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Sample records for steamboat springs colorado

  1. Soil moisture ground truth: Steamboat Springs, Colorado, site and Walden, Colorado, site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-truth data taken at Steamboat Springs and Walden, Colorado in support of the NASA missions in these areas during the period March 8, 1976 through March 11, 1976 was presented. This includes the following information: snow course data for Steamboat Springs and Walden, snow pit and snow quality data for Steamboat Springs, and soil moisture report.

  2. Helium and ground temperature surveys at Steamboat Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.; Been, J.; Reimer, G.M.; Bowles, C.G.; Murrey, D.G.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    As demonstrated in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, helium and shallow temperature surveys are quick, inexpensive geothermal exploration methods that can be used together with excellent results. Steamboat Springs, in northwestern Colorado, lies primarily upon terrace gravels and alluvium with the major structure being a north-trending normal fault passing through the western portion of the city. Work by Christopherson (1979) indicates that the Steamboat warm springs are not laterally connected at shallow depth with Routt Hot Springs, 6 km to the north, although both resource areas are fault controlled. A shallow temperature survey was conducted in the city to determine the usefulness of this method in a low temperature resource area. Several extraneous factors influencing shallow temperature measurements were dealt with by field technique or subsequent analysis. A helium survey was conducted to compare with temperature results. Sixty-two soil helium samples were taken, using an interval of .1 to .2 Km, twice the density of the 18 temperature probe stations. A mobile spectrometer allowed immediate analysis of helium samples. A direct correlation of temperature to helium value at each site is not valid due to the high solubility of this gas. The contoured data from each method does correlate well and indicates that two faults control the resource in Steamboat Springs. Although these surveys should always be used to supplement other data, their utility in this study was readily apparent.

  3. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

  4. Passive microwave studies of snowpack properties. [Walden and Steamboat Spring, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave brightness temperatures were measured for the snowpacks at Walden and Steamboat Springs, Colorado during 1976 and 1977 aircraft experiments. Variations in measured brightness temperatures are attributed to snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. Results demonstrate that shorter wavelength radiation is scattered more strongly than longer wavelength radiation.

  5. Snowpack ground truth: Radar test site, Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 8-16 April 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, S.; Jones, E. B.; Leaf, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-truth data taken at Steamboat Springs, Colorado is presented. Data taken during the period April 8, 1976 - April 16, 1976 included the following: (1) snow depths and densities at selected locations (using a Mount Rose snow tube); (2) snow pits for temperature, density, and liquid water determinations using the freezing calorimetry technique and vertical layer classification; (3) snow walls were also constructed of various cross sections and documented with respect to sizes and snow characteristics; (4) soil moisture at selected locations; and (5) appropriate air temperature and weather data.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  7. Intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs, Park Range, Colorado, with a section on geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Hedge, Carl E.

    1978-01-01

    Major Precambrian and minor Tertiary intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs in the Park Range between 40?30' and 40?45' N. lat. are described and compared with related rocks elsewhere in Colorado and Wyoming. The Precambrian intrusives were emplaced in a sequence of high-grade interlayered felsic gneisses, amphibolites, and pelitic schists of sedimentary and volcanic origin. These rocks are cut by a major northeast-trending Precambrian shear zone where mainly left lateral movement of 1/ 2 to 1 mile is certain. Cumulative movement of many miles is possible. The Precambrian intrusives consist of a batholith, the Mount Ethel pluton, a smaller Buffalo Pass pluton, and small dikes or lenses of fine-grained porphyry, pegmatites, and ultramafics. The Mount Ethel pluton is an oval shaped body 7 miles wide by about 40 miles long (shown by geophysical data to extend beneath younger sediments in North Park). Outer batholithic contacts are sharp and dip steeply outward at about 85?. Five mappable internal variants consist, in order of decreasing age, of granodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, granite and quartz monzonite, and. leucogranite. Internal contacts between these plutonic variants are sharp, and evidence of liquid-solid relationships abounds; despite this, all rocks except the granodiorite contribute to an Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron indicating emplacement about 1.4 b.y. (billion years) ago. The most important variants volumetrically are: the quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, which forms an irregular 2-mile-thick carapace or mapped band around the west edge of the pluton and is lithologically similar to nearby Sherman Granite, and the quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, which forms most of the rest of the pluton and is lithologically similar to Silver Plume Granite. An apparent Sherman -Silver Plume dichotomy with similar rock types and similar relative ages is noted throughout Colorado plutons of that age

  8. Analysis of waste-load assimilative capacity of the Yampa River, Steamboat Springs to Hayden, Routt County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Daniel P.; Steele, Timothy Doak; Anderson, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the waste-load assimilative capacity of the Yampa River from Steamboat Springs to Hayden, Colo., a distance of 38 miles, was made during September 1975 to obtain information on the effects of projected waste loadings on this stream reach. Simulations of effects of waste loadings on streamflow quality were made using a steady-state water-quality model. The simulations were based on 7-day low-flow values with a 10-year recurrence interval and population projections for 2010. Model results for December and September streamflow conditions indicated that the recommended 1978 Colorado and 1976 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality standard of 0.02 milligram per liter for nonionized ammonia concentration would be exceeded. Model simulations also included the effect of a flow augmentation of 20 cubic feet per second from a proposed upstream reservoir. The permissible ammonia loading in the study reach could be increased approximately 25 percent with this amount of flow augmentation. Simulations of concentrations of dissolved oxygen, fecal-coliform bacteria, and nitrate nitrogen indicated that the State 's water-quality goals proposed for 1978, 1983, or 1985 would not be exceeded. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Calibration of a dissolved-solids model for the Yampa River basin between Steamboat Springs and Maybell, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, R.S.; Litke, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The cumulative effects of changes in dissolved solids from a number of coal mines are needed to evaluate effects on downstream water use. A model for determining cumulative effects of streamflow, dissolved-solids concentration, and dissolved-solids load was calibrated for the Yampa River and its tributaries in northwestern Colorado. The model uses accounting principles. It establishes nodes on the stream system and sums water quantity and quality from node to node in the downstream direction. The model operates on a monthly time step for the study period that includes water years 1976 through 1981. Output is monthly mean streamflow, dissolved-solids concentration, and dissolved-solids load. Streamflow and dissolved-solids data from streamflow-gaging stations and other data-collection sites were used to define input data sets to initiate and to calibrate the model. The model was calibrated at four nodes and generally was within 10 percent of the observed values. The calibrated model can compute changes in dissolved-solids concentration or load resulting from the cumulative effects of new coal mines or the expansion of old coal mines in the Yampa River basin. (USGS)

  10. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in a part of the Yampa River basin between Craig and Steamboat Springs, Moffat and Routt counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogden, R.E.; Giles, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Parts of the Yampa River basin near the towns of Steamboat Springs and Craig, Colo., have undergone rapid population growth in recent years. Aquifers in the study area include: alluvium; the Browns Park, Wasatch, Fort Union, Lance, Williams Fork, and Iles Formations; and the Lewis and Mancos Shales. Well yields are generally less than 25 gpm (gallons per minute). In the alluvium of the Yampa River, well yields may be as much as 900 gpm. Where the sandstones of the Williams Fork and Iles Formations are fractured, well yields have been reported to be as much as 100 gpm. Well yields from the Lewis and Mancos Shales are less than 5 gpm. The quality of the ground water is variable and dependent on rock type. Most of the waters are calcium and sodium bicarbonate types. Calcium sulfate type waters are found where water in the aquifer has been in contact with gypsum, organic materials, or coals. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water range from as little as 82 to as much as 4,230 milligrams per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Argillization by descending acid at Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoen, R.; White, D.E.; Hemley, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    Steamboat Springs, Nevada, an area of present-day hot springs, clearly illustrates the genetic dependence of some kaolin deposits on hot-spring activity. Andesite, granodiorite and arkosic sediments are locally altered at the land surface to siliceous residues consisting of primary quartz and anatase, plus opal from primary silicates. These siliceous residues commonly exhibit the textural and structural features of their unaltered equivalents. Beneath the siliceous residues, kaolin and alunite replace primary silicates and fill open spaces, forming a blanketlike deposit. Beneath the kaolin-alunite zone, montmorillonite, commonly accompanied by pyrite, replaces the primary silicates. On the ground surface, the same alteration mineral zones can he traced outward from the siliceous residue; however, hematite rather than pyrite accompanies montmorillonite. Chemical analysis indicates that sulfuric acid is the active altering agent. The acid forms from hydrogen sulfide that exsolves from deep thermal water, rises above the water table and is oxidized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria living near the ground surface. This acid dissolves in precipitation or condensed water vapor and percolates downward destroying most of the primary minerals producing a siliceous residue. Coincidence of the water table with the downward transition from siliceous residue to kaolin alunite signifies decreasing hydrogen metasomatism because of dilution of descending acid by ground water. In hot-spring areas, beds of siliceous sinter deposited at the surface by hypogene thermal water look, superficially, like areas of surficial acid alteration. Features diagnostic of a surficial alteration are the relict rock structures of a siliceous residue and a kaolin-alunite zone immediately beneath. ?? 1974.

  12. Geothermal Geodatabase for Routt Hot Springs, Routt County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Routt Hot Springs, Routt County, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA 775.737.7806 rzehner@gdareno.com For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,500,000 South boundary: approximately 4,480,000 West boundary: approximately 330,000 East boundary: approximately 358,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs and wells in the Routt Hot Spring and Steamboat Springs areahave geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 2. Air photo lineaments 3. Groundwater geochemistry 5. Georeferenced geologic map of Routt County 6. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  13. Surface mineral mapping at Virginia City and Steamboat Springs, Nevada with multi-wavelength infrared remote sensing image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. Greg

    The purpose of this study was to use a combination of high spatial resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data to remotely identify and map exposed alteration minerals around both active and ancient hydrothermal systems, and the mineral by-products of weathered mine tailings. Three case study areas were evaluated: (1) Steamboat Springs, as an active geothermal system; (2) Geiger Grade and Virginia City, as ancient hydrothermal systems; and (3) Virginia City, as a historic mining district. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), as well as data from newly developed airborne imaging spectrometers: SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopic methods. In all of the case study areas the minerals mapped included sinter, quartz/chalcedony, albite, calcite, dolomite, hydrous sulfate minerals (tamarugite, alunogen, gypsum and hexahydrite), jarosite, hematite, goethite, alunite, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. The results were synthesized into single thematic mineral maps and indicate that the combination of multi-channel infrared remote sensing data is an effective technique for the unique identification and mapping of weathering and alteration minerals that are characteristic of active and fossil hydrothermal systems, as well as acid mine drainage potential. This study provides many examples of the advantages of high spatial and

  14. 78 FR 73886 - Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Register on July 2, 2013 (Volume 78 FR Pages 39776-39779). At the request of one-stop operator/partner, the... Foundry Operations Group, Colorado Springs Test Group and the Equipment Engineering Services Group....

  15. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... ladles. The vessel styles are black-on-gray, black-on-white, Tusayan black-on-red, corrugated and gray... collections from The Colorado College Museum, through long-term loans to the Fine Arts Center (formerly known as the Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center) and the Denver Museum of...

  16. Radioactive mineral springs in Delta County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert A.; Rosholt, John N.; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1976-01-01

    The system of springs in Delta County, Colo., contains geochemical clues to the nature and location of buried uranium-mineralized rock. The springs, which occur along the Gunnison River and a principal tributary between Delta and Paonia, are regarded as evidence of a still-functioning hydrothermal system. Associated with the springs are hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide gas seeps, carbon dioxide gas-powered geysers, thick travertine deposits including radioactive travertine, and a flowing warm-water (41?C) radioactive well. Geochemical study of the springs is based on surface observations, on-site water-property measurements, and sampling of water, travertine, soft precipitates, and mud. The spring deposits are mostly carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and chlorides that locally contain notable amounts of some elements, such as arsenic, barium, lithium, and radium. Samples from five localities have somewhat different trace element assemblages even though they are related to the same hydrothermal system. All the spring waters but one are dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The exception is an acid sulfate water with a pH of 2.9, which contains high concentrations of aluminum and iron. Most of the detectable radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, a uranium daughter product, but at least one spring precipitate contains abundant radium-228, a thorium daughter product. The 5:1 ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 suggests the proximity of a vein-type deposit as a source for the radium. The proposed locus of a thorium-uranium mineral deposit is believed to lie in the vicinity of Paonia, Colo. Exact direction and depth are not determinable from data now available.

  17. Chimney subsidence development in the Colorado Springs coal field, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, G.M.; Pearson, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Mining in the Colorodo Springs coal field took place from the 1880's to 1940's. The depth of mining in the coal field varied from about 10 meters to over 150 meters. Review of sequential historical aerial photographs from 1937 to 1960 indicated about 2400 chimney subsidence sinkholes had developed throughout the study area. Statistical analyses of the location and size of these sinkholes with respect to the time since mining, depth of mining, mined thickness and type of mining indicated definite trends in the time of occurrence, size, and location of these features. This data is valuable in the assessment of potential future subsidence in this and other areas of similar mining conditions.

  18. Geothermal resource assessment of Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 10 springs whose waters are used for recreation, steam baths and laundry purposes are located at Hot Sulphur Springs. Estimated heat-flow at Hot Sulphur Springs is approximately 100 mW/m2, which is about normal for western Colorado. Recent work tends to show that surface and reduced heat flow in the mountains of northern Colorado could be high. The thermal waters have an estimated discharge of 50 gpm, a temperature that ranges from 104/sup 0/F (40/sup 0/C) to a high of 111/sup 0/F (44/sup 0/C), and a total dissolved solid content of 1200 mg/l. The waters are a sodium bicarbonate type with a large concentration of sulphate. It is estimated that the most likely reservoir temperature of this system ranges from 167/sup 0/F (75/sup 0/F) to 302/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/C) and that the areal extent of the system could encompass 1.35 sq mi (3.50 sq km) and could contain 0.698 Q's (1015 B.T.U.'s) of heat energy. Soil mercury and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted. The geophysical survey delineated several areas of low resistivity associated with the north trending fault that passes just to the west of the spring area. It appears that this fault is saturated with thermal waters and may be the conduit along which the thermal waters are moving up from depth. The appendices to this report include tables showing water temperatures required for various industrial processes, as well as dissolved minerals, trace elements and radioactivity levels found in the thermal waters. Also presented are a complete description of the factors affecting the electrical resistivity measurements, a description of the electrical resistivity equipment used, and the resistivity field procedures. Electrical resistivity calculations are also included in the appendices.

  19. Geothermal Geodatabase for Wagon Wheel Hot Springs, Mineral County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Wagon Wheel Hot Springs, Mineral County, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA 775.737.7806 rzehner@gdareno.com For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,189,000 South boundary: approximately 4,170,000 West boundary: approximately 330,000 East boundary: approximately 351,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs at Wagon Wheel Gap have geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 2. Air photo lineaments 3. Groundwater geochemistry 4. Power lines 5. Georeferenced geologic map of Routt County 6. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  20. Surficial geologic map of the Steamboat Springs 30' x 60' quadrangle, Grand, Jackson, and Routt counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Mapping was done chiefly on aerial photographs taken in 1953. Hence, landslides and modifications resulting from gravel mining since 1953 may not show on this map. The scales of the aerial photographs (about 1:60,000) and the map (1:100,000) governed the minimum size of the deposits mapped. The minimum thickness of the depostis mapped is about 1.5m in most places. Deposit thickness, although not a mapping criterion, influences the topographic expression of many landforms, and landform is the basis for delineating the surficial deposits shown.

  1. Assessment of water resources at Fort Carson Military Reservation near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Fort Carson Military Reservation adjoins the rapidly growning Colorado Springs metropolitan area, where locally available water supplies are limited and strictly administered. Fort Carson purchases about 3,400 acre-feet of treated water annually from the city of Colorado Springs. The major streams entering Fort Carson have an estimated average annual discharge of 6,240 acre-feet of water per year upstream from diversions for municipal and domestic water supplies. The streamflow is unevenly distributed in time and consequently not dependable as a large or sole source of water. Ground water is available from alluvial and bedrock aquifers. Wells with yields greater than 100 gallons per minute can be expected from the alluvium along Rock and Little Fountain Creeks and from some parts of the Dakota-Purgatoire aquifer. The quality of surface water entering Fort Carson is generally suitable for irrigation and drinking but deteriorates eastward across Fort Carson. Water from the alluvial aquifer along Rock and Little Fountain Creeks in the eastern part of Fort Carson contains fluoride in concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards. Water from the Dakota-Purgatoire aquifer characteristically contains radiochemical constituents in concentrations that exceed drinking-water standards. (USGS)

  2. 78 FR 52984 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado Springs... investigation, I determine that workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and...

  3. Temporal Geochemistry Data from Five Springs in the Cement Creek Watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Wirt, Laurie; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal data from five springs in the Cement Creek watershed, San Juan County, Colorado provide seasonal geochemical data for further research in the formation of ferricretes. In addition, these data can be used to help understand the ground-water flow system. The resulting data demonstrate the difficulty in gathering reliable seasonal data from springs, show the unique geochemistry of each spring due to local geology, and provide seasonal trends in geochemistry for Tiger Iron Spring.

  4. Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-31

    A study has been made of the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing the geothermal resource underlying Glenwood Springs Colorado, to heat a group of public buildings. The results have shown that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection. Considerable study was done to examine the impact of reduced operating temperature on the existing heating systems. Several options to minimize this problem were identified. Economic analyses were completed to determine the present values of heat from the geothermal system and from the present natural gas over a 30 year projected system life. For the base case savings of over $1 million were shown. Sensitivities of the economics to capital cost, operating cost, system size and other parameters were calculated. For all reasonable assumptions, the geothermal system was cheaper. Financing alternatives were also examined. An extensive survey of all existing data on the geology of the study has led to the prediction of resource parameters. The wellhead temperature of produced fluid is suspected to lie between 140 and 180/sup 0/F (60 and 82/sup 0/C). Flowrates may be as high as 1000 gpm (3800 liters per minute) from a reservoir formation that is 300 ft (90 m) thick beginning about 500 ft (150 m) below the suggested drill site in the proposed Two Rivers Park.

  5. Prevalence of lesions in incisors of mule deer from Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Borrero, L.M.; Scanlon, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Lesions in teeth may be influenced by exposure to fluorides, malnutrition and trauma. Incisors of 228 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) taken from the USAF Academy, Colorado Springs, CO during the 1993 hunting season were examined for lesions. A classification scheme (scale = 0--5) for lesions was derived from the method of Shupe et al. 1963. Lesions were present in at least one incisor of 84.6% of deer. Of the deer with lesions, 86% had at least one tooth with very slight effect (one to few white spots), 9.8% had a slight effect (generalized mottling), 2.6% had a moderate effect (generalized mottling and wear), 10.04% had a marked effect (mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel) , and 0.5 % ad severe effects (hypoplasia of the enamel and abnormal wear). Lesions that affect the enamel are produced during the period of formation of the tooth. The severity of lesions depends on the cause and the length of exposure to the causative agent. Generally mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel are associated with fluorosis. The relationship of lesions to bone and tooth fluoride concentrations was examined.

  6. 78 FR 19304 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Completion (NICs) published in the Federal Register (69 FR 19232-19233, April 12, 2004, corrected by 74 FR... described in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate (NIR) published in the Federal Register (77 FR 15798, March 16... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado...

  7. Geothermal resource assessment of Waunita Hot Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    This assessment includes the project report; the geothermal prospect reconnaissance evaluation and recommendations; interpretation of water sample analyses; a hydrogeochemical comparison of the Waunita Hot Springs, Hortense, Castle Rock, and Anderson Hot Springs; geothermal resistivity resource evaluation survey, the geophysical environment; temperature, heat flow maps, and temperature gradient holes; and soil mercury investigations.

  8. Geothermal resource assessment of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Resource series 16

    SciTech Connect

    Repplier, F.N.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Located in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains approximately 30 miles west of Denver, in the community of Idaho Springs, are a series of thermal springs and wells. The temperature of these waters ranges from a low of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C) to a high of 127/sup 0/F (53/sup 0/C). To define the hydrothermal conditions of the Idaho Springs region in 1980, an investigation consisting of electrical geophysical surveys, soil mercury geochemical surveys, and reconnaissance geological and hydrogeological investigations was made. Due to topographic and cultural restrictions, the investigation was limited to the immediate area surrounding the thermal springs at the Indian Springs Resort. The bedrock of the region is faulted and fractured metamorphosed Precambrian gneisses and schists, locally intruded by Tertiary age plutons and dikes. The investigation showed that the thermal waters most likely are fault controlled and the thermal area does not have a large areal extent.

  9. 77 FR 9840 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... controlled airspace at Colorado Springs, CO (76 FR 70920). Interested parties were invited to participate in... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  10. Hydrogeologic and geothermal investigation of Pagosa Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The following topics are covered: geology; geophysical surveys; geothermal wells, springs, and heat flow; hydrology; drilling program, well testing, and mineralogical and petrographic studies of samples from geothermal wells. (MHR)

  11. Spring and springbrook fauna of the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, R.J.; Bergey, E.A.; Ward, J.V.

    1982-06-01

    The aquatic macroinvertebrates of Willow Creek, Piceance Creek, Stewart Gulch, and spring sources surrounding Tract C-b in the Piceance Basin were sampled from July 1978 through August 1980 as part of a baseline monitoring program prior to oil-shale development. Macroinvertebrate species lists are included in this report. The spring sources exhibited a somewhat different and more constant physical and chemical environment compared to the streams.

  12. Organic geochemistry of oils from Oil Spring and Florence oil field near Canon City, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, P.G.; Dolan, Michael P.; Warden, Augusta; King, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Oil Spring is an oil seep located approximately 6 miles north of Ca?on City, Colorado. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the oil from Oil Spring and the oil from nearby Florence oil field share a common source. Bulk and molecular geochemical analyses show that the oil seep is most likely derived from a group of geochemically similar Cretaceous source rocks including the Carlile Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Graneros Shale, and the Mowry Shale. The Florence oil is derived from the Sharon Springs Member of the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale.

  13. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  14. Connect with Parents: Build Support Groups. Conference Proceedings (Colorado Springs, Colorado, August 3-4, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Sharen E., Ed.

    This document is a guide for the establishment and maintenance of parent support groups. It is a result of a conference on building parent support groups sponsored by the Colorado State Department of Social Services which brought together professionals and parents. The suggested audiences are people interested in forming similar groups; non-profit…

  15. Colorado geothermal commercialization program. Geothermal energy opportunities at four Colorado towns: Durango, Glenwood Springs, Idaho Springs, Ouray

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.; Zimmerman, J.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of four prospective geothermal development sites in Colorado was analyzed and hypothetical plans prepared for their development. Several broad areas were investigated for each site. The first area of investigation was the site itself: its geographic, population, economic, energy demand characteristics and the attitudes of its residents relative to geothermal development potential. Secondly, the resource potential was described, to the extent it was known, along with information concerning any exploration or development that has been conducted. The third item investigated was the process required for development. There are financial, institutional, environmental, technological and economic criteria for development that must be known in order to realistically gauge the possible development. Using that information, the next concern, the geothermal energy potential, was then addressed. Planned, proposed and potential development are all described, along with a possible schedule for that development. An assessment of the development opportunities and constraints are included. Technical methodologies are described in the Appendix. (MHR)

  16. Geochemistry of spring water, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical quality of water in the southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, is important to the future development of the abundant oil-shale resources of the area. This report examines the observed changes in chemistry as water circulates in both shallow and deep ground-water systems. Mass-balance and mass-transfer calculations are used to define reactions that simulate the observed water chemistry in the mixed sandstone, siltstone, and carbonate lithology of the Green River Formation of Tertiary age. The mass-transfer calculations determine a reaction path particular to this system. The early dominance of calcite dissolution produces a calcium carbonate water. After calcite saturation, deeper circulation and further rock-water interaction cause the reprecipitation of calcite, the dissolution of dolomite and plagioclase, and the oxidation of pyrite; all combining to produce a calcium magnesium sodium bicarbonate sulfate water. The calculations suggest that silica concentrations are controlled by a kaolinite-Ca-montmorillonite phase boundary. Close agreement of mineral-saturation indices calculated by both an aqueous-equilibrium model and the mass-transfer model support the selection of reactions from the mass-transfer calculations.

  17. 78 FR 37586 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Determination was published in the Federal Register on May 15, 2013 (78 FR 28628-28630). Workers at the subject... Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado...

  18. Colorado geothermal commercialization program: community development of geothermal energy in Pagosa Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    A district heating system for the Pagosa Springs central business district is in the planning stage. A detailed analysis of the project is presented. It comprises area and site specific studies and describes in detail the recent, current, anticipated, and postulated geothermal development activities. (MHR)

  19. Private well/spring position paper, Rifle, Colorado, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the hydrogeochemical relationship between the New and Old Rifle processing sites and 15 domestic wells in their vicinity. The relationship of the domestic wells to the Old and New Rifle tailings sites requires clarification due to recent advances in understanding of Rifle site conceptual models. In order to form a bridge from the Rifle remedial action plan (RAP) and the recent baseline risk assessment to this position paper, several issues require discussion. First, through analysis of long-term ground water level data, the hydraulic gradient between the former tailings and private wells and springs was assessed. Second, in the Rifle RAP there was not a strong emphasis placed on describing regional influences on water quality in the vicinity of the processing sites. This document uses available information coupled with theory of regional ground water flow to describe regional flow systems north of Rifle. Third, the definition of background water quality from the RAP has been refined in several ways. Also, for the recent baseline risk assessment, all alluvial wells used to define background for the sites were located east of Old Rifle. In the RAP, alluvial background wells were also placed between the sites (downgradient of Old Rifle). Two additional wells were installed for the recent baseline risk assessment upgradient of Old Rifle which verified that several of the older wells (RFO-01-0597 and -0598) were in locations representative of background.

  20. Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,215,000 South boundary: approximately 4,160,000 West boundary: approximately 216,000 East boundary: approximately 245,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs have geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. In addition, the explorationists discovered a very young Climax-style molybdenum porphyry system northeast of Rico, and drilling intersected thermal waters at depth. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Structural data collected by Flint Geothermal 2. Point information 3. Mines and prospects from the USGS MRDS dataset 4. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 5. Air photo lineaments 6. Areas covered by travertine 7. Groundwater geochemistry 8. Land ownership in the Rico area 9. Georeferenced geologic map of the Rico Quadrangle, by Pratt et al. 10. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  1. Geothermal heating from Pinkerton Hot Springs at Colorado Timberline Academy, Durango, Colorado. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.C.; Allen, R.W.; Beldock, J.

    1981-11-08

    The efforts to establish a greater pool of knowledge in the field of low temperature heat transfer for the application of geothermal spring waters to space heating are described. A comprehensive set of heat loss experiments involving passive radiant heating panels is conducted and the results presented in an easily interpretable form. Among the conclusions are the facts that heating a 65 to 70 F/sup 0/ space with 90 to 100 F/sup 0/ liquids is a practical aim. The results are compared with the much lower rates published in the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers SYSTEMS, 1976. A heat exchange chamber consisting of a 1000 gallon three compartment, insulated and buried tank is constructed and a control and pumping building erected over the tank. The tank is intended to handle the flow of geothermal waters from Pinkerton Hot Springs at 50 GPM prior to the wasting of the spring water at a disposal location. Approximately 375,000 Btu per hour should be available for heating assuming a 15 F/sup 0/ drop in water temperature. A combination of the panel heat loss experiments, construction of the heat exchange devices and ongoing collection of heat loss numbers adds to the knowledge available to engineers in sizing low temperature heat systems, useful in both solar and geothermal applications where source temperature may be often below 110 F/sup 0/.

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, P.

    1985-08-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

  3. Rapids configuration and flow dynamics at Warm Springs Rapid on the Yampa River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, L.A.; Wohl, E.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Debris flows from the mouths of tributaries form the majority of the rapids in the Green and Colorado River systems. On June 10, 1965, a large debris flow dammed the Yampa River at Warm Springs Draw in Dinosaur National Monument, depositing nearly 10,000 metric tons of gravel and boulders in the river channel and forming Warm Springs Rapid. The Yampa River is the only river in the Colorado River system that is unregulated, and thus provides one of the few opportunities to study a canyon system under natural flow conditions. Kieffer (1985) has proposed that the configuration of a debris fan-rapid represents the interactions between the sediment characteristics (grain size, cementation) of the debris flow, the hydraulic conditions within the construction (roughness, velocities, channel dimensions), and the discharge history of the river since its modification. Warm Springs Rapid currently exhibits a constriction width to upstream channel width ratio of 0.59. Discharges on the Yampa River for June of 1965 averaged 420 m[sup 3]/sec. Estimates of the mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) through the initial channel constriction show that critical threshold velocities for sediment transport were reached for the range of boulder sizes contained in the debris fan (intermediate axis = 20--200 cm). However, the width and configuration of the present channel constriction could not have been formed by these flows. A discharge of 940 m[sup 3]/sec was recorded on the Yampa River on May 18, 1984. Mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) associated with a discharge of this magnitude may have been competent to erode the channel into its present configuration. Step-backwater modeling will be used to simulate the modification of Warm Springs Rapid through time and to quantify the exact relationship between the morphologic and hydraulic conditions in the evolution of a debris fan-rapid.

  4. GDA steamboat power plant: a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, G.M. III

    1987-08-01

    Located 10 mi south of Reno, Nevada, Steamboat Springs has long been recognized as a prime geothermal resource for electric power generation potential by the US Geological Survey and numerous energy companies. Extensive leasing and exploration by Phillips and Gulf led to the discovery of a high-temperature (over 400/sup 0/F) reservoir in 1979. Geothermal Development Associates obtained a geothermal resources lease on a 30-acre parcel and a 10-year power sales agreement for 5 MW from the local utility, Sierra Pacific Power Company, in late 1983. Drilling commenced in March 1985, modular power plant construction began in October, and initial plant startup with power to the grid was accomplished in December 1985. Owing to cooling-water access and treatment costs, air-cooled condensers replaced the planned cooling towers, and full-time scale continuous production at rated capacity did not begin until late 1986. Three production wells and two injection wells, completed in highly fractured Cretaceous granodiorite and Tertiary andesite at depths of less than 1000 ft, produce 340/sup 0/F water having a salinity of 2300 ppm. Production well line-shaft pumps deliver in excess of 3000 gpm water to seven 1.2 MW-Rankine cycle binary power plant modules. The heat extracted from the geothermal water vaporizes the low boiling point N-pentane working fluid that expands to drive the turbines. The geothermal water is injected back into the reservoir. Both the pentane and the geothermal water are in separate closed-loop systems, which provides for an environmentally clean operation in this sensitive, highly visible site on the periphery of a metropolitan area.

  5. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 Waldo Canyon Burn Area near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and potential volume of debris flows along the drainage network of the burned area and to estimate the same for 22 selected drainage basins along U.S. Highway 24 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (29 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (42 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (48 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities at the pour points of the the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 to 54 percent in response to the 2-year storm; from less than 1 to 74 percent in response to the 10-year storm; and from less than 1 to 82 percent in response to the 25-year storm. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the southern and southeastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Nine of the 22 drainage basins of interest have greater than a 40-percent probability of producing a debris flow in response to the 10-year storm. Estimated debris-flow volumes for all rainfalls modeled range from a low of 1,500 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce

  6. Colorado: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Colorado. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Colorado. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

  7. Digital Data from the Great Sand Dunes and Poncha Springs Aeromagnetic Surveys, South-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, B.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Bankey, Viki; New Sense Geophysics, Ltd.

    2009-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for two high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in south-central Colorado: one in the eastern San Luis Valley, Alamosa and Saguache Counties, and the other in the southern Upper Arkansas Valley, Chaffee County. In the San Luis Valley, the Great Sand Dunes survey covers a large part of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve and extends south along the mountain front to the foot of Mount Blanca. In the Upper Arkansas Valley, the Poncha Springs survey covers the town of Poncha Springs and vicinity. The digital files include grids, images, and flight-line data. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including two grids of reduced-to-pole aeromagnetic data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

  8. Snowpack chemistry at selected sites in northwestern Colorado during spring 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of the alpine and subalpine snowpack were collected in and near the headwater basins of the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado during maximum annual accumulation of snowpack in spring 1995. Sampling protocol at seven selected sites at more than 2,500 meters above sea level divided the snowpack into two distinct strata to enable separate chemical analyses of upper and lower layers of the annual snow cover. These two layers correspond to the early snow season beginning in September until December 12, 1994, and the remainder of the season from January 1 until the sampling date in spring 1995. At one site these two strata were resampled at closely spaced intervals defining substrata to observe variance within the two strata dividing the snow season. Analytical results of snowpack chemistry are presented in support of investigations of seasonal effects on ion concentrations in the snowpack. Chemical concentrations of major anions and cations, dissolved organic carbon, and alkalinity; measured pH; calculated charge balance between anions and cations; the stable-sulfur isotope ratio (34S/32S); and summary statistics of chemical concentrations are tabulated. Sampling sites are plotted on a map of the area. Spatial distributions of the concentrations of the hydrogen, nitrate, and sulfate ions and stable- sulfur isotope ratios also are mapped. Several unusual, late-season, snowfall events occurred during April and May of 1995 after the snowpack was sampled at most of the seven sites in the study area. Consequently, a considerable fraction of the total annual snowpack was not sampled. At one site, the full snowpack was sampled again in June, after the late-spring storms, for comparison to the chemistry of the snowpack sampled earlier in April. Precipitation chemistry from a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) collector located near the site is presented for comparison of the chemistry of the late-season snow to that of the typical annual snowpack season.

  9. Characterization and analysis of temporal and spatial variations in habitat and macroinvertebrate community structure, Fountain Creek basin, Colorado Springs and vicinity, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, James F.

    2002-01-01

    The Fountain Creek Basin in and around Colorado Springs, Colorado, is affected by various land- and water-use activities. Biological, hydrological, water-quality, and land-use data were collected at 10 sites in the Fountain Creek Basin from April 1998 through April 2001 to provide a baseline characterization of macroinvertebrate communities and habitat conditions for comparison in subsequent studies; and to assess variation in macroinvertebrate community structure relative to habitat quality. Analysis of variance results indicated that instream and riparian variables were not affected by season, but significant differences were found among sites. Nine metrics were used to describe and evaluate macroinvertebrate community structure. Statistical analysis indicated that for six of the nine metrics, significant variability occurred between spring and fall seasons for 60 percent of the sites. Cluster analysis (unweighted pair group method average) using macroinvertebrate presence-absence data showed a well-defined separation between spring and fall samples. Six of the nine metrics had significant spatial variation. Cluster analysis using Sorenson?s Coefficient of Community values computed from macroinvertebrate density (number of organisms per square meter) data showed that macroinvertebrate community structure was more similar among tributary sites than main-stem sites. Canonical correspondence analysis identified a substrate particle-size gradient from site-specific species-abundance data and environmental correlates that decreased the 10 sites to 5 site clusters and their associated taxa.

  10. Colorado

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Spectacular Mountain Views of Northwest Colorado     ... portion of the image (across the top in this orientation) mountain ranges pictured here include the Medicine Bow, Front, Gore and the ...

  11. Discharge and water quality of springs in Roan and Parachute Creek basins, northwestern Colorado, 1981-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation and interpretation of discharge, water-quality, and radiochemical data collected at springs in the oil-shale regions of Roan and Parachute Creek basins, Colorado, from 1981 to 1983. Springs located on upland plateaus and ridges are mixed-cation bicarbonate water types with 216 to 713 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Calcite and dolomite dissolution are dominant chemical reactions in upland springs. Springs located in the canyons contain greater concentrations of sodium and sulfate and have 388 to 3,970 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Gypsum dissolution is an important chemical reaction in canyon spring water. The only trace constituents with mean concentration greater than 10 micrograms per liter in the study area were barium, boron, lithium and strontium. None of the canyon springs investigated represent discharge from the lower aquifer in the Green River Formation. Analysis of chemical and discharge data for streams in the Roan Creek drainage showed evidence of lower-aquifer discharge into the canyons. Springs located near an oil-shale mine or processing plant could be used for monitoring groundwater quality and quantity. Bicarbonate, fluoride, arsenic, boron, lithium, mercury, ammonia, and organic carbon may be chemical indicators of mine or process-water contamination of shallow aquifers near an oil-shale plant or mine. (USGS)

  12. Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.; Dolton, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

  13. Hydrogeology of the Leadville limestone and other paleozoic rocks in northwestern Colorado, with results of aquifer tests at Glenwood Springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Paleozoic rocks in northwestern Colorado were investigated during the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis of the Upper Colorado River Basin. Paleozoic rocks in the study area are grouped into 11 hydrostratigraphic units on the basis of lithologic and hydrologic properties. Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks and Pennsylvanian and Permian sandstone are regional aquifers, with natural discharges commonly ranging from 50 to 1,000 gal/min. Other hydrostratigraphic units in the area are either local aquifers or confining layers, with discharges rarely exceeding 50 gal/min. Aquifer tests at Glenwood Springs indicate that the Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks unit locally has a transmissivity of 47,000 sq ft/day, a storage coefficient of 0.0005, and a hydraulic conductivity of more than 100 ft/day. Hydraulic conductivities in most hydrostratigraphic units decrease with distance away from structural uplifts. Water in the Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks unit flows from structural uplifts to structural and fluvial basins. This hydrostratigraphic unit supplies water to streams that drain the White River Plateau, hot springs at Glenwood Springs, and artesian wells in the Burns basin. (USGS)

  14. 76 FR 70920 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado...

  15. Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An early-season snowfall accents the Rocky Mountains through western and central Colorado. This true-color image made from data collected by MODIS on October 26, 2001, highlights the contrast between various irrigated areas and the otherwise dry environment at the foothills of the Rockies. One such example is the city of Denver and its outlying suburbs, which can be seen best in the high-resolution image. In areas that would normally harbor drought-tolerant grasses, shrubs and trees, humans are living, watering their lawns, and farming; those watered, green areas differ substantially from the surrounding hues of brown. Numerous National Parks and Monuments dot the Southwestern U.S. The Great Sand Dunes National Monument is one such park. Running along the western base the Sangre de Cristo Range(just below the image's center), a subsection of the Rockies, the monument possesses some of the highest inland sand dunes in the U.S., with crests reaching over 700 feet.

  16. Water quality and aquatic toxicity data of 2002 spring thaw conditions in the upper Animas River watershed, Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, D.L.; Wirt, L.; Besser, J.M.; Wright, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic, water-quality, and biologic toxicity data collected during the annual spring thaw of 2002 in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado. The spring-thaw runoff is a concern because elevated concentrations of iron oxyhydroxides can contain sorbed trace metals that are potentially toxic to aquatic life. Water chemistry of streams draining the San Juan Mountains is affected by natural acid drainage and weathering of hydrothermal altered volcanic rocks and by more than a century of mining activities. The timing of the spring-thaw sampling effort was determined by reviewing historical climate and stream-flow hydrographs and current weather conditions. Twenty-one water-quality samples were collected between 11:00 AM March 27, 2002 and 6:00 PM March 30, 2002 to characterize water chemistry at the A-72 gage on the upper Animas River below Silverton. Analyses of unfiltered water at the A-72 gage showed a relation between turbidity and total-recoverable iron concentrations, and showed diurnal patterns. Copper and lead concentrations were related to iron concentrations, indicating that these elements are probably sorbed to colloidal iron material. Calcium, strontium, and sulfate concentrations showed overall decreasing trends due to dilution, but the loads of those constituents increased over the sampling period. Nine water-quality samples were collected near the confluence of Mineral Creek with the Animas River, the confluence of Cement Creek with the Animas River, and on the upper Animas River above the confluence with Cement Creek (three samples at each site). A total of six bulk water-toxicity samples were collected before, during, and after the spring thaw from the Animas River at the A-72 gage site. Toxicity tests conducted with the bulk water samples on amphipods did not show strong differences in toxicity among the three sampling periods; however, toxicity of river water to fathead minnows showed a decreasing trend

  17. Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  18. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey To Image Shallow Faults, Poncha Springs and Vicinity, Chaffee County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data were acquired over the town of Poncha Springs and areas to the northwest to image faults, especially where they are concealed. Because this area has known hot springs, faults or fault intersections at depth can provide pathways for upward migration of geothermal fluids or concentrate fracturing that enhances permeability. Thus, mapping concealed faults provides a focus for follow-up geothermal studies. Fault interpretation was accomplished by synthesizing interpretative maps derived from several different analytical methods, along with preliminary depth estimates. Faults were interpreted along linear aeromagnetic anomalies and breaks in anomaly patterns. Many linear features correspond to topographic features, such as drainages. A few of these are inferred to be fault-related. The interpreted faults show an overall pattern of criss-crossing fault zones, some of which appear to step over where they cross. Faults mapped by geologists suggest similar crossing patterns in exposed rocks along the mountain front. In low-lying areas, interpreted faults show zones of west-northwest-, north-, and northwest-striking faults that cross ~3 km (~2 mi) west-northwest of the town of Poncha Springs. More easterly striking faults extend east from this juncture. The associated aeromagnetic anomalies are likely caused by magnetic contrasts associated with faulted sediments that are concealed less than 200 m (656 ft) below the valley floor. The faults may involve basement rocks at greater depth as well. A relatively shallow (<300 m or <984 ft), faulted basement block is indicated under basin-fill sediments just north of the hot springs and south of the town of Poncha Springs.

  19. Eldorado Springs member of the Skull Creek Shale in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    The Eldorado Springs Sandstone crops out at the west edge of the Denver Basin and is mapped in the subsurface as an elongate linear sand body that extends at least 70 mi east-southeast of the outcrop. Along its axis, the sand body thickness ranges from 63 ft at the type section to about 25 ft on the east side of the study area. North of the axis, the sandstone thins as the base interfingers with the Lower Cretaceous Skull Creek Shale. To the south of the main axis, the sand interfingers with silty facies. The Eldorado Springs displays a cleaning upward signature, and is thought to have been deposited in an offshore bar sub-parallel to shoreline. The eastward thinning of the sand body suggests an orientation oblique to the Skull Creek shoreline, the thinner end being farther from shore. The overlying Skull Creek Shale thins over this sand body. This subtle paleotopographic effect persisted through the close of Muddy (J) time. The Eldorado Springs consists of very fine- to fine-grained siliceous sandstone with low porosity and permeability. Pore-lining clays that locally bridge pore throats and variable amounts of silica and ankerite cement reduce reservoir quality. this unit is not considered a good stand-alone target for hydrocarbon exploration but instead as a potential secondary pay in wells with primary pay in the D or Muddy (J). Production has been established from this unit in a well located in Sec. 20, T4S, R63W. A large part of this thick and laterally continuous sandstone body falls within the window of the basin center hydrocarbon trap. The Eldorado Springs Member offers a potentially large hydrocarbon resource that is virtually untapped.

  20. Direct utilization of geothermal energy for Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Final report, June 1979-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.

    1984-08-01

    The Pagosa Springs Geothermal District Heating System was conceptualized, designed, and constructed between 1979 to 1984 under the US Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to demonstrate the feasibility for utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources for direct-use applications. The Pagosa Springs system successfully provides space heating to public buildings, school facilities, residences, and commercial establishments at costs significantly lower than costs of available conventional fuels. The Pagosa Springs project encompassed a full range of technical, institutional, and economic activities. Geothermal reservoir evaluations and testing were performed, and two productive approx.140/sup 0/F geothermal supply wells were successfully drilled and completed. Transmission and distribution system design, construction, startup, and operation were achieved with minimum difficulty. The geothermal system operation during the first two heating seasons has been fully reliable and well respected in the community. The project has proven that low to moderate-temperature waters can effectively meet required heating loads, even for harsh winter-mountain environments. The principal difficulty encountered has been institutional in nature and centers on the obtaining of the geothermal production well permits and the adjudicated water rights necessary to supply the geothermal hot water fluids for the full operating life of the system. 28 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Mines and Prospects, Idaho Springs District, Clear Creek and Gilpin Counties, Colorado - Descriptions and Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, Robert Hadley; Drake, Avery Ala

    1966-01-01

    The Idaho Springs mining district forms an important segment of the Front Range mineral belt, a northeast-trending zone of coextensive intrusive rocks and hydrothermal ore deposits of early Tertiary age. This belt, which is about 50 miles long, extends from the region just west of Boulder southwestward across the Front Range. From 1859, when placer gold was discovered in Idaho Springs and lode gold in Central City, through 1959, ores valued at about $200 million were shipped from a 50-square-mile area that includes the Idaho Springs and adjacent districts to the north, west, and southwest. The adjacent Central City district, which produced ores valued at more than $100 million, is clearly the most important district in the mineral belt. The Idaho Springs district from 1860 to 1959 produced ores valued at about $65 million, and the districts to the west and southwest produced smaller amounts. Gold has accounted for about 60 percent of the value of the ore, but in some areas silver provides the chief values, and copper, lead, and zinc add value to the ores in most areas. Mining activity in the Idaho Springs and adjacent districts was at its 'heyday' in the late 1800's, it declined sharply after 1914, it was somewhat renewed during the 1930's, and it greatly declined during World War II. In the 1950's uranium prospecting stimulated some mining activity. No uranium was produced, however, and at the close of the decade only one mine--the Bald Eagle--was being worked for its precious- and base-metal ores. In this report, 135 mines and prospects are described. The mines and prospects described are those that were accessible at the time of this study, as well as a few inaccessible properties for which some information was available. Most of the data for the inaccessible or unimportant properties were obtained from Bastin and Hill (1917) and Spurr, Garrey, and Ball (1908). The following list shows, in alphabetical order, the names of about 325 openings of mines and

  2. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas.

  3. Influence of Riparian Tree Phenology on Lower Colorado River Spring-Migrating Birds: Implications of Flower Cueing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGrath, Laura J.; van Riper, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Neotropical migrant birds make choices about which habitats are most likely to provide successful foraging locations during migration, but little is known about how these birds recognize and process environmental clues that indicate the presence of prey species. Aspects of tree phenology, notably flowering of trees along the lower Colorado River corridor, coincide with the migratory stopovers of leaf-gleaning insectivorous songbirds and may be an important indicator of arthropod prey species availability. Shifting tree flowering and leaf flush during the spring migration period presents avian insectivores with an assortment of foraging opportunities. During two field seasons at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Arizona, we examined riparian tree species to test whether leaf-gleaning insectivorous birds are attracted to the flowering condition of trees in choosing foraging sites. We predicted that flowering trees would host more insect prey resources, would thus show increased visit rates, length of stays and attack ratios of migrant avian insectivores, and that those arthropods would be found in the stomach contents of the birds. Paired trees of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), displaying heavy and light degrees of flowering were observed to test these predictions. To test whether birds are tracking arthropods directly or are using flowers as a proximate cue, we removed flowers from selected trees and paired these treated trees with neighboring high flowering trees, which served as controls. Avian foraging behavior, avian diets, arthropods, and phenology data were collected at the same time to control for temporal differences in insect availability, plant phenology, and differences in stopover arrivals of birds. We documented five patterns from this study: 1) Higher abundance and richness of arthropods were found on honey mesquite trees with greater numbers of flowers. 2) Arthropod abundance and richness increased as flowering

  4. Tuff of Bridge Spring: A mid-Miocene ash-flow tuff, northern Colorado River extensional corridor, Nevada and Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.I.; Morikawa, S.A.; Martin, M.W. . Dept. of Geoscience); Gonzales, D.A.; Walker, J.D. . Isotope Geochronology Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    The Tuff of Bridge Spring (TBS) (15.19[+-]0.02 Ma; Gans, 1991) is a compositionally variable dacite to rhyolite ash-flow tuff that crops out over 1800 sq. km in the northern Colorado River extensional corridor. The TBS varies in composition from 59.5 to 74 wt. % SiO[sub 2] and typically contains phenocrysts of sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, clinopyroxene, [+-] sphene, [+-] apatite, [+-] zircon, and [+-] hornblende. The TBS is thickest and displays its greatest compositional range in the center of its area of exposure. The McCullough Range section contains at least three chemically distinct flow units that vary in composition from dacite to rhyolite. The basal and uppermost units are normally zoned and the middle unit is reversely zoned. The complex chemical zonation and zoning reversals in the TBS indicate that it erupted from a magma chamber that was periodically injected by both mafic and felsic magmas. Sections at the edge of the exposure area are thin, contain only one or two chemically definable flow units and have a limited compositional range. To the west at Sheep Mountain, TBS is 2.9 m thick and ranges from 70.2--71.7 wt % SiO[sub 2]. To the east in the White Hills, TBS is 14 m thick and ranges from 59.5--65.3 wt % SiO[sub 2]. This chemical and field data indicate that although the TBS is regionally extensive, individual flow units are not. Isotopic data and chemistry suggest that all sections of the TBS are cogenetic. Comparisons of chemical, geochronological and isotopic data between the TBS and nearby coeval plutons indicate that the Aztec Wash (Eldorado Mts., Nevada) and Mt. Perkins (Black Mountain, Arizona) plutons are possible source for the TBS. Both plutons exhibit ample evidence of magma mixing and commingling, processes that may produce compositional zonation such as that observed in the TBS.

  5. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: a tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, John E.; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2-10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10-90 % flow-exceedance (R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  6. 75 FR 52935 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... notice that on August 12, 2010, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs.... Susan C. Stires, Director, Regulatory Affairs, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, P.O. Box 1087, Colorado... President and General Counsel, Colorado Interstate Gas Company; P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs,...

  7. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: A tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solder, John; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2−10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10–90 % flow-exceedance (R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  8. Biotic and abiotic processes controlling water chemistry during snowmelt at rabbit ears pass, Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Leavesley, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical composition of snowmelt, groundwater, and streamwater was monitored during the spring of 1991 and 1992 in a 200-ha subalpine catchment on the western flank of the Rocky Mountains near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Most of the snowmelt occurred during a one-month period annually that began in mid-May 1991 and mid-April 1992. The average water quality characteristics of individual sampling sites (meltwater, streamwater, and groundwater) were similar in 1991 and 1992. The major ions in meltwater were differentially eluted from the snowpack, and meltwater was dominated by Ca2+, SO4/2-, and NO3/-. Groundwater and streamwater were dominated by weathering products, including Ca2+, HCO3/- (measured as alkalinity), and SiO2, and their concentrations decreased as snowmelt progressed. One well had extremely high NO3/- concentrations, which were balanced by Ca2+ concentrations. For this well, hydrogen ion was hypothesized to be generated from nitrification in overlying soils, and subsequently exchanged with other cations, particularly Ca2+. Solute concentrations in streamwater also decreased as snowmelt progressed. Variations in groundwater levels and solute concentrations indicate thai most of the meltwater traveled through the surficial materials. A mass balance for 1992 indicated that the watershed retained H+, NH4/+, NO3/-, SO4/2- and Cl- and was the primary source of base cations and other weathering products. Proportionally more SO4/2- was deposited with the unusually high summer rainfall in 1992 compared to that released from snowmelt, whereas NO3/- was higher in snowmelt and Cl- was the same. The sum of snowmelt and rainfall could account for greater than 90% of the H+ and NH4/+ retained by the watershed and greater than 50% of the NO3/-.The chemical composition of snowmelt, groundwater, and streamwater was monitored during the spring of 1991 and 1992 in a 200-ha subalpine catchment on the western flank of the Rocky Mountains near Steamboat Springs

  9. Colorado composting

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, K.

    1994-08-01

    Composting operations come in all shapes and sizes, and there are many variables in operating a successful composting operation. The author looked at two markedly different composting operations in Colorado--the recycling/composting program at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, and the biosolids composting operation at the Upper Eagle Valley Sanitation District, Colorado Springs--to report on how each operation was developed and how both are working today. At the Air Force Academy, a three-acre base for the composting facility was prepared in the fall of 1991. As word of the facility started getting out, people began offering to bring in their clean, green yard trimmings. A Wildcat Compost Turner made it possible for the academy to add a variety of organic matter to the typical yard clippings it was collecting. Material currently being composted at the academy includes a mixture of approximately 15% grass, 25% sod, 10% pine needles, and 50% stable bedding. Four years ago, Colorado's Upper Eagle Valley Consolidated Sanitation District looked to composting as a way to handle its biosolids. A small, two-acre parcel, three miles from the nearest community, was chosen as the composting site. After meeting all of the associated regulations, trucks began hauling biosolids to the site. The sludge was mixed with sawdust and recycled sludge, and then windrowed. The district already has 14,000 cubic yards of compost stored up and ready to go.

  10. 78 FR 46552 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Colorado; Second Ten-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...; Second Ten-Year Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Colorado Springs AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Colorado Springs area for the carbon monoxide (CO) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS)....

  11. Water-quality assessment and macroinvertebrate data for the Upper Yampa River watershed, Colorado, 1975 through 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Moore, Jennifer L.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.; Dupree, Jean A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was initiated in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Routt County, the Colorado Water Conservation Board, and the City of Steamboat Springs, to compile and analyze historic water-quality data and assess water-quality conditions in the Upper Yampa River watershed (UYRW) in northwestern Colorado. Water-quality data for samples collected by federal, state, and local agencies for various periods from 1975 through 2009 were compiled and assessed for streams, lakes, reservoirs, and groundwater in the UYRW, including the Elkhead Creek subwatershed and the Yampa River watershed that is upstream from Elkhead Creek. For selected physical-property and chemical-constituent data for samples collected from surface-water sites and groundwater wells in the UYRW, this report: (1) characterizes available data through statistical summaries, (2) analyzes the spatial and temporal distribution of water-quality conditions, (3) identifies temporal trends in water quality, where possible, (4) provides comparisons to federal and state water-quality standards and recommendations, and (5) identifies factors affecting the quality of water. In addition, the availability and characteristics of macroinvertebrate data collected in the UYRW are described.

  12. Evaluation of water quality, suspended sediment, and stream morphology with an emphasis on effects of stormwater on Fountain and Monument Creek basins, Colorado Springs and vicinity, Colorado, 1981-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Ferguson, Sheryl A.; Stogner, Robert W.; August, Marianne; Payne, William F.; Bruce, James F.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents water quality and suspended sediment with an emphasis on evaluating the effects of stormflow on Fountain Creek Basin in the vicinity of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Water-quality data collected at 11 sites between 1981 and 2001 were used to evaluate the effects of stormflow on water quality. Suspended-sediment data collected at seven sites from 1998 through 2001 were used to evaluate effects of stormflow on suspended-sediment concentrations, discharges, and yields. Data were separated into three flow regimes: base flow, normal flow, and stormflow. A comparison of stormwater-quality concentrations measured between 1981 and 2001 to Colorado acute instream standards indicated that, except for isolated occurrences, stormwater quality met acute instream standards. At several sites, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand, fecal coliform, and selected nutrient concentrations tended to be highest during stormflow and lowest during base flow. Dissimilar to the other nutrients, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate concentrations generally were highest during base flow and lowest during stormflow. Most dissolved trace-element concentrations associated with stormflow decreased or showed little change compared to base flow. However, median concentrations of total copper, iron, lead, nickel, manganese, and zinc for stormflow samples generally were much larger than nonstorm samples. The substantially larger concentrations of total copper, iron, lead, nickel, manganese, and zinc measured at site 5800 during stormflow as compared to other sites indicates a relatively large source of these metals in the reach between sites 5530 and 5800. Semi-volatile organic compounds in samples collected during stormflow were detected relatively infrequently at the four sites monitored; however, analysis of pesticide data collected during stormflow showed a relatively frequent detection of pesticides at low levels. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and particulate trace-element loads substantially

  13. 78 FR 58555 - Public Land Order No. 7821; Withdrawal of National Forest System Land for Steamboat Rock Picnic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This order replaces expired Public Land Order No. 6689 (53 FR... Steamboat Rock Picnic Grounds; South Dakota AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land... to protect the recreational uses and improvements at the Steamboat Rock Picnic Grounds within...

  14. Volusia Blue Spring - A Hydrological Treasure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    Springs are natural openings in the ground through which water beneath the surface discharges into hydrologic features such as lakes, rivers, or the ocean. The beautiful springs and spring rivers are among Florida's most valued natural resources; their gemlike refreshing waters have been a focal point of life from prehistoric times to the present (2008). The steady flow of freshwater at a nearly constant water temperature attracted animals now long absent from Florida's landscape. Fossil remains and human artifacts, discovered by divers from many spring runs, attest to the importance of springs to the State's earliest inhabitants. Explorers of Florida, from Ponce de Leon to John and William Bartram and others, often mentioned the springs that were scattered across central and northern Florida. As colonists and settlers began to inhabit Florida, springs continued to be the focus of human activity, becoming sites of missions, towns, and steamboat landings.

  15. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  16. Spring runoff water-chemistry data from the Standard Mine and Elk Creek, Gunnison County, Colorado, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Mast, M. Alisa; Marsik, Joseph; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected approximately every two weeks during the spring of 2010 from the Level 1 portal of the Standard Mine and from two locations on Elk Creek. The objective of the sampling was to: (1) better define the expected range and timing of variations in pH and metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge and Elk Creek during spring runoff; and (2) further evaluate possible mechanisms controlling water quality during spring runoff. Samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (oxygen-18 and deuterium). The Level 1 portal sample and one of the Elk Creek samples (EC-CELK1) were collected from the same locations as samples taken in the spring of 2007, allowing comparison between the two different years. Available meteorological and hydrologic data suggest that 2010 was an average water year and 2007 was below average. Field pH and dissolved metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge had the following ranges: pH, 2.90 to 6.23; zinc, 11.2 to 26.5 mg/L; cadmium, 0.084 to 0.158 mg/L; manganese, 3.23 to 10.2 mg/L; lead, 0.0794 to 1.71 mg/L; and copper, 0.0674 to 1.14 mg/L. These ranges were generally similar to those observed in 2007. Metal concentrations near the mouth of Elk Creek (EC-CELK1) were substantially lower than in 2007. Possible explanations include remedial efforts at the Standard Mine site implemented after 2007 and greater dilution due to higher Elk Creek flows in 2010. Temporal patterns in pH and metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge were similar to those observed in 2007, with pH, zinc, cadmium, and manganese concentrations generally decreasing, and lead and copper generally increasing during the snowmelt runoff period. Zinc and cadmium concentrations were inversely correlated with flow and thus apparently dilution-controlled. Lead and copper concentrations were inversely correlated with pH and thus apparently pH-controlled. Zinc, cadmium, and manganese concentrations near the

  17. Watershed scale response to climate change--Yampa River Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Lauren E.; Battaglin, William A.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    General Circulation Model simulations of future climate through 2099 project a wide range of possible scenarios. To determine the sensitivity and potential effect of long-term climate change on the freshwater resources of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey Global Change study, "An integrated watershed scale response to global change in selected basins across the United States" was started in 2008. The long-term goal of this national study is to provide the foundation for hydrologically based climate change studies across the nation. Fourteen basins for which the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System has been calibrated and evaluated were selected as study sites. Precipitation Runoff Modeling System is a deterministic, distributed parameter watershed model developed to evaluate the effects of various combinations of precipitation, temperature, and land use on streamflow and general basin hydrology. Output from five General Circulation Model simulations and four emission scenarios were used to develop an ensemble of climate-change scenarios for each basin. These ensembles were simulated with the corresponding Precipitation Runoff Modeling System model. This fact sheet summarizes the hydrologic effect and sensitivity of the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System simulations to climate change for the Yampa River Basin at Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

  18. Radioactivity and uranium content of the Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale and associated rocks in western Kansas and eastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, Edwin R.

    1955-01-01

    As a part of the Geological Survey's program of investigating uranium-bearing carbonaceous rocks on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a reconnaissance of the Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale in western Kansas and eastern Colorado was conducted during 1954. The Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale and its lateral equivalents ranges from 155 to about 500 feet in thickness and generally contains about 0.001 percent uranium, but some beds contain larger amounts. A 6-foot thick shale bed in Cheyenne County, Colo., contains about 0.006 percent uranium, a 4 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Crowley County, Colo., is estimated to contain between 0.004 and 0.005 percent uranium, and a 3 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Kiowa County, Colo., contains about 0.004 percent uranium. At several outcrop localities, sequences of beds as much as 9 1/2 feet thick contain about 0.003 percent uranium. Data from wells indicate that the 4 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Crowley County, Colo., may have a lateral extent of at least 5 1/2 miles. A gamma-ray log of a well in Yuma County, Colo., indicates the presence of a sequence of beds 66 feet thick which contains 0.005 to 0.010 percent equivalent uranium. No definite pattern of areal distribution of radioactivity and uranium content in the Sharon Springs is indicated by available data. Lateral variation in uranium content of individual beds was not noted in outcrops, which seldom extend more than 150 feet, but subsurface data from gamma-ray logs of wells indicate that both the maximum radioactivity and the thickness of radioactive beds are variable within distances of a few miles. Vertical variation in radioactivity and uranium content of the more radioactive beds is usually abrupt, but in the rocks as a whole the range of uranium content is so small that large variations in content are absent. In most of the gamma-ray logs examined there is only part of the sequence of rocks

  19. Water quality of storm runoff and comparison of procedures for estimating storm-runoff loads, volume, event-mean concentrations, and the mean load for a storm for selected properties and constituents for Colorado Springs, southeastern Colorado, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul; Weiss, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires that municipalities that have a population of 100,000 or greater obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits to characterize the quality of their storm runoff. In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Springs City Engineering Division, began a study to characterize the water quality of storm runoff and to evaluate procedures for the estimation of storm-runoff loads, volume and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents. Precipitation, streamflow, and water-quality data were collected during 1992 at five sites in Colorado Springs. Thirty-five samples were collected, seven at each of the five sites. At each site, three samples were collected for permitting purposes; two of the samples were collected during rainfall runoff, and one sample was collected during snowmelt runoff. Four additional samples were collected at each site to obtain a large enough sample size to estimate storm-runoff loads, volume, and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents using linear-regression procedures developed using data from the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). Storm-water samples were analyzed for as many as 186 properties and constituents. The constituents measured include total-recoverable metals, vola-tile-organic compounds, acid-base/neutral organic compounds, and pesticides. Storm runoff sampled had large concentrations of chemical oxygen demand and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. Chemical oxygen demand ranged from 100 to 830 milligrams per liter, and 5.-day biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 14 to 260 milligrams per liter. Total-organic carbon concentrations ranged from 18 to 240 milligrams per liter. The total-recoverable metals lead and zinc had the largest concentrations of the total-recoverable metals analyzed. Concentrations of lead ranged from 23 to 350 micrograms per liter, and concentrations of zinc ranged from 110

  20. Monitoring the Lower Colorado River's Arid Delta in Mexico by Measuring the Response in Vegetation and Evapotranspiration Resulting from the 2014 Spring Pulse Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.; Gomez-Sapiens, M.; Jarchow, C.; Milliken, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Colorado River Spring 2014 pulse flood release of water to the delta in Mexico is a collaborative monitoring project funded by the Department of Interior, in part, with teams of scientists from governments, universities and non-profits on both sides of the border. Our goal was to provide measures of the vegetation response to this Minute 319 pulse flood and to document post-flooding changes in the vegetation along the lower Colorado River reaches 1-7, which include ca. 150 narrow miles of riparian habitat until it opens to the Sea of Cortez. We used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite, which provides near-daily coverage at 250 m resolution, while the Landsat 8 satellite provides this data at 16 day intervals at 30 m resolution. We are combining the two sources of satellite data to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution. NDVI and EVI data for each river reach from 2000 to the present were collected, as well as VI for specific target areas. These include restoration sites, vegetation transect sites, and bird observation sites. Green vegetation has decreased steadily in all river reaches since the flood years of 1997-2000. This loss of vegetation vigor has been accompanied by a loss of habitat for riparian dependent birds from 2002 to the present. The loss of vegetation vigor resulted in a lowering of evapotranspiration (ET) in each river reach. ET has decreased approximately from 155 mcm/year in 2000 to 100 mcm/year in 2013. The pulse flood, at 130 mcm, is designed to restore some of the vegetation vigor and to germinate new cohorts of native trees throughout the river reaches. Early positive results are apparent in the zones of inundation. For example, an area of about 600 hectares has shown rapid green-up at the end of the pilot channel in Reach 5 and extending into Reach 7. This is a mixed vegetation zone containing native

  1. Influence of rock composition on the geochemistry of stream and spring waters from mountainous watersheds in the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Grand Mesa National Forests, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William Roger

    2002-01-01

    The ranges of geochemical baselines for stream and spring waters were determined and maps were constructed showing acid-neutralizing capacity and potential release of total dissolved solids for streams and spring waters for watersheds underlain by each of ten different rock composition types in the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Grand Mesa National Forests, Colorado (GMUG). Water samples were collected in mountainous headwater watersheds that have comparatively high precipitation and low evapotranspiration rates and that generally lack extensive ground-water reservoirs. Mountainous headwaters react quickly to changes in input of water from rain and melting snow and they are vulnerable to anthropogenic impact. Processes responsible for the control and mobility of elements in the watersheds were investigated. The geochemistry of water from the sampled watersheds in the GMUG, which are underlain by rocks that are relatively unmineralized, is compared to the geochemistry of water from the mineralized Redcloud Peak area. The water with the highest potential for release of total dissolved solids is from watersheds that are underlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks; that high potential is caused primarily by gypsum in those rocks. Water that has the highest acid-neutralizing capacity is from watersheds that are underlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The water from watersheds underlain by the Mancos Shale has the next highest acid-neutralizing capacity. Water that has the lowest acid-neutralizing capacity is from watersheds that are underlain by Tertiary ash-flow tuff. Tertiary sedimentary rocks containing oil shale, the Mesavede Formation containing coal, and the Mancos Shale all contain pyrite with elevated metal contents. In these mountainous head-water areas, water from watersheds underlain by these rock types is only slightly impacted by oxidation of pyrite, and over-all it is of good chemical quality. These geochemical baselines demonstrate the importance of rock

  2. Lagrangian sampling of wastewater treatment plant effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, during the summer of 2003 and spring of 2005--Hydrological and chemical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, Larry B.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Brown, Gregory K.; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Gray, James L.; Meyer, Michael T.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Taylor, Howard E.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents methods and data for a Lagrangian sampling investigation into chemical loading and in-stream attenuation of inorganic and organic contaminants in two wastewater treatment-plant effluent-dominated streams: Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa. Water-quality sampling was timed to coincide with low-flow conditions when dilution of the wastewater treatment-plant effluent by stream water was at a minimum. Sample-collection times corresponded to estimated travel times (based on tracer tests) to allow the same "parcel" of water to reach downstream sampling locations. The water-quality data are linked directly to stream discharge using flow- and depth-integrated composite sampling protocols. A range of chemical analyses was made for nutrients, carbon, major elements, trace elements, biological components, acidic and neutral organic wastewater compounds, antibiotic compounds, pharmaceutical compounds, steroid and steroidal-hormone compounds, and pesticide compounds. Physical measurements were made for field conditions, stream discharge, and time-of-travel studies. Two Lagrangian water samplings were conducted in each stream, one in the summer of 2003 and the other in the spring of 2005. Water samples were collected from five sites in Boulder Creek: upstream from the wastewater treatment plant, the treatment-plant effluent, and three downstream sites. Fourmile Creek had seven sampling sites: upstream from the wastewater treatment plant, the treatment-plant effluent, four downstream sites, and a tributary. At each site, stream discharge was measured, and equal width-integrated composite water samples were collected and split for subsequent chemical, physical, and biological analyses. During the summer of 2003 sampling, Boulder Creek downstream from the wastewater treatment plant consisted of 36 percent effluent, and Fourmile Creek downstream from the respective wastewater treatment plant was 81 percent effluent. During the spring of 2005

  3. Water quality and quantity of selected springs and seeps along the Colorado River corridor, Utah and Arizona: Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Spence, John R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Berghoff, Kevin; Plowman, Terry I.; Peart, Dale B.; Roth, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service conducted an intensive assessment of selected springs along the Colorado River Corridor in Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park in 1997 and 1998, for the purpose of measuring and evaluating the water quality and quantity of the resource. This study was conducted to establish baseline data for the future evaluation of possible effects from recreational use and climate change. Selected springs and seeps were visited over a study period from 1997 to 1998, during which, discharge and on-site chemical measurements were made at selected springs and seeps, and samples were collected for subsequent chemical laboratory analysis. This interdisciplinary study also includes simultaneous studies of flora and fauna, measured and sampled coincidently at the same sites. Samples collected during this study were transported to U.S. Geological Survey laboratories in Boulder, Colorado, where analyses were performed using state-of-the-art laboratory technology. The location of the selected springs and seeps, elevation, geology, aspect, and onsite measurements including temperature, discharge, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance, were recorded. Laboratory analyses include determinations for alkalinity, aluminum, ammonium (nitrogen), antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromide, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chloride, chromium, cobalt, copper, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, holmium, iodine, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, nitrate (nitrogen), nitrite (nitrogen), phosphate, phosphorus, potassium, praseodymium, rhenium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, silica, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfate, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, tungsten

  4. Structural fabrics, mineralization and Lamaride kinematics of the Idaho Springs-Ralston shear zone, Colorado mineral belt and central Front Range uplift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, J.S.; Nelson, E.P.; Beach, S.T.; Layer, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Idaho Springs and Central City mining districts form the central portion of a structurally controlled hydrothermal precious- and base-metal vein system in the Front Range of the northeast-trending Colorado Mineral Belt. Three new 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages on hydrothermal sericite indicate the veins formed during the Laramide orogeny between 65.4??1.5 - 61.9??1.3 Ma. We compile structural geologic data from surface geological maps, subsurface mine maps, and theses for analysis using modern graphical methods and integration into models of formation of economic mineral deposits. Structural data sets, produced in the 1950s and 1960s by the U.S. Geological Survey, are compiled for fabric elements, including metamorphic foliations, fold axial trends, major brittle fault zones, quartz and precious- and base-metal veins and fault veins, Tertiary dikes, and joints. These fabric elements are plotted on equal-area projections and analyzed for mean fabric orientations. Strike-slip fault-vein sets are mostly parallel or sub-parallel, and not conjugate as interpreted by previous work; late-stage, normal-slip fault veins possibly show a pattern indicative of triaxial strain. Fault-slip kinematic analysis was used to model the trend of the Laramide maximum horizontal stress axis, or compression direction, and to determine compatibility of opening and shear motions within a single stress field. The combined-model maximum compression direction for all strike slip fault veins is ???068??, which is consistent with published Laramide compression directions of ???064?? (mean of 23 regional models) and ???072?? for the Front Range uplift. The orientations of fabric elements were analyzed for mechanical and kinematic compatibility with opening, and thus permeability enhancement, in the modeled regional east-northeast, Laramide compression direction. The fabric orientation analysis and paleostress modeling show that structural permeability during mineralization was enhanced along pre

  5. 76 FR 22686 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... notice that on April 8, 2011, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), Post Office Box 1087 Colorado..., Director, Regulatory Affairs, Post Office Box 1087 Colorado Springs, CO 80944; telephone (719)...

  6. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-02-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Major-ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations in the Steamboat Creek basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom-sediment concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, and organic carbon were largest in City Creek. In City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek, concentrations for 11 constituents--antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese (Horse Heaven Creek only), mercury, selenium, silver, zinc, and organic carbon (City Creek only)--exceeded concentrations considered to be enriched in streams of the nearby Willamette River Basin, whereas in Steamboat Creek only two trace elements--antimony and nickel--exceeded Willamette River enriched concentrations. Bottom-sediment concentrations for six of these constituents in City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek--arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc--also exceeded interim Canadian threshold effect level (TEL) concentrations established for the protection of aquatic life, whereas only four constituents between Singe Creek and Steamboat Creek--arsenic, chromium, copper (Singe Creek only), and nickel--exceeded the TEL concentrations.

  8. Potential preservation of native American petroglyphs at Steamboat Butte, Montana, using ethyl silicate solution treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisafe, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Samples of the Tongue River Sandstone, collected from the top of Steamboat Butte in central Montana, were treated with an ethyl silicate solution. The samples showed a large increase in compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance, relative to untreated samples, and indicates the treatment(s) significantly consolidate(s) the stone, thus providing a method to increase the lifetime of the petroglyphs carved onto the stone.

  9. Geophysical modeling and geochemical analysis for hydrogeologic assessment of the Steamboat Hills area, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalbeck, John David

    2001-07-01

    Three studies constitute the hydrogeologic assessment of the Steamboat Hills area, Washoe County, Nevada. Geophysical modeling and geochemical analysis are used to assess the hydrogeologic connection between a fractured bedrock geothermal system used to produce electrical power and surrounding alluvial aquifer basins used for municipal drinking water supply. Understanding the hydrogeologic connection between these two water resources is important for long-term management of these resources. Coupled 2.75-D forward modeling of multiple gravity and aeromagnetic profiles constrained by geological and physical properties (density, magnetic susceptibility, remanent magnetic) data yields a detailed 3-D geologic model of the geothermal system and the alluvial basins. A new method is presented for modeling the geothermal reservoir based on altered physical properties of host rock that yields a reservoir volume estimate that is double the previously assumed volume. The configuration of the modeled geothermal reservoir suggests that a previously unrecognized thermal water up-flow zone may exist along the west flank of the Steamboat Hills. Model results delineate the elevation and thickness of geologic units that can be used in numerical modeling of groundwater flow, planning exploration drilling, and evaluating fully 3-D forward modeling software. The Steamboat Hills geothermal resource area offers an excellent opportunity to test an exploration strategy using magnetics. A zone of demagnetized rock within the geothermal resource area resulting from thermochemical alteration due to thermal water flow along faults and fractures is apparent as an aeromagnetic low anomaly. Anomalously low ground magnetic data delineate a fault that conducts thermal water from the geothermal system to an alluvial aquifer. Vertical magnetic susceptibility from core measurements yields an average value for altered granodiorite used in forward modeling. Permeable fractures and a major fault zone

  10. Simulating the potential effects of climate change in two Colorado basins and at two Colorado ski areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.; Hay, L.; Markstrom, S.

    2011-01-01

    The mountainous areas of Colorado are used for tourism and recreation, and they provide water storage and supply for municipalities, industries, and agriculture. Recent studies suggest that water supply and tourist industries such as skiing are at risk from climate change. In this study, a distributed-parameter watershed model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), is used to identify the potential effects of future climate on hydrologic conditions for two Colorado basins, the East River at Almont and the Yampa River at Steamboat Springs, and at the subbasin scale for two ski areas within those basins. Climate-change input files for PRMS were generated by modifying daily PRMS precipitation and temperature inputs with mean monthly climate-change fields of precipitation and temperature derived from five general circulation model (GCM) simulations using one current and three future carbon emission scenarios. All GCM simulations of mean daily minimum and maximum air temperature for the East and Yampa River basins indicate a relatively steady increase of up to several degrees Celsius from baseline conditions by 2094. GCM simulations of precipitation in the two basins indicate little change or trend in precipitation, but there is a large range associated with these projections. PRMS projections of basin mean daily streamflow vary by scenario but indicate a central tendency toward slight decreases, with a large range associated with these projections. Decreases in water content or changes in the spatial extent of snowpack in the East and Yampa River basins are important because of potential adverse effects on water supply and recreational activities. PRMS projections of each future scenario indicate a central tendency for decreases in basin mean snow-covered area and snowpack water equivalent, with the range in the projected decreases increasing with time. However, when examined on a monthly basis, the projected decreases are most dramatic during fall and

  11. Evaluation of the solute geothermometry of thermal springs and drilled wells of La Primavera (Cerritos Colorados) geothermal field, Mexico: A geochemometrics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandarinath, Kailasa; Domínguez-Domínguez, Humberto

    2015-10-01

    A detailed study on the solute geothermometry of thermal water (18 springs and 8 drilled wells) of La Primavera geothermal field (LPGF) in Mexico has been carried out by employing a geochemical database compiled from the literature and by applying all the available solute geothermometers. The performance of these geothermometers in predicting the reservoir temperatures has been evaluated by applying a geochemometrics (geochemical and statistical) method. The springs of the LPGF are of bicarbonate type and the majority have attained partial-equilibrium chemical conditions and the remaining have shown non-equilibrium conditions. In the case of geothermal wells, water is dominantly of chloride-type and, among the studied eight geothermal wells, four have shown full-equilibrium chemical conditions and another four have indicated partial-equilibrium conditions. All springs of HCO3-​ type water have provided unreliable reservoir temperatures, whereas the only one available spring of SO42- type water has provided the reservoir temperature nearer to the average BHT of the wells. Contrary to the general expected behavior, spring water of non-equilibrium and geothermal well water of partial-equilibrium chemical conditions have indicated more reliable reservoir temperatures than those of partially-equilibrated and fully-equilibrated water, respectively. Among the chemical concentration data, Li and SiO2 of two springs, SO42- and Mg of four springs, and HCO3 and Na concentrations of two geothermal wells were identified as outliers and this has been reflected in very low reservoir temperatures predicted by the geothermometers associated with them (Li-Mg, Na-Li, Na-K-Mg, SiO2 etc.). Identification of the outlier data points may be useful in differentiating the chemical characteristics, lithology and the physico-chemical and geological processes at the sample locations of the study area. In general, the solute geothermometry of the spring waters of LPGF indicated a dominantly

  12. 75 FR 30806 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application May 26, 2010. Take notice that on May 17, 2010, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs... the Natural Gas Act, for a certificate of public convenience and necessity authorizing...

  13. 77 FR 51792 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 7, 2012, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C. (CIG), Post Office Box 1087, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80944, filed in the above captioned docket an application pursuant to section 7(c)...

  14. In Search of the Social: Steamboats, Square Wheels, Reindeer and Other Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolwick, Jim S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the concept of the ‘social,’ particularly from an archaeological perspective, and explores how it relates to the ways in which we seek to understand the processes of technological innovation and change. It is demonstrated that the concept ‘social’ is far from well defined and that enquiry is bedevilled by artificial polarization between subject-centred approaches and object-centred particularism. Through the medium of early United States steamboat technology a different approach is forged through the melding of people and things with the idea of viewing artefacts as active social actors along with people. Ultimately, it is argued that maritime archaeologists should be more bullish in their approaches to material things—instead of adopting social theories ‘wholesale,’ we should insist that they include the things we study: boats, material objects, people, artefacts, landscapes and animals.

  15. Analyzing post-fire topography at the hillslope-channel interface with terrestrial LiDAR: contrasting geomorphic responses from the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire of Colorado and the 2013 Springs Fire of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storesund, R.; Chin, A.; Florsheim, J. L.; O'Hirok, L.; Williams, K.; Austin, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Mountains areas are increasingly susceptible to wildfires because of warming climates. Although knowledge of the hydro-geomorphological impacts of wildfire has advanced in recent years, much is still unknown regarding how environmental fluxes move through burned watersheds. Because of the loss of vegetation and hydrophobic soils, flash floods often accompany elevated runoff events from burned watersheds, making direct process measurements challenging. Direct measurements are also only partly successful at capturing the spatial variations of post-fire effects. Coupled with short temporal windows for observing such responses, opportunities are often missed for collecting data needed for developing predictive models. Terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) of burned areas allows detailed documentation of the post-fire topography to cm-level accuracy, providing pictures of geomorphic responses not previously possible. This paper reports a comparative study of hillslope-channel interactions, using repeat TLS, in two contrasting environments. Burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire and 2013 Springs Fire, in Colorado and California respectively, the study sites share many similarities including steep erosive slopes, small drainage areas, and step-pool channel morphologies. TLS provided a tool to test the central hypothesis that, dry ravel, distinct in the California Mediterranean environment, would prompt a greater sedimentological response from the Springs Fire compared to the Waldo Canyon Fire. At selected sites in each area, TLS documented baseline conditions immediately following the fire. Repeat scanning after major storms allowed detection of changes in the landscape. Results show a tendency for sedimentation in river channels in the study sites interacting with dry ravel on hillslopes, whereas erosion dominated the response from the Waldo Canyon Fire with an absence of dry ravel. These data provide clues to developing generalizations for post-fire effects at regional scales

  16. Distribution of total and methyl mercury in sediments along Steamboat Creek (Nevada, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamenkovic, J.; Gustin, M.S.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Thomas, B.A.; Agee, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1800s, mills in the Washoe Lake area, Nevada, used elemental mercury to remove gold and silver from the ores of the Comstock deposit. Since that time, mercury contaminated waste has been distributed from Washoe Lake, down Steamboat Creek, and to the Truckee River. The creek has high mercury concentrations in both water and sediments, and continues to be a constant source of mercury to the Truckee River. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of total and methyl mercury (MeHg) in surface sediments and characterize their spatial distribution in the Steamboat Creek watershed. Total mercury concentrations measured in channel and bank sediments did not decrease downstream, indicating that mercury contamination has been distributed along the creek's length. Total mercury concentrations in sediments (0.01-21.43 ??g/g) were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those in pristine systems. At 14 out of 17 sites, MeHg concentrations in streambank sediments were higher than the concentrations in the channel, suggesting that low banks with wet sediments might be important sites of mercury methylation in this system. Both pond/wetland and channel sites exhibited high potential for mercury methylation (6.4-30.0 ng g-1 day-1). Potential methylation rates were positively correlated with sulfate reduction rates, and decreased as a function of reduced sulfur and MeHg concentration in the sediments. Potential demethylation rate appeared not to be influenced by MeHg concentration, sulfur chemistry, DOC, sediment grain size or other parameters, and showed little variation across the sites (3.7-7.4 ng g-1 day-1). ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Availability and chemical quality of ground water in the Crystal River and Cattle Creek Drainage Basins near Glenwood Springs, west-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogden, Robert E.; Giles, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    Parts of the Crystal River and cattle Creek drainage basins near Glenwood Springs, Colo., have undergone rapid population growth in recent years. This growth has resulted in an increased demand for information for additional domestic, industrial, and municipal water supplies. A knowledge of the occurrence of ground water will permit a more efficient allocation of the resource. Aquifers in the two drainage basins include: alluvium, basalts, the Mesa Verde Formation, Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Entrada Sandstone, Maroon Formation, Eagle Valley Evaporite, and undifferentiated formations. Except for aquifers in the alluvium, and basalt, well yields are generally low and are less than 25 gallons per minute. Well yields form aquifers in the alluvium and basalt can be as much as several hundred gallons per minute. Water quality is dependent of rock type. Calcium bicarbonate is the predominant type of water in the study area. However, calcium sulfate type water may be found in aquifers in the Eagle Valley Evaporite and in the alluvium where the alluvial material has been derived from the Eagle Valley Evaporite. Concentrations of selenium in excess of U.S. Public Health Service standards for drinking water can be found locally in aquifers in the Eagle Valley Evaporite. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

    1994-01-20

    Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

  19. Evaluation of trends in pH in the Yampa River, northwestern Colorado, 1950-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chafin, Daniel T.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of pH trends in the Yampa River from near its headwaters to its mouth. The study was prompted by an apparent historical increase in measured pH at the Yampa River near Maybell, from an average of about 7.6 in the 1950's and 1960's to about 8.3 in the 1980's and 1990's. If real, further increase could cause more frequent exceedances of the Colorado water-quality standard of 9.0 and adversely affect aquatic life in the Yampa River Basin, including Dinosaur National Monument. The principal conclusion of this study is that this apparent historical increase in measured pH was caused mostly by changes in measurement protocol. Synoptic sampling during August 16-19, 1999, a period of relatively warm weather and base flow, showed that late afternoon pH of the Yampa River ranged from 8.46 to 9.20. The largest pH (9.20) exceeded the Colorado water-quality standard and was measured at Yampa River above Elk River, about 1.8 miles downstream from the Steamboat Springs Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant outfall, where nutrient enrichment caused photosynthesis by algae to dominate. Here, the dissolved oxygen concentration was 161 percent of saturation and carbon dioxide (CO2 was at 26 percent of saturation. At Yampa River downstream from a diversion near Hayden, 16.3 miles downstream, the effects of photosynthesis were still dominant, though attenuated by reaeration and dilution with freshwater from the Elk River. About 37.2 miles farther downstream, at Yampa River below Craig, which is about 6.2 miles downstream from the Craig Waste Water Treatment Plant, the effects of photosynthesis increased slightly, and pH rose to 8.80. Respiration plus oxidation of organic matter became dominant at Yampa River at Deerlodge Park in Dinosaur National Monument, where pH was 8.51, dissolved oxygen concentration was at 109 percent of saturation, and CO2 was at 189 percent of saturation. Respiration plus oxidation of organic matter, though

  20. 75 FR 51035 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Authorization August 12, 2010. Take notice that on August 3, 2010, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), Post Office Box 1087, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80944, filed in Docket No. CP10-478-000, a prior notice... approximately $3.8 million. CIG avers that subsequent to the abandonment in place, the Fourway facilities...

  1. Washington, D.C.'s vanishing springs and waterways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Garnett P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper traces the disappearance or reduction of the many prominent springs and waterways that existed in Washington, D.C. , 200 years ago. The best known springs were the Smith Springs (now under the McMillan Reservoir), the Franklin Park Springs (13th and I Streets, NW.), Gibson 's Spring (15th and E Streets, NE.), Caffrey 's Spring (Ninth and F Streets, NW.), and the City Spring (C Street between Four and One-Half and Sixth Streets, NW.). Tiber Creek, flowing south to the Capitol and thence westward along Consititution Avenue, joined the Potomac River at 17th Street and Constitution Avenue. In the 1800's, the Constitution Avenue reach was made into a canal which was used by scows and steamboats up to about 1850. The canal was changed into a covered sewer in the 1870's, and the only remaining visible surface remnant is the lock-keeper 's little stone house at 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. Because of sedimentation problems and reclamation projects, Rock Creek, the Potomac River , and the Anacostia River are considerably narrower and shallower today than they were in colonial times. For example, the mouth of Rock Creek at one time was a wide, busy ship harbor , which Georgetown used for an extensive foreign trade, and the Potomac River shore originally extended to 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

    1995-01-26

    The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

  3. Hydrologic data for Paleozoic rocks in the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains data used to interpret the hydrology of Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin under the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis program. The study area includes the drainages of the Green and Colorado Rivers from their headwaters to Lees Ferry, Arizona. Hydrologic data presented in this report include artesian yields from wells and springs, and values of porosity, intrinsic permeability, and hydraulic conductivity determined by laboratory analyses and aquifer tests. (USGS)

  4. Detrital Zircon Record of Colorado River Incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, D.; Grove, M.; Gehrels, G.; Dorsey, R.; House, K. P.; Howard, K.; Pearthree, P. A.; Spencer, J. E.; Mahoney, B.

    2007-05-01

    The Colorado River is a large, youthful, unequilibrated continental drainage system the base-level for which was established rather abruptly between 5 and 6 million years ago in conjunction with Gulf of California rifting and establishment of the modern river course through the western Grand Canyon and lower Colorado river region. New laser ablation ICPMS detrital zircon U-Pb analyses (~3000) from ~40 samples provide insight into details relating to the cause, timing and consequences of river inception. These samples encompass (1) the modern Colorado River delta, (2) major tributaries including the Green, "Grand", San Juan, Little Colorado and Gila rivers (3) late Miocene to Pliocene sediments along the lower Colorado (4) late Miocene to Pleistocene deltaic and fluvial sediments of the Imperial and Palm Spring Groups in the western Salton Trough, and (5) late Miocene- early Pliocene Bidahochi Formation of eastern Arizona. Data from the western Salton Trough and modern delta yield strata yield remarkably homogeneous age distributions that indicate there was little evolution in Colorado River sediment composition since 5.3 Ma. Detrital zircon is dominated by a mix of local southwest US cratonal basement (1.7 and 1.4 Ga) plus reworked supracrustal sequences of the Colorado Plateau that provide Neoproterozoic, 1.1 Ga, and early Paleozoic zircons. A relative paucity of Grenville-age grains in the earliest part of the delta sequence may reflect an early stage of the modern river prior to deep incision through Colorado Plateau erg deposits. The strong homogeneity of the detrital zircon record from late Miocene to the present is consistent with the `lake spillover model' for inception and integration of the modern Colorado River drainage. Abrupt integration of the lower Colorado River after 5.6 Ma is clearly recorded by detrital zircon ages from the laucustrine Bouse Formation and Bullhead alluvium aggradational package. Fluvial-laucustrine deposits of the Bidahochi

  5. Effect of crop rotation distance on populations of Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): development of areawide Colorado potato beetle pest management strategies.

    PubMed

    Sexson, Deana L; Wyman, Jeffrey A

    2005-06-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), overwinters adjacent to field edges and infests nearby fields in the spring, primarily by walking. Crop rotation is known to be an effective cultural control against Colorado potato beetle populations limiting spring infestations. Spatial separation is an important consideration in optimizing the rotational effect because long-distance rotations have been shown to reduce Colorado potato beetle infestations. To determine the effect of long-distance rotations on Colorado potato beetle populations in commercial Wisconsin potato production, a geographic area of >18,200 ha (>45,000) acres in southern Portage County, Wisconsin, was selected as an experimental area for areawide pest management of the Colorado potato beetle. From 1997 to 1999, beetle populations at edges within each potato field in this region were determined by spring and fall field sampling. The rotational distance between current and previous potato fields was measured and analysis was run between the distance and Colorado potato beetle populations. Long-distance rotations of >400 m were an effective cultural control management strategy to limit adult beetle infestations in the spring. This strategy can be optimized when collaborating growers are able to maximize their rotational distances by coordinating their rotational schemes within large areawide, geographic locations. Deploying long-distance rotations within a geographic area over many years would limit Colorado potato beetle populations and could result in a significantly reduced Colorado potato beetle populations entering fields in the spring.

  6. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  7. Colorado amethyst.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michalski, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Of the 20 or so amethyst localities reported in Colorado, four are described in some detail and comments are given on their geology. The Crystal Hill mine, near La Garita, Saguache County, contains rock crystal (long slender prisms with small rhombohedral terminations) and pale lavender amethyst (generally <3 in. in length). The deposit was worked as early as the 1800's as a gold mine and also contains abundant manganese oxides. Amethyst, associated with argentiferous galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite, occurs in the Amethyst mine, in the Creede district, on West Willow Creek, Mineral County. The specimens here consist of small pale pinkish-purple crystals interlayered with milky quartz, some as banded forms ("sowbelly agate') and as geode-like vugs. Amethyst also occurs in Unaweep Canyon south of Grand Junction in Mesa County. Pale to very dark amethyst occurs as crystals dominated by large rhombohedra and small prisms (approx 1 in. across). At Red Feather Lakes, Larimer County, amethyst crystals are medium to dark purple and have prism and rhombohedral faces nearly equally developed; some are doubly terminated. -R.S.M.

  8. Spring Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  9. Geothermal resource assessment of western San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard; Ringrose, Charles D.

    1983-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey initiated and carried out a fully integrated assessment program of the geothermal resource potential of the western San Luis Valley during 1979 and 1980. The San Luis Valley is a large intermontane basin located in southcentral Colorado. While thermal springs and wells are found throughout the Valley, the only thermal waters found along the western part of the Valley are found at Shaw Warm Springs which is a relatively unused spring located approximately 6 miles (9.66 km) north of Del Norte, Colorado. The waters at Shaws Warm Spring have a temperature of 86 F (30 C), a discharge of 40 gallons per minute and contain approximately 408 mg/l of total dissolved solids. The assessment program carried out din the western San Luis Valley consisted of: soil mercury geochemical surveys; geothermal gradient drilling; and dipole-dipole electrical resistivity traverses, Schlumberger soundings, Audio-magnetotelluric surveys, telluric surveys, and time-domain electro-magnetic soundings and seismic surveys. Shaw Warm Springs appears to be the only source of thermal waters along the western side of the Valley. From the various investigations conducted the springs appear to be fault controlled and is very limited in extent. Based on best evidence presently available estimates are presented on the size and extent of Shaw Warm Springs thermal system. It is estimated that this could have an areal extent of 0.63 sq. miles (1.62 sq. km) and contain 0.0148 Q's of heat energy.

  10. Research Methods in Environmental Studies: A County Planning Application in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruntfest, Eve C.

    To obtain practical experience, a research methods class at the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs) undertook a special project to help a nearby county (Park County), assess its planning needs. The county was chosen for its characteristics as a rapidly growing rural area faced with the problems created by mounting population pressure on…

  11. Salinity in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley, western Colorado, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.; von Guerard, Paul B.

    1996-01-01

    Salinity, or the dissolved-solids concentration, is the measure of salts such as sodium chloride, calcium bicarbonate, and calcium sulfate that are dissolved in water. About one-half of the salinity in the Colorado River Basin is from natural sources (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1995), such as thermal springs in the Glenwood-Dotsero area, located about 90 miles upstream from Grand Junction (fig. 1). Effects of human activities, such as irrigation, reservoir evaporation, and transbasin diversions, have increased the levels of salinity in the Colorado River. High salinity can affect industrial and municipal water users by causing increased water-treatment costs, increased deterioration of plumbing and appliances, increased soap needs, and undesirable taste of drinking water. High salinity also can cause lower crop yields by reducing water and nutrient uptake by plants and can increase agricultural production costs because of higher leaching and drainage requirements. Agricultural losses might occur when salinity reaches about 700?850 milligrams per liter (U.S Department of the Interior, 1994). Figure 1. Irrigated area in the Grand Valley and locations of sampling sites for the 1994?95 salinity study of the Colorado River. The Colorado River is the major source of irrigation water to the Grand Valley (fig. 1) and also is one source of water for the Clifton Water District, which supplies domestic water to part of the eastern Grand Valley. During spring and early summer in 1994, the Colorado River in the Grand Valley had lower than average streamflow. There was concern by water users about the effect of this low streamflow on salinity in the river. In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study to evaluate salinity in the Colorado River. This fact sheet describes results of that study. The specific objectives of the fact sheet are to (1) compare salinity in the Colorado River among

  12. An Evaluation of Colorado's College Opportunity Fund and Related Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    During the spring of 2004, the State of Colorado enacted legislation that fundamentally changed the mechanisms through which it financed its public higher education system, beginning with the 2005-06 academic year. Rather than appropriating funds directly to institutions, the legislation created the College Opportunity Fund (COF), the principal…

  13. Being PREPaREd for Crisis in Northern Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kathy; Malvey, Michelle; Rastatter, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The Thompson School District recognized after the Columbine incident in the spring of 1999 that it was lacking an adequate plan for crisis response. Colorado legislation led to a mandate for having a crisis response plan so the district purchased a "canned" crisis response plan that served the needs of response in a very immediate but impersonal…

  14. Flooding the Colorado River Delta: A Landscape-Scale Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, Karl W.; Glenn, Edward P.; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Parra-Rentería, Carlos A.; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Schmidt, John C.; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco A.

    2013-12-01

    A large pulse of water is planned to be released into the dry Colorado River channel in Mexico. This engineered experimental spring flood, which will flow from Lake Mead and pass through downstream reservoirs, is the culmination of decades of applied research. The pulse flow is a rare opportunity for research at the landscape scale [Glenn et al., 2013].

  15. Colorado Children's Budget 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Children's Budget is a comprehensive report on funding for children's services in Colorado. This report provides a six- year funding history for more than 50 programs funded with state, local, and federal dollars. The Colorado Children's Budget analyzes reductions in programs and services during the economic downturn. The data in the…

  16. Colorado Children's Budget 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Colorado Children's Budget 2011" tallies up Colorado's public investments during FY 2007-08 through FY 2011-12 for programs and services that enhance the well-being of children across four domains--Early Childhood, K-12 Education, Health, and Other Supports. It is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested…

  17. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  18. Colorado Children's Budget 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Cuciti, Peggy L.; Baker, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget 2012" examines the state's commitment to investing in the well-being of children. It tallies up Colorado's actual and planned investment during the past five years (Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2009 through FY 2012-2013) on programs and services in four areas: Early Childhood Learning and Development, K-12 Education,…

  19. Colorado`s Pollution-Prevention Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.

    1994-12-31

    The Colorado Pollution Prevention Partnership is a nonprofit, voluntary alliance of government, business, and public interest groups organized in 1990 to develop and promote pollution prevention and waste minimization in Colorado industries. The partnership started with discussions between two individuals concerning a difficulty in a public-private working relationship. The discussions soon expanded to several individuals meeting on a regular basis, then to informal breakfast meetings with representatives from industry, EPA, and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Eventually, organizations representing the public interest joined the discussions. The goals of the partnership are clear: strengthen the working relationship between the private and public sectors; improve capabilities for anticipating and avoiding environmental problems; pool resources and focus attention on the mutual goal of pollution prevention; and exchange information and expertise, and help transfer these to medium and small companies and the general public.

  20. 75 FR 4429 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Post Office Closing AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This document informs the public that an appeal of the closing of the Sundance, CO, post office has been filed. It... closing of the Sundance post office located in Steamboat Springs, Colorado 80487. The appeal was...

  1. Geology highlights, Ride the Rockies 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The author provides a brief description of the geology along the route for each day of the ride, from June 12 through June 17, 2011. Ride the Rockies begins in Crested Butte, Colorado, with stops in Buena Vista, Edwards, Steamboat Springs, Granby, and Georgetown. A small, generalized geologic map also is shown.

  2. Pesticides in surface waters of the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Spahr, Norman E.

    2000-01-01

    Forty-four river, stream, and drain sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado were sampled during 1996?98 to determine the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in the basin. In a fixed-station study, 57 surface-water samples were collected from October 1996 through January 1998 at four sites. Each site was sampled approximately monthly for up to a year, with more frequent sampling during the spring and summer growing season. In a synoptic study, surface-water samples were collected at 43 sites in the agricultural areas of the Grand Valley and the Uncompahgre River Valley in May 1998. Each site was sampled once. Pesticide concentrations generally were low and varied seasonally and across land uses. Thirty-five pesticides were detected at least once in the two studies, and 11 pesticides accounted for almost 82 percent of the detections. Herbicides were more commonly detected than insecticides, and only the herbicides alachlor and atrazine were detected in more than 50 percent of the samples. Carbofuran was the most commonly detected insecticide and was detected in 19 percent of the samples. Pesticide detections increased and were measured at higher concentrations in the summer months and at the agriculture sites. All pesticide concentrations were less than drinking-water standards, and most complied with human-health advisories and criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Pesticides in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado were detected slightly less frequently and generally at lower concentrations than in 20 National Water-Quality Assessment Program study-unit basins that collected water-quality data from 1992 through 1996. Results from surface-water sampling conducted during 1996?98 in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado indicate that beneficial uses of water were not being impaired by the presence of pesticides in surface waters in the basin.

  3. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Xcel Energy Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado XcelEnergy NonXcel Transmission Network Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains transmission network of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4540689.017558 m Left: 160606.141934 m Right: 758715.946645 m Bottom: 4098910.893397m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shapefile

  5. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Ouray Colorado resource characteristics and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.

    1981-10-01

    Ouray, Colorado, at 7800 feet, lies in a natural amphitheater in the northern portion of the San Juan Mountains. Mining and tourism are the primary industries; each fluctuating between boom or bust; mining erratically; tourism seasonally. The hot springs in the area average from 80/sup 0/ to 152/sup 0/F and discharge from 2 to 200 gallons per minute. The resource is probably associated with circulation along deep normal faults with a limestone aquifer dispersing the hot water. It is estimated that 2256 x 10/sup 11/ Btu's of geothermal energy are available in the area. The springs are used in a pool, and for space heating. An unsolicited proposal for additional resource assessment and engineering was rejected by DOE. An Appropriate Technology Small Grant was applied for, and an A and E subcontract is being applied for. Independent development is happening nearby in exploration drilling for space heating needs. The city will pursue a heating district scheme involving use of the pool spring, or drilling a well as funding dictates. The city has unique funding problems involving an unstable seasonal economy, desire to continue to maintain the hot springs pool, impatient citizenry, and nervous spa owners.

  7. Town of Pagosa Springs geothermal heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The Town of Pagosa Springs has owned and operated a geothermal heating system since December 1982 to provide geothermal heating during the fall, winter and spring to customers in this small mountain town. Pagosa Springs is located in Archuleta County, Colorado in the southwestern corner of the State. The Town, nestled in majestic mountains, including the Continental Divide to the north and east, has an elevation of 7,150 feet. The use of geothermal water in the immediate area, however, dates back to the 1800`s, with the use of Ute Bands and the Navajo Nation and later by the U.S. Calvery in the 1880`s (Lieutenant McCauley, 1878). The Pagosa area geothermal water has been reported to have healing and therapeutic qualities.

  8. Colorado's clean energy choices

    SciTech Connect

    Strawn, N.; Jones, J.

    2000-04-15

    The daily choices made as consumers affect the environment and the economy. Based on the state of today's technology and economics, Colorado consumers can include energy efficiency and renewable energy into many aspects of their lives. These choices include where they obtain electricity, how they use energy at home, and how they transport themselves from one place to another. In addition to outlining how they can use clean energy, Colorado's Clean Energy Choices gives consumers contacts and links to Web sites for where to get more information.

  9. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  10. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  11. ECOREGIONS OF COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Colorado have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecor...

  12. Colorado's Guaranteed Graduate Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    An overview of the nature, benefits, and steps involved in Colorado's Guaranteed Graduate Program, a process that assures that high school graduates have the knowledge and skills considered essential for entry into employment and postsecondary education, begins this document. A discussion of the portfolio process follows, along with descriptions…

  13. Colorado Children's Budget 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Children's Budget 2010" is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested in better understanding how Colorado funds children's programs and services. It attempts to clarify often confusing budget information and describe where the state's investment trends are and where those trends will lead the state if…

  14. Colorado's Singular "No"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    Supporters of affirmative action may have finally found a way to defeat state ballot measures that would ban such programs: Latch onto an inspirational presidential candidate with piles of cash and an unprecedented voter-turnout machine. Those activists won a narrow victory in Colorado this month, when 50.7 percent of voters made the state the…

  15. Colorado Children's Budget 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Baker, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget" presents and analyzes investments and spending trends during the past five state fiscal years on services that benefit children. The "Children's Budget" focuses mainly on state investment and spending, with some analysis of federal investments and spending to provide broader context of state…

  16. MIGRATORY LABOR IN COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGLASS, M.R.; AND OTHERS

    CONDITIONS AND PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE EMPLOYMENT OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS AND MIGRANTS IN COLORADO ARE PRESENTED. THE FIVE MAJOR SEASONAL FARM LABOR STATE EMPLOYMENT AREAS ARE SURVEYED ACCORDING TO (1) THE ORGANIZATION OF THE SEASONAL FARM LABOR (4) TRENDS IN AGRICULTURAL ACREAGE, PRODUCTION, AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, (5) COMMUNITY ATTITUDES AND…

  17. Asbestos in Colorado Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia A.

    This study determined, by means of a random sample, how many of Colorado's public schools have asbestos materials and estimated the potential risk of exposure presented by these materials. Forty-one schools were surveyed. Bulk samples of possible asbestos materials were collected and analyzed using the K-squared Asbestos Screening Test to…

  18. Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    The results show that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection.

  19. Silverton folio, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Whitman; Howe, Ernest; Ransome, F. L.

    1905-01-01

    The term San Juan region, or simply "the San Juan," used with variable meaning by early explorers, and naturally with indefinite limitation during the period of settlement, is now quite generally applied to a large tract of mountainous country in southwestern Colorado, together with an undefined zone of lower country bordering it on the north, west, and south.  The Continental Divide traverses this area in a great bow.  The principal part of the district is a deeply scored volcanic plateau, more than 3000 square miles in extent, drained on the north by the tributaties of the Gunnison River, on the west by those of the Dolores and San Miguel rivers, on the south by numerous branches of the San Juan, and on the east by the Rio Grande.  ALl but the latter drainage finds its way to the Gulf of California through the Colorado River.

  20. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Pueblo County, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  1. Colorado Geothermal Commercialization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, F.C.

    1980-04-01

    Chaffee County, located in central Colorado, has immense potential for geothermal development. This report has been prepared to assist residents and developers in and outside the area to develop the hydrothermal resources of the county. Data has been collected and interpreted from numerous sources in order to introduce a general description of the area, estimate energy requirements, describe the resources and postulate a development plan. Electric power generation and direct heat application potential for the region are described.

  2. Workforce Brief: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Colorado (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 23 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding some 551,630 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 2,355,290 to 2,906,920. The rate of growth is much higher than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole.…

  3. Assessment of impacts of proposed coal-resource and related economic development on water resources, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming; a summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Timothy Doak; Hillier, Donald E.

    1981-01-01

    with ammonia-nitrogen concentrations in the Yampa River downstream from Steamboat Springs were evaluated using a waste-load assimilative-capacity model. Changes in sediment loads carried by streams due to increased coal mining and construction of roads and buildings may be apparent only locally; projected increases in sediment loads relative to historic loads from the basin are estimated to be 2 to 7 percent. Solid-waste residuals generated by coal-conversion processes and disposed of into old mine pits may cause widely dispersed ground-water contamination, based on simulation-modeling results. Projected increases in year-round water use will probably result in the construction of several proposed reservoirs. Current seasonal patterns of streamflow and of dissolvedsolids concentrations in streamflow will be altered appreciably by these reservoirs. Decreases in time-weighted mean-annual dissolved-solids concentrations of as much as 34 percent are anticipated, based upon model simulations of several configurations of proposed reservoirs. Detailed statistical analyses of water-quality conditions in the Yampa River basin were made. Regionalized maximum waterquality concentrations were estimated for possible comparison with future conditions. Using Landsat imagery and aerial photographs, potential remote-sensing applications were evaluated to monitor land-use changes and to assess both snow cover and turbidity levels in streams. The technical information provided by the several studies of the Yampa River basin assessment should be useful to regional planners and resource managers in evaluating the possible impacts of development on the basin's water resources.

  4. 77 FR 23498 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (formerly known as the Denver Museum of Natural History). In... sole responsibility of the museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the Native.... History and Description of the Cultural Items The 11 unassociated funerary objects are one basket and...

  5. 78 FR 53783 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural... representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to..., or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants...

  6. Africa in World History: A Teaching Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, April 25-26, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Bryant P., Ed.

    African history is a relatively new discipline and its sources, methodology, and content may be unfamiliar to those trained in European or U.S. history. Through presentations by African scholars, this document offers new strategies for integrating Africa into world history courses. Each presentation is followed by commentaries from experienced…

  7. 75 FR 58426 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Notice of Inventory Completion that was published in the Federal Register (74 FR 42105- 42106, August 20, 2009). The citation (72 FR 19920, April 14, 2004) should read (69 FR 19232-19233, April 12, 2004..., Bernstein & Associates - NAGPRA Consultants, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, CO 80218, telephone (303) 894-...

  8. World History Teaching Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 12-14, 1982). Corrected Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Joe C., Ed.; Martin, Neil D., Ed.

    Proceedings of a conference held to discuss the problems of teaching world history are reported. Eight papers are presented. The first four address the issue of world history as an academic discipline. In "The World History Survey Course" William McNeill argues that major curriculum changes take place in this country only when sound pedagogical…

  9. SANGRE DE CRISTO WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Bruce R.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys were undertaken of a wilderness study area which includes most of the Sangre de Cristo Range of south-central Colorado. Four areas of probable mineral-resource potential for gold, silver, and base metals lie along a northwest structural trend which follows the western margin of the range north of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument and crosses the range south of the monument. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for similar minerals plus tungsten has been identified east of Blanca Peak at the extreme southern end of the study area. Another area of probable mineral-resource potential includes molybdenum mineralization associated with the Rito Alto stock. A small area of probable geothermal resource potential exists on the west side of the area around the Valley View Hot Springs. There is little promise for the occurrence of oil and gas resources.

  10. Colorado Preschool Program: 2003 Report to the Colorado Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) serves at-risk preschool children in community programs, including Head Start programs, private for-profit programs, non-profit programs, and programs within public schools. This report to the Colorado legislature provides information on participation in the program, collaborations of CPP with other early…

  11. Study of Attrition of Chicana Students at the University of Southern Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, James

    Information was collected from 28 Chicano, 42 Chicana, 36 non-Chicano, and 52 non-Chicana students to identify reasons for Chicana attrition from the University of Southern Colorado. Information was also collected from 14 Chicanas who had already dropped out of college. Most of the data were collected at registration for spring semester, 1980. The…

  12. Colorado Model Content Standards: Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Colorado Model Content Standards for Science specify what all students should know and be able to do in science as a result of their school studies. Specific expectations are given for students completing grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Five standards outline the essential level of science knowledge and skills needed by Colorado citizens to…

  13. Colorado Local History: A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, Carol M., Comp.; Mood, Terry Ann, Comp.

    This directory lists by county 135 collections of local history to be found in libraries, museums, historical societies, schools, colleges, and private collections in Colorado. The directory includes only collections available in Colorado which contain bibliographic holdings such as books, newspaper files or clippings, letters, manuscripts,…

  14. WILSON MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromfield, Calvin S.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilson Mountains Wilderness consists of about 68 sq mi in the San Miguel Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Based on a mineral survey two areas in the wilderness have a probable mineral-resource potential. One area is on the east margin of the area in the Trout Lake mining district, and the other is near the center of the area, the Mount Wilson mining district. Both areas have had a modest base and (or) precious metal production from narrow veins and have a probable potential for the occurrence of similar deposits. Of more significance is a probable mineral-resource potential for disseminated copper mineralization in the Mount Wilson mining district.

  15. EAGLES NEST WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tweto, Ogden; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a geologic and mineral survey, a primitive area that constitutes the nucleus of the Eagles Nest Wilderness, Colorado was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Among the additional areas later incorporated in the wilderness, only a strip near a major fault west and northwest of Frisco and Dillon is classed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the silver-lead-zinc or fluorspar types.

  16. RAWAH WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, R.C.; Patten, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Rawah Wilderness, Colorado and some adjacent lands were studied and their mineral-resource potential was assessed using geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data. Traces of copper, silver, uranium, tungsten, and molybdenum were found in geochemical samples, but there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in this relatively unmineralized area. If our interpretation is valid that the southern Medicine Bow Mountains moved eastward along a gently west dipping thrust fault, it suggests the possibility that potential petroleum reservoir rocks are beneath the granite in at least parts of the area. This possibility could be investigated by seismic surveys or drilling.

  17. Thermal and tectonic history in the steamboat hills geothermal field: Determination of the age of active hydrothermal activity by application of AFTA{sup {trademark}} (apatite fission track analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Kamp, P.C. van de

    1995-12-31

    This study, in the Steamboat Hills area of the Carson segment of the northern Walker Lane Belt, was initiated to provide a regional thermal history framework and to investigate the age of the active local hydrothermal system. Seven outcrop samples, representing ?Cretaceous granodiorite and ?Triassic Peavine sequence metamorphosed volcanic flow and volcaniclastic rocks plus six samples of Peavine rocks in vertical sequence from an 0.8 km deep geothermal corehole have been analyzed using AFTA (apatite fission track analysis) and zircon fission track analysis.

  18. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  19. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  20. 1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING (LEFT BACKGROUND), AND TWIN COTTAGES (UPPER RIGHT) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  1. Fluorine, fluorite, and fluorspar in central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    related to the Pikes Peak batholith had a mean fluorine content of 1,700 ppm, and primary magmatic fluorite and fluorite-bearing pegmatites are common throughout that igneous mass. Fluorine was deposited in many types of economic mineral deposits in central Colorado, and it currently is a significant trace element in some thermal springs. In the fluorspar deposits, fluorine contents were as high as 37 percent. Some fluorine-rich porphyry systems, such as Jamestown, had fluorine values that ranged from 200 ppm to nearly 37 percent fluorine, and veins in other deposits contained hydrothermal fluorite, although it was not ubiquitous. For the 495 samples from non-fluorspar mining districts (and excluding Jamestown), however, the median fluorine content was 990 ppm. This is above the crustal average but still relatively modest compared to the fluorspar deposits, and it indicates that the majority of the mineralizing systems in central Colorado did not deposit large amounts of fluorine. Nevertheless, the fluorine- and fluorite-rich mineral deposits could be used as guides for the evaluation and discovery of related but concealed porphyry and epithermal base- and precious-metal deposits. The Cenozoic geologic history of central Colorado included multiple periods during which fluorine-bearing rocks and mineral deposits were exposed, weathered, and eroded. This protracted history has released fluorine into soils and regoliths, and modern rainfall and snowmelt interact with these substrates to add fluorine to the hydrosphere. This study did not evaluate the fluorine contents of water or make any predictions about what areas might be major sources for dissolved fluorine. However, the abundant data that are available on fluorine in surface water and ground water can be coupled with the results of this study to provide additional insight into natural sources of fluorine in domestic drinking water.

  2. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  3. Spring joint with overstrain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Peter M. (Inventor); Gaither, Bryan W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible joint may include a conductive compression spring and a pair of non-conductive spring cages disposed at opposite ends of the compression spring to support the compression spring. A conductive member disposed inside the compression spring may extend between the pair of spring cages. One end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with one of the spring cages and another end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with the other of the spring cages.

  4. The Colorado Adoption Project.

    PubMed

    Plomin, R; DeFries, J C

    1983-04-01

    This report provides an overview of the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), a longitudinal, prospective, multivariate adoption study of behavioral development. Examples of the types of analyses that can be conducted using this design are presented. The examples are based on general cognitive-ability data for adoptive, biological, and control parents; assessments of their home environment; and Bayley Mental Development Index scores for 152 adopted children and 120 matched control children tested at both 1 and 2 years of age. The illustrative analyses include matched control children tested at both 1 and 2 years of age. The illustrative analyses include examination of genetic and environmental sources of variance, identification of environmental influence devoid of genetic bias, assessment of genotype-environment interaction and correlation, and analyses of the etiology of change and continuity in development.

  5. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  6. Sources of water and nitrogen to the Widefield Aquifer, southwestern El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Cain, Doug

    1985-01-01

    The Widefield aquifer near Colorado Springs, Colorado, is recharged primarily by Fountain Creek and, to a lesser extent, by infiltration and percolation of water from the land surface and from groundwater inflow. During the past 20 to 30 years, concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen) in the Widefield aquifer have increased from 0.5 to 3.0 milligrams/L to nearly 10 milligrams/L, and occasionally exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams/L as nitrogen. During the summer of 1982, the concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen in water in the aquifer ranged from 3.2 to 15 milligrams/L with a mean concentration of 6.9 milligrams/L. In general, the nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations are greatest near the north end of the aquifer, probably resulting from effluent from Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant being discharged to Fountain Creek. During 1982, 93% of the total estimated 160 tons of nitrogen available to enter the Widefield aquifer was from the Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant. However, a significant proportion of this nitrogen may have been lost through denitrification. (USGS)

  7. 2010 weather and aeolian sand-transport data from the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dealy, Timothy P.; East, Amy E.; Fairley, Helen C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of weather parameters and aeolian sand transport were made in 2010 near selected archeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona. Data collected in 2010 indicate event- and seasonal-scale variations in rainfall, wind, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Differences in weather patterns between 2009 and 2010 included a slightly later spring windy season, greater spring precipitation and annual rainfall totals, and a later onset and length of the reduced diurnal barometric-pressure fluctuations commonly associated with summer monsoon conditions. The increase in spring precipitation was consistent with the 2010 spring El Niño conditions compared to the 2009 spring La Niña conditions, whereas the subsequent transition to an El Niño-Southern Oscillation neutral phase appeared to delay the reduction in diurnal barometric fluctuations.

  8. Geothermal heat pump system assisted by geothermal hot spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Koizumi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The authors propose a hybrid geothermal heat pump system that could cool buildings in summer and melt snow on the pedestrian sidewalks in winter, utilizing cold mine water and hot spring water. In the proposed system, mine water would be used as cold thermal energy storage, and the heat from the hot spring after its commercial use would be used to melt snow for a certain section of sidewalks. Neither of these sources is viable for direct use application of geothermal resources, however, they become contributing energy factors without producing any greenhouse gases. To assess the feasibility of the proposed system, a series of temperature measurements in the Edgar Mine (Colorado School of Mines' experimental mine) in Idaho Springs, Colorado, were first conducted, and heat/mass transfer analyses of geothermal hot spring water was carried out. The result of the temperature measurements proved that the temperature of Edgar Mine would be low enough to store cold groundwater for use in summer. The heat loss of the hot spring water during its transportation was also calculated, and the heat requirement for snow melt was compared with the heat available from the hot spring water. It was concluded that the heat supply in the proposed usage of hot spring water was insufficient to melt the snow for the entire area that was initially proposed. This feasibility study should serve as an example of "local consumption of locally available energy". If communities start harnessing economically viable local energy in a responsible manner, there will be a foundation upon which to build a sustainable community.

  9. 78 FR 19296 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... transferred to History Colorado, where they are referred to as Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation... the Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation). The remains described above...

  10. Microbial Communities of Terrestrial Springs in Extensional Settings of the Western U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs-Vesbach, C.; Hall, J.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Fischer, T.; Cron, B.

    2008-12-01

    Gas and water chemistry from hot springs, gas vents, travertine-bearing cool springs, and high-pCO2 groundwaters of the western U.S. indicate a regionally extensive flux of deeply sourced volatiles through spring vents. We use the term "continental smokers" to emphasize and test analogs to mid-ocean vent systems, and are currently concentrating on vents in the Rocky Mountain/Colorado Plateau region as part of the Colorado Rockies and Experiment and Seismic transects (CREST). Measurable mantle-derived helium components (3He/4He = 0.10 to 2.1 RA) occur in nearly all springs in Colorado and New Mexico suggesting direct fast fluid pathways from the mantle to the surface hydrologic system. Important components of the CO2 are also derived from the mantle. We surveyed the geochemistry and microbial diversity of more than forty deeply sourced terrestrial springs that ranged in temperatures from 9° to 70°C. We hypothesize that degassing in continental extensional settings supports microbial assemblages that are analogous to chemolithotrophic communities at mid-ocean ridges and continental volcanic hydrothermal systems. Geochemical characteristics of the fluids and gases structure and sustain distinctive geomicrobiological communities as indicated by the widespread presence of archaea and thermophilic organisms in cool as well as hot springs.

  11. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  13. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  14. Salinity Trends in the Upper Colorado River Basin Upstream From the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit, Colorado, 1986-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leib, Kenneth J.; Bauch, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Salinity Control Unit was 10,700 tons/year. This accounts for approximately 27 percent of the decrease observed downstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. Salinity loads were decreasing at the fastest rate (6,950 tons/year) in Region 4, which drains an area between the Colorado River at Cameo, Colorado (station CAMEO) and Colorado River above Glenwood Springs, Colorado (station GLEN) streamflow-gaging stations. Trends in salinity concentration and streamflow were tested at station CAMEO to determine if salinity concentration, streamflow, or both are controlling salinity loads upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. Trend tests of individual ion concentrations were included as potential indicators of what sources (based on mineral composition) may be controlling trends in the upper Colorado. No significant trend was detected for streamflow from 1986 to 2003 at station CAMEO; however, a significant downward trend was detected for salinity concentration. The trend slope indicates that salinity concentration is decreasing at a median rate of about 3.54 milligrams per liter per year. Five major ions (calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and chloride) were tested for trends. The results indicate that processes within source areas with rock and soil types (or other unidentified sources) bearing calcium, sodium, and sulfate had the largest effect on the downward trend in salinity load upstream from station CAMEO. Downward trends in salinity load resulting from ground-water sources and/or land-use change were thought to be possible reasons for the observed decreases in salinity loads; however, the cause or causes of the decreasing salinity loads are not fully understood. A reduction in the amount of ground-water percolation from Region 4 (resulting from work done through Federal irrigation system improvement programs as well as privately funded irrigation system improvements) has helped reduce annual salinity load from Region 4 by approxima

  15. The Colorado Adoption Project.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Sally-Ann; Bricker, Josh B; Wadsworth, Sally J; Corley, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), an ongoing genetically informative longitudinal study of behavioral development. We describe the features of the adoption design used in CAP, and discuss how this type of design uses data from both parent-offspring and related- versus unrelated-sibling comparisons to estimate the importance of genetic and shared environmental influences for resemblance among family members. The paper provides an overview of CAP's history, how subjects were ascertained, recruited, and retained, and the domains of assessment that have been explored since the CAP's initiation in 1975. Findings from some representative papers that make use of data from CAP participants illustrate the study's multifaceted nature as a parent-offspring and sibling behavioral genetic study, a study that parallels a complimentary twin study, a longitudinal study of development, a source of subjects for molecular genetic investigation, and a study of the outcomes of the adoption process itself. As subjects assessed first at age 1 approach age 40, we hope the CAP will establish itself as the first prospective adoption study of lifespan development.

  16. The Colorado Adoption Project

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Sally-Ann; Bricker, Josh B.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Corley, Robin P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), an ongoing genetically-informative longitudinal study of behavioral development. We describe the features of the adoption design used in CAP, and discuss how this type of design uses data from both parent-offspring and related- versus unrelated- sibling comparisons to estimate the importance of genetic and shared environmental influences for resemblance among family members. The paper provides an overview of CAP’s history, how subjects were ascertained, recruited, and retained, and the domains of assessment that have been explored since the CAP’s initiation in 1975. Findings from some representative papers that make use of data from CAP participants illustrate the study’s multifaceted nature as a parent-offspring and sibling behavioral genetic study, a study that parallels a complimentary twin study, a longitudinal study of development, a source of subjects for molecular genetic investigation, and a study of the outcomes of the adoption process itself. As subjects assessed first at age 1 approach age 40, we hope the CAP will establish itself as the first prospective adoption study of lifespan development. PMID:23158098

  17. Floods in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Follansbee, Robert; Sawyer, Leon R.

    1948-01-01

    The first records of floods in Colorado antedated the settlement of the State by about 30 years. These were records of floods on the Arkansas and Republican Rivers in 1826. Other floods noted by traders, hunters and emigrants, some of whom were on their way to the Far West, occurred in 1844 on the Arkansas River, and by inference on the South Platte River. Other early floods were those on the Purgatoire, the Lower Arkansas, and the San Juan Rivers about 1859. The most serious flood since settlement began was that on the Arkansas River during June 1921, which caused the loss of about 100 lives and an estimated property loss of $19,000,000. Many floods of lesser magnitude have occurred, and some of these have caused loss of life and very considerable property damage. Topography is the chief factor in determining the location of storms and resulting floods. These occur most frequently on the eastern slope of the Front Range. In the mountains farther west precipitation is insufficient to cause floods except during periods of melting snow, in June. In the southwestern part of the State, where precipitation during periods of melting snow is insufficient to cause floods, the severest floods yet experienced resulted from heavy rains in September 1909 and October 1911. In the eastern foothills region, usually below an altitude of about 7,500 feet and extending for a distance of about 50 miles east of the mountains, is a zone subject to rainfalls of great intensity known as cloudbursts. These cloudbursts are of short duration and are confined to very small areas. At times the intensity is so great as to make breathing difficult for those exposed to a storm. The areas of intense rainfall are so small that Weather Bureau precipitation stations have not been located in them. Local residents, being cloudburst conscious, frequently measure the rainfall in receptacles in their yards, and such records constitute the only source of information regarding the intensity. A flood

  18. Mineral springs and miracles.

    PubMed

    Forster, M M

    1994-04-01

    Development of hot springs in the Canadian Rockies was closely linked to their reputed medicinal value. In 1885, the federal government created a small reserve around the springs at Sulphur Mountain, an area later enlarged to become Banff National Park, in recognition of the "great sanitary and curative advantage to the public."

  19. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  20. Dynamic uplift of the Colorado Rockies and western Colorado Plateau in the last 6 Ma driven by mantle flow and buoyancy: Evidence from the Colorado River region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, K. E.; Coblentz, D. D.; Ouimet, W. B.; Kirby, E.; van Wijk, J. W.; Schmandt, B.; Crossey, L. J.; Crow, R.; Kelley, S.; McKeon, R. E.; Aslan, A.; Darling, A. L.; Dueker, K. G.; Aster, R. C.; Lazear, G. D.; Hilton, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    lower CRS integration at 6 Ma. Geodynamic models suggest that rock uplift may be driven by a combination of upper mantle buoyancy variations and mantle flow pressures. Analysis of the geoid (for sources shallower than 500 km) is consistent with 400/800 m of dynamic topography in the CP/RM respectively. Presence of mantle 3He in Colorado hot springs is interpreted as the youngest tectonic signal of ongoing mantle-driven uplift. The isostatic response to denudation accounts for several hundred meters of rock uplift, but is insufficient to account for the total magnitude of modeled and inferred uplift. Throughout the CRS, climatic influences on the profile and incision history are 100 ka time scale oscillations superimposed on Ma-scale persistent tectonic uplift forcings.

  1. Valve-spring Surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, Willy

    1937-01-01

    Test equipment is described that includes a system of three quartz indicators whereby three different pressures could be synchronized and simultaneously recorded on a single oscillogram. This equipment was used to test the reliction of waves at ends of valve spring, the dynamical stress of the valve spring for a single lift of the valve, and measurement of the curve of the cam tested. Other tests included simultaneous recording of the stress at both ends of the spring, spring oscillation during a single lift as a function of speed, computation of amplitude of oscillation for a single lift by harmonic analysis, effect of cam profile, the setting up of resonance, and forced spring oscillation with damping.

  2. Rotary spring energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, S.

    1981-07-01

    The goal was to design a lightweight system, for bicycles, that can level the input energy requirement (human exertion) in accordance with variations in road load (friction, wind, and grade) and/or to provide a system for regenerative braking, that is, to store energy normally lost in brake pad friction for brief periods until it required for re-acceleration or hill-climbing. The rotary spring, also called the coil, motor, spiral, or power spring is governed by the equations reviewed. Materials used in spring manufacture are briefly discussed, and justification for steel as the design choice of material is given. Torque and power requirements for a bicycle and rider are provided as well as estimated human power output levels. These criteria are examined to define spring size and possible orientations on a bicycle. Patents and designs for coupling the spring to the drive train are discussed.

  3. Flooding in the South Platte River and Fountain Creek Basins in eastern Colorado, September 9–18, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrough, Robert A.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2015-11-25

    Flooding in the Fountain Creek Basin was primarily contained to Fountain Creek from southern Colorado Springs to its confluence with the Arkansas River in Pueblo, in lower Monument Creek, and in several mountain tributaries. New record peak streamflows occurred at four mountain tributary streamgages having at least 10 years of record; Bear Creek, Cheyenne Creek, Rock Creek, and Little Fountain

  4. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  5. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal - (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  6. Age of the Peach Springs Tuff, southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielson, J.E.; Lux, D.R.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sanidine separates from pumice of the early Miocene Peach Springs Tuff are concordantly dated at 18.5??0.2 Ma by two isotopic techniques. The Peach Springs Tuff is the only known unit that can be correlated between isolated outcrops of Miocene strata from the central Mojave Desert of southeastern California to the western Colorado Plateau in Arizona, across five structural provinces, a distance of 350 km. Thus, the age of the Peach Springs Tuff is important to structural and paleogeographic reconstructions of a large region. -from Authors

  7. Radioactive springs geochemical data related to uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Felmlee, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive mineral springs and wells at 33 localities in the States of Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico in the United States were sampled and studied to obtain geochemical data which might be used for U exploration. The major source of radioactivity at mineral spring sites is 226Ra. Minor amounts of 228Ra, 238U and 232Th are also present. Ra is presumed to have been selectively removed from possibly quite deep uranium-mineralized rock by hydrothermal solutions and is either precipitated at the surface or added to fresh surface water. In this way, the source rocks influence the geochemistry of the spring waters and precipitates. Characteristics of the spring waters at or near the surface are also affected by variations in total dissolved solids, alkalinity, temperature and co-precipitation. Spring precipitates, both hard and soft, consist of four major types: (1) calcite travertine; (2) iron- and arsenic-rich precipitates; (3) manganese- and barium-rich precipitates; and (4) barite, in some instances accompanied by S, Ra and U, if present in the spring water, are co-precipitated with the barite, Mn-Ba and Fe-As precipitates. Using parameters based on U and Ra concentrations in waters and precipitates springsite areas are tentatively rated for favourability as potential uraniferous areas. ?? 1977.

  8. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  9. An equivalent spring for nonlinear springs in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radomirovic, Dragi; Kovacic, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    This work is concerned with nonlinear springs in series with the aim of obtaining the equivalent spring and its characteristics. The case of two linear springs in series is presented first as a basis for the extension to the cases of two purely nonlinear springs in series and two or more equal Duffing springs in series, which both allow the exact determination of the equivalent spring. Then, the most general case of two nonlinear springs with odd-power terms and different coefficients is examined. The condition is derived in terms of their characteristics for which the exact solution for the equivalent spring can be obtained.

  10. Persistence of Ethnicity: The Japanese of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell

    This paper presents an overview of the history of Japanese in Colorado. Japanese immigrants first came to Colorado between 1900 and 1910 as railroad laborers. Some became coal miners in southern Colorado; most others became farm laborers. Although the Japanese population during this period was small, communities developed in several locales. The…

  11. 2009 KidsCount in Colorado!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "KidsCount in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. KidsCount in Colorado! informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable resource for…

  12. 2008 KidsCount in Colorado!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "KidsCount in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. KidsCount in Colorado! informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable resource for…

  13. KidsCount in Colorado! 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shanna

    This 1995 KidsCount in Colorado report examines challenges and offers examples of how prevention and early intervention strategies can make a difference in the lives of Colorado children. The report looks at the state of child well-being in Colorado in terms of health, early care and education, and primary education. Statistics and descriptions…

  14. Breeding densities and migration periods of common snipe in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.R.; Ryder, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Breeding densities and migration periods of Common Snipe in Colorado were investigated in 1974-75. Sites studied were near Fort Collins and in North Park, both in north central Colorado; in the Yampa Valley in northwestern Colorado; and in the San Luis Valley in south central Colorado....Estimated densities of breeding snipe based on censuses conducted during May 1974 and 1975 were, by region: 1.3-1.7 snipe/ha near Fort Collins; 0.6 snipe/ha in North Park; 0.5-0.7 snipe/ha in the Yampa Valley; and 0.5 snipe/ha in the San Luis Valley. Overall mean densities were 06 and 0.7 snipe/ha in 1974 and 1975 respectively. On individual study sites, densities of snipe ranged from 0.2 to 2.1 snipe/ha. Areas with shallow, stable, discontinuous water levels, sparse, short vegetation, and soft organic soils had the highest densities.....Twenty-eight nests were located having a mean clutch size of 3.9 eggs. Estimated onset of incubation ranged from 2 May through 4 July. Most nests were initiated in May.....Spring migration extended from late March through early May. Highest densities of snipe were recorded in all regions during l&23 April. Fall migration was underway by early September and was completed by mid-October with highest densities occurring about the third week in September. High numbers of snipe noted in early August may have been early migrants or locally produced juveniles concentrating on favorable feeding areas.

  15. Effects of flow regime on stream turbidity and suspended solids after wildfire, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires occur frequently in the Colorado Front Range and can alter the hydrological response of watersheds, yet little information exists on the impact of flow regime and storm events on post-wildfire water quality. The flow regime in the region is characterized by base-flow conditions during much of the year and increased runoff during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms. The impact of snowmelt and storm events on stream discharge and water quality was evaluated for about a year after a wildfire near Boulder, Colorado, USA. During spring snowmelt and low-intensity storms, differences in discharge and turbidity at sites upstream and downstream from the burned areas were minimal. However, high-intensity convective storms resulted in dramatic increases in discharge and turbidity at sites downstream from the burned area. This study highlights the importance of using high-frequency sampling to assess accurately wildfire impacts on water quality downstream.

  16. Partners in Physics with Colorado School of Mines' Society of Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Shirley; Stilwell, Matthew; Boerner, Zach

    2011-04-01

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) Society of Physics Students (SPS) revitalized in 2008 and has since blown up with outreach activity, incorporating all age levels into our programs. In Spring 2010, CSM SPS launched a new program called Partners in Physics. Students from Golden High School came to CSM where they had a college-level lesson on standing waves and their applications. These students then joined volunteers from CSM in teaching local elementary school students about standing waves beginning with a science show. The CSM and high school students then helped the children to build make-and-take demonstrations incorporating waves. This year, rockets are the theme for Partners in Physics and we began with demonstrations with local middle school students. In Spring 2011, CSM SPS will be teaching elementary school students about projectile motion and model rockets along with these middle school students. Colorado School of Mines Department of Physics

  17. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  18. Evaluation of fecal contamination by human and ruminant sources in upper Fountain Creek, Colorado, 2007-2008, by using multiple lines of evidence:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeckel, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Fountain Creek is a high-gradient stream on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. The headwaters of Fountain Creek drain Pikes Peak, a major destination for tourism. Fountain Creek is a drinking-water source for the City of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is used for irrigation, recreation, and other purposes between Colorado Springs and the confluence with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado. In 2008, Fountain Creek was placed on the Colorado 303(d) list of impaired streams because of fecal contamination. Colorado uses a 30-day geometric mean standard of 126 Escherichia coli per 100 milliliters as its management goal for recreational waters. The objective of this study was to identify major sources of Escherichia coli in upper Fountain Creek during exceedances of the State recreational water standard. To meet this objective, a new approach was developed and tested that uses genetic marker analysis for microbial source tracking, along with other information, to evaluate potential contributions of fecal contamination from various sources.

  19. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue.

    This image was acquired on June 16, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  20. Springs of Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. B. W.

    1996-03-01

    Predictably, in a country such as Britain, with its preponderance of consolidated, sedimentary, mainly fissure-flow aquifers, there is a very large number of springs, many of which are, or have been, used for public supply. Migratory springs are a feature of the British (Ur. Cretaceous) Chalk, the most important British aquifer. The Chalk's low specific yield and high capillary moisture retention together give rise to very considerable fluctuations (more than 33 m in some areas) of the unconfined water table. Along the gentle dip slopes of the Chalk (North and South Downs of southern and southeastern England) springs may migrate laterally for several miles, giving rise to seasonal streams locally known as “bournes” or “lavants”. However, springs such as at Duncton, West Sussex, at the base of the much steeper scarp slopes of the Chalk, form point sources, the flows from which tend to be relatively steady; such springs commonly supply and are the original reason for the existence of many of the small towns and villages which nestle along the bases of the chalk scarps of Sussex and Kent. Where the Chalk forms coastal cliffs, a number of springs break out at the base of the cliff between high and low tide levels; there are major chalk coastal springs, for instance, at St. Margaret's Bay (Kent) and at Arish Mells, east of Lulworth Cove, Dorset. Such springs are not used for direct supply (their salinity is usually too high) but are indicators of the presence of local reserves of groundwater for possible future development.

  1. Mineral springs and miracles.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    Development of hot springs in the Canadian Rockies was closely linked to their reputed medicinal value. In 1885, the federal government created a small reserve around the springs at Sulphur Mountain, an area later enlarged to become Banff National Park, in recognition of the "great sanitary and curative advantage to the public." Images p730-a p731-a p732-a p733-a p734-a p736-a PMID:8199525

  2. Sapping Features of the Colorado Plateau: a Comparative Planetary Geology Field Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Alan D. (Editor); Kochel, R. Craig (Editor); Holt, Henry E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This book is an attempt to determine geomorphic criteria to be used to distinguish between channels formed predominantly by sapping and seepage erosion and those formed principally by surface runoff processes. The geologic nature of the Colorado Plateau has resulted in geomorphic features that show similarities to some areas on Mars, especially certain valley networks within thick sandstone formations. Where spring sapping is an effective process, the valleys that develop are unique in terms of their morphology and network pattern.

  3. COLORADO INDIAN EDUCATION WORKSHOP PAPERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SIZEMORE, MAMIE; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A COLLECTION OF ARTICLES WRITTEN BY MEMBERS OF THE COLORADO INDIAN EDUCATION WORKSHOP. THE ARTICLES ARE CONCERNED WITH THE PROBLEMS OF SOCIAL, CULTURAL, MORAL, EMOTIONAL, AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF BILINGUAL-BICULTURAL CHILDREN, AS A MEANINGFUL CURRICULUM IS DEVELOPED TO CORRELATE WITH THEIR SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT.…

  4. Rural School Communities in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Jack

    Visits to nine of the smallest rural elementary schools in Colorado were conducted to gain insights into types of communities served by the schools. No one definition of "rural" covered all nine communities, so they were classified into six types: predominantly agricultural, rural industrial, stable recreational, ranching/railraod, rural commuter,…

  5. Goals for Education in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Eleven goals for public education are set forth by the Colorado State Department of Education: (1) command of the knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes essential for effective learning throughout life; (2) understanding of man and society and the determination to strive for the welfare of all people; (3) knowledge of self, understanding of…

  6. Kids Count in Colorado! 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines state, county, and regional trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The first part of the report is presented in four chapters. Chapter 1 includes findings regarding the increasing diversity of the child population, linguistic isolation, the impact of parental unemployment, child poverty, and the affordable…

  7. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  8. The Colorado Caravan Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobin, Martin; And Others

    The second of four related manuals describing the goals and methods of an established developmental theatre project at the University of Colorado, this manual presents a hierarchical framework and practical guidelines for conducting drama workshops for elementary students, secondary students, and adults. It describes four types of…

  9. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, L. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A spring which includes a tube with an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension extending vertically is disclosed. A plurality of cuts in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube extend perpendiculary to a longitudinal axis extending along the tube. An uncut portion of the tube wall extends along the tube for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom of a seat cushion.

  10. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A spring (10) includes a tube (12) having an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension (22) extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension (24) extending vertically. A plurality of cuts (20) in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube (12) extend perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis (16) extending along the tube (12). An uncut portion (26) of the tube wall extends along the tube (12) for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom (28) of a seat cushion (30).

  11. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Virgin River contributes a substantial amount of dissolved solids (salt) to the Colorado River at Lake Mead in the lower Colorado River Basin. Degradation of Colorado River water by the addition of dissolved solids from the Virgin River affects the suitability of the water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural use within the basin. Dixie Hot Springs in Utah are a major localized source of dissolved solids discharging to the Virgin River. The average measured discharge from Dixie Hot Springs during 2009–10 was 11.0 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the average dissolved-solids concentration was 9,220 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The average dissolved-solids load—a measurement that describes the mass of salt that is transported per unit of time—from Dixie Hot Springs during this period was 96,200 tons per year (ton/yr). Annual dissolved-solids loads were estimated at 13 monitoring sites in the Virgin River Basin from streamflow data and discrete measurements of dissolved-solids concentrations and (or) specific conductance. Eight of the sites had the data needed to estimate annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WYs) 1999 through 2010. During 1999–2010, the smallest dissolved-solids loads in the Virgin River were upstream of Dixie Hot Springs (59,900 ton/yr, on average) and the largest loads were downstream of Littlefield Springs (298,200 ton/yr, on average). Annual dissolved-solids loads were smallest during 2002–03, which was a period of below normal precipitation. Annual dissolved-solids loads were largest during 2005—a year that included a winter rain storm that resulted in flooding throughout much of the Virgin River Basin. An average seepage loss of 26.7 ft3/s was calculated from analysis of monthly average streamflow from July 1998 to September 2010 in the Virgin River for the reach that extends from just upstream of the Utah/Arizona State line to just above the Virgin River Gorge Narrows. Seepage losses from three river reaches

  12. Buildings for the 21st Century, Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-04-01

    The Buildings for the 21st Century newsletter is produced by the Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and contains information on building programs, events, products, and initiatives, with a focus on energy efficiency and renewable energy. The spring issue contains information on a series of high-performance building brochures, the State Energy Program, a new modular and manufactured home, a new buildings database, solid-state ceramic lighting, weatherization, simplified Web site addresses, a Colorado home builder, and upcoming events and meetings.

  13. Regional variability in dust-on-snow processes and impacts in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skiles, S. McKenzie; Painter, Thomas H.; Belnap, Jayne; Holland, Lacey; Reynolds, Richard; Goldstein, Harland; Lin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Dust deposition onto mountain snow cover in the Upper Colorado River Basin frequently occurs in the spring when wind speeds and dust emission peaks on the nearby Colorado Plateau. Dust loading has increased since the intensive settlement in the western USA in the mid 1880s. The effects of dust-on-snow have been well studied at Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA) in the San Juan Mountains, CO, the first high-altitude area of contact for predominantly southwesterly winds transporting dust from the southern Colorado Plateau. To capture variability in dust transport from the broader Colorado Plateau and dust deposition across a larger area of the Colorado River water sources, an additional study plot was established in 2009 on Grand Mesa, 150 km to the north of SBBSA in west central, CO. Here, we compare the 4-year (2010–2013) dust source, deposition, and radiative forcing records at Grand Mesa Study Plot (GMSP) and Swamp Angel Study Plot (SASP), SBBSA's subalpine study plot. The study plots have similar site elevations/environments and differ mainly in the amount of dust deposited and ensuing impacts. At SASP, end of year dust concentrations ranged from 0.83 mg g−1 to 4.80 mg g−1, and daily mean spring dust radiative forcing ranged from 50–65 W m−2, advancing melt by 24–49 days. At GMSP, which received 1.0 mg g−1 less dust per season on average, spring radiative forcings of 32–50 W m−2 advanced melt by 15–30 days. Remote sensing imagery showed that observed dust events were frequently associated with dust emission from the southern Colorado Plateau. Dust from these sources generally passed south of GMSP, and back trajectory footprints modelled for observed dust events were commonly more westerly and northerly for GMSP relative to SASP. These factors suggest that although the southern Colorado Plateau contains important dust sources, dust contributions from other dust sources contribute to dust loading in this region

  14. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  15. Sediment discharge in the Colorado River near De Beque, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine annual-sediment discharge at the site of a proposed reservoir on the Colorado River at Una, located 3 miles upstream from De Beque, Colorado. Eleven suspended sediment samples were collected during 1984 at the De Beque bridge. These data were combined with suspended sediment data collected for the Colorado River at two nearby streamflow gaging stations to define relations between suspended-sediment discharge and stream discharge. Best results were obtained when the data were separated into two periods, March through October, and November through February. The data for March through October were separated into two periods: (1) Rising stream-stage period, which includes data collected prior to the data of the annual peak-stream discharge, and (2) falling stream-stage period, which includes data collected after the date of the annual peak-stream discharge. Nine bedload samples were collected during 1984 to determine the contribution of bedload sediment discharge to total sediment discharge. Bedload accounted for < 2% of total sediment discharge. The best relations describing bedload sediment discharge were obtained when the bedload data were separated into two periods: (1) Data collected prior to the date of the annual peak-stream discharge, and (2) data collected after the date of the annual peak-stream discharge. Mean annual sediment discharge in the Colorado River at the proposed Una reservoir site was estimated to be 1,065,000 tons/year for October 1966 through September 1984. Water storage capacity of the proposed reservoir would decrease about 30% after 100 years at this sediment discharge rate. (USGS)

  16. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Virgin River contributes a substantial amount of dissolved solids (salt) to the Colorado River at Lake Mead in the lower Colorado River Basin. Degradation of Colorado River water by the addition of dissolved solids from the Virgin River affects the suitability of the water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural use within the basin. Dixie Hot Springs in Utah are a major localized source of dissolved solids discharging to the Virgin River. The average measured discharge from Dixie Hot Springs during 2009–10 was 11.0 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the average dissolved-solids concentration was 9,220 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The average dissolved-solids load—a measurement that describes the mass of salt that is transported per unit of time—from Dixie Hot Springs during this period was 96,200 tons per year (ton/yr). Annual dissolved-solids loads were estimated at 13 monitoring sites in the Virgin River Basin from streamflow data and discrete measurements of dissolved-solids concentrations and (or) specific conductance. Eight of the sites had the data needed to estimate annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WYs) 1999 through 2010. During 1999–2010, the smallest dissolved-solids loads in the Virgin River were upstream of Dixie Hot Springs (59,900 ton/yr, on average) and the largest loads were downstream of Littlefield Springs (298,200 ton/yr, on average). Annual dissolved-solids loads were smallest during 2002–03, which was a period of below normal precipitation. Annual dissolved-solids loads were largest during 2005—a year that included a winter rain storm that resulted in flooding throughout much of the Virgin River Basin. An average seepage loss of 26.7 ft3/s was calculated from analysis of monthly average streamflow from July 1998 to September 2010 in the Virgin River for the reach that extends from just upstream of the Utah/Arizona State line to just above the Virgin River Gorge Narrows. Seepage losses from three river reaches

  17. Roller belleville spring damper

    SciTech Connect

    Hebel, J.B.

    1981-07-07

    A double acting damper for use in rotary drilling includes a splined tubular telescopic joint and employs plural paralleled stacks of double acting series stacked roller belleville spring washers in an annular pocket between the inner and outer tubular members of the joint. The springs, spline and telescopic bearings are in an oil filled volume sealed from the outside by a pressure seal at the lower end of the damper and a floating seal at the upper end. Electric and magnetic means are provided to check on the condition and quantity of the lubricant.

  18. Gunnison, Colorado, subpile study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    To protect human health and the environment, the UMTRA project will remediate the uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. There are explicit requirements (i.e., 40 Part CFR Part 192) for the surface remediation of radiologically contaminated soils on UMTRA sites. The removal of subpile sediment to the depth required by 40 CFR Part 192 will leave in place deeper foundation sediment that is contaminated with hazardous constituents other than radium-226 and thorium-230. The Department of Energy and the Colorado Department of Health have questioned whether this contaminated soil could potentially act as a continuing source of ground water contamination even after surface remediation based on 40 CFR Part 192 is complete. To evaluate the subpile sediments as a potential source of ground water contamination, the Gunnison subpile study was initiated. This report summarizes the results and findings of this study.

  19. Geochronology Database for Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Evans, K.V.; deWitt, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and some unpublished isotopic and fission track age determinations in central Colorado. The compiled area extends from the southern Wyoming border to the northern New Mexico border and from approximately the longitude of Denver on the east to Gunnison on the west. Data for the tephrochronology of Pleistocene volcanic ash, carbon-14, Pb-alpha, common-lead, and U-Pb determinations on uranium ore minerals have been excluded.

  20. 78 FR 29321 - Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Forest Service Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Rocky Mountain Region, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory... National Forest. Proposals, updates, and other information can be found on the Colorado Recreation...

  1. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  2. Spa, springs and safety.

    PubMed

    Sukthana, Yaowalark; Lekkla, Amorn; Sutthikornchai, Chantira; Wanapongse, Paitoon; Vejjajiva, Athasit; Bovornkitti, Somchai

    2005-01-01

    Natural mineral water has long been used worldwide for bathing and health purposes. At present, Thailand is famous for health spas and natural hot springs among local people and tourists. Due to possible risks of exposure to harmful agents, we studied hazardous pollutants at 57 natural hot springs from 11 provinces in northern, central, eastern and southern Thailand. Pathogenic, free-living amebae of the genera Naegleria and Acanthamoeba, which can cause central nervous system infection, were found in 26.3% (15/57) and 15.8% (9/ 57), respectively. Dissolved radon, a soil gas with carcinogenic properties, was present in nearly all hot springs sites, with concentration ranging from 0.87-76,527 Becquerels/m3. There were 5 water samples in which radon concentration exceeded the safety limit for drinking. Legionella pneumoniphila (serogroups 1, 3, 5, 6, 7 10 and 13) were found in samples from 71.9% (41/57) of studied sites. Because spas and natural springs are popular tourist attractions, health authorities should be aware of possible hazards and provide tactful measures and guidelines to ensure safety without causing undue alarm to foreign and Thai tourists.

  3. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  4. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  5. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  6. 1981 Spring Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Approximately 2150 participants registered for the 1981 Spring Meeting. More than 1500 papers were presented.The spaciousness of the Baltimore Convention Center provided ample opportunity for attendees to exchange ideas and interact with their colleagues. Here are some candid shots.

  7. The News. Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This Spring issue of the quarterly newsletter of the Community College League of California contains the following articles: (1) Enrollment Drops; Fees to Blame?; (2) Senate's Grad Proposal Triggers Debate on Mission, Access; (3) Compton Decision has Affected Perceptions of Commission (discussion with Barbara Beno); (4) Dynamic New Architectural…

  8. Planar torsion spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A torsion spring comprises an inner mounting segment. An outer mounting segment is located concentrically around the inner mounting segment. A plurality of splines extends from the inner mounting segment to the outer mounting segment. At least a portion of each spline extends generally annularly around the inner mounting segment.

  9. Renaissance Administrator, Spring 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, June P., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This spring 1998 issue of Renaissance Administrator features the following articles: (1) "Servant Leadership and Higher Education--What is Leadership?" (Richard E. Hasselbach); (2) "Teaching Writing in the 90's--Carnivorous Printers and Dying Grandmothers" (Helen Ruggieri); (3) Assignment--Journal Writing" (Lynn Muscato); and (4) "A Business…

  10. Ready for College in Colorado: Evaluation of the Colorado SUN and the College Connection Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 2007, the state of Colorado received one of four federal grants from the Ready for College (RFC) grant program of the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), U.S. Department of Education. The Colorado (CO) SUN project (where SUN stands for Success UNlimited) was designed to identify and enhance innovative practices from Colorado's…

  11. Colorado Preschool Project. Progress Report: Year 1. A Report to the Colorado General Assembly. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmiaston, Rebecca; And Others

    By creating the Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) in 1988, the Colorado General Assembly responded to the needs of 4- and 5-year-old children who are at risk of educational failure in Colorado. This paper is an executive summary of a report to the state's general assembly on the project's first 6 months of progress. The CPP addresses two critical…

  12. 78 FR 9629 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Reestablishment of Membership on the Colorado Potato...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 948 Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Reestablishment of Membership on the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, Area No. 2 AGENCY: Agricultural... membership on the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, Area No. 2 (Committee). The Committee...

  13. 2011 Kids Count in Colorado! The Impact of the Great Recession on Colorado's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Kids Count in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. "Kids Count in Colorado!" informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable resource…

  14. 9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. - Juniata Mill Complex, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  15. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 1998--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Bruce, N.L.; Unruh, J.W.; Steinheimer, J.T.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, M.E.; Jenkins, Jenkins; O'Neill, G. B.

    1998-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 1998 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 316 gaging stations, stage and contents of 26 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 29 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 118 gaging stations and for 8 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 192 gaged sites; water quality for 72 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 3 observation wells, and meteorological data for 25 sites. Seven pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  16. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 2002--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Boulger, R.W.; O'Neill, G. B.

    2003-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 2002 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; meteorological data; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 319 gaging stations, stage and contents of 16 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 22 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 118 gaging stations and for 8 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 183 gaged sites; water quality for 65 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 2 observation wells, and meteorological data for 57 sites. Three pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  17. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 2000--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Unruh, J.W.; Boulger, R.W.; O'Neill, G. B.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 2000 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; meteorological data; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 305 gaging stations, stage and contents of 15 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 22 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 102 gaging stations and for 7 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 185 gaged sites; water quality for 141 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 4 observation wells, and meteorological data for 45 sites. Three pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  18. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 2001--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Boulger, R.W.; O'Neill, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 2001 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; meteorological data; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 313 gaging stations, stage and contents of 16 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 22 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 125 gaging stations and for 10 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 181 gaged sites; water quality for 77 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 3 observation wells, and meteorological data for 55 sites. Three pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  19. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  20. 1996 monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites was near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Surface remediation was completed at the Gunnison site in December 1995. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres of wetlands and mitigation of this loss is through the enhancement of 17.8 acres of riparian plant communities in six spring-fed areas on US Bureau of Land Management mitigation sites. A five-year monitoring program was then implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This report provides the results of the third year of the monitoring program.

  1. Estimates of average annual tributary inflow to the lower Colorado River, Hoover Dam to Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.

    1987-01-01

    River valley will eventually be reduced if not stopped completely. Groundwater discharged at springs below Hoover Dam is unused and flows directly to the Colorado River. (Lantz-PTT)

  2. Microwave remote sensing of snow experiment description and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Stiles, W. H.; Hanson, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    The active and passive microwave responses to snow were investigated at a site near Steamboat Springs, Colorado during the February and March winter months. The microwave equipment was mounted atop truck-mounted booms. Data were acquired at numerous frequencies, polarizations, and angles of incidence for a variety of snow conditions. The experiment description, the characteristics of the microwave and ground truth instruments, and the results of a preliminary analysis of a small portion of the total data volume acquired in Colorado are documented.

  3. Annual monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites is near the town of Gunnison, Colorado; surface remediation and the environmental impacts of remedial action are described in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA) (DOE, 1992). Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) 1.7 hectares (ha) of wetlands and mitigation of this loss of wetlands is being accomplished through the enhance of 18.4 ac (7.5 ha) of riparian plant communities in six spring feed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land. The description of the impacted and mitigation wetlands is provided in the Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for Impacted Wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado (DOE, 1994), which is attached to the US Army corps of Engineers (USACE) Section 404 Permit. As part of the wetlands mitigation plan, the six mitigation wetlands were fenced in the fall of 1993 to exclude livestock grazing. Baseline of grazed conditions of the wetlands vegetation was determined during the summer of 1993 (DOE, 1994). A 5-year monitoring program of these six sites has been implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This annual monitoring report provides the results of the first year of the 5-year monitoring period.

  4. Effects of wildfire on source-water quality and aquatic ecosystems, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; McClelskey, R. Blaine; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    Watershed erosion can dramatically increase after wildfire, but limited research has evaluated the corresponding influence on source-water quality. This study evaluated the effects of the Fourmile Canyon wildfire (Colorado Front Range, USA) on source-water quality and aquatic ecosystems using high-frequency sampling. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrient loads in stream water were evaluated for a one-year period during different types of runoff events, including spring snowmelt, and both frontal and summer convective storms. DOC export from the burned watershed did not increase relative to the unburned watershed during spring snowmelt, but substantial increases in DOC export were observed during summer convective storms. Elevated nutrient export from the burned watershed was observed during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms, which increased the primary productivity of stream biofilms. Wildfire effects on source-water quality were shown to be substantial following high-intensity storms, with the potential to affect drinking-water treatment processes.

  5. 1997 Monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleaned up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) (1.7 hectares [ha]) of wetlands. This loss is mitigated by the enhancement of six spring-fed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land (mitigation sites). Approximately 254 ac (1 03.3 ha) were fenced at the six sites to exclude grazing livestock. Of the 254 ac (103.3 ha), 17.8 ac (7.2 ha) are riparian plant communities; the rest are sagebrush communities. Baseline grazed conditions of the riparian plant communities at the mitigation sites were measured prior to fencing. This report discusses results of the fourth year of a monitoring program implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. Three criteria for determining success of the mitigation were established: plant height, vegetation density (bare ground), and vegetation diversity. By 1996, Prospector Spring, Upper Long`s Gulch, and Camp Kettle met the criteria. The DOE requested transfer of these sites to BLM for long-term oversight. The 1997 evaluation of the three remaining sites, discussed in this report, showed two sites (Houston Gulch and Lower Long`s Gulch) meet the criteria. The DOE will request the transfer of these two sites to the BLM for long-term oversight. The last remaining site, Sage Hen Spring, has met only two of the criteria (percent bare ground and plant height). The third criterion, vegetation diversity, was not met. The vegetation appears to be changing from predominantly wet species to drier upland species, although the reason for this change is uncertain. It may be due to below-normal precipitation in recent years, diversion of water from the spring to the stock tank, or manipulation of the hydrology farther up gradient.

  6. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  7. Hot spring metagenomics.

    PubMed

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities-their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  8. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-12

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  9. Colorado Lightning Mapping Array Collaborations through the GOES-R Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Szoke, Edward; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert; Mazur, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    For the past two years, the GOES-R Proving Ground has solicited proposals for its Visiting Scientist Program. NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has used this opportunity to support the GOES-R Proving Ground by expanding SPoRT's total lightning collaborations. In 2012, this expanded the evaluation of SPoRT's pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper product to the Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center. This year, SPoRT has collaborated with the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) and potential end users. In particular, SPoRT is collaborating with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and Colorado State University (CSU) to obtain these data in real-time. From there, SPoRT is supporting the transition of these data to the local forecast offices in Boulder, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming as well as to Proving Ground projects (e.g., the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Spring Program and Aviation Weather Center's Summer Experiment). This presentation will focus on the results of this particular Visiting Scientist Program trip. In particular, the COLMA data are being provided to both forecast offices for initial familiarization. Additionally, several forecast issues have been highlighted as important uses for COLMA data in the operational environment. These include the utility of these data for fire weather situations, situational awareness for both severe weather and lightning safety, and formal evaluations to take place in the spring of 2014.

  10. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  11. Colorado: Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ. Health Sciences Center, Denver.

    In April 1991, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey was administered to a sample of 1,412 high school students in Colorado public schools to collect information about priority health-risk behaviors among adolescents. Questionnaires were received from 1,170 students, a response rate of 83%. Classes in Colorado's 280 public schools were also selected to…

  12. 2013 Kids Count in Colorado! Community Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Kids Count in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Children's Campaign, providing state and county level data on child well-being factors including child health, education, and economic status. Since its first release 20 years ago, "Kids Count in Colorado!" has become the most trusted source for data and information on…

  13. COLORADO MIGRANT MINISTRY. ANNUAL REPORT, 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1961

    MIGRANTS WERE AIDED BY THE COLORADO MIGRANT MINISTRY, WHICH WITH PUBLIC SCHOOL OFFICALS AND HEALTH AND WELFARE AGENCY PERSONNEL, HELPED TO DETERMINE LEGISLATIVE NEEDS, AND PROVIDED DIRECT SERVICES TO MIGRANTS IN THREE AREAS OF COLORADO. IN ROCKY FORD, A SPANISH-SPEAKING EDUCATED HUSBAND-WIFE-DAUGHTER TEAM WORKED WITH VARIOUS GROUPS WHO LED…

  14. The Colorado Scale-Model Solar System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jeffrey O.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Colorado Scale-Model Solar System, a display illustrating the sizes and distances to the Sun and the nine planets on the campus of Colorado University. Discusses the model's educational value and uses for the classroom and the community. (MDH)

  15. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of...

  20. Healthy Child Care Colorado, 2002: Outcome Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Susan

    This report describes the impact of nurse consultant services to child care programs in Colorado on the children, parents, and staff of the centers they serve as part of the Healthy Child Care Colorado (HCCC) initiative. Study participants included 25 child care center directors and 24 nurse consultants, representing large and small centers in…

  1. Paleocurrent evidence for lateral displacement of the Pliocene Colorado River delta by the San Andreas fault system, southeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, Charles D.; Kidwell, Susan M.

    1986-09-01

    More than 600 paleocurrent measurements from fluvial paleochannels of the early Colorado River delta plain, preserved in the Palm Spring Formation in the Fish Creek Vallecito (FCV) section of southern California, indicate that the FCV section was on the Gulf of California (southeastern) flank of the delta plain as recently as 2.8 Ma. These measurements imply ˜130 km of tectonic translation to the northwest since 2.8 Ma, which can be accounted for by the displacement histories of Baja California and component faults of the San Andreas system. Stratigraphic data from the FCV section and other Neogene localities, when plotted on a palinspastic base, indicate (1) marine transgression of a narrow Gulf of California rift basin and Bouse embayment (site of modern lower Colorado River) by 5.5 Ma, and (2) uplift of the Bouse embayment, initiation of the: lower Colorado River, and southward progradation of the delta to essentially its present position by 4 Ma.

  2. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 ??g/L from 24-Road, 0.9 ??g/L from Horsethief, 5.5 ??g/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 ??g/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 ??g/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  3. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado: II. Eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Effects on hatching and development of fertilized eggs in adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) exposed to selenium in flooded bottomland sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, were determined. After 9 months exposure, fish were collected and induced to spawn and eggs collected for inorganic element analyses. A 9-day egg study was conducted with five spawns from Horsethief ponds, six spawns from Adobe Creek channel, and four spawns from North Pond using a reference water and site waters. Selenium concentrations in eggs were 6.5 ??g/g from Horsethief, 46 ??g/g from Adobe Creek, 38 ??g/g from North Pond, and 6.0 ??g/g from brood stock. Eggs from young adults had a smaller diameter and higher moisture content than brood stock. There were no differences among the four sources in viability, survival, hatch, hatchability, or mortality of deformed embryos or larvae. Adobe Creek larvae had more deformed embryos in eggs held in site water than held in reference water. There were significant negative correlations between selenium concentrations in adult muscle plugs and percent hatch, egg diameter, and deformities in embryos. Results from this study suggest that selenium contamination in parts of the upper basin of the Colorado River should be a major concern to recovery efforts for endangered fish.

  4. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River III. Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A

    2005-06-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 microg/L from 24-Road, 0.9 microg/L from Horsethief, 5.5 microg/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 microg/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 microg/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 microg/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 microg/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 microg/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of 4.6 microg/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  5. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River III. Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A

    2005-06-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 microg/L from 24-Road, 0.9 microg/L from Horsethief, 5.5 microg/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 microg/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 microg/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 microg/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 microg/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 microg/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of 4.6 microg/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish. PMID:15883090

  6. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, Claudia; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27?5 mW^-2 is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mW^-2, characteristic of the 'cool interior' of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mW^-2.

  7. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, C.; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27 +- 5 mWm/sup -2/ is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mWm/sup -2/, characteristics of the coal interior of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mWm/sup -2/.

  8. Health Maintenance Organizations and Academic Medical Centers. Proceedings of a National Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, James I., Ed.; Nevins, Madeline M., Ed.

    In October 1980 a national conference on health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) was held by the Association of American Medical Colleges and supported by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, in response to inquiries about the advantages and disadvantages of AMC affiliation with or sponsorship of HMOs.…

  9. Energy Smart Colorado, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gitchell, John M.; Palmer, Adam L.

    2014-03-31

    Energy Smart Colorado is an energy efficiency program established in 2011 in the central mountain region of Colorado. The program was funded through a grant of $4.9 million, awarded in August 2010 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Program. As primary grant recipient, Eagle County coordinated program activities, managed the budget, and reported results. Eagle County staff worked closely with local community education and outreach partner Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability (now Walking Mountains Science Center) to engage residents in the program. Sub-recipients Pitkin County and Gunnison County assigned local implementation of the program in their regions to their respective community efficiency organizations, Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) in Pitkin County, and Office for Resource Efficiency (ORE) in Gunnison County. Utility partners contributed $166,600 to support Home Energy Assessments for their customers. Program staff opened Energy Resource Centers, engaged a network of qualified contractors, developed a work-flow, an enrollment website, a loan program, and a data management system to track results.

  10. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  11. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato...

  12. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  13. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  14. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  15. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato...

  16. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  17. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

  18. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1983-07-01

    The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

  19. Colorado School of Mines Society of Physics Students Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Shirley; Otzenberger, Marty

    2009-10-01

    Since the reinstatement of CSM's chapter of the Society of Physics Students last year, we have been dedicated to spreading the knowledge of physics through outreach while providing both social and professional events for students and the community. We did many things last year that we intend to repeat this year. In August we participate in Celebration of Mines, doing interesting demonstrations while informing new students about our organization. In autumn, a haunted physics lab is built, SPS and the CSM Physics Department hold Physics Week, and volunteers judge science fairs at local schools. In spring, a workshop is held for students to apply for summer internships and REUs and students enjoy a fun night of bowling. SPS also prepares demonstrations for the Associated Students of CSM to use in their Into the Streets volunteer event and co-organizes Mitchell Elementary School's Family Math and Science Night. Last year, we hosted the Colorado/Wyoming AAPT and SPS Zone 14 meeting. This year, we will host an E-days dunk tank and soapbox derby. At the end of the year, a department barbeque is held to finish off the spring semester. For our efforts, we accepted a Marsh White award for demonstrations in addition to a SOCK and outstanding chapter award from SPS national.

  20. Lomonosov In Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 September 2004 This blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the frost-covered rims of Lomonosov Crater in late martian spring. At the north (top) end of the image, low, ground-hugging fog can be seen in association with the retreating seasonal polar cap. Lomonosov Crater is about 150 km (93 mi) in diameter and located at 65oN, 9oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  1. Geologic map of the Grand Junction Quadrangle, Mesa County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Robert B.; Carrara, Paul E.; Hood, William C.; Murray, Kyle E.

    2002-01-01

    -angle reverse fault. The other locality displays a second similar asymmetric fold. No evidence of post-Laramide tilting or uplift exists here, but the antecedent Unaweep Canyon, only 30 km to the south-southwest of the map area, provides clear evidence of Late Cenozoic, if not Pleistocene, uplift. The major geologic hazards in the area include large landslides associated with the dip-slope-underlain, smectite-rich Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and overlying Dakota and Burro Canyon Formations. Active landslides affect the southern bank of the Colorado River where undercutting by the river and smectitic clays in the Mancos trigger landslides. The Wanakah, Morrison, and Dakota Formations and the Mancos Shale create a significant hazard to houses and other structures by containing expansive smectitic clay. In addition to seasonal spring floods associated with the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers, a serious flash flood hazard associated with sudden summer thunderstorms threatens the intermittent washes that drain the dip slope of the monocline.

  2. Comparability among four invertebrate sampling methods, Fountain Creek Basin, Colorado, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Robert W.; Brown, Krystal D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering and Colorado Springs Utilities, designed a study to determine if sampling method and sample timing resulted in comparable samples and assessments of biological condition. To accomplish this task, annual invertebrate samples were collected concurrently using four sampling methods at 15 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages in the Fountain Creek basin from 2010 to 2012. Collectively, the four methods are used by local (U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program) and State monitoring programs (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment) in the Fountain Creek basin to produce two distinct sample types for each program that target single-and multiple-habitats. This study found distinguishable differences between single-and multi-habitat sample types using both community similarities and multi-metric index values, while methods from each program within sample type were comparable. This indicates that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment methods were compatible with the cooperative monitoring program methods within multi-and single-habitat sample types. Comparisons between September and October samples found distinguishable differences based on community similarities for both sample types, whereas only differences were found for single-habitat samples when multi-metric index values were considered. At one site, differences between September and October index values from single-habitat samples resulted in opposing assessments of biological condition. Direct application of the results to inform the revision of the existing Fountain Creek basin U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program are discussed.

  3. Southern Mars: It's Spring!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    August 2, 1999, marks the spring equinox for the martian southern hemisphere. It is also the start of autumn for regions north of the equator. Winter in the south has finally come to a close, and the seasonal frosts of the wintertime south polar cap are retreating. Small, local dust storms frequently occur along the margins of the polar cap, as the colder air blowing off the cap moves northward into warmer regions.

    The wide angle camera view of Mars shown here was obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera in late July 1999, about 1 week before the start of southern spring. The frosty, retreating south polar cap (white) is seen in the lower quarter of the image, and wisps of dust storm clouds (grayish-orange in this view) occur just above the cap at the lower left. The southern most of the large environmental changes volcanoes, Arsia Mons, is seen at the upper left. Arsia Mons is about 350 kilometers(220 miles) across.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  4. Colorado geology then and now: following the route of the Colorado Scientific Society's 1901 trip through central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Beth

    2013-01-01

    In 1901, Charles Van Hise asked Samuel Emmons and Whitman Cross to organize a grand excursion across Colorado as part of the combined meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, GSA, and the Colorado Scientific Society (CSS). This trip replays part of that 10-day excursion across Colorado. Shortened to three days, this trip takes in some of the same sites as the 1901 trip, plus adds others of interest along the route where CSS members are reinventing geological interpretations. The trip will follow the precedent set in 1901; CSS members will serve as “site or stop hosts” in addition to the trip leader and drivers. While walking in the steps of the most famous of our profession we will also see some of the most magnificent scenery of Colorado.

  5. 76 FR 46288 - Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Cañon City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Peak Area Council of Governments (PPACG), the North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Organization... outlined in 40 CFR 93.118(e)(4), which was promulgated August 15, 1997 (62 FR 43780). We described our... Rule Amendments (69 FR 40004). In addition, in certain areas with monitored ambient carbon...

  6. Aqueous Geochemistry of the Pueblo Colorado Wash Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandamouz, A.; Ort, M. H.; Breit, G. N.; Hiza, M.; Parnell, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Pueblo Colorado Wash alluvial aquifer, located in northeastern Arizona on the Navajo Nation, is about 20 km long and 2-5 km wide and formed by infilling a canyon as deep as 70 m in Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks. This aquifer is the main source of drinking water for many Navajo communities. The composition of shallow water (<20 m) in the aquifer contrasts with that from deeper parts. The shallower water is distinguished by low specific conductance (<1 mS cm-1) and higher dissolved oxygen, while the deeper parts have a wide range of values for specific conductance (<1-22 mS cm-1) and low dissolved oxygen. Some wells (deeper water) are sulfate dominant whilst most springs and shallow wells (shallow water) are bicarbonate dominant. A comparison of two datasets-one from 1960's, and the other from the current study started in 2004-shows that the concentration of ions, such as Cl- and SO42-, in the water from some wells is much higher in samples taken in 2004. High concentrations of SO42-, Cl-, F- , K+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ in different wells and springs follow no apparent spatial trends. δ 13C data have a wide range, from -3.4 in shallow water to -11.7 in deep water. The low δ 13C values along with the high dissolved Fe, Mn, and Ba in some wells and springs are consistent with microbial respiration in the aquifer. The δ 18O and δ D show that the shallow water has experienced varying amounts of evaporation. The differences in water composition reflect the heterogeneity in the alluvium and older formations surrounding the aquifer, and the role of water-sediment interactions in the water composition. Temporal increases in salinity are attributed to decreased rainfall and increased withdrawal of water for domestic supplies. Results highlight the sensitivity of water quality in small aquifers to climate shifts and development.

  7. Perchlorate as a Ground-Water Tracer Along the Lower Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justet, L.; Lico, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Anthropogenic perchlorate was first observed in the lower Colorado River (NV and AZ) in 1997. The perchlorate source was traced upstream from Hoover Dam and Lake Mead to Las Vegas Wash. Perchlorate migrated through the local surface- and ground-water systems to the Wash from nearby manufacturing facilities in Henderson, NV, which had been operating since the 1940s. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) began monitoring perchlorate in the lower Colorado River at Willow Beach, located about 18 km south of the Dam, in 1997. A 3 μg/L reduction was observed at Willow Beach in 2003-2004, coincident with remediation at the Henderson site in 1999-2004. This observed decrease indicates that the effects of remediation rapidly propagated through the surface-water system below the Dam. In July 2008 water samples were collected and analyzed for perchlorate from eight springs along the lower Colorado River below Hoover Dam, from a discharge tunnel in the country rock at Hoover Dam, and from Lake Mead (above and below the thermocline). Lake Mead water collected above the thermocline east of Sentinel Island contained 3.9 μg/L perchlorate, while water below the thermocline contained 1.8 μg/L. Perchlorate concentrations were lower than the 2 to 4 μg/L quantitation limit for the six springs located more than 2 km south of the Dam. Samples from Pupfish Springs, about 0.9 km south of the Dam, contained 6.4-6.8 μg/L perchlorate. Water collected from the discharge tunnel in the Dam contained 8.2 μg/L perchlorate. Perchlorate concentrations observed at Pupfish Springs and the discharge tunnel in the Dam in 2008 are similar to those reported downstream at Willow Beach prior to 2003-2004 by NDEP indicating that the ground water travel time from the Dam to Pupfish Springs is between 4 and 70 years and the maximum flow velocities are between about 13-200 m/y. These rapid velocity estimates suggest that faults and fractures in the area are an important control on

  8. FLUORINE IN COLORADO OIL SHALE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyni, John R.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Oil shale from the lower part of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, averages 0. 13 weight percent fluorine, which is about twice that found in common shales, but is the same as the average amount found in some oil shales from other parts of the world. Some fluorine may reside in fluorapatite; however, limited data suggest that cryolite may be quantitatively more important. To gain a better understanding of the detailed distribution of fluorine in the deeper nahcolite-bearing oil shales, cores were selected for study from two exploratory holes drilled in the northern part of the Piceance Creek Basin where the oil shales reach their maximum thickness and grade.

  9. Mercury and selenium in fish of Fountain Creek, Colorado (USA): possible sources and implications.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, D R; Herrmann, S J; Carsella, J S; McGarvy, C M; Foutz, H P; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Gregorich, J M; Turner, J A; Vanden Heuvel, B D

    2016-01-01

    Fountain Creek in Colorado USA is a major tributary that confluences with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado, the result being the tributary's influence on Arkansas River water quality affecting down-stream users. In a previous study, we found that bryophytes (aquatic plants) accumulated selenium in Fountain Creek watershed and this finding prompted us to investigate the extent of the metalloid in the whole-body tissues of fish. One hundred 11 fish (six species) were collected and analyzed for Se by inductively-coupled plasma emission mass spectrometry. Analysis of all analytical data also showed mercury in all of the fish whole bodies and selected tissues. There was a general increase in selenium but a decrease in mercury in fish with downstream travel-distance. The highest whole-body selenium was in Pueblo, Colorado (3393 µg/kg, dry weight; 906 µg/kg, wet weight); the highest mercury in fish was in the Monument Creek tributary north of Colorado Springs, Colorado (71 µg/kg, dry weight; 19 µg/kg, wet weight). In four tissues of 11 female fish captured, selenium was highest in the livers at eight sites but highest in the ovaries at three sites. Mercury was highest in the epaxial muscle at all sites. Selenium availability could be due to the watershed lithology and land uses; however, mercury could be carried by atmospheric deposition from coal-fired power plants and historic mining activities. Selenium in fish tissues and water samples were compared to U.S. national water quality criteria. PMID:27104125

  10. Aggregate supply and demand modeling using GIS methods for the front range urban corridor, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ahmet; Turner, Keith

    2004-07-01

    The combined use of allocation modeling and geographical information system (GIS) technologies for providing quantitative assessments of aggregate supply and demand is evaluated using representative data for the Front Range Urban Corridor (FRUC) in Colorado. The FRUC extends from the Colorado-Wyoming border to south of Colorado Springs, and includes Denver and the major urban growth regions of Colorado. In this area, aggregate demand is high and is increasing in response to population growth. Neighborhood opposition to the establishment of new pits and quarries and the depletion of many deposits are limiting aggregate supplies. Many sources are already covered by urban development or eliminated from production by zoning. Transport of aggregate by rail from distant resources may be required in the future. Two allocation-modeling procedures are tested in this study. Network analysis procedures provided within the ARC/INFO software, are unsatisfactory. Further aggregate allocation modeling used a model specifically designed for this task; a modified version of an existing Colorado School of Mines allocation model allows for more realistic market analyses. This study evaluated four scenarios. The entire region was evaluated with a scenario reflecting the current market and by a second scenario in which some existing suppliers were closed down and new potential suppliers were activated. The conditions within the Denver metropolitan area were studied before and after the introduction of three possible rail-to-truck aggregate distribution centers. GIS techniques are helpful in developing the required database to describe the Front Range Urban Corridor aggregate market conditions. GIS methods allow the digital representation of the regional road network, and the development of a distance matrix relating all suppliers and purchasers.

  11. Mercury and selenium in fish of Fountain Creek, Colorado (USA): possible sources and implications.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, D R; Herrmann, S J; Carsella, J S; McGarvy, C M; Foutz, H P; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Gregorich, J M; Turner, J A; Vanden Heuvel, B D

    2016-01-01

    Fountain Creek in Colorado USA is a major tributary that confluences with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado, the result being the tributary's influence on Arkansas River water quality affecting down-stream users. In a previous study, we found that bryophytes (aquatic plants) accumulated selenium in Fountain Creek watershed and this finding prompted us to investigate the extent of the metalloid in the whole-body tissues of fish. One hundred 11 fish (six species) were collected and analyzed for Se by inductively-coupled plasma emission mass spectrometry. Analysis of all analytical data also showed mercury in all of the fish whole bodies and selected tissues. There was a general increase in selenium but a decrease in mercury in fish with downstream travel-distance. The highest whole-body selenium was in Pueblo, Colorado (3393 µg/kg, dry weight; 906 µg/kg, wet weight); the highest mercury in fish was in the Monument Creek tributary north of Colorado Springs, Colorado (71 µg/kg, dry weight; 19 µg/kg, wet weight). In four tissues of 11 female fish captured, selenium was highest in the livers at eight sites but highest in the ovaries at three sites. Mercury was highest in the epaxial muscle at all sites. Selenium availability could be due to the watershed lithology and land uses; however, mercury could be carried by atmospheric deposition from coal-fired power plants and historic mining activities. Selenium in fish tissues and water samples were compared to U.S. national water quality criteria.

  12. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  13. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  14. Edible Pot Sends Toddlers to Colorado ERs

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Edible Pot Sends Toddlers to Colorado ERs Cannabis-laced candy, baked goods look irresistible to kids, ... being exposed to pot, researchers found. Edible products -- cannabis-laced brownies, cookies, candy and the like -- were ...

  15. Professional Orientation of Colorado PR Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattimore, Dan L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Findings indicate that a majority of public relations practitioners are highly educated, have professional media backgrounds as part of their professional experience, and are paid better than newspaper personnel in Colorado. (RB)

  16. A Cooperative Film Effort in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spetnagel, H. T.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The mass communications department of the University of Denver assisted in producing a film on community colleges in Colorado which improved the film students' cinema skills while providing greater exposure for the community college system. (NF)

  17. The Geologic Story of Colorado National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1981-01-01

    From 1946 until about 1956 I carried out fieldwork intermittently on the geology and artesian water supply of the Grand Junction area, Colorado, the results of which have been published. The area mapped geologically contains about 332 square miles in the west-central part of Mesa County and includes all of Colorado National Monument. During the field work several successive custodians or superintendents and several park naturalists urged that upon completion of my professional paper I prepare a brief account of the geology of the Monument in terms understandable by laymen, and which could be sold at the Visitor Center. This I was happy to do and there resulted 'The geologic story of Colorado National Monument', published by the Colorado and Black Canyon Natural History Association in cooperation with the National Park Service. This report contained colored sketches by John R. Stacy and a colored cover, but the photographs and many of the drawings were reproduced in black and white.

  18. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  19. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  20. Temporal change in biological community structure in the Fountain Creek basin, Colorado, 2001-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, began a study to better understand the relations between environmental characteristics and biological communities in the Fountain Creek basin in order to aide water-resource management and guide future monitoring activities. To accomplish this task, environmental (streamflow, habitat, and water chemistry) and biological (fish and macroinvertebrate) data were collected annually at 24 sites over a 6- or 8-year period (fish, 2003 to 2008; macroinvertebrates, 2001 to 2008). For this report, these data were first analyzed to determine the presence of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure among years using nonparametric multivariate statistics. Where temporal change in the biological communities was found, these data were further analyzed using additional nonparametric multivariate techniques to determine which subset of selected streamflow, habitat, or water-chemistry variables best described site-specific changes in community structure relative to a gradient of urbanization. This study identified significant directional patterns of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure at 15 of 24 sites in the Fountain Creek basin. At four of these sites, changes in environmental variables were significantly correlated with the concurrent temporal change identified in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure (Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Monument Creek at Bijou Street at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bear Creek near Colorado Springs, Colo.; Fountain Creek at Security, Colo.). Combinations of environmental variables describing directional temporal change in the biota appeared to be site specific as no single variable dominated the results; however, substrate composition variables (percent substrate composition composed of sand, gravel, or cobble) collectively were present in 80 percent of the environmental

  1. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs (< 100) generally correlated with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Previous study (e.g., Manga, 1999) has shown groundwater responds on shorter time scales than the MTT, but of interest the results presented here indicate that relatively stable and old springs with long MTTs (> 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While

  2. 1979 summary of coal resources in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Colorado, with 8 coal-bearing regions and 20 coal fields, contains at least 11 percent of the total remaining coal resources of the United States to a depth of 6000 feet. Colorado coals range from early Late Cretaceous to Eocene in age. The higher rank bituminous coals and the largest reserves generally are found in the Upper Cretaceous Dakota and Mesa Verde Groups/Formations in western Colorado. The younger coals, generally of lower rank (subbituminous a to lignite), are found in latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks in the Green River, North and South Park, Raton Mesa, and Denver coal regions. Marginal and premium grades of coking coal are found in the Carbondale, Crested Butte, and Somerset fields, Uinta coal region; in the Trinidad field, Raton Mesa region; and in the Durango field, San Juan River region. Colorado coals range in rank from lignite to anthracite; over 70 percent of the resource is bituminous, approximately 23 percent is subbituminous, 5 percent lignite, and less than one percent anthracite. Moisture, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents of Colorado coals vary considerably with rank from region to region. According to the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Colorado ranks seventh in the total U.S. demonstrated reserve base of coal (16.3 billion short tons) and fourth in the reserve base of bituminous coal. Furthermore, Colorado ranks first in the reserve base of underground-minable low sulphur bituminous coal. The Green River region produced over 9 million tons of the total 1978 state-wide coal production of 14.3 million tons. Projections for Colorado coal production through 1985 is in the order of 32.2 million tons per year.

  3. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  4. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  5. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  6. Single-Crystal Springs For Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal noise reduced, enabling use of smaller proof masses. Spring-and-mass accelerometers in which springs made of single-crystal material being developed. In spring-and-mass accelerometer, proof mass attached to one end of spring, and acceleration of object at other end of spring measured in terms of deflection of spring, provided frequency spectrum of acceleration lies well below resonant frequency of spring-and-proof-mass system. Use of single-crystal spring materials instead of such polycrystalline spring materials as ordinary metals makes possible to construct highly sensitive accelerometers (including seismometers) with small proof masses.

  7. Mallow Springs, County Cork, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, C. R.

    1996-03-01

    Because of its copious and reliable rainfall, Ireland has an abundance of springs. Many of the larger ones issue from the Carboniferous limestone that occurs in over 40% of the country. The spring water is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type with a temperature of about 10°C. In the 18th century, warm and cold springs were developed as spas in various parts of Ireland. The popularity of these springs was short and most were in major decline by 1850. Today only one cold spa at Lisdoonvarna, Co. Clare is still operating. Springs in Ireland were places of religious significance for the pre-Christian Druidic religion. In the Christian period they became holy wells, under the patronage of various saints. Cures for many different ailments were attributed to water from these wells.

  8. The Status of Spanish-Surnamed Citizens in Colorado. Report to the Colorado General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Spanish-Surnamed Citizens, Denver.

    The purpose of this 1967 report sponsored by the Colorado Commission on Spanish-Surnamed Citizens was to study statistical, sociological, and psychological data pertaining to current problems, conditions, and needs of Spanish-surnamed residents of Colorado. The data were derived primarily from analysis of existing studies and the 1950 and 1960…

  9. Colorado School Finance Partnership: Report and Recommendations. Financing Colorado's Future: Assessing Our School Finance System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Colorado has emerged as a national leader in crafting innovative solutions for challenges facing its public school system. From implementing the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB) reforms to more recent legislation including standards and assessments for a preschool-through-college…

  10. Colorado Preschool Program. 2002 Report. A Report to the Colorado General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) serves at-risk preschool children in community programs, including Head Start programs, private for-profit programs, non-profit programs, and programs within public schools. This 2002 report to the Colorado General Assembly provides information on the effectiveness of major early childhood education programs,…

  11. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  12. Hydrologic data from Naval Oil Shale Reserves, Parachute Creek basin, northwestern Colorado, 1975-79

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patt, Ralph O.; Adams, D. Briane; Collins, Dannie L.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy, Naval Petroleum, and Oil Shale Reserves in the Parachute Creek drainage basin of western Colorado. It includes data from five surface-water gages, two automatic sediment samplers and two water-quality monitors. Instantaneous streamflow measurements were made at 63 sites on Parachute Creek tributaries to determine gain or loss of flow. Thirteen springs and nine surface-water sites were sampled and chemical analyses of these sites are included. From 1975 to 1979, 88 spring sites were inventoried; conductivity, temperature, pH, and discharge were measured. Climate data include maximum, minimum, and total daily solar radiation. Daily total precipitation is reported for three stations and snow-course data is reported for one site.

  13. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River.

    PubMed

    Osmundson, B C; May, T W; Osmundson, D B

    2000-05-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 microg/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 microg/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995. PMID:10787099

  14. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): Relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osmundson, B.C.; May, T.W.; Osmundson, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 ??g/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 ??g/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995.

  15. Geothermal potential for commercial and industrial direct heat applications in Salida, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.; Galloway, M.J.; Gross, J.T.; Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    The Salida Geothermal Prospect (Poncha Hot Springs) was evaluated for industrial and commercial direct heat applications at Salida, Colorado, which is located approximately five miles east of Poncha Hot Springs. Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd., holds the geothermal leases on the prospect and the right-of-way for the main pipeline to Salida. The Poncha Hot Springs are located at the intersection of two major structural trends, immediately between the Upper Arkansas graben and the Sangre de Cristo uplift. Prominent east-west faulting occurs at the actual location of the hot springs. Preliminary exploration indicates that 1600 gpm of geothermal fluid as hot as 250/sup 0/F is likely to be found at around 1500 feet in depth. The prospective existing endusers were estimated to require 5.02 x 10/sup 10/ Btu per year, but the total annual amount of geothermal energy available for existing and future endusers is 28.14 x 10/sup 10/ Btu. The engineering design for the study assumed that the 1600 gpm would be fully utilized. Some users would be cascaded and the spent fluid would be cooled and discharged to nearby rivers. The economic analysis assumes that two separate businesses, the energy producer and the energy distributor, are participants in the geothermal project. The producer would be an existing limited partnership, with Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. as one of the partners; the distributor would be a new Colorado corporation without additional income sources. Economic evaluations were performed in full for four cases: the Base Case and three alternate scenarios. Alternate 1 assumes a three-year delay in realizing full production relative to the Base Case; Alternate 2 assumes that the geothermal reservoir is of a higher quality than is assumed for the Base Case; and Alternate 3 assumes a lower quality reservoir. 11 refs., 34 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. Geologic Map of the Peach Springs 30' x 60' Quadrangle, Mohave and Coconino Counties, Northwestern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Block, Debra L.; Dyer, Helen C.

    2006-01-01

    This map is a product of a cooperative project of the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management to provide geologic map coverage and regional geologic information for visitor services and resource management of Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Grand Canyon-Parashant-National Monument, and adjacent lands in northwestern Arizona. This map is a synthesis of previous and new geologic mapping that encompasses the Peach Springs 30' x 60' quadrangle, Arizona. The geologic data will support future geologic, biologic, hydrologic, and other science resource studies of this area conducted by the National Park Service, the Hualapai Indian Tribe, the Bureau of Land Management, the State of Arizona, and private organizations. The Colorado River and its tributaries have dissected the southwestern Colorado Plateau into what is now the southwestern part of Grand Canyon. The erosion of Grand Canyon has exposed about 426 m (1,400 ft) of Proterozoic crystalline metamorphic rocks and granite, about 1,450 m (4,760 ft) of Paleozoic strata, and about 300 m (1,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. Outcrops of Proterozoic crystalline rocks are exposed at the bottom of Grand Canyon at Granite Park from Colorado River Mile 207 to 209, at Mile 212, and in the Lower Granite Gorge from Colorado River Mile 216 to 262, and along the Grand Wash Cliffs in the southwest corner of the map area.

  17. 1976 Big Thompson flood, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R. D.; Vandas, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the early evening of July 31, 1976, a large stationary thunderstorm released as much as 7.5 inches of rainfall in about an hour (about 12 inches in a few hours) in the upper reaches of the Big Thompson River drainage. This large amount of rainfall in such a short period of time produced a flash flood that caught residents and tourists by surprise. The immense volume of water that churned down the narrow Big Thompson Canyon scoured the river channel and destroyed everything in its path, including 418 homes, 52 businesses, numerous bridges, paved and unpaved roads, power and telephone lines, and many other structures. The tragedy claimed the lives of 144 people. Scores of other people narrowly escaped with their lives. The Big Thompson flood ranks among the deadliest of Colorado's recorded floods. It is one of several destructive floods in the United States that has shown the necessity of conducting research to determine the causes and effects of floods. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts research and operates a Nationwide streamgage network to help understand and predict the magnitude and likelihood of large streamflow events such as the Big Thompson Flood. Such research and streamgage information are part of an ongoing USGS effort to reduce flood hazards and to increase public awareness.

  18. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  19. Correlation of the Peach Springs Tuff, a large-volume Miocene ignimbrite sheet in California and Arizona ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Nielson, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Miller, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Peach Springs Tuff is a distinctive early Miocene ignimbrite deposit that was first recognized in western Arizona. Recent field studies and phenocryst analyses indicate that adjacent outcrops of similar tuff in the central and eastern Mojave Desert may be correlative. This proposed correlation implies that outcrops of the tuff are scattered over an area of at least 35 000 km2 from the western Colorado Plateau to Barstow, California, and that the erupted volume, allowing for posteruption crustal extension, was at least several hundred cubic kilometres. Thus, the Peach Springs Tuff may be a regional stratigraphic marker, useful for determining regional paleogeography and the time and extent of Tertiary crustal extension. -Authors

  20. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado I. Adults.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A; Ken Weston, L; McDonald, Susan F

    2005-05-01

    Adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) were exposed to various selenium concentrations in ponds and isolated river channels of the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO, to determine effects on their growth and residue accumulation over an 11-month period. Adults at Horsethief ponds were fed a commercial diet, whereas fish at Adobe Creek channel and North Pond foraged on natural food items. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 2.2 microg/L in water, 0.1-1.4 microg/g in sediment, and 2.3-3.1 microg/g in food organisms (1.1 microg/g in commercial fish food), at Adobe Creek were 3.8 microg/L in water, 0.5-2.1 microg/g in sediment, and 4-56 microg/g in food organisms, and at North Pond were 9.5 microg/L in water, 7-55 microg/g in sediment, and 20-81 microg/g in food organisms. The selenium concentrations in muscle plugs from adults at Adobe Creek (11.7 microg/g, SD = 0.4, n = 6) and North Pond (16.6 microg/g, SD = 1.0, n = 6) were greater than at Horsethief (4.5 microg/g, SD = 0.2, n = 6). During a depuration period adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond lost 1-2% of their selenium burden in 32 days and 14-19% in 66 days. Selenium accumulated in razorback sucker above toxic thresholds reported in other studies, yet those residues were less than those reported in muscle plugs of 40% of wild razorback sucker caught in the Green River, Utah.

  1. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado: I. Adults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.; Weston, L.K.; McDonald, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    Adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) were exposed to various selenium concentrations in ponds and isolated river channels of the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO, to determine effects on their growth and residue accumulation over an 11-month period. Adults at Horsethief ponds were fed a commercial diet, whereas fish at Adobe Creek channel and North Pond foraged on natural food items. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 2.2 ??g/L in water, 0.1-1.4 ??g/g in sediment, and 2.3-3.1 ??g/g in food organisms (1.1 ??g/g in commercial fish food), at Adobe Creek were 3.8 ??g/L in water, 0.5-2.1 ??g/g in sediment, and 4-56 ??g/g in food organisms, and at North Pond were 9.5 ??g/L in water, 7-55 ??g/g in sediment, and 20-81 ??g/g in food organisms. The selenium concentrations in muscle plugs from adults at Adobe Creek (11.7 ??g/g, SD=0.4, n=6) and North Pond (16.6 ??g/g, SD=1.0, n=6) were greater than at Horsethief (4.5 ??g/g, SD=0.2, n=6). During a depuration period adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond lost 1-2% of their selenium burden in 32 days and 14-19% in 66 days. Selenium accumulated in razorback sucker above toxic thresholds reported in other studies, yet those residues were less than those reported in muscle plugs of 40% of wild razorback sucker caught in the Green River, Utah.

  2. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  3. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  4. Magnetic fabric, flow directions, and source area of the Lower Miocene Peach Springs Tuff in Arizona, California, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Wells, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Uses anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to define the flow fabric and possible source area of the Peach Springs Tuff, a widespread rhyolitic ash flow tuff in the Mojave Desert and Great Basin of California, Arizona, and Nevada. Lineation and imbrication indicate a source region near the southern tip of Nevada. The optimum intersection of magnetic lineations lies in the southern Black Mountains of Arizona on the eastern side of the Colorado River extensional corridor. -from Authors

  5. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  6. Effects of climate change and land use on water resources in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Campbell, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    The health of the Colorado River watershed is critical to the socioeconomic and ecosystem well-being of the Southwestern United States. Water in springs, streams, and rivers supports a range of aquatic and riparian ecosystems that contain many endangered species. Terrestrial habitats support a wide array of plants and wildlife. In addition, this region is enjoyed by millions of people annually for its recreational and esthetic opportunities. The Colorado River provides water for about 25 million people and is used to irrigate 2.5 million acres of farmland. However, competition for this water is expected to increase as human populations dependent on this water are projected to increase to 38 million by 2020. Climate change is expected to further exacerbate water issues in this region. Drought in the Southwest during 2000-04, caused by both reduced precipitation and a series of the hottest years on record, resulted in streamflows lower than during the 1930s Dust Bowl or the 1950s. Increased temperatures alone are a major factor in reducing surface-water flows in this region. For instance, precipitation received during the winter of 2005 was at the 100-year average. However, low soil moisture and high January-July temperatures resulted in flows that were only 75 percent of average. Climate models predict future warmer temperatures and reduced precipitation in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), which would reduce water available to humans and ecosystems.

  7. Comparison of mine waste assessment methods at the Rattler mine site, Virginia Canyon, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Phil L.; Smith, Kathleen S.; Wildeman, Thomas R.; Ranville, James F.

    2005-01-01

    In a joint project, the mine waste-piles at the Rattler Mine near Idaho Springs, Colorado, were sampled and analyzed by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). Separate sample collection, sample leaching, and leachate analyses were performed by both groups and the results were compared. For the study, both groups used the USGS sampling procedure and the USGS Field Leach Test (FLT). The leachates generated from these tests were analyzed for a suite of elements using ICP-AES (CSM) and ICP-MS (USGS). Leachate geochemical fingerprints produced by the two groups for composites collected from the same mine waste showed good agreement. In another set of tests, CSM collected another set of Rattler mine waste composite samples using the USGS sampling procedure. This set of composite samples was leached using the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (CDMG) leach test, and a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach test. Leachate geochemical fingerprints produced using these tests showed a variation of more than a factor of two from the geochemical fingerprints produced using the USGS FLT leach test. We have concluded that the variation in the results is due to the different parameters of the leaching tests and not due to the sampling or analytical methods.

  8. Climatology of extreme daily precipitation in Colorado and its diverse spatial and seasonal variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahoney, Kelly M.; Ralph, F. Martin; Walter, Klaus; Doesken, Nolan; Dettinger, Michael; Gottas, Daniel; Coleman, Timothy; White, Allen

    2015-01-01

    The climatology of Colorado’s historical extreme precipitation events shows a remarkable degree of seasonal and regional variability. Analysis of the largest historical daily precipitation totals at COOP stations across Colorado by season indicates that the largest recorded daily precipitation totals have ranged from less than 60 mm day−1 in some areas to more than 250 mm day−1 in others. East of the Continental Divide, winter events are rarely among the top 10 events at a given site, but spring events dominate in and near the foothills; summer events are most common across the lower-elevation eastern plains, while fall events are most typical for the lower elevations west of the Divide. The seasonal signal in Colorado’s central mountains is complex; high-elevation intense precipitation events have occurred in all months of the year, including summer, when precipitation is more likely to be liquid (as opposed to snow), which poses more of an instantaneous flood risk. Notably, the historic Colorado Front Range daily rainfall totals that contributed to the damaging floods in September 2013 occurred outside of that region’s typical season for most extreme precipitation (spring–summer). That event and many others highlight the fact that extreme precipitation in Colorado has occurred historically during all seasons and at all elevations, emphasizing a year-round statewide risk.

  9. Development of a tree-ring isotope proxy for cool-season temperatures for the Colorado River Headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csank, A. Z.; Woodhouse, C. A.; Pederson, G. T.; Leavitt, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Snowpack in the mountains of Colorado, a major water reservoir, has been declining since the 1950s. Recent work indicates that spring temperatures are increasingly becoming an important driver of snowpack declines in the Southern Rockies. Understanding how temperatures have interacting with winter precipitation during periods of past droughts would shed light on the response of Colorado River flow to warming temperatures in the future. Instrumental records provide some insights on this, but are too short to document a broader range of natural variability over longer time scales. At present, tree-ring records from the Upper Colorado River have been used to provide extended records of summer temperature, winter precipitation and streamflow. There is thus a need to develop reconstructions of cool-season temperatures in order to investigate its impact on snowpack and runoff beyond the period represented by the instrumental record. To date, the ability to provide annually resolved reconstructions of cool-season temperatures has eluded dendrochronologists. Here we are developing δ18O records derived from tree rings of Douglas-fir and piñon pine in western Colorado as a proxy for cool-season temperatures. We sampled trees at 6 sites in western Colorado, at low, high and mid elevations. All trees were limited in growth by moisture and our sites were chosen to have paired sites at each elevation of the two species. Results show high correlations between Douglass-fir δ18O and March-May temperatures (r = 0.54, p=0.01). Results from piñon pine, however, correlate most strongly with prior September (r = 0.48, p=0.01) and May-July precipitation (r = -0.43; p=0.01). Our results indicate that δ18O records obtained from Douglass-fir in western Colorado may be a good proxy of spring temperatures with a high potential for extending records back 500 to 800 years. Our results also indicate that by using isotopic records of δ18O in conjunction with ring width data from the same

  10. Overview of the Colorado River Canyon from the helicopter pad. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Colorado River Canyon from the helicopter pad. View of the Nevada side where new bridge will cross canyon, view northwest - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  11. View of Nevada side of Colorado River Canyon taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Nevada side of Colorado River Canyon taken from Lower Portal Road looking up towards area where new bridge will be located, view northwest - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  12. View of the Colorado River Canyon showing lower portal road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the Colorado River Canyon showing lower portal road in background taken from the rim of Hoover Dam, view south - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  13. View of Arizona side of Colorado River Canyon taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Arizona side of Colorado River Canyon taken from Lower Portal Road looking up towards area where new bridge will be located, view northeast - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  14. 2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below Parker Dam; View southeast from TV Hill above Whitsett Pump Plant. - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  15. Fusulinid biostratigraphy of Bird Spring Formation in Spring Mountains near Mountain Springs Pass, Clark County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gamache, M.T.; Webster, G.D.

    1987-05-01

    Fusulinids from a 955.16 m thick section of Chesterian into Wolfcampian rocks of the Indian Springs and Bird Spring formations exposed near Mountain Springs Pass represent the biozones of Millerella to Pseudoschwagerina. Species of Millerella, Plectofusulina, Staffella, Schubertina, Pseudostaffella, Profusulinella, Fusulinella, Beedeina, Oketaella, Pseudofusulina, Triticites, Schwagerina, Eoparafusulina, and Cuniculinella were described. One new species of Millerella and three new species of Tricities were named. The Mountain Springs section can be correlated intraregionally with other sections in Clark County using similar cherty limestones or sandstone-dominated strata in association with biozones recognized in the southern Great Basin. The thickening of strata from the Mountain Springs section to the Arrow Canyon and Lee Canyon sections demonstrated by this method reflects each section's position to the northeast-trending Las Vegas-Wasatch hinge line between thin, shallow shelf sediments and thicker sediments to the west after palinspastic reconstruction. The large diversity of fusulinid species in the Mountain Springs section relative to Arrow Canyon and Lee Canyon suggests that a fusulinid diversity index may be useful in correlating similar paleoenvironments. Fusulinid biozones of the Mountain Springs section can also be correlated regionally with fusulinid subbiozones A through G of the Shasta Lake area in northern California and with fusulinid biozones of the Mid-Continent based on similar species and occurrences.

  16. Flooding in the South Platte River and Fountain Creek Basins in eastern Colorado, September 9–18, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrough, Robert A.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2015-11-25

    Flooding in the Fountain Creek Basin was primarily contained to Fountain Creek from southern Colorado Springs to its confluence with the Arkansas River in Pueblo, in lower Monument Creek, and in several mountain tributaries. New record peak streamflows occurred at four mountain tributary streamgages having at least 10 years of record; Bear Creek, Cheyenne Creek, Rock Creek, and Little Fountain Creek. Five streamgages with at least 10 years of record in a 32-mile reach of Fountain Creek extending from Colorado Springs to Piñon had peak streamflows in the top five for the period of record. A peak of 15,300 ft3/s at Fountain Creek near Fountain was the highest streamflow recorded in the Fountain Creek Basin during the September 2013 event and ranks the third highest peak in 46 years. Near the mouth of the basin, a peak of 11,800 ft3/s in Pueblo was only the thirteenth highest annual peak in 74 years. A new Colorado record for daily rainfall of 11.85 inches was recorded at a USGS rain gage in the Little Fountain Creek Basin on September 12, 2013.

  17. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  18. Resistivity sections, upper Arkansas River basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zohdy, Adel A.R.; Hershey, Lloyd A.; Emery, Philip A.; Stanley, William D.

    1971-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of ground-water resources in the upper Arkansas River basin from Pueblo to Leadville is being made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District, and the Colorado Division of Water Resources, Colorado State Engineer. As part of the investigation, surface geophysical electrical resistivity surveys were made during the summer and fall of 1970 near Buena Vista and Westcliffe, Colo. (p1.1). The resistivity surveys were made to verify a previous gravity survey and to help locate areas where ground-water supplies might be developed. This report presents the results of the surveys in the form of two resistivity sections.

  19. Urbanization and water supplies for northeastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.R.

    1981-03-01

    Increasing populations in northeastern Colorado have resulted in reductions in irrigated acreage and the proportionate quantities of water available to support that segment of the agricultural industry. The growth has caused increased demands for municipal-domestic and industrial water supplies from the South Platte and Colorado River Basins. These impacts have been determined by comparing hydrologic data in conjunction with water use for agricultural, municipal-domestic, and industrial purposes between the period 1975 to 1979. Pricing and water rights ownership were also compared for the same period, as were land conversion data, population data, and crop production valuation. Proper administration of nonconsumptive return flows coupled with the importation of water from the Colorado River Basin will provide adequate, industrial, and irrigation water supplies for this growth intense area and downstream farm lands. 8 figures.

  20. Water resources data, Colorado, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Payne, W.F.; O'Neill, G. B.; Boulger, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 2004 water year (WY) in this report consist of records of stage and discharge of streams; and stage and contents of one reservoir. This report contains discharge records for 312 gaging stations, stage and contents of 1 lake and reservoir, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, and peak-flow information for 22 crest-stage partial-record stations. Three pertinent stations operated by bordering states, and 34 stations operated by the Colorado Division of Water Resources are included in this report. All records (except as just noted) were collected and computed by the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of J.E. Kircher, Director, USGS Colorado Water Science Center. These data represent that part of the National Water Information System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  1. 75 FR 66389 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  2. 76 FR 61382 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council (Council) was established by the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974 (Pub....

  3. 76 FR 24515 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of... Committee Act, the Bureau of Reclamation announces that the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory...) 524-3826; e-mail at: kjacobson@usbr.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Colorado River Basin...

  4. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  5. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  6. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  7. Probable effects of the proposed Sulphur Gulch Reservoir on Colorado River quantity and quality near Grand Junction, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A 16,000 acre-foot reservoir is proposed to be located about 25 miles east of Grand Junction, Colorado, on a tributary of the Colorado River that drains the Sulphur Gulch watershed between De Beque and Cameo, Colorado. The Sulphur Gulch Reservoir, which would be filled by pumping water from the Colorado River, is intended to provide the Colorado River with at least 5,412.5 acre-feet of water during low-flow conditions to meet the East Slopes portion of the 10,825 acre-feet of water required under the December 20, 1999, Final Programmatic Biological Opinion for the Upper Colorado River. The reservoir also may provide additional water in the low-flow period and as much as 10,000 acre-feet of water to supplement peak flows when flows in the Colorado River are between 12,900 and 26,600 cubic feet per second. For this study, an annual stochastic mixing model with a daily time step and 1,500 Monte Carlo trials were used to evaluate the probable effect that reservoir operations may have on water quality in the Colorado River at the Government Highline Canal and the Grand Valley Irrigation Canal. Simulations of the divertible flow (ambient background streamflow), after taking into account demands of downstream water rights, indicate that divertible flow will range from 621,860 acre-feet of water in the driest year to 4,822,732 acrefeet of water in the wettest year. Because of pumping limitations, pumpable flow (amount of streamflow available after considering divertible flow and subsequent pumping constraints) will be less than divertible flow. Assuming a pumping capacity of 150 cubic feet per second and year round pumping, except during reservoir release periods, the simulations indicate that there is sufficient streamflow to fill a 16,000 acre-feet reservoir 100 percent of the time. Simulated pumpable flows in the driest year are 91,669 acre-feet and 109,500 acre-feet in the wettest year. Simulations of carryover storage together with year-round pumping indicate that

  8. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  9. The Boulder Creek Batholith, Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gable, Dolores J.

    1980-01-01

    The Boulder Creek batholith is the best known of several large Precambrian batholiths of similar rock composition that crop out across central Colorado. The rocks in the batholith belong to the calc-alkaline series and range in composition from granodiorite through quartz diorite (tonalite) to gneissic aplite. Two rock types dominate': the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, the major rock unit, and a more leucocratic and slightly younger unit herein named Twin Spruce Quartz Monzonite. Besides mafic inclusions, which occur mainly in hornblende-bearing phases of the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, there are cogenetic older and younger lenses, dikes, and small plutons of hornblende diorite, hornblendite, gabbro, and pyroxenite. Pyroxenite is not found in the batholith. The Boulder Creek Granodiorite in the batholith represents essentially two contemporaneous magmas, a northern body occurring in the Gold Hill and Boulder quadrangles and a larger southern body exposed in the Blackhawk and the greater parts of the Tungsten and Eldorado Springs quadrangles. The two bodies are chemically and mineralogically distinct. The northern body is richer in CaO and poorer in K2O, is more mafic, and has a larger percentage of plagioclase than the southern body. A crude sequence of rock types occurs from west to east in the batholith accompanied by a change in plagioclase composition from calcic plagioclase on the west to sodic on the east. Ore minerals tend to decrease, and the ratio potassium feldspar:plagioclase increases inward from the western contact of the batholith, indicating that the Boulder Creek batholith is similar to granodiorite batholiths the world over. Emplacement of the Boulder Creek batholith was contemporaneous with plastic deformation and high-grade regional metamorphism that folded the country rock and the batholith contact along west-northwest and north-northwest axes. Also, smaller satellitic granodiorite bodies tend to conform to the trends of foliation and fold axes in

  10. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54” outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m

  11. GREENHORN MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toth, Margo I.; Baskin, G. David

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource studies of the Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Colorado, were done and one area of probable tungsten resource potential was identified. Sediment samples from streams draining into South Apache Creek have anomalously high values of tungsten. Although mineralization was not located in the underlying rock, similar rocks elsewhere in Colorado have known tungsten resources. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas resources because of the geologic setting of the area and little promise for other mineral or energy resources.

  12. The instrumental climate history of southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Doesken, N.J.; McKee, T.B.

    1995-09-01

    Instrumental observations of the climate of southwestern Colorado date back to about 1880. Climatic conditions since the late 19th century will be described with emphasis on temperatures, temperature ranges and observed precipitation. Typical seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation will be shown, and variations and apparent trends over time will be discussed. Drought characteristics will be described based on a standardized precipitation index developed for Colorado. Finally, brief comments on the challenge of collecting accurate and consistent long-term data will be given.

  13. Exploration for uranium deposits in the Spring Creek Mesa area, Montrose County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, Carl Houston

    1954-01-01

    4. The “ore-bearing sandstone” in the vicinity of relatively unoxidized ore deposits commonly contains sparse to abundant disseminated pyrite. In the vicinity of oxidized deposits it commonly contains abundant limonite spots and widespread limonite staining.

  14. 77 FR 32393 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... processing and charting. DATES: The effective date for final rule published February 21, 2012, at 77 FR 9840...; telephone (425) 203-4537. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On February 21, 2012, the FAA published in...

  15. Spring-summer movements of bonytail in a Colorado River reservoir, Lake Mohave, Arizona and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Paul C.; Mueller, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Bonytail can move substantial distances in a short time (10s of km in a few days). Fish in both years apparently favored the same areas, where they may remain for weeks. Unmarked bonytail were observed or captured by setting nets in places favored by tagged fish, a significant result since future use of the technique may enhance our ability to monitor reintroductions, locate and document spawning, examine habitat use, and acquire desperately needed brood stock for this critically imperiled species. External tagging techniques developed for juvenile razorback sucker may provide a method of minimizing telemetry induced stress while allowing us to focus sampling on congregation sites.

  16. 77 FR 35617 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Federal Regulations, which is published #0;under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510. #0; #0;The Code...

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF A PULSED LIMESTONE BED REACTOR AT THE ARGO TUNNEL IN IDAHO SPRINGS, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is an unintended consequence of coal and metal mining that adversely affects thousands of miles of streams both in the eastern and western regions of the U.S. A novel AMD treatment process based on limestone based on limestone neutralization has been dev...

  18. Colorado Commission on Higher Education Report to the General Assembly: Teach Colorado Grant Final Evaluation, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is prepared pursuant to Colorado Revised Statute Section 23-3.3-901 to describe the monies allocated as part of the 2009-2010 Teach Colorado Grant Initiative and how the scholarships met the intent of the initiative. Senate Bill 08-133 established the Teach Colorado Grant Initiative (TCGI) to give financial incentives to college…

  19. Grand Junction Resource Area, Resource Management Plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for the 2.0-million-acre Grand Junction Planning Area, located in west-central Colorado. Under the preferred alternative, existing withdrawals from mineral location on 124,442 acres would continue and an additional 154,067 acres would be withdrawn. Approximately 14,100 acres would be identified as unsuitable for further coal leasing. Approximately 624,701 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing without stipulations; 685,603 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing with stipulations; and 149,087 acres would be closed to oil and gas leasing. Air quality enhancement, soil stabilization, and watershed protection would be emphasized. Habitats of major wildlife species and of threatened and endangered plants and animals would be actively managed, but no new livestock management actions would be implemented. The wild horse herd would be allowed to expand from 65 to 120 animals. Paleontological sites and 11,685 archaeological sites would be protected. Approximately 1319 acres of commercial forest land would be identified as suitable for management, and 2800 cords of fuel wood would be offered for sale annually. The three existing developed recreation sites would be maintained, and the Mud Springs site would be expanded to accommodate more group use.

  20. Enhanced Drought Monitoring in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doesken, N.; Smith, R.; Ryan, W.; Schwalbe, Z.; Verdin, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of the National Integrated Drought Information System's Upper Colorado River Basin pilot project, an aggressive collaborative drought monitoring and communication process was initiated in 2010. Weekly climate, drought and water supply assessments were begun which included webinars during critical times of the year -- primarily late January through mid summer. A diverse set of stakeholders ranging from ski area operators, river commissioners, state and federal agency representatives, public land managers, municipal water providers, agricultural interests and media from a 3-state area were invited to participate along with National Weather Service forecast office personal, state climate office representatives and other information providers. The process evolved to become a weekly drought monitoring "committee" providing detailed input to the U.S. Drought Monitor national author. In 2012 this new system was put to the test as dry winter conditions exploded into extreme and widespread drought as the normal spring storms failed to materialize and instead long-duration above average temperatures added evaporative stress to the already limited water supplies. This presentation examines this effort with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement. The overall impact of the 2012 drought appears, so far, to be less than what was experienced in 2002 although measured stream flow appears tp be similar. To what extent this could be attributed to the enhanced drought monitoring and communication will be discussed. The sustainability of this aggressive monitoring effort will also be assessed.

  1. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  2. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression. ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section...

  3. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression. ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section...

  4. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression. ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression. ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section...

  6. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression. ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section...

  7. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  8. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  9. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  10. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  11. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  12. 76 FR 17444 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... Ruin had multiple owners, including private citizens and the State of New Mexico. It is not known if... with the human remains should contact Bridget Ambler, Curator of Material Culture, Colorado...

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  14. Fossilization Processes in Thermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry; Desmarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    To create a comparative framework for the study of ancient examples, we have been carrying out parallel studies of the microbial biosedimentology, taphonomy and geochemistry of modem and sub-Recent thermal spring deposits. One goal of the research is the development of integrated litho- and taphofacies models for siliceous and travertline sinters. Thermal springs are regarded as important environments for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth, and we seek to utilize information from the fossil record to reconstruct the evolution of high temperature ecosystems. Microbial contributions to the fabric of thermal spring sinters occur when population growth rates keep pace with, or exceed rates of inorganic precipitation, allowing for the development of continuous biofilms or mats. In siliceous thermal springs, microorganisms are typically entombed while viable. Modes of preservation reflect the balance between rates of organic matter degradation, silica precipitation and secondary infilling. Subaerial sinters are initially quite porous and permeable and at temperatures higher than about 20 C, organic materials are usually degraded prior to secondary infilling of sinter frameworks. Thus, organically-preserved microfossils are rare and fossil information consists of characteristic biofabrics formed by the encrustation and underplating of microbial mat surfaces. This probably accounts for the typically low total organic carbon values observed in thermal spring deposits. In mid-temperature, (approx. 35 - 59 C) ponds and outflows, the surface morphology of tufted Phormidium mats is preserved through mat underplating by thin siliceous: crusts. Microbial taxes lead to clumping of ceils and/or preferred filament orientations that together define higher order composite fabrics in thermal spring stromatolites (e.g. network, coniform, and palisade). At lower temperatures (less than 35 C), Calothrix mats cover shallow terracette pools forming flat carpets or pustular

  15. Meeting report - TGF-β superfamily: signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying E; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    The latest advances on the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways were reported at the July 2013 FASEB Summer Research Conference 'The TGF-β Superfamily: Development and Disease'. The meeting was held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA at 6700 feet above sea level in the Rocky Mountains. This was the seventh biannual meeting in the series. In attendance were investigators from a broad range of disciplines with a common interest in the mechanics of TGF-β and BMP signaling pathways, their normal developmental and homeostatic functions, and the diseases associated with pathway misregulation. PMID:24172535

  16. Microwave signatures of snow and fresh water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Wilheit, T. T.; Gloersen, P.; Meier, M. F.; Frank, D.; Dirmhirn, I.

    1973-01-01

    During March of 1971, the NASA Convair 990 Airborne Observatory carrying microwave radiometers in the wavelength range 0.8 to 21 cm was flown over dry snow with different substrata: Lake ice at Bear Lake in Utah; wet soil in the Yampa River Valley near Steamboat Springs, Colorado; and glacier ice, firm and wet snow on the South Cascade Glacier in Washington. The data presented indicate that the transparency of the snow cover is a function of wavelength. False-color images of microwave brightness temperatures obtained from a scanning radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm demonstrate the capability of scanning radiometers for mapping snowfields.

  17. Colorado Oral History Projects: A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whistler, Nancy, Comp.

    More than 100 oral history projects in the state of Colorado are described. Information was collected from public libraries, historical societies, public schools, colleges, and universities in order to develop a statewide "locator file" of oral history tapes. This directory lists only those projects which have interview tapes and related oral…

  18. KidsCount in Colorado! 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. Indicators are presented in the general areas of demographics, abuse and neglect, child health, family issues, and teen issues. The statistical portrait is based on 16 indicators of well-being: (1) confirmed incidents of child abuse and neglect;…

  19. KidsCount in Colorado! 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staberg, Christine

    This Kids Count report examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The statistical portrait is based on 12 indicators of well-being: (1) infant mortality; (2) low birth weight births; (3) immunizations; (4) child poverty; (5) early prenatal care; (6) child abuse deaths; (7) health insurance; (8) paternity…

  20. KidsCount in Colorado! 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Jenifer

    This Kids Count report examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The statistical portrait is based on 24 indicators of well-being: (1) children receiving AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent children); (2) children receiving TANF; (3) children qualifying for free lunch; (4) children in out-of-home placements;…

  1. KidsCount in Colorado! 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staberg, Christine

    This Kids Count report examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The statistical portrait is based on 12 indicators of well-being: (1) infant mortality; (2) low birth weight births; (3) immunizations; (4) child poverty; (5) early prenatal care; (6) child abuse deaths; (7) health insurance; (8) paternity…

  2. KidsCount in Colorado! 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly R.

    This 1994 Kids Count report focuses on risk-taking behaviors among Colorado adolescents and discusses how prevention and early intervention strategies can impact the lives of the state's children. Statistics and descriptions are given for: (1) alcohol, tobacco, and drug use; (2) teen sexuality, including sexual activity and teen pregnancy and…

  3. KidsCount in Colorado! 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shanna

    This 1997 Kids Count report examines challenges to Colorado children and youth and how prevention and early intervention can enhance their well-being. The report includes a summary of recent research on brain development and the importance of early experience and stimulation in early intervention programs. The levels of state funding for various…

  4. Colorado Career Information System. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Colorado Career Information Center.

    Covering the period from October 1, 1975, to September 30, 1976, this annual report contains information on the Colorado Career Information System's (COCIS) administration and organization, information development, delivery vehicle, and marketing and field services. (COCIS is an on-line computerized career information system that has been…

  5. Is Colorado's Voucher System Worth Vouching for?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    In 2004 Colorado passed legislation enacting the nation's first voucher-based approach to financing higher education, known as the College Opportunity Fund (COF). The work of an unusual coalition that included higher education leaders, generally conservative policymakers, and others, COF completely replaced the traditional approach of subsidizing…

  6. Providing Location Information for Colorado Library Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Karl M., Jr.

    This report examines the feasibility of developing a Colorado statewide union data base to support cataloging, acquisitions, and interlibrary loan functions. It concludes that any data base developed should focus on providing location information for the state's library materials to support patron access to available resources. The title location…

  7. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Colorado students showed gains in reading at the proficient level for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were slight declines or flat trends for almost all subgroups at the advanced level in reading. In math, gains were…

  8. Bats of the Colorado oil shale region

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.B. Jr.; Caire, W.; Wilhelm, D.E.

    1984-10-31

    New records for Myotis californicus, M. evotis, M. leibii, M. lucifugus, M. thysanodes, M. volans, M. yumanensis, Lasionycteris noctivagans, Pipistrellus hesperus, Eptesicus fuscus, Lasiurus cinereus, Plecotus townsendii, and Antrozous pallidus and their habitat occurrence in northwestern Colorado are reported. Mortality of 27 bats of six species trapped in an oil sludge pit is described. 7 references.

  9. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ, and areas with temperature equal to 1σ to 2σ, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. The Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speece, Susan

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of the water quality of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon was made, using the following parameters: dissolved oxygen, water temperature, hydrogen ion concentration, total dissolved solids, turbidity, and ammonium/nitrogen levels. These parameters were used to provide some clue as to the "wellness" and stability of the aquatic…

  11. Career Education Activities in Colorado Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Stephen, Ed.

    This collection of articles deals with various career educational activities that inform students about the concept of career education as well as activities related to the specific fields of career education study in higher education. The publication is a result of a study of the involvement of Colorado institutions of higher learning in career…

  12. Understanding Mill Levy Stabilization in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2007

    2007-01-01

    On March 13, 2007, Governor Bill Ritter and state Senator Sue Windels announced a proposal they call the "Colorado Children's Amendment." This proposal would "freeze," or stabilize, local property tax mill levies for general education to maintain local funding for public K-12 education. As overall costs for K-12 education grow, and as the state…

  13. Discover a Watershed: The Colorado Educators Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This engaging, informative "Educators Guide" provides detailed background information about the Colorado Watershed. Its reference section contains 25 science-based, multidisciplinary, hands-on activities that teach about hydrology, geography, geology, ecology, tribes, history, cultures, economics, management issues and resource stewardship. In…

  14. Bilingual Bicultural Education: The Colorado Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Lawrence A.; Goldsmith, Ross

    Because a lack of adequate data eliminated the possibility of using control groups or historical comparison groups, Colorado's procedure for evaluating state bilingual/bicultural programs was designed to determine whether children in the bilingual program (K-3) had learned more than they would have learned if they had not been in the program. A…

  15. KidsCount in Colorado! 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines statewide, countywide, and citywide trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. Following a brief foreword, the report presents state data and city data for 15 major cities in the form of a report card. The report cards relay: demographic data related to number of children by age and race; indicators of child…

  16. Colorado Agriculture Education Tech Prep Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This guide is intended to provide local agricultural education tech prep programs throughout Colorado with a framework for updating their own curriculum and developing articulation with postsecondary institutions. First, a primer to standards-based education explains the role of the following items in standards-based education in agriculture: (1)…

  17. The Colorado Plateau: High, Wide, and Windswept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Bibi; Brook, Richard; Fischman, Shelly; Jacobson, LouAnn; Smith, Shelley; Tisdale, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Explores the natural forces that created the Colorado Plateau, examines a few of the myriad plants and animals inhabiting the six life zones on the plateau, and provides an overview of the challenges faced by land managers seeking to care for the plateau's extraordinary life and land forms. Contains 17 references. (WRM)

  18. 78 FR 61441 - Colorado Disaster #CO-00066

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00066 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite...

  19. 78 FR 47816 - Colorado Disaster #CO-00061

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00061 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  20. 78 FR 47815 - Colorado Disaster # CO-00060

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00060 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  1. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406...

  2. Logistics Handbook, 1976. Colorado Outward Bound School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Outward Bound School, Denver.

    Logistics, a support mission, is vital to the successful operation of the Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) courses. Logistics is responsible for purchasing, maintaining, transporting, and replenishing a wide variety of items, i.e., food, mountaineering and camping equipment, medical and other supplies, and vehicles. The Logistics coordinator…

  3. Colorado Outdoor Education Center Teacher's Field Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Outdoor Education Center, Inc., Florissant.

    The Colorado Outdoor Education Center aims to educate the total person by offering programs which help each individual to gain a sense of the earth, of community, and of self. At High Trails the students are brought into direct contact with nature, utilizing small groups and emphasizing direct experiences. The integrated, multi-disciplinary…

  4. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Denver, Colorado, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  5. Colorado's Response to Defense Department Base Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartgow, Jerome F.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the conversion of Colorado's Lowry Air Force Base from a military training center to a multifaceted educational center. Discusses key components of the center, including an electronic arts associate degree program, a multimedia production facility, advanced machining and manufacturing, graduate and undergraduate courses, and National…

  6. 40 CFR 81.306 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.306 Colorado... Transportation Planing Study Area as defined in 1989. Beginning near the Town of Palmer Lake, at the Northwest...) Unclassifiable/Attainment El Paso County (part) Area other than Urban Transportation Planning Study Area...

  7. 40 CFR 81.306 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.306 Colorado... Transportation Planing Study Area as defined in 1989. Beginning near the Town of Palmer Lake, at the Northwest...) Unclassifiable/Attainment El Paso County (part) Area other than Urban Transportation Planning Study Area...

  8. 40 CFR 81.306 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.306 Colorado.... Beginning near the Town of Palmer Lake, at the Northwest corner of the Study Area at a point on the El Paso... County (part) Area other than Urban Transportation Planning Study Area as defined in 1989 Park...

  9. The Effectiveness of Colorado's TASC Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Stephen J.; Klebe, Kelli J.; Arens, Sheila A.; Durham, Robert L.; Hughes, Joel; Moor, Candace J.; O'Keefe, Maureen; Phillips, Janis; Sarno, Julie A.; Stommel, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of Colorado's Treatment Alternatives to Street Crime (TASC) program in reducing recidivism rates. Two studies were conducted to investigate parolees' (N=536) return to prison. Results did not demonstrate the effectiveness of TASC: TASC participants did not have a lower recidivism when compared to nonparticipants. (RJM)

  10. Public acceptance of wildlife trapping in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manfredo, M.J.; Pierce, C.L.; Fulton, D.; Pate, J.; Gill, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    In November 1994, the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) initiated a stakeholder process to develop trapping regulations that would seek to achieve compromise among divergent interests. A telephone survey was conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the Colorado public's acceptance of trapping. A random sample of 900 residents, stratified by geographic region, indicated that the public would vote to ban trapping and that they believed the ban would eliminate a cruel activity and help to preserve endangered wildlife. Most, however, agreed that trapping was acceptable to prevent spread of disease and to protect livestock, but unacceptable on the basis of providing recreation or making money. Beliefs about trapping were found to be rooted in a protection versus use value orientation about wildlife. The regulations subsequently adopted by the CDOW were consistent with survey findings; however, the regulatory process was bypassed by legislative action, giving trapping authority to the Colorado Department of Agriculture. In response, citizen activists succeeded in placing a ballot initiative before voters. In 1996, the ballot initiative passed, banning trapping in Colorado.

  11. Colorado Preschool Program: 2003-2004 Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) provides funding to establish quality early childhood education programs that serve children eligible to enroll in kindergarten the following year. A vital component of CPP is to strengthen families and support them as participants in their child's education. District Councils made up of representatives of key…

  12. Colorado Outward Bound School River Rafters' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachman, Mark

    Instructional sequences, safety rules, duties of crew members, and procedures for Colorado Outward Bound School river rafting trips are summarized in this manual. Designed to acquaint instructors with the duties expected of them on the trips, the information in the manual is presented in outline form and is intended for those with prior river…

  13. Colorado Academic Library Master Plan. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Claude, Jr., Ed.; Moore, Beverly, Ed.

    This master plan for Colorado academic libraries assesses current strengths and weaknesses of public and private academic libraries in the state and forecasts the role of academic libraries in support of higher education. The plan consists of a series of recommendations divided into six related and overlapping sections: access, collection…

  14. Southern Colorado State College Teacher Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquibel, Antonio A.

    Occurring in six elementary schools in Pueblo, the Teacher Corps Program at Southern Colorado State College features the following components: a) a cross-cultural component for all participants; b) a community-based component designed to assist the community to participate in educational decision making; c) a 2-year undergraduate, field- and…

  15. The Dependence of the Spring Constant in the Linear Range on Spring Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Viridi, Sparisoma; Widayani; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    In basic physics laboratories, springs are normally used to determine both spring constants and the Earth's gravitational acceleration. Students generally do not notice that the spring constant is not a universal constant, but depends on the spring parameters. This paper shows and verifies that the spring constant in the linear range is inversely…

  16. Multi-Target Calibration with a VIC Hydrologic Model: Impacts of Climate Change and Risk Assessment in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, S.; Isenstein, L.; Yang, Y. C. E.; Brown, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is applied to the headwaters of the Arkansas River (Colorado Springs) in the USA for the purpose of water supply evaluation. Modeling the hydrologic regime of the Arkansas River is a challenge due to the large number of diversions and regulations that might impact the natural streamflow. Since the Arkansas River headwaters are snow-melt dominated, a snow cover dataset can provide additional information during the model calibration process. Remote sensing snow data have been successfully used in previous studies coupled with hydrologic modeling to improve calibration results. Using the daily snow data acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite, and this study tests different calibration schemes to determine the most suitable calibration target(s) for the Colorado Springs. First, the VIC model is calibrated to streamflow and snow alone, and then a mutli-objective optimization is utilized to calibrate the model to streamflow and snow simultaneously. A well calibrated hydrologic model can be employed particularly for climate change assessments to inform decision makers about water availability and water supply under different climate conditions. This study will provide such information to Colorado Springs in which development in terms of water supply is expected to grow considerably; increases in demands are projected to be 28% higher than the present demands (approximately 102 billion gallons) by the year 2050.

  17. Regulation of an Actin Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Barney; Shin, Jennifer; Brau, Ricardo; Lang, Matthew; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-03-01

    To produce motion, cells rely on the conversion of potential energy into mechanical work. One such example is the dramatic process involving the acrosome reaction of Limulus sperm, whereby a 60 μm-long bundle of actin filaments straightens from a coiled conformation to extend out of the cell in five seconds. This cellular engine and the motion it produces represent a third type of actin-based motility fundamentally different from polymerization or myosin-driven processes. The motive force for this extension originates from stored elastic energy in the overtwisted, pre-formed coil---much like a compressed mechanical spring. When the actin bundle untwists, this energy is converted to mechanical work powering the extension. We report on experiments probing the regulation of this actin spring by extracellular calcium. We find that extracellular calcium needs to be present for the spring to activate, and that calcium regulates the velocity of the extension.

  18. Bouncing dynamics of a spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, M.; Ludewig, F.; Dorbolo, S.; Vandewalle, N.

    2014-04-01

    We consider the dynamics of a deformable object bouncing on an oscillating plate and we propose to model its deformations. For this purpose, we use a spring linked to a damper. Elastic properties and viscous effects are taken into account. From the bouncing spring equations of motion, we emphasize the relevant parameters of the dynamics. We discuss the range of parameters in which elastic deformations do not influence the bouncing dynamics of this object and compare this behavior with the bouncing ball dynamics. By calculating the spring bouncing threshold, we evidence the effect of resonance and prove that elastic properties can make the bounce easier. This effect is for example encountered in the case of bouncing droplets. We also consider bifurcation diagrams in order to describe the consequences of a dependence on the frequency. Finally, hysteresis in the dynamics is presented.

  19. Tracking transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter using fluorescence spectroscopy at Rifle vadose zone, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Gilbert, B.; Kim, Y.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the most mobile and active form of natural organic matter. It plays important roles in terrestrial C transport and biogeochemical cycles. Its reactivity makes it sensitive to seasonal variations and climate change. The objective of this study is to investigate the transport and transformation of DOM by tracking the spatial and seasonal variations of DOM concentrations and characteristics throughout the vadose zone and groundwater within a semi-arid floodplain at Rifle, Colorado. Three sets of vertically stratified pore water samplers were installed along a groundwater flow transect, and allowed collection of temporally resolved pore water samples from different depths. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was used to trace changes in DOM characteristics. The humification index (HIX) was applied to evaluate variations in humification extent of DOM. EEM analysis identified fulvic-like, humic-like, tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances as the major fluorescent components of DOM in pore waters. Tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like compounds are typically considered as the recent microbial by-products, and they showed higher concentrations in the deeper vadose zone in late spring, and decrease from spring to winter. HIX values are smaller within the deeper vadose zone (1.5 ̶ 3.5 m) than in the overlying 1.0 m soil water and underlying groundwater samples (≥ 3.5 m), suggesting that some non- or less-humified DOM (or "fresh" microbial-derived DOM) was transferred during late spring. HIX value at each depth increased continuously from late spring to winter, with rapid humification occurring in late spring to early summer. These results suggest an annual cycle in which less humified soil organic matter is transferred into the deeper vadose zone during snowmelt/rainfall events, and then humified further through microbial transformation.

  20. Spring for It: First Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  1. A Breath of Spring Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The most promising sights of spring in Nebraska this year were two conferences for women. One event, sponsored by Metropolitan Community College in Omaha, was a Women's History Month Tea. A second conference was the meeting of the Nebraska Women in Higher Education. These two events suggest that there is a continuing interest in women's leadership…

  2. NOVA Spring 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Ransick, Kristina; Recio, Belinda

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Surviving AIDS"; (2) "Secrets of Making Money"; (3) "Escape!: Fire"; (4) "Escape!: Car Crash"; (5) "Volcanoes of the Deep"; and (6) "Odyssey of Life: Part 1. The Ultimate Journey". It provides activity…

  3. Registration of 'Rollag' spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) (caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe) is a disease that annually threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in the northern plains of the United States. Resistance to this disease is a high priority trait in the University of Minnesota’s spring wheat breedi...

  4. Research Synopsis: Spring 1983 Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    An analysis of spring 1983 retention rates and grade distributions within the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) revealed: (1) College of Alameda had the highest successful retention rate in the PCCD, defined as the total of all students who completed the term with a grade of A, B, C, D, or CR (credit); (2) the PCCD's successful retention…

  5. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  6. NOVA Spring 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Gregoire, Tanya; Ransick, Kristina; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lost on Everest"; (2) "Lost Tribes of Israel"; (3) "Crocodiles"; (4) "Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude"; (5) "Global Warming"; and (6) "Secrets of Lost Empires". It provides activity set-ups related to…

  7. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  8. Community Needs Assessment, Spring 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis-Rounds, Jan

    In Spring 1982, a districtwide survey was conducted by Cerritos College (CC) to assess the educational needs of the surrounding community. Residents were asked to provide demographic information and respond to questions about their awareness of the college, their perception and evaluation of various CC roles, and their preferences for courses and…

  9. Finding Spring on Planet X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    For a given orbital period and eccentricity, we determine the maximum time lapse between the winter solstice and the spring equinox on a planet. In addition, given an axial precession path, we determine the effects on the seasons. This material can be used at various levels to illustrate ideas such as periodicity, eccentricity, polar coordinates,…

  10. Carnivorous arthropods after spring flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring flooding is a common practice in Wisconsin cranberries, but flooding as insect control produces variable results among marshes. This project is aimed at figuring out why it works, and why it sometimes doesn’t. We have focused on tracking arthropod populations to explain the observed patterns ...

  11. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  12. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2σ, and areas with temperature equal to 1σ to 2σ, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth

  13. Water-resources investigations in Dinosaur National Monument, Utah-Colorado, fiscal year 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumsion, C.T.

    1971-01-01

    Water-resources data were acquired during fiscal year 1970 by the U.S. Geological Survey at Dinosaur National Monument, Utah-Colorado, for the U.S. National Park Service as part of a continuing project. The data provide a basis for planning the development, management, and use of available water resources to provide adequate water supplies. Thirty-one springs, 19 in relatively inaccessible areas, were evaluated as sources of water supplies. Seven potential well sites were evaluated for drilling depths in specific aquifers. A well drilled in Echo Park near the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers was tested. The pumping test showed the well to yield 130 gallons per minute with a drawdown of 1.96 feet; specific capacity of the well at 130 gallons per minute is 66 gallons per minute per foot. Water samples for chemical analysis were collected from nine springs and one well; all except that from Disappointment Spring, were of good chemical quality.

  14. Phenology and climate relationships in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forest and woodland communities of southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, Gretchen A.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Evelsizer, Ross J.; Vogelmann, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) occurs over wide geographical, latitudinal, elevational, and environmental gradients, making it a favorable candidate for a study of phenology and climate relationships. Aspen forests and woodlands provide numerous ecosystem services, such as high primary productivity and biodiversity, retention and storage of environmental variables (precipitation, temperature, snow–water equivalent) that affect the spring and fall phenology of the aspen woodland communities of southwestern Colorado. We assessed the land surface phenology of aspen woodlands using two phenology indices, start of season time (SOST) and end of season time (EOST), from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database of conterminous U.S. phenological indicators over an 11-year time period (2001–2011). These indicators were developed with 250 m resolution remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer processed to highlight vegetation response. We compiled data on SOST, EOST, elevation, precipitation, air temperature, and snow water equivalent (SWE) for selected sites having more than 80% cover by aspen woodland communities. In the 11-year time frame of our study, EOST had significant positive correlation with minimum fall temperature and significant negative correlation with fall precipitation. SOST had a significant positive correlation with spring SWE and spring maximum temperature.

  15. Archaeal Nitrification in Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Daims, H.; Reigstad, L.; Wanek, W.; Wagner, M.; Schleper, C.

    2006-12-01

    Biological nitrification, i.e. the aerobic conversion of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is a major component of the global nitrogen cycle. Until recently, it was thought that the ability to aerobically oxidize ammonia was confined to bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria. However, it has recently been shown that Archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota are also capable of ammonia oxidation. As many Crenarchaeota are thermophilic or hyperthermophilic, and at least some of them are capable of ammonia oxidation we speculated on the existence of (hyper)thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Using PCR primers specifically targeting the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene, we were indeed able to confirm the presence of such organisms in several hot springs in Reykjadalur, Iceland. These hot springs exhibited temperatures well above 80 °C and pH values ranging from 2.0 to 4.5. To proof that nitrification actually took place under these extreme conditions, we measured gross nitrification rates by the isotope pool dilution method; we added 15N-labelled nitrate to the mud and followed the dilution of the label by nitrate production from ammonium either in situ (incubation in the hot spring) or under controlled conditions in the laboratory (at 80 °C). The nitrification rates in the hot springs ranged from 0.79 to 2.22 mg nitrate-N per L of mud and day. Controls, in which microorganisms were killed before the incubations, demonstrated that the nitrification was of biological origin. Addition of ammonium increased the gross nitrification rate approximately 3-fold, indicating that the nitrification was ammonium limited under the conditions used. Collectively, our study provides evidence that (1) AOA are present in hot springs and (2) that they are actively nitrifying. These findings have major implications for our understanding of nitrogen cycling of hot environments.

  16. Late Cenozoic Colorado River Incision and Implications for Neogene Uplift of the Colorado Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, A.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Kirby, E.; Heizler, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Basalt flows and volcanic ashes serve as a datum for calculating post-10 Ma river incision rates in western Colorado. The main picture that emerges from the data is one of regional variability of incision rates, which we hypothesize to reflect differential uplift of the Colorado Rockies during the Neogene. Maximum rates (90-180 m/Ma) and magnitudes (750-1500 m) of river incision are recorded between Grand Mesa and Glenwood Canyon, and in the Flat Tops. Minimum rates (<30 m/Ma) and magnitudes (<250 m) of river incision are associated post-Laramide normal faults within the Browns Park-Sand Wash basin in northwestern Colorado and in Middle Park of north-central Colorado. Differential uplift of the Colorado Rockies during the late Cenozoic can be inferred by comparing incision rates and magnitudes at locations upstream and downstream of knickzones. Along the Colorado River, post-10 Ma incision rates and magnitudes incision remain fairly constant (rates >100 m/Ma; magnitudes >1000 m) from Grand Mesa upstream to Gore Canyon, and then decrease markedly in Middle Park (rates <10 m/Ma; magnitudes <100 m) across the Gore Canyon knickzone. Normal-faulting of ca. 10 Ma deposits in Middle Park shows that incision rate variations partly reflect late Cenozoic faulting. Along the Yampa River, post-10 Ma incision rates and magnitudes are low (rates 15-27 m/Ma; magnitudes < 230 m) immediately upstream of Yampa Canyon, and then increase significantly (rates 96-132 m/Ma; magnitudes ~1250 m) upstream near the headwaters. We interpret this upstream increase in river incision rate and magnitude to reflect Neogene uplift of the Yampa River headwaters relative to its lower reaches. Lastly, differential late Cenozoic uplift of the Colorado Rockies is suggested by differences in the timing of regional exhumation and river incision within different drainage basins. Colorado River incision and regional exhumation occurred between 9.8 and 7.8 Ma. In contrast, Yampa River incision began between

  17. Geologic framework of thermal springs, Black Canyon, Nevada and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L. Sue; Anderson, Zachary W.; Felger, Tracey J.; Seixas, Gustav B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal springs in Black Canyon of the Colorado River, downstream of Hoover Dam, are important recreational, ecological, and scenic features of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. This report presents the results from a U.S. Geological Survey study of the geologic framework of the springs. The study was conducted in cooperation with the National Park Service and funded by both the National Park Service and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The report has two parts: A, a 1:48,000-scale geologic map created from existing geologic maps and augmented by new geologic mapping and geochronology; and B, an interpretive report that presents results based on a collection of fault kinematic data near springs within Black Canyon and construction of 1:100,000-scale geologic cross sections that extend across the western Lake Mead region. Exposures in Black Canyon are mostly of Miocene volcanic rocks, underlain by crystalline basement composed of Miocene plutonic rocks or Proterozoic metamorphic rocks. The rocks are variably tilted and highly faulted. Faults strike northwest to northeast and include normal and strike-slip faults. Spring discharge occurs along faults intruded by dacite dikes and plugs; weeping walls and seeps extend away from the faults in highly fractured rock or relatively porous volcanic breccias, or both. Results of kinematic analysis of fault data collected along tributaries to the Colorado River indicate two episodes of deformation, consistent with earlier studies. The earlier episode formed during east-northeast-directed extension, and the later during east-southeast-directed extension. At the northern end of the study area, pre-existing fault blocks that formed during the first episode were rotated counterclockwise along the left-lateral Lake Mead Fault System. The resulting fault pattern forms a complex arrangement that provides both barriers and pathways for groundwater movement within and around Black

  18. Gunnison, Colorado subpile study report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    To protect human health and the environment, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project will remediate the uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison Colorado. There are explicit requirements (i.e., 40 CFR Part 192) for the surface remediation of radiologically contaminated soils on UMTRA sites. The removal of subpile sediment to the depth required by 40 CFR Part 192 will leave in place deeper foundation sediment that is contaminated with hazardous constituents other than radium-226 and thorium-230. The Department of Energy and the Colorado Department of Health have questioned whether this contaminated soil could potentially act as a continuing source of ground water contamination even after surface remediation based on 40 CFR Part 192 is complete. To evaluate the subpile sediments as a potential source of ground water contamination, the Gunnison Subpile study was initiated. This report summarizes the results and findings of this study.

  19. MOUNT ZIRKEL WILDERNESS AND VICINITY, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    Several areas of metallic and nonmetallic mineralization have been identified from surface occurrences within the Mount Zirkel Wilderness and vicinity, Colorado. Three areas of probable copper-lead-zinc-silver-gold resource potential, two areas of probable chrome-platinum resource potential, four areas of probable uranium-thorium resource potential, two areas of probable molybdenum resource potential, and one area of probable fluorspar potential were identified. No potential for fossil fuel or geothermal resources was identified.

  20. Green pricing: A Colorado case study

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, E.; Udall, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    A model program for green pricing targeted primarily at large customers is proposed in this paper. The program would create a partnership between a local community group, a renewables advocacy group, and several Colorado utilities. The first part of the paper summarizes pertinent background issues, including utility experience with green pricing programs. The rest of the paper outlines the program proposal, focusing primarily on organizational structure.

  1. West Needle Wilderness study area, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loenen, R.E.; Scott, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The West Needle Wilderness study area, southwestern Colorado, was evaluated for mineral-resource potential in 1982. An area extending westward into the wilderness near the Elk Park mine, has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium. Uranium resources, and associated silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper, are located at the Elk Park mine, directly adjacent to the eastern study area boundary. No potential for other mineral or energy resources was identified in this study.

  2. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-27

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  3. Triangular springs for modeling nonlinear membranes.

    PubMed

    Delingette, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a formal connexion between springs and continuum mechanics in the context of one-dimensional and two-dimensional elasticity. In a first stage, the equivalence between tensile springs and the finite element discretization of stretching energy on planar curves is established. Furthermore, when considering a quadratic strain function of stretch, we introduce a new type of springs called tensile biquadratic springs. In a second stage, we extend this equivalence to non-linear membranes (St Venant-Kirchhoff materials) on triangular meshes leading to triangular biquadratic and quadratic springs. Those tensile and angular springs produce isotropic deformations parameterized by Young modulus and Poisson ratios on unstructured meshes in an efficient and simple way. For a specific choice of the Poisson ratio, 0.3, we show that regular spring-mass models may be used realistically to simulate a membrane behavior. Finally, the different spring formulations are tested in pure traction and cloth simulation experiments.

  4. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... considered the top.) Broken springs not exceeding these requirements may be repaired by applying clips providing the clips can be made to remain in place; (2) Any spring with leaves excessively shifting in...

  5. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... considered the top.) Broken springs not exceeding these requirements may be repaired by applying clips providing the clips can be made to remain in place; (2) Any spring with leaves excessively shifting in...

  6. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be... unsafe flight characteristics....

  7. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be... unsafe flight characteristics....

  8. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be... unsafe flight characteristics....

  9. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be... unsafe flight characteristics....

  10. 75 FR 3917 - Notice of Public Meeting, Northwest Colorado Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... meeting. ADDRESSES: The Northwest Colorado RAC meeting will be held in Silt, Colorado, at the BLM Field... Frontage Road, Silt, CO, (970) 876-9008. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Northwest Colorado RAC advises...

  11. 76 FR 63600 - Notice of Meeting of the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee; Federal Lands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Forest Service Notice of Meeting of the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act AGENCY: Rocky Mountain Region, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Meeting of the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Colorado Recreation Resource...

  12. 75 FR 23288 - Notice of Public Meeting, Southwest Colorado Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... will be held on June 4, 2010, in Dolores, Colorado; August 13, 2010, in Gunnison, Colorado; and October... 184, Dolores, Colorado 81323; August 13, 2010, at the Holiday Inn Express at 910 E. Tomichi,...

  13. Streamflow gains and losses in the Colorado River in northwestern Burnet and southeastern San Saba Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braun, Christopher L.; Grzyb, Scott D.

    2015-08-12

    During the spring 2014 gain-loss survey, 11 reaches were combined into 3 in an attempt to consolidate gains and losses as well as group reaches within the same hydrogeologic units. An unverifiable loss was measured in the reach farthest upstream, which crosses a combination of alluvium and Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer outcrop, whereas an unverifiable gain was measured in the middle reach, which crosses each of the different hydrogeologic units represented in the study area. The reach farthest downstream crosses an area where only the Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer crops out; a streamflow gain of 123 ft3/s was measured in this reach, exceeding the potential error of 93.9 ft3/s. The verifiable streamflow gain in this downstream reach implies the Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer was discharging groundwater to the Colorado River in this part of the study area under the hydrologic conditions of the spring 2014 gain-loss survey.

  14. Radioactive springs geochemical data related to uranium exploration: basic data and use of multivariate factor scores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert Allen; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive springs and wells at 33 localities in the States of Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico have been studied and sampled to obtain geochemical data to determine whether such data are useful in a uranium exploration program. Most samples were collected from mineral-rich springs probably related to hydrothermal systems of various ages. Two sets of data were obtained, the first based on the chemical composition and physical and chemical properties of spring and ground water, and the second based on the chemical composition of mineral precipitates deposited by radioactive springs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the water data suggests four major geochemical factors affecting the 23 parameters measured. These factors were labeled as total dissolved solids, alkalinity, temperature, and Fe-U concentration. Multivariate statistical analysis of the precipitate data suggests five factors affecting the 32 element values measured. These factors were labeled as mineral contamination, Mn precipitation, Fe-As-Be precipitation, heavy metals precipitation, and Ba-Ra precipitation. Relative intensities of the geochemical processes represented by the factors were computed using factor scores. Sample localities were ranked on the basis of relative intensities, and the five localities with the highest intensities were selected as being the most favorable for more intensive exploration for uranium. Immediate use of such selection would be experimental because of the lack of industry experience at this time in the exploration of active hydrothermal systems for uranium.

  15. Chemical and Aerosol Signatures of Biomass Burning via Long Range Transport observed at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; Obrist, D.; McCubbin, I. B.; Fain, X.; Rahn, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort in Colorado at an elevation 3.2 km. During the spring of 2008, two field projects were conducted at SPL; Storm Peak Cloud and Aerosol Characterization (SPACC) and a State of Colorado Mercury Monitoring project. Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), along with CO, ozone and aerosol concentrations and aerosol size distributions will be presented from April 28 to July 1st 2008. This work focuses on specific case studies pertaining to long range transport events. Specifically, high levels of GEM and CO will be presented from May 15, 2008. This data will be coupled with HYSPLIT backtrajectories, chemical modeling via MOZART, and satellite imagery (MODIS) to present evidence that Siberian wildfires impacted the air quality at Storm Peak Laboratory.

  16. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  17. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  18. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must...

  19. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  20. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  1. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  2. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  3. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  4. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  5. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  6. Geochemistry of Standard Mine Waters, Gunnison County, Colorado, July 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Manning, Andrew H.; Graves, Jeffrey T.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Todorov, Todor; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    In many hard-rock-mining districts water flowing from abandoned mine adits is a primary source of metals to receiving streams. Understanding the generation of adit discharge is an important step in developing remediation plans. In 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency listed the Standard Mine in the Elk Creek drainage basin near Crested Butte, Colorado as a superfund site because drainage from the Standard Mine enters Elk Creek, contributing dissolved and suspended loads of zinc, cadmium, copper, and other metals to the stream. Elk Creek flows into Coal Creek, which is a source of drinking water for the town of Crested Butte. In 2006 and 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook a hydrogeologic investigation of the Standard Mine and vicinity and identified areas of the underground workings for additional work. Mine drainage, underground-water samples, and selected spring water samples were collected in July 2009 for analysis of inorganic solutes as part of a follow-up study. Water analyses are reported for mine-effluent samples from Levels 1 and 5 of the Standard Mine, underground samples from Levels 2 and 3 of the Standard Mine, two spring samples, and an Elk Creek sample. Reported analyses include field measurements (pH, specific conductance, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and redox potential), major constituents and trace elements, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic determinations. Overall, water samples collected in 2009 at the same sites as were collected in 2006 have similar chemical compositions. Similar to 2006, water in Level 3 did not flow out the portal but was observed to flow into open workings to lower parts of the mine. Many dissolved constituent concentrations, including calcium, magnesium, sulfate, manganese, zinc, and cadmium, in Level 3 waters substantially are lower than in Level 1 effluent. Concentrations of these dissolved constituents in water samples collected from Level 2 approach or exceed concentrations of Level 1 effluent

  7. FOSSIL SPRINGS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L.S.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on field studies, the Fossil Springs Roadless Area in central Arizona is concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Rocks in the Supai Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) near the central part of the roadless area contain widespread but spotty copper mineralization and trace amounts of uranium. Analyses obtained during the study define geochemical anomalies in two portions of the area that remain unexplained. The suites of anomalous metals suggest the possibility of hydrothermal veins and the presence of ultramafic rocks; neither were found in the field. Although there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Fossil Springs Roadless Area, studies to identify the source of the geochemical anomalies could have valuable implications for regional studies and mineral exploration in the surrounding area.

  8. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  9. VGP highlights of Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    Two special events of interest to Union and VGP section members will take place on Tuesday afternoon, May 25, during AGU's Spring Meeting in Baltimore.R. A. Daly Lecture: Every section of AGU has an established “Bowie Lecture” named after a distinguished scientist associated with the work of the section. These lectures are delivered by special invitation during the annual AGU Spring or Fall meetings and are highlighted in the program. The VGP lecture is named for Reginald A. Daly, but it has never been given. Its inauguration at this year's Spring Meeting celebrates the distinguished career of this famous Harvard professor and author of the seminal Igneous Rocks and the Depths of the Earth (1914, 1933). Most fittingly, the inaugural lecture will be given by David Walker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory after a day-long Union session on discontinuities in the mantle. Dave's lecture, “Errors in Earth Evolution,” will start at 4:45 P.M. We can expect to hear an original and provocative talk that features exciting, new data.

  10. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  11. Geology and underground waters of the Arkansas Valley in eastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darton, N.H.

    1906-01-01

    For the western portion of the area the maps and texts of the Pueblo, Elmoro, Walsenburg, Spanish Peaks, and Pikes Peak folios have been utilized as far as practicable. For the central and eastern portions the larger features of the geology have been specially mapped, and considerable detailed mapping has been done in the region south and southeast of Canyon and Colorado Springs. In the field work I have been assisted by Mr. C. A. Fisher, who has examined in detail the Nepesta quadrangle and contributed numerous other data. Dr. W. S. Tangier Smith and Messrs. C. E. Sicbenthal and W. T. Lee have made observations in certain areas. Much valuable information respecting wells has been furnished by Mr. William Archer, of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, and Mr. C. H. McVay, well driller at Rocky Ford.

  12. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  14. Outbreak of Kawasaki syndrome in Denver, Colorado: association with rug and carpet cleaning.

    PubMed

    Rauch, A M; Glode, M P; Wiggins, J W; Rodriguez, J G; Hopkins, R S; Hurwitz, E S; Schonberger, L B

    1991-05-01

    Between October 1984 and January 1985, the largest outbreak of Kawasaki syndrome reported to date in the continental United States (62 cases) occurred in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, extending from Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Cheyenne, Wyoming. Fifty-two (84%) of these Kawasaki syndrome patients lived in the Denver metropolitan area. A case-control study revealed that 16 (62%) of 26 Kawasaki syndrome patients compared with 10 (20%) of 49 matched control subjects had a history of exposure to shampooed (19%) or spot-cleaned (81%) rugs or carpets within 30 days of the Kawasaki syndrome onset date (odds ratio = 5, P less than .01). The time of exposure to shampooed or spot-cleaned rugs or carpets for 9 of 10 Kawasaki syndrome patients who had a single exposure and for all 6 Kawasaki syndrome patients who had multiple exposures were clustered within an interval 13 to 30 days before the onset of illness. Although the reason for this unusually large outbreak remains obscure, it is the third in which a statistically significant association between Kawasaki syndrome and rug or carpet cleaning has been found.

  15. Reconnaissance of Colorado Front Range bogs for uranium and other elements

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Schumann, R.R.; Otton, J.K.

    1987-08-01

    Alpine bogs form along spring-fed valley floors and in steam drainages restricted by moraines, slides, and beaver dams. The bogs are generally young (Holocene) and contain a few tens of centimeters to several meters of peat and organic-rich muck. Organic matter has a great affinity for cations such as uranium; the geochemical enrichment factor between the peats and uraniferous ground water can approach 10,000 to 1. Because the bog sediments are geologically young, the uranium is in gross disequilibrium and has low radioactivity, thus it is undetectable by ground and aerial gamma surveys. Communities that derive a part of their water supplies from drainages containing uraniferous bogs face a potential health threat because the uranium is loosely bound and may easily be remobilized by ground water moving through the bogs. Reconnaissance sampling of bogs was conducted in the Colorado Front Range from the South Park area to the Colorado-Wyoming state line. Several bogs have uranium concentrations of 1000-3000 ppm, but most bogs have uranium concentrations in the 10-100 ppm range. Zinc concentrations of 100-1000 ppm are found in some bogs and many other metallic elements are present in concentrations between 10 and 100 ppm. Concentrations between 100 and 1000 ppm of some of the rare earth elements (e.g., Ce, La, Nd, Yb) were found in the Cripple Creek area.

  16. Outbreak of Kawasaki syndrome in Denver, Colorado: association with rug and carpet cleaning.

    PubMed

    Rauch, A M; Glode, M P; Wiggins, J W; Rodriguez, J G; Hopkins, R S; Hurwitz, E S; Schonberger, L B

    1991-05-01

    Between October 1984 and January 1985, the largest outbreak of Kawasaki syndrome reported to date in the continental United States (62 cases) occurred in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, extending from Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Cheyenne, Wyoming. Fifty-two (84%) of these Kawasaki syndrome patients lived in the Denver metropolitan area. A case-control study revealed that 16 (62%) of 26 Kawasaki syndrome patients compared with 10 (20%) of 49 matched control subjects had a history of exposure to shampooed (19%) or spot-cleaned (81%) rugs or carpets within 30 days of the Kawasaki syndrome onset date (odds ratio = 5, P less than .01). The time of exposure to shampooed or spot-cleaned rugs or carpets for 9 of 10 Kawasaki syndrome patients who had a single exposure and for all 6 Kawasaki syndrome patients who had multiple exposures were clustered within an interval 13 to 30 days before the onset of illness. Although the reason for this unusually large outbreak remains obscure, it is the third in which a statistically significant association between Kawasaki syndrome and rug or carpet cleaning has been found. PMID:2020511

  17. Star crossings and stone monuments-Field astronomy by the Wheeler Survey in 1870s Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, William E.

    2010-01-01

    The decade of the 1870s was a time of extensive exploration and surveying in the American West. The nation needed knowledge of the cultural features, topography, natural resources, and geology of this land to promote and aid the 'rapid development of an empire.' The need was particularly acute in the region that still was known in the early 1870s as Colorado Territory. There, cities and towns were springing up along the base of the Front Range, railroads were expanding, and in the mountains prospectors and miners were exploring the countryside seeking and extracting the region's abundant mineral resources. Also, recurring conflicts between the newcomers and Native Americans made it desirable to have accurate maps for military purposes. Four major government-sponsored scientific surveys formed the principal organized effort to provide critical knowledge of the land. Civilian scientists led three of these: John Wesley Powell ('Geographical and Topographical Survey of the Colorado River of the West'); Ferdinand V. Hayden ('Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories'); and Clarence King ('Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel'). Lt. George Montague Wheeler, a young graduate of West Point (Class of 1866) and a member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, led the fourth and most ambitious project ('United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian').

  18. Mass Wasting Following the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire near Durango, Colorado, a Field Trip Guidebook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigio, Erica R.; Blair, Robert W.; Burke, Michael; Cannon, Susan H.; deWolfe, Victor G.; Ey, John; Gartner, Joseph E.; Gillam, Mary L.; Knowlton, N.D.; Santi, Paul M.; Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    This field trip guide focuses on mass wasting following the 2002 Missionary Ridge fire near Durango, Colorado. We prepared this guide to accompany a May 4, 2006, field trip during the second Roy J. Shlemon Specialty Conference, which was held in Durango, Colorado, May 3-5. The conference, entitled Mass Wasting in Disturbed Watersheds, was sponsored by the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists (AEG) and the AEG Foundation. The objective of this Shlemon Conference was to bring together practitioners and researchers to define the current state of practice and identify unresolved problems with regard to the prediction and mitigation of mass wasting in disturbed watersheds. The one-day field trip begins and ends in Durango. Many of the field trip stops are at debris-flow fans around the periphery of the burn area, but one stop examines landslide activity in the burn area that initiated during spring 2005 snowmelt within a dormant, deep-seated landslide, as well as an erosion/debris-flow mitigation effort in a drainage basin above Lemon Reservoir. Also provided are descriptions of the Missionary Ridge fire, the geologic and climatic setting of the field-trip area, and the general effects of wildfire on watersheds.

  19. Generalized surficial geology map of the Pueblo 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, D.W.; Straub, A.W.; Berry, M.E.; Baker, M.L.; Brandt, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-three types of surficial geologic deposits and residual materials of Quaternary age are described in a pamphlet and located on a map of the greater Pueblo area, in part of the Front Range, in the Wet and Sangre de Cristo Mountains, and on the plains east of Colorado Springs and Pueblo. Deposits formed by landslides, wind, and glaciers, as well as colluvium, residuum, alluvium, and others are described in terms of predominant grain size, mineral or rock composition (e.g., gypsiferous, calcareous, granitic, andesitic), thickness, and other physical characteristics. Origins and ages of the deposits and geologic hazards related to them are noted. Many lines drawn between units on our map were placed by generalizing contacts on published maps. However, in 1997-1999 we mapped new boundaries as well. The map was projected to the UTM projection. This large map area extends from near Salida (on the west edge), eastward about 107 mi (172 km), and from Antero Reservoir and Woodland Park on the north edge to near Colorado City at the south edge (68 mi; 109 km).

  20. Evaluating Changes And Estimating Seasonal Precipitation For Colorado River Basins Using Nonparametric Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.; Stephen, H.

    2009-12-01

    Evaluating the hydrologic impacts of climate variability due to changes in precipitation has been an important and challenging task in the field of hydrology. This requires estimation of rainfall, preserving its spatial and temporal variability. The current research focuses on 1) analyzing changes (trend/step) in seasonal precipitation and 2) simulating seasonal precipitation using k-nearest neighbor (k-nn) non-parametric technique for 29 climate divisions covering the entire Colorado River Basin. The current research analyzes water year precipitation data ranging from 1900 to 2008 subdivided into four seasons i.e. autumn (October-December), winter (January-March), spring (April-June), and summer (July-September). Two statistical tests i.e., Mann Kendal and Spearman’s Rho are used to evaluate trend changes and Rank Sum test is used to identify the step change in seasonal precipitation for the selected climate divisions. The results show that changes are mostly during winter season. Eleven divisions show increase in precipitation, 6 divisions show decrease and the remaining 12 show no change in the precipitation for the period of record. A total of eight climate divisions observed changes during autumn season precipitation, with four climate divisions showing increasing and remaining four showing decreasing changes. Decreasing precipitation changes are observed for 6 divisions during spring season. In summer season, three climate divisions show increase and one division showed decrease in precipitation. The increasing precipitation changes during winter season are attributed to gradual step change, whereas the decreasing changes are due to trend changes. The decreasing precipitation changes in spring season occurred due to trend changes. The summer season changes occurred due to a gradual step change. During autumn season six divisions showed changes (3 increasing and 3 decreasing) due to a gradual step change and the remaining two divisions observed changes due

  1. The Science and Policy of the First Environmental Flows to the Colorado River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, K. W.; Kendy, E.; Schlatter, K.

    2014-12-01

    The first transboundary flow of water for the environment was delivered to the Colorado River Delta in spring of 2014. This engineered mini-spring flood of 130 million cubic meters (105,000 acre-feet) was implemented as part of Minute 319, an addition to the 1944 U.S.-Mexico Water Treaty. Minute 319 is a temporary agreement, expiring in 2017. Teams of scientists from government agencies, universities, and environmental NGOs from both the U.S. and Mexico are measuring the surface flow rates, inundation, ground water recharge, ground water levels and subsurface flows, geomorphic change, recruitment, survival and health of vegetation, and avian response to the environmental flow. Monitoring includes on-the-ground observations and measurements and remote sensing. Surface water from the pulse flow reached restoration sites, prompted germination of both native and non-native vegetation, recharged groundwater and reached the Gulf of California - the first reconnection of the Colorado River and the sea in 16 years. People in local communities joyously welcomed the return of the river; extensive media coverage was overwhelmingly positive - despite widespread drought in the West. After about ten weeks, most of the pulse flow had infiltrated the subsurface, ponded in a few cut-off meanders, or run to the sea. The river no longer flows. Monitoring of seedling survival, groundwater, vegetation and wildlife will continue through 2017. Results of this landscape-scale experiment will play a role in negotiations to renew the agreement, help model and design future flows and guide the efficient use of water for restoration in semi-arid river systems.

  2. Bats of Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado: composition, reproduction, and roosting habits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Snider, E. Apple; Valdez, Ernest W.; Ellison, Laura E.; Neubaum, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    We determined the bat fauna at Mesa Verde National Park (Mesa Verde) in 2006 and 2007, characterized bat elevational distribution and reproduction, and investigated roosting habits of selected species. We captured 1996 bats of 15 species in mist nets set over water during 120 nights of sampling and recorded echolocation calls of an additional species. The bat fauna at Mesa Verde included every species of bat known west of the Great Plains in Colorado, except the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Some species showed skewed sex ratios, primarily due to a preponderance of males. Thirteen species of bats reproduced at Mesa Verde. Major differences in spring precipitation between the 2 years of our study were associated with differences in reproductive rates and, in some species, with numbers of juveniles captured. Reduced reproductive effort during spring drought will have a greater impact on bat populations with the forecasted increase in aridity in much of western North America by models of global climate change. We radiotracked 46 bats of 5 species to roosts and describe the first-known maternity colonies of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Colorado. All 5 species that we tracked to diurnal roosts relied almost exclusively on rock crevices rather than trees or snags, despite the presence of mature forests at Mesa Verde and the use of trees for roosts in similar forests elsewhere by some of these species. Comparisons with past bat surveys at Mesa Verde and in surrounding areas suggest no dramatic evidence for effects of recent stand-replacing fires on the composition of the bat community.

  3. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment near Tassi and Pakoon Springs, western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truini, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Tassi and Pakoon Springs are both in the Grand Wash Trough in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument on the Arizona Strip. The monument is jointly managed by the National Park Service (NPS) and the Bureau of Land Management. This study was in response to NPS’s need to better understand the influence from regional increases in groundwater withdrawals near Grand Canyon-Parashant on the groundwater discharge from Tassi and Pakoon Springs. The climate of the Arizona Strip is generally semiarid to arid, and springs in the monument provide the water for the fragile ecosystems that are commonly separated by large areas of dry washes in canyons with pinyon and juniper. Available hydrogeologic data from previous investigations included water levels from the few existing wells, location information for springs, water chemistry from springs, and geologic maps. Available groundwater-elevation data from the wells and springs in the monument indicate that groundwater in the Grand Wash Trough is moving from north to south, discharging to springs and into the Colorado River. Groundwater may also be moving from east to west from Paleozoic rocks in the Grand Wash Cliffs into sedimentary deposits in the Grand Wash Trough. Finally, groundwater may be moving from the northwest in the Mesoproterozoic crystalline rocks of the Virgin Mountains into the northern part of the Grand Wash Trough. Water discharging from Tassi and Pakoon Springs has a major-ion chemistry similar to that of other springs in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant. Stable-isotopic signatures for oxygen-18 and hydrogen-2 are depleted in the water from both Tassi and Pakoon Springs in comparison to other springs on the Arizona Strip. Tassi Spring discharges from multiple seeps along the Wheeler Fault, and the depleted isotopic signatures suggest that water may be flowing from multiple places into Lake Mead and seems to have a higher elevation or an older climate source. Elevated water

  4. Seasonal changes in an alpine soil bacterial community in the colorado rocky mountains.

    PubMed

    Lipson, David A; Schmidt, Steven K

    2004-05-01

    The period when the snowpack melts in late spring is a dynamic time for alpine ecosystems. The large winter microbial community begins to turn over rapidly, releasing nutrients to plants. Past studies have shown that the soil microbial community in alpine dry meadows of the Colorado Rocky Mountains changes in biomass, function, broad-level structure, and fungal diversity between winter and early summer. However, little specific information exists on the diversity of the alpine bacterial community or how it changes during this ecologically important period. We constructed clone libraries of 16S ribosomal DNA from alpine soil collected in winter, spring, and summer. We also cultivated bacteria from the alpine soil and measured the seasonal abundance of selected cultured isolates in hybridization experiments. The uncultured bacterial communities changed between seasons in diversity and abundance within taxa. The Acidobacterium division was most abundant in the spring. The winter community had the highest proportion of Actinobacteria and members of the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides (CFB) division. The summer community had the highest proportion of the Verrucomicrobium division and of beta-PROTEOBACTERIA: As a whole, alpha-Proteobacteria were equally abundant in all seasons, although seasonal changes may have occurred within this group. A number of sequences from currently uncultivated divisions were found, including two novel candidate divisions. The cultured isolates belonged to the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-Proteobacteria, the Actinobacteria, and the CFB groups. The only uncultured sequences that were closely related to the isolates were from winter and spring libraries. Hybridization experiments showed that actinobacterial and beta-proteobacterial isolates were most abundant during winter, while the alpha- and gamma-proteobacterial isolates tested did not vary significantly. While the cultures and clone libraries produced generally distinct groups of organisms

  5. Seasonal Changes in an Alpine Soil Bacterial Community in the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, David A.; Schmidt, Steven K.

    2004-01-01

    The period when the snowpack melts in late spring is a dynamic time for alpine ecosystems. The large winter microbial community begins to turn over rapidly, releasing nutrients to plants. Past studies have shown that the soil microbial community in alpine dry meadows of the Colorado Rocky Mountains changes in biomass, function, broad-level structure, and fungal diversity between winter and early summer. However, little specific information exists on the diversity of the alpine bacterial community or how it changes during this ecologically important period. We constructed clone libraries of 16S ribosomal DNA from alpine soil collected in winter, spring, and summer. We also cultivated bacteria from the alpine soil and measured the seasonal abundance of selected cultured isolates in hybridization experiments. The uncultured bacterial communities changed between seasons in diversity and abundance within taxa. The Acidobacterium division was most abundant in the spring. The winter community had the highest proportion of Actinobacteria and members of the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides (CFB) division. The summer community had the highest proportion of the Verrucomicrobium division and of β-Proteobacteria. As a whole, α-Proteobacteria were equally abundant in all seasons, although seasonal changes may have occurred within this group. A number of sequences from currently uncultivated divisions were found, including two novel candidate divisions. The cultured isolates belonged to the α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria, the Actinobacteria, and the CFB groups. The only uncultured sequences that were closely related to the isolates were from winter and spring libraries. Hybridization experiments showed that actinobacterial and β-proteobacterial isolates were most abundant during winter, while the α- and γ-proteobacterial isolates tested did not vary significantly. While the cultures and clone libraries produced generally distinct groups of organisms, the two approaches

  6. 76 FR 62839 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria... California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract),...

  7. 1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH HOUSE AT REAR) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulphur Springs, Spring House, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  8. Colorado Charter Schools Special Education Guidelines: Negotiating New and Renewal Charter Contracts for Colorado Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freppel, Laura

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist local boards of education, charter school organizers, and charter school governing boards in identifying legal, procedural, and funding issues related to serving students with disabilities in Colorado charter schools. As a best practice, charters should contain a specific plan for compliance with…

  9. Colorado Preschool Program. Progress Report, 1989-1990. A Report to the Colorado General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    From January to May, 1989, community programs funded by the Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) were implemented in 33 school districts. In this paper, findings are presented from the evaluation of the CPP's continued implementation in 36 districts from June, 1989, to May, 1990, and the related development of statewide evaluation and accountability…

  10. Colorado Fathers' Resource Guide = Guia de Recursos para los Padres en Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Foundation for Families and Children, Denver.

    Developed through the Colorado Fatherhood Connection, this guide, in English- and Spanish-language versions, provides suggestions and resources for fathers as well as tips on discipline, communication, and activities fathers can do with their children. Topics addressed in the guide include characteristics of responsible fatherhood, characteristics…

  11. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices. PMID:23239886

  12. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices.

  13. Measurements of the surface energy budget in the southern Gobi Desert of China, and in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, E. R.; Smith, E. A.; Sheaffer, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the land surface energy balance were made in the Gobi desert and at two mountain sites in northern Colorado. The Gobi study included 12 days of observations in spring (April 8 to 20, 1984) and 31 days in summer at the same site (June 17 to July 18, 1984). The Colorado study included 126 days (March 13 to July 17, 1984) at a valley site and 34 days (July 31 to September 3, 1984) at a mountain top location. The data for each study included continuous observations of upward and downward radiative fluxes in three wave bands, soil temperature and moisture at four levels, air temperature and humidity at four levels and UVW wind components at three levels. Analyses of the Gobi data include definition of the impact of variable atmospheric moisture on the surface energy balance between spring and summer. In addition, diurnal wind circulations forced by heating of the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau were observed during both periods.

  14. Spatial variability and hydrologic response to dust radiative forcing of snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, A. C.; Painter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Dust deposition on snow influences the spring melt regime of the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) snowpack. In the UCRB, the addition of dust and other light absorbing impurities (LAI) to snow enhances the absorption of solar radiation, which increases spring melt rate and spurs a more-rapid decline in total snow extent. This research explores the spatial and temporal variability of surface radiative forcing by LAI and its intrinsic relationship to stream flow. Surface radiative forcing measurements are derived from the MODDRFS (MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing of Snow) model, which uses MODIS surface reflectance data to determine the amount of additional energy absorbed by the snowpack attributable to LAI. Our results show that between years 2000 - 2011 MODDRFS data for the UCRB exhibit distinct spatial variability dominated by a latitudinal gradient. To better understand the relationship between the spatial variability of surface forcing and stream flow, MODDRFS gridded data were compared to fifteen of the USGS Hydro-Climatic Data Network sites that span the UCRB. Preliminary results show that MODDRFS surface forcing data have a positive correlation with stream flow. This analysis of the spatial and temporal dynamics of hydrologic response to dust radiative forcing of snow is a critical component to understanding the hydrologic regime of the Colorado River.

  15. Estimated probabilities and volumes of postwildfire debris flows—A prewildfire evaluation for the Pikes Peak area, El Paso and Teller Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, John G.; Ruddy, Barbara C.; Verdin, Kristine L.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2012-01-01

    Debris flows are fast-moving, high-density slurries of water, sediment, and debris that can have enormous destructive power. Although debris flows, triggered by intense rainfall or rapid snowmelt on steep hillsides covered with erodible material, are a common geomorphic process in some unburned areas, a wildfire can transform conditions in a watershed with no recent history of debris flows into conditions that pose a substantial hazard to residents, communities, infrastructure, aquatic habitats, and water supply. The location, extent, and severity of wildfire and the subsequent rainfall intensity and duration cannot be known in advance; however, hypothetical scenarios based on empirical debris-flow models are useful planning tools for conceptualizing potential postwildfire debris flows. A prewildfire study to determine the potential for postwildfire debris flows in the Pikes Peak area in El Paso and Teller Counties, Colorado, was initiated in 2010 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Utilities. The study was conducted to provide a relative measure of which subwatersheds might constitute the most serious potential debris-flow hazards in the event of a large-scale wildfire and subsequent rainfall.

  16. Chemical and Isotopic Variability of Spring Discharge: Implications for Groundwater Flow Pathways and Residence Times in the R-aquifer, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. R.; Springer, A. E.; Hogan, J.; Rice, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Roaring Springs is the sole supply of potable water to the 4.4 million annual visitors and employees at Grand Canyon National Park. Roaring Springs and other karst-fed springs on the Grand Canyon's North Rim also provide baseflow to the Colorado River and support riparian habitats along tributary canyons. Climate change and proposed changes in land management north of Grand Canyon National Park may dramatically affect the quantity and quality of water discharging from the North Rim springs. These springs are sourced from water recharged on the Kaibab Plateau that travels a minimum of 900 vertical meters through conduits, faults, and fractures before discharging from the R-aquifer, a deep unconfined karstic carbonate aquifer. Stable isotope data, specifically ä18O and ä2H, from spring and precipitation samples were used to indicate the seasonality and location of recharge. Roaring Springs shows a distinct seasonal variation in isotopic signature with summer values more depleted in 2H and more enriched in 18O than winter values. Major cation/anion analyses along with other geochemical signatures will be assessed to interpret groundwater flowpaths and residence times, and to put North Rim springs in a regional context with other Grand Canyon springs. Specifically, evidence for seasonal transition between saturated and unsaturated conduit flow may be accentuated by variations in isotopic and chemical signatures in North Rim spring discharge. These results will represent the most comprehensive hydrologic dataset for North Rim springs and will be used to develop a conceptual groundwater flow model with the United States Geological Survey's new Conduit Flow Process package. Previous conceptual groundwater flow models for the area have yet to take into account the possibility of turbulent flow through karst conduits.

  17. Colorado Air Quality Control Regulations and Ambient Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver. Div. of Air Pollution Control.

    Regulations and standards relative to air quality control in Colorado are defined in this publication. Presented first are definitions of terms, a statement of intent, and general provisions applicable to all emission control regulations adopted by the Colorado Air Pollution Control Commission. Following this, three regulations are enumerated: (1)…

  18. 75 FR 52649 - Radio Broadcasting Services; DeBeque, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... substitution of Channel 247C3 for vacant Channel 275C3 at DeBeque, Colorado. See 75 FR 4036, published January... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 . Radio Broadcasting Services; DeBeque, Colorado AGENCY: Federal Communications... Congressional Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio,...

  19. Colorado Preschool & Kindergarten Program: 2007-08 Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Colorado Preschool and Kindergarten Program (CPKP) began as the Colorado Preschool Project in 1988 when it was authorized to serve 2,000 four and five year olds in need of language development. The General Assembly created this program in recognition of the need to adequately prepare children with specific at-risk factors to learn. The intent…

  20. 77 FR 50712 - Notice of Filing of Plats; Colorado.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Filing of Plats; Colorado. AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats; Colorado. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM... survey plat listed below and afford all affected parties a proper period of time to protest this...