ irradiation. Surface sputtering measurements can be performed using a quartz crystal microbalance -- dual crystal unit (QCM-DCU) with very high sensitivity.Initial results suggest that lithium intercalation into graphite occurs quite rapidly and only a fraction lithium can be kept on the surface. On metallic substrates this intercalation is absent. Additional results of Li/metal systems show lithium surface self-healing with temperature. It was also found that the presence of lithium seems to inhibit hydrocarbon formation during D+ bombardment of graphite. Experiments in CDX-U have tested the effect of both solid and liquid lithium PFCs on tokamak plasmas, and significant changes in tokamak operation are observed. These include a strong reduction in both recycling and impurity levels in the gas phase, lowered loop voltage during ohmic operation, and an increased electron temperature at the edge.

  20. Steady state thermal radiation analysis between the TOPAZ-II radiator and a heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Maveety, J.G.; Wold, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    In this study the authors investigate the feasibility and efficiency of coupling a single-pass heat exchanger to the TOPAZ-II space power system operating at steady state conditions. A first and second law analysis was performed in order to determine the optimal operating conditions which minimize the pumping power and maximize the flow exergy of the working fluid. The results of this study show that (1) the space power system is basically unaffected by the addition of this heat exchanger and (2) as much as 60% of the availability is destroyed by irreversibilities while operating at optimal flow conditions.

  1. The VERRUN and VERNAL software systems for steady-state visual evoked response experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two digital computer programs were developed for use in experiments involving steady-state visual evoked response (VER): VERRUN, whose primary functions are to generate a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus and to digitize and store electro-cortical response; and VERNAL, which provides both time- and frequency-domain metrics of the evoked response. These programs were coded in FORTRAN for operation on the PDP-11/34, using the RSX-11 Operating System, and the PDP-11/23, using the RT-11 Operating System. Users' and programmers' guides to these programs are provided, and guidelines for model analysis of VER data are suggested.

  2. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Listopad, A. A.; Mishagin, V. V.; Putvinsky, S. V.; Shulzhenko, G. I.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  3. Steady-state and transient analysis of a squeeze film damper bearing for rotor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, L. E.; Gunter, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the steady-state and transient response of the squeeze film damper bearing is presented. Both the steady-state and transient equations for the hydrodynamic bearing forces are derived. The bearing equivalent stiffness and damping coefficients are determined by steady-state equations. These coefficients are used to find the bearing configuration which will provide the optimum support characteristics based on a stability analysis of the rotor-bearing system. The transient analysis of rotor-bearing systems is performed by coupling the bearing and journal equations and integrating forward in time. The effects of unbalance, cavitation, and retainer springs are included in the analysis. Methods of determining the stability of a rotor-bearing system under the influence of aerodynamic forces and internal shaft friction are discussed with emphasis on solving the system characteristic frequency equation and on producing stability maps. It is shown that for optimum stability and low force transmissability the squeeze bearing should operate at an eccentricity ratio epsilon 0.4.

  4. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Listopad, A. A. Mishagin, V. V.; Shulzhenko, G. I.; Putvinsky, S. V.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB{sub 6} cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  5. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Belchenko, Yu I; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, I A; Kolmogorov, V V; Listopad, A A; Mishagin, V V; Putvinsky, S V; Shulzhenko, G I; Smirnov, A

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  6. Non-equilibrium steady states in the Klein-Gordon theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyon, Benjamin; Lucas, Andrew; Schalm, Koenraad; Bhaseen, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    We construct non-equilibrium steady states in the Klein-Gordon theory in arbitrary space dimension d following a local quench. We consider the approach where two independently thermalized semi-infinite systems, with temperatures {{T}L} and {{T}R}, are connected along a d-1-dimensional hypersurface. A current-carrying steady state, described by thermally distributed modes with temperatures {{T}L} and {{T}R} for left and right-moving modes, respectively, emerges at late times. The non-equilibrium density matrix is the exponential of a non-local conserved charge. We obtain exact results for the average energy current and the complete distribution of energy current fluctuations. The latter shows that the long-time energy transfer can be described by a continuum of independent Poisson processes, for which we provide the exact weights. We further describe the full time evolution of local observables following the quench. Averages of generic local observables, including the stress-energy tensor, approach the steady state with a power-law in time, where the exponent depends on the initial conditions at the connection hypersurface. We describe boundary conditions and special operators for which the steady state is reached instantaneously on the connection hypersurface. A semiclassical analysis of freely propagating modes yields the average energy current at large distances and late times. We conclude by comparing and contrasting our findings with results for interacting theories and provide an estimate for the timescale governing the crossover to hydrodynamics. As a modification of our Klein-Gordon analysis we also include exact results for free Dirac fermions.

  7. Experiments on steady state particle control in Tore Supra and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    Particle control is playing an increasingly important role in tokamak plasma performance. The present paper discusses particle control of hydrogen/deuterium by wall pumping on graphite or carbonized surfaces, as well as by external exhaust with pumped limiters and pumped divertors. Wall pumping is ultimately a transient effect and by itself not suitable for steady state particle exhaust. Therefore, external exhaust techniques with pumped divertors and limiters are being developed. How wall pumping phenomena interact and correlate with these inherently steady state, external exhaust techniques, is not well known to date. In the present paper, the processes involved in wall pumping and in external pumping are investigated in an attempt to evaluate the effect of external exhaust on wall pumping. Some of the key elements of this analysis are: (1) charge-exchange fluxes to the wall play a crucial role in the core-wall particle dynamics, (2) the recycling fluxes of thermal molecules have a high probability of ionization in the scrape-off layer, (3) thermal particles originating from the wall, which are ionized within the scrape-off layer, can be directly exhausted, thus providing a direct path between wall and exhaust which can be used to control the wall inventory. This way, the wall can be kept in a continuous pumping state in the sense that it continuously absorbs energetic particles and releases thermal molecules which are then removed by the external exhaust mechanism. While most of the ingredients of this analysis have been observed individually before, the present evaluation is an attempt to correlate effects of wall recycling and external exhaust.

  8. Power supplies and quench protection for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First plasma is scheduled for the year 2000. TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This is a new feature which requires not only a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes but also that ultra-reliable quench protection devices be used to rapidly discharge the stored energy from the magnets in the event of a quench. This paper describes the plan and basis for the adaptation and augmentation of the PPPL/TFTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Following a description of the basic operational requirements, four major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF power supply, the PF power supply, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems.

  9. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  10. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Jarzynski, C.

    2016-04-01

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters—also known as a stochastic pump (SP)—reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

  11. Fitting Boolean Networks from Steady State Perturbation Data

    PubMed Central

    Almudevar, Anthony; McCall, Matthew N; McMurray, Helene; Land, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Gene perturbation experiments are commonly used for the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. Typical experimental methodology imposes persistent changes on the network. The resulting data must therefore be interpreted as a steady state from an altered gene regulatory network, rather than a direct observation of the original network. In this article an implicit modeling methodology is proposed in which the unperturbed network of interest is scored by first modeling the persistent perturbation, then predicting the steady state, which may then be compared to the observed data. This results in a many-to-one inverse problem, so a computational Bayesian approach is used to assess model uncertainty. The methodology is first demonstrated on a number of synthetic networks. It is shown that the Bayesian approach correctly assigns high posterior probability to the network structure and steady state behavior. Further, it is demonstrated that where uncertainty of model features is indicated, the uncertainty may be accurately resolved with further perturbation experiments. The methodology is then applied to the modeling of a gene regulatory network using perturbation data from nine genes which have been shown to respond synergistically to known oncogenic mutations. A hypothetical model emerges which conforms to reported regulatory properties of these genes. Furthermore, the Bayesian methodology is shown to be consistent in the sense that multiple randomized applications of the fitting algorithm converge to an approximately common posterior density on the space of models. Such consistency is generally not feasible for algorithms which report only single models. We conclude that fully Bayesian methods, coupled with models which accurately account for experimental constraints, are a suitable tool for the inference of gene regulatory networks, in terms of accuracy, estimation of model uncertainty, and experimental design. PMID:23089817

  12. Determination of the steady-state behavior of immobilized. beta. -galactosidase utilizing an integral reactor scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.C.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Amundson, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of the steady-state behavior of immobilized ..beta..-galactosidase by integral reactor techniques has yielded a model which allows one to predict reactor performance under normal operating conditions. Values of the mechanistic rate constants for enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose were determined as a function of temperature by fitting the reactor model to experimental lactose conversion profiles. Use of this model along with the activity decay characteristics of the immobilized enzyme which have been presented in a previous publication could prove to be a useful tool in determining appropriate operating strategies for industrial applications of the immobilized enzyme catalyst. 18 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Open XXZ spin chain: nonequilibrium steady state and a strict bound on ballistic transport.

    PubMed

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2011-05-27

    An explicit matrix product ansatz is presented, in the first two orders in the (weak) coupling parameter, for the nonequilibrium steady state of the homogeneous, nearest neighbor Heisenberg XXZ spin 1/2 chain driven by Lindblad operators which act only at the edges of the chain. The first order of the density operator becomes, in the thermodynamic limit, an exact pseudolocal conservation law and yields-via the Mazur inequality-a rigorous lower bound on the high-temperature spin Drude weight. Such a Mazur bound is a nonvanishing fractal function of the anisotropy parameter Δ for |Δ|<1. PMID:21699339

  14. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  15. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  16. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  17. An automatic method for deriving steady-state rate equations.

    PubMed Central

    Cornish-Bowden, A

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for systematically deriving steady-state rate equations. It is based on the schematic method of King & Altman [J. Phys. Chem. (1956) 60, 1375-1378], but is expressed in purely algebraic terms. It is suitable for implementation as a computer program, and a program has been written in FORTRAN IV and deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50078 (12 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1977) 161, 1-2. PMID:889575

  18. New solution method for steady-state canopy structural loads

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.

    1986-08-01

    A new computer code has been written to perform structural analysis canopies. Although an existing code, CANO, has been available, the new code has better convergence reliability, is more understandably written, and is easier to use. The equations have been reformulated for the new solution method. The new code assumes a symmetric canopy, a steady-state condition, and no strength in the vertical direction. It computes the inflated shape, loads in the horizontal members, radial members, vent lines, and suspension lines, and total drag. Constructed geometry, material properties, dynamic pressure, and pressure distribution are required as input.

  19. Thermodynamic formalism and linear response theory for nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study the linear response in systems driven away from thermal equilibrium into a nonequilibrium steady state with nonvanishing entropy production rate. A simple derivation of a general response formula is presented under the condition that the generating function describes a transformation that (to lowest order) preserves normalization and thus describes a physical stochastic process. For Markov processes we explicitly construct the conjugate quantities and discuss their relation with known response formulas. Emphasis is put on the formal analogy with thermodynamic potentials and some consequences are discussed. PMID:27627270

  20. Paleoenvironmental evolution in a steady state foredeep, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S.; Castelltort, S.; Willett, S. D.; Mouthereau, F.; Lin, A. T.; Granjeon, D.; Kaus, B.

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of mountain ranges to steady state is an important concept in the study of the interrelationships between climate, mountain building and topography. The young and active Taiwan orogeny situated in the western pacific typhoon belt has often been regarded as the type locality of a steady state orogeny, and an ideal case study for tectonic and climatic geomorphology. One prediction of the steady-state theory applied to mountains is the attainment of a constant sediment flux. Our aim in the present study is to estimate the material flux out of the Taiwan orogeny through its evolution. To do so, we have studied the basin wide sedimentary facies distribution at five key stratigraphic horizons to construct detailed paleogeographic maps that include paleobathymetric information and sediment feeding systems. The maps highlight the complicated basin-wide dynamics of sediment dispersal within an evolving foreland basin. The basin physiography changed very little from the middle Miocene (around 12.5 Ma) to the late Pliocene (around 3 Ma); the paleoenvironments were essentially maintained from the passive margin to the foreland basin stage. At 3 Ma, during deposition of the mud-dominated Chinshui Shale, the main depositional basin started to widen and deepen. This clearly marks the increased subsidence associated with the approach of the growing orogen to the east. The basin started to become filled in the late early Pleistocene when a shallow marine wedge in front of the growing orogen initiated to propagate towards the south. We use Dionisos, a forward stratigraphic model, to simulate the evolution of the Taiwan foreland basin in terms of sediment flux (in and out of the basin) towards steady state. We constrain the model with our paleogeographic and sedimentary reconstructions. As an initial input data we utilize the paleoenvironmental maps and a primary sediment supply from the hinterland (topography). The model enables us to look at the long-term basin

  1. Linear modeling of steady-state behavioral dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Palya, William L; Walter, Donald; Kessel, Robert; Lucke, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The observed steady-state behavioral dynamics supported by unsignaled periods of reinforcement within repeating 2,000-s trials were modeled with a linear transfer function. These experiments employed improved schedule forms and analytical methods to improve the precision of the measured transfer function, compared to previous work. The refinements include both the use of multiple reinforcement periods that improve spectral coverage and averaging of independently determined transfer functions. A linear analysis was then used to predict behavior observed for three different test schedules. The fidelity of these predictions was determined. PMID:11831782

  2. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  3. Skewness of steady-state current fluctuations in nonequilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Roman; Cohen, E G D; Wong, Chun-Shang; Goree, John A; Feng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A skewness of the probability for instantaneous current fluctuations, in a nonequilibrium steady state, is observed experimentally in a dusty plasma. This skewness is attributed to the spatial asymmetry, which is imminent to the nonequilibrium systems due to the external hydrodynamic gradient. Using the modern framework of the large deviation theory, we extend the Onsager-Machlup ansatz for equilibrium fluctuations to systems with a preferred spatial direction, and provide a modulated Gaussian probability distribution, which is tested by simulations. This probability distribution is also of potential interest for other statistical disciplines. Connections with the principles of statistical mechanics, due to Boltzmann and Gibbs, are discussed as well. PMID:27176272

  4. Thermodynamic formalism and linear response theory for nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study the linear response in systems driven away from thermal equilibrium into a nonequilibrium steady state with nonvanishing entropy production rate. A simple derivation of a general response formula is presented under the condition that the generating function describes a transformation that (to lowest order) preserves normalization and thus describes a physical stochastic process. For Markov processes we explicitly construct the conjugate quantities and discuss their relation with known response formulas. Emphasis is put on the formal analogy with thermodynamic potentials and some consequences are discussed.

  5. Analysis of discrete bioregulatory networks using symbolic steady states.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Heike

    2011-04-01

    A discrete model of a biological regulatory network can be represented by a discrete function that contains all available information on interactions between network components and the rules governing the evolution of the network in a finite state space. Since the state space size grows exponentially with the number of network components, analysis of large networks is a complex problem. In this paper, we introduce the notion of symbolic steady state that allows us to identify subnetworks that govern the dynamics of the original network in some region of state space. We state rules to explicitly construct attractors of the system from subnetwork attractors. Using the results, we formulate sufficient conditions for the existence of multiple attractors resp. a cyclic attractor based on the existence of positive resp. negative feedback circuits in the graph representing the structure of the system. In addition, we discuss approaches to finding symbolic steady states. We focus both on dynamics derived via synchronous as well as asynchronous update rules. Lastly, we illustrate the results by analyzing a model of T helper cell differentiation.

  6. Steady-state flow properties of amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, Vikram; O'Connor, Thomas; Robbins, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the steady-state shear flow curves of a standard glass model: the bidisperse Lennard-Jones system. For a wide range of temperatures in the neighborhood of the glass transition temperature Tg predicted by the mode coupling theory, we compute the steady-state shear stress and viscosity as a function of the shear rate γ ˙. At temperatures near and above Tg, the stress crosses over from linear Newtonian behavior at low rates to power law shear-thinning at high rates. As T decreases below Tg, the stress shows a plateau, becoming nearly rate-independent at low γ ˙. There is a weak increase in stress that is consistent with Eyring theory for activated flow of a solid. We find that when the strain rate is reduced to extremely low values, Newtonian behavior appears once more. Insights gained from these simulations are applied to the computation of flow curves of a well-established boundary lubricant: squalane. In the elastohydrodynamic regime, squalane responds like a glassy solid with an Eyring-like response, but at low rates it has a relatively small Newtonian viscosity. Supported by the Army Research Laboratory under Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  7. Zeroth law and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for steady states in contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sayani; Pradhan, Punyabrata; Mohanty, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    We ask what happens when two nonequilibrium systems in steady state are kept in contact and allowed to exchange a quantity, say mass, which is conserved in the combined system. Will the systems eventually evolve to a new stationary state where a certain intensive thermodynamic variable, like equilibrium chemical potential, equalizes following the zeroth law of thermodynamics and, if so, under what conditions is it possible? We argue that an equilibriumlike thermodynamic structure can be extended to nonequilibrium steady states having short-ranged spatial correlations, provided that the systems interact weakly to exchange mass with rates satisfying a balance condition—reminiscent of a detailed balance condition in equilibrium. The short-ranged correlations would lead to subsystem factorization on a coarse-grained level and the balance condition ensures both equalization of an intensive thermodynamic variable as well as ensemble equivalence, which are crucial for construction of a well-defined nonequilibrium thermodynamics. This proposition is proved and demonstrated in various conserved-mass transport processes having nonzero spatial correlations.

  8. Drug Sanctuaries, Low Steady State Viral Loads and Viral Blips.

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.,; Callaway, D.; Pomerantz, R. J.; Chen, H. Y.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, David D.; Di Mascio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients on HAART for long periods of time obtain viral loads (VLs) below 50 copies/ml. Ultrasensitive VL assays show that some of these patients obtain a low steady state VL, while others continue to exhibit VL declines to below 5 copies/ml. Low steady states can be explained by two-compartment models that incorporate a drug sanctuary. Interestingly, when patients exhibit continued declines below 50 copies/ml the rate of decline has a half-life of {approx} 6 months, consistent with some estimates of the rate of latent cell decline. Some patients, despite having sustained undetectable VLs show periods of transient viremia (blips). I will present some statistical characterization of the blips observed in a set of 123 patients, suggesting that blips are generated largely by random processes, that blips tend to correspond to periods of a few weeks in which VLs are elevated, and that VL decay from the peak of a blip may have two-phases. Using new results suggesting that the viral burst size, N {approx} 5 x 10{sup 4}, we estimate the number of cells needed to produce a blip.

  9. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Adam; Vasilaki, Eleni; Beste, Christian; Gurney, Kevin; Humphries, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients. PMID:24478684

  10. Estimating instantaneous energetic cost during non-steady-state gait.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Jessica C; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory measures of oxygen and carbon dioxide are routinely used to estimate the body's steady-state metabolic energy use. However, slow mitochondrial dynamics, long transit times, complex respiratory control mechanisms, and high breath-by-breath variability obscure the relationship between the body's instantaneous energy demands (instantaneous energetic cost) and that measured from respiratory gases (measured energetic cost). The purpose of this study was to expand on traditional methods of assessing metabolic cost by estimating instantaneous energetic cost during non-steady-state conditions. To accomplish this goal, we first imposed known changes in energy use (input), while measuring the breath-by-breath response (output). We used these input/output relationships to model the body as a dynamic system that maps instantaneous to measured energetic cost. We found that a first-order linear differential equation well approximates transient energetic cost responses during gait. Across all subjects, model fits were parameterized by an average time constant (τ) of 42 ± 12 s with an average R(2) of 0.94 ± 0.05 (mean ± SD). Armed with this input/output model, we next tested whether we could use it to reliably estimate instantaneous energetic cost from breath-by-breath measures under conditions that simulated dynamically changing gait. A comparison of the imposed energetic cost profiles and our estimated instantaneous cost demonstrated a close correspondence, supporting the use of our methodology to study the role of energetics during locomotor adaptation and learning.

  11. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  12. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Adam; Vasilaki, Eleni; Beste, Christian; Gurney, Kevin; Humphries, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  13. Resolution enhanced T1-insensitive steady-state imaging.

    PubMed

    Derakhshan, Jamal J; Nour, Sherif G; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A; Duerk, Jeffrey L

    2012-08-01

    Resolution enhanced T(1)-insensitive steady-state imaging (RE-TOSSI) is a new MRI pulse sequence for the generation of rapid T(2) contrast with high spatial resolution. TOSSI provides T(2) contrast by using nonequally spaced inversion pulses throughout a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) acquisition. In RE-TOSSI, these energy and time intensive adiabatic inversion pulses and associated magnetization preparation are removed from TOSSI after acquisition of the data around the center of k-space. Magnetization evolution simulations demonstrate T(2) contrast in TOSSI as well as reduction in the widening of the point spread function width (by up to a factor of 4) to a near ideal case for RE-TOSSI. Phantom experimentation is used to characterize and compare the contrast and spatial resolution properties of TOSSI, RE-TOSSI, balanced SSFP, Half-Fourier Acquisition Single-Shot Turbo Spin Echo (HASTE), and turbo spin echo and to optimize the fraction of k-space acquired using TOSSI. Comparison images in the abdomen and brain demonstrate similar contrast and improved spatial resolution in RE-TOSSI compared with TOSSI; comparison balanced SSFP, HASTE, and turbo spin echo images are provided. RE-TOSSI is capable of providing high spatial resolution T(2)-weighted images in 1 s or less per image.

  14. Steady States and Universal Conductance in a Quenched Luttinger Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, Edwin; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Mastropietro, Vieri; Moosavi, Per

    2016-05-01

    We obtain exact analytical results for the evolution of a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger model prepared in a domain wall initial state, i.e., a state with different densities on its left and right sides. Such an initial state is modeled as the ground state of a translation invariant Luttinger Hamiltonian {H_{λ}} with short range non-local interaction and different chemical potentials to the left and right of the origin. The system evolves for time t > 0 via a Hamiltonian {H_{λ'}} which differs from {H_{λ}} by the strength of the interaction. Asymptotically in time, as {t to &infty}; , after taking the thermodynamic limit, the system approaches a translation invariant steady state. This final steady state carries a current I and has an effective chemical potential difference {μ+ - μ-} between right- (+) and left- (-) moving fermions obtained from the two-point correlation function. Both I and {μ+ - μ-} depend on {λ} and {λ'} . Only for the case {λ = λ' = 0} does {μ+ - μ-} equal the difference in the initial left and right chemical potentials. Nevertheless, the Landauer conductance for the final state, {G = I/(μ+ - μ-)} , has a universal value equal to the conductance quantum {e^2/h} for the spinless case.

  15. Steady State Erosion of Granular Particles by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-11-01

    Despite decades of scientific observation of rivers, streams and laboratory experiments the process of erosion still is not understood. Empirical fits are used to determine when erosion starts with more than an order of magnitude scatter or a shifting power law determining how much material erodes away. In order to study the many body problem of multiple particles we first need to understand the basics of a single particle eroding from a potential well in laminar flow. Using different particle densities and different barrier heights we looked at the onset of erosion and the balance of forces and torques to create a predictive model of when a single particle will erode over a barrier of a given height as a function of shear rate and viscosity. We then create a steady state system in which to image erosion as it happens and simultaneously measure flow velocity and particle movement. Measuring particle movement allows us to determine when steady state erosion occurs and calculate the fluxes and slip velocities at the beginning of the erosion process as we transition from rolling particles to particles suspended in the fluid flow. NSF Grant Number CBET 1335928.

  16. Steady-State ALPS for Real-Valued Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    The two objectives of this paper are to describe a steady-state version of the Age-Layered Population Structure (ALPS) Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and to compare it against other GAs on real-valued problems. Motivation for this work comes from our previous success in demonstrating that a generational version of ALPS greatly improves search performance on a Genetic Programming problem. In making steady-state ALPS some modifications were made to the method for calculating age and the method for moving individuals up layers. To demonstrate that ALPS works well on real-valued problems we compare it against CMA-ES and Differential Evolution (DE) on five challenging, real-valued functions and on one real-world problem. While CMA-ES and DE outperform ALPS on the two unimodal test functions, ALPS is much better on the three multimodal test problems and on the real-world problem. Further examination shows that, unlike the other GAs, ALPS maintains a genotypically diverse population throughout the entire search process. These findings strongly suggest that the ALPS paradigm is better able to avoid premature convergence then the other GAs.

  17. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I; Provan, G; Nasheuer, H P

    2010-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in Escherichia coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis.

  18. Characterization of the Radiation Environment During and Following Operation of the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riso, Victoria; Pace, D. C.; Cooper, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A survey of the gamma ray spectrum throughout the machine hall of the DIII-D tokamak provides a detailed mapping of its energy and temporal evolution. Engineering issues related to the structural effects of radiation produced by a fusion power plant will significantly affect the cost-effectiveness of the resulting energy. While existing magnetic confinement facilities produce considerably less neutron and gamma radiation than that expected from a power plant-scale facility, it remains useful to examine the latent gamma spectrum of the surrounding structures. The DIII-D tokamak produces ~1016 neutrons per run day (resulting primarily from beam-target DD fusion), with ~75 run days per year, leading to the activation of support structures with a short half-life. Measurements are made using bismuth germinate scintillator detectors operated in pulse height analysis mode. These detectors are placed throughout the machine hall and acquire gamma data both during experiments and for some time afterward. Results of these surveys from the 2015 experiments will be presented. Supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. Stabilization of unstable steady states of a continuous stirred tank bioreactor with predator-prey kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tabiś, Bolesław; Skoneczny, Szymon

    2013-07-20

    Nonlinear properties of a bioreactor with a developed microbiological predator-prey food chain are discussed. The presence of the predator microorganism completely changes the position and stability of the stationary states. A wide range of unstable steady states appears, associated with high amplitude oscillations of the state variables. Without automatic control such a system can only operate in transient states, with the yield undergoing periodic changes following the dynamics of the stable limit cycle. Technologically, this is undesirable. It has been shown that the oscillations can be removed by employing continuous P or PI controllers. Moreover, with a PI-controller, the predator can be eliminated from the system.

  20. Catalytic honeycomb combustor - Steady-state model and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A steady-state lean combustion model for monolithic catalytic combustors is given. The model, consisting of several semi-global chemical reaction steps in the gas-phase and on the surface, is capable of analyzing CO and THC emissions. In the model computation presented, the influence of operating and design parameters on the minimum combustor length is studied. Special attention is given to the effect of after-bed gas-phase reaction space. Comparison with experimental data indicates good agreement in the range of parameters covered.

  1. Feedback-assisted extension of the tokamak operating space to low safety factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J. M. Bialek, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Shiraki, D.; Turco, F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Recent DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments have demonstrated stable tokamak operation at very low values of the edge safety factor q(a) near and below 2. The onset of n = 1 resistive wall mode (RWM) kink instabilities leads to a disruptive stability limit, encountered at q(a) = 2 (limiter plasmas) and q{sub 95} = 2 (divertor plasmas). However, passively stable operation can be attained for q(a) and q{sub 95} values as low as 2.2. RWM damping in the q(a) = 2 regime was measured using active MHD spectroscopy. Although consistent with theoretical predictions, the amplitude of the damped response does not increase significantly as the q(a) = 2 limit is approached, in contrast with damping measurements made approaching the pressure-driven RWM limit. Applying proportional gain magnetic feedback control of the n = 1 modes has resulted in stabilized operation with q{sub 95} values reaching as low as 1.9 in DIII-D and q(a) reaching 1.55 in RFX-mod. In addition to being consistent with the q(a) = 2 external kink mode stability limit, the unstable modes have growth rates on the order of the characteristic wall eddy-current decay timescale in both devices, and a dominant m = 2 poloidal structure that is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The experiments contribute to validating MHD stability theory and demonstrate that a key tokamak stability limit can be overcome with feedback.

  2. Building steady-state simulators via hierarchical feedback decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rouquette, N.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, compositional modeling and self-explanatory simulation techniques have simplified the process of building dynamic simulators of physical systems. Building steady-state simulators is, conceptually, a simpler task consisting in solving a set algebraic equations. This simplicity hides delicate technical issues of convergence and search-space size due to the potentially large number of unknown parameters. We present an automated technique for reducing the dimensionality of the problem by (1) automatically identifying feedback loops (a generally NP-complete problem), (2) hierarchically decomposing the set of equations in terms of feedback loops, and (3) structuring a simulator where equations are solved either serially without search or in isolation within a feedback loop. This paper describes the key algorithms and the results of their implementation on building simulators for a two-phase evaporator loop system across multiple combinations of causal and non-causal approximations.

  3. Thermodynamics and phase coexistence in nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    I review recent work focussing on whether thermodynamics can be extended to nonequilibrium steady states (NESS), in particular, the possibility of consistent definitions of temperature T and chemical potential μ for NESS. The testing-grounds are simple lattice models with stochastic dynamics. Each model includes a drive that maintains the system far from equilibrium, provoking particle and/or energy flows; for zero drive the system relaxes to equilibrium. Analysis and numerical simulation show that for spatially uniform NESS, consistent definitions of T and μ are possible via coexistence with an appropriate reservoir, if (and in general only if) a particular kind of rate (that proposed by Sasa and Tasaki) is used for exchanges of particles and energy between systems. The program fails, however, for nonuniform systems. The functions T and μ describing isolated phases cannot be used to predict the properties of coexisting phases in a single, phase-separated system.

  4. Steady-State Density Functional Theory for Finite Bias Conductances.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, G; Kurth, S

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of density functional theory, a formalism to describe electronic transport in the steady state is proposed which uses the density on the junction and the steady current as basic variables. We prove that, in a finite window around zero bias, there is a one-to-one map between the basic variables and both local potential on as well as bias across the junction. The resulting Kohn-Sham system features two exchange-correlation (xc) potentials, a local xc potential, and an xc contribution to the bias. For weakly coupled junctions the xc potentials exhibit steps in the density-current plane which are shown to be crucial to describe the Coulomb blockade diamonds. At small currents these steps emerge as the equilibrium xc discontinuity bifurcates. The formalism is applied to a model benzene junction, finding perfect agreement with the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade. PMID:26571349

  5. Steady-state plasma transition in the Venus ionosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Intriligator, D. S.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1991-02-01

    The results of an extended analysis of the plasma and electric field data of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are presented. The persistent presence of a plasma transition embedded in the flanks of the Venus ionosheath between the bow shock and the ionopause is reported. This transition is identified by the repeated presence of characteristic bursts in the 30 kHz channel of the electric field detector of the PVO. The observed electric field signals coincide with the onset of different plasma conditions in the inner ionosheath where more rarified plasma fluxes are measured. The repeated identification of this intermediate ionosheath transition in the PVO data indicates that it is present as a steady state feature of the Venus plasma environment. The distribution of PVO orbits in which the transition is observed suggests that it is more favorably detected in the vicinity of and downstream from the terminator.

  6. Steady-State Density Functional Theory for Finite Bias Conductances.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, G; Kurth, S

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of density functional theory, a formalism to describe electronic transport in the steady state is proposed which uses the density on the junction and the steady current as basic variables. We prove that, in a finite window around zero bias, there is a one-to-one map between the basic variables and both local potential on as well as bias across the junction. The resulting Kohn-Sham system features two exchange-correlation (xc) potentials, a local xc potential, and an xc contribution to the bias. For weakly coupled junctions the xc potentials exhibit steps in the density-current plane which are shown to be crucial to describe the Coulomb blockade diamonds. At small currents these steps emerge as the equilibrium xc discontinuity bifurcates. The formalism is applied to a model benzene junction, finding perfect agreement with the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade.

  7. Taylor dispersion in equilibrium gradient focusing at steady state.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Cornelius F

    2015-03-01

    An analytic expression is presented for the effective dispersion coefficient in the case where a solute is focused in a parabolic flow against a linear gradient in a restoring force. This expression was derived by employing a minor variation on the method of moments used by Aris in his development of the dispersion coefficients for a time-dependent, isocratic system. In the present case, dispersion is controlled by two dimensionless groups, a Peclet number which is proportional to the parabolic component of the flow, and a gradient number which is proportional to the slope of the restoring force. These results confirm that the Aris-Taylor expression for the dispersion coefficient should not be applied in cases where a solute is focused to a stationary steady state.

  8. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's. PMID:27575115

  9. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  10. [Auditory steady-state responses--the state of art].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Anna; Gryczyński, Maciej; Pajor, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) is quite a new method of electrophysiological threshold estimation with no clinical standards. It was the aim of this study to review practical and theoretical thesis of ASSR and mention recent recommendations and achievements of this technique. The most common application of ASSR is diagnosis of hearing loss in children together with ABR test. In this paper we mentioned information about influence of physiological factors (age, sex, state of arousal, handedness) and type of recording technique (electrodes placement, air and bone stimulation, occlusion effect, amplitude and frequency stimulation, multiple or single frequency stimulation, dichotic and monotic recording technique and type of hearing loss) on ASSR. We conclude that putting ASSR in clinical use as an standardized method it is necessary to do research with numerous groups of patients using the same equipment and parameters of tests. PMID:21166136

  11. Locating CVBEM collocation points for steady state heat transfer problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method or CVBEM provides a highly accurate means of developing numerical solutions to steady state two-dimensional heat transfer problems. The numerical approach exactly solves the Laplace equation and satisfies the boundary conditions at specified points on the boundary by means of collocation. The accuracy of the approximation depends upon the nodal point distribution specified by the numerical analyst. In order to develop subsequent, refined approximation functions, four techniques for selecting additional collocation points are presented. The techniques are compared as to the governing theory, representation of the error of approximation on the problem boundary, the computational costs, and the ease of use by the numerical analyst. ?? 1985.

  12. Waveguides formed by quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial solitons.

    PubMed

    Morin, M; Duree, G; Salamo, G; Segev, M

    1995-10-15

    We show that a quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial soliton forms a waveguide structure in the bulk of a photorefractive material. Although the optically induced waveguide is formed by a very low-power (microwatts) soliton beam, it can guide a powerful (watt) beam of a longer wavelength at which the medium is nonphotosensitive. Furthermore, the waveguide survives, either in the dark or when guiding the longerwavelength beam, for a long time after the soliton beam is turned off. We take advantage of the solitons' property of evolution from a relatively broad input beam into a narrow channel and show that the soliton induces a tapered waveguide (an optical funnel) that improves the coupling efficiency of light into the waveguiding structure.

  13. Steady-state cracks in viscoelastic lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A.; Levine, H.

    1999-05-01

    We study the steady-state motion of mode III cracks propagating on a lattice exhibiting viscoelastic dynamics. The introduction of a Kelvin viscosity {eta} allows for a direct comparison between lattice results and continuum treatments. Utilizing both numerical and analytical (Wiener-Hopf) techniques, we explore this comparison as a function of the driving displacement {Delta} and the number of transverse rows {ital N}. At any {ital N}, the continuum theory misses the lattice-trapping phenomenon; this is well known, but the introduction of {eta} introduces some new twists. More importantly, for large {ital N} even at large {Delta}, the standard two-dimensional elastodynamics approach completely misses the {eta}-dependent velocity selection, as this selection disappears completely in the leading order naive continuum limit of the lattice problem. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Interpolation of steady-state concentration data by inverse modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Ronnie L; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2010-01-01

    In most groundwater applications, measurements of concentration are limited in number and sparsely distributed within the domain of interest. Therefore, interpolation techniques are needed to obtain most likely values of concentration at locations where no measurements are available. For further processing, for example, in environmental risk analysis, interpolated values should be given with uncertainty bounds, so that a geostatistical framework is preferable. Linear interpolation of steady-state concentration measurements is problematic because the dependence of concentration on the primary uncertain material property, the hydraulic conductivity field, is highly nonlinear, suggesting that the statistical interrelationship between concentration values at different points is also nonlinear. We suggest interpolating steady-state concentration measurements by conditioning an ensemble of the underlying log-conductivity field on the available hydrological data in a conditional Monte Carlo approach. Flow and transport simulations for each conditional conductivity field must meet the measurements within their given uncertainty. The ensemble of transport simulations based on the conditional log-conductivity fields yields conditional statistical distributions of concentration at points between observation points. This method implicitly meets physical bounds of concentration values and non-Gaussianity of their statistical distributions and obeys the nonlinearity of the underlying processes. We validate our method by artificial test cases and compare the results to kriging estimates assuming different conditional statistical distributions of concentration. Assuming a beta distribution in kriging leads to estimates of concentration with zero probability of concentrations below zero or above the maximal possible value; however, the concentrations are not forced to meet the advection-dispersion equation.

  15. A mathematical model of pan evaporation under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wee Ho; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of changing climate, global pan evaporation records have shown a spatially-averaged trend of ∼ -2 to ∼ -3 mm a-2 over the past 30-50 years. This global phenomenon has motivated the development of the "PenPan" model (Rotstayn et al., 2006). However, the original PenPan model has yet to receive an independent experimental evaluation. Hence, we constructed an instrumented US Class A pan at Canberra Airport (Australia) and monitored it over a three-year period (2007-2010) to uncover the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. The experimental investigations of pan evaporation enabled theoretical formulation and parameterisation of the aerodynamic function considering the wind, properties of air and (with or without) the bird guard effect. The energy balance investigation allowed for detailed formulation of the short- and long-wave radiation associated with the albedos and the emissivities of the pan water surface and the pan wall. Here, we synthesise and generalise those earlier works to develop a new model called the "PenPan-V2" model for application under steady state conditions (i.e., uses a monthly time step). Two versions (PenPan-V2C and PenPan-V2S) are tested using pan evaporation data available across the Australian continent. Both versions outperformed the original PenPan model with better representation of both the evaporation rate and the underlying physics of a US Class A pan. The results show the improved solar geometry related calculations (e.g., albedo, area) for the pan system led to a clear improvement in representing the seasonal cycle of pan evaporation. For general applications, the PenPan-V2S is simpler and suited for applications including an evaluation of long-term trends in pan evaporation.

  16. Electrically Evoked Auditory Steady State Responses in Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Auditory steady state responses are neural potentials in response to repeated auditory stimuli. This study shows that electrically evoked auditory steady state responses (EASSRs) to low-rate pulse trains can be reliably recorded by electrodes placed on the scalp of a cochlear implant (CI) user and separated from the artifacts generated by the electrical stimulation. Response properties are described, and the predictive value of EASSRs for behaviorally hearing thresholds is analyzed. For six users of a Cochlear Nucleus CI, EASSRs to symmetric biphasic pulse trains with rates between 35 and 47 Hz were recorded with seven scalp electrodes. The influence of various stimulus parameters was assessed: pulse rate, stimulus intensity, monopolar or bipolar stimulation mode, and presentation of either one pulse train on one electrode or interleaved pulse trains with different pulse rates on multiple electrodes. To compensate for the electrical artifacts caused by the stimulus pulses and radio frequency transmission, different methods of artifact reduction were employed. The validity of the recorded responses was confirmed by recording on–off responses, determination of response latency across the measured pulse rates, and comparison of amplitude growth of stimulus artifact and response amplitude. For stimulation in the 40 Hz range, response latencies of 35.6 ms (SD = 5.3 ms) were obtained. Responses to multiple simultaneous stimuli on different electrodes can be evoked, and the electrophysiological thresholds determined from EASSR amplitude growth in the 40 Hz range correlate well with behaviorally determined threshold levels for pulse rates of 41 Hz. PMID:20033246

  17. Equatorial ground ice on Mars: Steady-state stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellon, Michael T.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Postawko, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Current Martian equatorial surface temperatures are too warm for water ice to exist at the surface for any appreciable length of time before subliming into the atmosphere. Subsurface temperatures are generally warmer still and, despite the presence of a diffusive barrier of porous regolith material, it has been shown by Smoluchowski, Clifford and Hillel, and Fanale et al. that buried ground ice will also sublime and be lost to the atmosphere in a relatively short time. We investigate the behavior of this subliming subsurface ice and show that it is possible for ice to maintain at a steady-state depth, where sublimation and diffusive loss to the atmosphere is balanced by resupply from beneath by diffusion and recondensation of either a deeper buried ice deposits or ground water. We examine the behavior of equatorial ground ice with a numercial time-marching molecular diffusion model. In our model we allow for diffusion of water vapor through a porous regolith, variations in diffusivity and porosity with ice content, and recondensation of sublimed water vapor. A regolith containing considerable amounts of ice can still be very porous, allowing water vapor to diffuse up from deeper within the ice layer where temperatures are warmer due to the geothermal gradient. This vapor can then recondense nearer to the surface where ice had previously sublimed and been lost to the atmosphere. As a result we find that ice deposits migrate to find a steady-state depth, which represents a balance between diffusive loss to the atmosphere through the overlying porous regolith and diffusive resupply through a porous icy regolith below. This depth depends primarily on the long-term mean surface temperature and the nature of the geothermal gradient, and is independent of the ice-free porosity and the regolith diffusivity. Only the rate of loss of ground ice depends on diffusive properties.

  18. Son of IXION: A Steady State Centrifugally Confined Plasma for Fusion*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassam, Adil

    1996-11-01

    A magnetic confinement scheme in which the inertial, u.grad(u), forces effect parallel confinement is proposed. The basic geometry is mirror-like as far as the poloidal field goes or, more simply, multipole (FM-1) type. The rotation is toroidal in this geometry. A supersonic rotation can effect complete parallel confinement, with the usual magnetic mirror force rendered irrelevant. The rotation shear, in addition, aids in the suppression of the flute mode. This suppression is not complete which indicates the addition of a toroidal field, at maximum of the order of the poloidal field. We show that at rotation in excess of Mach 3, the parallel particle and heat losses can be minimized to below the Lawson breakeven point. The crossfield transport can be expected to be better than tokamaks on account of the large velocity shear. Other advantages of the scheme are that it is steady state and disruption free. An exploratory experiment that tests equilibrium, parallel detachment, and MHD stability is proposed. The concept resembles earlier (Geneva, 1958) experiments on "homopolar generators" and a mirror configuration called IXION. Ixion, Greek mythological king, was forever strapped to a rotating, flaming wheel. *Work supported by DOE

  19. Steady-state dynamic behavior of an auxiliary bearing supported rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Lawrence, Charles

    1995-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping is studied. It is found that imbalance may change the rotor responses dramatically in terms of frequency contents at certain operating speeds. Subharmonic responses of 2nd order through 10th order are all observed except the 9th order. Chaotic phenomenon is also observed. Jump phenomena (or double-valued responses) of both hard-spring type and soft-spring type are shown to occur at low operating speeds for systems with low auxiliary bearing damping or large clearance even with relatively small imbalance. The effect of friction between the shaft and the inner race of the bearing is also discussed.

  20. Improved operating scenarios of the DIII-D tokamak as a result of the addition of UNIX computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henline, P.A.

    1995-10-01

    The increased use of UNIX based computer systems for machine control, data handling and analysis has greatly enhanced the operating scenarios and operating efficiency of the DRI-D tokamak. This paper will describe some of these UNIX systems and their specific uses. These include the plasma control system, the electron cyclotron heating control system, the analysis of electron temperature and density measurements and the general data acquisition system (which is collecting over 130 Mbytes of data). The speed and total capability of these systems has dramatically affected the ability to operate DIII-D. The improved operating scenarios include better plasma shape control due to the more thorough MHD calculations done between shots and the new ability to see the time dependence of profile data as it relates across different spatial locations in the tokamak. Other analysis which engenders improved operating abilities will be described.

  1. Chemostat-cultivated Escherichia coli at high dilution rate: multiple steady states and drift.

    PubMed

    Majewski, R A; Domach, M M

    1990-06-20

    The representation of metabolic network reaction kinetics in a scaled, polynomial form can allow for the prediction of multiple steady states. The polynomial formalism is used to study chemostat-cultured Escherichia coli which has been observed to exhibit two multiple steady states under ammonium ion-limited growth conditions: a high cell density-low ammonium ion concentration steady state and a low cell density-high ammonium ion concentration steady state. Additionally, the low-cell-density steady state has been observed to drift to the high-cell-density steady state. Inspection of the steady-state rate expressions for the ammonium ion transport/assimilation network (in polynomial form) suggests that at low ammonium ion concentrations, two steady states are possible. One corresponds to heavy use of the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GLNS-GS) branch and the second to heavy use of the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) branch. Realization of the predicted intracellular steady states is also found to be dependent on the parameters of the transport process. Moreover, the two steady states differ in where their energy intensity lies. To explain the drift, GLNS, which is inducible under low ammonium ion concentrations, is suggested to be a "memory element." A chemostat-based model is developed to illustrate that perturbations in dilution rate can lead to drift between the two steady states provided that the disturbance in dilution rate is sufficiently large and/or long in duration.

  2. Ignition and steady-state current drive capability of INTOR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The confinement capability of the INTOR plasma for achieving ignition and noninductively driven, Q>5 steady-state operation has been assessed for various energy confinement scaling laws and current drive schemes by using a global power balance model. Plasma operation contours are used to illustrate the boundaries of the operating regimes in density-temperature (n-T) space. Results of the analysis indicate a very restricted capability (if any) for ignition and a limited flexibility in driven modes of operation in the INTOR (8-MA) design. Nearly a factor of two increase in plasma current (through stronger plasma shaping) could improve the feasibility of ignition in INTOR. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  4. Cyclic steady state performance of adsorption chiller with low regeneration temperature zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Mr. Suxin; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Hwang, Dr. Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Chun, Mr. Ho-Hwan

    2013-10-01

    Adsorption chillers are capable of utilizing inexpensive or free low grade thermal energy such as waste heat and concentrated solar thermal energy. Recently developed low regeneration temperature working pairs allow adsorption chillers to be driven by even lower temperature sources such as engine coolant and flat plate solar collectors. In this work, synthetic zeolite/water was implemented into a 3kW adsorption chiller test facility driven by hot water at 70 C. The zeolite was coated onto two fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with heat recovery employed between the two. Cyclic steady state parametric studies were experimentally conducted to evaluate the chiller's performance, resulting in a cooling coefficient of performance (COP) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 at different operating conditions. Its performance was compared with published values for other low regeneration temperature working pairs. The physical limitations of the synthetic zeolite revealed by parametric study results were then discussed. A novel operating control strategy was proposed based on the unique characteristics of synthetic zeolite. In addition, a physics-based COP prediction model was derived to predict the performance of the chiller under equilibrium loading, and was validated by the experiment results. This analytical expression can be used to estimate the cyclic steady state performance for future studies.

  5. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  6. Heat Deposition and Heat Removal in the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael Lee

    1990-01-01

    Energy transfer processes in a steady-state tokamak are examined both theoretically and experimentally in order to determine the patterns of plasma heat deposition to material surfaces and the methods of heat removal. Heat transfer experiments involving actively cooled limiters and heat flux probes were performed in the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT). The simple exponential model of plasma power deposition was extended to describe the global heat deposition to the first wall of a steady-state tokamak. The heat flux distribution in CCT was determined from measurements of heat flow to 32 large-area water-cooled Faraday shield panels. Significant toroidal and poloidal asymmetries were observed, with the maximum heat fluxes tending to fall on the lower outside panels. Heat deposition to the water-cooled guard limiters of an ion Bernstein wave antenna in CCT was measured during steady-state operation. Very strong asymmetries were observed. The heat distribution varied greatly with magnetic field. Copper heat flux sensors incorporating internal thermocouples were developed to measure plasma power deposition to exterior probe surfaces and heat removal from water -cooled interior surfaces. The resulting inverse heat conduction problem was solved using the function specification method. Cooling by an impinging liquid jet was investigated. One end of a cylindrical copper heat flux sensor was heated by a DC electrical arc and the other end was cooled by a low velocity water jet at 1 atm. Critical heat flux (CHF) values for the 55-80 ^circC sub-cooled free jets were typically 2.5 times published values for saturated free jets. For constrained jets, CHF values were about 20% lower. Heat deposition and heat removal in thick (3/4 inch diameter) cylindrical metal probes (SS304 or copper) inserted into a steady-state tokamak plasma were measured for a broad range of heat loads. The probes were cooled internally by a constrained jet of either air or water. Steady -state heat

  7. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, B.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard

    1997-01-10

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  9. Low-Aspect Tokamak Start-Up and Operational Current Limits in Cdx-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Theodore George

    1995-01-01

    A new, small, low-aspect-ratio tokamak (LART), named the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), has been designed and built for the investigation and development of the LART configuration, as well as for the investigation of novel current drive methods. Recently, an inductive ohmic heating and current drive (OH) system, including a compact high-field OH transformer coil, was designed and installed in CDX-U, enabling the study of LART plasmas with higher plasma currents and temperatures. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) was used in CDX-U to assist plasma breakdown, allowing breakdown with low initial induced voltage. Plasma start-up was achieved with transmitted ECH power of approximately l% of the maximum coupled OH power, at loop voltages as low as 1 Volt, and in toroidal magnetic fields ranging by a factor of 2.5 in strength. The reduction in loop voltage necessary for start-up minimized large, induced eddy currents in the toroidally continuous vessel walls common to LARTs. Plasma start-up and control in the presence of these significant vessel eddy currents was demonstrated, an important achievement for LART operation. Calculated ohmic efficiency, in terms of the Ejima coefficient. C_{E} , compared favorably with that found in other tokamaks, yielding C_{E} >=q 0.3-0.4. An operational current limit was found during extensive CDX-U ohmic operation, corresponding to an MHD safety factor, q(a), of approximately 3.5, a new low demonstrated q-limit for an aspect ratio, A, of 1.6. Studies of magnetic fluctuations in a range of plasma current from 15 kA to 40 kA revealed a coherent, saturating, 10-15 kHz frequency mode, with a toroidal mode number of n = l and a poloidol mode number ranging from m = 1 to m = 3. Numerical stability analysis of a magnetic reconstruction of a typical discharge exhibiting this mode indicated ideal stability. Previous studies of this mode at the lower plasma currents showed the amplitude increasing dramatically as the safety

  10. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER-II)) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-D transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability. 23 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Critical Concavity of a Drainage Basin for Steady-State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Jongmin; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal profiles of natural streams are known to show concave forms. Saying A as drainage area, channel gradient S can be expressed as the power-law, S≈A-θ (Flint, 1974), which is one of the scale-invariant features of drainage basin. According to literature, θ of most natural streams falls into a narrow range (0.4 < θ < 0.7) (Tucker and Whipple, 2002). It leads to fundamental questions: 'Why does θ falls into such narrow range?' and 'How is this related with other power-law scaling relationships reported in natural drainage basins?' To answer above questions, we analytically derive θ for a steady-state drainage basin following Lane's equilibrium (Lane, 1955) throughout the corridor and named this specific case as the 'critical concavity'. In the derivation, sediment transport capacity is estimated by unit stream power model (Yang, 1976), yielding a power function of upstream area. Stability of channel at a local point occurs when incoming flux equals outgoing flux at the point. Therefore, given the drainage at steady-state where all channel beds are stable, the exponent of the power function should be zero. From this, we can determine the critical concavity. Considering ranges of variables associated in this derivation, critical concavity cannot be resolved as a single definite value, rather a range of critical concavity is suggested. This range well agrees with the widely reported range of θ (0.4 < θ < 0.7) in natural streams. In this theoretical study, inter-relationships between power-laws such as hydraulic geometry (Leopold and Maddock, 1953), dominant discharge-drainage area (Knighton et al., 1999), and concavity, are coupled into the power-law framework of stream power sediment transport model. This allows us to explore close relationships between their power-law exponents: their relative roles and sensitivity. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Flint, J. J., 1974, Stream gradient as a function of order, magnitude

  12. PSGL-1 function in immunity and steady state homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Gossens, Klaus; Naus, Silvia; Veerman, Krystle M; Seo, Wooseok; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2009-07-01

    The substantial importance of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) in leukocyte trafficking has continued to emerge beyond its initial identification as a selectin ligand. PSGL-1 seemed to be a relatively simple molecule with an extracellular mucin domain extended as a flexible rod, teleologically consistent with its primary role in tethering leukocytes to endothelial selectins. The rolling interaction between leukocyte and endothelium mediated by this selectin-PSGL-1 interaction requires branched O-glycan extensions on specific PSGL-1 amino acid residues. In some cells, such as neutrophils, the glycosyltransferases involved in formation of the O-glycans are constitutively expressed, while in other cells, such as T cells, they are expressed only after appropriate activation. Thus, PSGL-1 supports leukocyte recruitment in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. A complex array of amino acids within the selectins engage multiple sugar residues of the branched O-glycans on PSGL-1 and provide the molecular interactions responsible for the velcro-like catch bonds that support leukocyte rolling. Such binding of PSGL-1 can also induce signaling events that influence cell phenotype and function. Scrutiny of PSGL-1 has revealed a better understanding of how it performs as a selectin ligand and yielded unexpected insights that extend its scope from supporting leukocyte rolling in inflammatory settings to homeostasis including stem cell homing to the thymus and mature T-cell homing to secondary lymphoid organs. PSGL-1 has been found to bind homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and to support the chemotactic response to these chemokines. Surprisingly, the O-glycan modifications of PSGL-1 that support rolling mediated by selectins in inflammatory conditions interfere with PSGL-1 binding to homeostatic chemokines and thereby limit responsiveness to the chemotactic cues used in steady state T-cell traffic. The multi-level influence of PSGL-1 on cell traffic

  13. Mantle Sulfur Cycle: A Case for Non-Steady State ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, Pierre; Labidi, Jabrane

    2016-04-01

    Data published over the last 5 years show that the early inference that mantle is isotopically homogeneous is no more valid. Instead, new generation data on lavas range over a significant 34S/32S variability of up to 5‰ with δ 34S values often correlated to Sr- and Nd-isotope compositions. This new set of data also reveals the Earth's mantle to have a sub-chondritic 34S/32S ratio, by about ˜ 1‰. We will present at the conference our published and unpublished data on samples characterizing the different mantle components (i.e. EM1, EM2, HIMU and LOMU). All illustrate 34S-enrichments compared to MORB with Δ 33S and Δ 36S values indistinguishable from CDT or chondrites at the 0.03‰ level. These data are consistent with the recycling of subducted components carrying sulfur with Δ 33S and Δ 36S-values close to zero. Archean rocks commonly display Δ 33S and Δ 36S values deviating from zero by 1 to 10 ‰. The lack of variations for Δ 33S and Δ 36S values in present day lava argue against the sampling of any subducted protolith of Archean age in their mantle source. Instead, our data are consistent with the occurrence of Proterozoic subducted sulfur in the source of the EM1, EM2, LOMU and HIMU endmember at the St-Helena island. This is in agreement with the age of those components early derived through the use of the Pb isotope systematic. Currently, the negative δ 34S-values of the depleted mantle seem to be associated with mostly positive values of enriched components. This would be inconsistent with the concept a steady state of sulfur. Assuming that the overall observations of recycled sulfur are not biased, the origin of such a non-steady state remains unclear. It could be related to the relatively compatible behavior of sulfur during partial melting, as the residue of present-day melting can be shown to always contain significant amounts of sulfide (50{%} of what is observed in a fertile source). This typical behavior likely prevents an efficient

  14. NASA Glenn Steady-State Heat Pipe Code GLENHP: Compilation for 64- and 32-Bit Windows Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    A new version of the NASA Glenn Steady State Heat Pipe Code, designated "GLENHP," is introduced here. This represents an update to the disk operating system (DOS) version LERCHP reported in NASA/TM-2000-209807. The new code operates on 32- and 64-bit Windows-based platforms from within the 32-bit command prompt window. An additional evaporator boundary condition and other features are provided.

  15. Development in Diagnostics Application to Control Advanced Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, Y.

    2008-03-12

    For continuous operation expected in DEMO, all the plasma current must be non-inductively driven, with self-generated neoclassical bootstrap current being maximized. The control of such steady state high performance tokamak plasma (so-called 'Advanced Tokamak Plasma') is a challenge because of the strong coupling between the current density, the pressure profile and MHD stability. In considering diagnostic needs for the advanced tokamak research, diagnostics for MHD are the most fundamental, since discharges which violate the MHD stability criteria either disrupt or have significantly reduced confinement. This report deals with the development in diagnostic application to control advanced tokamak plasma, with emphasized on recent progress in active feedback control of the current profile and the pressure profile under DEMO-relevant high bootstrap-current fraction. In addition, issues in application of the present-day actuators and diagnostics for the advanced control to DEMO will be briefly addressed, where port space for the advanced control may be limited so as to keep sufficient tritium breeding ratio (TBR)

  16. Confinement degradation by Alfvén-eigenmode induced fast-ion transport in steady-state scenario discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Holcomb, C. T.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Chen, Xi; Collins, C. M.; Garofalo, A.; Gong, X.; Grierson, B. A.; Podestà, M.; Stagner, L.; Zhu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of neutron and fast-ion Dα data from the DIII-D tokamak shows that Alfvén eigenmode activity degrades fast-ion confinement in many high βN, high qmin, steady-state scenario discharges. (βN is the normalized plasma pressure and qmin is the minimum value of the plasma safety factor.) Fast-ion diagnostics that are sensitive to the co-passing population exhibit the largest reduction relative to classical predictions. The increased fast-ion transport in discharges with strong AE activity accounts for the previously observed reduction in global confinement with increasing qmin; however, not all high qmin discharges show appreciable degradation. Two relatively simple empirical quantities provide convenient monitors of these effects: (1) an ‘AE amplitude’ signal based on interferometer measurements and (2) the ratio of the neutron rate to a zero-dimensional classical prediction.

  17. Steady State Response Analysis of a Tubular Piezoelectric Print Head.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-12

    In recent years, inkjet technology has played an important role in industrial materials printing and various sensors fabrication, but the mechanisms of the inkjet print head should be researched more elaborately. The steady state deformation analysis of a tubular piezoelectric print head, which can be classified as a plane strain problem because the radii of the tubes are considerably smaller than the lengths, is discussed in this paper. The geometric structure and the boundary conditions are all axisymmetric, so a one-dimensional mathematical model is constructed. By solving the model, the deformation field and stress field, as well as the electric potential distribution of the piezoelectric tube and glass tube, are obtained. The results show that the deformations are on the nanometer scale, the hoop stress is larger than the radial stress on the whole, and the potential is not linearly distributed along the radial direction. An experiment is designed to validate these computations. A discussion of the effect of the tubes' thicknesses on the system deformation status is provided.

  18. Hyperbolic method for magnetic reconnection process in steady state magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Hubert; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    A recent numerical approach for solving the advection-diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations is extended for the first time to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, aiming in particular consistent improvements over classical methods for investigating the magnetic reconnection process. In this study, we mainly focus on a two-dimensional incompressible set of resistive MHD equations written in flux-vorticity scalar variables. The originality of the method is based on hyperbolic reformulation of the dissipative terms, leading to the construction of an equivalent hyperbolic first-order (spatial derivatives) system. This enables the use of approximate Riemann solvers for handling dissipative and advective flux in the same way. A simple second-order finite-volume discretization on rectangular grids using an upwind flux is employed. The advantages of this method are illustrated by a comparison to two particular analytical steady state solutions of the inviscid magnetic reconnection mechanism, namely the magnetic annihilation and the reconnective diffusion problems. In particular, the numerical solution is obtained with the same order of accuracy for the solution and gradient for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers, without any deterioration characteristic of more conventional schemes. The amelioration of the hyperbolic method and its extension to time-dependent MHD problems related to solar flares mechanisms is also discussed.

  19. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS d+1-background, for d = 2, 4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d = 2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1 + 1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d = 6.

  20. Acquisition versus steady state in the time-left experiment.

    PubMed

    Machado, Armando; Vasconcelos, Marco

    2006-02-28

    To test some predictions of scalar expectancy theory (SET) for the time-left procedure, we performed one experiment with two conditions. In Condition A, pigeons were exposed to two fixed-interval schedules, a fixed-interval (FI) 30s and an FI 60s, each associated with a distinct key and presented on a separate trial. Subsequently, during test trials, the FI 60-s key was illuminated and then after T = 15, 30 or 45 s the FI 30-s key also was illuminated. The main issue was how choice between the two keys varied with T. Condition B replicated Condition A with different FI parameters and T values. The results showed that (a) contrary to SET's predictions, preference changed reliably with testing, which suggests that learning took place during the test trials; (b) within each test trial, pigeons revealed an almost exclusive preference for one of the keys, and (c) at steady state pigeons behaved in the same way as rats. Because SET could not account for these findings we advanced a new descriptive model of performance for the time-left task. The model fit the data well.

  1. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; SooHoo, J.B.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1980-09-01

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using /sup 15/N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which /sup 15/N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea.

  2. Steady state solutions to dynamically loaded periodic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The general problem of solving for the steady state (time domain) dynamic response (i.e., NASTRAN rigid format-8) of a general elastic periodic structure subject to a phase difference loading of the type encountered in traveling wave propagation problems was studied. Two types of structural configurations were considered; in the first type, the structure has a repeating pattern over a span that is long enough to be considered, for all practical purposes, as infinite; in the second type, the structure has structural rotational symmetry in the circumferential direction. The theory and a corresponding set of DMAP instructions which permits the NASTRAN user to automatically alter the rigid format-8 sequence to solve the intended class of problems are presented. Final results are recovered as with any ordinary rigid format-8 solution, except that the results are only printed for the typical periodic segment of the structure. A simple demonstration problem having a known exact solution is used to illustrate the implementation of the procedure.

  3. Steady State Response Analysis of a Tubular Piezoelectric Print Head.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, inkjet technology has played an important role in industrial materials printing and various sensors fabrication, but the mechanisms of the inkjet print head should be researched more elaborately. The steady state deformation analysis of a tubular piezoelectric print head, which can be classified as a plane strain problem because the radii of the tubes are considerably smaller than the lengths, is discussed in this paper. The geometric structure and the boundary conditions are all axisymmetric, so a one-dimensional mathematical model is constructed. By solving the model, the deformation field and stress field, as well as the electric potential distribution of the piezoelectric tube and glass tube, are obtained. The results show that the deformations are on the nanometer scale, the hoop stress is larger than the radial stress on the whole, and the potential is not linearly distributed along the radial direction. An experiment is designed to validate these computations. A discussion of the effect of the tubes' thicknesses on the system deformation status is provided. PMID:26771612

  4. Steady-state and transient results on insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA, ASTM C 1114) was used to determine the thermal conductivity (k), specific heat (C), and thermal diffusivity ({alpha}) of selected building materials from 24 to 50{degree}C. Steady-state and transient measurements yielded data on four types of material: gypsum wall board containing 0, 15, and 30 wt % wax; calcium silicate insulations with densities ({rho}) of 307, 444, and 605 kg/m{sup 3}; three wood products: southern yellow pine flooring (575 kg/m{sup 3}), Douglas fir plywood (501 kg/m{sup 3}), and white spruce flooring (452 kg/m{sup 3}); and two cellular plastic foams: extruded polystyrene (30 kg/m{sup 3}) blown with HCFC-142b and polyisocyanurate rigid board (30.2 kg/m{sup 3}) blown with CFC-11. The extruded polystyrene was measured several times after production (25 days, 45 days, 74 days, 131 days, and 227 days). The UTHA is an absolute technique that yields k with an uncertainty of less than {plus minus}2% as determined by modeling, by determinate error analyses, and by use of Standard Reference Materials SRM-1450b and SRM-1451. 37 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  6. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.240405]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  7. Steady State Responses: Electrophysiological Assessment of Sensory Function in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Colleen A.; Krishnan, Giri P.; Vohs, Jenifer L.; Ahn, Woo-Young; Hetrick, William P.; Morzorati, Sandra L.; O'Donnell, Brian F.

    2009-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia experience subjective sensory anomalies and objective deficits on assessment of sensory function. Such deficits could be produced by abnormal signaling in the sensory pathways and sensory cortex or later stage disturbances in cognitive processing of such inputs. Steady state responses (SSRs) provide a noninvasive method to test the integrity of sensory pathways and oscillatory responses in schizophrenia with minimal task demands. SSRs are electrophysiological responses entrained to the frequency and phase of a periodic stimulus. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit pronounced auditory SSR deficits within the gamma frequency range (35–50 Hz) in response to click trains and amplitude-modulated tones. Visual SSR deficits are also observed, most prominently in the alpha and beta frequency ranges (7–30 Hz) in response to high-contrast, high-luminance stimuli. Visual SSR studies that have used the psychophysical properties of a stimulus to target specific visual pathways predominantly report magnocellular-based deficits in those with schizophrenia. Disruption of both auditory and visual SSRs in schizophrenia are consistent with neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of anatomic abnormalities affecting the auditory and visual cortices. Computational models suggest that auditory SSR abnormalities at gamma frequencies could be secondary to γ-aminobutyric acid–mediated or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid dysregulation. The pathophysiological process in schizophrenia encompasses sensory processing that probably contributes to alterations in subsequent encoding and cognitive processing. The developmental evolution of these abnormalities remains to be characterized. PMID:19726534

  8. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-01-01

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. PMID:27412267

  9. Steady State Response Analysis of a Tubular Piezoelectric Print Head

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, inkjet technology has played an important role in industrial materials printing and various sensors fabrication, but the mechanisms of the inkjet print head should be researched more elaborately. The steady state deformation analysis of a tubular piezoelectric print head, which can be classified as a plane strain problem because the radii of the tubes are considerably smaller than the lengths, is discussed in this paper. The geometric structure and the boundary conditions are all axisymmetric, so a one-dimensional mathematical model is constructed. By solving the model, the deformation field and stress field, as well as the electric potential distribution of the piezoelectric tube and glass tube, are obtained. The results show that the deformations are on the nanometer scale, the hoop stress is larger than the radial stress on the whole, and the potential is not linearly distributed along the radial direction. An experiment is designed to validate these computations. A discussion of the effect of the tubes’ thicknesses on the system deformation status is provided. PMID:26771612

  10. Auditory steady-state responses in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, F; Paludetti, G; Grassi, S; Draicchio, F; Santarelli, R M; Serafini, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1990-01-01

    The authors have studied auditory brainstem (ABRs), middle latency (MLRs) and steady-state potentials (SSRs) in 15 adult male rabbits weighing between 2.5 and 3 kg in order to verify if SSRs are due to a mere superimposition of ABRs and MLRs or to a resonance phenomenon. Ten of them were awake while 5 were studied under urethane anesthesia. Acoustic stimuli consisted in 0.1-ms square-wave pulses delivered at presentation rates ranging between 1 and 80/s at a stimulus intensity of 80 dB p.e. SPL. Our data show that reliable auditory SSRs can be obtained in the rabbit at a presentation rate of 30 stimuli/s, probably due to the superimposition of ABRs and MLR Pb waves which show an interwave interval of about 35 ms. The nonlinear aspects which can be detected are probably due to the effect of decreasing interstimulus intervals on the duration and amplitude of the Pb wave. It can then be concluded that SSRs in the rabbit are due more to a superimposition of ABR and MLR waves than to a resonance phenomenon.

  11. Manifest and Subtle Cyclic Behavior in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, R. K. P.; Weiss, Jeffrey B.; Mandal, Dibyendu; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-09-01

    Many interesting phenomena in nature are described by stochastic processes with irreversible dynamics. To model these phenomena, we focus on a master equation or a Fokker-Planck equation with rates which violate detailed balance. When the system settles in a stationary state, it will be a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS), with time independent probability distribution as well as persistent probability current loops. The observable consequences of the latter are explored. In particular, cyclic behavior of some form must be present: some are prominent and manifest, while others are more obscure and subtle. We present a theoretical framework to analyze such properties, introducing the notion of “probability angular momentum” and its distribution. Using several examples, we illustrate the manifest and subtle categories and how best to distinguish between them. These techniques can be applied to reveal the NESS nature of a wide range of systems in a large variety of areas. We illustrate with one application: variability of ocean heat content in our climate system.

  12. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    PubMed Central

    Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. PMID:27412267

  13. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-08-15

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  14. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state. PMID:26764644

  15. Steady state gas efficiency of ion sources for neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; Owren, H.M.; Willis, J.E.

    1981-09-01

    Gas present in the acceleration grids of a neutral beam line is one cause of divergent beam power. A measure of this problem is the gas efficiency (nuclear) of the ion source, epsilon/sub g/ = I/sub b//I/sub g/, where I/sub b/ denotes the extracted current of beam nuclei, and I/sub g/ the total current of nuclei to the source as gas. For a short pulse beam, less than or equal to 0.1 sec, gas transients make epsilon/sub g/ difficult to observe. Using the fraction size Berkeley LPA (nominally 120 keV, 10A), the gas efficiency of a positive ion, hydrogen neutral beam has been studied with pulses from 0.5 to 28 sec at 80 keV, 5.7 A, and 0.5 sec at 120 keV, 10A. The observed gas efficiency, 20% to 40%, is shown to agree with a simple steady state model. The model indicates that gas efficiency is determined by the degree of arc ionization.

  16. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XX. The Steady State

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, M.; Massini, Peter

    1952-09-01

    The separation of the phenomenon of photosynthesis in green plants into a photochemical reaction and into the light-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide is discussed, The reduction of carbon dioxide and the fate of the assimilated carbon were investigated with the help of the tracer technique (exposure of the planks to the radioactive C{sup 14}O{sub 2}) and of paper chromatography. A reaction cycle is proposed in which phosphoglyceric acid is the first isolable assimilations product. Analyses of the algal extracts which had assimilated radioactive carbon dioxide in a stationary condition ('steady-state' photosynthesis) for a long time provided further information concerning the proposed cycle and permitted the approximate estimation, for a number of compounds of what fraction of each compound was taking part in the cycle. The earlier supposition that light influences the respiration cycle was confirmed. The possibility of the assistance of {alpha}-lipoic acid, or of a related substance, in this influence and in the photosynthesis cycle, is discussed.

  17. Modeling of Steady-State Non-Inductive ITB Discharges with Application to DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St John, H. E.; Lao, L. L.; Murakami, M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2001-10-01

    Establishment of near steady-state high-performance discharges with internal transport barriers in the electron and ion heat and the toroidal momentum channels is investigated using the GLF23 and Weiland confinement models. A combination of neutral beam and electron cyclotron heating and current drive is used to optimally shape the current profile for near non-inductive steady-state operation. The GLF23 and Weiland confinement models have had some success in modeling DIII-D discharges and consequently represents our best choice for DIII-D AT scenario development at this time. By starting the modeling with actual high-performance DIII-D discharges, we expect to obtain experimentally realized results. The stability of our simulations is monitored with the BALOO and GATO codes and rf heating and current drive is modelled with TORAY-GA. This computationally instensive modeling approach requires concurrent computing methods in order to be used routinely. We discuss our efforts to date in producing a parallel computational transport environment.

  18. DIII-D Upgrade to Prepare the Basis for Steady-State Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, R. J.; Guo, H. Y.; Taylor, T. S.; Wade, M. R.; Hill, D. N.

    2014-10-01

    Future steady-state burning plasma facilities will access new physics regimes and modes of plasma behavior. It is vital to prepare for this both experimentally using existing facilities, and theoretically in order to develop the tools to project to and optimize these devices. An upgrade to DIII-D is proposed to address the three critical aspects where research must go beyond what we can do now: (i) torque free electron heating to address the energy, particle and momentum transport mechanisms of burning plasmas using electron cyclotron (EC) heating and full power balanced neutral beams; (ii) off-axis heating and current drive to develop the path to true fusion steady state by reorienting neutral beams and deploying EC and helicon current drive; (iii) a new divertor with hot walls and reactor relevant materials to develop the basis for benign detached divertor operation compatible with wall materials and a high performance fusion core. These elements with modest incremental cost and enacted as a user facility for the whole US program will enable the US to lead on ITER and take a decision to proceed with a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. The Steady State Challenge for Soft X-Ray Diagnostics on Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, H.; Broszat, T.; Mohr, S.; Weller, A.; Ye, M. Y.; Carvalho, P.

    2008-03-19

    The steady state operation of Wendelstein 7-X stellarator presently under construction in Greifswald poses special challenges to the diagnostics development [1, 2]. A critical issue is the heat load on plasma facing components ({approx}500 kW/m{sup 2}) over a long discharge time (up to 30 min), which leads to the necessity of active cooling. As result, the design of the 400 channel soft X-Ray Multi Camera Tomography System (XMCTS) [2, 3] has to cope with dark currents and amplifier drifts due to the heating of active components like photo diodes and in-vessel preamplifiers. In order to allow for a quantitative measurement of dynamic drifts and offsets, a shutter system and blind diodes are considered to compensate these effects. Another important issue is the large amount of data gathered by the XMCT system during long pulse discharges. A fast but less precise online reconstruction is planned, which will give information on the plasma shape and position on a human time scale. The two options under investigation are a Cormack-Inversion method and an approach based on neural networks [4]. Dependent on the available hardware, as much information as possible should be stored for more accurate offline-analysis. An intelligent way of marking interesting data is required. In case that the steady-state storage of all measured data is not feasible, at least this marked data will be stored in high time resolution.

  20. There are no steady state processes in compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dysthe, D. K.

    2003-04-01

    Compaction of sediments is normally thought to start with grain sliding and cataclastic grain crushing. Then the ductile dissolution-precipitation creep processes take over. Modeling of this process normally neglects all collective rearrangement processes and regard simple packings of grains that slowly deform by steady state pressure solution creep. From simple geometrical reasoning we know, however that imperfect packings of plastic grains must undergo rearrangement during compaction. Such rearrangement will drastically alter the microscopic, or "primitive processes" of compaction. Recent research has questioned the fundamental mechanisms ("primitive processes") of dissolution-precipitation creep. Do grain contacts heal or dissolve? Why is there asymmetric dissolution? Does pressure solution creep in single contacts ever reach steady state? Can transient free face dissolution feed back on pressure solution creep in the contacts? The emerging radical change in our understanding of dissolution-precipitation creep as a dynamic, transient process is driven by new experiments and reevaluation of the fundamental theory. The same change in viewpoint is necessary on all time and length scales. I will present experiments [1-8] and simulations [9-11] of complex compaction behaviour [1], transient primitive processes of pressure solution creep in the contacts [2-4], free face dissolution [5] and crack healing [6]. I will also show that macroscopic observation of compaction shows smooth, universal behaviour [7]. Microscopic observation of compaction shows transient collective behaviour at all scales. Evidence points in the direction that compaction is dominated by transient processes with interacting instabilities. The interaction causes intermittency or switching between processes. A new, more complex theory of compaction is necessary to explain how the cooperative microscopic phenomena contribute to the simple, universal, macroscopic behaviour. 1. Uri, L., et. al., in

  1. Steady state growth of E. Coli in low ammonium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsu; Deris, Barret; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for many microorganisms. In medium with low ammonium concentrations, enteric bacteria turn on the nitrogen responsive (ntr) genes to assimilate ammonium. Two proteins in E. coli, Glutamine synthetase (GS) and the Ammonium/methylammonium transporter AmtB play crucial roles in this regard. GS is the major ammonium assimilation enzyme below 1mM of NH4 + . AmtB is an inner membrane protein that transports NH4 + across the cell membrane against a concentration gradient. In order to study ammonium uptake at low NH4 + concentration at neutral pH, we developed a microfluidic flow chamber that maintains a homogenous nutrient environment during the course of exponential cell growth, even at very low concentration of nutrients. Cell growth can be accurately monitored using time-lapse microscopy. We followed steady state growth down to micro-molar range of NH4 + for the wild type and Δ amtB strains. The wild type strain is able to maintain the growth rate from 10mM down to a few uM of NH4 + , while the mutant exhibited reduced growth below ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + . Simultaneous characterization of the expression levels of GS and AmtB using fluorescence reporters reveals that AmtB is turned on already at 1mM, but contributes to function only below ~ 30 ~uM in the wild-type. Down to ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + , E.~coli can compensate the loss of AmtB by GS alone.

  2. Steady-state Burgers turbulence with large-scale forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, T.; Kraichnan, R.H.

    1998-11-01

    Steady-state Burgers turbulence supported by white-in-time random forcing at low wave numbers is studied analytically and by computer simulation. The peak of the probability distribution function (pdf) Q({xi}) of velocity gradient {xi} is at {xi}=O({xi}{sub f}), where {xi}{sub f} is a forcing parameter. It is concluded that Q({xi}) displays four asymptotic regimes at Reynolds number R{gt}1: (A) Q({xi}){approximately}{xi}{sub f}{sup {minus}2}{xi}exp({minus}{xi}{sup 3}/3{xi}{sub f}{sup 3}) for {xi}{gt}{xi}{sub f} (reduction of large positive {xi} by stretching); (B) Q({xi}){approximately}{xi}{sub f}{sup 2}{vert_bar}{xi}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}3} for {xi}{sub f}{lt}{minus}{xi}{lt}R{sup 1/2}{xi}{sub f} (transient inviscid steepening of negative {xi}); (C) Q({xi}){approximately}{vert_bar}R{xi}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}1} for R{sup 1/2}{xi}{sub f}{lt}{minus}{xi}{lt}R{xi}{sub f} (shoulders of mature shocks); (D) very rapid decay of Q for {minus}{xi}{ge}O(R{xi}{sub f}) (interior of mature shocks). The typical shock width is O(1/Rk{sub f}). If R{sup {minus}1/2}{gt}rk{sub f}{gt}R{sup {minus}1}, the pdf of velocity difference across an interval r is found to be P({Delta}u,r){proportional_to}r{sup {minus}1}Q({Delta}u/r) throughout regimes A and B and into the middle of C. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Impact of aquifer desaturation on steady-state river seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J.; Miracapillo, Cinzia; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    Flow exchange between surface and ground water is of great importance be it for beneficial allocation and use of the water resources or for the proper exercise of water rights. That exchange can take place under a saturated or unsaturated flow regime. Which regimes occur depend on conditions in the vicinity of the interactive area. Withdrawals partially sustained by seepage may not bring about desaturation but greater amounts eventually will. The problem considered in this paper deals only with the steady-state case. It is meant as a first step toward a simple, yet accurate and physically based treatment of the transient situation. The primary purpose of the article is to provide simple criteria for determination of the initiation of desaturation in an aquifer originally in saturated hydraulic connection with a river or a recharge area. The extent of the unsaturated zone in the aquifer will increase with increasing withdrawals while at the same time the seepage rate from the river increases. However the seepage increase will stop once infiltration takes place strictly by gravity in the aquifer and is no longer opposed by the capillary rise from the water table below the riverbed. Following desaturation simple criteria are derived and simple analytical formulae provided to estimate the river seepage based on the position of the water table mound below the clogging layer and at some distance away from the river bank. They fully account for the unsaturated flow phenomena, including the existence of a drainage entry pressure. Two secondary objectives were to verify that (1) the assumption of uniform vertical flow through a clogging layer and that (2) the approximation of the water table mound below the seepage area as a flat surface were both reasonably legitimate. This approach will be especially advantageous for the implementation of the methodology in large-scale applications of integrated hydrologic models used for management.

  4. Nonequilibrium steady states in a model for prebiotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Wynveen, A; Fedorov, I; Halley, J W

    2014-02-01

    Some statistical features of steady states of a Kauffman-like model for prebiotic evolution are reported from computational studies. We postulate that the interesting "lifelike" states will be characterized by a nonequilibrium distribution of species and a time variable species self-correlation function. Selecting only such states from the population of final states produced by the model yields the probability of the appearance of such states as a function of a parameter p of the model. p is defined as the probability that a possible reaction in the the artificial chemistry actually appears in the network of chemical reactions. Small p corresponds to sparse networks utilizing a small fraction of the available reactions. We find that the probability of the appearance of such lifelike states exhibits a maximum as a function of p: at large p, most final states are in chemical equilibrium and hence are excluded by our criterion. At very small p, the sparseness of the network makes the probability of formation of any nontrivial dynamic final state low, yielding a low probability of production of lifelike states in this limit as well. We also report results on the diversity of the lifelike states (as defined here) that are produced. Repeated starts of the model evolution with different random number seeds in a given reaction network lead to final lifelike states which have a greater than random likelihood of resembling one another. Thus a form of "convergence" is observed. On the other hand, in different reaction networks with the same p, lifelike final states are statistically uncorrelated. In summary, the main results are (1) there is an optimal p or "sparseness" for production of lifelike states in our model-neither very dense nor very sparse networks are optimal--and (2) for a given p or sparseness, the resulting lifelike states can be extremely different. We discuss some possible implications for studies of the origin of life. PMID:25353526

  5. Phencyclidine Disrupts the Auditory Steady State Response in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Emma; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Millward, James B.; Vohs, Jenifer L.; Rass, Olga; Krishnan, Giri P.; Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Morzorati, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The Auditory Steady-State Response (ASSR) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is usually reduced in schizophrenia (SZ), particularly to 40 Hz stimulation. The gamma frequency ASSR deficit has been attributed to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction. We tested whether the NMDAR antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP), produced similar ASSR deficits in rats. EEG was recorded from awake rats via intracranial electrodes overlaying the auditory cortex and at the vertex of the skull. ASSRs to click trains were recorded at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 Hz and measured by ASSR Mean Power (MP) and Phase Locking Factor (PLF). In Experiment 1, the effect of different subcutaneous doses of PCP (1.0, 2.5 and 4.0 mg/kg) on the ASSR in 12 rats was assessed. In Experiment 2, ASSRs were compared in PCP treated rats and control rats at baseline, after acute injection (5 mg/kg), following two weeks of subchronic, continuous administration (5 mg/kg/day), and one week after drug cessation. Acute administration of PCP increased PLF and MP at frequencies of stimulation below 50 Hz, and decreased responses at higher frequencies at the auditory cortex site. Acute administration had a less pronounced effect at the vertex site, with a reduction of either PLF or MP observed at frequencies above 20 Hz. Acute effects increased in magnitude with higher doses of PCP. Consistent effects were not observed after subchronic PCP administration. These data indicate that acute administration of PCP, a NMDAR antagonist, produces an increase in ASSR synchrony and power at low frequencies of stimulation and a reduction of high frequency (> 40 Hz) ASSR activity in rats. Subchronic, continuous administration of PCP, on the other hand, has little impact on ASSRs. Thus, while ASSRs are highly sensitive to NMDAR antagonists, their translational utility as a cross-species biomarker for NMDAR hypofunction in SZ and other disorders may be dependent on dose and schedule. PMID:26258486

  6. PET imaging of the 40 Hz auditory steady state response.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Samuel A; Salvi, Richard J; Burkard, Robert F; Coad, Mary Lou; Wack, David S; Galantowicz, Paul J; Lockwood, Alan H

    2004-08-01

    The auditory steady state response (aSSR) is an oscillatory electrical potential recorded from the scalp induced by amplitude-modulated (AM) or click/tone burst stimuli. Its clinical utility has been limited by uncertainty regarding the specific areas of the brain involved in its generation. To identify the generators of the aSSR, 15O-water PET imaging was used to locate the regions of the brain activated by a steady 1 kHz pure tone, the same tone amplitude modulated (AM) at 40 Hz and the specific regions of the brain responsive to the AM component of the stimulus relative to the continuous tone. The continuous tone produced four clusters of activation. The boundaries of these activated clusters extended to include regions in left primary auditory cortex, right non-primary auditory cortex, left thalamus, and left cingulate. The AM tone produced three clusters of activation. The boundaries of these activated clusters extended to include primary auditory cortex bilaterally, left medial geniculate and right middle frontal gyrus. Two regions were specifically responsive to the AM component of the stimulus. These activated clusters extended to include the right anterior cingulate near frontal cortex and right auditory cortex. We conclude that cortical sites, including areas outside primary auditory cortex, are involved in generating the aSSR. There was an unexpected difference between morning and afternoon session scans that may reflect a pre- versus post-prandial state. These results support the hypothesis that a distributed resonating circuit mediates the generation of the aSSR.

  7. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  8. On the number of steady states in a multiple futile cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Sontag, Eduardo D

    2008-07-01

    The multisite phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle is a motif repeatedly used in cell signaling. This motif itself can generate a variety of dynamic behaviors like bistability and ultrasensitivity without direct positive feedbacks. In this paper, we study the number of positive steady states of a general multisite phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, and how the number of positive steady states varies by changing the biological parameters. We show analytically that (1) for some parameter ranges, there are at least n + 1 (if n is even) or n (if n is odd) steady states; (2) there never are more than 2n - 1 steady states (in particular, this implies that for n = 2, including single levels of MAPK cascades, there are at most three steady states); (3) for parameters near the standard Michaelis-Menten quasi-steady state conditions, there are at most n + 1 steady states; and (4) for parameters far from the standard Michaelis-Menten quasi-steady state conditions, there is at most one steady state.

  9. Computational multiple steady states for enzymatic esterification of ethanol and oleic acid in an isothermal CSTR.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pang-Yen; Chuang, Guo-Syong; Chao, An-Chong; Li, Hsing-Ya

    2005-05-01

    The capacity of complex biochemical reaction networks (consisting of 11 coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations) to show multiple steady states, was investigated. The system involved esterification of ethanol and oleic acid by lipase in an isothermal continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The Deficiency One Algorithm and the Subnetwork Analysis were applied to determine the steady state multiplicity. A set of rate constants and two corresponding steady states are computed. The phenomena of bistability, hysteresis and bifurcation are discussed. Moreover, the capacity of steady state multiplicity is extended to the family of the studied reaction networks.

  10. Simple contour analysis of ignition conditions and plasma operating regimes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Sheffield, J.; Selcow, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    Contour plots of ignition, auxiliary power requirements, heating and operating windows, optimal path to ignition, ignition margin, etc., are generated analytically in terms of a small number of parameters (aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */, R/sub 0//B/sub 0/, , etc.) for classes of devices with equivalent performance. Numerical studies are carried out to map the physics design space. Considering both the Murakami density limit (approx.B/sub 0//R/sub 0/) and the Troyon beta limit (approx.I/aB/sub 0/), results from analytic calculations indicate that in a standard tokamak geometry (A approx. 2.5 to 3.5, kappa = b/a approx. 1.6 to 1.7, q/sub psi/ approx. 2.6) devices with aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */ approx. 20 should be ignitable provided confinement does not degrade with heating (ohmic + alpha + auxiliary, etc.) power; however, aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */ approx. 30 (25) may be required for minimal ignition for a typical L- (H-) mode confinement scaling. Increased plasma elongation (kappa approx. 2) may help to reduce these requirements.

  11. First operations with the new Collective Thomson Scattering diagnostic on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, W.; Bruschi, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Castaldo, C.; De Angeli, M.; Figini, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, G.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lontano, M.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Moro, A.; Nardone, A.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Simonetto, A.; Stejner, M.; Tartari, U.

    2015-10-01

    Anomalous emissions were found over the last few years in spectra of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostics in tokamak devices such as TEXTOR, ASDEX and FTU, in addition to real CTS signals. The signal frequency, down-shifted with respect to the probing one, suggested a possible origin in Parametric Decay Instability (PDI) processes correlated with the presence of magnetic islands and occurring for pumping wave power levels well below the threshold predicted by conventional models. A threshold below or close to the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) power levels could limit, under certain circumstances, the use of the ECRH in fusion devices. An accurate characterization of the conditions for the occurrence of this phenomenon and of its consequences is thus of primary importance. Exploiting the front-steering configuration available with the real-time launcher, the implementation of a new CTS setup now allows studying these anomalous emission phenomena in FTU under conditions of density and wave injection geometry that are more similar to those envisaged for CTS in ITER. The upgrades of the diagnostic are presented as well as a few preliminary spectra detected with the new system during the very first operations in 2014. The present work has been carried out under an EUROfusion Enabling Research project. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  12. D3-D research operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, R. J.

    1994-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. In doing so, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R&D outputs to aid the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY93 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics. The major goals of the Divertor and Boundary Physics studies are the control of impurities, efficient heat removal and understanding the strong role that the edge plasma plays in the global energy confinement of the plasma. The advanced tokamak studies initiated the investigation into new techniques for improving energy confinement, controlling particle fueling and increasing plasma beta. The major goal of the Tokamak Physics Studies is the understanding of energy and particle transport in a reactor relevant plasma.

  13. The high-β{sub N} hybrid scenario for ITER and FNSF steady-state missions

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F.; Petty, C. C.; Luce, T. C.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Carpanese, F.; Holcomb, C. T.

    2015-05-15

    New experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the steady-state potential of the hybrid scenario, with 1 MA of plasma current driven fully non-inductively and β{sub N} up to 3.7 sustained for ∼3 s (∼1.5 current diffusion time, τ{sub R}, in DIII-D), providing the basis for an attractive option for steady-state operation in ITER and FNSF. Excellent confinement is achieved (H{sub 98y2} ∼ 1.6) without performance limiting tearing modes. The hybrid regime overcomes the need for off-axis current drive efficiency, taking advantage of poloidal magnetic flux pumping that is believed to be the result of a saturated 3/2 tearing mode. This allows for efficient current drive close to the axis, without deleterious sawtooth instabilities. In these experiments, the edge surface loop voltage is driven down to zero for >1 τ{sub R} when the poloidal β is increased above 1.9 at a plasma current of 1.0 MA and the ECH power is increased to 3.2 MW. Stationary operation of hybrid plasmas with all on-axis current drive is sustained at pressures slightly above the ideal no-wall limit, while the calculated ideal with-wall MHD limit is β{sub N} ∼ 4–4.5. Off-axis Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power has been used to broaden the pressure and current profiles in this scenario, seeking to take advantage of higher predicted kink stability limits and lower values of the tearing stability index Δ′, as calculated by the DCON and PEST3 codes. Results based on measured profiles predict ideal limits at β{sub N} > 4.5, 10% higher than the cases with on-axis NBI. A 0-D model, based on the present confinement, β{sub N} and shape values of the DIII-D hybrid scenario, shows that these plasmas are consistent with the ITER 9 MA, Q = 5 mission and the FNSF 6.7 MA scenario with Q = 3.5. With collisionality and edge safety factor values comparable to those envisioned for ITER and FNSF, the high-β{sub N} hybrid represents an attractive high performance option for the steady-state

  14. The high-βN hybrid scenario for ITER and FNSF steady-state missionsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, F.; Petty, C. C.; Luce, T. C.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Heidbrink, W.; Carpanese, F.; Solomon, W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    New experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the steady-state potential of the hybrid scenario, with 1 MA of plasma current driven fully non-inductively and βN up to 3.7 sustained for ˜3 s (˜1.5 current diffusion time, τR, in DIII-D), providing the basis for an attractive option for steady-state operation in ITER and FNSF. Excellent confinement is achieved (H98y2 ˜ 1.6) without performance limiting tearing modes. The hybrid regime overcomes the need for off-axis current drive efficiency, taking advantage of poloidal magnetic flux pumping that is believed to be the result of a saturated 3/2 tearing mode. This allows for efficient current drive close to the axis, without deleterious sawtooth instabilities. In these experiments, the edge surface loop voltage is driven down to zero for >1 τR when the poloidal β is increased above 1.9 at a plasma current of 1.0 MA and the ECH power is increased to 3.2 MW. Stationary operation of hybrid plasmas with all on-axis current drive is sustained at pressures slightly above the ideal no-wall limit, while the calculated ideal with-wall MHD limit is βN ˜ 4-4.5. Off-axis Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power has been used to broaden the pressure and current profiles in this scenario, seeking to take advantage of higher predicted kink stability limits and lower values of the tearing stability index Δ', as calculated by the DCON and PEST3 codes. Results based on measured profiles predict ideal limits at βN > 4.5, 10% higher than the cases with on-axis NBI. A 0-D model, based on the present confinement, βN and shape values of the DIII-D hybrid scenario, shows that these plasmas are consistent with the ITER 9 MA, Q = 5 mission and the FNSF 6.7 MA scenario with Q = 3.5. With collisionality and edge safety factor values comparable to those envisioned for ITER and FNSF, the high-βN hybrid represents an attractive high performance option for the steady-state missions of these devices.

  15. The mechanism of volcanic eruptions (a steady state approach)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezin, Yu. B.

    2003-03-01

    sharp regime changes. Catastrophic rise of eruption intensity is possible if H< H cr. The critical chamber depth H cr depends approximately linearly on c0 and is about 15 km at c0=0.05. Some scenarios of eruption evolution are described in a steady state approximation, and the mechanism of catastrophic explosive eruptions is proposed. The theory is applied to well documented eruptions (Tolbachik, 1975-1976, and Mount St. Helens, 1980). The theory can also describe changes in a volcanic system, such as destruction of the conduit or chamber walls, destruction of the edifice, changes in magma composition, and caldera subsidence due to magma evacuation.

  16. Specific determination of maximal lactate steady state in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Loures, João P; Chamari, Karim; Ferreira, Eliel C; Campos, Eduardo Z; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Milioni, Fabio; da Silva, Adelino S R; Papoti, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the validity of the anaerobic threshold (AT) determined on the soccer-specific Hoff circuit (ATHoff) to predict the maximal lactate steady-state exercise intensity (MLSSHoff) with the ball. Sixteen soccer players (age: 16.0 ± 0.5 years; body mass: 63.7 ± 9.0 kg; and height: 169.4 ± 5.3 cm) were submitted to 5 progressive efforts (7.0-11.0 km·h) with ball dribbling. Thereafter, 11 players were submitted to 3 efforts of 30 minutes at 100, 105, and 110% of ATHoff. The ATHoff corresponded to the speed relative to 3.5 mmol·L lactate concentration. The speed relative to 4.0 mmol·L was assumed to be ATHoff4.0, and the ATHoffBI was determined through bisegmented adjustment. For comparisons, Student's t-test, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman analyses were used. For reproducibility, ICC, typical error, and coefficient of variation were used. No significant difference was found between AT test and retest determined using different methods. A positive correlation was observed between ATHoff and ATHoff4.0. The MLSSHoff (10.6 ± 1.3 km·h) was significantly different compared with ATHoff (10.2 ± 1.2 km·h) and ATHoffBI (9.5 ± 0.4 km·h) but did not show any difference from LAnHoff4.0 (10.7 ± 1.4 km·h). The MLSSHoff presented high ICCs with ATHoff and ATHoff4.0 (ICC = 0.94; and ICC = 0.89; p ≤ 0.05, respectively), without significant correlation with ATHoffBI. The results suggest that AT determined on the Hoff circuit is reproducible and capable of predicting MLSS. The ATHoff4.0 was the method that presented a better approximation to MLSS. Therefore, it is possible to assess submaximal physiological variables through a specific circuit performed with the ball in young soccer players.

  17. Steady-state and dynamic performance of a gas-lubricated seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colsher, R.; Shapiro, W.

    1972-01-01

    Steady-state and dynamic performance of a gas-lubricated, self-acting face seal was determined using numerical methods based on a variable grid, finite-difference, time-transient procedure. Results were obtained for a gas turbine main shaft seal operating at 206.9 newton per square centimeter (300 psi) sealed air pressure and 152.4 meters per second (500 ft/sec) sliding velocity. Analysis of the seal dynamics revealed that the response of the seal nosepiece to runout of the seat face is markedly affected by secondary seal friction and by nosepiece inertia. The nosepiece response was determined for various levels of secondary seal friction and seat face runout magnitudes.

  18. Preliminary results of steady state characterization of near term electric vehicle breadboard propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, N. B.

    1980-01-01

    The steady state test results on a breadboard version of the General Electric Near Term Electric Vehicle (ETV-1) are discussed. The breadboard was built using exact duplicate vehicle propulsion system components with few exceptions. Full instrumentation was provided to measure individual component efficiencies. Tests were conducted on a 50 hp dynamometer in a road load simulator facility. Characterization of the propulsion system over the lower half of the speed-torque operating range has shown the system efficiency to be composed of a predominant motor loss plus a speed dependent transaxle loss. At the lower speeds with normal road loads the armature chopper loss is also a significant factor. At the conditions corresponding to a cycle for which the vehicle system was specifically designed, the efficiencies are near optimum.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of a Steady-State Cylindrical Blackbody Cavity at 1100 Degrees Celsius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Thomas J.; Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    2000-01-01

    A blackbody calibration furnace at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is used to calibrate heat flux gages. These gages are for measuring the aerodynamic heat flux on hypersonic flight vehicle surfaces. The blackbody is a graphite tube with a midplane partition which divides the tube into two compartments (dual cavities). Electrical resistance heating is used to heat the graphite tube. This heating and the boundary conditions imposed on the graphite tube result in temperature gradients along the walls of the blackbody cavity. This paper describes measurements made during steady-state operation and development of finite-difference thermal models of the blockbody furnace at 1100 C. Two configurations were studied, one with the blackbody outer surface insulated and the other without insulation. The dominant modes of heat transfer were identified for each configuration and the effect of variations in material properties and electric current that was passed through the blackbody were quantified.

  20. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  1. Progress towards Steady State at Low Aspect Ratio on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates, J. Menard, R. Maingi, S. Kaye, S.A. Sabbagh, S. Diem, J.R.Wilson, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, J. Ferron, E.D. Fredrickson, C.E. Kessel, B.P. LeBlanc, F. Levinton, J. Manickam, D. Mueller, R. Raman, T. Stevenson, D. Stutman, G. Taylor, K. Tritz, H. Yu, and the NSTX Research Team

    2007-11-08

    Modifications to the plasma control capabilities and poloidal field coils of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have enabled a significant enhancement in shaping capability which has led to the transient achievement of a record shape factor (S ≡ q95 (Iρ/αΒτ)) of ~41 (MA m-1 Τ-1) simultaneous with a record plasma elongation of κ ≡ β /α ~ 3. This result was obtained using isoflux control and real-time equilibrium reconstruction. Achieving high shape factor together with tolerable divertor loading is an important result for future ST burning plasma experiments as exemplified by studies for future ST reactor concepts, as well as neutron producing devices, which rely on achieving high shape factors in order to achieve steady state operation while maintaining MHD stability. Statistical evidence is presented which demonstrates the expected correlation between increased shaping and improved plasma performance.

  2. Steady-State Characterization of Bacteriorhodopsin-D85N Photocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An operational characterization of the photocycle of the genetic mutant D85N of bacteriorhodopsin, BR-D85N, is presented. Steady-state bleach spectra and pump-probe absorbance data are obtained with thick hydrated films containing BR-D85N embedded in a gelatin host. Simple two- and three-state models are used to analyze the photocycle dynamics and extract relevant information such as pure-state absorption spectra, photochemical-transition quantum efficiencies, and thermal lifetimes of dominant states appearing in the photocycle, the knowledge of which should aid in the analysis of optical recording and retrieval of data in films incorporating this photochromic material. The remarkable characteristics of this material and their implications from the viewpoint of optical data storage and processing are discussed.

  3. a Semiclassical Analysis of a Detuned Ring Laser with a Saturable Absorber: New Results for the Steady States and a Formulation of the Linearized Stability Problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, David Edward

    This dissertation presents new results for the steady states of a detuned ring laser with a saturable absorber. The treatment is based on a semiclassical model which assumes homogeneously broadened two-level atoms. Part 1 presents a solution of the Maxwell-Bloch equations for the longitudinal dependence of the steady states of this system. The solution is then simplified by use of the mean field approximation. Graphical results in the mean field approximation are presented for squared electric field versus operating frequency, and for each of these versus cavity tuning and laser excitation. Various cavity linewidths and both resonant and non-resonant amplifier and absorber line center frequencies are considered. The most notable finding is that cavity detuning breaks the degeneracies previously found in the steady state solutions to the fully tuned case. This lead to the prediction that an actual system will bifurcate from the zero intensity solution to a steady state solution as laser excitation increases from zero, rather than to the small amplitude pulsations found for the model with mathematically exact tuning of the cavity and the media line centers. Other phenomena suggested by the steady state results include tuning-dependent hysteresis and bistability, and instability due to the appearance of another steady state solution. Results for the case in which the media have different line center frequencies suggest non-monotonic behavior of the electric field amplitude as laser excitation varies, as well as hysteresis and bistability. Part 2 presents a formulation of the linearized stability problem for the steady state solutions discussed in the first part. Thus the effects of detuning and the other parameters describing the system is incorporated into the stability analysis. The equations of the system are linearized about both the mean field steady states and about the longitudinally dependent steady states. Expansion in Fourier spatial modes is used in the

  4. Transient and steady State Patterns in Gravel Bars Following Sediment Supply Increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.; Wilcock, P.

    2011-12-01

    Bedforms in a gravel-bed river respond to a combination of water discharge, sediment supply, and valley-scale geometry. The bed configuration can also vary between transient and steady-state conditions. Field and flume observations of gravel bedform responses to changes in sediment supply have focused primarily on decreased sediment supply, and those that have dealt with increased sediment supply have found cases of both increasing relief and decreasing relief. We present gravel bedform configurations under conditions of increased sediment supply in both field and laboratory conditions. The field study tracked the response of the Sandy River, Oregon after an increase in sediment flux due to the 2007 Marmot Dam removal in which nearly 750,000 m3 of impounded sediment which was made available for transport and resulted in a several-fold increase in annual sediment flux. The flume experiments introduced perturbation in a planar gravel bed (gravel D50 = 10mm, 15% sand) prompting alternate bar formation. Sediment was then manually added to the recirculating flume (in essence operating it as a feed flume) increasing flux rates by 50%. Upon reaching a steady state, the upstream flux was then augmented again to double the steady state rate. In response to the increased sediment supply the bed topography steepened to transport the imposed sediment flux. In both flume and field, the final bed response to increased sediment supply was deposition of a sediment wedge, steeping the channel slope with little change in bar morphology. Although the location and morphology of the bedforms were similar as the bed configuration stabilized, the transient response showed different patterns of deposition across the stream. A pattern of decreasing relief both from bar tops eroding and pools filling was observed as well as the migration of smaller wavelength high-celerity gravel bars as the bed decreased in relief. To explore the transient response we modeled both cases with a 2-D depth

  5. 40 CFR 92.130 - Determination of steady-state concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... values shall be used instead of a steady-state or integrated concentration: (1) The highest value of the... same units as the steady-state concentration; this value is h. (iii) Bisect the peak height by drawing... the line described in paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section intersects the baseline; this value is...

  6. 40 CFR 92.130 - Determination of steady-state concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... values shall be used instead of a steady-state or integrated concentration: (1) The highest value of the... same units as the steady-state concentration; this value is h. (iii) Bisect the peak height by drawing... the line described in paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section intersects the baseline; this value is...

  7. 40 CFR 92.130 - Determination of steady-state concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... values shall be used instead of a steady-state or integrated concentration: (1) The highest value of the... same units as the steady-state concentration; this value is h. (iii) Bisect the peak height by drawing... the line described in paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section intersects the baseline; this value is...

  8. 40 CFR 92.130 - Determination of steady-state concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... values shall be used instead of a steady-state or integrated concentration: (1) The highest value of the... same units as the steady-state concentration; this value is h. (iii) Bisect the peak height by drawing... the line described in paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section intersects the baseline; this value is...

  9. 40 CFR 92.130 - Determination of steady-state concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... values shall be used instead of a steady-state or integrated concentration: (1) The highest value of the... same units as the steady-state concentration; this value is h. (iii) Bisect the peak height by drawing... the line described in paragraph (b)(2)(iv) of this section intersects the baseline; this value is...

  10. The steady-state phase distribution of the motor switch complex model of Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Diener, Francine; Diener, Marc; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Steady-state analysis is performed on the kinetic model for the switch complex of the flagellar motor of Halobacterium salinarum (Nutsch et al.). The existence and uniqueness of a positive steady-state of the system is established and it is demonstrated why the steady-state is centered around the competent phase, a state of the motor in which it is able to respond to light stimuli. It is also demonstrated why the steady-state shifts to the refractory phase when the steady-state value of the response regulator CheYP increases. This work is one aspect of modeling in systems biology wherein the mathematical properties of a model are established. PMID:19857501

  11. Steady- and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate controls on atmospheric CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundquist, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Two contrasting hypotheses have recently been proposed for the past long-term relation between atmospheric CO2 and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle. One approach (Berner, 1990) suggests that CO2 levels have varied in a manner that has maintained chemical weathering and carbonate sedimentation at a steady state with respect to tectonically controlled decarbonation reactions. A second approach (Raymo et al., 1988), applied specificlly to the late Cenozoic, suggests a decrease in CO2 caused by an uplift-induced increase in chemical weathering, without regard to the rate of decarbonation. According to the steady-state (first) hypothesis, increased weathering and carbonate sedimentation are generally associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, whereas the uplift (second) hypothesis implies decreasing CO2 under the same conditions. An ocean-atmosphere-sediment model has been used to assess the response of atmospheric CO2 and carbonate sedimentation to global perturbations in chemical weathering and decarbonation reactions. Although this assessment is theoretical and cannot yet be related to the geologic record, the model simulations compare steady-state and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate cycle response. The e-fold response time of the 'CO2-weathering' feedback mechanism is between 300 and 400 ka. The response of carbonate sedimentation is much more rapid. These response times provide a measure of the strength of steady-state assumptions, and imply that certain systematic relations are sustained throughout steady-state and non-steady-state scenarios for the carbonate-silicate cycle. The simulations suggest that feedbacks can maintain the system near a steady state, but that non-steady-state effects may contribute to long-term trends. The steady-state and uplift hypotheses are not necessarily incompatible over time scales of a few million years. ?? 1991.

  12. Rotation of weakly collisional plasmas in tokamaks, operated with Alfv{acute e}n waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsypin, V.S.; Elfimov, A.G.; de Azevedo, C.A.; de Assis, A.S.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves on weakly collisional plasma rotation in tokamaks has been studied for the plateau and banana regimes. The quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field have been found. The estimation of these quantities for the Phaedrus-T tokamak [S. Wukitch {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 77}, 294 (1996)] and for the Joint European Torus (JET) [A. Fasoli {ital et} {ital al}., Nucl. Fusion, {bold 36}, 258 (1996)] has been presented. It is shown that the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves, which are needed for current drive, change weakly the quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field, as found from the experimental data of these tokamaks. In conditions with increased rf power, the plasma rotation and radial electric field can essentially grow up. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  14. Support and enhancement of ASPEN Plus for the steady state simulation of the SRC-I process. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fais, B.D.; Tomkinson, W.S.; Kradel, R.H.

    1983-10-01

    The ASPEN computer program was developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE). ASPEN provides steady state simulation of certain fossil fuel conversion processes at the steady state. As part of its contract with DOE to design, build and operate the SRC-I Coal Refinery, International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) was asked to evaluate the ASPEN program to determine its usefulness in simulating the steady state performance of coal conversion processes. ICRC performed a preliminary technical assessment of ASPEN in 1981 and concluded that it could be readily upgraded for simulation of the SRC-I process. In 1983, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) licensed ASPEN Plus, an upgraded version of ASPEN from ASPEN Technology, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for ICRC. ICRC commissioned APCI to maintain, support and enhance ASPEN Plus in 1983 and this report documents the work performed with ASPEN Plus during 1983. Two versions of the program have been installed and installation of a third version is pending. System support, maintenance, system tuning and validation, technical support and training are part of the work performed with ASPEN Plus. System tuning included modifying the execution of ASPEN Plus to increase its efficiency. The method of installation of two unit models developed at APCI are described. Conclusions and recommendations are included in the report.

  15. The effects of intrinsic noise on the behaviour of bistable cell regulatory systems under quasi-steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Roberto; Alarcón, Tomás de la; Guerrero, Pilar; Spill, Fabian

    2015-08-21

    We analyse the effect of intrinsic fluctuations on the properties of bistable stochastic systems with time scale separation operating under quasi-steady state conditions. We first formulate a stochastic generalisation of the quasi-steady state approximation based on the semi-classical approximation of the partial differential equation for the generating function associated with the chemical master equation. Such approximation proceeds by optimising an action functional whose associated set of Euler-Lagrange (Hamilton) equations provides the most likely fluctuation path. We show that, under appropriate conditions granting time scale separation, the Hamiltonian can be re-scaled so that the set of Hamilton equations splits up into slow and fast variables, whereby the quasi-steady state approximation can be applied. We analyse two particular examples of systems whose mean-field limit has been shown to exhibit bi-stability: an enzyme-catalysed system of two mutually inhibitory proteins and a gene regulatory circuit with self-activation. Our theory establishes that the number of molecules of the conserved species is order parameters whose variation regulates bistable behaviour in the associated systems beyond the predictions of the mean-field theory. This prediction is fully confirmed by direct numerical simulations using the stochastic simulation algorithm. This result allows us to propose strategies whereby, by varying the number of molecules of the three conserved chemical species, cell properties associated to bistable behaviour (phenotype, cell-cycle status, etc.) can be controlled.

  16. The effects of intrinsic noise on the behaviour of bistable cell regulatory systems under quasi-steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Roberto; Guerrero, Pilar; Spill, Fabian; Alarcón, Tomás

    2015-08-01

    We analyse the effect of intrinsic fluctuations on the properties of bistable stochastic systems with time scale separation operating under quasi-steady state conditions. We first formulate a stochastic generalisation of the quasi-steady state approximation based on the semi-classical approximation of the partial differential equation for the generating function associated with the chemical master equation. Such approximation proceeds by optimising an action functional whose associated set of Euler-Lagrange (Hamilton) equations provides the most likely fluctuation path. We show that, under appropriate conditions granting time scale separation, the Hamiltonian can be re-scaled so that the set of Hamilton equations splits up into slow and fast variables, whereby the quasi-steady state approximation can be applied. We analyse two particular examples of systems whose mean-field limit has been shown to exhibit bi-stability: an enzyme-catalysed system of two mutually inhibitory proteins and a gene regulatory circuit with self-activation. Our theory establishes that the number of molecules of the conserved species is order parameters whose variation regulates bistable behaviour in the associated systems beyond the predictions of the mean-field theory. This prediction is fully confirmed by direct numerical simulations using the stochastic simulation algorithm. This result allows us to propose strategies whereby, by varying the number of molecules of the three conserved chemical species, cell properties associated to bistable behaviour (phenotype, cell-cycle status, etc.) can be controlled.

  17. Steady State Performance Characteristics of Micropolar Lubricated Hydrodynamic Journal Bearings with Flexible Liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Pikesh; Chattopadhyay, Ajit Kumar; Agrawal, Vishnu Prakash

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to theoretically determine the steady state characteristics of hydrodynamic oil journal bearings considering the effect of deformation of liner and with micropolar lubrication. Modified Reynolds equation based on micropolar lubrication theory is solved using finite difference method to obtain steady state film pressures. Minimum film thickness is calculated taking into consideration the deformation of the liner. Parametric study has been conducted and steady state characteristics for journal bearing with elasticity of bearing liner are plotted for various values of eccentricity ratio, deformation factor, characteristic length and coupling number.

  18. Optimal harvesting in forestry: steady-state analysis and climate change impact.

    PubMed

    Hritonenko, Natali; Yatsenko, Yuri; Goetz, Renan-Ulrich; Xabadia, Angels

    2013-01-01

    We perform the steady-state analysis of a nonlinear partial differential equation model that describes the dynamics of a managed size-structured forest. The harvesting policy is to maximize the net benefits from timber production over an infinite planning horizon. The existence and uniqueness of the steady-state trajectories are analysed. Closed-form steady states are obtained in meaningful special cases and are used to estimate how climate change affects the optimal harvesting regime, diameter of cut trees, number of logged trees, and net benefits in the long run.

  19. Dependence of the rate of steady-state swelling of fuel-element claddings made of ChS68 steel on the characteristics of neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Rate of steady-state swelling of fuel-element sheaths made of the 06Kh16N15M2G2TFR steel in the course of their operation in a BN-600 reactor has been calculated. In the calculations, the diffusion characteristics of point defects and the results of the determination of the characteristics of the irradiation-induced porosity have been used. The dependence of the dose rate of steady-state swelling on neutron-irradiation characteristics has been analyzed. It has been established that the dose rate of swelling at the steady-state stage is independent of the energy of migration of vacancies and the rate of generation of atomic displacements.

  20. Who will save the tokamak - Harry Potter, Arnold Schwarzenegger, or Shaquille O'Neil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, J.; Mangiarotti, F.; Minervini, J.

    2014-10-01

    The tokamak is the current leading contender for a fusion power reactor. The reason for the preeminence of the tokamak is its high quality plasma physics performance relative to other concepts. Even so, it is well known that the tokamak must still overcome two basic physics challenges before becoming viable as a DEMO and ultimately a reactor: (1) the achievement of non-inductive steady state operation, and (2) the achievement of robust disruption free operation. These are in addition to the PMI problems faced by all concepts. The work presented here demonstrates by means of a simple but highly credible analytic calculation that a ``standard'' tokamak cannot lead to a reactor - it is just not possible to simultaneously satisfy all the plasma physics plus engineering constraints. Three possible solutions, some more well-known than others, to the problem are analyzed. These visual image generating solutions are defined as (1) the Harry Potter solution, (2) the Arnold Schwarzenegger solution, and (3) the Shaquille O'Neil solution. Each solution will be described both qualitatively and quantitatively at the meeting.

  1. Study of ITER Steady-State High qmin Scenarios Using FASTRAN/IPS Integrated Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, S. J.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Sontag, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    A high qmin (qmin > 2) operational scenario has been identified as a possible candidate to achieve ITER baseline goals. This scenario requires a broad current profile with high bootstrap fraction, which in turn requires a relatively large pedestal height. The goal of this study is to identify an operational space for ITER high-qmin steady-state scenarios via self-consistent integrated modeling using the IPS/FASTRAN framework with EPED providing the edge pedestal height. FASTRAN is an iterative numerical procedure that integrates a variety of models (transport, heating, CD, equilibrium and stability) and has been shown to reproduce most features of DIII-D high beta discharges with a stationary current profile. The FASTRAN solver has been implemented in the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) framework. The sensitivity of this operating space to uncertainties in the transport and pedestal predictions will be studied. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Evaluation of the operational parameters for NBI-driven fusion in low-gain tokamaks with two-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkov, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Low gain (Q ~ 1) fusion plasma systems are of interest for concepts of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. Operational regimes of large modern tokamaks are close to Q  ≈  1. Therefore, they can be considered as prototypes of neutron sources for fusion-fission hybrids. Powerful neutral beam injection (NBI) can support the essential population of fast particles compared with the Maxwellial population. In such two-component plasma, fusion reaction rate is higher than for Maxwellian plasma. Increased reaction rate allows the development of relatively small-size and relatively inexpensive neutron sources. Possible operating regimes of the NBI-heated tokamak neutron source are discussed. In a relatively compact device, the predictions of physics of two-component fusion plasma have some volatility that causes taking into account variations of the operational parameters. Consequent parameter ranges are studied. The feasibility of regimes with Q  ≈  1 is shown for the relatively small and low-power system. The effect of NBI fraction in total heating power is analyzed.

  3. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Turbulence-driven bootstrap current in low-collisionality tokamaks.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, C J; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2013-11-15

    Neoclassical bootstrap current is expected to provide a significant fraction of the equilibrium plasma current in tokamak reactors. Here we report a novel mechanism through which a bootstrap current may be driven even in a collisionless plasma. In analogy with the neoclassical mechanism, in which the collisional equilibrium established between trapped and passing electrons produces a steady state current, we show that resonant scattering of electrons by drift wave microturbulence provides an additional means of determining the equilibrium between trapped and passing electrons and thus driving a bootstrap current. Employing a linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator, the plasma current in the presence of both collisions and resonant electron scattering is computed, allowing for the relative strength of these two mechanisms to be quantified as a function of collisionality and fluctuation amplitude.

  5. Trade studies of plasma elongation for next-step tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of elongation on minimum-cost devices is investigated for elongations ranging from 2 to 3. The analysis, carried out with the TETRA tokamak systems code, includes the effects of elongation on both physics (plasma beta limit) and engineering (poloidal field coil currents) issues. When ignition is required, the minimum cost occurs for elongations from 2.3 to 2.9, depending on the plasma energy confinement scaling used. Scalings that include favorable plasma current dependence and/or degradation with fusion power tend to have minimum cost at higher elongation (2.5-2.9); scalings that depend primarily on size result in lower elongation (/approximately/2.3) for minimum cost. For design concepts that include steady-state current-driven operation, minimum cost occurs at an elongation of 2.3. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Exacting predictions by cybernetic model confirmed experimentally: steady state multiplicity in the chemostat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Il; Song, Hyun-Seob; Sunkara, Sunil R; Lali, Arvind; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate strong experimental support for the cybernetic model based on maximizing carbon uptake rate in describing the microorganism's regulatory behavior by verifying exacting predictions of steady state multiplicity in a chemostat. Experiments with a feed mixture of glucose and pyruvate show multiple steady state behavior as predicted by the cybernetic model. When multiplicity occurs at a dilution (growth) rate, it results in hysteretic behavior following switches in dilution rate from above and below. This phenomenon is caused by transient paths leading to different steady states through dynamic maximization of the carbon uptake rate. Thus steady state multiplicity is a manifestation of the nonlinearity arising from cybernetic mechanisms rather than of the nonlinear kinetics. The predicted metabolic multiplicity would extend to intracellular states such as enzyme levels and fluxes to be verified in future experiments.

  7. Prediction of elemental creep. [steady state and cyclic data from regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. W.; Rummler, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic and steady-state creep tests were performed to provide data which were used to develop predictive equations. These equations, describing creep as a function of stress, temperature, and time, were developed through the use of a least squares regression analyses computer program for both the steady-state and cyclic data sets. Comparison of the data from the two types of tests, revealed that there was no significant difference between the cyclic and steady-state creep strains for the L-605 sheet under the experimental conditions investigated (for the same total time at load). Attempts to develop a single linear equation describing the combined steady-state and cyclic creep data resulted in standard errors of estimates higher than obtained for the individual data sets. A proposed approach to predict elemental creep in metals uses the cyclic creep equation and a computer program which applies strain and time hardening theories of creep accumulation.

  8. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  9. Decoding of the sound frequency from the steady-state neural activities in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I; Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory cortex, onset activities have been extensively investigated as a cortical representation of sound information such as sound frequency. Yet, less attention has been paid to date to steady-state activities following the onset activities. In this study, we used machine learning to investigate whether steady-state activities in the presence of continuous sounds represent the sound frequency. Sparse Logistic Regression (SLR) decoded the sound frequency from band specific power or phase locking value (PLV) of local field potentials (LFP) from the fourth layer of the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats. Consequently, we found that SLR was able to decode the sound frequency from steady-state neural activities as well as onset activities. This result demonstrates that the steady-state activities contain information about the sound such as sound frequency.

  10. Detection meeting control: Unstable steady states in high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huanfei; Ho, Daniel W C; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    We articulate an adaptive and reference-free framework based on the principle of random switching to detect and control unstable steady states in high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems, without requiring any a priori information about the system or about the target steady state. Starting from an arbitrary initial condition, a proper control signal finds the nearest unstable steady state adaptively and drives the system to it in finite time, regardless of the type of the steady state. We develop a mathematical analysis based on fast-slow manifold separation and Markov chain theory to validate the framework. Numerical demonstration of the control and detection principle using both classic chaotic systems and models of biological and physical significance is provided. PMID:26565299

  11. Optimization of out-vessel magnetic diagnostics for plasma boundary reconstruction in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, J. A.; Svensson, J.

    2013-03-01

    To improve the low-frequency spectrum of magnetic field measurements of future tokamak reactors such as ITER, several steady-state magnetic sensor technologies have been considered. For all the studied technologies it is always advantageous to place the sensors outside the vacuum vessel and as far away from the reactor core to minimize radiation damage and temperature effects, but not so far as to compromise the accuracy of the equilibrium reconstruction. We have studied to what extent increasing the distance between out-vessel sensors and plasma can be compensated for sensor accuracy and/or density before the limit imposed by the degeneracy of the problem is reached. The study is particularized for the Swiss TCV tokamak, due to the quality of its magnetic data and its ability to operate with a wide range of plasma shapes and divertor configurations. We have scanned the plasma boundary reconstruction error as a function of out-vessel sensor density, accuracy and distance to the plasma. The study is performed for both the transient and steady-state phases of the tokamak discharge. We find that, in general, there is a broad region in the parameter space where sensor accuracy, density and proximity to the plasma can be traded for one another to obtain a desired level of accuracy in the reconstructed boundary, up to some limit. Extrapolation of the results to a tokamak reactor suggests that a hybrid configuration with sensors inside and outside the vacuum vessel could be used to obtain a good boundary reconstruction during both the transient and the flat-top of the discharges, if out-vessel magnetic sensors of sufficient density and accuracy can be placed sufficiently far outside the vessel to minimize radiation damage.

  12. Profile control of advanced tokamak plasmas in view of continuous operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, D.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of the tokamak is a very good candidate to lead to a fusion reactor. In fact, certain regimes of functioning allow today the tokamaks to attain performances close to those requested by a reactor. Among the various scenarios of functioning nowadays considered for the reactor option, certain named 'advanced scenarios' are characterized by an improvement of the stability and confinement in the plasma core, as well as by a modification of the current profile, notably thank to an auto-generated 'bootstrap' current. The general frame of this paper treats the perspective of a real-time control of advanced regimes. Concrete examples will underline the impact of diagnostics on the identification of plasma models, from which the control algorithms are constructed. Several preliminary attempts will be described.

  13. Steady-state 2. pi. pulses under conditions of passive locking of laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, K.P.; Ugozhaev, V.D.

    1984-06-01

    A theoretical study is made of laser mode locking in the regime of self-induced transparency of a passive filter. It is shown that there is a solution in the form of ultrashort steady-state 2..pi.. pulses. The range of stability of this regime and its characteristics are determined. By way of example, estimates are obtained of parameters of a steady-state pulse emitted by an alexandrite laser with a potassium absorption cell.

  14. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  15. Steady-state entanglement of a Bose-Einstein condensate and a nanomechanical resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Asjad, Muhammad; Saif, Farhan

    2011-09-15

    We analyze the steady-state entanglement between Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside an optical cavity with a moving end mirror (nanomechanical resonator) driven by a single mode laser. The quantized laser field mediates the interaction between the Bose-Einstein condensate and nanomechanical resonator. In particular, we study the influence of temperature on the entanglement of the coupled system, and note that the steady-state entanglement is fragile with respect to temperature.

  16. Customized Steady-State Constraints for Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equation Models.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Marcus; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equation models have become a wide-spread approach to analyze dynamical systems and understand underlying mechanisms. Model parameters are often unknown and have to be estimated from experimental data, e.g., by maximum-likelihood estimation. In particular, models of biological systems contain a large number of parameters. To reduce the dimensionality of the parameter space, steady-state information is incorporated in the parameter estimation process. For non-linear models, analytical steady-state calculation typically leads to higher-order polynomial equations for which no closed-form solutions can be obtained. This can be circumvented by solving the steady-state equations for kinetic parameters, which results in a linear equation system with comparatively simple solutions. At the same time multiplicity of steady-state solutions is avoided, which otherwise is problematic for optimization. When solved for kinetic parameters, however, steady-state constraints tend to become negative for particular model specifications, thus, generating new types of optimization problems. Here, we present an algorithm based on graph theory that derives non-negative, analytical steady-state expressions by stepwise removal of cyclic dependencies between dynamical variables. The algorithm avoids multiple steady-state solutions by construction. We show that our method is applicable to most common classes of biochemical reaction networks containing inhibition terms, mass-action and Hill-type kinetic equations. Comparing the performance of parameter estimation for different analytical and numerical methods of incorporating steady-state information, we show that our approach is especially well-tailored to guarantee a high success rate of optimization. PMID:27243005

  17. Customized Steady-State Constraints for Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equation Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Marcus; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equation models have become a wide-spread approach to analyze dynamical systems and understand underlying mechanisms. Model parameters are often unknown and have to be estimated from experimental data, e.g., by maximum-likelihood estimation. In particular, models of biological systems contain a large number of parameters. To reduce the dimensionality of the parameter space, steady-state information is incorporated in the parameter estimation process. For non-linear models, analytical steady-state calculation typically leads to higher-order polynomial equations for which no closed-form solutions can be obtained. This can be circumvented by solving the steady-state equations for kinetic parameters, which results in a linear equation system with comparatively simple solutions. At the same time multiplicity of steady-state solutions is avoided, which otherwise is problematic for optimization. When solved for kinetic parameters, however, steady-state constraints tend to become negative for particular model specifications, thus, generating new types of optimization problems. Here, we present an algorithm based on graph theory that derives non-negative, analytical steady-state expressions by stepwise removal of cyclic dependencies between dynamical variables. The algorithm avoids multiple steady-state solutions by construction. We show that our method is applicable to most common classes of biochemical reaction networks containing inhibition terms, mass-action and Hill-type kinetic equations. Comparing the performance of parameter estimation for different analytical and numerical methods of incorporating steady-state information, we show that our approach is especially well-tailored to guarantee a high success rate of optimization. PMID:27243005

  18. Theory of second-harmonic generation of molecular systems: The steady-state case

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Alden, R.G. ); Villaeys, A.A.; Pflumio, V. )

    1993-10-01

    In this paper, a general formalism for treating both steady-state and time-resolved second-harmonic generation for molecular systems is presented. Here, only the steady-state case will be reported. The adiabatic approximation is introduced. Four important cases, resonance-resonance, resonance--off-resonance, off-resonance--resonance, and off-resonance--off-resonance transitions, have been considered. Finally, numerical calculations of rhodamine 6G are performed to demonstrate the applications of theoretical results.

  19. The effect of oxygen on denitrification during steady-state growth of Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Betlach, M.; Kritikos, G.

    1984-01-01

    Steady-state cultures of Paracoccus halodenitrificans were grown anaerobically prior to establishing steady states at different concentrations of oxygen. In the absence of oxygen, nitrate-limited cultures produced dinitrogen, and as the oxygen supply increased, these cultures produced nitrous oxide, then nitrite. These changes reflected two phenomena: the inactivation of nitrous oxide reductase by oxygen and the diversion of electrons from nitrite to oxygen.

  20. Gain in the non-steady-state free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Min, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The non-steady-state self-consistent equation in the linear regime of the free-electron laser (FEL) and the low gain formulas in the non-steady-state FEL are derived in this paper. It is found that due to slippage the nonuniformity effect in the longitudinal distribution of the electron beam density is dominant in the influence of the electron pulse length on the gain of the FEL. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Customized Steady-State Constraints for Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equation Models.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Marcus; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equation models have become a wide-spread approach to analyze dynamical systems and understand underlying mechanisms. Model parameters are often unknown and have to be estimated from experimental data, e.g., by maximum-likelihood estimation. In particular, models of biological systems contain a large number of parameters. To reduce the dimensionality of the parameter space, steady-state information is incorporated in the parameter estimation process. For non-linear models, analytical steady-state calculation typically leads to higher-order polynomial equations for which no closed-form solutions can be obtained. This can be circumvented by solving the steady-state equations for kinetic parameters, which results in a linear equation system with comparatively simple solutions. At the same time multiplicity of steady-state solutions is avoided, which otherwise is problematic for optimization. When solved for kinetic parameters, however, steady-state constraints tend to become negative for particular model specifications, thus, generating new types of optimization problems. Here, we present an algorithm based on graph theory that derives non-negative, analytical steady-state expressions by stepwise removal of cyclic dependencies between dynamical variables. The algorithm avoids multiple steady-state solutions by construction. We show that our method is applicable to most common classes of biochemical reaction networks containing inhibition terms, mass-action and Hill-type kinetic equations. Comparing the performance of parameter estimation for different analytical and numerical methods of incorporating steady-state information, we show that our approach is especially well-tailored to guarantee a high success rate of optimization.

  2. Transient and steady-state performance of a single turbojet combustor with four different fuel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccafferty, Richard J; Donlon, Richard H

    1955-01-01

    Acceleration and steady-state performance of a tubular combustor was evaluated at two simulated altitudes with four different fuel nozzles. Temperature response lag was observed with all the nozzles. Except for rich-limit blowout, the only combustion failures observed during acceleration were with a fuel nozzle that gave an interrupted flow delivery during the acceleration. This same nozzle, because of superior fuel atomization, gave the highest steady-state combustion efficiencies.

  3. Non-equilibrium Steady States in Kac's Model Coupled to a Thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness and convergence to non-equilibrium steady states in Kac's model with an external coupling. We work in both Fourier distances and Wasserstein distances. Our methods work in the case where the external coupling is not a Maxwellian equilibrium. This provides an example of a non-equilibrium steady state. We also study the behaviour as the number of particles goes to infinity and show quantitative estimates on the convergence rate of the first marginal.

  4. Steady-state ab initio laser theory for N-level lasers.

    PubMed

    Cerjan, Alexander; Chong, Yidong; Ge, Li; Stone, A Douglas

    2012-01-01

    We show that Steady-state Ab initio Laser Theory (SALT) can be applied to find the stationary multimode lasing properties of an N-level laser. This is achieved by mapping the N-level rate equations to an effective two-level model of the type solved by the SALT algorithm. This mapping yields excellent agreement with more computationally demanding N-level time domain solutions for the steady state.

  5. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  6. On multiple alternating steady states induced by periodic spin phase perturbation waveforms.

    PubMed

    Buračas, Giedrius T; Jung, Youngkyoo; Lee, Jongho; Buxton, Richard B; Wong, Eric C; Liu, Thomas T

    2012-05-01

    Direct measurement of neural currents by means of MRI can potentially open a high temporal resolution (10-100 ms) window applicable for monitoring dynamics of neuronal activity without loss of the high spatial resolution afforded by MRI. Previously, we have shown that the alternating balanced steady state imaging affords high sensitivity to weak periodic currents owing to its amplification of periodic spin phase perturbations. This technique, however, requires precise synchronization of such perturbations to the radiofrequency pulses. Herein, we extend alternating balanced steady state imaging to multiple balanced alternating steady states for estimation of neural current waveforms. Simulations and phantom experiments show that the off-resonance profile of the multiple alternating steady state signal carries information about the frequency content of driving waveforms. In addition, the method is less sensitive than alternating balanced steady state to precise waveform timing relative to radiofrequency pulses. Thus, multiple alternating steady state technique is potentially applicable to MR imaging of the waveforms of periodic neuronal activity.

  7. Steady state effects in a two-pulse diffusion-weighted sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S.; Stilbs, Peter

    2015-04-21

    In conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements a significant amount of experimental time is used up by magnetization recovery, serving to prevent the formation of the steady state, as in the latter case the manifestation of diffusion is modulated by multiple applications of the pulse sequence and conventional diffusion coefficient inference procedures are generally not applicable. Here, an analytical expression for diffusion-related effects in a two-pulse NMR experiment (e.g., pulsed-gradient spin echo) in the steady state mode (with repetition times less than the longitudinal relaxation time of the sample) is derived by employing a Fourier series expansion within the solution of the Bloch-Torrey equations. Considerations are given for the transition conditions between the full relaxation and the steady state experiment description. The diffusion coefficient of a polymer solution (polyethylene glycol) is measured by a two-pulse sequence in the full relaxation mode and for a range of repetition times, approaching the rapid steady state experiment. The precision of the fitting employing the presented steady state solution by far exceeds that of the conventional fitting. Additionally, numerical simulations are performed yielding results strongly supporting the proposed description of the NMR diffusion measurements in the steady state.

  8. A steady-state simulation methodology for predicting runaway speed in Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinimanesh, H.; Vu, T. C.; Devals, C.; Nennemann, B.; Guibault, F.

    2014-03-01

    Runaway speed is an important performance factor for the safe operation of hydropower systems. In turbine design, the manufacturers must conduct several model tests to calculate the accurate value of runaway speed for the complete range of operating conditions, which are expensive and time-consuming. To study runaway conditions, the application of numerical tools such as unsteady CFD simulations can help to better understand the complex flow physics during transient processes. However, unsteady simulations require significant computational effort to compute accurate values of runaway speed due to difficulties related to unsteady turbulent flow modelling and instabilities. The present study presents a robust methodology based on steady-state RANS flow simulations capable of predicting the runaway speed of a Francis turbine with an adequate level of accuracy and in a reasonable simulation time. The simulations are implemented using a commercial flow solver and an iterative algorithm that relies on a smooth relation between turbine torque and speed coefficient. The impact of friction has been considered when estimating turbine torque, in order to improve the accuracy. The results of this study show good agreement with experiments.

  9. Theoretical research of helium pulsating heat pipe under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Huang, R. J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    As a new-type heat pipe, pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has several outstanding features, such as great heat transport ability, strong adjustability, small size and simple construction. PHP is a complex two-phase flow system associated with many physical subjects and parameters, which utilizes the pressure and temperature changes in volume expansion and contraction during phase changes to excite the pulsation motion of liquid plugs and vapor bubbles in the capillary tube between the evaporator and the condenser. At present time, some experimental investigation of helium PHP have been done. However, theoretical research of helium PHP is rare. In this paper, the physical and mathematical models of operating mechanism for helium PHP under steady state are established based on the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Several important parameters are correlated and solved, including the liquid filling ratio, flow velocity, heat power, temperature, etc. Based on the results, the operational driving force and flow resistances of helium PHP are analysed, and the flow and heat transfer is further studied.

  10. Two-dimensional steady-state analysis of an electrically heated thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Huimin Xue; El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-20

    A two-dimensional transient model of a single cell, long Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) is developed and its predictions are compared with published calculations and experimental data on steady-state operation of electrically heated, TOPAZ-II type TFEs. The operation parameters of the TFE, such as axial distributions of the emitter temperature, emission current density, and the electrode voltage are calculated and discussed. Results show that despite the excellent agreement between the model predictions of the axial distribution of the emitter temperature, its predictions of the maximum emission current density was lower by about 17%. This difference is attributed primarily to the J-V characteristics in the model, which could be different than those of the TOPAZ-II TFE, hence additional data on the latter is needed. When compared with experimental data, the model predictions of the electric power output are in excellent agreement with the data at thermal power input of 3.5 kW or higher, but within 10% of the data at lower thermal power.

  11. Self-organized stationary states of tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We report here on a nonlinear mechanism that forms and maintains a self-organized stationary (sawtooth free) state in tokamaks. This process was discovered by way of extensive long-time simulations using the M3D-C1 3D extended MHD code in which new physics diagnostics have been added. It is well known that most high-performance modes of tokamak operation undergo ``sawtooth'' cycles, in which the peaking of the toroidal current density triggers a periodic core instability which redistributes the current density. However, certain modes of operation are known, such as the ``hybrid'' mode in DIII-D, ASDEX-U, JT-60U and JET, and the long-lived modes in NSTX and MAST, which do not experience this cycle of instability. Empirically, it is observed that these modes maintain a non-axisymmetric equilibrium which somehow limits the peaking of the toroidal current density. The physical mechanism responsible for this has not previously been understood, but is often referred to as ``flux-pumping,'' in which poloidal flux is redistributed in order to maintain q0 >1. In this talk, we show that in long-time simulations of inductively driven plasmas, a steady-state magnetic equilibrium may be obtained in which the condition q0 >1 is maintained by a dynamo driven by a stationary marginal core interchange mode. This interchange mode, unstable because of the pressure gradient in the ultra-low shear region in the center region, causes a (1,1) perturbation in both the electrostatic potential and the magnetic field, which nonlinearly cause a (0,0) component in the loop voltage that acts to sustain the configuration. This hybrid mode may be a preferred mode of operation for ITER. We present parameter scans that indicate when this sawtooth-free operation can be expected.

  12. Electrode erosion in steady-state electric propulsion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, Thomas J.; Deininger, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The anode and cathode of a 30 kW class arcjet engine were sectioned and analyzed. This arcjet was operated for a total time of 573 hr at power levels between 25 and 30 kW with ammonia at flow rates of 0.25 and 0.27 gm/s. The accumulated run time was sufficient to clearly establish erosion patterns and their causes. The type of electron emission from various parts of the cathode surface was made clear by scanning electron microscope analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to study recrystallization on the hot anode surface. These electrodes were made of 2 percent thoriated tungsten and the surface thorium content and gradient perpendicular to the surfaces was determined by quantitative microprobe analysis. The results of this material analysis on the electrodes and recommendations for improving electrode operational life time are presented.

  13. Progress toward steady-state, high-efficiency vircators

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.; Morrison, J.J.

    1990-12-05

    The resonance at which high-efficiency operation of virtual cathode oscillators is obtained occurs when the beam frequency equals the reflex frequency to within 2%. This tolerance limit in the frequency ratio implies that cathode closure in the anode-cathode gap is not acceptable. We have developed and tested a 6-cm{sup 2} cathode that will operate longer than 1 {mu}s at 300 A/cm{sup 2} without significant closure. As yet, the full-scale (>80-cm{sup 2}) cathode has not worked quite as well. In many tests, the cathode will operate in the emission-limited temperature/field (T/F) mode for approximately 300 ns, and then transition into explosive emission with a relatively slow ({approximately}0.5 cm/{mu}s) closure rate. The current density was 45 to 90 A/cm{sup 2}. We have not run high-power rf-emission tests under conditions where the diode stays open and in resonance for the duration of the rf pulse at a current density of 250 A/cm{sup 2}, which is required for 3-GHz operation; that test remains the focus of our continuing research. We have obtained long (600-ns) duration rf pulses at low power. We have also extended the data base on microwave generation at lower power and have shown that high-efficiency resonances will occur when a multiple of the reflex frequency equals the beam frequency. This allows greater flexibility in the design and scaling of the microwave device. 6 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Bacterial dynamics in steady-state biofilters: beyond functional stability.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial community structure and function were surveyed in duplicated woodchip-biofilters operated under constant conditions for 231 days. The contaminated gaseous stream for treatment was representative of composting emissions, included ammonia, dimethyl disulfide and a mixture of five oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The community structure and diversity were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis on 16S rRNA gene fragments. During the first 42 days, microbial acclimatization revealed the influence of operating conditions and contaminant loading on the biofiltration community structure and diversity, as well as the limited impact of inoculum compared to the greater persistence of the endogenous woodchip community. During long-term operation, a high and stable removal efficiency was maintained despite a highly dynamic microbial community, suggesting the probable functional redundancy of the community. Most of the contaminant removal occurred in the first compartment, near the gas inlet, where the microbial diversity was the highest. The stratification of the microbial structures along the filter bed was statistically correlated to the longitudinal distribution of environmental conditions (selective pressure imposed by contaminant concentrations) and function (contaminant elimination capacity), highlighting the central role of the bacterial community. The reproducibility of microbial succession in replicates suggests that the community changes were presumably driven by a deterministic process.

  15. Illustrating the Steady-State Condition and the Single-Molecule Kinetic Method with the NMDA Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosman, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    The steady-state is a fundamental aspect of biochemical pathways in cells; indeed, the concept of steady-state is a definition of life itself. In a simple enzyme kinetic scheme, the steady-state condition is easy to define analytically but experimentally often difficult to capture because of its evanescent quality; the initial, constant velocity…

  16. Using bioprocess stoichiometry to build a plant-wide mass balance based steady-state WWTP model.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A

    2009-05-01

    Steady-state models are useful for design of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) because they allow reactor sizes and interconnecting flows to be simply determined from explicit equations in terms of unit operation performance criteria. Once the overall WWTP scheme is established and the main system defining parameters of the individual unit operations estimated, dynamic models can be applied to the connected unit operations to refine their design and evaluate their performance under dynamic flow and load conditions. To model anaerobic digestion (AD) within plant-wide WWTP models, not only COD and nitrogen (N) but also carbon (C) fluxes entering the AD need to be defined. Current plant-wide models, like benchmark simulation model No 2 (BSM2), impose a C flux at the AD influent. In this paper, the COD and N mass balance steady-state models of activated sludge (AS) organics degradation, nitrification and denitrification (ND) and anaerobic (AD) and aerobic (AerD) digestion of wastewater sludge are extended and linked with bioprocess transformation stoichiometry to form C, H, O, N, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and charge mass balance based models so that also C (and H and O) can be tracked through the whole WWTP. By assigning a stoichiometric composition (x, y, z and a in C(x)H(y)O(z)N(a)) to each of the five main influent wastewater organic fractions and ammonia, these, and the products generated from them via the biological processes, are tracked through the WWTP. The model is applied to two theoretical case study WWTPs treating the same raw wastewater (WW) to the same final sludge residual biodegradable COD. It is demonstrated that much useful information can be generated with the relatively simple steady-state models to aid WWTP layout design and track the different products exiting the WWTP via the solid, liquid and gas streams, such as aerobic versus anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, N loads in recycle streams, methane production for energy recovery

  17. Using bioprocess stoichiometry to build a plant-wide mass balance based steady-state WWTP model.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A

    2009-05-01

    Steady-state models are useful for design of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) because they allow reactor sizes and interconnecting flows to be simply determined from explicit equations in terms of unit operation performance criteria. Once the overall WWTP scheme is established and the main system defining parameters of the individual unit operations estimated, dynamic models can be applied to the connected unit operations to refine their design and evaluate their performance under dynamic flow and load conditions. To model anaerobic digestion (AD) within plant-wide WWTP models, not only COD and nitrogen (N) but also carbon (C) fluxes entering the AD need to be defined. Current plant-wide models, like benchmark simulation model No 2 (BSM2), impose a C flux at the AD influent. In this paper, the COD and N mass balance steady-state models of activated sludge (AS) organics degradation, nitrification and denitrification (ND) and anaerobic (AD) and aerobic (AerD) digestion of wastewater sludge are extended and linked with bioprocess transformation stoichiometry to form C, H, O, N, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and charge mass balance based models so that also C (and H and O) can be tracked through the whole WWTP. By assigning a stoichiometric composition (x, y, z and a in C(x)H(y)O(z)N(a)) to each of the five main influent wastewater organic fractions and ammonia, these, and the products generated from them via the biological processes, are tracked through the WWTP. The model is applied to two theoretical case study WWTPs treating the same raw wastewater (WW) to the same final sludge residual biodegradable COD. It is demonstrated that much useful information can be generated with the relatively simple steady-state models to aid WWTP layout design and track the different products exiting the WWTP via the solid, liquid and gas streams, such as aerobic versus anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, N loads in recycle streams, methane production for energy recovery

  18. Predicting steady-state temperature, life, skid, and film thickness in a greased preloaded hybrid ball bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, J.V.; Atwell, D.R.; Lubas, M.J.; Odessky, V. |

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the SHABERTH computer program supplemented with experimental temperature and skid data to quantify steady-state bearing operation. Parametric studies on ball diameter and number, contact angle, curvature, grease type, and preload are presented with their influence on contact stress, fatigue life, skid load, film thickness, and inner and outer race temperatures. These results are compared for a steel versus hybrid bearing set in a DB and DFSL mounting. The method presented can be applied to the design of other steel and hybrid ball thrust bearing systems.

  19. Tritium distribution in the environment in the vicinity of a chronic atmospheric source-assessment of the steady state hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major radionuclide production center. Tritium has been released to the atmosphere over the 36 year period of operation. The tritiated water concentration of the atmosphere, rain, vegetation and food have been routinely monitored during this period. Special studies have been made of tritium in soils and in the organic fractions of these same materials. The available data suggest that the average tritium concentration in the components of the terrestrial environment have approached a steady state with the two main sources of tritium, rainfall and atmospheric water vapor.

  20. Tritium distribution in the environment in the vicinity of a chronic atmospheric source-assessment of the steady state hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1990-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major radionuclide production center. Tritium has been released to the atmosphere over the 36 year period of operation. The tritiated water concentration of the atmosphere, rain, vegetation and food have been routinely monitored during this period. Special studies have been made of tritium in soils and in the organic fractions of these same materials. The available data suggest that the average tritium concentration in the components of the terrestrial environment have approached a steady state with the two main sources of tritium, rainfall and atmospheric water vapor.

  1. Characterization of energetic deuterium striking the divertor of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Whaley, J.A.; Whyte, D.G.; Parks, P.B.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1996-06-01

    The flux and energy of particles striking the divertor during steady state operation and during disruptions are parameters of central interest in the design of power producing tokamaks. The energetic particle flux to the divertor is a critical factor, as it has a large effect on material behavior and the lifetime of plasma-facing components. Here, measurements of the deuterium particle flux and energy to the divertor of the DIII-D tokamak during a series of plasmas that terminated in disruptions have been made using a silicon collector probe installed on the divertor materials exposure system (DiMES). During the steady state portion of each discharge, the probe was located under the separatrix, but immediately before disrupting the plasma, by injecting either Ar or D{sub 2} gas, the strike point of the outer divertor leg was positioned over the probe. Comparison of the amount of retained D in the probe for the two types of disruptions indicates that much of the trapped D could have resulted from exposure in the private flux zone prior to the disruption. Measurements of the depth distribution of the trapped D in the Si imply that the incident ion energy was approximately 100 eV at normal incidence and decreased slightly at oblique angles. The measurements give an upper bound to the energy of deuterons striking the divertor floor in the vicinity of the strikepoint during disruptions.

  2. Two-phase bioconversion product recovery by microfiltration I. Steady state studies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P B; Lee, S S

    1998-03-20

    Recovery of an aqueous bioconversion product from complex, two-phase Pseudomonas putida broths containing 20% (v/v) soybean oil presents a significant challenge for downstream processing. Although not used before in multiple-phase separation for complex biotech products, crossflow filtration employing ceramic filters is one of the most attractive options which allow the design of integrated, continuous bioconversion processes. As a first attempt, we studied multichannel, monolithic ceramic membranes of different nominal pore sizes and lumen diameters under steady-state conditions. The best performance was obtained with 0.2-microm-pore/3-mm-lumen membrane, which completely rejected both cells and oil droplets from the permeate, creating a clear aqueous product stream. Although the same separation was achieved, the 50K molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) ultrafilter showed greater irreversible but similar reversible resistance, in addition to an order-of-magnitude higher membrane resistance. Larger nominal pore microfilters, such as 0.45 and 1.0 microm, experienced both cell and oil leakage even at low transmembrane pressure (10 psig). Attributed to greater shear at the same recirculation rate, smaller lumen filters did provide greater permeate flux. However, for practical purposes, the 0. 2-microm-pore/4-mm-lumen ceramic membrane was chosen for further evaluation. Transmembrane pressures up to 50 psig provided only marginal gains in filtration performance, whereas increasing shear rate resulted in linear increases in steady-state flux, presumably due to formation of shear-sensitive, complex gel/oil/cell layer near the membrane surface. A nominal shear rate of 9200 s-1 and 20 psig transmembrane pressure were chosen as optimal operating conditions. Additional studies in a clean system revealed that as low as 5% (v/v) soybean oil in deionized (DI) water resulted in an order-of-magnitude decline in steady-state permeate flux. Breakthrough of oil droplets occurred at 35 psig

  3. THE DEBRIS DISK OF VEGA: A STEADY-STATE COLLISIONAL CASCADE, NATURALLY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.; Loehne, T.; Krivov, A. V.

    2010-01-10

    The archetypical debris disk around Vega has been observed intensively over the past 25 years. It has been argued that the resulting photometric data and images may be in contradiction with a standard, steady-state collisional scenario of the disk evolution. In particular, the emission in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) appears to be in excess of what is expected from a 'Kuiper belt' at approx100 AU, which is evident in the submillimeter images and inferred from the majority of photometric points. Here we re-address the question of whether or not the Vega disk observations are compatible with a continuous dust production through a collisional cascade. Instead of seeking a size and spatial distribution of dust that provide the best fit to observations, our approach involves physical modeling of the debris disk 'from the sources'. We assume that dust is maintained by a belt of parent planetesimals, and employ our collisional and radiative transfer codes to consistently model the size and radial distribution of the disk material and then thermal emission of dust. In doing so, we vary a broad set of parameters, including the stellar properties, the exact location, extension, and dynamical excitation of the planetesimal belt, chemical composition of solids, and the collisional prescription. We are able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution in the entire wavelength range from the near-IR to millimeter, as well as the mid-IR and submillimeter radial brightness profiles of the Vega disk. Thus, our results suggest that the Vega disk observations are not in contradiction with a steady-state collisional dust production, and we put important constraints on the disk parameters and physical processes that sustain it. The total disk mass in approx<100 km-sized bodies is estimated to be approx10 Earth masses. Provided that collisional cascade has been operating over much of the Vega age of approx350 Myr, the disk must have lost a few Earth masses of solids during that time. We

  4. High βp plasma formation using off-axis ECCD in Ohmic heated plasma in the spherical tokamak QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kishore; Zushi, H.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Hanada, K.

    2015-03-01

    High poloidal beta (ɛβp ~ 1) operation in steady state condition in tokamaks is of great interest and has previously been demonstrated using NBI, LHCD and low current (Ip) plasma for a short time (<0.5 s). A very few experiments however, have been performed towards the investigation of highest obtainable βp in tokamak plasma. In this work we report the first result of high βp production and its sustainment though an off axis ECCD at two different frequencies (fundamental and second harmonic) in Ohmic (OH) target plasma. With application of ECCD, plasma βp increased to encounter an equilibrium limit and the standard limiter configuration is transformed to an Inboard Poloidal field Null (IPN) configuration. Both off-axis and on-axis ECCD is studied and found to have some distinctive features, which are discussed in this paper.

  5. An Efficient Steady-State Analysis Method for Large Boolean Networks with High Maximum Node Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Changki; Hwang, Jeewon; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Shin, Insik

    2015-01-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used to model biological processes lacking detailed kinetic information. Despite their simplicity, Boolean network dynamics can still capture some important features of biological systems such as stable cell phenotypes represented by steady states. For small models, steady states can be determined through exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. As the number of nodes increases, however, the state space grows exponentially thus making it difficult to find steady states. Over the last several decades, many studies have addressed how to handle such a state space explosion. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to a satisfiability solving algorithm due to its potential scalability to handle large networks. Meanwhile, there still lies a problem in the case of large models with high maximum node connectivity where the satisfiability solving algorithm is known to be computationally intractable. To address the problem, this paper presents a new partitioning-based method that breaks down a given network into smaller subnetworks. Steady states of each subnetworks are identified by independently applying the satisfiability solving algorithm. Then, they are combined to construct the steady states of the overall network. To efficiently apply the satisfiability solving algorithm to each subnetwork, it is crucial to find the best partition of the network. In this paper, we propose a method that divides each subnetwork to be smallest in size and lowest in maximum node connectivity. This minimizes the total cost of finding all steady states in entire subnetworks. The proposed algorithm is compared with others for steady states identification through a number of simulations on both published small models and randomly generated large models with differing maximum node connectivities. The simulation results show that our method can scale up to several hundreds of nodes even for Boolean networks with high maximum node connectivity. The

  6. Steady state analysis of Boolean molecular network models via model reduction and computational algebra

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A key problem in the analysis of mathematical models of molecular networks is the determination of their steady states. The present paper addresses this problem for Boolean network models, an increasingly popular modeling paradigm for networks lacking detailed kinetic information. For small models, the problem can be solved by exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. But for larger models this is not feasible, since the size of the phase space grows exponentially with the dimension of the network. The dimension of published models is growing to over 100, so that efficient methods for steady state determination are essential. Several methods have been proposed for large networks, some of them heuristic. While these methods represent a substantial improvement in scalability over exhaustive enumeration, the problem for large networks is still unsolved in general. Results This paper presents an algorithm that consists of two main parts. The first is a graph theoretic reduction of the wiring diagram of the network, while preserving all information about steady states. The second part formulates the determination of all steady states of a Boolean network as a problem of finding all solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the finite number system with two elements. This problem can be solved with existing computer algebra software. This algorithm compares favorably with several existing algorithms for steady state determination. One advantage is that it is not heuristic or reliant on sampling, but rather determines algorithmically and exactly all steady states of a Boolean network. The code for the algorithm, as well as the test suite of benchmark networks, is available upon request from the corresponding author. Conclusions The algorithm presented in this paper reliably determines all steady states of sparse Boolean networks with up to 1000 nodes. The algorithm is effective at analyzing virtually all published models even those of moderate

  7. An Efficient Steady-State Analysis Method for Large Boolean Networks with High Maximum Node Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Changki; Hwang, Jeewon; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Shin, Insik

    2015-01-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used to model biological processes lacking detailed kinetic information. Despite their simplicity, Boolean network dynamics can still capture some important features of biological systems such as stable cell phenotypes represented by steady states. For small models, steady states can be determined through exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. As the number of nodes increases, however, the state space grows exponentially thus making it difficult to find steady states. Over the last several decades, many studies have addressed how to handle such a state space explosion. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to a satisfiability solving algorithm due to its potential scalability to handle large networks. Meanwhile, there still lies a problem in the case of large models with high maximum node connectivity where the satisfiability solving algorithm is known to be computationally intractable. To address the problem, this paper presents a new partitioning-based method that breaks down a given network into smaller subnetworks. Steady states of each subnetworks are identified by independently applying the satisfiability solving algorithm. Then, they are combined to construct the steady states of the overall network. To efficiently apply the satisfiability solving algorithm to each subnetwork, it is crucial to find the best partition of the network. In this paper, we propose a method that divides each subnetwork to be smallest in size and lowest in maximum node connectivity. This minimizes the total cost of finding all steady states in entire subnetworks. The proposed algorithm is compared with others for steady states identification through a number of simulations on both published small models and randomly generated large models with differing maximum node connectivities. The simulation results show that our method can scale up to several hundreds of nodes even for Boolean networks with high maximum node connectivity. The

  8. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  9. Measurement and Characterization of Helicopter Noise in Steady-State and Maneuvering Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H.; Greenwood, Eric; Sickenberger, Richard D.; Gopalan, Gaurav; Sim, Ben Well-C; Conner, David; Moralez, Ernesto; Decker, William A.

    2007-01-01

    A special acoustic flight test program was performed on the Bell 206B helicopter outfitted with an in-flight microphone boom/array attached to the helicopter while simultaneous acoustic measurements were made using a linear ground array of microphones arranged to be perpendicular to the flight path. Air and ground noise measurements were made in steady-state longitudinal and steady turning flight, and during selected dynamic maneuvers. Special instrumentation, including direct measurement of the helicopter s longitudinal tip-path-plane (TPP) angle, Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) measurements, and a pursuit guidance display were used to measure important noise controlling parameters and to make the task of flying precise operating conditions and flight track easier for the pilot. Special care was also made to test only in very low winds. The resulting acoustic data is of relatively high quality and shows the value of carefully monitoring and controlling the helicopter s performance state. This paper has shown experimentally, that microphones close to the helicopter can be used to estimate the specific noise sources that radiate to the far field, if the microphones are positioned correctly relative to the noise source. Directivity patterns for steady, turning flight were also developed, for the first time, and connected to the turning performance of the helicopter. Some of the acoustic benefits of combining normally separated flight segments (i.e. an accelerated segment and a descending segment) were also demonstrated.

  10. Evaluation of boundary lubricants using steady-state wear and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to establish operating limits and procedures for obtaining improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester base and C-other base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results of a parametric study with varying loads and speeds slowed that satisfactory test conditions for studying the direction and wear characteristics in the boundary lubrication regime with this test device were found to be 1 kilogram load; 7 to 9 meters-per-minute (50 rpm) surface speed; dry air test atmosphere (less than 100 ppm H2O); and use of a time stepwise procedure for measuring wear. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates resulted from the two fluid studies which had a linearity of about 99 percent after initially higher wear rates and friction coefficients during run-in periods of 20 to 40 minutes.

  11. Steady-state transport characteristics of photoconductor based on dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Wang, X. Q.; Lu, Y. M.; Liu, Z. Y.; Cai, C. B.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work, three photoconductors based on dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 are designed with two dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) connected together using a common counter electrode but different connecting approaches for electrolytes and TiO2 film. DC steady-state transport measurements on source and drain corresponding to the photoanodes of two constituent DSSC units, respectively, show that the three photoconductive devices exhibit similar transistor characteristics, regardless of their different electronic connecting approaches. It is revealed that their transport characteristics are determined by the effective areas of the photoanode and the counter electrode, rather than the connection of electrolytes and TiO2 film. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dominant factor of transport behavior is the imbalanced energy band caused by the match of intrinsic potential within two constituent DSSC units. Due to unique mechanism and relatively simple fabrication process, the present phototransistors have potentials for an economical and efficient light-operated switch as well as an emerged optical communication device.

  12. Efficiency arcjet thruster with controlled arc startup and steady state attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William W. (Inventor); Knowles, Steven C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved efficiency arcjet thruster has a constrictor and electrically-conductive nozzle anode defining an arc chamber, and an electrically-conductive rod having a tip spaced upstream from the constrictor and defining a cathode spaced from the anode by a gap generally coextensive with the arc chamber. An electrical potential is applied to the anode and cathode to generate an electrical arc in the arc chamber from the cathode to anode. Catalytically decomposed hydrazine is supplied to the arc chamber with generation of the arc so as to produce thermal heating and expansion thereof through the nozzle. The constrictor can have a electrically insulative portion disposed between the cathode tip and the nozzle anode, and an electrically-conductive anode extension disposed along the insulative portion so as to define an auxiliary gap with the cathode tip substantially smaller than the gap defined between the cathode and nozzle anode for facilitating startup of arc generation. The constrictor can also include an electrically-conductive electrode with a variable electrical potential to vary the shape of the arc generated in the arc chamber. Also, the cathode is mounted for axial movement such that the gap between its tip and the nozzle anode can be varied to facilitate a generally nonerosive generation of the electrical arc at startup and reliable steady state operation. Further, the arc chamber can have a nonparallel subsonic-to-supersonic transition configuration, or alternatively solely a nonparallel supersonic configuration, for improved arc attachment.

  13. Field study of subsurface heterogeneity with steady-state hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2013-01-01

    Remediation of subsurface contamination requires an understanding of the contaminant (history, source location, plume extent and concentration, etc.), and, knowledge of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) that governs groundwater flow and solute transport. Many methods exist for characterizing K heterogeneity, but most if not all methods require the collection of a large number of small-scale data and its interpolation. In this study, we conduct a hydraulic tomography survey at a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) located at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada to sequentially interpret four pumping tests using the steady-state form of the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) (Yeh and Liu 2000). The resulting three-dimensional (3D) K distribution (or K-tomogram) is compared against: (1) K distributions obtained through the inverse modeling of individual pumping tests using SSLE, and (2) effective hydraulic conductivity (K(eff) ) estimates obtained by automatically calibrating a groundwater flow model while treating the medium to be homogeneous. Such a K(eff) is often used for designing remediation operations, and thus is used as the basis for comparison with the K-tomogram. Our results clearly show that hydraulic tomography is superior to the inversions of single pumping tests or K(eff) estimates. This is particularly significant for contaminated sites where an accurate representation of the flow field is critical for simulating contaminant transport and injection of chemical and biological agents used for active remediation of contaminant source zones and plumes.

  14. Steady state security assessment in deregulated power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjure, Durgesh Padmakar

    Power system operations are undergoing changes, brought about primarily due to deregulation and subsequent restructuring of the power industry. The primary intention of the introduction of deregulation in power systems was to bring about competition and improved customer focus. The underlying motive was increased economic benefit. Present day power system analysis is much different than what it was earlier, essentially due to the transformation of the power industry from being cost-based to one that is price-based and due to open access of transmission networks to the various market participants. Power is now treated as a commodity and is traded in an open market. The resultant interdependence of the technical criteria and the economic considerations has only accentuated the need for accurate analysis in power systems. The main impetus in security analysis studies is on efficient assessment of the post-contingency status of the system, accuracy being of secondary consideration. In most cases, given the time frame involved, it is not feasible to run a complete AC load flow for determining the post-contingency state of the system. Quite often, it is not warranted as well, as an indication of the state of the system is desired rather than the exact quantification of the various state variables. With the inception of deregulation, transmission networks are subjected to a host of multilateral transactions, which would influence physical system quantities like real power flows, security margins and voltage levels. For efficient asset utilization and maximization of the revenue, more often than not, transmission networks are operated under stressed conditions, close to security limits. Therefore, a quantitative assessment of the extent to which each transaction adversely affects the transmission network is required. This needs to be done accurately as the feasibility of the power transactions and subsequent decisions (execution, curtailment, pricing) would depend upon the

  15. Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-03-15

    The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters.

  16. Operation of bolometer system using Pt foil on SiN substrate detector for EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y. M.; Mao, S. T.; Hu, L. Q.; Xu, P.; Xu, L. Q.; Zhang, J. Z.; Lin, S. Y.

    2016-11-01

    The foil resistive bolometer diagnostic on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak has been upgraded partly with a new generation of detectors. The new detectors have faster response time. However, the microwave interference is still a serious issue for the bolometer system. The system response to microwave is tested, and the test results show that the closed Wheatstone bridge circuit in the detector is the most sensitive component to high power microwave field. Simulation results of microwave transmission by the high frequency structure simulator software and shielding design are also presented.

  17. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, S.; Bieli, R.; Bergmann, U. C.

    2012-07-01

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  18. Development of High vacuum facility for baking and cool down experiments for SST-1 Tokamak components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ziauddin; Pathan, Firozkhan S.; Yuvakiran, Paravastu; George, Siju; Manthena, Himabindu; Raval, Dilip C.; Thankey, Prashant L.; Dhanani, Kalpesh R.; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Pradhan, Subrata

    2012-11-01

    SST-1 Tokamak, a steady state super-conducting device, is under refurbishment to demonstrate the plasma discharge for the duration of 1000 second. The major fabricated components of SST-1 like vacuum vessel, thermal shields, superconducting magnets etc have to be tested for their functional parameters. During machine operation, vacuum vessel will be baked at 150 °C, thermal shields will be operated at 85 K and magnet system will be operated at 4.5 K. All these components must have helium leak tightness under these conditions so far as the machine operation is concerned. In order to validate the helium leak tightness of these components, in-house high vacuum chamber is fabricated. This paper describes the analysis, design and fabrication of high vacuum chamber to demonstrate these functionalities. Also some results will be presented.

  19. Formation of a 100-kA tokamak discharge in the Princeton large torus by lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.; Stevens, J.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Cohen, S.; Denne, B.; Efthimion, P.; Hinnov, E.

    1984-03-01

    The development of non-inductive current drive is of great importance in establishing the tokamak as a long-pulse or steady-state fusion reactor. Lower hybrid waves, carrying 200 kW of power at 800 MHz, have been launched into the PLT tokamak to initiate and drive the discharge current to a level in excess of 100 kA.

  20. Dynamic evolution of initial instability during non-steady-state growth.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhibo; Zheng, Wenjian; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic evolution of initial instability is investigated by an analytic model obtained by modifying the theory of Warren and Langer [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2702 (1993)] and the quantitative phase-field model in directional solidification under transient conditions for realistic parameters of a dilute alloy. The evolutions of tip velocity and concentration in the liquid side of the interface predicted by the analytic model agree very well with that from the phase-field simulation in the linear growth stage of the non-steady-state growth, indicating that the model could be used as a convenient method to study the initial instability during non-steady-state growth. The influences of non-steady-state conditions which include the increasing rate of pulling speed and temperature gradient at the onset of initial instability are investigated, and we find that, the initial instability seems to depend strongly on the non-steady-state conditions and the non-steady-state history, and thus, it should be primarily considered in the study of the transient growth.

  1. Dynamic evolution of initial instability during non-steady-state growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhibo; Zheng, Wenjian; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic evolution of initial instability is investigated by an analytic model obtained by modifying the theory of Warren and Langer [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2702 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.2702] and the quantitative phase-field model in directional solidification under transient conditions for realistic parameters of a dilute alloy. The evolutions of tip velocity and concentration in the liquid side of the interface predicted by the analytic model agree very well with that from the phase-field simulation in the linear growth stage of the non-steady-state growth, indicating that the model could be used as a convenient method to study the initial instability during non-steady-state growth. The influences of non-steady-state conditions which include the increasing rate of pulling speed and temperature gradient at the onset of initial instability are investigated, and we find that, the initial instability seems to depend strongly on the non-steady-state conditions and the non-steady-state history, and thus, it should be primarily considered in the study of the transient growth.

  2. Perception of steady-state vowels and vowelless syllables by adults and children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, Susan

    2005-04-01

    Vowels can be produced as long, isolated, and steady-state, but that is not how they are found in natural speech. Instead natural speech consists of almost continuously changing (i.e., dynamic) acoustic forms from which mature listeners recover underlying phonetic form. Some theories suggest that children need steady-state information to recognize vowels (and so learn vowel systems), even though that information is sparse in natural speech. The current study examined whether young children can recover vowel targets from dynamic forms, or whether they need steady-state information. Vowel recognition was measured for adults and children (3, 5, and 7 years) for natural productions of /dæd/, /dUd/ /æ/, /U/ edited to make six stimulus sets: three dynamic (whole syllables; syllables with middle 50-percent replaced by cough; syllables with all but the first and last three pitch periods replaced by cough), and three steady-state (natural, isolated vowels; reiterated pitch periods from those vowels; reiterated pitch periods from the syllables). Adults scored nearly perfectly on all but first/last three pitch period stimuli. Children performed nearly perfectly only when the entire syllable was heard, and performed similarly (near 80%) for all other stimuli. Consequently, children need dynamic forms to perceive vowels; steady-state forms are not preferred.

  3. Analytical solution of steady-state equations for chemical reaction networks with bilinear rate laws.

    PubMed

    Halász, Adám M; Lai, Hong-Jian; McCabe Pryor, Meghan; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    True steady states are a rare occurrence in living organisms, yet their knowledge is essential for quasi-steady-state approximations, multistability analysis, and other important tools in the investigation of chemical reaction networks (CRN) used to describe molecular processes on the cellular level. Here, we present an approach that can provide closed form steady-state solutions to complex systems, resulting from CRN with binary reactions and mass-action rate laws. We map the nonlinear algebraic problem of finding steady states onto a linear problem in a higher-dimensional space. We show that the linearized version of the steady-state equations obeys the linear conservation laws of the original CRN. We identify two classes of problems for which complete, minimally parameterized solutions may be obtained using only the machinery of linear systems and a judicious choice of the variables used as free parameters. We exemplify our method, providing explicit formulae, on CRN describing signal initiation of two important types of RTK receptor-ligand systems, VEGF and EGF-ErbB1.

  4. Steady-State Model of Solar Wind Electrons and Implications for Kappa Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, P. H.; Choe, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The solar wind electrons are made of three or four distinct components, which are core Maxwellian background, isotropic halo, and super-halo (and sometimes, highly field-aligned strahl component which can be considered as a fourth element). A recent paper [Kim et al., ApJ, 806, 32 (2015)] puts forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The halo electrons are assumed to be in dynamical steady state with the whistler fluctuations, while the super-halo electrons maintain dynamical steady-state equilibrium with the Langmuir fluctuations, known as the quasi-thermal noise. However, the model was based upon the consideration of steady-state electron particle kinetic equation. The present paper completes the analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the coupled equations enjoy two exact solutions, the Maxwellian and inverse power-law velocity distribution functions (VDFs). Kim et al. (2015) had modeled both halo and super-halo electrons by kappa VDFs. Since the kappa VDF matches the Maxwellian model for low energy and an inverse power-law for high-energy tail, the fact that exact solutions represent both aspects provides the plasma physical justification for the kappa VDF.

  5. Synchronous machine steady-state stability analysis using an artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.R.; Hsu, Y.Y. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    A new type of artificial neural network is proposed for the steady-state stability analysis of a synchronous generator. In the developed artificial neutral network, those system variables which play an important role in steady-state stability such as generator outputs and power system stabilizer parameters are employed as the inputs. The output of the neural net provides the information on steady-state stability. Once the connection weights of the neural network have been learned using a set of training data derived off-line, the neural net can be applied to analyze the steady-state stability of the system time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed neural net, steady-state stability analysis is performed on a synchronous generator connected to a large power system. It is found that the proposed neural net requires much less training time than the multilayer feedforward network with backpropagation-momentum learning algorithm. It is also concluded from the test results that correct stability assessment can be achieved by the neural network.

  6. Analytical Solution of Steady State Equations for Chemical Reaction Networks with Bilinear Rate Laws

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Ádám M.; Lai, Hong-Jian; McCabe, Meghan M.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    True steady states are a rare occurrence in living organisms, yet their knowledge is essential for quasi-steady state approximations, multistability analysis, and other important tools in the investigation of chemical reaction networks (CRN) used to describe molecular processes on the cellular level. Here we present an approach that can provide closed form steady-state solutions to complex systems, resulting from CRN with binary reactions and mass-action rate laws. We map the nonlinear algebraic problem of finding steady states onto a linear problem in a higher dimensional space. We show that the linearized version of the steady state equations obeys the linear conservation laws of the original CRN. We identify two classes of problems for which complete, minimally parameterized solutions may be obtained using only the machinery of linear systems and a judicious choice of the variables used as free parameters. We exemplify our method, providing explicit formulae, on CRN describing signal initiation of two important types of RTK receptor-ligand systems, VEGF and EGF-ErbB1. PMID:24334389

  7. Steady state bifurcation of a periodically excited system under delayed feedback controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A. Y. T.; Guo, Zhongjin; Myers, Alan

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the steady state bifurcation of a periodically excited system subject to time-delayed feedback controls by the combined method of residue harmonic balance and polynomial homotopy continuation. Three kinds of delayed feedback controls are considered to examine the effects of different delayed feedback controls and delay time on the steady state response. By means of polynomial homotopy continuation, all the possible steady state solutions corresponding the third-order superharmonic and second-subharmonic responses are derived analytically, i.e. without numerical integration. It is found that the delayed feedback changes the bifurcating curves qualitatively and possibly eliminates the saddle-node bifurcation during resonant. The delayed position-velocity coupling and the delayed velocity feedback controls can destabilize the steady state responses. Coexisting periodic solutions, period-doubling bifurcation and even chaos are found in these control systems. The neighborhood of the periodic solutions is verified numerically in the phase portraits. The various effects of time delay on the steady state response are investigated. Many new phenomena are observed.

  8. Steady state scenario development with elevated minimum safety factor on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petrie, T. W.; Park, J. M.; Turco, F.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Lasnier, C. T.; Hanson, J. M.; Politzter, P. A.; In, Y.; Hyatt, A. W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    On DIII-D (Luxon 2005 Fusion Sci. Technol. 48 828), a high β scenario with minimum safety factor (qmin) near 1.4 has been optimized with new tools and shown to be a favourable candidate for long pulse or steady state operation in future devices. The new capability to redirect up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) from on- to off-axis improves the ability to sustain elevated qmin with a less peaked pressure profile. These changes increase the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) n = 1 mode βN limit thus providing a path forward for increasing the noninductive current drive fraction by operating at high βN. Quasi-stationary discharges free of tearing modes have been sustained at βN = 3.5 and βT = 3.6% for two current profile diffusion timescales (about 3 s) limited by neutral beam duration. The discharge performance has normalized fusion performance expected to give fusion gain Q ≈ 5 in a device the size of ITER. Analysis of the poloidal flux evolution and current drive balance show that the loop voltage profile is almost relaxed even with 25% of the current driven inductively, and qmin remains elevated near 1.4. These observations increase confidence that the current profile will not evolve to one unstable to a tearing mode. In preliminary tests a divertor heat flux reduction technique based on producing a radiating mantle with neon injection appears compatible with this operating scenario. 0D model extrapolations suggest it may be possible to push this scenario up to 100% noninductive current drive by raising βN. Similar discharges with qmin = 1.5-2 were susceptible to tearing modes and off-axis fishbones, and with qmin > 2 lower normalized global energy confinement time is observed.

  9. TFTR: Present results and prospects for tritium operation

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experiments in TFTR are making contributions to several critical problem areas of tokamak reactor design. The magnitude of tokamak plasma transport is found to be sensitive to the shape of the density profile: central peaking may be advantageous for high-temperature tokamak confinement. For moderate-Q reactor operation, the present TFTR data base suffices to solve the three main steady-state reactor-plasma-physics problems of current drive, refueling, and impurity control. The achievement of high Q-values at high fusion power densities is being pursued in the economically promising direction of maximizing performance at moderate plasma current. In TFTR D-T plasmas, fusion reactions due to non-Maxwellian energetic-ion components will serve to generate alpha-particle populations of significant magnitude, permitting the near-term study of collective alpha-particle phenomena. 56 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effect of steady-state faldaprevir on the pharmacokinetics of steady-state methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone in subjects receiving stable addiction management therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, David; Schobelock, Michael J; Riesenberg, Robert R; Vince, Bradley D; Webster, Lynn R; Adeniji, Abidemi; Elgadi, Mabrouk; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-01-01

    The effects of steady-state faldaprevir on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of steady-state methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone were assessed in 34 healthy male and female subjects receiving stable addiction management therapy. Subjects continued receiving a stable oral dose of either methadone (up to a maximum dose of 180 mg per day) or buprenorphine-naloxone (up to a maximum dose of 24 mg-6 mg per day) and also received oral faldaprevir (240 mg) once daily (QD) for 8 days following a 480-mg loading dose. Serial blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. The pharmacodynamics of the opioid maintenance regimens were evaluated by the objective and subjective opioid withdrawal scales. Coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in geometric mean ratios for the steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24,ss)), the steady-state maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (C(max,ss)), and the steady-state concentration of the drug in plasma at 24 h (C(24,ss)) of 0.92 to 1.18 for (R)-methadone, (S)-methadone, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone, with 90% confidence intervals including, or very close to including, 1.00 (no effect), suggesting a limited overall effect of faldaprevir. Although individual data showed moderate variability in the exposures between subjects and treatments, there was no evidence of symptoms of opiate overdose or withdrawal either during the coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone or after faldaprevir dosing was stopped. Similar faldaprevir exposures were observed in the methadone- and buprenorphine-naloxone-treated subjects. In conclusion, faldaprevir at 240 mg QD can be coadministered with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone without dose adjustment, although given the relatively narrow therapeutic windows of these agents, monitoring for opiate overdose and withdrawal may still be appropriate. (This

  11. Effect of Steady-State Faldaprevir on the Pharmacokinetics of Steady-State Methadone and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Subjects Receiving Stable Addiction Management Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, David; Schobelock, Michael J.; Riesenberg, Robert R.; Vince, Bradley D.; Webster, Lynn R.; Adeniji, Abidemi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    The effects of steady-state faldaprevir on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of steady-state methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone were assessed in 34 healthy male and female subjects receiving stable addiction management therapy. Subjects continued receiving a stable oral dose of either methadone (up to a maximum dose of 180 mg per day) or buprenorphine-naloxone (up to a maximum dose of 24 mg-6 mg per day) and also received oral faldaprevir (240 mg) once daily (QD) for 8 days following a 480-mg loading dose. Serial blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. The pharmacodynamics of the opioid maintenance regimens were evaluated by the objective and subjective opioid withdrawal scales. Coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in geometric mean ratios for the steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24,ss), the steady-state maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax,ss), and the steady-state concentration of the drug in plasma at 24 h (C24,ss) of 0.92 to 1.18 for (R)-methadone, (S)-methadone, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone, with 90% confidence intervals including, or very close to including, 1.00 (no effect), suggesting a limited overall effect of faldaprevir. Although individual data showed moderate variability in the exposures between subjects and treatments, there was no evidence of symptoms of opiate overdose or withdrawal either during the coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone or after faldaprevir dosing was stopped. Similar faldaprevir exposures were observed in the methadone- and buprenorphine-naloxone-treated subjects. In conclusion, faldaprevir at 240 mg QD can be coadministered with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone without dose adjustment, although given the relatively narrow therapeutic windows of these agents, monitoring for opiate overdose and withdrawal may still be appropriate. (This study

  12. Steady state performance, photo-induced performance degradation and their relation to transient hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ajay Kumar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is a serious concern as it creates confusions about actual cell performance and raises questions on its reliability. Although a lot of effort has been made to understand the origin of hysteresis, knowing whether hysteresis affects the cell performance while they are in practical use (operated constantly at maximum power point) is not yet examined. In the present study, we investigate steady state performance and performance stability of perovskite solar cells (planar architecture with varying perovskite film thickness and TiO2 mesoscopic structure with different TiO2 compact layer thickness exhibiting hysteresis of different magnitudes) operating across an external load in relation to hysteresis. The planar cells with larger hysteresis exhibit a steady state current that closely matches the value determined on forward voltage scan. Cyclic photocurrent-dark current measurements on cells with hysteresis of different magnitudes reveal that photo-induced electrical instability (not material degradation), which might be originated from ion migration or photo-induced traps formation, is not related to hysteresis. Performance of the cells is recovered partially or fully, depending on the device structure, on storage in dark. TiO2 meso-structure cells tend to show complete recovery while the planar cells recover partially.

  13. Transient getter scheme for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi, J.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to attain the largest fusion power gain depends critically on minimizing plasma contamination and controlling the densities of the reacting deuterium and tritium. Experiments on a number of tokamaks have demonstrated that gettering over an appreciable surface area (greater than or equal to 10%) of the vacuum vessel greatly facilitates both of these objectives. One particular problem in implementing a surface pumping system in TFTR, however, is a restriction on the maximum allowable tritium content of the getter. This restriction could require regeneration of the absorbed tritium after as few as 50 machine pulses. We have developed a scheme utilizing SAES Zr/Al getter modules which obviates the need for such frequent interruptions of machine operation by taking advantage of the pulsed operation of TFTR. With the Zr/Al getter at temperatures between 500/sup 0/C to 600/sup 0/C it is possible to achieve a quasi-steady state in the tritium loading where the quantity of tritium desorbed between pulses is equal to the quantity which is absorbed during a pulse. Since frequent thermal cycling is not required, this scheme also reduces the possibility of Zr/Al getter material fatigue.

  14. Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Incorporation by DNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Peter Guengerich, F

    2016-06-01

    Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis is a powerful and widely used method to obtain multiple kinetic parameters. This protocol provides a step-by-step procedure for pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of single-nucleotide incorporation by a DNA polymerase. It describes the experimental details of DNA substrate annealing, reaction mixture preparation, handling of the RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, denaturing polyacrylamide DNA gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation, and data analysis. The core and unique part of this protocol is the rationale for preparation of the reaction mixture (the ratio of the polymerase to the DNA substrate) and methods for conducting pre-steady-state assays on an RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, as well as data interpretation after analysis. In addition, the methods for the DNA substrate annealing and DNA polyacrylamide gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation and analysis are suitable for use in other studies. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Steady-state two-atom entanglement in a pumped cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nihira, Hideomi; Stroud, C. R. Jr.

    2009-10-15

    In this paper we explore the possibility of a steady-state entanglement of two two-level atoms inside a pumped cavity by taking into account cavity leakage and the spontaneous emission of photons by the atoms. We describe the system in the dressed state picture in which the coherence is built into the dressed states while transitions between the dressed states are incoherent. Our model assumes the vacuum Rabi splitting of the dressed states to be much larger than any of the decay parameters of the system which allows atom-field coherence to build up before any decay process takes over. We show that, under our model, a pumping field cannot entangle two closed two-level atoms inside the cavity in the steady-state, but a steady-state entanglement can be achieved with two open two-level atoms.

  16. Analytical Complementary Relationship Between Actual and Potential Evaporation Defined by Steady State Reference Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Aminzadeh, M.; Roderick, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from porous surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady-state reference temperature for air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady-state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and available energy is consumed by evaporation. Potential evaporation based on steady-state surface temperature was in surprisingly good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that pan evaporation occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new analytical generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship across a wide range of meteorological conditions with good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  17. Equilibrium and Steady State of Dense Z-Pinches Superposing a Small Amount of Axial Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Tetsu

    2016-07-01

    The pressure equilibrium and steady state of z-pinches trapping a small amount of axial magnetic flux are studied. The Bennett relation and the Pease-Braginskii-current are modified, taking into account the superposed axial field. The line energy density decreases in the modified Bennett relation, but the decrease is only of the order ɛ2, where ɛ = (the axial field strength at the axis)/(the azimuthal field strength at the plasma periphery) ≪ 1. On the other hand, the current in the steady state can increase without being limited by the Pease-Braginskii-current. Hence, the radiation collapse is prevented. The decrease of line energy density in the modified Bennett relation is almost canceled in the steady state.

  18. Analytical and experimental study of steady-state convection in a double-loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mihir; Pruzan, D. A.; Torrance, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    Steady-state natural convection in a toroidal loop with a heated diametrical branch and cooled side branches is studied. The loop is rotated to vary the tilt angle of the diametral branch. A one-dimensional analysis provides the fluid velocities and temperature distributions in the loop. The effects of axial conduction are examined. With increasing tilt from the vertical, the fluid in the lower side branch slows down and reverses. The flow through the central branch increases and the main return path is through the upper side branch. For small tilt angles around the horizontal, multiple steady states exist. Comparison experiments on a water-filled glass loop are in qualitative agreement with the analysis and multiple steady states are observed.

  19. New method for studying steady states in quantum impurity problems: the interacting resonant level model.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2007-08-17

    We develop a new perturbative method for studying any steady states of quantum impurities, in or out of equilibrium. We show that steady-state averages are completely fixed by basic properties of the steady-state (Hershfield's) density matrix along with dynamical "impurity conditions." This gives the full perturbative expansion without Feynman diagrams (matrix products instead are used), and "resums" into an equilibrium average that may lend itself to numerical procedures. We calculate the universal current in the interacting resonant level model (IRLM) at finite bias V to first order in Coulomb repulsion U for all V and temperatures. We find that the bias, like the temperature, cuts off low-energy processes. In the IRLM, this implies a power-law decay of the current at large V (also recently observed by Boulat and Saleur at some finite value of U).

  20. Casimir effect in the nonequilibrium steady state of a quantum spin chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, D. L.; Racz, Z.

    2010-05-15

    We present a fully microscopics-based calculation of the Casimir effect in a nonequilibrium system, namely, an energy-flux-driven quantum XX chain. The force between the walls (transverse-field impurities) is calculated in a nonequilibrium steady state which is prepared by letting the system evolve from an initial state with the two halves of the chain prepared at equilibrium at different temperatures. The steady state emerging in the large-time limit is homogeneous but carries an energy flux. The Casimir force in this nonequilibrium state is calculated analytically in the limit when the transverse fields are small. We find that the the Casimir force range is reduced compared to the equilibrium case, and suggest that the reason for this is the reduction of fluctuations in the flux-carrying steady state.

  1. The steady-state visual evoked potential in vision research: A review

    PubMed Central

    Norcia, Anthony M.; Appelbaum, L. Gregory; Ales, Justin M.; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Periodic visual stimulation and analysis of the resulting steady-state visual evoked potentials were first introduced over 80 years ago as a means to study visual sensation and perception. From the first single-channel recording of responses to modulated light to the present use of sophisticated digital displays composed of complex visual stimuli and high-density recording arrays, steady-state methods have been applied in a broad range of scientific and applied settings.The purpose of this article is to describe the fundamental stimulation paradigms for steady-state visual evoked potentials and to illustrate these principles through research findings across a range of applications in vision science. PMID:26024451

  2. Steady-State Density Functional Theory for Non-equilibrium Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuanglong, Liu

    Recently, electron transport properties of molecular junctions under finite bias voltages have attracted a lot of attention because of the potential application of molecular electronic devices. When a molecular junction is under zero bias voltage at zero temperature, it is in equilibrium ground state and all its properties can be solved by ground-state density functional theory (GS-DFT) where ground-state electron density determines everything. Under finite bias voltage, the molecular junction is in non-equilibrium steady state. According to Hershfield's non-equilibrium statistics, a system in non-equilibrium steady state corresponds to an effective equilibrium system. This correspondence provides the basis for the steady-state density functional theory (SS-DFT) which will be developed in this thesis. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  3. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all known organisms. Bacteria, fungi, and graminaceous plants are capable of exuding siderophores as part of an iron acquisition strategy. The production of these strong iron chelating ligands is induced by iron limited conditions. Grasses under iron stress, for example, exude phytosiderophores into the rhizosphere in a special diurnal rhythm (Roemheld and Marschner 1986). A few hours after sunrise the exudation starts, culminates around noon and is shut down again until about 4 hours after noon. The phytosiderophores diffuse into the rhizosphere (Marschner et al. 1986) and are passively back transported to the plants by advective flow induced by high transpiration around noon. Despite a fairly short residence time of the phytosiderophores in the rhizosphere, it is a very effective strategy for iron acquisition. To investigate the effect of such pulse inputs of siderophores on iron acquisition, we studied the dissolution mechanism of goethite (alpha-FeOOH), a mineral phase common in soils, under non-steady state conditions. In consideration of the chemical complexity of the rhizosphere, we also investigated the effect of other organic ligands commonly found in the rhizosphere (e. g. oxalate) on the dissolution kinetics. The dissolution experiments were conducted in batch reactors with a constant goethite solids concentration of 2.5 g/l, an ionic strength of 0.01 M, a pH of 6 and 100 microM oxalate. To induce non-steady state conditions, 3 mM phytosiderophores were added to a batch after the goethite-oxalate suspension reacted for a certain time period. Before the siderophore was added to the goethite-oxalate suspension, no dissolution of iron was observed. But, with the addition of the siderophore, a high rate was observed for the iron mobilization under these non-steady state conditions that subsequently was followed by a slow steady state dissolution rate. The results of these non-steady state experiments are very

  4. Steady-state solutions of a diffusive energy-balance climate model and their stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1975-01-01

    A diffusive energy-balance climate model, governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation, was studied. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. Models similar to the main one are considered, and the number of their steady states was determined. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates was investigated. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the present climate and the deep freeze are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. The dependence was examined of the number of steady states and of their stability on the average solar radiation.

  5. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  6. Computational Study on the Steady-state Impedance of Saturated-core Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Tang, Y.; Liang, S.; Ren, L.; Wang, Z.; Xu, Y.

    This paper presents the electromagnetic analysis of a high voltage saturated-core superconducting fault current limiter (SCSFCL). The numerical analyses of a three-dimensional (3D) model is shown, and the specific parameters are given. The model focus on the steady-state impedance of the limiter when connected to the power grid. It analyzed the dependence of steady-state impedance on the AC coil current, and the relationship between oil gap and coil inductance. The results suggest that, adding oil gap between slice of silicon steel can reduce the core cross-section, restrain the ultraharmonic and decrease the steady-state impedance. As the core cross-section of AC limb decreased from 4344 cm2 to 3983 cm2, the total harmonic distortion for voltage decreased from 2.4% to 1.8%, and the impedance decreased from 1.082 Ω to 1.069 Ω(Idc=400A,Iac=1296A).

  7. Coherent Quantum Dynamics in Steady-State Manifolds of Strongly Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been realized that dissipative processes can be harnessed and exploited to the end of coherent quantum control and information processing. In this spirit, we consider strongly dissipative quantum systems admitting a nontrivial manifold of steady states. We show how one can enact adiabatic coherent unitary manipulations, e.g., quantum logical gates, inside this steady-state manifold by adding a weak, time-rescaled, Hamiltonian term into the system's Liouvillian. The effective long-time dynamics is governed by a projected Hamiltonian which results from the interplay between the weak unitary control and the fast relaxation process. The leakage outside the steady-state manifold entailed by the Hamiltonian term is suppressed by an environment-induced symmetrization of the dynamics. We present applications to quantum-computation in decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems and numerical analysis of nonadiabatic errors.

  8. Thermodynamic Limit of a Nonequilibrium Steady State: Maxwell-Type Construction for a Bistable Biochemical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2009-10-01

    We show that the thermodynamic limit of a bistable phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle has a selection rule for the “more stable” macroscopic steady state. The analysis is akin to the Maxwell construction. Based on the chemical master equation approach, it is shown that, except at a critical point, bistability disappears in the stochastic model when fluctuation is sufficiently low but unneglectable. Onsager’s Gaussian fluctuation theory applies to the unique macroscopic steady state. With an initial state in the basin of attraction of the “less stable” steady state, the deterministic dynamics obtained by the law of mass action is a metastable phenomenon. Stability and robustness in cell biology are emergent stochastic concepts.

  9. On the accuracy of limiters and convergence to steady state solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the practical problem of obtaining convergence to steady state solutions when limiters are used in conjunction with upwind schemes on unstructured grids. The base scheme forms a gradient and limits it by imposing monotonicity conditions in the reconstruction stage. It is shown by analysis in one dimension that such an approach leads to various schemes meeting TVD requirements in one dimension. It is further shown that these formally second order accurate schemes are less than second order accurate in practice because of the action of the limiter function in smooth regions of the solution. Modifications are proposed to the limiter that restore the second order accuracy. In multiple dimensions these schemes produce steady state solutions that are monotone and devoid of oscillations. However, convergence stalls after a few orders of reduction in the residual. With the modified limiter, on the other hand, it is shown that converged steady state solutions can be obtained.

  10. Tokamak power system studies at ANL

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.; Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Evans, K. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    The following features, in particular, have been examined: (a) large aspect ratio (A approx. = 6), which may ease maintenance; (b) high beta (..beta.. greater than or equal to 0.20) without indentation, which brings the maximum toroidal field down to about 6 to 7 T; (c) low toroidal current (I approx. = 4MA), which reduces the cost of the current drive and equilibrium field system; and (d) steady state operation with current density control via fast and slow wave current drive. The key to high beta operation with low toroidal current lies in utilizing second stability regime equilibria with the required current distributions produced by an appropriate selection of wave driver frequencies and power spectra. The ray tracing and current drive calculation is self-consistent with the actual magnetic fields they produce in the plasma. The impurity control activities in TPSS have emphasized the self-pumping concept as applied to using the entire first wall or ''slot'' limiters. The blanket design effort has emphasized liquid metal and Flibe concepts. The reference concept is a liquid lithium/vanadium, self-cooled configuration. Overall, there exists a number of major design improvements which will substantially improve the attractiveness of tokamak reactors.

  11. Mass transport in salt repositories: Steady-state transport through interbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-03-01

    Salt has long been a candidate for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Because salt is extremely soluble in water, the existence of rock salt in the ground atest to the long-term stability of the salt. Both bedded salt and salt domes have been considered for nuclear waste disposal in the United States and Europe. While the salt is known to be quite pure in salt domes, bedded salt is interlaced with beds of sediments. Traditionally rock salt has not been considered water-conducting, but sediments layers would be classical porous media, capable of conducting water. Therefore there is interest in determining whether interbeds in bedded salt constitute pathway for radionuclide migration. In this report we consider steady-state migration of radionuclides from a single waste cylinder into a single interbed. Two approaches are used. In 1982 Neretnieks proposed an approach for calculating the steady-state transport of oxidants to a copper container. We have adapted that approach for calculating steady-state radionuclide migration away from the waste package, as a first approximation. We have also analyzed the problem of time-dependent radionuclide diffusion from a container through a backfill layer into a fracture, and we used the steady-state solution from that problem for comparison. Section 2 gives a brief summary of the geology of interbeds in bedded salt. Section 3 presents the mass transfer resistances approach of Neretnieks, summarizing the formulation and giving numerical illustrations of the steady-state two-dimensional diffusion analysis. Section 4 gives a brief statement of the steady-state result from a related analysis. Conclusions are stated in Section 5. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Metabolic and ventilatory responses to steady state exercise relative to lactate thresholds.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J P; Hughes, V; Fielding, R A; Holden, W; Evans, W; Knuttgen, H G

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and ventilatory responses to steady state submaximal exercise on the cycle ergometer were compared at four intensities in 8 healthy subjects. The trials were performed so that, after a 10 min adaptation period, power output was adjusted to maintain steady state VO2 for 30 min at values equivalent to: (1) the aerobic threshold (AeT); (2) between the aerobic and the anaerobic threshold (AeTAnT); (3) the anaerobic threshold (AnT); and (4) between the anaerobic threshold and VO2max (AnTmax). Blood lactate concentration and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 demonstrated steady state values during the last 20 min of exercise at the AeT, AeAnT and AnT intensities, but increased progressively until fatigue in the AnTmax trial (mean time = 16 min). Serum glycerol levels were significantly higher at 40 min of exercise on the AeAnT and the AnT when compared to AeT, while the respiratory exchange ratios were not significantly different from each other. Thus, metabolic and ventilatory steady state can be maintained during prolonged exercise at intensities up to and including the AnT, and fat continues to be a major fuel source when exercise intensities are increased from the AeT to the AnT in steady state conditions. The blood lactate response to exercise suggests that, for the organism as a whole, anaerobic glycolysis plays a minor role in the energy release system at exercise intensities upt to and including the AnT during steady state conditions.

  13. The Effects of High Intensity Interval Training vs Steady State Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carl; Farland, Courtney V.; Guidotti, Flavia; Harbin, Michelle; Roberts, Brianna; Schuette, Jeff; Tuuri, Andrew; Doberstein, Scott T.; Porcari, John P.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has become an increasingly popular form of exercise due to its potentially large effects on exercise capacity and small time requirement. This study compared the effects of two HIIT protocols vs steady-state training on aerobic and anaerobic capacity following 8-weeks of training. Fifty-five untrained college-aged subjects were randomly assigned to three training groups (3x weekly). Steady-state (n = 19) exercised (cycle ergometer) 20 minutes at 90% of ventilatory threshold (VT). Tabata (n = 21) completed eight intervals of 20s at 170% VO2max/10s rest. Meyer (n = 15) completed 13 sets of 30s (20 min) @ 100% PVO2 max/ 60s recovery, average PO = 90% VT. Each subject did 24 training sessions during 8 weeks. Results: There were significant (p < 0.05) increases in VO2max (+19, +18 and +18%) and PPO (+17, +24 and +14%) for each training group, as well as significant increases in peak (+8, + 9 and +5%) & mean (+4, +7 and +6%) power during Wingate testing, but no significant differences between groups. Measures of the enjoyment of the training program indicated that the Tabata protocol was significantly less enjoyable (p < 0.05) than the steady state and Meyer protocols, and that the enjoyment of all protocols declined (p < 0.05) across the duration of the study. The results suggest that although HIIT protocols are time efficient, they are not superior to conventional exercise training in sedentary young adults. Key points Steady state training equivalent to HIIT in untrained students Mild interval training presents very similar physiologic challenge compared to steady state training HIIT (particularly very high intensity variants were less enjoyable than steady state or mild interval training Enjoyment of training decreases across the course of an 8 week experimental training program PMID:26664271

  14. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  15. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of dAFM in the transient and steady state motions.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir Farokh

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, based on the slow time varying function theory, dynamical equations for the amplitude and phase of the dynamic atomic force microscope are derived. Then, the sensitivity of the amplitude and phase to the dissipative and conservative parts of interaction force is investigated. The most advantage of this dynamical model is the ability to simulate and analysis the dynamics behavior of amplitude and phase of the AFM tip motion not only in the steady state but also in the transient regime. Using numerical analysis the transient and steady state behavior of amplitude and phase is studied and the sensitivity of amplitude and phase to the interaction force is analyzed. PMID:27448201

  16. Switching from stable to unknown unstable steady states of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Tamasevicius, Arūnas; Tamaseviciūte, Elena; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Bumeliene, Skaidra

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate that a dynamical system can be switched from a stable steady state to a previously unknown unstable (saddle) steady state using proportional feedback coupling to an auxiliary unstable system. The simplest one-dimensional nonlinear model is treated analytically, the more complicated two-dimensional pendulum is considered numerically, while the damped Duffing-Holmes oscillator is investigated analytically, numerically, and experimentally. Experiments have been performed using a simplified version of the electronic Young-Silva circuit imitating the dynamical behavior of the Duffing-Holmes system. The physical mechanism behind the switching effect is discussed. PMID:18850919

  17. S3C: EBT Steady-State Shooting code description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Downum, W.B.

    1983-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) one-dimensional (1-D) Steady-State Shooting code (S3C) for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) plasmas is described. Benchmark calculations finding the steady-state density and electron and ion temperature profiles for a known neutral density profile and known external energy sources are carried out. Good agreement is obtained with results from the ORNL Radially Resolved Time Dependent 1-D Transport code for an EBT-Q type reactor. The program logic is described, along with the physics models in each code block and the variable names used. Sample input and output files are listed, along with the main code.

  18. Transient brain activity explains the spectral content of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaume, Antoine; Vialatte, François; Dreyfus, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are widely used in the design of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). A lot of effort has therefore been devoted to find a fast and reliable way to detect SSVEPs. We study the link between transient and steady-state VEPs and show that it is possible to predict the spectral content of a subject's SSVEPs by simulating trains of transient VEPs. This could lead to a better understanding of evoked potentials as well as to better performances of SSVEP-based BCIs, by providing a tool to improve SSVEP detection algorithms.

  19. A quaternionic map for the steady states of the Heisenberg spin-chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mitaxi P.; Dutta, Souvik; Tiwari, Shubhanshu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the steady states of the classical Heisenberg XXX spin-chain in an external magnetic field can be found by iterations of a quaternionic map. A restricted model, e.g., the xy spin-chain is known to have spatially chaotic steady states and the phase space occupied by these chaotic states is known to go through discrete changes as the field strength is varied. The same phenomenon is studied for the xxx spin-chain. It is seen that in this model the phase space volume varies smoothly with the external field.

  20. Global stability of steady states in the classical Stefan problem for general boundary shapes

    PubMed Central

    Hadžić, Mahir; Shkoller, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The classical one-phase Stefan problem (without surface tension) allows for a continuum of steady-state solutions, given by an arbitrary (but sufficiently smooth) domain together with zero temperature. We prove global-in-time stability of such steady states, assuming a sufficient degree of smoothness on the initial domain, but without any a priori restriction on the convexity properties of the initial shape. This is an extension of our previous result (Hadžić & Shkoller 2014 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 68, 689–757 (doi:10.1002/cpa.21522)) in which we studied nearly spherical shapes. PMID:26261359

  1. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies.

  3. {\\mathscr{P}}{\\mathscr{T}}-symmetry breaking in the steady state of microscopic gain–loss systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepesidis, Kosmas V.; Milburn, Thomas J.; Huber, Julian; Makris, Konstantinos G.; Rotter, Stefan; Rabl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of { P }{ T } (parity- and time-reversal) symmetry breaking is conventionally associated with a change in the complex mode spectrum of a non-Hermitian system that marks a transition from a purely oscillatory to an exponentially amplified dynamical regime. In this work we describe a new type of { P }{ T }-symmetry breaking, which occurs in the steady-state energy distribution of open systems with balanced gain and loss. In particular, we show that the combination of nonlinear saturation effects and the presence of thermal or quantum noise in actual experiments results in unexpected behavior that differs significantly from the usual dynamical picture. We observe additional phases with preserved or ‘weakly’ broken { P }{ T }-symmetry, and an unconventional transition from a high-noise thermal state to a low-amplitude lasing state with broken symmetry and strongly reduced fluctuations. We illustrate these effects here for the specific example of coupled mechanical resonators with optically induced loss and gain, but the described mechanisms will be essential for a general understanding of the steady-state properties of actual { P }{ T }-symmetric systems operated at low amplitudes or close to the quantum regime.

  4. {\\mathscr{P}}{\\mathscr{T}}-symmetry breaking in the steady state of microscopic gain-loss systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepesidis, Kosmas V.; Milburn, Thomas J.; Huber, Julian; Makris, Konstantinos G.; Rotter, Stefan; Rabl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of { P }{ T } (parity- and time-reversal) symmetry breaking is conventionally associated with a change in the complex mode spectrum of a non-Hermitian system that marks a transition from a purely oscillatory to an exponentially amplified dynamical regime. In this work we describe a new type of { P }{ T }-symmetry breaking, which occurs in the steady-state energy distribution of open systems with balanced gain and loss. In particular, we show that the combination of nonlinear saturation effects and the presence of thermal or quantum noise in actual experiments results in unexpected behavior that differs significantly from the usual dynamical picture. We observe additional phases with preserved or ‘weakly’ broken { P }{ T }-symmetry, and an unconventional transition from a high-noise thermal state to a low-amplitude lasing state with broken symmetry and strongly reduced fluctuations. We illustrate these effects here for the specific example of coupled mechanical resonators with optically induced loss and gain, but the described mechanisms will be essential for a general understanding of the steady-state properties of actual { P }{ T }-symmetric systems operated at low amplitudes or close to the quantum regime.

  5. Overview of Recent Steady-State Scenario Experiments on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Pace, D. C.; Petrie, T. W.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Park, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McKee, G. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Holland, C.; Turco, F.; Solomon, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    On DIII-D, on- and off-axis neutral beams and electron cyclotron heating have expanded access to a wide range of q-profiles. Plasmas with qmin = 1 - 3 have been evaluated for high β steady-state operation. With qmin > 2 and no internal transport barrier, ideal-wall kink mode βN limits >4 are calculated but the global energy confinement is low compared to lower qmin plasmas. The thermal and fast ion transport dependence on qmin will be discussed, as well as the dependence of stability and confinement on ρqmin and q0 -qmin , and the characteristics of plasmas dominated by bootstrap current at high βp. At intermediate qmin >= 1 . 5 , high noninductive current fraction is possible with performance that projects to Q ~ 5 in ITER, both in double null and ITER-like shape. Divertor heat flux is reduced using increased radiation from impurity gas injection. At qmin ~ 1 , ``high-li'' plasmas transiently reach βN > 5 with excellent confinement, but MHD avoidance and profile control are needed to achieve stationary high performance. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC-02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-00OR22725, SC-G903402, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FG02-08ER54981, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FG02-04ER54761, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  7. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HU, T.A.

    2004-10-27

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  8. Steady State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation and Lower Flammability Level Evaluation for Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    HU, T.A.

    2001-02-23

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. Hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using rate equation model. Ammonia liquid/vapor equilibrium model is incorporated into the methodology for ammonia analysis.

  9. User's instructions for the 41-node thermoregulatory model (steady state version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    A user's guide for the steady-state thermoregulatory model is presented. The model was modified to provide conversational interaction on a remote terminal, greater flexibility for parameter estimation, increased efficiency of convergence, greater choice of output variable and more realistic equations for respiratory and skin diffusion water losses.

  10. Dissipative production of a maximally entangled steady state of two quantum bits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Gaebler, J P; Reiter, F; Tan, T R; Bowler, R; Sørensen, A S; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2013-12-19

    Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryptography and quantum computation. Introduction of controlled unitary processes--quantum gates--to a quantum system has so far been the most widely used method to create entanglement deterministically. These processes require high-fidelity state preparation and minimization of the decoherence that inevitably arises from coupling between the system and the environment, and imperfect control of the system parameters. Here we combine unitary processes with engineered dissipation to deterministically produce and stabilize an approximate Bell state of two trapped-ion quantum bits (qubits), independent of their initial states. Compared with previous studies that involved dissipative entanglement of atomic ensembles or the application of sequences of multiple time-dependent gates to trapped ions, we implement our combined process using trapped-ion qubits in a continuous time-independent fashion (analogous to optical pumping of atomic states). By continuously driving the system towards the steady state, entanglement is stabilized even in the presence of experimental noise and decoherence. Our demonstration of an entangled steady state of two qubits represents a step towards dissipative state engineering, dissipative quantum computation and dissipative phase transitions. Following this approach, engineered coupling to the environment may be applied to a broad range of experimental systems to achieve desired quantum dynamics or steady states. Indeed, concurrently with this work, an entangled steady state of two superconducting qubits was demonstrated using dissipation.

  11. 40 CFR 86.1362-2010 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Transition Linear Transition. 14 Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES... described in 40 CFR 1065.650 and cycle statistics as described in 40 CFR 1065.514. (b) Measure emissions...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES... in 40 CFR 1065.650 and cycle statistics as described in 40 CFR 1065.514. (b) Measure emissions by... Torque(percent) 2,3 1a Steady-state 170 Warm Idle 0 1b Transition 20 Linear Transition Linear...

  13. Steady State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation and Lower Flammability Level Evaluation for Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    HU, T.A.

    2000-04-27

    This work is to assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions in the tank dome space for 177 double-shell and single-shell tanks at Hanford. Hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using rate equation model developed recently.

  14. Steady-State Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion Extended-Release In Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Birmaher, Boris; Rudolph, George R.; Melhem, Imad; Axelson, David A.; Brent, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine in children and adolescents the 24-hour, steady-state clinical pharmacokinetics of an extended-release (XL) formulation of bupropion (Wellbutrin XL). Method: Subjects were six male and four female patients (ages 11.5-16.2 years) prescribed bupropion XL in morning daily doses of either 150 mg (n = 5) or 300 mg (n = 5) for at…

  15. Analysis of steady state creep of southeastern New Mexico bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.; Wawersik, W.R.; Lauson, H.S.

    1980-03-01

    Steady state creep rates have been obtained from a large suite of existing experimental creep data relating to bedded rock salt from the Salado formation of S.E. New Mexico. Experimental conditions covered an intermediate temperature range from 22/sup 0/C to 200/sup 0/C, and shear stresses from 1000 psi (7 MPa) to 6000 psi (31 MPa). An expression, based on a single diffusion controlled dislocation climb mechanism, has been found to fit the observed dependence of steady state creep rate on shear stress and temperature, yielding an activation energy of 12 kcal/mole (50 kJ/mole) and a stress exponent of 4.9. Multiple regression analysis revealed a dependence on stratigraphy, but no statistically significant dependence on pressure of specimen size. No consistent dilatancy or compaction associated with steady state creep was found, although some individual specimens dilated or compacted during creep. The steady state creep data were found to agree very well with creep data for both bedded and dome salt from a variety of other locations.

  16. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HU TA

    2009-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  17. Dissipative production of a maximally entangled steady state of two quantum bits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Gaebler, J P; Reiter, F; Tan, T R; Bowler, R; Sørensen, A S; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2013-12-19

    Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryptography and quantum computation. Introduction of controlled unitary processes--quantum gates--to a quantum system has so far been the most widely used method to create entanglement deterministically. These processes require high-fidelity state preparation and minimization of the decoherence that inevitably arises from coupling between the system and the environment, and imperfect control of the system parameters. Here we combine unitary processes with engineered dissipation to deterministically produce and stabilize an approximate Bell state of two trapped-ion quantum bits (qubits), independent of their initial states. Compared with previous studies that involved dissipative entanglement of atomic ensembles or the application of sequences of multiple time-dependent gates to trapped ions, we implement our combined process using trapped-ion qubits in a continuous time-independent fashion (analogous to optical pumping of atomic states). By continuously driving the system towards the steady state, entanglement is stabilized even in the presence of experimental noise and decoherence. Our demonstration of an entangled steady state of two qubits represents a step towards dissipative state engineering, dissipative quantum computation and dissipative phase transitions. Following this approach, engineered coupling to the environment may be applied to a broad range of experimental systems to achieve desired quantum dynamics or steady states. Indeed, concurrently with this work, an entangled steady state of two superconducting qubits was demonstrated using dissipation. PMID:24270806

  18. A general theory of kinetics and thermodynamics of steady-state copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yao-Gen; Song, Yong-Shun; Ou-Yang, Zhong-Can; Li, Ming

    2015-06-17

    Kinetics of steady-state copolymerization has been investigated since the 1940s. Irreversible terminal and penultimate models were successfully applied to a number of comonomer systems, but failed for systems where depropagation is significant. Although a general mathematical treatment of the terminal model with depropagation was established in the 1980s, a penultimate model and higher-order terminal models with depropagation have not been systematically studied, since depropagation leads to hierarchically-coupled and unclosed kinetic equations which are hard to solve analytically. In this work, we propose a truncation method to solve the steady-state kinetic equations of any-order terminal models with depropagation in a unified way, by reducing them into closed steady-state equations which give the exact solution of the original kinetic equations. Based on the steady-state equations, we also derive a general thermodynamic equality in which the Shannon entropy of the copolymer sequence is explicitly introduced as part of the free energy dissipation of the whole copolymerization system.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix C to Subpart S of... - Steady-State Short Test Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Steady-State Short Test Standards C Appendix C to Subpart S of Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.../Maintenance Program Requirements Pt. 51, Subpt. S, App. C Appendix C to Subpart S of Part...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix C to Subpart S of... - Steady-State Short Test Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Steady-State Short Test Standards C Appendix C to Subpart S of Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.../Maintenance Program Requirements Pt. 51, Subpt. S, App. C Appendix C to Subpart S of Part...