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Sample records for steamboat springs colorado

  1. Soil moisture ground truth: Steamboat Springs, Colorado, site and Walden, Colorado, site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-truth data taken at Steamboat Springs and Walden, Colorado in support of the NASA missions in these areas during the period March 8, 1976 through March 11, 1976 was presented. This includes the following information: snow course data for Steamboat Springs and Walden, snow pit and snow quality data for Steamboat Springs, and soil moisture report.

  2. Helium and ground temperature surveys at Steamboat Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.; Been, J.; Reimer, G.M.; Bowles, C.G.; Murrey, D.G.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    As demonstrated in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, helium and shallow temperature surveys are quick, inexpensive geothermal exploration methods that can be used together with excellent results. Steamboat Springs, in northwestern Colorado, lies primarily upon terrace gravels and alluvium with the major structure being a north-trending normal fault passing through the western portion of the city. Work by Christopherson (1979) indicates that the Steamboat warm springs are not laterally connected at shallow depth with Routt Hot Springs, 6 km to the north, although both resource areas are fault controlled. A shallow temperature survey was conducted in the city to determine the usefulness of this method in a low temperature resource area. Several extraneous factors influencing shallow temperature measurements were dealt with by field technique or subsequent analysis. A helium survey was conducted to compare with temperature results. Sixty-two soil helium samples were taken, using an interval of .1 to .2 Km, twice the density of the 18 temperature probe stations. A mobile spectrometer allowed immediate analysis of helium samples. A direct correlation of temperature to helium value at each site is not valid due to the high solubility of this gas. The contoured data from each method does correlate well and indicates that two faults control the resource in Steamboat Springs. Although these surveys should always be used to supplement other data, their utility in this study was readily apparent.

  3. Region 8: Colorado Lamar and Steamboat Springs Adequate Letter (11/12/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Lamar and Steamboat Springs particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  4. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

  5. Passive microwave studies of snowpack properties. [Walden and Steamboat Spring, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave brightness temperatures were measured for the snowpacks at Walden and Steamboat Springs, Colorado during 1976 and 1977 aircraft experiments. Variations in measured brightness temperatures are attributed to snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. Results demonstrate that shorter wavelength radiation is scattered more strongly than longer wavelength radiation.

  6. Snowpack ground truth: Radar test site, Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 8-16 April 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, S.; Jones, E. B.; Leaf, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-truth data taken at Steamboat Springs, Colorado is presented. Data taken during the period April 8, 1976 - April 16, 1976 included the following: (1) snow depths and densities at selected locations (using a Mount Rose snow tube); (2) snow pits for temperature, density, and liquid water determinations using the freezing calorimetry technique and vertical layer classification; (3) snow walls were also constructed of various cross sections and documented with respect to sizes and snow characteristics; (4) soil moisture at selected locations; and (5) appropriate air temperature and weather data.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  8. Areas with Surface Thermal Anomalies as Detected by ASTER and LANDSAT Data in Southwest Steamboat Springs, Garfield County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalid Hussein

    2012-02-01

    This map shows areas of anomalous surface temperature around south Steamboat Springs as identified from ASTER and LANDSAT thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature for the ASTER data was calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas having anomalous temperature in the ASTER data are shown in blue diagonal hatch, while areas having anomalous temperature in the LANDSAT data are shown in magenta on the map. Thermal springs and areas with favorable geochemistry are also shown. Springs or wells having non-favorable geochemistry are shown as blue dots. Publication Information: Originator: Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder

  9. Intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs, Park Range, Colorado, with a section on geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Hedge, Carl E.

    1978-01-01

    Major Precambrian and minor Tertiary intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs in the Park Range between 40?30' and 40?45' N. lat. are described and compared with related rocks elsewhere in Colorado and Wyoming. The Precambrian intrusives were emplaced in a sequence of high-grade interlayered felsic gneisses, amphibolites, and pelitic schists of sedimentary and volcanic origin. These rocks are cut by a major northeast-trending Precambrian shear zone where mainly left lateral movement of 1/ 2 to 1 mile is certain. Cumulative movement of many miles is possible. The Precambrian intrusives consist of a batholith, the Mount Ethel pluton, a smaller Buffalo Pass pluton, and small dikes or lenses of fine-grained porphyry, pegmatites, and ultramafics. The Mount Ethel pluton is an oval shaped body 7 miles wide by about 40 miles long (shown by geophysical data to extend beneath younger sediments in North Park). Outer batholithic contacts are sharp and dip steeply outward at about 85?. Five mappable internal variants consist, in order of decreasing age, of granodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, granite and quartz monzonite, and. leucogranite. Internal contacts between these plutonic variants are sharp, and evidence of liquid-solid relationships abounds; despite this, all rocks except the granodiorite contribute to an Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron indicating emplacement about 1.4 b.y. (billion years) ago. The most important variants volumetrically are: the quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, which forms an irregular 2-mile-thick carapace or mapped band around the west edge of the pluton and is lithologically similar to nearby Sherman Granite, and the quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, which forms most of the rest of the pluton and is lithologically similar to Silver Plume Granite. An apparent Sherman -Silver Plume dichotomy with similar rock types and similar relative ages is noted throughout Colorado plutons of that age

  10. Calibration of a dissolved-solids model for the Yampa River basin between Steamboat Springs and Maybell, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, R.S.; Litke, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The cumulative effects of changes in dissolved solids from a number of coal mines are needed to evaluate effects on downstream water use. A model for determining cumulative effects of streamflow, dissolved-solids concentration, and dissolved-solids load was calibrated for the Yampa River and its tributaries in northwestern Colorado. The model uses accounting principles. It establishes nodes on the stream system and sums water quantity and quality from node to node in the downstream direction. The model operates on a monthly time step for the study period that includes water years 1976 through 1981. Output is monthly mean streamflow, dissolved-solids concentration, and dissolved-solids load. Streamflow and dissolved-solids data from streamflow-gaging stations and other data-collection sites were used to define input data sets to initiate and to calibrate the model. The model was calibrated at four nodes and generally was within 10 percent of the observed values. The calibrated model can compute changes in dissolved-solids concentration or load resulting from the cumulative effects of new coal mines or the expansion of old coal mines in the Yampa River basin. (USGS)

  11. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in a part of the Yampa River basin between Craig and Steamboat Springs, Moffat and Routt counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogden, R.E.; Giles, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Parts of the Yampa River basin near the towns of Steamboat Springs and Craig, Colo., have undergone rapid population growth in recent years. Aquifers in the study area include: alluvium; the Browns Park, Wasatch, Fort Union, Lance, Williams Fork, and Iles Formations; and the Lewis and Mancos Shales. Well yields are generally less than 25 gpm (gallons per minute). In the alluvium of the Yampa River, well yields may be as much as 900 gpm. Where the sandstones of the Williams Fork and Iles Formations are fractured, well yields have been reported to be as much as 100 gpm. Well yields from the Lewis and Mancos Shales are less than 5 gpm. The quality of the ground water is variable and dependent on rock type. Most of the waters are calcium and sodium bicarbonate types. Calcium sulfate type waters are found where water in the aquifer has been in contact with gypsum, organic materials, or coals. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water range from as little as 82 to as much as 4,230 milligrams per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Argillization by descending acid at Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoen, R.; White, D.E.; Hemley, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    Steamboat Springs, Nevada, an area of present-day hot springs, clearly illustrates the genetic dependence of some kaolin deposits on hot-spring activity. Andesite, granodiorite and arkosic sediments are locally altered at the land surface to siliceous residues consisting of primary quartz and anatase, plus opal from primary silicates. These siliceous residues commonly exhibit the textural and structural features of their unaltered equivalents. Beneath the siliceous residues, kaolin and alunite replace primary silicates and fill open spaces, forming a blanketlike deposit. Beneath the kaolin-alunite zone, montmorillonite, commonly accompanied by pyrite, replaces the primary silicates. On the ground surface, the same alteration mineral zones can he traced outward from the siliceous residue; however, hematite rather than pyrite accompanies montmorillonite. Chemical analysis indicates that sulfuric acid is the active altering agent. The acid forms from hydrogen sulfide that exsolves from deep thermal water, rises above the water table and is oxidized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria living near the ground surface. This acid dissolves in precipitation or condensed water vapor and percolates downward destroying most of the primary minerals producing a siliceous residue. Coincidence of the water table with the downward transition from siliceous residue to kaolin alunite signifies decreasing hydrogen metasomatism because of dilution of descending acid by ground water. In hot-spring areas, beds of siliceous sinter deposited at the surface by hypogene thermal water look, superficially, like areas of surficial acid alteration. Features diagnostic of a surficial alteration are the relict rock structures of a siliceous residue and a kaolin-alunite zone immediately beneath. ?? 1974.

  13. Origin and evolution of the Steamboat Springs siliceous sinter deposit, Nevada, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynne, Bridget Y.; Campbell, Kathleen A.; Moore, Joseph; Browne, P. R. L.

    2008-10-01

    Siliceous hot spring deposits from Steamboat Springs, Nevada, U.S.A., record a complex interplay of multiple, changing, primary environmental conditions, fluid overprinting and diagenesis. Consequently these deposits reflect dynamic geologic and geothermal processes. Two surface sinters were examined—the high terrace, and the distal apron-slope, as well as 13.11 m (43 ft) of core material from drill hole SNLG 87-29. The high terrace sinter consists of vitreous and massive-mottled silica horizons, while the distal deposit and core comprise dominantly porous, indurated fragmental sinters. Collectively, the three sinter deposits archive a complete sequence of silica phase diagenetic minerals from opal-A to quartz. X-ray powder diffraction analyses and infrared spectroscopy of the sinters indicate that the distal apron-slope consists of opal-A and opal-A/CT mineralogy; the core yielded opal-A/CT and opal-CT with minor opal-A; and the high terrace constitutes opal-C, moganite, and quartz. Mineralogical maturation of the deposit produced alternating nano-micro-nano-sized silica particle changes. Based on filament diameters of microbial fossils preserved within the sinter, discharging thermal outflows fluctuated between low-temperatures (< 35 °C, coarse filaments) and mid-temperatures (˜ 35-60 °C, fine filaments). Despite transformation to quartz, primary coarse and fine filaments were preserved in the high terrace sinter. AMS 14C dating of pollen from three horizons within core SNLG 87-29, from depths of 8.13 to 8.21 m (26'8″ to 26'11″), 10.13 to 10.21 m (33'3″ to 33'6″), and 14.81 to 14.88 m (48'7″ to 48'10″), yielded dates of 8684 ± 64 years, 11,493 ± 70 years and 6283 ±60 years, respectively. In the upper section of the core, the stratigraphically out-of-sequence age likely reflects physical mixing of younger sinter with quartzose sinter fragments derived from the high terrace. Within single horizons, mineralogical and morphological components of

  14. 78 FR 73886 - Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Amended Certification... Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The Department's notice of determination was published in the Federal... workers at Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado were engaged in activities related to production...

  15. Geothermal Geodatabase for Routt Hot Springs, Routt County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Routt Hot Springs, Routt County, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA 775.737.7806 rzehner@gdareno.com For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,500,000 South boundary: approximately 4,480,000 West boundary: approximately 330,000 East boundary: approximately 358,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs and wells in the Routt Hot Spring and Steamboat Springs areahave geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 2. Air photo lineaments 3. Groundwater geochemistry 5. Georeferenced geologic map of Routt County 6. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  16. 78 FR 53783 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Colorado College, in consultation... claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Colorado College. If no additional...

  17. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... collections from The Colorado College Museum, through long-term loans to the Fine Arts Center (formerly known... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Colorado College,...

  18. 78 FR 19304 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ..., along with other collections from The Colorado College Museum, through long-term loans to the Fine Arts... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Colorado College,...

  19. 77 FR 9840 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY... airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport, Colorado Springs, CO. Decommissioning of the Black... controlled airspace at Colorado Springs, CO (76 FR 70920). Interested parties were invited to participate...

  20. RadNet Air Data From Colorado Springs, CO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Colorado Springs, CO from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  1. Region 8: Colorado Springs Adequate Letter (8/17/2011)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This March 3, 2011 letter from EPA to Chistopher E. Urbina M.D., MPH, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment states that EPA has found that the Colorado Springs, CO second 10 year Limited Maintenance Plan (LMP) adequate for transportation

  2. Colorado Academic Library Master Plan, Spring 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breivik, Patricia Senn; And Others

    Based on a need to assess current library strengths and weaknesses and to project potential library roles in supporting higher education, this master plan makes a series of recommendations to Colorado's academic libraries. It is noted that the plan was endorsed by both the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the Colorado State Department…

  3. World History Workshop (Colorado Springs, Colorado, July 13-15, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matusiak, Frederick C., Ed.

    Described is a workshop that brought together world history teachers from the Colorado Springs (Colorado) area and new instructors at the U.S. Air Force Academy to discuss problems in world history instruction. There were six workshop sessions, each including presentations and discussions. This report summarizes both the presentations and the…

  4. Health hazard evaluation report no. HETA-81-034,035-934, Colorado Springs Public Utilities, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, R.

    1981-08-01

    On October 16, 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the City of Colorado Springs Department of Public Utilities for a 'baseline' environmental evaluation of two coal-fired electrical power production facilities. These substances included fly ash, coal dust, free silica, flue gases, trace metals, and boiler feed-water chemicals. Based on the environmental data collected at these facilities, NIOSH determined that a potential health hazard existed at both plants from overexposure to fly ash and coal dust containing free silica, and to inorganic arsenic, cristobalite, sulfur dioxide, and hydrazine at the Martin-Drake facility. Recommendations for control of excessive exposures are made.

  5. SERVICE CREEK ROADLESS AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Paul W.; Kluender, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Service Creek Roadless Area, near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, was studied. Geologic mapping and geochemical sampling did not identify any mineral-resource potential in the area. No mining activity has been recorded for the area. An east-west topographic linear feature just south of Silver Creek, which contains clusters of single and multi-element anomalies of certain rare-earth and metallic minerals deserves further study.

  6. 77 FR 35617 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class C Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies the Colorado Springs, CO, Class C... recently attempted to modify the Class E airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS),...

  7. 76 FR 70920 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs...). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport, Colorado Springs, CO. Decommissioning of the Black Forest Tactical Air Navigation System (TACAN) has...

  8. Radioactive mineral springs in Delta County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert A.; Rosholt, John N.; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1976-01-01

    The system of springs in Delta County, Colo., contains geochemical clues to the nature and location of buried uranium-mineralized rock. The springs, which occur along the Gunnison River and a principal tributary between Delta and Paonia, are regarded as evidence of a still-functioning hydrothermal system. Associated with the springs are hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide gas seeps, carbon dioxide gas-powered geysers, thick travertine deposits including radioactive travertine, and a flowing warm-water (41?C) radioactive well. Geochemical study of the springs is based on surface observations, on-site water-property measurements, and sampling of water, travertine, soft precipitates, and mud. The spring deposits are mostly carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and chlorides that locally contain notable amounts of some elements, such as arsenic, barium, lithium, and radium. Samples from five localities have somewhat different trace element assemblages even though they are related to the same hydrothermal system. All the spring waters but one are dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The exception is an acid sulfate water with a pH of 2.9, which contains high concentrations of aluminum and iron. Most of the detectable radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, a uranium daughter product, but at least one spring precipitate contains abundant radium-228, a thorium daughter product. The 5:1 ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 suggests the proximity of a vein-type deposit as a source for the radium. The proposed locus of a thorium-uranium mineral deposit is believed to lie in the vicinity of Paonia, Colo. Exact direction and depth are not determinable from data now available.

  9. Surficial geologic map of the Steamboat Springs 30' x 60' quadrangle, Grand, Jackson, and Routt counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Mapping was done chiefly on aerial photographs taken in 1953. Hence, landslides and modifications resulting from gravel mining since 1953 may not show on this map. The scales of the aerial photographs (about 1:60,000) and the map (1:100,000) governed the minimum size of the deposits mapped. The minimum thickness of the depostis mapped is about 1.5m in most places. Deposit thickness, although not a mapping criterion, influences the topographic expression of many landforms, and landform is the basis for delineating the surficial deposits shown.

  10. 77 FR 32393 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Springs, CO, until September 20, 2012. The FAA is taking this action to allow additional time for..., Colorado Springs, CO (77 FR 9840). Airspace reconfiguration is necessary due to the decommissioning of...

  11. Geothermal resource assessment of Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 10 springs whose waters are used for recreation, steam baths and laundry purposes are located at Hot Sulphur Springs. Estimated heat-flow at Hot Sulphur Springs is approximately 100 mW/m2, which is about normal for western Colorado. Recent work tends to show that surface and reduced heat flow in the mountains of northern Colorado could be high. The thermal waters have an estimated discharge of 50 gpm, a temperature that ranges from 104/sup 0/F (40/sup 0/C) to a high of 111/sup 0/F (44/sup 0/C), and a total dissolved solid content of 1200 mg/l. The waters are a sodium bicarbonate type with a large concentration of sulphate. It is estimated that the most likely reservoir temperature of this system ranges from 167/sup 0/F (75/sup 0/F) to 302/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/C) and that the areal extent of the system could encompass 1.35 sq mi (3.50 sq km) and could contain 0.698 Q's (1015 B.T.U.'s) of heat energy. Soil mercury and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted. The geophysical survey delineated several areas of low resistivity associated with the north trending fault that passes just to the west of the spring area. It appears that this fault is saturated with thermal waters and may be the conduit along which the thermal waters are moving up from depth. The appendices to this report include tables showing water temperatures required for various industrial processes, as well as dissolved minerals, trace elements and radioactivity levels found in the thermal waters. Also presented are a complete description of the factors affecting the electrical resistivity measurements, a description of the electrical resistivity equipment used, and the resistivity field procedures. Electrical resistivity calculations are also included in the appendices.

  12. Hydrologic data for water-table aquifers in the Colorado Springs-Castle Rock area, Front Range Urban Corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, E. Carter; Hillier, Donald E.

    1978-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's investigations of the hydrology and geology in the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado, hydrologic data for water-table aquifers in the Colorado Springs--Castle Rock area were collected and compiled during 1976-77. These data, consisting of records for 157 wells and 47 springs and chemical analyses of water for 135 of the wells and all 47 springs, are presented in tabular form. The tables contain data that were collected during the investigation , data compiled from reports published by the Colorado Water Conservation Board, and unpublished data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey. State and local officials in the Colorado Springs--Castle Rock area may find these data useful in planning for residential, commercials, and industrial development. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Proceedings of the Atmospheric Neutral Density Specialist Conference, Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on March 22-23, 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-23

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE ATMOSPHERIC NEUTRAL DENSITY SPECIALIST CONFERENCE Lf) cN HELD AT THE RAINTREE INN, AIRPORT COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 22 - 23...Lt Col George R. Davenport Headquarters Fourth Weather Wing Air Weather Service Neutral Atmospheric Modeling Requirements...5 Captain Chris R. Tschan HO AWS/DNXP Air Force Space Command Requiremnents for Neutral Atmospheric Density Specification and

  14. Geothermal Geodatabase for Wagon Wheel Hot Springs, Mineral County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Wagon Wheel Hot Springs, Mineral County, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA 775.737.7806 rzehner@gdareno.com For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,189,000 South boundary: approximately 4,170,000 West boundary: approximately 330,000 East boundary: approximately 351,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs at Wagon Wheel Gap have geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 2. Air photo lineaments 3. Groundwater geochemistry 4. Power lines 5. Georeferenced geologic map of Routt County 6. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  15. Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Water in Snow and Soil During Spring Snowmelt in a Small Watershed in Northwest Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    The melting of a winter snowpack will often include spatially and temporally variable infiltration across the soil-snow-interface prior to generating streamflow, groundwater recharge, or plant production. During spring snowmelt, moisture distribution is largely driven by hydraulic gradients under variably saturated conditions within the soil and snowpack. In complex mountainous terrain, the variable melt rates across the landscape due to slope, aspect, and landcover add further irregularities to this dynamic system. The aim of this research is gain insight into the distribution of water both within and below a melting snowpack during spring at Dry Lake Study Site near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. This site is a small (0.2 km2) subalpine watershed with a seasonally persistent snowpack each year. Intensive field surveys were conducted to collect snow water equivalent and soil moisture distribution during April and May of 2014 and 2015. Results show the variability in soil moisture consistent with similar studies, suggesting soil moisture distribution follows a similar trend as accumulation of snow depth in relation to topographic and canopy influences. The soil moisture on south facing hillslopes tended to be less than north facing slopes, with flat terrain holding near saturated conditions, particularly in locations with thick layers of organic matter. However, of notable interest is the distribution of snow water equivalent during melt. Early in the melt period at the base of some hillslopes snow water equivalent increased as locations directly upslope decreased suggesting movement of moisture within the snowpack during the transitional period from winter to spring. The hydraulic conductivity of snow has been shown to be greater than that of common soils, suggesting that the timing of water movement from a snowpack to stream will be shortened when considering the flow through the snow layers compared to shallow groundwater on hillslopes. These results have

  17. Assessment of water resources at Fort Carson Military Reservation near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Fort Carson Military Reservation adjoins the Colorado Springs metropolitan area. Fort Carson purchases an average of 3400 acre-feet of treated water annually from the city of Colorado Springs. Locally available surface-water resources are limited and are fully appropriated. The occurrence of precipitation and streamflow at Fort Carson is unevenly distributed in time. The streams that enter Fort Carson have an estimated average annual discharge of more than 6240 acre-feet upstream from diversions for municipal and domestic water supplies. Ground water is available at Fort Carson from alluvial and bedrock aquifers. The alluvial aquifer with the greatest potential for water production occurs along Little Fountain and Rock Creeks in the eastern part of Fort Carson where the alluvium is about 60 ft thick and well yields greater than 100 gpm have been obtained. The bedrock aquifer with the greatest potential for water production is the Dakota-Purgatoire aquifer which underlies most of Fort Carson. The Dakota-Purgatoire aquifer, which is exposed at the surface in the southwestern part of Fort Carson, dips steeply to the south and east and is 1500 to 2000 feet below the land surface along the eastern boundary of Fort Carson. Well yields greater than 100 gpm have been obtained in the southern part of Fort Carson where the bedrock units have been structurally deformed. The potential for development of dependable water supplies at Fort Carson is good. Additional reservoir storage would be needed to provide a dependable water supply from streamflow. Integrated use of surface water and ground water with the storage capacity of the alluvial aquifer along Little Fountain and Rock Creeks could provide a dependable water supply. Significant well yields can be obtained from the Dakota-Purgatoire aquifer, but treatment will be required prior to use for drinking water. 32 refs., 18 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Region 8: Colorado Denver, Pagosa Springs and Telluride Adequate Letter (8/18/2000)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan, Pagosa Springs and Tellurides' Particulate Matter (PM10) maintenance plans for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate

  19. Temporal Geochemistry Data from Five Springs in the Cement Creek Watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Wirt, Laurie; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal data from five springs in the Cement Creek watershed, San Juan County, Colorado provide seasonal geochemical data for further research in the formation of ferricretes. In addition, these data can be used to help understand the ground-water flow system. The resulting data demonstrate the difficulty in gathering reliable seasonal data from springs, show the unique geochemistry of each spring due to local geology, and provide seasonal trends in geochemistry for Tiger Iron Spring.

  20. Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: A Colorado Springs Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Jones, A.

    2016-04-26

    This report explores the correlation between energy efficiency and the business success of home builders by examining a data set of builders and homes in the Colorado Springs, Colorado, market between 2006 and 2014. During this time, the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009 occurred, and new-home sales plummeted both nationally and in Colorado Springs. What is evident from an analysis of builders and homes in Colorado Springs is that builders who had Home Energy Rating System (HERS) ratings performed on some or all of their homes during the Recession remained in business during this challenging economic period. Many builders who did not have HERS ratings performed on their homes at that time went out of business or left the area. From the analysis presented in this report, it is evident that a correlation exists between energy efficiency and the business success of home builders, although the reasons for this correlation remain largely anecdotal and not yet clearly understood.

  1. Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-31

    A study has been made of the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing the geothermal resource underlying Glenwood Springs Colorado, to heat a group of public buildings. The results have shown that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection. Considerable study was done to examine the impact of reduced operating temperature on the existing heating systems. Several options to minimize this problem were identified. Economic analyses were completed to determine the present values of heat from the geothermal system and from the present natural gas over a 30 year projected system life. For the base case savings of over $1 million were shown. Sensitivities of the economics to capital cost, operating cost, system size and other parameters were calculated. For all reasonable assumptions, the geothermal system was cheaper. Financing alternatives were also examined. An extensive survey of all existing data on the geology of the study has led to the prediction of resource parameters. The wellhead temperature of produced fluid is suspected to lie between 140 and 180/sup 0/F (60 and 82/sup 0/C). Flowrates may be as high as 1000 gpm (3800 liters per minute) from a reservoir formation that is 300 ft (90 m) thick beginning about 500 ft (150 m) below the suggested drill site in the proposed Two Rivers Park.

  2. 78 FR 52984 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado Springs, Colorado (hereafter collectively referred to as either ``Stone Age Interiors'' or ``subject firm''). The...

  3. Prevalence of lesions in incisors of mule deer from Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Borrero, L.M.; Scanlon, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Lesions in teeth may be influenced by exposure to fluorides, malnutrition and trauma. Incisors of 228 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) taken from the USAF Academy, Colorado Springs, CO during the 1993 hunting season were examined for lesions. A classification scheme (scale = 0--5) for lesions was derived from the method of Shupe et al. 1963. Lesions were present in at least one incisor of 84.6% of deer. Of the deer with lesions, 86% had at least one tooth with very slight effect (one to few white spots), 9.8% had a slight effect (generalized mottling), 2.6% had a moderate effect (generalized mottling and wear), 10.04% had a marked effect (mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel) , and 0.5 % ad severe effects (hypoplasia of the enamel and abnormal wear). Lesions that affect the enamel are produced during the period of formation of the tooth. The severity of lesions depends on the cause and the length of exposure to the causative agent. Generally mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel are associated with fluorosis. The relationship of lesions to bone and tooth fluoride concentrations was examined.

  4. Geophysical well logs for eleven drill holes at the Colorado School of Mines Experimental Mine Site, Idaho Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, J.J.; Scott, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The following geophysical well log measurements were made in eleven drill holes above the Colorado School of Mines Experimental Mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado: (1) acoustic velocity (2) resistivity, (3) caliper, (4) gamma-gamma density, (5) neutron-thermal neutron, (6) gamma ray, (7) induced polarization (IP), (8) self potential (SP), and magnetic susceptibility. The density and acoustic velocity logs indicate extensive fracturing in each of the drill holes. Variations in the relative amount of felsic or mafic mineral components in the rocks can be inferred from the magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray well log responses. Zones containing metallic sulfide mineralization are interpreted from the IP well log response.

  5. Geothermal resource assessment of Waunita Hot Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    This assessment includes the project report; the geothermal prospect reconnaissance evaluation and recommendations; interpretation of water sample analyses; a hydrogeochemical comparison of the Waunita Hot Springs, Hortense, Castle Rock, and Anderson Hot Springs; geothermal resistivity resource evaluation survey, the geophysical environment; temperature, heat flow maps, and temperature gradient holes; and soil mercury investigations.

  6. 75 FR 58426 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ..., should contact Chris Melcher, General Counsel, The Colorado College c/o Jan Bernstein, President, Bernstein & Associates - NAGPRA Consultants, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, CO 80218, telephone (303) 894- 0648...

  7. 78 FR 37586 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado Springs... produced by Stone Age did not increase during the relevant period. With respect to Section 222(a)(2)(B) of...

  8. Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: A Colorado Springs Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Jones, A.

    2016-04-26

    The building industry needs to understand how energy ratings can impact homebuilders. Of interest is how energy efficiency may or may not have a positive impact on homebuilders’ business success. Focusing on Colorado Springs, Colorado, as a case study, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team IBACOS suggests a win–win between a builder’s investment in energy efficiency and that builder’s ability to sell homes. Although this research did not ultimately determine why a correlation may exist, a builder’s investment in voluntary energy-efficiency programs correlated with that builder’s ability to survive the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. This report explores the relationship between energy-efficiency ratings and the market performance of several builders in Colorado Springs.

  9. Wildfire risk and housing prices: a case study from Colorado Springs.

    Treesearch

    G.H. Donovan; P.A. Champ; D.T. Butry

    2007-01-01

    Unlike other natural hazards such as floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes, wildfire risk has not previously been examined using a hedonic property value model. In this article, we estimate a hedonic model based on parcel-level wildfire risk ratings from Colorado Springs. We found that providing homeowners with specific information about the wildfire risk rating of their...

  10. Wildfire risk and housing prices: a case study from colorado springs

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Patricia A. Champ; David T. Butry

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, concerned about the risks of wildfires to local homes, the Colorado Springs Fire Department rated the wildfire risk of 35,000 housing parcels within the wildland-urban interface and made its findings available online. We examine the effectiveness of this rating project by comparing the relationship between home price and wildfire risk before and after the...

  11. Region 8: Colorado Pagosa Springs Adequate Letter (8/17/2011)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This March 17, 2011 letter from EPA to Chistopher E. Urbina M.D., MPH, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment states that EPA has found that the Pagosa Springs, CO PM10 maintenance plan and the 2021 motor vehicle emisssions budget (MVEB)

  12. Measuring the efficacy of a wildfire education program in Colorado Springs.

    Treesearch

    G.H. Donovan; P.A. Champ; D.T. Butry

    2007-01-01

    We examine an innovative wildfire risk education program in Colorado Springs, which rated the wildfire risk of 35,000 homes in the city's wildland urban interface. Evidence from home sales before and after the program's implementation suggests that the program was successful at changing homebuyers' attitudes toward wildfire risk, particularly preferences...

  13. Measuring the efficacy of a wildfire education program in Colorado Springs

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Patricia A. Champ; David T. Butry

    2007-01-01

    Drought conditions in much of the West, increased residential development, and elevated fuels from a century of wildfire suppression have increased wildfire risk in the United States. In light of this increased risk, an innovative wildfire risk education program in Colorado Springs was examined, which rated the wildfire risk of 35,000 homes in the city's wildland-...

  14. Geothermal-resource assessment of Ranger Warm Spring, Colorado. Resources Series 24

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, T.G.; Pearl, R.H.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    In 1977 a program was initiated to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of geothermal resources in Colorado. This program consisted of literature search, reconnaissance geologic and hydrogeologic mapping and geophysical and geochemical surveys. During 1980 and 1981 geothermal resource assessment efforts were conducted in the Cement Creek Valley south of Crested Butte. In this valley are two warm springs, Cement Creek and Ranger, about 4 mi (6.4 km) apart. The temperature of both springs is 77 to 79/sup 0/F (25 to 26/sup 0/C) and the discharge ranges from 60 to 195 gallons per minute. Due to access problems no work was conducted in the Cement Creek Warm Springs area. At Ranger Warm Springs electrical resistivity and soil mercury surveys were conducted. The warm springs are located in the Elk Mountains of west central Colorado. The bedrock of the area consists of sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Recent. Several faults with displacements of up to 3000 ft (194 m) are found in the area. One of these faults passes close to the Ranger Warm Springs. The electrical resistivity survey indicated that the waters of Ranger Warm Springs are moving up along a buried fault which parallels Cement Creek.

  15. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  16. The Contribution of Individual Springs to the Chemistry of a Headwater Stream in the Colorado Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, C.; Dwire, K.; Quiet, N.; Dixon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Here we examine spatial patterns in dissolved oxygen, temperature and inorganic and organic chemistry of water emerging from fifty springs in a high-elevation watershed at the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado. The springs extend from above treeline at 3500m to 3000m within subalpine forest. Conductivity, pH and ANC of spring water average 42 μS cm -1, 7.0, and 360 μeq L-1, respectively. In general, spring water was less chemically dilute than streamwater though spring chemistry differed with elevation and proximity to the stream channel. Concentrations of most dissolved inorganic ions were lowest in springs near treeline, and both spring water and streamwater chemical concentrations increased at lower elevation. Spring water contained higher concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfate than streamwater. Nitrate was also higher, but DOC was lower and DON did not differ compared to streamwater. In general, spring water was well oxygenated, and DO was highest in the coldest and most vigorously flowing springs. Spring water remained 3°C cooler than streamwater during summer months. The more dilute chemical composition of the treeline springs suggests that they are fed by recent snowmelt. In contrast, springs with the highest ion concentrations emerge from faulted portions of the watershed where groundwater may follow deeper flowpaths and contact weatherable materials. The chemical composition of streamwater was most similar to spring water emerging near the channel. The high discharge and their relative abundance suggests that these springs may have a predominant influence on basin-scale aqueous chemistry.

  17. GDA steamboat power plant: a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, G.M. III

    1987-08-01

    Located 10 mi south of Reno, Nevada, Steamboat Springs has long been recognized as a prime geothermal resource for electric power generation potential by the US Geological Survey and numerous energy companies. Extensive leasing and exploration by Phillips and Gulf led to the discovery of a high-temperature (over 400/sup 0/F) reservoir in 1979. Geothermal Development Associates obtained a geothermal resources lease on a 30-acre parcel and a 10-year power sales agreement for 5 MW from the local utility, Sierra Pacific Power Company, in late 1983. Drilling commenced in March 1985, modular power plant construction began in October, and initial plant startup with power to the grid was accomplished in December 1985. Owing to cooling-water access and treatment costs, air-cooled condensers replaced the planned cooling towers, and full-time scale continuous production at rated capacity did not begin until late 1986. Three production wells and two injection wells, completed in highly fractured Cretaceous granodiorite and Tertiary andesite at depths of less than 1000 ft, produce 340/sup 0/F water having a salinity of 2300 ppm. Production well line-shaft pumps deliver in excess of 3000 gpm water to seven 1.2 MW-Rankine cycle binary power plant modules. The heat extracted from the geothermal water vaporizes the low boiling point N-pentane working fluid that expands to drive the turbines. The geothermal water is injected back into the reservoir. Both the pentane and the geothermal water are in separate closed-loop systems, which provides for an environmentally clean operation in this sensitive, highly visible site on the periphery of a metropolitan area.

  18. Colorado geothermal commercialization program. Geothermal energy opportunities at four Colorado towns: Durango, Glenwood Springs, Idaho Springs, Ouray

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.; Zimmerman, J.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of four prospective geothermal development sites in Colorado was analyzed and hypothetical plans prepared for their development. Several broad areas were investigated for each site. The first area of investigation was the site itself: its geographic, population, economic, energy demand characteristics and the attitudes of its residents relative to geothermal development potential. Secondly, the resource potential was described, to the extent it was known, along with information concerning any exploration or development that has been conducted. The third item investigated was the process required for development. There are financial, institutional, environmental, technological and economic criteria for development that must be known in order to realistically gauge the possible development. Using that information, the next concern, the geothermal energy potential, was then addressed. Planned, proposed and potential development are all described, along with a possible schedule for that development. An assessment of the development opportunities and constraints are included. Technical methodologies are described in the Appendix. (MHR)

  19. Geochemistry of spring water, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical quality of water in the southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, is important to the future development of the abundant oil-shale resources of the area. This report examines the observed changes in chemistry as water circulates in both shallow and deep ground-water systems. Mass-balance and mass-transfer calculations are used to define reactions that simulate the observed water chemistry in the mixed sandstone, siltstone, and carbonate lithology of the Green River Formation of Tertiary age. The mass-transfer calculations determine a reaction path particular to this system. The early dominance of calcite dissolution produces a calcium carbonate water. After calcite saturation, deeper circulation and further rock-water interaction cause the reprecipitation of calcite, the dissolution of dolomite and plagioclase, and the oxidation of pyrite; all combining to produce a calcium magnesium sodium bicarbonate sulfate water. The calculations suggest that silica concentrations are controlled by a kaolinite-Ca-montmorillonite phase boundary. Close agreement of mineral-saturation indices calculated by both an aqueous-equilibrium model and the mass-transfer model support the selection of reactions from the mass-transfer calculations.

  20. Colorado geothermal commercialization program: community development of geothermal energy in Pagosa Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    A district heating system for the Pagosa Springs central business district is in the planning stage. A detailed analysis of the project is presented. It comprises area and site specific studies and describes in detail the recent, current, anticipated, and postulated geothermal development activities. (MHR)

  1. Private well/spring position paper, Rifle, Colorado, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the hydrogeochemical relationship between the New and Old Rifle processing sites and 15 domestic wells in their vicinity. The relationship of the domestic wells to the Old and New Rifle tailings sites requires clarification due to recent advances in understanding of Rifle site conceptual models. In order to form a bridge from the Rifle remedial action plan (RAP) and the recent baseline risk assessment to this position paper, several issues require discussion. First, through analysis of long-term ground water level data, the hydraulic gradient between the former tailings and private wells and springs was assessed. Second, in the Rifle RAP there was not a strong emphasis placed on describing regional influences on water quality in the vicinity of the processing sites. This document uses available information coupled with theory of regional ground water flow to describe regional flow systems north of Rifle. Third, the definition of background water quality from the RAP has been refined in several ways. Also, for the recent baseline risk assessment, all alluvial wells used to define background for the sites were located east of Old Rifle. In the RAP, alluvial background wells were also placed between the sites (downgradient of Old Rifle). Two additional wells were installed for the recent baseline risk assessment upgradient of Old Rifle which verified that several of the older wells (RFO-01-0597 and -0598) were in locations representative of background.

  2. Borehole Sonar Investigations at Idaho Springs, Colorado and Manatee Springs, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    in transmission range the SX-8 pulse-echo sonar did not provide useful tun- nel location data. All data from all tests were recorded on magnetic ...files from the borehole survey conlucted at Idaho Springs. Data have been reproduced from tle dati recorded on magnetic diskettes. The control computer...projected anamoly centerlines. .45- IDAHO SPRINGS LOOKING EASTWARD (TOWARD THE PORTAL) HOLE 7 HOLE 6 139. * 139 1420 e 142 1450 * 145 148. e* 148 154

  3. Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,215,000 South boundary: approximately 4,160,000 West boundary: approximately 216,000 East boundary: approximately 245,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs have geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. In addition, the explorationists discovered a very young Climax-style molybdenum porphyry system northeast of Rico, and drilling intersected thermal waters at depth. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Structural data collected by Flint Geothermal 2. Point information 3. Mines and prospects from the USGS MRDS dataset 4. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 5. Air photo lineaments 6. Areas covered by travertine 7. Groundwater geochemistry 8. Land ownership in the Rico area 9. Georeferenced geologic map of the Rico Quadrangle, by Pratt et al. 10. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  4. Geothermal heating from Pinkerton Hot Springs at Colorado Timberline Academy, Durango, Colorado. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.C.; Allen, R.W.; Beldock, J.

    1981-11-08

    The efforts to establish a greater pool of knowledge in the field of low temperature heat transfer for the application of geothermal spring waters to space heating are described. A comprehensive set of heat loss experiments involving passive radiant heating panels is conducted and the results presented in an easily interpretable form. Among the conclusions are the facts that heating a 65 to 70 F/sup 0/ space with 90 to 100 F/sup 0/ liquids is a practical aim. The results are compared with the much lower rates published in the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers SYSTEMS, 1976. A heat exchange chamber consisting of a 1000 gallon three compartment, insulated and buried tank is constructed and a control and pumping building erected over the tank. The tank is intended to handle the flow of geothermal waters from Pinkerton Hot Springs at 50 GPM prior to the wasting of the spring water at a disposal location. Approximately 375,000 Btu per hour should be available for heating assuming a 15 F/sup 0/ drop in water temperature. A combination of the panel heat loss experiments, construction of the heat exchange devices and ongoing collection of heat loss numbers adds to the knowledge available to engineers in sizing low temperature heat systems, useful in both solar and geothermal applications where source temperature may be often below 110 F/sup 0/.

  5. Hydrologic data for wells, springs, and streams in Boulder County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Dennis C.; Boyd, Elaine L.; Cain, Doug

    1979-01-01

    Hydrologic data collected in 1975-77 as part of a comprehensive water-resources investigation of Boulder County, Colo., by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Boulder County Health Department and the Colorado Geological Survey are presented in this report. The data, in tabular and graphic form, consist of water-quality analyses of selected constituents and geohydrologic-site, water-treatment, and sewage-treatment data for 609 wells and 48 springs; water-quality analyses for 102 of the wells and 9 of the springs; water-quality analyses of streamflow from 34 sites; and specific conductance and water-temperature measurements of streamflow from 3 sites. State and local officials in Boulder County may find these data useful in planning for residential, commercial, and industrial development. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. Rapids configuration and flow dynamics at Warm Springs Rapid on the Yampa River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, L.A.; Wohl, E.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Debris flows from the mouths of tributaries form the majority of the rapids in the Green and Colorado River systems. On June 10, 1965, a large debris flow dammed the Yampa River at Warm Springs Draw in Dinosaur National Monument, depositing nearly 10,000 metric tons of gravel and boulders in the river channel and forming Warm Springs Rapid. The Yampa River is the only river in the Colorado River system that is unregulated, and thus provides one of the few opportunities to study a canyon system under natural flow conditions. Kieffer (1985) has proposed that the configuration of a debris fan-rapid represents the interactions between the sediment characteristics (grain size, cementation) of the debris flow, the hydraulic conditions within the construction (roughness, velocities, channel dimensions), and the discharge history of the river since its modification. Warm Springs Rapid currently exhibits a constriction width to upstream channel width ratio of 0.59. Discharges on the Yampa River for June of 1965 averaged 420 m[sup 3]/sec. Estimates of the mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) through the initial channel constriction show that critical threshold velocities for sediment transport were reached for the range of boulder sizes contained in the debris fan (intermediate axis = 20--200 cm). However, the width and configuration of the present channel constriction could not have been formed by these flows. A discharge of 940 m[sup 3]/sec was recorded on the Yampa River on May 18, 1984. Mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) associated with a discharge of this magnitude may have been competent to erode the channel into its present configuration. Step-backwater modeling will be used to simulate the modification of Warm Springs Rapid through time and to quantify the exact relationship between the morphologic and hydraulic conditions in the evolution of a debris fan-rapid.

  7. Proceedings of the Symposium on Psychology in the Department of Defense (13th) Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on 15-17 April 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-17

    indicate that the cadet sample was more likely to engage in behavior that would be considered reckless, non- conforming, or impulsive . The primary hypothesis...1992 This document haM boon Oppioved for pl.,Il;C 1oleCse ond sale; its di tributjcn i unIited, Sponsor USAF Academy Department of Behavioral Sciences...DEFENSE 15-17 APRIL 1992 DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AND LEADERSHIP UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO Dit ib itFori SYMP

  8. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 Waldo Canyon Burn Area near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and potential volume of debris flows along the drainage network of the burned area and to estimate the same for 22 selected drainage basins along U.S. Highway 24 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (29 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (42 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (48 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities at the pour points of the the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 to 54 percent in response to the 2-year storm; from less than 1 to 74 percent in response to the 10-year storm; and from less than 1 to 82 percent in response to the 25-year storm. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the southern and southeastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Nine of the 22 drainage basins of interest have greater than a 40-percent probability of producing a debris flow in response to the 10-year storm. Estimated debris-flow volumes for all rainfalls modeled range from a low of 1,500 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce

  9. Nitrogen dynamics in two high elevation catchments during spring snowmelt 1996, Rocky Mountains, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Kristi; Brooks, Paul D.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    1999-10-01

    Snowpack, soil, soil leachate, and streamwater samples were analyzed for inorganic nitrogen (N) to quantify the net effect of soil processes on N export during spring snowmelt. The two catchments used for this work, Snake River and Deer Creek, are located in Summit County, Colorado and range in elevation from 3350 to 4120 m. Atmospheric N loading to the snowpack, 88 mg N m-2 (=0·88 kg N ha-1), was representative of low N deposition sites in the Rocky Mountains. Potentially mobile inorganic N in soil, 1252 to 1868 mg N m-2, was much greater than N inputs from snow. During spring snowmelt, nitrate (NO) leachate from alpine soil, 702 mg N m-2, was significantly greater than from sub-alpine forest and meadow soils (p<0·001). This pattern in soil leachate was consistent with streamwater N concentrations in Deer Creek, indicating the importance of soil processes in regulating N export from these high elevation catchments. Soils may function as sources or sinks of N during spring snowmelt; alpine soils were a significant source of N to the stream, while sub-alpine soils were possible N sinks.

  10. Colorado: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Colorado. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Colorado. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

  11. Proceedings of the Symposium: Psychology in the Department of Defense (9th) Held at Colorado Springs, Colorado on 18-20 April 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    Rosenbach Lieutenant Colonel John E. Anderson Major William H. Clover Major Robert A. Gregory Major Thomas M. McCloy Major William L. Derrick PROGRAM ...10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership U.S. Air Force Academy Colorado Springs...Radiation-Induced Combat Perfor- mance Degradation: The Defense Nuclear Agency Intermediate Dose Program Panel: Physical Performance Tests as Predictors

  12. Fire-related hyperconcentrated and debris flows on Storm King Mountain, Glenwood Springs, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, S.H.; Powers, P.S.; Savage, W.Z.

    1998-01-01

    The South Canyon Fire of July 1994 burned 800 ha of vegetation on Storm King Mountain near Glenwood Springs, Colorado, USA. On the night of 1 September 1994, in response to torrential rains, debris flows inundated seven areas along a 5-km length of interstate Highway 70. Mapping from aerial photographs, along with field observations and measurements, shows that the September rainstorm eroded unconsolidated, burned surficial soil from the hillsides, flushed dry-ravel deposits from the tributary channels, and transported loose, large material from the main channels. The hyperconcentrated flows and debris flows inundated 14 ha of Interstate Highway 70 with 70000 m3 of material. Although the burned area was seeded in November 1994, the potential for continuing debris-flow activity remains. Incision and entrainment of channel alluvium, as well as erosion of loose material from the hillslopes could result in future debris- and hyperconcentrated-flow activity.The South Canyon Fire of July 1994 burned 800 ha of vegetation on Storm King Mountain near Glenwood Springs, Colorado, USA. On the night of 1 September 1994, in response to torrential rains, debris flows inundated seven areas along a 5-km length of Interstate Highway 70. Mapping from aerial photographs, along with field observations and measurements, shows that the September rainstorm eroded unconsolidated, burned surficial soil from the hillsides, flushed dry-ravel deposits from the tributary channels, and transported loose, large material from the main channels. The hyperconcentrated flows and debris flows inundated 14 ha of Interstate Highway 70 with 70000 m3 of material. Although the burned area was seeded in November 1994, the potential for continuing debris-flow activity remains. Incision and entrainment of channel alluvium, as well as erosion of loose material from the hillslopes could result in future debris- and hyperconcentrated-flow activity.

  13. The plumbing system of the Pagosa thermal Springs, Colorado: Application of geologically constrained geophysical inversion and data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Cuttler, S.; Karaoulis, M.; Zhou, J.; Raynolds, B.; Batzle, M.

    2015-06-01

    Fault and fracture networks usually provide the plumbing for movement of hydrothermal fluids in geothermal fields. The Big Springs of Pagosa Springs in Colorado is known as the deepest geothermal hot springs in the world. However, little is known about the plumbing system of this hot spring, especially regarding the position of the reservoir (if any) or the position of the major tectonic faults controlling the flow of the thermal water in this area. The Mancos shale, a Cretaceous shale, dominates many of the surface expressions around the springs and impede an easy recognition of the fault network. We use three geophysical methods (DC resistivity, self-potential, and seismic) to image the faults in this area, most of which are not recognized in the geologic fault map of the region. Results from these surveys indicate that the hot Springs (the Big Spring and a warm spring located 1.8 km further south) are located at the intersection of the Victoire Fault, a major normal crustal fault, and two north-northeast trending faults (Fault A and B). Self-potential and DC resistivity tomographies can be combined and a set of joint attributes defined to determine the localization of the flow of hot water associated with the Eight Miles Mesa Fault, a second major tectonic feature responsible for the occurrence of warm springs further West and South from the Big Springs of Pagosa Springs.

  14. Digital Data from the Great Sand Dunes and Poncha Springs Aeromagnetic Surveys, South-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, B.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Bankey, Viki; New Sense Geophysics, Ltd.

    2009-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for two high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in south-central Colorado: one in the eastern San Luis Valley, Alamosa and Saguache Counties, and the other in the southern Upper Arkansas Valley, Chaffee County. In the San Luis Valley, the Great Sand Dunes survey covers a large part of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve and extends south along the mountain front to the foot of Mount Blanca. In the Upper Arkansas Valley, the Poncha Springs survey covers the town of Poncha Springs and vicinity. The digital files include grids, images, and flight-line data. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including two grids of reduced-to-pole aeromagnetic data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

  15. The South Canon Number 1 Coal Mine fire: Glenwood Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn B. Stracher; Steven Renner; Gary Colaizzi; Tammy P. Taylor

    2004-07-01

    The South Canon Number 1 Coal Mine fire, in South Canyon west of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, is a subsurface fire of unknown origin, burning since 1910. Subsidence features, gas vents, ash, condensates, and red oxidized shales are surface manifestations of the fire. The likely success of conventional fire-containment methodologies in South Canyon is questionable, although drilling data may eventually suggest a useful control procedure. Drill casings in voids in the D coal seam on the western slope trail are useful for collecting gas samples, monitoring the temperature of subsurface burning, and measuring the concentration of gases such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in the field. Coal fire gas and mineral condensates may contribute to the destruction of floral and faunal habitats and be responsible for a variety of human diseases; hence, the study of coal gas and its condensation products may prove useful in understanding environmental pollution created by coal mine fires. The 2002 Coal Seam Fire, which burned over 12,000 acres and destroyed numerous buildings in and around Glenwood Springs, exemplifies the potential danger an underground coal fire poses for igniting a surface fire.

  16. Snowpack chemistry at selected sites in northwestern Colorado during spring 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of the alpine and subalpine snowpack were collected in and near the headwater basins of the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado during maximum annual accumulation of snowpack in spring 1995. Sampling protocol at seven selected sites at more than 2,500 meters above sea level divided the snowpack into two distinct strata to enable separate chemical analyses of upper and lower layers of the annual snow cover. These two layers correspond to the early snow season beginning in September until December 12, 1994, and the remainder of the season from January 1 until the sampling date in spring 1995. At one site these two strata were resampled at closely spaced intervals defining substrata to observe variance within the two strata dividing the snow season. Analytical results of snowpack chemistry are presented in support of investigations of seasonal effects on ion concentrations in the snowpack. Chemical concentrations of major anions and cations, dissolved organic carbon, and alkalinity; measured pH; calculated charge balance between anions and cations; the stable-sulfur isotope ratio (34S/32S); and summary statistics of chemical concentrations are tabulated. Sampling sites are plotted on a map of the area. Spatial distributions of the concentrations of the hydrogen, nitrate, and sulfate ions and stable- sulfur isotope ratios also are mapped. Several unusual, late-season, snowfall events occurred during April and May of 1995 after the snowpack was sampled at most of the seven sites in the study area. Consequently, a considerable fraction of the total annual snowpack was not sampled. At one site, the full snowpack was sampled again in June, after the late-spring storms, for comparison to the chemistry of the snowpack sampled earlier in April. Precipitation chemistry from a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) collector located near the site is presented for comparison of the chemistry of the late-season snow to that of the typical annual snowpack season.

  17. Colorado

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... the Medicine Bow, Front, Gore and the Sawatch. The Colorado River originates in the Rocky Mountains National Park near Lake Granby - a dark ... between the Turquoise and Twin Lakes. The Colorado River traverses the length of the image, running roughly east and south to the ...

  18. Characterization and analysis of temporal and spatial variations in habitat and macroinvertebrate community structure, Fountain Creek basin, Colorado Springs and vicinity, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, James F.

    2002-01-01

    The Fountain Creek Basin in and around Colorado Springs, Colorado, is affected by various land- and water-use activities. Biological, hydrological, water-quality, and land-use data were collected at 10 sites in the Fountain Creek Basin from April 1998 through April 2001 to provide a baseline characterization of macroinvertebrate communities and habitat conditions for comparison in subsequent studies; and to assess variation in macroinvertebrate community structure relative to habitat quality. Analysis of variance results indicated that instream and riparian variables were not affected by season, but significant differences were found among sites. Nine metrics were used to describe and evaluate macroinvertebrate community structure. Statistical analysis indicated that for six of the nine metrics, significant variability occurred between spring and fall seasons for 60 percent of the sites. Cluster analysis (unweighted pair group method average) using macroinvertebrate presence-absence data showed a well-defined separation between spring and fall samples. Six of the nine metrics had significant spatial variation. Cluster analysis using Sorenson?s Coefficient of Community values computed from macroinvertebrate density (number of organisms per square meter) data showed that macroinvertebrate community structure was more similar among tributary sites than main-stem sites. Canonical correspondence analysis identified a substrate particle-size gradient from site-specific species-abundance data and environmental correlates that decreased the 10 sites to 5 site clusters and their associated taxa.

  19. Extension of Phoenix/City of Colorado Springs solar assisted heat pump project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-31

    Ground coupled heat pump systems employing commercially available equipment have been installed and tested in three different climatic regions of the US in residential, commercial, and industrial building applications. These systems were automatically controlled to respond to load requirements and provided space heating, space cooling, and domestic water heating. Results of the key technical and economic tradeoff work are presented. Component and configuration options are screened and a final cost effective design is justified. Final system design specifications are given. A complete preliminary design of a natural gas fired heat pump is reported, including a performance analysis. The market side economics of the system is examined, including load and system performance, system and utility energy cost summaries, and an economic analysis for new and retrofit systems. The impact of electric and gas utility interfaces with the system is discussed. The status of the natural gas and electric power utilities systems in the Colorado Springs area are assessed. Some options for commercializing the system are discussed. (LEW)

  20. The role of stalking in domestic violence crime reports generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, P; Thoennes, N

    2000-01-01

    A review of 1,785 domestic violence crime reports generated by the Colorado Springs Police Department found that 1 in 6 (16.5 percent) contained evidence the suspect stalked the victim. Female victims were significantly more likely than male victims to allege stalking by their partners (18.3 vs. 10.5 percent). Most stalkers were former rather than current intimates. Regardless of victims' gender, reports with stalking allegations were significantly less likely to mention physical abuse or victim injury in the presenting condition, to involve households with children, or to involve victims and suspects who were using alcohol at the time of the report. Female victims who alleged stalking by their partner were significantly less likely than female victims who did not allege stalking to be emotionally distraught at the time of the report, but significantly more likely to have an active restraining order against the suspect, and to sign releases to facilitate the police investigation. Police almost never charged domestic violence stalking suspects with stalking, preferring instead to charge them with harassment or violation of a restraining order.

  1. Discharge and water quality of springs in Roan and Parachute Creek basins, northwestern Colorado, 1981-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation and interpretation of discharge, water-quality, and radiochemical data collected at springs in the oil-shale regions of Roan and Parachute Creek basins, Colorado, from 1981 to 1983. Springs located on upland plateaus and ridges are mixed-cation bicarbonate water types with 216 to 713 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Calcite and dolomite dissolution are dominant chemical reactions in upland springs. Springs located in the canyons contain greater concentrations of sodium and sulfate and have 388 to 3,970 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Gypsum dissolution is an important chemical reaction in canyon spring water. The only trace constituents with mean concentration greater than 10 micrograms per liter in the study area were barium, boron, lithium and strontium. None of the canyon springs investigated represent discharge from the lower aquifer in the Green River Formation. Analysis of chemical and discharge data for streams in the Roan Creek drainage showed evidence of lower-aquifer discharge into the canyons. Springs located near an oil-shale mine or processing plant could be used for monitoring groundwater quality and quantity. Bicarbonate, fluoride, arsenic, boron, lithium, mercury, ammonia, and organic carbon may be chemical indicators of mine or process-water contamination of shallow aquifers near an oil-shale plant or mine. (USGS)

  2. Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.; Dolton, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

  3. Areas with Surface Thermal Anomalies as Detected by ASTER and LANDSAT Data around Pinkerton Hot Springs, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalid Hussein

    2012-02-01

    This map shows areas of anomalous surface temperature in northern Saguache Counties identified from ASTER and LANDSAT thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature for the ASTER data was calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas having anomalous temperature in the ASTER data are shown in blue diagonal hatch, while areas having anomalous temperature in the LANDSAT data are shown in magenta on the map. Thermal springs and areas with favorable geochemistry are also shown. Springs or wells having non-favorable geochemistry are shown as blue dots. Publication Information: Originator: Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder

  4. Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  5. Hydrogeology of the Leadville limestone and other paleozoic rocks in northwestern Colorado, with results of aquifer tests at Glenwood Springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Paleozoic rocks in northwestern Colorado were investigated during the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis of the Upper Colorado River Basin. Paleozoic rocks in the study area are grouped into 11 hydrostratigraphic units on the basis of lithologic and hydrologic properties. Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks and Pennsylvanian and Permian sandstone are regional aquifers, with natural discharges commonly ranging from 50 to 1,000 gal/min. Other hydrostratigraphic units in the area are either local aquifers or confining layers, with discharges rarely exceeding 50 gal/min. Aquifer tests at Glenwood Springs indicate that the Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks unit locally has a transmissivity of 47,000 sq ft/day, a storage coefficient of 0.0005, and a hydraulic conductivity of more than 100 ft/day. Hydraulic conductivities in most hydrostratigraphic units decrease with distance away from structural uplifts. Water in the Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks unit flows from structural uplifts to structural and fluvial basins. This hydrostratigraphic unit supplies water to streams that drain the White River Plateau, hot springs at Glenwood Springs, and artesian wells in the Burns basin. (USGS)

  6. Areas with Surface Thermal Anomalies as Detected by ASTER and LANDSAT Data around South Canyon Hot Springs, Garfield County, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalid Hussein

    2012-02-01

    This map shows areas of anomalous surface temperature around South Canyon Hot Springs as identified from ASTER and LANDSAT thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature for the ASTER data was calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas having anomalous temperature in the ASTER data are shown in blue diagonal hatch, while areas having anomalous temperature in the LANDSAT data are shown in magenta on the map. Thermal springs and areas with favorable geochemistry are also shown. Springs or wells having non-favorable geochemistry are shown as blue dots. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder

  7. Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, using geoelectrical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, K.; Revil, A.; Jardani, A.; Henderson, F.; Batzle, M.; Haas, A.

    2010-12-01

    In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas valley is characterized by a right-lateral offset at Mount Princeton Hot springs. This offset is associated with the Chalk Cliffs of hydrothermally altered quartz monzonite. Because fault identification in this area is complicated by quaternary deposits (including glacial and fluvial deposits), we use DC electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential mapping to identify preferential fluid flow pathways. The geophysical data (over 5600 resistivity and 2700 self-potential measurements) provide evidence of the existence of a dextral strike slip fault zone (Fault B) responsible for the offset of the Sawatch fault. A segment of this dextral strike slip fault (termed U1) is acting as the dominant vertical flow path bringing thermal waters to a shallow unconfined aquifer. Upwelling of the thermal waters is also observed at two zones (U2 and U3) of an open fracture called Fault A. This fault is located at the tip of the Sawatch fault and is likely associated with an extensional strain regime in this area. Self-potential measurements are used to estimate the flux of upwelling thermal water. The upflow estimate (4 ± 1 × 10 3 m 3/day for the open segment of the Fault B and 2 ± 1 × 10 3 m 3/day for Fault A) from the geophysical data is remarkably consistent with the downstream Mt. Princeton hot water production (4.3-4.9) × 10 3 m 3/day at approximately 60-86 °C). A temperature map indicates that a third upwelling zone termed U4 may exist at the southern tip of the Sawatch fault.

  8. Methods to determine transit losses for return flows of transmountain water in Fountain Creek between Colorado Springs and the Arkansas River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuhn, Gerhard

    1988-01-01

    Methods were developed by which transit losses could be determined for transmountain return flows in Fountain Creek between Colorado Springs, Colorado, and its confluence with the Arkansas River. The study reach is a complex hydrologic system wherein a substantially variable streamflow interacts with an alluvial aquifer. The study approach included: (1) calibration and verification of a streamflow-routing model that contained a bank-storage-discharge component; (2) use of the model to develop the methods by which transit losses could be calculated; and (3) design of an application method for calculating daily transit loss using the model results. Sources of transit losses that were studied are bank storage, channel storage, and evaporation. Magnitude of bank-storage loss primarily depends on duration of a recovery period during which water lost to bank storage is returned to the stream. Net loss to bank storage can vary from about 50% for a 0-day recovery period to about 2% for a 180-day recovery period. Virtually all water lost to bank storage could be returned to the stream with longer recovery periods. Channel-storage loss was determined to be about 10% of a release quantity. Because the loss on any given day is totally recovered in the form of gains from channel storage on the subsequent day, channel storage is a temporary transit loss. Evaporation loss generally is less than 5% of a given daily transmountain return-flow release, depending on month of year. Evaporation losses are permanently lost from the system. (USGS)

  9. Source characterization of volatile organic compounds in the Colorado Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area during spring and summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeleira, A.; Pollack, I. B.; Sive, B.; Zhou, Y.; Fischer, E. V.; Farmer, D. K.

    2017-03-01

    Hourly measurements of 46 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO, were collected over 16 weeks in spring and summer 2015. Average VOC reactivity (1.2 s-1 in spring and 2.4 s-1 in summer) was lower than most other U.S. urban sites. Positive matrix factorization analysis identified five VOC factors in the spring, corresponding to sources from (1) long-lived oil and natural gas (ONG-long lived), (2) short-lived oil and natural gas (ONG-short lived), (3) traffic, (4) background, and (5) secondary chemical production. In the summer, an additional biogenic factor was dominated by isoprene. While ONG-related VOCs were the single largest contributor (40-60%) to the calculated VOC reactivity with hydroxyl radicals (OH) throughout the morning in both spring and summer, the biogenic factor substantially enhanced afternoon and evening (2-10 P.M. local time) VOC reactivity (average of 21%; maxima of 49% of VOC reactivity) during summertime. These results contrast with a previous summer 2012 campaign which showed that biogenics contributed only 8% of VOC reactivity on average. The interannual differences suggest that the role of biogenic VOCs in the Colorado Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) varies with environmental conditions such as drought stress. Overall, the NFRMA was more strongly influenced by ONG sources of VOCs than other urban and suburban regions in the U.S.

  10. Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An early-season snowfall accents the Rocky Mountains through western and central Colorado. This true-color image made from data collected by MODIS on October 26, 2001, highlights the contrast between various irrigated areas and the otherwise dry environment at the foothills of the Rockies. One such example is the city of Denver and its outlying suburbs, which can be seen best in the high-resolution image. In areas that would normally harbor drought-tolerant grasses, shrubs and trees, humans are living, watering their lawns, and farming; those watered, green areas differ substantially from the surrounding hues of brown. Numerous National Parks and Monuments dot the Southwestern U.S. The Great Sand Dunes National Monument is one such park. Running along the western base the Sangre de Cristo Range(just below the image's center), a subsection of the Rockies, the monument possesses some of the highest inland sand dunes in the U.S., with crests reaching over 700 feet.

  11. Water quality and aquatic toxicity data of 2002 spring thaw conditions in the upper Animas River watershed, Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, D.L.; Wirt, L.; Besser, J.M.; Wright, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic, water-quality, and biologic toxicity data collected during the annual spring thaw of 2002 in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado. The spring-thaw runoff is a concern because elevated concentrations of iron oxyhydroxides can contain sorbed trace metals that are potentially toxic to aquatic life. Water chemistry of streams draining the San Juan Mountains is affected by natural acid drainage and weathering of hydrothermal altered volcanic rocks and by more than a century of mining activities. The timing of the spring-thaw sampling effort was determined by reviewing historical climate and stream-flow hydrographs and current weather conditions. Twenty-one water-quality samples were collected between 11:00 AM March 27, 2002 and 6:00 PM March 30, 2002 to characterize water chemistry at the A-72 gage on the upper Animas River below Silverton. Analyses of unfiltered water at the A-72 gage showed a relation between turbidity and total-recoverable iron concentrations, and showed diurnal patterns. Copper and lead concentrations were related to iron concentrations, indicating that these elements are probably sorbed to colloidal iron material. Calcium, strontium, and sulfate concentrations showed overall decreasing trends due to dilution, but the loads of those constituents increased over the sampling period. Nine water-quality samples were collected near the confluence of Mineral Creek with the Animas River, the confluence of Cement Creek with the Animas River, and on the upper Animas River above the confluence with Cement Creek (three samples at each site). A total of six bulk water-toxicity samples were collected before, during, and after the spring thaw from the Animas River at the A-72 gage site. Toxicity tests conducted with the bulk water samples on amphipods did not show strong differences in toxicity among the three sampling periods; however, toxicity of river water to fathead minnows showed a decreasing trend

  12. Report upon the determination of the astronomical co-ordinates of the primary stations at Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, and Colorado Springs, Colorado Territory, made during the years 1872 and 1873

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, George Montague; Kampf, F.; Clark, J.H.

    1874-01-01

    I [George M. Wheeler] have the honor to forward herewith a report embodying the results from the astronomical observations made at Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, and Colorado Springs, Colorado Territory. They are typical stations for the years 1872 and 1873, although not selected because of probable errors that are a minimum. Attention is invited to the methods employed and the order of sequence in reporting the results. Uniformity of plan seems to be a matter of so great importance in the prosecution of astronomical work in the western interior that the one now in use is submitted for consideration as a step at least in this direction.

  13. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey To Image Shallow Faults, Poncha Springs and Vicinity, Chaffee County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data were acquired over the town of Poncha Springs and areas to the northwest to image faults, especially where they are concealed. Because this area has known hot springs, faults or fault intersections at depth can provide pathways for upward migration of geothermal fluids or concentrate fracturing that enhances permeability. Thus, mapping concealed faults provides a focus for follow-up geothermal studies. Fault interpretation was accomplished by synthesizing interpretative maps derived from several different analytical methods, along with preliminary depth estimates. Faults were interpreted along linear aeromagnetic anomalies and breaks in anomaly patterns. Many linear features correspond to topographic features, such as drainages. A few of these are inferred to be fault-related. The interpreted faults show an overall pattern of criss-crossing fault zones, some of which appear to step over where they cross. Faults mapped by geologists suggest similar crossing patterns in exposed rocks along the mountain front. In low-lying areas, interpreted faults show zones of west-northwest-, north-, and northwest-striking faults that cross ~3 km (~2 mi) west-northwest of the town of Poncha Springs. More easterly striking faults extend east from this juncture. The associated aeromagnetic anomalies are likely caused by magnetic contrasts associated with faulted sediments that are concealed less than 200 m (656 ft) below the valley floor. The faults may involve basement rocks at greater depth as well. A relatively shallow (<300 m or <984 ft), faulted basement block is indicated under basin-fill sediments just north of the hot springs and south of the town of Poncha Springs.

  14. 75 FR 30806 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... notice that on May 17, 2010, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs... Affairs, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80944 at 719-667- 7514 or David R. Cain, Senior Counsel, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, P.O. Box 1087, Colorado...

  15. 78 FR 58555 - Public Land Order No. 7821; Withdrawal of National Forest System Land for Steamboat Rock Picnic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Steamboat Rock Picnic Grounds; South Dakota AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land... to protect the recreational uses and improvements at the Steamboat Rock Picnic Grounds within the... and improvements within the Steamboat Rock Picnic Grounds. Order By virtue of the authority vested in...

  16. Eldorado Springs member of the Skull Creek Shale in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    The Eldorado Springs Sandstone crops out at the west edge of the Denver Basin and is mapped in the subsurface as an elongate linear sand body that extends at least 70 mi east-southeast of the outcrop. Along its axis, the sand body thickness ranges from 63 ft at the type section to about 25 ft on the east side of the study area. North of the axis, the sandstone thins as the base interfingers with the Lower Cretaceous Skull Creek Shale. To the south of the main axis, the sand interfingers with silty facies. The Eldorado Springs displays a cleaning upward signature, and is thought to have been deposited in an offshore bar sub-parallel to shoreline. The eastward thinning of the sand body suggests an orientation oblique to the Skull Creek shoreline, the thinner end being farther from shore. The overlying Skull Creek Shale thins over this sand body. This subtle paleotopographic effect persisted through the close of Muddy (J) time. The Eldorado Springs consists of very fine- to fine-grained siliceous sandstone with low porosity and permeability. Pore-lining clays that locally bridge pore throats and variable amounts of silica and ankerite cement reduce reservoir quality. this unit is not considered a good stand-alone target for hydrocarbon exploration but instead as a potential secondary pay in wells with primary pay in the D or Muddy (J). Production has been established from this unit in a well located in Sec. 20, T4S, R63W. A large part of this thick and laterally continuous sandstone body falls within the window of the basin center hydrocarbon trap. The Eldorado Springs Member offers a potentially large hydrocarbon resource that is virtually untapped.

  17. Checklist of the vascular plants of Steamboat Mountain Research Natural Area.

    Treesearch

    S. Reid Schuller; Robert E. Frenkel

    1981-01-01

    Lists 237 vascular plant taxa found in the 570-hectare Steamboat Mountain Research Natural Area. Notes on habitats, community types, and abundance are included for most taxa. This research note provides scientists, educators, and land managers with baseline information on the presence, location, and abundance of vascular plants within the Steamboat Mountain Research...

  18. Direct utilization of geothermal energy for Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Final report, June 1979-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.

    1984-08-01

    The Pagosa Springs Geothermal District Heating System was conceptualized, designed, and constructed between 1979 to 1984 under the US Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to demonstrate the feasibility for utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources for direct-use applications. The Pagosa Springs system successfully provides space heating to public buildings, school facilities, residences, and commercial establishments at costs significantly lower than costs of available conventional fuels. The Pagosa Springs project encompassed a full range of technical, institutional, and economic activities. Geothermal reservoir evaluations and testing were performed, and two productive approx.140/sup 0/F geothermal supply wells were successfully drilled and completed. Transmission and distribution system design, construction, startup, and operation were achieved with minimum difficulty. The geothermal system operation during the first two heating seasons has been fully reliable and well respected in the community. The project has proven that low to moderate-temperature waters can effectively meet required heating loads, even for harsh winter-mountain environments. The principal difficulty encountered has been institutional in nature and centers on the obtaining of the geothermal production well permits and the adjudicated water rights necessary to supply the geothermal hot water fluids for the full operating life of the system. 28 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Mines and Prospects, Idaho Springs District, Clear Creek and Gilpin Counties, Colorado - Descriptions and Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, Robert Hadley; Drake, Avery Ala

    1966-01-01

    The Idaho Springs mining district forms an important segment of the Front Range mineral belt, a northeast-trending zone of coextensive intrusive rocks and hydrothermal ore deposits of early Tertiary age. This belt, which is about 50 miles long, extends from the region just west of Boulder southwestward across the Front Range. From 1859, when placer gold was discovered in Idaho Springs and lode gold in Central City, through 1959, ores valued at about $200 million were shipped from a 50-square-mile area that includes the Idaho Springs and adjacent districts to the north, west, and southwest. The adjacent Central City district, which produced ores valued at more than $100 million, is clearly the most important district in the mineral belt. The Idaho Springs district from 1860 to 1959 produced ores valued at about $65 million, and the districts to the west and southwest produced smaller amounts. Gold has accounted for about 60 percent of the value of the ore, but in some areas silver provides the chief values, and copper, lead, and zinc add value to the ores in most areas. Mining activity in the Idaho Springs and adjacent districts was at its 'heyday' in the late 1800's, it declined sharply after 1914, it was somewhat renewed during the 1930's, and it greatly declined during World War II. In the 1950's uranium prospecting stimulated some mining activity. No uranium was produced, however, and at the close of the decade only one mine--the Bald Eagle--was being worked for its precious- and base-metal ores. In this report, 135 mines and prospects are described. The mines and prospects described are those that were accessible at the time of this study, as well as a few inaccessible properties for which some information was available. Most of the data for the inaccessible or unimportant properties were obtained from Bastin and Hill (1917) and Spurr, Garrey, and Ball (1908). The following list shows, in alphabetical order, the names of about 325 openings of mines and

  20. Accelerator dating of a mixed assemblage of late Pleistocene insect fossils from the Lamb Spring site, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.; Toolin, Laurence J.

    1990-01-01

    Fossil insects from the late-glacial deposits at the Lamb Spring archaeological site, near Denver, Colorado, are relatively abundant and diverse, providing considerable paleoecological data for the site. The late Pleistocene insect fauna from the site comprises 72 identified taxa, principally beetles. However, the fauna presented an interpretive problem because it contained a mixture of prairie and alpine tundra species. This was initially considered to be the result of a mixing of faunal elements during the climatic transition of late-glacial times, a "no-modern-analog" fauna. Accelerator dating of insect fossil specimens from the two ecological groups helped resolve the paleoecological problem. Fossil specimens of the prairie-associated species were dated at 17,850 ± 550 yr B.P., while specimens of the tundra-associated species yielded an age of 14,500 ± 500 yr B.P. These dates reveal that what appeared to be an ecological mixing was probably a taphonomic problem, wherein full-glacial-age fossils were probably reworked into latest Wisconsin sediments. While both faunal assemblages reflect climatic conditions substantially colder than present, initial results suggest that the full-glacial fauna represents a cold, dry grassland or steppe environment, while the younger fauna suggests moister and more tundra-like conditions.

  1. Influence of Riparian Tree Phenology on Lower Colorado River Spring-Migrating Birds: Implications of Flower Cueing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGrath, Laura J.; van Riper, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Neotropical migrant birds make choices about which habitats are most likely to provide successful foraging locations during migration, but little is known about how these birds recognize and process environmental clues that indicate the presence of prey species. Aspects of tree phenology, notably flowering of trees along the lower Colorado River corridor, coincide with the migratory stopovers of leaf-gleaning insectivorous songbirds and may be an important indicator of arthropod prey species availability. Shifting tree flowering and leaf flush during the spring migration period presents avian insectivores with an assortment of foraging opportunities. During two field seasons at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Arizona, we examined riparian tree species to test whether leaf-gleaning insectivorous birds are attracted to the flowering condition of trees in choosing foraging sites. We predicted that flowering trees would host more insect prey resources, would thus show increased visit rates, length of stays and attack ratios of migrant avian insectivores, and that those arthropods would be found in the stomach contents of the birds. Paired trees of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), displaying heavy and light degrees of flowering were observed to test these predictions. To test whether birds are tracking arthropods directly or are using flowers as a proximate cue, we removed flowers from selected trees and paired these treated trees with neighboring high flowering trees, which served as controls. Avian foraging behavior, avian diets, arthropods, and phenology data were collected at the same time to control for temporal differences in insect availability, plant phenology, and differences in stopover arrivals of birds. We documented five patterns from this study: 1) Higher abundance and richness of arthropods were found on honey mesquite trees with greater numbers of flowers. 2) Arthropod abundance and richness increased as flowering

  2. 75 FR 52935 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... notice that on August 12, 2010, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs.... Susan C. Stires, Director, Regulatory Affairs, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, P.O. Box 1087, Colorado... President and General Counsel, Colorado Interstate Gas Company; P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs,...

  3. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: a tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, John E.; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-12-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2-10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10-90 % flow-exceedance ( R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  4. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: A tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solder, John; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2−10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10–90 % flow-exceedance (R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  5. Biotic and abiotic processes controlling water chemistry during snowmelt at rabbit ears pass, Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Leavesley, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical composition of snowmelt, groundwater, and streamwater was monitored during the spring of 1991 and 1992 in a 200-ha subalpine catchment on the western flank of the Rocky Mountains near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Most of the snowmelt occurred during a one-month period annually that began in mid-May 1991 and mid-April 1992. The average water quality characteristics of individual sampling sites (meltwater, streamwater, and groundwater) were similar in 1991 and 1992. The major ions in meltwater were differentially eluted from the snowpack, and meltwater was dominated by Ca2+, SO4/2-, and NO3/-. Groundwater and streamwater were dominated by weathering products, including Ca2+, HCO3/- (measured as alkalinity), and SiO2, and their concentrations decreased as snowmelt progressed. One well had extremely high NO3/- concentrations, which were balanced by Ca2+ concentrations. For this well, hydrogen ion was hypothesized to be generated from nitrification in overlying soils, and subsequently exchanged with other cations, particularly Ca2+. Solute concentrations in streamwater also decreased as snowmelt progressed. Variations in groundwater levels and solute concentrations indicate thai most of the meltwater traveled through the surficial materials. A mass balance for 1992 indicated that the watershed retained H+, NH4/+, NO3/-, SO4/2- and Cl- and was the primary source of base cations and other weathering products. Proportionally more SO4/2- was deposited with the unusually high summer rainfall in 1992 compared to that released from snowmelt, whereas NO3/- was higher in snowmelt and Cl- was the same. The sum of snowmelt and rainfall could account for greater than 90% of the H+ and NH4/+ retained by the watershed and greater than 50% of the NO3/-.The chemical composition of snowmelt, groundwater, and streamwater was monitored during the spring of 1991 and 1992 in a 200-ha subalpine catchment on the western flank of the Rocky Mountains near Steamboat Springs

  6. Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA Report No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Engen, I.A.

    1981-11-01

    This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effort assesses the conversion of Colorado School District 50 facilities - a high school and gym, and a middle school building - at Pagosa Springs, Colorado to geothermal space heating. A preliminary cost-benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 150/sup 0/F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system-compatible components would be used for the building modifications. Asbestos-cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates. In view of the favorable economics and the uncertain future availability and escalating cost of natural gas, the conversion appears economicaly feasible and desirable.

  7. Water-quality assessment and macroinvertebrate data for the Upper Yampa River watershed, Colorado, 1975 through 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Moore, Jennifer L.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.; Dupree, Jean A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was initiated in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Routt County, the Colorado Water Conservation Board, and the City of Steamboat Springs, to compile and analyze historic water-quality data and assess water-quality conditions in the Upper Yampa River watershed (UYRW) in northwestern Colorado. Water-quality data for samples collected by federal, state, and local agencies for various periods from 1975 through 2009 were compiled and assessed for streams, lakes, reservoirs, and groundwater in the UYRW, including the Elkhead Creek subwatershed and the Yampa River watershed that is upstream from Elkhead Creek. For selected physical-property and chemical-constituent data for samples collected from surface-water sites and groundwater wells in the UYRW, this report: (1) characterizes available data through statistical summaries, (2) analyzes the spatial and temporal distribution of water-quality conditions, (3) identifies temporal trends in water quality, where possible, (4) provides comparisons to federal and state water-quality standards and recommendations, and (5) identifies factors affecting the quality of water. In addition, the availability and characteristics of macroinvertebrate data collected in the UYRW are described.

  8. Colorado composting

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, K.

    1994-08-01

    Composting operations come in all shapes and sizes, and there are many variables in operating a successful composting operation. The author looked at two markedly different composting operations in Colorado--the recycling/composting program at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, and the biosolids composting operation at the Upper Eagle Valley Sanitation District, Colorado Springs--to report on how each operation was developed and how both are working today. At the Air Force Academy, a three-acre base for the composting facility was prepared in the fall of 1991. As word of the facility started getting out, people began offering to bring in their clean, green yard trimmings. A Wildcat Compost Turner made it possible for the academy to add a variety of organic matter to the typical yard clippings it was collecting. Material currently being composted at the academy includes a mixture of approximately 15% grass, 25% sod, 10% pine needles, and 50% stable bedding. Four years ago, Colorado's Upper Eagle Valley Consolidated Sanitation District looked to composting as a way to handle its biosolids. A small, two-acre parcel, three miles from the nearest community, was chosen as the composting site. After meeting all of the associated regulations, trucks began hauling biosolids to the site. The sludge was mixed with sawdust and recycled sludge, and then windrowed. The district already has 14,000 cubic yards of compost stored up and ready to go.

  9. 33 CFR 117.1059 - Snohomish River, Steamboat Slough, and Ebey Slough.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... draws of the twin, SR 529, highway bridges across the Snohomish River, mile 3.6, at Everett shall open... bridge across Ebey Slough, at Marysville, and at all other times to the drawtender at the twin SR 529... of the twin, SR 529, highway bridges across Steamboat Slough, miles 1.1 and 1.2, near Marysville...

  10. 33 CFR 117.1059 - Snohomish River, Steamboat Slough, and Ebey Slough.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... draws of the twin, SR 529, highway bridges across the Snohomish River, mile 3.6, at Everett shall open... bridge across Ebey Slough, at Marysville, and at all other times to the drawtender at the twin SR 529... of the twin, SR 529, highway bridges across Steamboat Slough, miles 1.1 and 1.2, near Marysville...

  11. Evaluation of water quality, suspended sediment, and stream morphology with an emphasis on effects of stormflow on Fountain and Monument Creek basins, Colorado Springs and vicinity, Colorado, 1981 through 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Ferguson, Sheryl A.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.; August, Marianne; Payne, William F.; Bruce, James F.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents water quality and suspended sediment with an emphasis on evaluating the effects of stormflow on Fountain Creek Basin in the vicinity of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Water-quality data collected at 11 sites between 1981 and 2001 were used to evaluate the effects of stormflow on water quality. Suspended-sediment data collected at seven sites from 1998 through 2001 were used to evaluate effects of stormflow on suspended-sediment concentrations, discharges, and yields. Data were separated into three flow regimes: base flow, normal flow, and stormflow. A comparison of stormwater-quality concentrations measured between 1981 and 2001 to Colorado acute instream standards indicated that, except for isolated occurrences, stormwater quality met acute instream standards. At several sites, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand, fecal coliform, and selected nutrient concentrations tended to be highest during stormflow and lowest during base flow. Dissimilar to the other nutrients, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate concentrations generally were highest during base flow and lowest during stormflow. Most dissolved trace-element concentrations associated with stormflow decreased or showed little change compared to base flow. However, median concentrations of total copper, iron, lead, nickel, manganese, and zinc for stormflow samples generally were much larger than nonstorm samples. The substantially larger concentrations of total copper, iron, lead, nickel, manganese, and zinc measured at site 5800 during stormflow as compared to other sites indicates a relatively large source of these metals in the reach between sites 5530 and 5800. Semi-volatile organic compounds in samples collected during stormflow were detected relatively infrequently at the four sites monitored; however, analysis of pesticide data collected during stormflow showed a relatively frequent detection of pesticides at low levels. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and particulate trace-element loads substantially

  12. 78 FR 47330 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ..., Stormwater www.bakeraecom.com/ 08-0083P). Mayor, City of Authority, 76 index.php/colorado/ Centennial... Donald Rosier, Department of www.bakeraecom.com/ Jefferson County Chairman, Planning and index.php....bakeraecom.com/ 0177P). Steamboat Steamboat index.php/colorado/ Springs, P.O. Springs, CO routt/. Box 775088...

  13. Watershed scale response to climate change--Yampa River Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Lauren E.; Battaglin, William A.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    General Circulation Model simulations of future climate through 2099 project a wide range of possible scenarios. To determine the sensitivity and potential effect of long-term climate change on the freshwater resources of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey Global Change study, "An integrated watershed scale response to global change in selected basins across the United States" was started in 2008. The long-term goal of this national study is to provide the foundation for hydrologically based climate change studies across the nation. Fourteen basins for which the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System has been calibrated and evaluated were selected as study sites. Precipitation Runoff Modeling System is a deterministic, distributed parameter watershed model developed to evaluate the effects of various combinations of precipitation, temperature, and land use on streamflow and general basin hydrology. Output from five General Circulation Model simulations and four emission scenarios were used to develop an ensemble of climate-change scenarios for each basin. These ensembles were simulated with the corresponding Precipitation Runoff Modeling System model. This fact sheet summarizes the hydrologic effect and sensitivity of the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System simulations to climate change for the Yampa River Basin at Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

  14. Volusia Blue Spring - A Hydrological Treasure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    Springs are natural openings in the ground through which water beneath the surface discharges into hydrologic features such as lakes, rivers, or the ocean. The beautiful springs and spring rivers are among Florida's most valued natural resources; their gemlike refreshing waters have been a focal point of life from prehistoric times to the present (2008). The steady flow of freshwater at a nearly constant water temperature attracted animals now long absent from Florida's landscape. Fossil remains and human artifacts, discovered by divers from many spring runs, attest to the importance of springs to the State's earliest inhabitants. Explorers of Florida, from Ponce de Leon to John and William Bartram and others, often mentioned the springs that were scattered across central and northern Florida. As colonists and settlers began to inhabit Florida, springs continued to be the focus of human activity, becoming sites of missions, towns, and steamboat landings.

  15. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  16. Spring runoff water-chemistry data from the Standard Mine and Elk Creek, Gunnison County, Colorado, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Mast, M. Alisa; Marsik, Joseph; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected approximately every two weeks during the spring of 2010 from the Level 1 portal of the Standard Mine and from two locations on Elk Creek. The objective of the sampling was to: (1) better define the expected range and timing of variations in pH and metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge and Elk Creek during spring runoff; and (2) further evaluate possible mechanisms controlling water quality during spring runoff. Samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (oxygen-18 and deuterium). The Level 1 portal sample and one of the Elk Creek samples (EC-CELK1) were collected from the same locations as samples taken in the spring of 2007, allowing comparison between the two different years. Available meteorological and hydrologic data suggest that 2010 was an average water year and 2007 was below average. Field pH and dissolved metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge had the following ranges: pH, 2.90 to 6.23; zinc, 11.2 to 26.5 mg/L; cadmium, 0.084 to 0.158 mg/L; manganese, 3.23 to 10.2 mg/L; lead, 0.0794 to 1.71 mg/L; and copper, 0.0674 to 1.14 mg/L. These ranges were generally similar to those observed in 2007. Metal concentrations near the mouth of Elk Creek (EC-CELK1) were substantially lower than in 2007. Possible explanations include remedial efforts at the Standard Mine site implemented after 2007 and greater dilution due to higher Elk Creek flows in 2010. Temporal patterns in pH and metal concentrations in Level 1 discharge were similar to those observed in 2007, with pH, zinc, cadmium, and manganese concentrations generally decreasing, and lead and copper generally increasing during the snowmelt runoff period. Zinc and cadmium concentrations were inversely correlated with flow and thus apparently dilution-controlled. Lead and copper concentrations were inversely correlated with pH and thus apparently pH-controlled. Zinc, cadmium, and manganese concentrations near the

  17. Major-ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations in the Steamboat Creek basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom-sediment concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, and organic carbon were largest in City Creek. In City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek, concentrations for 11 constituents--antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese (Horse Heaven Creek only), mercury, selenium, silver, zinc, and organic carbon (City Creek only)--exceeded concentrations considered to be enriched in streams of the nearby Willamette River Basin, whereas in Steamboat Creek only two trace elements--antimony and nickel--exceeded Willamette River enriched concentrations. Bottom-sediment concentrations for six of these constituents in City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek--arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc--also exceeded interim Canadian threshold effect level (TEL) concentrations established for the protection of aquatic life, whereas only four constituents between Singe Creek and Steamboat Creek--arsenic, chromium, copper (Singe Creek only), and nickel--exceeded the TEL concentrations.

  18. Radioactivity and uranium content of the Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale and associated rocks in western Kansas and eastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, Edwin R.

    1955-01-01

    As a part of the Geological Survey's program of investigating uranium-bearing carbonaceous rocks on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a reconnaissance of the Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale in western Kansas and eastern Colorado was conducted during 1954. The Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale and its lateral equivalents ranges from 155 to about 500 feet in thickness and generally contains about 0.001 percent uranium, but some beds contain larger amounts. A 6-foot thick shale bed in Cheyenne County, Colo., contains about 0.006 percent uranium, a 4 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Crowley County, Colo., is estimated to contain between 0.004 and 0.005 percent uranium, and a 3 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Kiowa County, Colo., contains about 0.004 percent uranium. At several outcrop localities, sequences of beds as much as 9 1/2 feet thick contain about 0.003 percent uranium. Data from wells indicate that the 4 1/2-foot thick sequence of beds in Crowley County, Colo., may have a lateral extent of at least 5 1/2 miles. A gamma-ray log of a well in Yuma County, Colo., indicates the presence of a sequence of beds 66 feet thick which contains 0.005 to 0.010 percent equivalent uranium. No definite pattern of areal distribution of radioactivity and uranium content in the Sharon Springs is indicated by available data. Lateral variation in uranium content of individual beds was not noted in outcrops, which seldom extend more than 150 feet, but subsurface data from gamma-ray logs of wells indicate that both the maximum radioactivity and the thickness of radioactive beds are variable within distances of a few miles. Vertical variation in radioactivity and uranium content of the more radioactive beds is usually abrupt, but in the rocks as a whole the range of uranium content is so small that large variations in content are absent. In most of the gamma-ray logs examined there is only part of the sequence of rocks

  19. Potential preservation of native American petroglyphs at Steamboat Butte, Montana, using ethyl silicate solution treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisafe, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Samples of the Tongue River Sandstone, collected from the top of Steamboat Butte in central Montana, were treated with an ethyl silicate solution. The samples showed a large increase in compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance, relative to untreated samples, and indicates the treatment(s) significantly consolidate(s) the stone, thus providing a method to increase the lifetime of the petroglyphs carved onto the stone.

  20. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-02-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. 1993 IEEE Aerospace Applications Conference, 14th, Steamboat Springs, CO, Jan. 31-Feb. 5, 1993, Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topics discussed include communications and radar systems, devices, and components. Attention is also given to system concepts and aerospace manufacturing and instrumentation. Particular papers are presented on the performance modeling of simultaneous TDRSS support of the Space Station and the Space Shuttle, a wide swath SAR and radar altimeter, microwave feed systems for NASA's beam-waveguide reflector antennas, the development of the Cassini flight computer requirements, and EMI shielding materials.

  2. Water quality of storm runoff and comparison of procedures for estimating storm-runoff loads, volume, event-mean concentrations, and the mean load for a storm for selected properties and constituents for Colorado Springs, southeastern Colorado, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul; Weiss, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires that municipalities that have a population of 100,000 or greater obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits to characterize the quality of their storm runoff. In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Springs City Engineering Division, began a study to characterize the water quality of storm runoff and to evaluate procedures for the estimation of storm-runoff loads, volume and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents. Precipitation, streamflow, and water-quality data were collected during 1992 at five sites in Colorado Springs. Thirty-five samples were collected, seven at each of the five sites. At each site, three samples were collected for permitting purposes; two of the samples were collected during rainfall runoff, and one sample was collected during snowmelt runoff. Four additional samples were collected at each site to obtain a large enough sample size to estimate storm-runoff loads, volume, and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents using linear-regression procedures developed using data from the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). Storm-water samples were analyzed for as many as 186 properties and constituents. The constituents measured include total-recoverable metals, vola-tile-organic compounds, acid-base/neutral organic compounds, and pesticides. Storm runoff sampled had large concentrations of chemical oxygen demand and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. Chemical oxygen demand ranged from 100 to 830 milligrams per liter, and 5.-day biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 14 to 260 milligrams per liter. Total-organic carbon concentrations ranged from 18 to 240 milligrams per liter. The total-recoverable metals lead and zinc had the largest concentrations of the total-recoverable metals analyzed. Concentrations of lead ranged from 23 to 350 micrograms per liter, and concentrations of zinc ranged from 110

  3. Monitoring the Lower Colorado River's Arid Delta in Mexico by Measuring the Response in Vegetation and Evapotranspiration Resulting from the 2014 Spring Pulse Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.; Gomez-Sapiens, M.; Jarchow, C.; Milliken, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Colorado River Spring 2014 pulse flood release of water to the delta in Mexico is a collaborative monitoring project funded by the Department of Interior, in part, with teams of scientists from governments, universities and non-profits on both sides of the border. Our goal was to provide measures of the vegetation response to this Minute 319 pulse flood and to document post-flooding changes in the vegetation along the lower Colorado River reaches 1-7, which include ca. 150 narrow miles of riparian habitat until it opens to the Sea of Cortez. We used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite, which provides near-daily coverage at 250 m resolution, while the Landsat 8 satellite provides this data at 16 day intervals at 30 m resolution. We are combining the two sources of satellite data to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution. NDVI and EVI data for each river reach from 2000 to the present were collected, as well as VI for specific target areas. These include restoration sites, vegetation transect sites, and bird observation sites. Green vegetation has decreased steadily in all river reaches since the flood years of 1997-2000. This loss of vegetation vigor has been accompanied by a loss of habitat for riparian dependent birds from 2002 to the present. The loss of vegetation vigor resulted in a lowering of evapotranspiration (ET) in each river reach. ET has decreased approximately from 155 mcm/year in 2000 to 100 mcm/year in 2013. The pulse flood, at 130 mcm, is designed to restore some of the vegetation vigor and to germinate new cohorts of native trees throughout the river reaches. Early positive results are apparent in the zones of inundation. For example, an area of about 600 hectares has shown rapid green-up at the end of the pilot channel in Reach 5 and extending into Reach 7. This is a mixed vegetation zone containing native

  4. Influence of rock composition on the geochemistry of stream and spring waters from mountainous watersheds in the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Grand Mesa National Forests, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, William Roger

    2002-01-01

    The ranges of geochemical baselines for stream and spring waters were determined and maps were constructed showing acid-neutralizing capacity and potential release of total dissolved solids for streams and spring waters for watersheds underlain by each of ten different rock composition types in the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Grand Mesa National Forests, Colorado (GMUG). Water samples were collected in mountainous headwater watersheds that have comparatively high precipitation and low evapotranspiration rates and that generally lack extensive ground-water reservoirs. Mountainous headwaters react quickly to changes in input of water from rain and melting snow and they are vulnerable to anthropogenic impact. Processes responsible for the control and mobility of elements in the watersheds were investigated. The geochemistry of water from the sampled watersheds in the GMUG, which are underlain by rocks that are relatively unmineralized, is compared to the geochemistry of water from the mineralized Redcloud Peak area. The water with the highest potential for release of total dissolved solids is from watersheds that are underlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks; that high potential is caused primarily by gypsum in those rocks. Water that has the highest acid-neutralizing capacity is from watersheds that are underlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The water from watersheds underlain by the Mancos Shale has the next highest acid-neutralizing capacity. Water that has the lowest acid-neutralizing capacity is from watersheds that are underlain by Tertiary ash-flow tuff. Tertiary sedimentary rocks containing oil shale, the Mesavede Formation containing coal, and the Mancos Shale all contain pyrite with elevated metal contents. In these mountainous head-water areas, water from watersheds underlain by these rock types is only slightly impacted by oxidation of pyrite, and over-all it is of good chemical quality. These geochemical baselines demonstrate the importance of rock

  5. Lagrangian sampling of wastewater treatment plant effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, during the summer of 2003 and spring of 2005--Hydrological and chemical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, Larry B.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Brown, Gregory K.; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Gray, James L.; Meyer, Michael T.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Taylor, Howard E.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents methods and data for a Lagrangian sampling investigation into chemical loading and in-stream attenuation of inorganic and organic contaminants in two wastewater treatment-plant effluent-dominated streams: Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa. Water-quality sampling was timed to coincide with low-flow conditions when dilution of the wastewater treatment-plant effluent by stream water was at a minimum. Sample-collection times corresponded to estimated travel times (based on tracer tests) to allow the same "parcel" of water to reach downstream sampling locations. The water-quality data are linked directly to stream discharge using flow- and depth-integrated composite sampling protocols. A range of chemical analyses was made for nutrients, carbon, major elements, trace elements, biological components, acidic and neutral organic wastewater compounds, antibiotic compounds, pharmaceutical compounds, steroid and steroidal-hormone compounds, and pesticide compounds. Physical measurements were made for field conditions, stream discharge, and time-of-travel studies. Two Lagrangian water samplings were conducted in each stream, one in the summer of 2003 and the other in the spring of 2005. Water samples were collected from five sites in Boulder Creek: upstream from the wastewater treatment plant, the treatment-plant effluent, and three downstream sites. Fourmile Creek had seven sampling sites: upstream from the wastewater treatment plant, the treatment-plant effluent, four downstream sites, and a tributary. At each site, stream discharge was measured, and equal width-integrated composite water samples were collected and split for subsequent chemical, physical, and biological analyses. During the summer of 2003 sampling, Boulder Creek downstream from the wastewater treatment plant consisted of 36 percent effluent, and Fourmile Creek downstream from the respective wastewater treatment plant was 81 percent effluent. During the spring of 2005

  6. Water quality and quantity of selected springs and seeps along the Colorado River corridor, Utah and Arizona: Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Spence, John R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Berghoff, Kevin; Plowman, Terry I.; Peart, Dale B.; Roth, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service conducted an intensive assessment of selected springs along the Colorado River Corridor in Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park in 1997 and 1998, for the purpose of measuring and evaluating the water quality and quantity of the resource. This study was conducted to establish baseline data for the future evaluation of possible effects from recreational use and climate change. Selected springs and seeps were visited over a study period from 1997 to 1998, during which, discharge and on-site chemical measurements were made at selected springs and seeps, and samples were collected for subsequent chemical laboratory analysis. This interdisciplinary study also includes simultaneous studies of flora and fauna, measured and sampled coincidently at the same sites. Samples collected during this study were transported to U.S. Geological Survey laboratories in Boulder, Colorado, where analyses were performed using state-of-the-art laboratory technology. The location of the selected springs and seeps, elevation, geology, aspect, and onsite measurements including temperature, discharge, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance, were recorded. Laboratory analyses include determinations for alkalinity, aluminum, ammonium (nitrogen), antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromide, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chloride, chromium, cobalt, copper, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, holmium, iodine, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, nitrate (nitrogen), nitrite (nitrogen), phosphate, phosphorus, potassium, praseodymium, rhenium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, silica, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfate, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, tungsten

  7. Colorado Destructive Waldo Canyon Fire

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-06

    NASA Terra spacecraft acquired this image of the Waldo Canyon Fire, west of Colorado Springs, Colo., being called the worst fire in Colorado history. Healthy vegetation is red, water is dark blue, streets and buildings are gray, and the burned areas are

  8. Extension of the Phoenix/City of Colorado Springs solar-assisted heat-pump project. Technical progress report No. 18, sixth quarterly report, 1 October 1980-31 January 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-03

    Three gas-driven heat pumps are being considered, which are a Wisconsin engine drive heat pump, a Stirling engine drive heat pump, and a gas turbine drive heat pump. Also considered is an electric driven heat pump. Cost effectiveness of both the electric driven and gas fired solar-assisted heat pumps is demonstrated by comparing the present value of the system over its 20 year life with the present value of the fuel saved in Denver and Colorado Springs. The opinions of the local electric utilities for both cities and the natural gas pipeline company are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  9. Structural fabrics, mineralization and Lamaride kinematics of the Idaho Springs-Ralston shear zone, Colorado mineral belt and central Front Range uplift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Nelson, E.P.; Beach, S.T.; Layer, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Idaho Springs and Central City mining districts form the central portion of a structurally controlled hydrothermal precious- and base-metal vein system in the Front Range of the northeast-trending Colorado Mineral Belt. Three new 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages on hydrothermal sericite indicate the veins formed during the Laramide orogeny between 65.4??1.5 - 61.9??1.3 Ma. We compile structural geologic data from surface geological maps, subsurface mine maps, and theses for analysis using modern graphical methods and integration into models of formation of economic mineral deposits. Structural data sets, produced in the 1950s and 1960s by the U.S. Geological Survey, are compiled for fabric elements, including metamorphic foliations, fold axial trends, major brittle fault zones, quartz and precious- and base-metal veins and fault veins, Tertiary dikes, and joints. These fabric elements are plotted on equal-area projections and analyzed for mean fabric orientations. Strike-slip fault-vein sets are mostly parallel or sub-parallel, and not conjugate as interpreted by previous work; late-stage, normal-slip fault veins possibly show a pattern indicative of triaxial strain. Fault-slip kinematic analysis was used to model the trend of the Laramide maximum horizontal stress axis, or compression direction, and to determine compatibility of opening and shear motions within a single stress field. The combined-model maximum compression direction for all strike slip fault veins is ???068??, which is consistent with published Laramide compression directions of ???064?? (mean of 23 regional models) and ???072?? for the Front Range uplift. The orientations of fabric elements were analyzed for mechanical and kinematic compatibility with opening, and thus permeability enhancement, in the modeled regional east-northeast, Laramide compression direction. The fabric orientation analysis and paleostress modeling show that structural permeability during mineralization was enhanced along pre

  10. 75 FR 51035 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Office Box 1087, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80944, filed in Docket No. CP10-478-000, a prior notice..., Director, Regulatory Affairs Department, Post Office Box 1087, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, ]...

  11. 76 FR 22686 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... notice that on April 8, 2011, Colorado Interstate Gas Company (CIG), Post Office Box 1087 Colorado..., Director, Regulatory Affairs, Post Office Box 1087 Colorado Springs, CO 80944; telephone (719)...

  12. In Search of the Social: Steamboats, Square Wheels, Reindeer and Other Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolwick, Jim S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the concept of the ‘social,’ particularly from an archaeological perspective, and explores how it relates to the ways in which we seek to understand the processes of technological innovation and change. It is demonstrated that the concept ‘social’ is far from well defined and that enquiry is bedevilled by artificial polarization between subject-centred approaches and object-centred particularism. Through the medium of early United States steamboat technology a different approach is forged through the melding of people and things with the idea of viewing artefacts as active social actors along with people. Ultimately, it is argued that maritime archaeologists should be more bullish in their approaches to material things—instead of adopting social theories ‘wholesale,’ we should insist that they include the things we study: boats, material objects, people, artefacts, landscapes and animals.

  13. Distribution of total and methyl mercury in sediments along Steamboat Creek (Nevada, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamenkovic, J.; Gustin, M.S.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Thomas, B.A.; Agee, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1800s, mills in the Washoe Lake area, Nevada, used elemental mercury to remove gold and silver from the ores of the Comstock deposit. Since that time, mercury contaminated waste has been distributed from Washoe Lake, down Steamboat Creek, and to the Truckee River. The creek has high mercury concentrations in both water and sediments, and continues to be a constant source of mercury to the Truckee River. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of total and methyl mercury (MeHg) in surface sediments and characterize their spatial distribution in the Steamboat Creek watershed. Total mercury concentrations measured in channel and bank sediments did not decrease downstream, indicating that mercury contamination has been distributed along the creek's length. Total mercury concentrations in sediments (0.01-21.43 ??g/g) were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those in pristine systems. At 14 out of 17 sites, MeHg concentrations in streambank sediments were higher than the concentrations in the channel, suggesting that low banks with wet sediments might be important sites of mercury methylation in this system. Both pond/wetland and channel sites exhibited high potential for mercury methylation (6.4-30.0 ng g-1 day-1). Potential methylation rates were positively correlated with sulfate reduction rates, and decreased as a function of reduced sulfur and MeHg concentration in the sediments. Potential demethylation rate appeared not to be influenced by MeHg concentration, sulfur chemistry, DOC, sediment grain size or other parameters, and showed little variation across the sites (3.7-7.4 ng g-1 day-1). ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulating the potential effects of climate change in two Colorado basins and at two Colorado ski areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.; Hay, L.; Markstrom, S.

    2011-01-01

    The mountainous areas of Colorado are used for tourism and recreation, and they provide water storage and supply for municipalities, industries, and agriculture. Recent studies suggest that water supply and tourist industries such as skiing are at risk from climate change. In this study, a distributed-parameter watershed model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), is used to identify the potential effects of future climate on hydrologic conditions for two Colorado basins, the East River at Almont and the Yampa River at Steamboat Springs, and at the subbasin scale for two ski areas within those basins. Climate-change input files for PRMS were generated by modifying daily PRMS precipitation and temperature inputs with mean monthly climate-change fields of precipitation and temperature derived from five general circulation model (GCM) simulations using one current and three future carbon emission scenarios. All GCM simulations of mean daily minimum and maximum air temperature for the East and Yampa River basins indicate a relatively steady increase of up to several degrees Celsius from baseline conditions by 2094. GCM simulations of precipitation in the two basins indicate little change or trend in precipitation, but there is a large range associated with these projections. PRMS projections of basin mean daily streamflow vary by scenario but indicate a central tendency toward slight decreases, with a large range associated with these projections. Decreases in water content or changes in the spatial extent of snowpack in the East and Yampa River basins are important because of potential adverse effects on water supply and recreational activities. PRMS projections of each future scenario indicate a central tendency for decreases in basin mean snow-covered area and snowpack water equivalent, with the range in the projected decreases increasing with time. However, when examined on a monthly basis, the projected decreases are most dramatic during fall and

  15. Fraser, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-25

    This sequence of three images in northern Colorado, taken by NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar AIRSAR in 2002, shows Fraser, Colorado, before snowfall, the morning after snow, and after the snow melted.

  16. X-Ray Diffraction for Research and Education in Southern Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-18

    2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: X-Ray Diffraction for Research and Education in Southern Colorado The views...RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Colorado - Colorado Springs CLEER 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway Colorado Springs, CO 80918 -3733 10-Feb...Diffraction for Research and Education in Southern Colorado Report Title We examined three X-Ray Diffraction systems with an emphasis on thin film

  17. Evaluation of the solute geothermometry of thermal springs and drilled wells of La Primavera (Cerritos Colorados) geothermal field, Mexico: A geochemometrics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandarinath, Kailasa; Domínguez-Domínguez, Humberto

    2015-10-01

    A detailed study on the solute geothermometry of thermal water (18 springs and 8 drilled wells) of La Primavera geothermal field (LPGF) in Mexico has been carried out by employing a geochemical database compiled from the literature and by applying all the available solute geothermometers. The performance of these geothermometers in predicting the reservoir temperatures has been evaluated by applying a geochemometrics (geochemical and statistical) method. The springs of the LPGF are of bicarbonate type and the majority have attained partial-equilibrium chemical conditions and the remaining have shown non-equilibrium conditions. In the case of geothermal wells, water is dominantly of chloride-type and, among the studied eight geothermal wells, four have shown full-equilibrium chemical conditions and another four have indicated partial-equilibrium conditions. All springs of HCO3-​ type water have provided unreliable reservoir temperatures, whereas the only one available spring of SO42- type water has provided the reservoir temperature nearer to the average BHT of the wells. Contrary to the general expected behavior, spring water of non-equilibrium and geothermal well water of partial-equilibrium chemical conditions have indicated more reliable reservoir temperatures than those of partially-equilibrated and fully-equilibrated water, respectively. Among the chemical concentration data, Li and SiO2 of two springs, SO42- and Mg of four springs, and HCO3 and Na concentrations of two geothermal wells were identified as outliers and this has been reflected in very low reservoir temperatures predicted by the geothermometers associated with them (Li-Mg, Na-Li, Na-K-Mg, SiO2 etc.). Identification of the outlier data points may be useful in differentiating the chemical characteristics, lithology and the physico-chemical and geological processes at the sample locations of the study area. In general, the solute geothermometry of the spring waters of LPGF indicated a dominantly

  18. Proceedings of International Pyrotechnics Seminar (4th), Held at Steamboat Village, Colorado, 22-26 July 1974

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-17

    example of this is the Serial Flechette V Rifle ( SFR ), a micro-caliber weapon, which due to the small projectile size, has an inherent ballistic mismatch...I e c ~! D’ I K n Figure 1. SFR Tracer Projectiles: a) Type 10 Internal; b) External-hand fabricated and filed (epoxy); c) Molded (epoxy); d...Young, SFR Tracer Ammunition Development, Final Report, AAI Corporation, Baltimore, Md., Contract DAAA25-70-C-0688 (March 1971). I 2. W. E. Mott, V. T

  19. 76 FR 33353 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Colorado Springs, and the associated Pi on Canyon Maneuver Area for military maneuvering, training and... Parkway, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80911; November 2, 2006, at Trinidad State Jr. College, Sullivan... contain the military values in need of protection. The Army would not need to acquire water rights...

  20. Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

    1994-01-20

    Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

  1. Analyzing post-fire topography at the hillslope-channel interface with terrestrial LiDAR: contrasting geomorphic responses from the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire of Colorado and the 2013 Springs Fire of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storesund, R.; Chin, A.; Florsheim, J. L.; O'Hirok, L.; Williams, K.; Austin, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Mountains areas are increasingly susceptible to wildfires because of warming climates. Although knowledge of the hydro-geomorphological impacts of wildfire has advanced in recent years, much is still unknown regarding how environmental fluxes move through burned watersheds. Because of the loss of vegetation and hydrophobic soils, flash floods often accompany elevated runoff events from burned watersheds, making direct process measurements challenging. Direct measurements are also only partly successful at capturing the spatial variations of post-fire effects. Coupled with short temporal windows for observing such responses, opportunities are often missed for collecting data needed for developing predictive models. Terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) of burned areas allows detailed documentation of the post-fire topography to cm-level accuracy, providing pictures of geomorphic responses not previously possible. This paper reports a comparative study of hillslope-channel interactions, using repeat TLS, in two contrasting environments. Burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire and 2013 Springs Fire, in Colorado and California respectively, the study sites share many similarities including steep erosive slopes, small drainage areas, and step-pool channel morphologies. TLS provided a tool to test the central hypothesis that, dry ravel, distinct in the California Mediterranean environment, would prompt a greater sedimentological response from the Springs Fire compared to the Waldo Canyon Fire. At selected sites in each area, TLS documented baseline conditions immediately following the fire. Repeat scanning after major storms allowed detection of changes in the landscape. Results show a tendency for sedimentation in river channels in the study sites interacting with dry ravel on hillslopes, whereas erosion dominated the response from the Waldo Canyon Fire with an absence of dry ravel. These data provide clues to developing generalizations for post-fire effects at regional scales

  2. Hump-shaped 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra in K-feldspar and evidence for Cretaceous authigenesis in the Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Andrew C.; van de Kamp, Peter C.

    1999-12-01

    The Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, CO, USA, shows evidence of alteration by hydrothermal fluids that precipitated authigenic potassium feldspar (adularia) as rims on detrital feldspars and as interstitial cement deposits. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating experiments of samples from the Fountain Formation reveal age spectra having a characteristic hump at laboratory temperatures between 900 and 1080°C. The humps appear to be related to the presence of adularia. Laser analyses of small grains of adularia indicate that the hump can be physically dissected, unlike age gradients found in igneous feldspars. Such behavior is consistent with the mixing of gas from two or more generations of K-feldspar, each having unique diffusion properties. The feldspars studied here indicate that two pulses of ˜150°C hydrothermal fluids migrated through the Fountain Formation at 135 and 94 Ma, prior to the main phase of Laramide tectonic activity in the region. The limited occurrence of authigenic cements suggests that reactivation of the underlying Precambrian Idaho Springs-Ralston Creek shear zone was significant enough to heat and mobilize large quantities of meteoric fluids. In addition, these data also suggest that Cretaceous movements along the Transcontinental Arch, correlated with stratigraphic events, began approximately 40 million years earlier than previously thought.

  3. 76 FR 23808 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... using the ``eLibrary'' link. Enter the docket number excluding the last three digits in the docket..., Regulatory Affairs Department, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, Post Office Box 1087, Colorado Springs...

  4. Availability and chemical quality of ground water in the Crystal River and Cattle Creek Drainage Basins near Glenwood Springs, west-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogden, Robert E.; Giles, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    Parts of the Crystal River and cattle Creek drainage basins near Glenwood Springs, Colo., have undergone rapid population growth in recent years. This growth has resulted in an increased demand for information for additional domestic, industrial, and municipal water supplies. A knowledge of the occurrence of ground water will permit a more efficient allocation of the resource. Aquifers in the two drainage basins include: alluvium, basalts, the Mesa Verde Formation, Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Entrada Sandstone, Maroon Formation, Eagle Valley Evaporite, and undifferentiated formations. Except for aquifers in the alluvium, and basalt, well yields are generally low and are less than 25 gallons per minute. Well yields form aquifers in the alluvium and basalt can be as much as several hundred gallons per minute. Water quality is dependent of rock type. Calcium bicarbonate is the predominant type of water in the study area. However, calcium sulfate type water may be found in aquifers in the Eagle Valley Evaporite and in the alluvium where the alluvial material has been derived from the Eagle Valley Evaporite. Concentrations of selenium in excess of U.S. Public Health Service standards for drinking water can be found locally in aquifers in the Eagle Valley Evaporite. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

    1995-01-26

    The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

  6. 40 CFR 52.329 - Rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.329 Rules and regulations. (a) On January 14, 1993, the Governor of Colorado submitted revisions to the State's nonattainment new source review..., and Steamboat Springs moderate PM10 nonattainment areas, the Denver/Metro Boulder, Longmont, Colorado...

  7. 40 CFR 52.329 - Rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.329 Rules and regulations. (a) On January 14, 1993, the Governor of Colorado submitted revisions to the State's nonattainment new source review..., and Steamboat Springs moderate PM10 nonattainment areas, the Denver/Metro Boulder, Longmont, Colorado...

  8. 40 CFR 52.329 - Rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.329 Rules and regulations. (a) On January 14, 1993, the Governor of Colorado submitted revisions to the State's nonattainment new source review..., and Steamboat Springs moderate PM10 nonattainment areas, the Denver/Metro Boulder, Longmont, Colorado...

  9. Evaluation of trends in pH in the Yampa River, northwestern Colorado, 1950-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chafin, Daniel T.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of pH trends in the Yampa River from near its headwaters to its mouth. The study was prompted by an apparent historical increase in measured pH at the Yampa River near Maybell, from an average of about 7.6 in the 1950's and 1960's to about 8.3 in the 1980's and 1990's. If real, further increase could cause more frequent exceedances of the Colorado water-quality standard of 9.0 and adversely affect aquatic life in the Yampa River Basin, including Dinosaur National Monument. The principal conclusion of this study is that this apparent historical increase in measured pH was caused mostly by changes in measurement protocol. Synoptic sampling during August 16-19, 1999, a period of relatively warm weather and base flow, showed that late afternoon pH of the Yampa River ranged from 8.46 to 9.20. The largest pH (9.20) exceeded the Colorado water-quality standard and was measured at Yampa River above Elk River, about 1.8 miles downstream from the Steamboat Springs Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant outfall, where nutrient enrichment caused photosynthesis by algae to dominate. Here, the dissolved oxygen concentration was 161 percent of saturation and carbon dioxide (CO2 was at 26 percent of saturation. At Yampa River downstream from a diversion near Hayden, 16.3 miles downstream, the effects of photosynthesis were still dominant, though attenuated by reaeration and dilution with freshwater from the Elk River. About 37.2 miles farther downstream, at Yampa River below Craig, which is about 6.2 miles downstream from the Craig Waste Water Treatment Plant, the effects of photosynthesis increased slightly, and pH rose to 8.80. Respiration plus oxidation of organic matter became dominant at Yampa River at Deerlodge Park in Dinosaur National Monument, where pH was 8.51, dissolved oxygen concentration was at 109 percent of saturation, and CO2 was at 189 percent of saturation. Respiration plus oxidation of organic matter, though

  10. Colorado Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle ... x 565 kilometers. They use data from blocks 58 to 61 within World Reference System-2 path 32. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's ...

  11. Birds and mammals of Manitou Experimental Forest, Colorado

    Treesearch

    Meredith J. Morris; Vincent H. Reld; Richard E. Pillmore; Mary C. Hammer

    1977-01-01

    Seasonal occurrence, relative abundance, and habitat preference are listed for 90 bird and 41 mammal species that can be found at Manitou Experimental Forest. An annotated list is given also for an additional 70 casual or accidental bird species. Manitou Experimental Forest is located near Colorado Springs in the montane zone of the Colorado Front Range.

  12. Exploring Reading First Program Implementation across Colorado Schools with Differing Achievement Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonds, Darryl E.

    2010-01-01

    This study is a mixed method examination of two elementary level Colorado Reading First Schools in Colorado Springs, Colorado. This study replicated a study conducted in two California Reading First elementary schools, in one Southern California School District. The purpose of the study was to examine whether there were differences in the…

  13. Washington, D.C.'s vanishing springs and waterways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Garnett P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper traces the disappearance or reduction of the many prominent springs and waterways that existed in Washington, D.C. , 200 years ago. The best known springs were the Smith Springs (now under the McMillan Reservoir), the Franklin Park Springs (13th and I Streets, NW.), Gibson 's Spring (15th and E Streets, NE.), Caffrey 's Spring (Ninth and F Streets, NW.), and the City Spring (C Street between Four and One-Half and Sixth Streets, NW.). Tiber Creek, flowing south to the Capitol and thence westward along Consititution Avenue, joined the Potomac River at 17th Street and Constitution Avenue. In the 1800's, the Constitution Avenue reach was made into a canal which was used by scows and steamboats up to about 1850. The canal was changed into a covered sewer in the 1870's, and the only remaining visible surface remnant is the lock-keeper 's little stone house at 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. Because of sedimentation problems and reclamation projects, Rock Creek, the Potomac River , and the Anacostia River are considerably narrower and shallower today than they were in colonial times. For example, the mouth of Rock Creek at one time was a wide, busy ship harbor , which Georgetown used for an extensive foreign trade, and the Potomac River shore originally extended to 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Hydrologic data for Paleozoic rocks in the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains data used to interpret the hydrology of Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin under the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis program. The study area includes the drainages of the Green and Colorado Rivers from their headwaters to Lees Ferry, Arizona. Hydrologic data presented in this report include artesian yields from wells and springs, and values of porosity, intrinsic permeability, and hydraulic conductivity determined by laboratory analyses and aquifer tests. (USGS)

  15. Detrital Zircon Record of Colorado River Incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, D.; Grove, M.; Gehrels, G.; Dorsey, R.; House, K. P.; Howard, K.; Pearthree, P. A.; Spencer, J. E.; Mahoney, B.

    2007-05-01

    The Colorado River is a large, youthful, unequilibrated continental drainage system the base-level for which was established rather abruptly between 5 and 6 million years ago in conjunction with Gulf of California rifting and establishment of the modern river course through the western Grand Canyon and lower Colorado river region. New laser ablation ICPMS detrital zircon U-Pb analyses (~3000) from ~40 samples provide insight into details relating to the cause, timing and consequences of river inception. These samples encompass (1) the modern Colorado River delta, (2) major tributaries including the Green, "Grand", San Juan, Little Colorado and Gila rivers (3) late Miocene to Pliocene sediments along the lower Colorado (4) late Miocene to Pleistocene deltaic and fluvial sediments of the Imperial and Palm Spring Groups in the western Salton Trough, and (5) late Miocene- early Pliocene Bidahochi Formation of eastern Arizona. Data from the western Salton Trough and modern delta yield strata yield remarkably homogeneous age distributions that indicate there was little evolution in Colorado River sediment composition since 5.3 Ma. Detrital zircon is dominated by a mix of local southwest US cratonal basement (1.7 and 1.4 Ga) plus reworked supracrustal sequences of the Colorado Plateau that provide Neoproterozoic, 1.1 Ga, and early Paleozoic zircons. A relative paucity of Grenville-age grains in the earliest part of the delta sequence may reflect an early stage of the modern river prior to deep incision through Colorado Plateau erg deposits. The strong homogeneity of the detrital zircon record from late Miocene to the present is consistent with the `lake spillover model' for inception and integration of the modern Colorado River drainage. Abrupt integration of the lower Colorado River after 5.6 Ma is clearly recorded by detrital zircon ages from the laucustrine Bouse Formation and Bullhead alluvium aggradational package. Fluvial-laucustrine deposits of the Bidahochi

  16. 78 FR 19988 - Safety Zone; BWRC Spring Classic, Parker, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... safety zone within the Lake Moovalya region of the navigable waters of the Colorado River in Parker... Casino Spring Classic, which is held on the Lake Moovalya region of the Colorado River in Parker, Arizona... act as river closure boats that help facilitate the event and ensure public safety. C. Discussion of...

  17. Denver, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-248-092 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- The location of Denver, Colorado - on the western edge of the High Plains, at the junction of the South Platte River and Clear Creek east of the Rocky Mountains - is graphically displayed. Mount Evans and its surroundings are already covered by snow on October 8, 1994. Clear Creek was one of the first areas in the Rockies where gold was discovered by American prospectors in the 19th century, which led to the settlement of Denver. The growth of 20th century Denver, dominantly to the west and south, is apparent. Stapleton Field, close to downtown Denver, is being replaced by the new regional airport well out on the plains.

  18. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  19. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-10-30

    STS058-89-013 (18 Oct-1 Nov 1993) --- An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  20. Colorado as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An oblique westward view, across the wheat fields and cattle pastures, of eastern Colorado to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is bisected at the center of the right edge of the frame. Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs are left of center, and the Arkansas River Valley with Canyon City and the Royal Gorge are along the left edge of the frame. This view shows the startling contrast between the nearly-flat High Plains and the ancient geological uplift of the Rockies.

  1. Colorado amethyst.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michalski, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Of the 20 or so amethyst localities reported in Colorado, four are described in some detail and comments are given on their geology. The Crystal Hill mine, near La Garita, Saguache County, contains rock crystal (long slender prisms with small rhombohedral terminations) and pale lavender amethyst (generally <3 in. in length). The deposit was worked as early as the 1800's as a gold mine and also contains abundant manganese oxides. Amethyst, associated with argentiferous galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite, occurs in the Amethyst mine, in the Creede district, on West Willow Creek, Mineral County. The specimens here consist of small pale pinkish-purple crystals interlayered with milky quartz, some as banded forms ("sowbelly agate') and as geode-like vugs. Amethyst also occurs in Unaweep Canyon south of Grand Junction in Mesa County. Pale to very dark amethyst occurs as crystals dominated by large rhombohedra and small prisms (approx 1 in. across). At Red Feather Lakes, Larimer County, amethyst crystals are medium to dark purple and have prism and rhombohedral faces nearly equally developed; some are doubly terminated. -R.S.M.

  2. Spring Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  3. Quaternary geochronology and distribution of Mammuthus on the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Agenbroad, L.D.; Mead, J.I. )

    1989-09-01

    There are 41 known localities containing mammoth remains from the Colorado Plateau: 24 in Arizona, 12 in Utah, 3 in New Mexico, and 2 in Colorado. Of the 41 localities, 13 (32%; Arizona and Utah only) have yielded radiometric dates ({sup 14}C and U/Th); 10 (77%) of these have been the result of the authors' investigations. The four youngest radiocarbon dates produce a weighted average date of approximately 11,270 {plus minus}65 yr B.P., the youngest directly aged mammoth remains on the Colorado Plateau. Mammoth remains are recovered predominantly in alluvial regimes, in addition to alcove, cave, and spring deposits. No direct association of Mammuthus and the Clovis hunters has been reported from the Colorado Plateau. Dietary intake, recorded in dung remains, included predominantly graminoids, in addition to various woody shrubs and trees that currently grow at higher elevations on the Colorado Plateau.

  4. Colorado Commission on Higher Education Legislative Report on Remedial Education, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The information in this report is presented to encourage continued conversation regarding preparation for college and remedial or developmental education in Colorado. This report documents action taken and data gathered by the Colorado Department of Higher Education (DHE) for academic year 2010 (Summary 2009-Spring 2010) as required by statute to…

  5. Research Methods in Environmental Studies: A County Planning Application in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruntfest, Eve C.

    To obtain practical experience, a research methods class at the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs) undertook a special project to help a nearby county (Park County), assess its planning needs. The county was chosen for its characteristics as a rapidly growing rural area faced with the problems created by mounting population pressure on…

  6. The Implementation of the National Geography Standards in Colorado: To Everything There Is a Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    Much like the cycles and rhythms of the seasons, implementation of the national geography standards in Colorado has, over the course of a decade, grown, developed, and changed. As with the exciting beginning of spring, our time of planting was set in motion in 1993 by the passage of Colorado House Bill 1313, which set a deadline for school…

  7. Spring Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-15

    1 through Figure 2- 2. (These illustrations are several days prior to the arrival of the vernal equinox ). Note: Further discussions on jet stream...upper-level westerlies, and become cut off. Cutoff lows appear more often during the transitional periods of spring and autumn because the main belt...events of late autumn and winter. Low clouds and fog may con- tinue to occur in the Columbia Basin/Snake River Valley regions during early spring

  8. University of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Gary D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The management information system used at the University of Colorado is described, outlining its history, administrative organization, administrative systems, hardware, budgets, software, and future plans. (MSE)

  9. Spring performance tester for miniature extension springs

    DOEpatents

    Salzbrenner, Bradley; Boyce, Brad

    2017-05-16

    A spring performance tester and method of testing a spring are disclosed that has improved accuracy and precision over prior art spring testers. The tester can perform static and cyclic testing. The spring tester can provide validation for product acceptance as well as test for cyclic degradation of springs, such as the change in the spring rate and fatigue failure.

  10. Salinity in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley, western Colorado, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.; von Guerard, Paul B.

    1996-01-01

    Salinity, or the dissolved-solids concentration, is the measure of salts such as sodium chloride, calcium bicarbonate, and calcium sulfate that are dissolved in water. About one-half of the salinity in the Colorado River Basin is from natural sources (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1995), such as thermal springs in the Glenwood-Dotsero area, located about 90 miles upstream from Grand Junction (fig. 1). Effects of human activities, such as irrigation, reservoir evaporation, and transbasin diversions, have increased the levels of salinity in the Colorado River. High salinity can affect industrial and municipal water users by causing increased water-treatment costs, increased deterioration of plumbing and appliances, increased soap needs, and undesirable taste of drinking water. High salinity also can cause lower crop yields by reducing water and nutrient uptake by plants and can increase agricultural production costs because of higher leaching and drainage requirements. Agricultural losses might occur when salinity reaches about 700?850 milligrams per liter (U.S Department of the Interior, 1994). Figure 1. Irrigated area in the Grand Valley and locations of sampling sites for the 1994?95 salinity study of the Colorado River. The Colorado River is the major source of irrigation water to the Grand Valley (fig. 1) and also is one source of water for the Clifton Water District, which supplies domestic water to part of the eastern Grand Valley. During spring and early summer in 1994, the Colorado River in the Grand Valley had lower than average streamflow. There was concern by water users about the effect of this low streamflow on salinity in the river. In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study to evaluate salinity in the Colorado River. This fact sheet describes results of that study. The specific objectives of the fact sheet are to (1) compare salinity in the Colorado River among

  11. Quantum Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    In this paper, we will give a short review on quantum spring, which is a Casimir effect from the helix boundary condition that proposed in our earlier works. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  12. Flooding the Colorado River Delta: A Landscape-Scale Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, Karl W.; Glenn, Edward P.; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Parra-Rentería, Carlos A.; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Schmidt, John C.; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco A.

    2013-12-01

    A large pulse of water is planned to be released into the dry Colorado River channel in Mexico. This engineered experimental spring flood, which will flow from Lake Mead and pass through downstream reservoirs, is the culmination of decades of applied research. The pulse flow is a rare opportunity for research at the landscape scale [Glenn et al., 2013].

  13. Being PREPaREd for Crisis in Northern Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kathy; Malvey, Michelle; Rastatter, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The Thompson School District recognized after the Columbine incident in the spring of 1999 that it was lacking an adequate plan for crisis response. Colorado legislation led to a mandate for having a crisis response plan so the district purchased a "canned" crisis response plan that served the needs of response in a very immediate but…

  14. An Evaluation of Colorado's College Opportunity Fund and Related Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    During the spring of 2004, the State of Colorado enacted legislation that fundamentally changed the mechanisms through which it financed its public higher education system, beginning with the 2005-06 academic year. Rather than appropriating funds directly to institutions, the legislation created the College Opportunity Fund (COF), the principal…

  15. Spring Defrosting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows defrosting south high latitude dunes. In late winter and into the spring season, dark spots commonly form on dunes and other surfaces as seasonal carbon dioxide begins to sublime away.

    Location near: 59.3oS, 343.3oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  16. Colorado Children's Budget 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Colorado Children's Budget 2011" tallies up Colorado's public investments during FY 2007-08 through FY 2011-12 for programs and services that enhance the well-being of children across four domains--Early Childhood, K-12 Education, Health, and Other Supports. It is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are…

  17. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  18. Colorado Children's Budget 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Children's Budget is a comprehensive report on funding for children's services in Colorado. This report provides a six- year funding history for more than 50 programs funded with state, local, and federal dollars. The Colorado Children's Budget analyzes reductions in programs and services during the economic downturn. The data in the…

  19. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  20. Colorado Library Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Colorado school librarians are in the midst of a crisis. According to a 2009-2010 survey of public schools in Colorado, just 23% of elementary schools have an endorsed librarian, while 37% of middle schools and 32% of high schools report having an endorsed librarian. This report also shows how these percentages have dropped in just a two-year…

  1. Colorado Children's Budget 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Cuciti, Peggy L.; Baker, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget 2012" examines the state's commitment to investing in the well-being of children. It tallies up Colorado's actual and planned investment during the past five years (Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2009 through FY 2012-2013) on programs and services in four areas: Early Childhood Learning and Development, K-12…

  2. 77 FR 62500 - Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC; Notice of Intent To File License...: Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC. e. Name of Project: Trout Creek Reservoir Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On Trout Creek, 15 miles southwest of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The project occupies 4.3 acres...

  3. 75 FR 39201 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Steamboat Springs, Colorado... Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the...

  4. 77 FR 51992 - Catamount Metropolitan District; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Catamount Metropolitan District; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory... Steamboat Springs, in the state of Colorado, and has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA). In the EA...

  5. Geology highlights, Ride the Rockies 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The author provides a brief description of the geology along the route for each day of the ride, from June 12 through June 17, 2011. Ride the Rockies begins in Crested Butte, Colorado, with stops in Buena Vista, Edwards, Steamboat Springs, Granby, and Georgetown. A small, generalized geologic map also is shown.

  6. Colorado`s Pollution-Prevention Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.

    1994-12-31

    The Colorado Pollution Prevention Partnership is a nonprofit, voluntary alliance of government, business, and public interest groups organized in 1990 to develop and promote pollution prevention and waste minimization in Colorado industries. The partnership started with discussions between two individuals concerning a difficulty in a public-private working relationship. The discussions soon expanded to several individuals meeting on a regular basis, then to informal breakfast meetings with representatives from industry, EPA, and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Eventually, organizations representing the public interest joined the discussions. The goals of the partnership are clear: strengthen the working relationship between the private and public sectors; improve capabilities for anticipating and avoiding environmental problems; pool resources and focus attention on the mutual goal of pollution prevention; and exchange information and expertise, and help transfer these to medium and small companies and the general public.

  7. The Colorado River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image shows the passage of the Colorado River through several southwestern states. The river begins, in this image, in Utah at the far upper right, where Lake Powell is visible as dark pixels surrounded by the salmon-colored rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado flows southwest through Glen Canyon, to the Glen Canyon Dam, on the Utah-Arizona border. From there it flows south into Arizona, and then turns sharply west where the Grand Canyon of the Colorado cuts through the mountains. The Colorado flows west to the Arizona-Nevada (upper left) border, where it is dammed again, this time by the Hoover Dam. The dark-colored pixels surrounding the bend in the river are Lake Mead. The river flows south along the border of first Nevada and Arizona and then California and Arizona. The Colorado River, which begins in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, empties into the Gulf of California, seen at the bottom center of this image.

  8. The Colorado River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image shows the passage of the Colorado River through several southwestern states. The river begins, in this image, in Utah at the far upper right, where Lake Powell is visible as dark pixels surrounded by the salmon-colored rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado flows southwest through Glen Canyon, to the Glen Canyon Dam, on the Utah-Arizona border. From there it flows south into Arizona, and then turns sharply west where the Grand Canyon of the Colorado cuts through the mountains. The Colorado flows west to the Arizona-Nevada (upper left) border, where it is dammed again, this time by the Hoover Dam. The dark-colored pixels surrounding the bend in the river are Lake Mead. The river flows south along the border of first Nevada and Arizona and then California and Arizona. The Colorado River, which begins in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, empties into the Gulf of California, seen at the bottom center of this image.

  9. 78 FR 46552 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Colorado; Second Ten-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Colorado; Second Ten-Year Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Colorado Springs AGENCY: Environmental...

  10. Game Animals of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game animals typical of Colorado. Discussions in both English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game animals, individual game species, and introduced species of game animals. (RE)

  11. Pesticides in surface waters of the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Spahr, Norman E.

    2000-01-01

    Forty-four river, stream, and drain sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado were sampled during 1996?98 to determine the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in the basin. In a fixed-station study, 57 surface-water samples were collected from October 1996 through January 1998 at four sites. Each site was sampled approximately monthly for up to a year, with more frequent sampling during the spring and summer growing season. In a synoptic study, surface-water samples were collected at 43 sites in the agricultural areas of the Grand Valley and the Uncompahgre River Valley in May 1998. Each site was sampled once. Pesticide concentrations generally were low and varied seasonally and across land uses. Thirty-five pesticides were detected at least once in the two studies, and 11 pesticides accounted for almost 82 percent of the detections. Herbicides were more commonly detected than insecticides, and only the herbicides alachlor and atrazine were detected in more than 50 percent of the samples. Carbofuran was the most commonly detected insecticide and was detected in 19 percent of the samples. Pesticide detections increased and were measured at higher concentrations in the summer months and at the agriculture sites. All pesticide concentrations were less than drinking-water standards, and most complied with human-health advisories and criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Pesticides in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado were detected slightly less frequently and generally at lower concentrations than in 20 National Water-Quality Assessment Program study-unit basins that collected water-quality data from 1992 through 1996. Results from surface-water sampling conducted during 1996?98 in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Colorado indicate that beneficial uses of water were not being impaired by the presence of pesticides in surface waters in the basin.

  12. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Xcel Energy Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado XcelEnergy NonXcel Transmission Network Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains transmission network of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4540689.017558 m Left: 160606.141934 m Right: 758715.946645 m Bottom: 4098910.893397m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shapefile

  14. Spring Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars. In this scene, the dunes, and the plain on which the dunes reside, are at least in part covered by a bright carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots indicate areas where the frost has begun to change, either by subliming away to expose dark sand, changing to a coarser particle size, or both. The winds responsible for the formation of these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest) toward the upper right (northeast).

    Location near: 76.3oN, 261.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  15. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Proceedings IV: Issues and technology in the management of impacted wildlife; February 6-8, 1989; Glenwood Springs, CO

    Treesearch

    Peter R. Davis; John C. Emerick; Deborah M. Finch; Susan Q. Foster; John W. Monarch; Sandra Rush; Oakleigh Thorne; Jeffrey Todd

    1989-01-01

    The Fourth Biennial Wildlife Symposium was held at the historic Hotel Colorado in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, from February 6-8, 1989. In spite of some very cold wcather, the attendees came from many parts of the United States and Canada. As in previous years, they represented government, industry, academic and professional organizations, including nonprofits. Thorne...

  17. Town of Pagosa Springs geothermal heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The Town of Pagosa Springs has owned and operated a geothermal heating system since December 1982 to provide geothermal heating during the fall, winter and spring to customers in this small mountain town. Pagosa Springs is located in Archuleta County, Colorado in the southwestern corner of the State. The Town, nestled in majestic mountains, including the Continental Divide to the north and east, has an elevation of 7,150 feet. The use of geothermal water in the immediate area, however, dates back to the 1800`s, with the use of Ute Bands and the Navajo Nation and later by the U.S. Calvery in the 1880`s (Lieutenant McCauley, 1878). The Pagosa area geothermal water has been reported to have healing and therapeutic qualities.

  18. State summaries: Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, J.; Carroll, C.; Widmann, B.

    2006-01-01

    According to the Colorado Geological Survey (CGS), Colorado's mining industry enjoyed a record-breaking year in 2005. For the whole year, the total value of nonfuel minerals, coal and uranium produced in the state in 2005 amounted to $2.4 billion. The production value of $1.52 billion in the nonfuel sector broke the previous record of $1.3 billion set in 1980, and is 60% higher than the revised 2004 CGS estimate of $950.5 million. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) ranked Colorado ninth among the states in nonfuel mineral value, up from 17th in 2004. About $1 billion of the nonfuel total is from metal mining. New record-high productions were achieved not only for molybdenum but also for coal and goal.

  19. Ouray Colorado resource characteristics and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.

    1981-10-01

    Ouray, Colorado, at 7800 feet, lies in a natural amphitheater in the northern portion of the San Juan Mountains. Mining and tourism are the primary industries; each fluctuating between boom or bust; mining erratically; tourism seasonally. The hot springs in the area average from 80/sup 0/ to 152/sup 0/F and discharge from 2 to 200 gallons per minute. The resource is probably associated with circulation along deep normal faults with a limestone aquifer dispersing the hot water. It is estimated that 2256 x 10/sup 11/ Btu's of geothermal energy are available in the area. The springs are used in a pool, and for space heating. An unsolicited proposal for additional resource assessment and engineering was rejected by DOE. An Appropriate Technology Small Grant was applied for, and an A and E subcontract is being applied for. Independent development is happening nearby in exploration drilling for space heating needs. The city will pursue a heating district scheme involving use of the pool spring, or drilling a well as funding dictates. The city has unique funding problems involving an unstable seasonal economy, desire to continue to maintain the hot springs pool, impatient citizenry, and nervous spa owners.

  20. Thermal springs in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Norah D.; Stearns, Harold T.; Waring, Gerald A.

    1937-01-01

    , closely associated with the larger faults. In the Pacific Mountain System, including the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada, there are many warm and hot springs, some of which issue in areas of granite, and others in areas of lava. In the Coast Ranges of California many thermal springs issue from different geologic formations.Of the total of more than 1,000 thermal-spring localities listed in this paper more than half are situated in the three States of Idaho, California, and Nevada, each of which contains more than 150 thermal-spring localities. Wyoming, including the Yellowstone National Park, contains more than 100 hot-spring localities. Oregon, Utah, Colorado, Montana, and New Mexico contain several dozen thermal springs each, of which the principal ones are developed as resorts. The other thermal springs are scattered through 12 States, of which Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina contain one spring or group each. More than half of the total number are developed as resorts or used for irrigation or water supply, but many have remained undeveloped because they are not easily accessible.

  1. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) CEO Elaine Thorndike, seated left, and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, seated right, sign an agreement at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, that created a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. Looking on from left, Executive Director, Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade Don Marostica, Colorado State Representative Su Ryden, Colorado State Senate President Brandon Schaffer, Representative from U.S. Senator Udall's office Jimmy Haugue, NIST/MEP Director Roger Kilmer and Colorado State Governor Bill Ritter. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  3. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  4. Thermal and tectonic history in the steamboat hills geothermal field: Determination of the age of active hydrothermal activity by application of AFTA{sup {trademark}} (apatite fission track analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Kamp, P.C. van de

    1995-12-31

    This study, in the Steamboat Hills area of the Carson segment of the northern Walker Lane Belt, was initiated to provide a regional thermal history framework and to investigate the age of the active local hydrothermal system. Seven outcrop samples, representing ?Cretaceous granodiorite and ?Triassic Peavine sequence metamorphosed volcanic flow and volcaniclastic rocks plus six samples of Peavine rocks in vertical sequence from an 0.8 km deep geothermal corehole have been analyzed using AFTA (apatite fission track analysis) and zircon fission track analysis.

  5. Colorado's Singular "No"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    Supporters of affirmative action may have finally found a way to defeat state ballot measures that would ban such programs: Latch onto an inspirational presidential candidate with piles of cash and an unprecedented voter-turnout machine. Those activists won a narrow victory in Colorado this month, when 50.7 percent of voters made the state the…

  6. ECOREGIONS OF COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Colorado have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecor...

  7. ECOREGIONS OF COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Colorado have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecor...

  8. Game Birds of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game birds typical of Colorado. Discussions in English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game birds, individual game bird species, and endangered species of birds related to game birds. (RE)

  9. Asbestos in Colorado Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia A.

    This study determined, by means of a random sample, how many of Colorado's public schools have asbestos materials and estimated the potential risk of exposure presented by these materials. Forty-one schools were surveyed. Bulk samples of possible asbestos materials were collected and analyzed using the K-squared Asbestos Screening Test to…

  10. Game Birds of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game birds typical of Colorado. Discussions in English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game birds, individual game bird species, and endangered species of birds related to game birds. (RE)

  11. Colorado Children's Budget 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Baker, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget" presents and analyzes investments and spending trends during the past five state fiscal years on services that benefit children. The "Children's Budget" focuses mainly on state investment and spending, with some analysis of federal investments and spending to provide broader context of state…

  12. MIGRATORY LABOR IN COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGLASS, M.R.; AND OTHERS

    CONDITIONS AND PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE EMPLOYMENT OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS AND MIGRANTS IN COLORADO ARE PRESENTED. THE FIVE MAJOR SEASONAL FARM LABOR STATE EMPLOYMENT AREAS ARE SURVEYED ACCORDING TO (1) THE ORGANIZATION OF THE SEASONAL FARM LABOR (4) TRENDS IN AGRICULTURAL ACREAGE, PRODUCTION, AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, (5) COMMUNITY ATTITUDES AND…

  13. Asbestos in Colorado Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia A.

    This study determined, by means of a random sample, how many of Colorado's public schools have asbestos materials and estimated the potential risk of exposure presented by these materials. Forty-one schools were surveyed. Bulk samples of possible asbestos materials were collected and analyzed using the K-squared Asbestos Screening Test to…

  14. MIGRATORY LABOR IN COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGLASS, M.R.; AND OTHERS

    CONDITIONS AND PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE EMPLOYMENT OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS AND MIGRANTS IN COLORADO ARE PRESENTED. THE FIVE MAJOR SEASONAL FARM LABOR STATE EMPLOYMENT AREAS ARE SURVEYED ACCORDING TO (1) THE ORGANIZATION OF THE SEASONAL FARM LABOR (4) TRENDS IN AGRICULTURAL ACREAGE, PRODUCTION, AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, (5) COMMUNITY ATTITUDES AND…

  15. Colorado's Singular "No"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    Supporters of affirmative action may have finally found a way to defeat state ballot measures that would ban such programs: Latch onto an inspirational presidential candidate with piles of cash and an unprecedented voter-turnout machine. Those activists won a narrow victory in Colorado this month, when 50.7 percent of voters made the state the…

  16. Colorado tick fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Colorado tick fever URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  17. Furbearers of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with furbearing animals typical of Colorado. Discussions in both English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of furbearers, individual species (including prime pelt seasons for each), and threatened and endangered furbearing species. (RE)

  18. Colorado Children's Budget 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Children's Budget 2010" is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested in better understanding how Colorado funds children's programs and services. It attempts to clarify often confusing budget information and describe where the state's investment trends are and where those trends will lead the…

  19. Homebuyers and wildfire risk: a Colorado Springs case study

    Treesearch

    Patraicia Ann Champ; Geoffrey H. Donovan; Christopher M. Barth

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the threat that wildfire poses to homes has received much attention in both the mainstream press and academic literature. However, little is known about how homebuyers consider wildfire risk during the home-purchase process. In the context of a unique wildfire education program, we consider two approaches to examining the relationship between wildfire...

  20. Homebuyers and wildfire risk: A Colorado Springs case study

    Treesearch

    Patricia Ann Champ; Geoffrey H. Donovan; Christopher M. Barth

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the threat that wildfire poses to homes has received much attention in both the mainstream press and academic literature. However, little is known about how homebuyers consider wildfire risk during the home-purchase process. In the context of a unique wildfire education program, we consider two approaches to examining the relationship between wildfire...

  1. Education for a Productive Society. Remarks to the National Commission on Excellence in Education. (Public Hearing, Denver, Colorado, September 16, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Donald

    The link between education and work and the situation at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs are discussed by the university chancellor in testimony to the National Commission on Excellence in Education. Characteristics of this urban, commuter university and its students are described, along with historical changes in the role of the…

  2. Helical spring holder assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Wyatt S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helically-threaded spring holder on which a helically wound spring is mounted has a groove formed in one side of the thread at the end where the spring engages the spring holder. The groove relieves the portion of the side in which it is formed from restricting the spring against axial movement during deflection of the spring. The circumferential length of this groove is chosen to establish the number of spring coils which can be deflected without contacting the side of the thread. The end of the thread is also made rigid to prevent flexing thereof during maximal elongation of the spring.

  3. Importance of the 2014 Colorado River Delta pulse flow for migratory songbirds: Insights from foraging behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darrah, Abigail J.; Greeney, Harold F.; Van Riper, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The Lower Colorado River provides critical riparian areas in an otherwise arid region and is an important stopover site for migrating landbirds. In order to reverse ongoing habitat degradation due to drought and human-altered hydrology, a pulse flow was released from Morelos Dam in spring of 2014, which brought surface flow to dry stretches of the Colorado River in Mexico. To assess the potential effects of habitat modification resulting from the pulse flow, we used foraging behavior of spring migrants from past and current studies to assess the relative importance of different riparian habitats. We observed foraging birds in 2000 and 2014 at five riparian sites along the Lower Colorado River in Mexico to quantify prey attack rates, prey attack maneuvers, vegetation use patterns, and degree of preference for fully leafed-out or flowering plants. Prey attack rate was highest in mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in 2000 and in willow (Salix gooddingii) in 2014; correspondingly, migrants predominantly used mesquite in 2000 and willow in 2014 and showed a preference for willows in flower or fruit in 2014. Wilson’s warbler (Cardellina pusilla) used relatively more low-energy foraging maneuvers in willow than in tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) or mesquite. Those patterns in foraging behavior suggest native riparian vegetation, and especially willow, are important resources for spring migrants along the lower Colorado River. Willow is a relatively short-lived tree dependent on spring floods for dispersal and establishment and thus spring migrants are likely to benefit from controlled pulse flows.

  4. Access to the Medical Profession in Colorado by Minorities and Women. A Report Prepared by the Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldrow, William; And Others

    During spring 1975, the Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights investigated four main areas where minorities and women traditionally encountered obstacles because of their minority status and/or sex: academic preparation at the preprofessional level and recruitment to a medical center, admission to medical school,…

  5. Access to the Medical Profession in Colorado by Minorities and Women. A Report Prepared by the Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldrow, William; And Others

    During spring 1975, the Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights investigated four main areas where minorities and women traditionally encountered obstacles because of their minority status and/or sex: academic preparation at the preprofessional level and recruitment to a medical center, admission to medical school,…

  6. Colorado River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado River ends its 2330 km journey in the Gulf of Mexico in Baja California. The heavy use of the river as an irrigation source for the Imperial Valley has dessicated the lower course of the river in Mexico such that it no longer consistently reaches the sea. Prior to the mid 20th century, the Colorado River Delta provided a rich estuarine marshland that is now essentially desiccated, but nonetheless is an important ecological resource.

    The image was acquired May 29, 2006, covers an area of 44.3 x 57.5 km, and is located at 32.1 degrees north latitude, 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Colorado River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado River ends its 2330 km journey in the Gulf of Mexico in Baja California. The heavy use of the river as an irrigation source for the Imperial Valley has dessicated the lower course of the river in Mexico such that it no longer consistently reaches the sea. Prior to the mid 20th century, the Colorado River Delta provided a rich estuarine marshland that is now essentially desiccated, but nonetheless is an important ecological resource.

    The image was acquired May 29, 2006, covers an area of 44.3 x 57.5 km, and is located at 32.1 degrees north latitude, 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Silverton folio, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Whitman; Howe, Ernest; Ransome, F. L.

    1905-01-01

    The term San Juan region, or simply "the San Juan," used with variable meaning by early explorers, and naturally with indefinite limitation during the period of settlement, is now quite generally applied to a large tract of mountainous country in southwestern Colorado, together with an undefined zone of lower country bordering it on the north, west, and south.  The Continental Divide traverses this area in a great bow.  The principal part of the district is a deeply scored volcanic plateau, more than 3000 square miles in extent, drained on the north by the tributaties of the Gunnison River, on the west by those of the Dolores and San Miguel rivers, on the south by numerous branches of the San Juan, and on the east by the Rio Grande.  ALl but the latter drainage finds its way to the Gulf of California through the Colorado River.

  9. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado State Governor Bill Ritter delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Assessment of impacts of proposed coal-resource and related economic development on water resources, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming; a summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Timothy Doak; Hillier, Donald E.

    1981-01-01

    with ammonia-nitrogen concentrations in the Yampa River downstream from Steamboat Springs were evaluated using a waste-load assimilative-capacity model. Changes in sediment loads carried by streams due to increased coal mining and construction of roads and buildings may be apparent only locally; projected increases in sediment loads relative to historic loads from the basin are estimated to be 2 to 7 percent. Solid-waste residuals generated by coal-conversion processes and disposed of into old mine pits may cause widely dispersed ground-water contamination, based on simulation-modeling results. Projected increases in year-round water use will probably result in the construction of several proposed reservoirs. Current seasonal patterns of streamflow and of dissolvedsolids concentrations in streamflow will be altered appreciably by these reservoirs. Decreases in time-weighted mean-annual dissolved-solids concentrations of as much as 34 percent are anticipated, based upon model simulations of several configurations of proposed reservoirs. Detailed statistical analyses of water-quality conditions in the Yampa River basin were made. Regionalized maximum waterquality concentrations were estimated for possible comparison with future conditions. Using Landsat imagery and aerial photographs, potential remote-sensing applications were evaluated to monitor land-use changes and to assess both snow cover and turbidity levels in streams. The technical information provided by the several studies of the Yampa River basin assessment should be useful to regional planners and resource managers in evaluating the possible impacts of development on the basin's water resources.

  11. Colorado Geothermal Commercialization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, F.C.

    1980-04-01

    Chaffee County, located in central Colorado, has immense potential for geothermal development. This report has been prepared to assist residents and developers in and outside the area to develop the hydrothermal resources of the county. Data has been collected and interpreted from numerous sources in order to introduce a general description of the area, estimate energy requirements, describe the resources and postulate a development plan. Electric power generation and direct heat application potential for the region are described.

  12. Workforce Brief: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Colorado (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 23 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding some 551,630 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 2,355,290 to 2,906,920. The rate of growth is much higher than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole.…

  13. Colorado wind profilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) has operated a network of wind profiling radars in Colorado. The current configuration of the network is described. All radars operate continuously and unattended to supply hourly-averaged wind profiles to a central computer in Boulder in real time. The hardware and software changes made to improve reliability are discussed. This research network will continue to be used to provide wind profiles for operational and research meteorologists and the performance of various wavelength systems will be evaluated.

  14. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Pueblo County, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  15. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Prowers County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Prowers County, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  16. Book of Abstracts from the MORS Symposium (62nd) Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Analysis necessarily becomes a combat rehearsal system . Sustainiabilty Model (CASMO) involved a rigorous proem In die future and even now, time and... systems will be an adequate deterrent against ancording to preselected criteria, the principal criterion this threat for some time , but this will not...measured Aaasir: A Deciole Analysis Aid/or Policy in terms of the time delay to achieving a weapon, and Derelopmeu*, Maning, and Requirements Deflation

  17. 77 FR 23498 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... contains beans; and one pitcher. The vessel styles are brown-on-red zoomorphic; red-ware; Tsegi orange-ware... ancestral Puebloan peoples and modern Puebloan peoples based on oral tradition and scientific studies. The...

  18. Environmental Assessment for the Indoor Training Facility, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    and intramural sports played at the Academy. 17 The facility exterior would be white precast concrete , blue polycarbonate, aluminum and 18 glass. The...Retaining Walls Structure NA 1958 Terrazzo Site NA 1958 Court of Honor Site NA 1958 Parade Grounds Site NA 1958 Circulation System Site NA 1958 No

  19. Installation restoration program. Phase 1. Records search, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The U.S. Air Force Academy proper contains 18,235 acres and occupies most of the T12S and R67W, R66W area. Farrish Memorial Recreation Annex consists of 655 additional acres and is located in the mountainous Rampart Range. As a result of the HARM rating, recommendations were developed for follow-on investigations to determine if contamination has occurred. Among the sites recommended for further investigation are: (1) JP-4 Spill -- In 1983 an unknown quantity of JP-4 was spilled from a partially buried tank located behind a retaining wall. (2) Farrish Sites -- A landfill and a dredged material disposal site have been identified at the Farrish Memorial Recreation Area. (3) Fire Training Area -- The Fire Protection Training Area has been identified as a site for additional investigation because the site is in close proximity to a stream and to ground water. (4) Dredged Material Disposal Site -- This site was used for disposal of sediment from non-potable reservoir 1. (5) Landfills -- Landfills 1 and 2 have been identified as sites because of the wide variety of wastes that may have been disposed. (6) Digester Sludge Disposal Site -- This site has been used for disposal of digester sludge from the Academy Sanitary Sewage Treatment Plant.

  20. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1. Records Search, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Academy 2-5 3 2-3 U.S. Air Force Academy Site Prior to 2-6 Construction 3 3-1 Major Topographic Features at the U.S. Air 3-4 Force Academy 3 3-2 Site Soils...2 i ment Rating Metholodgy 6-1 Summary of Recommendations, U.S. Air Force 6-3 a Academy 6-2 Recommended Minimum Well Construction 6-5 Requirements 6... Construction of the Academy began in 1955 and was completed in late 1958. A $40 million expansion program was completed between 1965 to 1968 to accommodate an

  1. World History Teaching Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 12-14, 1982). Corrected Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Joe C., Ed.; Martin, Neil D., Ed.

    Proceedings of a conference held to discuss the problems of teaching world history are reported. Eight papers are presented. The first four address the issue of world history as an academic discipline. In "The World History Survey Course" William McNeill argues that major curriculum changes take place in this country only when sound pedagogical…

  2. Africa in World History: A Teaching Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, April 25-26, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Bryant P., Ed.

    African history is a relatively new discipline and its sources, methodology, and content may be unfamiliar to those trained in European or U.S. history. Through presentations by African scholars, this document offers new strategies for integrating Africa into world history courses. Each presentation is followed by commentaries from experienced…

  3. Geophysical Exploration of the Red Rocks Canyon Landfill in Colorado Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, N.; Morin, C.; Gy250, S.; Bank, C.

    2005-05-01

    Our introductory geophysics class conducted a survey of the Red Rocks Canyon landfill to determine its boundaries, depth, type of fill, and groundwater runoff patterns. In the 1970s and 1980s the canyon was filled with domestic waste, and has recently been acquired by the city to extend an existing park. Our results in general portray a heterogenous subsurface and reveal that the landfill likely contains many metallic objects. More specifically we found the following: A negative Bouguer anomaly across the landfill matches a model for a ~25 m thick fill. Resistivity is much lower on the landfill than off, but we could not confirm our hypothesis that the landfill drains water through the north end of the canyon. Our seismic data are inconclusive, we think that our assumption of a planar bottom and seismically homogenous fill is violated. The magnetic data show on average higher total values, large (>1,000 nT) variations and high magnetic gradients on the landfill; because this method is fast and very clearly maps the landfill boundaries we propose a magnetic survey to detect possible unregistered dumps outside the mapped boundaries of the landfill. Measuring ground conductivity utilizing an electromagnetic survey produces significantly higher values on the landfill than off. Additionally, directional anisotropies match the direction of the strike of the geological formations adjacent to the landfill and are more randomly oriented on the landfill.

  4. Colorado Preschool Program: 2003 Report to the Colorado Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Colorado Preschool Program (CPP) serves at-risk preschool children in community programs, including Head Start programs, private for-profit programs, non-profit programs, and programs within public schools. This report to the Colorado legislature provides information on participation in the program, collaborations of CPP with other early…

  5. BUFFALO PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Wood, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colorado. On the basis of this study there is a probable mineral-resource potential for silver vein and bedding replacement deposits along the Weston Pass fault zone, for hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits in the vicinity of the Parkdale iron pit, and for gold vein deposits in the parts of the Granite and Four Mile districts that are within the wilderness study area. A probable barite resource potential occurs at Rough and Tumbling Creek and near Spring Creek on the east side of the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  6. SANGRE DE CRISTO WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Bruce R.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys were undertaken of a wilderness study area which includes most of the Sangre de Cristo Range of south-central Colorado. Four areas of probable mineral-resource potential for gold, silver, and base metals lie along a northwest structural trend which follows the western margin of the range north of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument and crosses the range south of the monument. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for similar minerals plus tungsten has been identified east of Blanca Peak at the extreme southern end of the study area. Another area of probable mineral-resource potential includes molybdenum mineralization associated with the Rito Alto stock. A small area of probable geothermal resource potential exists on the west side of the area around the Valley View Hot Springs. There is little promise for the occurrence of oil and gas resources.

  7. Mountain Pine Beetles and Invasive Plant Species Findings from a Survey of Colorado Community Residents

    Treesearch

    Courtney Flint; Hua Qin; Michael Daab

    2008-01-01

    The US Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station funded research to assess community responses to forest disturbance by mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and public reaction to invasive plants in north central Colorado. In the Spring of2007, 4,027 16-page questionnaires were mailed to randomly selected households with addresses in Breckenridge,...

  8. Study of Attrition of Chicana Students at the University of Southern Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, James

    Information was collected from 28 Chicano, 42 Chicana, 36 non-Chicano, and 52 non-Chicana students to identify reasons for Chicana attrition from the University of Southern Colorado. Information was also collected from 14 Chicanas who had already dropped out of college. Most of the data were collected at registration for spring semester, 1980. The…

  9. Colorado Model Content Standards: Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Colorado Model Content Standards for Science specify what all students should know and be able to do in science as a result of their school studies. Specific expectations are given for students completing grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Five standards outline the essential level of science knowledge and skills needed by Colorado citizens to…

  10. Special Education Funding in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braeger, Todd; Cottle, Valerie; Gee, Eric J.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated the funding of education programs for children with disabilities in Colorado. The report describes the characteristics of the students being served in special education, reviews Colorado's current system of funding special education, reviews the results of a survey given to…

  11. Selected Colorado Technology Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloeckner, Gene W.

    The transition from industrial arts to technology education is a priority in Colorado. Millions of dollars have been and will be spent to renovate industrial arts facilities and laboratories. Four Colorado middle schools have exemplary technology education programs. The Eagle Crest Technology Education Laboratory is used for both middle and high…

  12. Colorado Career Development Video Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Rich; Jacobsen, Brent

    The average number of points assigned by 15-25 reviewers to each of 13 guidance and career development videotapes is recorded in a video quality assessment matrix. Reviewers were participants in Colorado State University's 1989-90 Colorado Career Guidance Video Review Project training sessions and videotapes were rated on: (1) instructional…

  13. RAWAH WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, R.C.; Patten, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Rawah Wilderness, Colorado and some adjacent lands were studied and their mineral-resource potential was assessed using geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data. Traces of copper, silver, uranium, tungsten, and molybdenum were found in geochemical samples, but there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in this relatively unmineralized area. If our interpretation is valid that the southern Medicine Bow Mountains moved eastward along a gently west dipping thrust fault, it suggests the possibility that potential petroleum reservoir rocks are beneath the granite in at least parts of the area. This possibility could be investigated by seismic surveys or drilling.

  14. EAGLES NEST WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tweto, Ogden; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a geologic and mineral survey, a primitive area that constitutes the nucleus of the Eagles Nest Wilderness, Colorado was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Among the additional areas later incorporated in the wilderness, only a strip near a major fault west and northwest of Frisco and Dillon is classed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the silver-lead-zinc or fluorspar types.

  15. WILSON MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromfield, Calvin S.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilson Mountains Wilderness consists of about 68 sq mi in the San Miguel Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Based on a mineral survey two areas in the wilderness have a probable mineral-resource potential. One area is on the east margin of the area in the Trout Lake mining district, and the other is near the center of the area, the Mount Wilson mining district. Both areas have had a modest base and (or) precious metal production from narrow veins and have a probable potential for the occurrence of similar deposits. Of more significance is a probable mineral-resource potential for disseminated copper mineralization in the Mount Wilson mining district.

  16. Visions in Action: Colorado Community Cases. A Report of the Colorado Rural Revitalization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Local Affairs, Denver.

    This report describes the Colorado Rural Revitalization Project (CRRP) and the participant rural communities between 1988-1991. The CRRP, established in 1988, consists of a partnership among rural Colorado communities, Colorado State University, the University of Colorado, the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.…

  17. 76 FR 17444 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Colorado Historical Society... remains was made by the Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado) professional staff in...

  18. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  19. Ombla Spring, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanović, P.

    1996-03-01

    Ombla Spring is located on the Adriatic coast near the town of Dubrovnik. The spring discharges at sea level. To eliminate the influence of the tide, a small dam was constructed 50 m downstream of the spring outlet. The spring water overflows the dam crest at an elevation of 2.40 m. Since 1897 the springwater has been used for the water supply for Dubrovnik.

  20. Chapter 2. Colorado River cutthroat trout

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Young

    1995-01-01

    The Colorado River cutthroat trout historically occupied portions of the Colorado River drainage in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico (Behnke 1992). Though it is now restricted to headwater streams and lakes, its original distribution probably included portions of larger streams, such as the Green (Simon 1935), Yampa, White, Colorado, and San Juan rivers...

  1. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  2. Spring Wheat Breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common wheat, known as bread wheat, is one of major crops for human food consumption. It is further classified into spring and winter wheat based on the distinct growing seasons. Spring wheat is grown worldwide and usually planted in the spring and harvested in late summer or early fall. In this c...

  3. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  4. Ground-water data from the San Miguel River basin, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.; Brooks, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected from 36 wells and 80 springs in the San Miguel River basin from 1977 to 1979. Depth to water was measured for 22 wells and discharges were measured for 53 springs. Chemical analyses for water samples collected from 23 wells and 25 springs indicated larger dissolved solids concentrations in bedrock water samples than in alluvial water samples. Drillers ' records obtained from the Colorado State Engineer 's Office for 86 wells indicate generally larger yields from wells completed in alluvium than in bedrock. (USGS)

  5. Geology and gold deposits of the Cripple Creek district, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Waldemar; Ransome, F.L.

    1906-01-01

    The Cripple Creek gold deposits, discovered in 1891, were investigated by Messrs. Cross and Penrose, of the United States Geological Survey, in 1894. The present reexamination was requested by citizens of Colorado, and . has been carried out under the financial cooperation of the State with the Federal Survey. It has involved complete revision of the topographic map of the district used as a base by Cross and Penrose, the running of a line of accurate levels from Colorado Springs to Cripple Creek, remapping of the geology, and a thorough study of the extensive mine workings opened during the past ten years. Due acknowledgment is made, of the cordial assistance rendered by mining men, and a list is given of the important publications concerning the geology or mines of the district.

  6. 1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING (LEFT BACKGROUND), AND TWIN COTTAGES (UPPER RIGHT) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  7. Fluorine, fluorite, and fluorspar in central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    related to the Pikes Peak batholith had a mean fluorine content of 1,700 ppm, and primary magmatic fluorite and fluorite-bearing pegmatites are common throughout that igneous mass. Fluorine was deposited in many types of economic mineral deposits in central Colorado, and it currently is a significant trace element in some thermal springs. In the fluorspar deposits, fluorine contents were as high as 37 percent. Some fluorine-rich porphyry systems, such as Jamestown, had fluorine values that ranged from 200 ppm to nearly 37 percent fluorine, and veins in other deposits contained hydrothermal fluorite, although it was not ubiquitous. For the 495 samples from non-fluorspar mining districts (and excluding Jamestown), however, the median fluorine content was 990 ppm. This is above the crustal average but still relatively modest compared to the fluorspar deposits, and it indicates that the majority of the mineralizing systems in central Colorado did not deposit large amounts of fluorine. Nevertheless, the fluorine- and fluorite-rich mineral deposits could be used as guides for the evaluation and discovery of related but concealed porphyry and epithermal base- and precious-metal deposits. The Cenozoic geologic history of central Colorado included multiple periods during which fluorine-bearing rocks and mineral deposits were exposed, weathered, and eroded. This protracted history has released fluorine into soils and regoliths, and modern rainfall and snowmelt interact with these substrates to add fluorine to the hydrosphere. This study did not evaluate the fluorine contents of water or make any predictions about what areas might be major sources for dissolved fluorine. However, the abundant data that are available on fluorine in surface water and ground water can be coupled with the results of this study to provide additional insight into natural sources of fluorine in domestic drinking water.

  8. Nonthermal springs of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.

    1971-01-01

    Data are presented for about 4,500 nonthermal springs that discharge in the State of Utah. Most major springs having discharge of several cubic feet per second or more are in or near mountain ranges or plateaus where precipitation is much greater than in other parts of the State. The largest instantaneous discharge observed at any spring was 314 cfs at Mammoth Spring in southwestern Utah.  Discharges exceeding 200 cfs have been observed at Swan Creek Spring in extreme northern Utah, and discharges of 200 cfs have been reported for Big Brush Creek Spring in northeastern Utah. Maximum discharges generally are during or within a few weeks after the main period of snowmelt, which is usually from late April to the middle of June.The largest springs generally discharge form or very near carbonate rocks in which solution channels and fractures are numerous or from areas of porous or fractured volcanic rocks. Most nonthermal springs in Utah probably are variable springs – that is, their variability of discharge exceeds 100 percent.Most of the major springs discharge water that contains less than 500 ppm (parts per million) of dissolved solids, and most of the water is of the calcium bicarbonate type. Water from springs is used for domestic, municipal, irrigation, livestock, mining, and industrial purposes.

  9. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) CEO Elaine Thorndike delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Colorado State Capitol Geothermal project

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Lance

    2016-04-29

    Colorado State Capitol Geothermal Project - Final report is redacted due to space constraints. This project was an innovative large-scale ground-source heat pump (GSHP) project at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver, Colorado. The project employed two large wells on the property. One for pulling water from the aquifer, and another for returning the water to the aquifer, after performing the heat exchange. The two wells can work in either direction. Heat extracted/added to the water via a heat exchanger is used to perform space conditioning in the building.

  11. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    NIST MEP Director Roger Kilmer delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement between the Colorado Association for Manufacturing and Technology (CAMT) and NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  13. Smoke from Colorado Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman fire, situated about 65 kilometers southwest of Denver, Colorado, is the largest fire ever recorded in that state. The amount and distribution of smoke from the Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The images were captured on June 9, 2002, on the second day of the Hayman fire, when only about 13 percent of the total 137,000 acres eventually consumed had been scorched.

    The image at top-left was acquired by MISR's most oblique (70-degree) forward-viewing camera, and the view at bottom-left was captured by MISR's 26-degree forward-viewing camera. Both left-hand panels are 'false color' views, utilizing near-infrared, red, and blue spectral bands displayed as red, green and blue respectively. With this spectral combination, highly vegetated areas appear red. At top right is a map of aerosol optical depth. This map utilizes the capability of the oblique view angles to measure the abundance of particles in the atmosphere. Haze distributed across the eastern part of the state is indicated by a large number of green pixels, and areas where no retrieval occurred are shown in dark grey. The more oblique perspective utilized within the top panels enhances the appearance of smoke and reveals the haze. In the lower left-hand panel the view is closer to nadir (downward-looking). Here the smoke plumes appear more compact and the haze across eastern Colorado is not detected. The lower right-hand panel is a stereoscopically derived height field that echoes the compact shape of the smoke plumes in the near-nadir image. Results indicate that the smoke plumes reached altitudes of a few kilometers above the surface terrain, or about the same height as the small clouds that appear orange along the bottom edge to the left of center.

    Data used in these visualizations were generated as part of operational processing at the Atmospheric

  14. Spring joint with overstrain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Peter M. (Inventor); Gaither, Bryan W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible joint may include a conductive compression spring and a pair of non-conductive spring cages disposed at opposite ends of the compression spring to support the compression spring. A conductive member disposed inside the compression spring may extend between the pair of spring cages. One end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with one of the spring cages and another end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with the other of the spring cages.

  15. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  16. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-18

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03499

  17. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  18. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  19. Sources of water and nitrogen to the Widefield Aquifer, southwestern El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Cain, Doug

    1985-01-01

    The Widefield aquifer near Colorado Springs, Colorado, is recharged primarily by Fountain Creek and, to a lesser extent, by infiltration and percolation of water from the land surface and from groundwater inflow. During the past 20 to 30 years, concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen) in the Widefield aquifer have increased from 0.5 to 3.0 milligrams/L to nearly 10 milligrams/L, and occasionally exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams/L as nitrogen. During the summer of 1982, the concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen in water in the aquifer ranged from 3.2 to 15 milligrams/L with a mean concentration of 6.9 milligrams/L. In general, the nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations are greatest near the north end of the aquifer, probably resulting from effluent from Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant being discharged to Fountain Creek. During 1982, 93% of the total estimated 160 tons of nitrogen available to enter the Widefield aquifer was from the Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant. However, a significant proportion of this nitrogen may have been lost through denitrification. (USGS)

  20. Geothermal heat pump system assisted by geothermal hot spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Koizumi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The authors propose a hybrid geothermal heat pump system that could cool buildings in summer and melt snow on the pedestrian sidewalks in winter, utilizing cold mine water and hot spring water. In the proposed system, mine water would be used as cold thermal energy storage, and the heat from the hot spring after its commercial use would be used to melt snow for a certain section of sidewalks. Neither of these sources is viable for direct use application of geothermal resources, however, they become contributing energy factors without producing any greenhouse gases. To assess the feasibility of the proposed system, a series of temperature measurements in the Edgar Mine (Colorado School of Mines' experimental mine) in Idaho Springs, Colorado, were first conducted, and heat/mass transfer analyses of geothermal hot spring water was carried out. The result of the temperature measurements proved that the temperature of Edgar Mine would be low enough to store cold groundwater for use in summer. The heat loss of the hot spring water during its transportation was also calculated, and the heat requirement for snow melt was compared with the heat available from the hot spring water. It was concluded that the heat supply in the proposed usage of hot spring water was insufficient to melt the snow for the entire area that was initially proposed. This feasibility study should serve as an example of "local consumption of locally available energy". If communities start harnessing economically viable local energy in a responsible manner, there will be a foundation upon which to build a sustainable community.

  1. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver delivers remarks at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to signing an agreement that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. 2010 weather and aeolian sand-transport data from the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dealy, Timothy P.; East, Amy E.; Fairley, Helen C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of weather parameters and aeolian sand transport were made in 2010 near selected archeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona. Data collected in 2010 indicate event- and seasonal-scale variations in rainfall, wind, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Differences in weather patterns between 2009 and 2010 included a slightly later spring windy season, greater spring precipitation and annual rainfall totals, and a later onset and length of the reduced diurnal barometric-pressure fluctuations commonly associated with summer monsoon conditions. The increase in spring precipitation was consistent with the 2010 spring El Niño conditions compared to the 2009 spring La Niña conditions, whereas the subsequent transition to an El Niño-Southern Oscillation neutral phase appeared to delay the reduction in diurnal barometric fluctuations.

  4. Registration of 'Stoneham' spring feed barley resistant to Russian wheat aphid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'Stoneham' (REG. No.; PI 641940) a Russian wheat aphid (RWA, Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov)-resistant, spring, two-rowed, feed barley (Hordeum vulgare) tested as 97BX 27-132, was developed and released by the USDA-ARS, Stillwater, OK and Aberdeen, ID; Colorado State University; and the University of Neb...

  5. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  6. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  7. Salinity Trends in the Upper Colorado River Basin Upstream From the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit, Colorado, 1986-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leib, Kenneth J.; Bauch, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Salinity Control Unit was 10,700 tons/year. This accounts for approximately 27 percent of the decrease observed downstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. Salinity loads were decreasing at the fastest rate (6,950 tons/year) in Region 4, which drains an area between the Colorado River at Cameo, Colorado (station CAMEO) and Colorado River above Glenwood Springs, Colorado (station GLEN) streamflow-gaging stations. Trends in salinity concentration and streamflow were tested at station CAMEO to determine if salinity concentration, streamflow, or both are controlling salinity loads upstream from the Grand Valley Salinity Control Unit. Trend tests of individual ion concentrations were included as potential indicators of what sources (based on mineral composition) may be controlling trends in the upper Colorado. No significant trend was detected for streamflow from 1986 to 2003 at station CAMEO; however, a significant downward trend was detected for salinity concentration. The trend slope indicates that salinity concentration is decreasing at a median rate of about 3.54 milligrams per liter per year. Five major ions (calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and chloride) were tested for trends. The results indicate that processes within source areas with rock and soil types (or other unidentified sources) bearing calcium, sodium, and sulfate had the largest effect on the downward trend in salinity load upstream from station CAMEO. Downward trends in salinity load resulting from ground-water sources and/or land-use change were thought to be possible reasons for the observed decreases in salinity loads; however, the cause or causes of the decreasing salinity loads are not fully understood. A reduction in the amount of ground-water percolation from Region 4 (resulting from work done through Federal irrigation system improvement programs as well as privately funded irrigation system improvements) has helped reduce annual salinity load from Region 4 by approxima

  8. 76 FR 35010 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado... funerary objects in the possession/control of the Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver.... ] History and Description of the Remains In July 1990, human remains representing a minimum of 10...

  9. Floods in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Follansbee, Robert; Sawyer, Leon R.

    1948-01-01

    The first records of floods in Colorado antedated the settlement of the State by about 30 years. These were records of floods on the Arkansas and Republican Rivers in 1826. Other floods noted by traders, hunters and emigrants, some of whom were on their way to the Far West, occurred in 1844 on the Arkansas River, and by inference on the South Platte River. Other early floods were those on the Purgatoire, the Lower Arkansas, and the San Juan Rivers about 1859. The most serious flood since settlement began was that on the Arkansas River during June 1921, which caused the loss of about 100 lives and an estimated property loss of $19,000,000. Many floods of lesser magnitude have occurred, and some of these have caused loss of life and very considerable property damage. Topography is the chief factor in determining the location of storms and resulting floods. These occur most frequently on the eastern slope of the Front Range. In the mountains farther west precipitation is insufficient to cause floods except during periods of melting snow, in June. In the southwestern part of the State, where precipitation during periods of melting snow is insufficient to cause floods, the severest floods yet experienced resulted from heavy rains in September 1909 and October 1911. In the eastern foothills region, usually below an altitude of about 7,500 feet and extending for a distance of about 50 miles east of the mountains, is a zone subject to rainfalls of great intensity known as cloudbursts. These cloudbursts are of short duration and are confined to very small areas. At times the intensity is so great as to make breathing difficult for those exposed to a storm. The areas of intense rainfall are so small that Weather Bureau precipitation stations have not been located in them. Local residents, being cloudburst conscious, frequently measure the rainfall in receptacles in their yards, and such records constitute the only source of information regarding the intensity. A flood

  10. The Colorado Adoption Project.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Sally-Ann; Bricker, Josh B; Wadsworth, Sally J; Corley, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), an ongoing genetically informative longitudinal study of behavioral development. We describe the features of the adoption design used in CAP, and discuss how this type of design uses data from both parent-offspring and related- versus unrelated-sibling comparisons to estimate the importance of genetic and shared environmental influences for resemblance among family members. The paper provides an overview of CAP's history, how subjects were ascertained, recruited, and retained, and the domains of assessment that have been explored since the CAP's initiation in 1975. Findings from some representative papers that make use of data from CAP participants illustrate the study's multifaceted nature as a parent-offspring and sibling behavioral genetic study, a study that parallels a complimentary twin study, a longitudinal study of development, a source of subjects for molecular genetic investigation, and a study of the outcomes of the adoption process itself. As subjects assessed first at age 1 approach age 40, we hope the CAP will establish itself as the first prospective adoption study of lifespan development.

  11. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  12. Mineral springs and miracles.

    PubMed

    Forster, M M

    1994-04-01

    Development of hot springs in the Canadian Rockies was closely linked to their reputed medicinal value. In 1885, the federal government created a small reserve around the springs at Sulphur Mountain, an area later enlarged to become Banff National Park, in recognition of the "great sanitary and curative advantage to the public."

  13. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  14. Restoration of White Springs

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Delbin Endfield

    2000-01-01

    Rock structures, road closures, fencing and revegetation methods were employed to restore a culturally and ecologically important spring that had been damaged in the aftermath of a wildfire. The project has reestablished the stability of the spring and has moved it closer to its former condition. School groups were an essential part of the restoration project, and...

  15. Valve-spring Surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, Willy

    1937-01-01

    Test equipment is described that includes a system of three quartz indicators whereby three different pressures could be synchronized and simultaneously recorded on a single oscillogram. This equipment was used to test the reliction of waves at ends of valve spring, the dynamical stress of the valve spring for a single lift of the valve, and measurement of the curve of the cam tested. Other tests included simultaneous recording of the stress at both ends of the spring, spring oscillation during a single lift as a function of speed, computation of amplitude of oscillation for a single lift by harmonic analysis, effect of cam profile, the setting up of resonance, and forced spring oscillation with damping.

  16. Rotary spring energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, S.

    1981-07-01

    The goal was to design a lightweight system, for bicycles, that can level the input energy requirement (human exertion) in accordance with variations in road load (friction, wind, and grade) and/or to provide a system for regenerative braking, that is, to store energy normally lost in brake pad friction for brief periods until it required for re-acceleration or hill-climbing. The rotary spring, also called the coil, motor, spiral, or power spring is governed by the equations reviewed. Materials used in spring manufacture are briefly discussed, and justification for steel as the design choice of material is given. Torque and power requirements for a bicycle and rider are provided as well as estimated human power output levels. These criteria are examined to define spring size and possible orientations on a bicycle. Patents and designs for coupling the spring to the drive train are discussed.

  17. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal - (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  18. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  19. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal - (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  20. Comparing Chitin And Organic Substrates On The National Tunnel Waters In BlackHawk, Colorado For Manganese Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Tunnel is a part of the Central City/Idaho Springs Superfund site. Because passive treatment is an important possibility for removal of contaminants from the water, the USEPA and the Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) have been sponsoring a ...

  1. Age of the Peach Springs Tuff, southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielson, J.E.; Lux, D.R.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sanidine separates from pumice of the early Miocene Peach Springs Tuff are concordantly dated at 18.5??0.2 Ma by two isotopic techniques. The Peach Springs Tuff is the only known unit that can be correlated between isolated outcrops of Miocene strata from the central Mojave Desert of southeastern California to the western Colorado Plateau in Arizona, across five structural provinces, a distance of 350 km. Thus, the age of the Peach Springs Tuff is important to structural and paleogeographic reconstructions of a large region. -from Authors

  2. Persistence of Ethnicity: The Japanese of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell

    This paper presents an overview of the history of Japanese in Colorado. Japanese immigrants first came to Colorado between 1900 and 1910 as railroad laborers. Some became coal miners in southern Colorado; most others became farm laborers. Although the Japanese population during this period was small, communities developed in several locales. The…

  3. Colorado Schools Making Gains. Reading & Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication illustrates a sampling of Colorado schools that despite a variety of challenges are accomplishing achievement results that are noteworthy. These schools and others were identified through a statewide study of Colorado reading and writing conducted by the Colorado Department of Education Office of Learning and Results. The report,…

  4. 2008 KidsCount in Colorado!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "KidsCount in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. KidsCount in Colorado! informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable…

  5. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  6. Radioactive springs geochemical data related to uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Felmlee, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive mineral springs and wells at 33 localities in the States of Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico in the United States were sampled and studied to obtain geochemical data which might be used for U exploration. The major source of radioactivity at mineral spring sites is 226Ra. Minor amounts of 228Ra, 238U and 232Th are also present. Ra is presumed to have been selectively removed from possibly quite deep uranium-mineralized rock by hydrothermal solutions and is either precipitated at the surface or added to fresh surface water. In this way, the source rocks influence the geochemistry of the spring waters and precipitates. Characteristics of the spring waters at or near the surface are also affected by variations in total dissolved solids, alkalinity, temperature and co-precipitation. Spring precipitates, both hard and soft, consist of four major types: (1) calcite travertine; (2) iron- and arsenic-rich precipitates; (3) manganese- and barium-rich precipitates; and (4) barite, in some instances accompanied by S, Ra and U, if present in the spring water, are co-precipitated with the barite, Mn-Ba and Fe-As precipitates. Using parameters based on U and Ra concentrations in waters and precipitates springsite areas are tentatively rated for favourability as potential uraniferous areas. ?? 1977.

  7. Colorado Twin Registry: an update.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Sally-Ann; Gross, Andy A; Haberstick, Brett C; Corley, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    The Colorado Twin Registry (CTR) is a population-based registry housed at the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado. Recruitment began in 1982 and includes twins born from 1968 to the present. Four samples are currently drawn from the CTR: The Community Twin Sample, the Longitudinal Twin Sample, the Early Reading Development Sample, and the Colorado Learning Sample. Criteria for enrollment, recruitment strategies, demographic information, and zygosity assignment are explained for each sample. In addition, five studies in which CTR twins are now participating are highlighted. These include studies of cognition, learning ability, and vulnerability to substance abuse and antisocial behavior. The development of the CTR is an ongoing and evolving process, and it has proven to be a valuable registry, relatively representative of the population from which it was drawn.

  8. Breeding densities and migration periods of common snipe in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.R.; Ryder, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Breeding densities and migration periods of Common Snipe in Colorado were investigated in 1974-75. Sites studied were near Fort Collins and in North Park, both in north central Colorado; in the Yampa Valley in northwestern Colorado; and in the San Luis Valley in south central Colorado....Estimated densities of breeding snipe based on censuses conducted during May 1974 and 1975 were, by region: 1.3-1.7 snipe/ha near Fort Collins; 0.6 snipe/ha in North Park; 0.5-0.7 snipe/ha in the Yampa Valley; and 0.5 snipe/ha in the San Luis Valley. Overall mean densities were 06 and 0.7 snipe/ha in 1974 and 1975 respectively. On individual study sites, densities of snipe ranged from 0.2 to 2.1 snipe/ha. Areas with shallow, stable, discontinuous water levels, sparse, short vegetation, and soft organic soils had the highest densities.....Twenty-eight nests were located having a mean clutch size of 3.9 eggs. Estimated onset of incubation ranged from 2 May through 4 July. Most nests were initiated in May.....Spring migration extended from late March through early May. Highest densities of snipe were recorded in all regions during l&23 April. Fall migration was underway by early September and was completed by mid-October with highest densities occurring about the third week in September. High numbers of snipe noted in early August may have been early migrants or locally produced juveniles concentrating on favorable feeding areas.

  9. [Activities of Colorado University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    During the report period we completed several studies and embarked on a new set of laboratory experiments. We also hired a new post-doctoral Research Associate, Momir Stepanovic, who has gradually assumed leadership in the laboratory work. The other person involved has been graduate student Brian Eichelberger, who will complete his Ph.D. based on this work by late spring of this year. We have also continued to collaborate with our previous postdoctoral Research Associate, Valery Le Page, through a consulting arrangement. In the following sections we summarize work that has been completed and either in print, in press, or in final stages of preparation for publication; current work being carried out in the laboratory; and plans for the coming year. Work completed in 2002: 1. Modeling the physical and chemical states of PAHs in the diffuse interstellar medium. 2. Hydrogenation and charge states of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diffuse clouds. 3. Laboratory studies of chemical reactions involving carbon chain anions.

  10. NASA Helps Build Colorado Economy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-13

    Representative from U.S. Senator Udall's office Jimmy Haugue reads remarks from U.S. Senator Udall at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Monday, Dec. 13, 2010, prior to the signing of an agreement with NASA that creates a Technology Acceleration Program and Regional Innovation Cluster for Aerospace and Clean Energy. A manufacturing park focused on rapid new product development and production will be developed to assist growing Colorado businesses while promoting the commercialization of technology developed for the space program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Examination of native fish recruitment and description of the fish communities found in the San Juan and Colorado River interface zones of Lake Powell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon; Horn, Mike; Bradwisch, Quent; Boobar, Lewis

    2001-01-01

    Researchers examined the fish communities of the Colorado and San Juan river interface zones of Lake Powell during 1999 and 2000. The objectives were to: (1) search for young razorback sucker and Colorado pikeminnow and, if found, RIT tag them; (2) examine the effectiveness of the various collection techniques on juvenile native fish; and (3) describe the fish communities found in these transitory, or actually a??migratorya?? habitats. The San Juan River interface zone was sampled 5 time each year during the spring and summer while the Colorado River site was sampled a total of 3 times over the 2-year period, all in the springa?|

  12. Evaluation of fecal contamination by human and ruminant sources in upper Fountain Creek, Colorado, 2007-2008, by using multiple lines of evidence:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeckel, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Fountain Creek is a high-gradient stream on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. The headwaters of Fountain Creek drain Pikes Peak, a major destination for tourism. Fountain Creek is a drinking-water source for the City of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is used for irrigation, recreation, and other purposes between Colorado Springs and the confluence with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado. In 2008, Fountain Creek was placed on the Colorado 303(d) list of impaired streams because of fecal contamination. Colorado uses a 30-day geometric mean standard of 126 Escherichia coli per 100 milliliters as its management goal for recreational waters. The objective of this study was to identify major sources of Escherichia coli in upper Fountain Creek during exceedances of the State recreational water standard. To meet this objective, a new approach was developed and tested that uses genetic marker analysis for microbial source tracking, along with other information, to evaluate potential contributions of fecal contamination from various sources.

  13. Effects of flow regime on stream turbidity and suspended solids after wildfire, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires occur frequently in the Colorado Front Range and can alter the hydrological response of watersheds, yet little information exists on the impact of flow regime and storm events on post-wildfire water quality. The flow regime in the region is characterized by base-flow conditions during much of the year and increased runoff during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms. The impact of snowmelt and storm events on stream discharge and water quality was evaluated for about a year after a wildfire near Boulder, Colorado, USA. During spring snowmelt and low-intensity storms, differences in discharge and turbidity at sites upstream and downstream from the burned areas were minimal. However, high-intensity convective storms resulted in dramatic increases in discharge and turbidity at sites downstream from the burned area. This study highlights the importance of using high-frequency sampling to assess accurately wildfire impacts on water quality downstream.

  14. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  15. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  16. Mineral springs and miracles.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    Development of hot springs in the Canadian Rockies was closely linked to their reputed medicinal value. In 1885, the federal government created a small reserve around the springs at Sulphur Mountain, an area later enlarged to become Banff National Park, in recognition of the "great sanitary and curative advantage to the public." Images p730-a p731-a p732-a p733-a p734-a p736-a PMID:8199525

  17. Springs of Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. B. W.

    1996-03-01

    Predictably, in a country such as Britain, with its preponderance of consolidated, sedimentary, mainly fissure-flow aquifers, there is a very large number of springs, many of which are, or have been, used for public supply. Migratory springs are a feature of the British (Ur. Cretaceous) Chalk, the most important British aquifer. The Chalk's low specific yield and high capillary moisture retention together give rise to very considerable fluctuations (more than 33 m in some areas) of the unconfined water table. Along the gentle dip slopes of the Chalk (North and South Downs of southern and southeastern England) springs may migrate laterally for several miles, giving rise to seasonal streams locally known as “bournes” or “lavants”. However, springs such as at Duncton, West Sussex, at the base of the much steeper scarp slopes of the Chalk, form point sources, the flows from which tend to be relatively steady; such springs commonly supply and are the original reason for the existence of many of the small towns and villages which nestle along the bases of the chalk scarps of Sussex and Kent. Where the Chalk forms coastal cliffs, a number of springs break out at the base of the cliff between high and low tide levels; there are major chalk coastal springs, for instance, at St. Margaret's Bay (Kent) and at Arish Mells, east of Lulworth Cove, Dorset. Such springs are not used for direct supply (their salinity is usually too high) but are indicators of the presence of local reserves of groundwater for possible future development.

  18. Sapping Features of the Colorado Plateau: a Comparative Planetary Geology Field Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Alan D. (Editor); Kochel, R. Craig (Editor); Holt, Henry E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This book is an attempt to determine geomorphic criteria to be used to distinguish between channels formed predominantly by sapping and seepage erosion and those formed principally by surface runoff processes. The geologic nature of the Colorado Plateau has resulted in geomorphic features that show similarities to some areas on Mars, especially certain valley networks within thick sandstone formations. Where spring sapping is an effective process, the valleys that develop are unique in terms of their morphology and network pattern.

  19. Hydrologic and climatologic data, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, water year 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, Loretta S.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains data collected in the vicinity of the oil-shale area in the southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, from Oct. 1, 1977, to Sept. 30, 1978. The data presented in tables, include monthly precipitation, depth-duration of rainfall, snow depth and water content, air temperature, daily streamflow records, water-quality data from continuous-recording gaging sites, water-quality data for wells and springs, and water levels, temperature, and specific conductance for selected wells. (USGS)

  20. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue.

    This image was acquired on June 16, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  1. Hayman Fire, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hayman forest fire, started on June 8, is continuing to burn in the Pike National Forest, 57 km (35 miles) south-southwest of Denver. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has consumed more than 90,000 acres and has become Colorado's worst fire ever. In this ASTER image, acquired Sunday, June 16, 2002 at 10:30 am MST, the dark blue area is burned vegetation and the green areas are healthy vegetation. Red areas are active fires, and the blue cloud at the top center is smoke. Meteorological clouds are white. The image covers an area of 32.2 x 35.2 km (20.0 x 21.8 miles), and displays ASTER bands 8-3-2 in red, green and blue.

    This image was acquired on June 16, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  2. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  3. Kids Count in Colorado! 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines state, county, and regional trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The first part of the report is presented in four chapters. Chapter 1 includes findings regarding the increasing diversity of the child population, linguistic isolation, the impact of parental unemployment, child poverty, and the affordable…

  4. Living with wildfire in Colorado

    Treesearch

    Patricia A. Champ; Nicholas Flores; Hannah Brenkert-Smith

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation, we describe results of a survey to homeowners living in wildfire-prone areas of two counties along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. The survey was designed to elicit information on homeowners' experience with wildfire, perceptions of wildfire risk on their property and neighboring properties, mitigation efforts undertaken...

  5. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Colorado Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Colorado state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  6. The Colorado Children's Book Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livo, Norma J.

    This paper discusses the Colorado Children's Book Award (CCBA), established in 1975 to allow children, rather than adults, to vote on their favorite books. The rules for book nomination and voting are explained in this paper and a short history of the award is given. The remaining portion of the paper reviews briefly each of the 12 children's…

  7. Goals for Education in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Eleven goals for public education are set forth by the Colorado State Department of Education: (1) command of the knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes essential for effective learning throughout life; (2) understanding of man and society and the determination to strive for the welfare of all people; (3) knowledge of self, understanding of…

  8. Rural School Communities in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Jack

    Visits to nine of the smallest rural elementary schools in Colorado were conducted to gain insights into types of communities served by the schools. No one definition of "rural" covered all nine communities, so they were classified into six types: predominantly agricultural, rural industrial, stable recreational, ranching/railraod, rural…

  9. Decay of aspen in Colorado

    Treesearch

    Ross W. Davidson; Thomas E. Hinds; Frank G. Hawksworth

    1959-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stands are extensive in the central Rocky Mountains. The species reaches its maximum development in the mountains and high mesas west of the Continental Divide in Colorado (Baker, 1925). On the better sites aspen yields a greater volume of wood in a shorter period than most of the conifers growing at comparable elevations. The...

  10. Alcohol Research Center in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivers, Leslie D.

    1999-01-01

    A summer program at the Alcohol Research Center (University of Colorado) introduces American Indian and other college students from across the country to opportunities in research and graduate programs in science and medicine. The eight-week program arranges for housing, expenses, a stipend, and a mentor. A related summer program brings high…

  11. Rural School Communities in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Jack

    Visits to nine of the smallest rural elementary schools in Colorado were conducted to gain insights into types of communities served by the schools. No one definition of "rural" covered all nine communities, so they were classified into six types: predominantly agricultural, rural industrial, stable recreational, ranching/railraod, rural…

  12. Evolution of the Colorado River: Culmination of a Major Cenozoic Transformation of SW North American Drainage Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, M.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    The modern Colorado River is a large, youthful, unequilibrated continental drainage system that was established abruptly between 5 and 6 million years ago in conjunction with Gulf of California rifting and establishment of the modern river course through the western Grand Canyon and lower Colorado river region. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses provide insight into details relating to the cause, timing and consequences of river inception. These samples encompass (1) the modern Colorado River delta, (2) major tributaries including the Green, "Grand", San Juan, Little Colorado and Gila rivers (3) late Miocene to Pliocene sediments along the lower Colorado (4) late Miocene to Pleistocene deltaic and fluvial sediments of the Imperial and Palm Spring Groups in the western Salton Trough, and (5) late Miocene- early Pliocene Bidahochi Formation of eastern Arizona. Data from the western Salton Trough and modern delta yield strata yield remarkably homogeneous age distributions that indicate there was little evolution in Colorado River sediment composition since 5.3 Ma. Detrital zircon is dominated by a mix of local southwest US cratonal basement (1.7 and 1.4 Ga) plus reworked supracrustal sequences of the Colorado Plateau that provide Neoproterozoic, 1.1 Ga, and early Paleozoic zircons. The strong homogeneity of the detrital zircon record from late Miocene to the present combined with the fact that the most easterly tributaries most strongly resemble the delta is consistent with the 'lake spillover model' for inception and integration of the modern Colorado River drainage. Abrupt integration of the lower Colorado River after 5.6 Ma is clearly recorded by detrital zircon ages from the laucustrine Bouse Formation and Bullhead alluvium aggradational package. Fluvial-laucustrine deposits of the Bidahochi Formation may represent a lake that overtopped the Kaibab upwarp to initiate western Grand Canyon incision.

  13. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A spring (10) includes a tube (12) having an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension (22) extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension (24) extending vertically. A plurality of cuts (20) in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube (12) extend perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis (16) extending along the tube (12). An uncut portion (26) of the tube wall extends along the tube (12) for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom (28) of a seat cushion (30).

  14. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, L. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A spring which includes a tube with an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension extending vertically is disclosed. A plurality of cuts in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube extend perpendiculary to a longitudinal axis extending along the tube. An uncut portion of the tube wall extends along the tube for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom of a seat cushion.

  15. Regional variability in dust-on-snow processes and impacts in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skiles, S. McKenzie; Painter, Thomas H.; Belnap, Jayne; Holland, Lacey; Reynolds, Richard; Goldstein, Harland; Lin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Dust deposition onto mountain snow cover in the Upper Colorado River Basin frequently occurs in the spring when wind speeds and dust emission peaks on the nearby Colorado Plateau. Dust loading has increased since the intensive settlement in the western USA in the mid 1880s. The effects of dust-on-snow have been well studied at Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA) in the San Juan Mountains, CO, the first high-altitude area of contact for predominantly southwesterly winds transporting dust from the southern Colorado Plateau. To capture variability in dust transport from the broader Colorado Plateau and dust deposition across a larger area of the Colorado River water sources, an additional study plot was established in 2009 on Grand Mesa, 150 km to the north of SBBSA in west central, CO. Here, we compare the 4-year (2010–2013) dust source, deposition, and radiative forcing records at Grand Mesa Study Plot (GMSP) and Swamp Angel Study Plot (SASP), SBBSA's subalpine study plot. The study plots have similar site elevations/environments and differ mainly in the amount of dust deposited and ensuing impacts. At SASP, end of year dust concentrations ranged from 0.83 mg g−1 to 4.80 mg g−1, and daily mean spring dust radiative forcing ranged from 50–65 W m−2, advancing melt by 24–49 days. At GMSP, which received 1.0 mg g−1 less dust per season on average, spring radiative forcings of 32–50 W m−2 advanced melt by 15–30 days. Remote sensing imagery showed that observed dust events were frequently associated with dust emission from the southern Colorado Plateau. Dust from these sources generally passed south of GMSP, and back trajectory footprints modelled for observed dust events were commonly more westerly and northerly for GMSP relative to SASP. These factors suggest that although the southern Colorado Plateau contains important dust sources, dust contributions from other dust sources contribute to dust loading in this region

  16. Walking with springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  17. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  18. Sediment discharge in the Colorado River near De Beque, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine annual-sediment discharge at the site of a proposed reservoir on the Colorado River at Una, located 3 miles upstream from De Beque, Colorado. Eleven suspended sediment samples were collected during 1984 at the De Beque bridge. These data were combined with suspended sediment data collected for the Colorado River at two nearby streamflow gaging stations to define relations between suspended-sediment discharge and stream discharge. Best results were obtained when the data were separated into two periods, March through October, and November through February. The data for March through October were separated into two periods: (1) Rising stream-stage period, which includes data collected prior to the data of the annual peak-stream discharge, and (2) falling stream-stage period, which includes data collected after the date of the annual peak-stream discharge. Nine bedload samples were collected during 1984 to determine the contribution of bedload sediment discharge to total sediment discharge. Bedload accounted for < 2% of total sediment discharge. The best relations describing bedload sediment discharge were obtained when the bedload data were separated into two periods: (1) Data collected prior to the date of the annual peak-stream discharge, and (2) data collected after the date of the annual peak-stream discharge. Mean annual sediment discharge in the Colorado River at the proposed Una reservoir site was estimated to be 1,065,000 tons/year for October 1966 through September 1984. Water storage capacity of the proposed reservoir would decrease about 30% after 100 years at this sediment discharge rate. (USGS)

  19. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  20. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Virgin River contributes a substantial amount of dissolved solids (salt) to the Colorado River at Lake Mead in the lower Colorado River Basin. Degradation of Colorado River water by the addition of dissolved solids from the Virgin River affects the suitability of the water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural use within the basin. Dixie Hot Springs in Utah are a major localized source of dissolved solids discharging to the Virgin River. The average measured discharge from Dixie Hot Springs during 2009–10 was 11.0 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the average dissolved-solids concentration was 9,220 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The average dissolved-solids load—a measurement that describes the mass of salt that is transported per unit of time—from Dixie Hot Springs during this period was 96,200 tons per year (ton/yr). Annual dissolved-solids loads were estimated at 13 monitoring sites in the Virgin River Basin from streamflow data and discrete measurements of dissolved-solids concentrations and (or) specific conductance. Eight of the sites had the data needed to estimate annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WYs) 1999 through 2010. During 1999–2010, the smallest dissolved-solids loads in the Virgin River were upstream of Dixie Hot Springs (59,900 ton/yr, on average) and the largest loads were downstream of Littlefield Springs (298,200 ton/yr, on average). Annual dissolved-solids loads were smallest during 2002–03, which was a period of below normal precipitation. Annual dissolved-solids loads were largest during 2005—a year that included a winter rain storm that resulted in flooding throughout much of the Virgin River Basin. An average seepage loss of 26.7 ft3/s was calculated from analysis of monthly average streamflow from July 1998 to September 2010 in the Virgin River for the reach that extends from just upstream of the Utah/Arizona State line to just above the Virgin River Gorge Narrows. Seepage losses from three river reaches

  1. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  2. 78 FR 29321 - Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Forest Service Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Rocky Mountain Region, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory... National Forest. Proposals, updates, and other information can be found on the Colorado Recreation...

  3. Microwave remote sensing of snow experiment description and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Stiles, W. H.; Hanson, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    The active and passive microwave responses to snow were investigated at a site near Steamboat Springs, Colorado during the February and March winter months. The microwave equipment was mounted atop truck-mounted booms. Data were acquired at numerous frequencies, polarizations, and angles of incidence for a variety of snow conditions. The experiment description, the characteristics of the microwave and ground truth instruments, and the results of a preliminary analysis of a small portion of the total data volume acquired in Colorado are documented.

  4. Geochronology Database for Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Evans, K.V.; deWitt, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and some unpublished isotopic and fission track age determinations in central Colorado. The compiled area extends from the southern Wyoming border to the northern New Mexico border and from approximately the longitude of Denver on the east to Gunnison on the west. Data for the tephrochronology of Pleistocene volcanic ash, carbon-14, Pb-alpha, common-lead, and U-Pb determinations on uranium ore minerals have been excluded.

  5. 2011 Kids Count in Colorado! The Impact of the Great Recession on Colorado's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Kids Count in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. "Kids Count in Colorado!" informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as…

  6. Ready for College in Colorado: Evaluation of the Colorado SUN and the College Connection Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 2007, the state of Colorado received one of four federal grants from the Ready for College (RFC) grant program of the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), U.S. Department of Education. The Colorado (CO) SUN project (where SUN stands for Success UNlimited) was designed to identify and enhance innovative practices from Colorado's…

  7. Major thermal springs of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.

    1970-01-01

    As part of a study of the springs of Utah, reconnaissance data were obtained on the thermal, chemical, and geologic characteristics of the major thermal springs or Utah. Only three of the springs have temperatures near the boiling point of water; the maximum recorded temperatures of these springs range from 185° to 189° F. All three springs are in or near areas of late Tertiary or Quaternary volcanism.Temperatures of the thermal springs studied ranged from 68° to 189° F. Nearly all thermal springs in Utah are in or near fault zones. Very few of these springs issue from volcanic rocks, but several springs are close to areas of late Tertiary or Quaternary volcanic rocks.

  8. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  9. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  10. A Burst of Spring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-10

    In the winter a layer of carbon dioxide ice dry ice covers the north polar sand dunes as shown by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the spring the sublimation of the ice going directly from ice to gas causes a host of uniquely Martian phenomena.

  11. The News. Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This Spring issue of the quarterly newsletter of the Community College League of California contains the following articles: (1) Enrollment Drops; Fees to Blame?; (2) Senate's Grad Proposal Triggers Debate on Mission, Access; (3) Compton Decision has Affected Perceptions of Commission (discussion with Barbara Beno); (4) Dynamic New Architectural…

  12. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  13. Planar torsion spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A torsion spring comprises an inner mounting segment. An outer mounting segment is located concentrically around the inner mounting segment. A plurality of splines extends from the inner mounting segment to the outer mounting segment. At least a portion of each spline extends generally annularly around the inner mounting segment.

  14. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  15. 1981 Spring Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Approximately 2150 participants registered for the 1981 Spring Meeting. More than 1500 papers were presented.The spaciousness of the Baltimore Convention Center provided ample opportunity for attendees to exchange ideas and interact with their colleagues. Here are some candid shots.

  16. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  17. Renaissance Administrator, Spring 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, June P., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This spring 1998 issue of Renaissance Administrator features the following articles: (1) "Servant Leadership and Higher Education--What is Leadership?" (Richard E. Hasselbach); (2) "Teaching Writing in the 90's--Carnivorous Printers and Dying Grandmothers" (Helen Ruggieri); (3) Assignment--Journal Writing" (Lynn Muscato); and (4) "A Business…

  18. Atascocita Springs Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigaglioni, Irene; Yocham, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    With the significant amount of time invested in researching the best techniques for delivering instruction to their students, Humble ISD is always on the forefront of education. Taking the recommendations of their active and vocal community groups, the district embarked in the design of the 26th elementary school, Atascocita Springs Elementary…

  19. Has Spring Sprung?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Tarin Harrar

    1997-01-01

    Describes a research project that allows students to behave like scientists studying something as simple as the arrival of spring. Gives students practice in stating logical predictions and hypotheses, designing sound research, and collecting reliable data. Exposes them to the successes, failures, and biases inherent in scientific research.…

  20. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  1. Spa, springs and safety.

    PubMed

    Sukthana, Yaowalark; Lekkla, Amorn; Sutthikornchai, Chantira; Wanapongse, Paitoon; Vejjajiva, Athasit; Bovornkitti, Somchai

    2005-01-01

    Natural mineral water has long been used worldwide for bathing and health purposes. At present, Thailand is famous for health spas and natural hot springs among local people and tourists. Due to possible risks of exposure to harmful agents, we studied hazardous pollutants at 57 natural hot springs from 11 provinces in northern, central, eastern and southern Thailand. Pathogenic, free-living amebae of the genera Naegleria and Acanthamoeba, which can cause central nervous system infection, were found in 26.3% (15/57) and 15.8% (9/ 57), respectively. Dissolved radon, a soil gas with carcinogenic properties, was present in nearly all hot springs sites, with concentration ranging from 0.87-76,527 Becquerels/m3. There were 5 water samples in which radon concentration exceeded the safety limit for drinking. Legionella pneumoniphila (serogroups 1, 3, 5, 6, 7 10 and 13) were found in samples from 71.9% (41/57) of studied sites. Because spas and natural springs are popular tourist attractions, health authorities should be aware of possible hazards and provide tactful measures and guidelines to ensure safety without causing undue alarm to foreign and Thai tourists.

  2. 9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. - Juniata Mill Complex, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  3. Acoustic doppler velocity monitoring within Main Spring, Barton Springs, Austin, Texas, April-September 2004-enhancing the accuracy of springflow data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.; Gary, M.O.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler velocity (ADV) meters are sophisticated underwater monitoring instruments that use sound waves to measure water velocity in as many as three directions. In April 2004, an ADV meter was installed inside the principal orifice and discharge point of Main Spring at Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. This instrument collects velocity data that can be used to enhance the accuracy of springflow data and identify previously unrecognized hydrologic patterns.An accurate record of springflow at Barton Springs is important for several reasons. First, Barton Springs is the only known habitat for the Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sosorum), a federally-listed endangered species that is dependent on reliable springflow to survive. Determination of sustainable Edwards aquifer yields compatible with the survival of the species is impossible without an accurate springflow record. Second, the 3-acre swimming pool fed by Barton Springs is enjoyed by about 340,000 people per year (2003) and is an important tourist attraction. Third, Barton Springs provides a part of Austin's municipal water supply; water from Barton Springs discharges into Town Lake on the Colorado River about 0.4 mile upstream from one of Austin's three water-supply plants. Fourth, flow in Barton Springs reflects water levels in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, which currently (2005) is designated a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, briefly summarizes the results of recent ADV-based velocity and springflow data acquisition at Barton Springs and describes an application of velocity monitoring to enhance the accuracy of springflow data.

  4. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 2000--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Unruh, J.W.; Boulger, R.W.; O'Neill, G. B.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 2000 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; meteorological data; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 305 gaging stations, stage and contents of 15 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 22 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 102 gaging stations and for 7 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 185 gaged sites; water quality for 141 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 4 observation wells, and meteorological data for 45 sites. Three pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  5. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 1998--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Bruce, N.L.; Unruh, J.W.; Steinheimer, J.T.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, M.E.; Jenkins, Jenkins; O'Neill, G. B.

    1998-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 1998 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 316 gaging stations, stage and contents of 26 lakes and reservoirs, discharge measurements for 1 partial-record low-flow station and 1 miscellaneous site, peak-flow information for 29 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 118 gaging stations and for 8 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 192 gaged sites; water quality for 72 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 3 observation wells, and meteorological data for 25 sites. Seven pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  6. Water Resources Data, Colorado, Water Year 1996--Volume 2. Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowfoot, R.M.; Paillet, A.V.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, M.E.; Jenkins, R.A.; O'Neill, G. B.

    1996-01-01

    Water-resources data for Colorado for the 1996 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of wells and springs. This report (Volumes 1 and 2) contains discharge records for 321 gaging stations, stage and contents of 26 lakes and reservoirs, 1 partial-record low-flow station, peak-flow information for 30 crest-stage partial-record stations; water quality for 135 gaging stations and for 11 lakes and reservoirs, supplemental water quality for 175 gaged sites; water quality for 34 miscellaneous sites and 14 observation wells; water levels for 2 observation wells, and meteorological data for 30 sites. Nine pertinent stations operated by bordering States also are included in this report. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W.F. Horak, District Chief. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies.

  7. 1996 monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites was near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Surface remediation was completed at the Gunnison site in December 1995. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres of wetlands and mitigation of this loss is through the enhancement of 17.8 acres of riparian plant communities in six spring-fed areas on US Bureau of Land Management mitigation sites. A five-year monitoring program was then implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This report provides the results of the third year of the monitoring program.

  8. Annual monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites is near the town of Gunnison, Colorado; surface remediation and the environmental impacts of remedial action are described in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA) (DOE, 1992). Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) 1.7 hectares (ha) of wetlands and mitigation of this loss of wetlands is being accomplished through the enhance of 18.4 ac (7.5 ha) of riparian plant communities in six spring feed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land. The description of the impacted and mitigation wetlands is provided in the Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for Impacted Wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado (DOE, 1994), which is attached to the US Army corps of Engineers (USACE) Section 404 Permit. As part of the wetlands mitigation plan, the six mitigation wetlands were fenced in the fall of 1993 to exclude livestock grazing. Baseline of grazed conditions of the wetlands vegetation was determined during the summer of 1993 (DOE, 1994). A 5-year monitoring program of these six sites has been implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This annual monitoring report provides the results of the first year of the 5-year monitoring period.

  9. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  10. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  11. Effects of wildfire on source-water quality and aquatic ecosystems, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; McClelskey, R. Blaine; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    Watershed erosion can dramatically increase after wildfire, but limited research has evaluated the corresponding influence on source-water quality. This study evaluated the effects of the Fourmile Canyon wildfire (Colorado Front Range, USA) on source-water quality and aquatic ecosystems using high-frequency sampling. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrient loads in stream water were evaluated for a one-year period during different types of runoff events, including spring snowmelt, and both frontal and summer convective storms. DOC export from the burned watershed did not increase relative to the unburned watershed during spring snowmelt, but substantial increases in DOC export were observed during summer convective storms. Elevated nutrient export from the burned watershed was observed during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms, which increased the primary productivity of stream biofilms. Wildfire effects on source-water quality were shown to be substantial following high-intensity storms, with the potential to affect drinking-water treatment processes.

  12. Recovery Act. Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado Using Remote Sensing and On-Site Exploration, Testing, and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Paul; Skeehan, Kirsten; Smith, Jerome; Mink, Roy; Geohydro, Mink

    2016-02-16

    Report on the confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado describing the on site testing and analysis to confirm remote sensing identified potential resources. A series of thermal gradient wells were drilled in the Pagosa Springs region and the data collected is analyzed within.

  13. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-12

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  14. Geothermal resource assessment of the Animas Valley, Colorado. Resource Series 17

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey, has been engaged in assessing the nature and extent of Colorado's geothermal resources. The program has included geologic and hydrogeologic reconnaissance, and geophysical and geochemical surveys. In the Animas Valley, in southwestern Colorado, two groups of thermal springs exist: Pinkerton Springs to the north, and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten Springs about 5 miles (8.1 Km) south of Pinkerton. The geothermal resources of the Animas Valley were studied. Due to terrain problems in the narrow valley, a soil mercury survey was conducted only at Tripp-Trimble Stratten, while an electrical D.C. resistivity survey was limited to the vicinity of Pinkerton. Although higher mercury values tended to be near a previously mapped fault, the small extent of the survey ruled out conclusive results. Consistent low resistivity zones interpreted from the geophysical data were mapped as faults near Pinkerton, and compared well with aerial photo work and spring locations. This new information was added to reconnaissance geology and hydrogeology to provide several clues regarding the geothermal potential of the valley. Hydrothermal minerals found in faults in the study area are very similar to ore mined in a very young mountain range, nearby. Groundwater would not need to circulate very deeply along faults to attain the estimated subsurface temperatures present in the valley. The water chemistry of each area is unique. Although previously incompletely manned, faulting in the area is extensive. The geothermal resources in the Animas Valley are fault controlled. Pinkerton and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten are probably not directly connected systems, but may have the same source at distance. Recharge to the geothermal system comes from the needle and La Plata Mountains, and the latter may also be a heat source. Movement of the thermal water is probably primarily horizontal, via the Leadville Limestone aquifer.

  15. 1997 Monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleaned up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) (1.7 hectares [ha]) of wetlands. This loss is mitigated by the enhancement of six spring-fed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land (mitigation sites). Approximately 254 ac (1 03.3 ha) were fenced at the six sites to exclude grazing livestock. Of the 254 ac (103.3 ha), 17.8 ac (7.2 ha) are riparian plant communities; the rest are sagebrush communities. Baseline grazed conditions of the riparian plant communities at the mitigation sites were measured prior to fencing. This report discusses results of the fourth year of a monitoring program implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. Three criteria for determining success of the mitigation were established: plant height, vegetation density (bare ground), and vegetation diversity. By 1996, Prospector Spring, Upper Long`s Gulch, and Camp Kettle met the criteria. The DOE requested transfer of these sites to BLM for long-term oversight. The 1997 evaluation of the three remaining sites, discussed in this report, showed two sites (Houston Gulch and Lower Long`s Gulch) meet the criteria. The DOE will request the transfer of these two sites to the BLM for long-term oversight. The last remaining site, Sage Hen Spring, has met only two of the criteria (percent bare ground and plant height). The third criterion, vegetation diversity, was not met. The vegetation appears to be changing from predominantly wet species to drier upland species, although the reason for this change is uncertain. It may be due to below-normal precipitation in recent years, diversion of water from the spring to the stock tank, or manipulation of the hydrology farther up gradient.

  16. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  17. The joys of spring.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M

    2013-01-01

    This study used Vivaldi's Four Seasons, an extraordinary example of program music, to explore the consequence of music exposure on cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs). Seventeen participants performed a three-stimulus visual odd-ball task while ERPs were recorded. Participants were required to differentiate between a rare target stimulus (to elicit a memory updating component; P3b), a rare novel stimulus (to elicit a novelty attention component; P3a), and a frequent nontarget stimulus. During task performance participants listened to the four concertos: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter in comparison to a silent control condition. Additionally, the three movements of each concerto have a fast, slow, fast structure that enabled examination of the impact of tempo. The data revealed that "Spring," particularly the well-recognized, vibrant, emotive, and uplifting first movement, had the ability to enhance mental alertness and brain measures of attention and memory.

  18. Colorado Technology Transfer Plan for Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Advanced Tech. Inst., Denver.

    Recognizing the importance of technology transfer to economic growth, the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) provided the Colorado Advanced Technology Institute (CATI) with a grant to coordinate the development of a plan for using technology transfer in Colorado's economic development. The plan, outlined in this report, describes the…

  19. COLORADO MIGRANT MINISTRY. ANNUAL REPORT, 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1961

    MIGRANTS WERE AIDED BY THE COLORADO MIGRANT MINISTRY, WHICH WITH PUBLIC SCHOOL OFFICALS AND HEALTH AND WELFARE AGENCY PERSONNEL, HELPED TO DETERMINE LEGISLATIVE NEEDS, AND PROVIDED DIRECT SERVICES TO MIGRANTS IN THREE AREAS OF COLORADO. IN ROCKY FORD, A SPANISH-SPEAKING EDUCATED HUSBAND-WIFE-DAUGHTER TEAM WORKED WITH VARIOUS GROUPS WHO LED…

  20. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of the...

  1. 78 FR 57923 - Colorado Disaster #CO-00065

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00065 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Colorado...

  2. 77 FR 48197 - Colorado Disaster #CO-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Colorado dated...

  3. 78 FR 55770 - Colorado Disaster #CO-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Colorado dated...

  4. 78 FR 52600 - Colorado Disaster # CO-00054

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00054 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Colorado dated...

  5. 75 FR 60151 - Colorado Disaster # CO-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Colorado Disaster CO-00033 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of COLORADO dated...

  6. Conservation status of Colorado River cutthroat trout

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Young; R. Nick Schmal; Thomas W. Kohley; Victoria G. Leonard

    1996-01-01

    Though biologists recognize that populations of Colorado River cutthroat trout have declined, the magnitude of the loss remains unquantified. We obtained information from state and federal biologists and from state databases to determine the current distribution and status of populations of Colorado River cutthroat trout. Recent population extinctions have been...

  7. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.963 - Colorado River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Colorado River. 117.963 Section 117.963 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.963 Colorado River. The draw of the...

  11. Sudden aspen decline in southwest Colorado

    Treesearch

    J. J. Worrall; R. A. Mask; T. Eager; L. Egeland; W. D. Shepperd

    2008-01-01

    Sudden aspen decline (SAD) has increased rapidly in recent years, approaching 350,000 acres in Colorado in 2007, or 13% of the aspen cover type. We investigated the severity, site/stand factors and causes associated with SAD in southwest Colorado. First, we documented landscape (GIS-DEM analyses) and stand factors (stand exams). There was a strong inverse relationship...

  12. The Colorado Scale-Model Solar System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jeffrey O.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Colorado Scale-Model Solar System, a display illustrating the sizes and distances to the Sun and the nine planets on the campus of Colorado University. Discusses the model's educational value and uses for the classroom and the community. (MDH)

  13. Colorado Centennial-Bicentennial Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Centennial - Bicentennial Commission, Denver.

    Intended for use by teachers in the establishment of curriculum to study centennial-bicentennial topics, the main purpose of this guide is to instill in students an appreciation of Colorado's system of government, resources, people, territory, and technology. Suggestions for teaching about seven major areas which relate to Colorado's heritage are…

  14. 2013 Kids Count in Colorado! Community Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Kids Count in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Children's Campaign, providing state and county level data on child well-being factors including child health, education, and economic status. Since its first release 20 years ago, "Kids Count in Colorado!" has become the most trusted source for data and information on…

  15. Flora of the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado

    Treesearch

    Steve J. Popovich; Wayne D. Shepperd; Donald W. Reichert; Michael A. Cone

    1993-01-01

    This report lists 441 vascular plant taxa in 228 genera and 63 families encountered on the 9,300-ha Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. Synonyms appearing in previous publications and other works pertaining to the Fraser Experimental Forest, as well as appropriate Colorado floras and less-technical field guides, are included. Plant communities and habitats...

  16. Colorado: Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ. Health Sciences Center, Denver.

    In April 1991, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey was administered to a sample of 1,412 high school students in Colorado public schools to collect information about priority health-risk behaviors among adolescents. Questionnaires were received from 1,170 students, a response rate of 83%. Classes in Colorado's 280 public schools were also selected to…

  17. Healthy Child Care Colorado, 2002: Outcome Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Susan

    This report describes the impact of nurse consultant services to child care programs in Colorado on the children, parents, and staff of the centers they serve as part of the Healthy Child Care Colorado (HCCC) initiative. Study participants included 25 child care center directors and 24 nurse consultants, representing large and small centers in…

  18. Report of the Colorado Minority Success Taskforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the best practices described by national experts, some of the actions that are currently being taken by Colorado institutions of higher education and recommendations for improving programs to retain and graduate minority and low-income students. Over the course of the taskforce's meetings, it became clear that Colorado's…

  19. Arizona Migrant Child Education Teacher Exchange: Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, J. O., Jr.; Brink, Donald

    The Office of Migrant Child Education of the Arizona Department of Education participated in the annual Teacher Exchange Program by visiting Colorado, April 14-18, 1980. Sixteen teachers and/or program coordinators (selected by the project administrator) prepresented 13 Arizona Migrant Child Education Projects and traveled to Colorado under the…

  20. Colorado Special Education Administrative Decisions, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Div. of Special Education Services.

    This document contains six inserts for the Colorado Administrative Decisions Notebooks, a compilation of all Colorado Special Education Administrative Decisions issued in 1992, including all Impartial Hearing Officer Decisions, State Level Review Decisions, and Federal Complaint Findings. The full text of each decision is preceded by a case…

  1. Colorado Education & Library Directory, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordbye, Jody Ohmert, Ed.

    The "Colorado Education Directory" is published annually as a service to schools, libraries, and other members of the educational community. All information within each section is arranged alphabetically. Thirteen sections include: 1) Colorado State Department of Education (CDE) staff and telephone numbers; 2) State Advisory Committees…

  2. Colorado Education & Library Directory, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordbye, Jody Ohmert, Ed.

    This Colorado education and library directory, published annually, contains the following sections: (1) Colorado Department of Education; (2) State Advisory Committees; (3) School District Map, School Districts, Buildings, and Personnel; (4) Charter Schools; (5) District Calendars; (6) Boards of Cooperative (Educational) Services (BOCES); (7)…

  3. Colorado Education & Library Directory, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordbye, Jody Ohmert, Ed.

    The "Colorado Education & Library Directory" is published annually as a service to schools, libraries, and other members of the educational community. All information in this 1997-1998 edition is arranged alphabetically. Thirteen sections include: Colorado Department of Education (CDE) staff and telephone numbers; State Advisory…

  4. Areas with Surface Thermal Anomalies as Detected by ASTER and LANDSAT Data in Northwest Delta, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalid Hussein

    2012-02-01

    This map shows areas of anomalous surface temperature in northern Saguache Counties identified from ASTER and LANDSAT thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature for the ASTER data was calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas having anomalous temperature in the ASTER data are shown in blue diagonal hatch, while areas having anomalous temperature in the LANDSAT data are shown in magenta on the map. Thermal springs and areas with favorable geochemistry are also shown. Springs or wells having non-favorable geochemistry are shown as blue dots. Publication Information: Originator: Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder

  5. Areas with Surface Thermal Anomalies as Detected by ASTER and LANDSAT Data in Ouray, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalid Hussein

    2012-02-01

    This map shows areas of anomalous surface temperature in Ouray identified from ASTER and LANDSAT thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature for the ASTER data was calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas having anomalous temperature in the ASTER data are shown in blue diagonal hatch, while areas having anomalous temperature in the LANDSAT data are shown in magenta on the map. Thermal springs and areas with favorable geochemistry are also shown. Springs or wells having non-favorable geochemistry are shown as blue dots. Publication Information: Originator: Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder

  6. Colorado Lightning Mapping Array Collaborations through the GOES-R Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Szoke, Edward; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert; Mazur, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    For the past two years, the GOES-R Proving Ground has solicited proposals for its Visiting Scientist Program. NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has used this opportunity to support the GOES-R Proving Ground by expanding SPoRT's total lightning collaborations. In 2012, this expanded the evaluation of SPoRT's pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper product to the Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center. This year, SPoRT has collaborated with the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) and potential end users. In particular, SPoRT is collaborating with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and Colorado State University (CSU) to obtain these data in real-time. From there, SPoRT is supporting the transition of these data to the local forecast offices in Boulder, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming as well as to Proving Ground projects (e.g., the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Spring Program and Aviation Weather Center's Summer Experiment). This presentation will focus on the results of this particular Visiting Scientist Program trip. In particular, the COLMA data are being provided to both forecast offices for initial familiarization. Additionally, several forecast issues have been highlighted as important uses for COLMA data in the operational environment. These include the utility of these data for fire weather situations, situational awareness for both severe weather and lightning safety, and formal evaluations to take place in the spring of 2014.

  7. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, C.; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27 +- 5 mWm/sup -2/ is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mWm/sup -2/, characteristics of the coal interior of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mWm/sup -2/.

  8. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, Claudia; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27?5 mW^-2 is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mW^-2, characteristic of the 'cool interior' of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mW^-2.

  9. New State Records of Mosquitoes for Colorado.

    PubMed

    Rose, Dominic A; Kondratieff, B C; Weissmann, M J

    2015-06-01

    The 1967 treatment of the Mosquitoes of Colorado by Harmston and Lawson and subsequent publications have recorded 46 culicid species from Colorado. As part of a study to create an updated synopsis of the mosquitoes of Colorado, adult trapping at numerous localities was conducted in Colorado during the summers of 2013 and 2014. This review also included an examination of mosquito specimens in various relevant museum collections. Aedes (Ochlerotatus) niphadopsis and Ae. (Och.) spencerii spencerii were collected during the 2013 and 2014 field seasons. Records for Ae. (Och.) canadensis canadensis, Ae. (Stegomyia) aegypti, and Uranotaenia (Pseudoficalbia) anhydor syntheta were obtained from examination of museum specimens. These species constitute new state records for Colorado, with 51 species now known from the state.

  10. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  11. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado II. Eggs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A

    2005-05-01

    Effects on hatching and development of fertilized eggs in adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) exposed to selenium in flooded bottomland sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, were determined. After 9 months exposure, fish were collected and induced to spawn and eggs collected for inorganic element analyses. A 9-day egg study was conducted with five spawns from Horsethief ponds, six spawns from Adobe Creek channel, and four spawns from North Pond using a reference water and site waters. Selenium concentrations in eggs were 6.5 microg/g from Horsethief, 46 microg/g from Adobe Creek, 38 microg/g from North Pond, and 6.0 microg/g from brood stock. Eggs from young adults had a smaller diameter and higher moisture content than brood stock. There were no differences among the four sources in viability, survival, hatch, hatchability, or mortality of deformed embryos or larvae. Adobe Creek larvae had more deformed embryos in eggs held in site water than held in reference water. There were significant negative correlations between selenium concentrations in adult muscle plugs and percent hatch, egg diameter, and deformities in embryos. Results from this study suggest that selenium contamination in parts of the upper basin of the Colorado River should be a major concern to recovery efforts for endangered fish.

  12. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River III. Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A

    2005-06-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 microg/L from 24-Road, 0.9 microg/L from Horsethief, 5.5 microg/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 microg/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 microg/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 microg/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 microg/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 microg/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of 4.6 microg/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  13. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado: II. Eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Effects on hatching and development of fertilized eggs in adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) exposed to selenium in flooded bottomland sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, were determined. After 9 months exposure, fish were collected and induced to spawn and eggs collected for inorganic element analyses. A 9-day egg study was conducted with five spawns from Horsethief ponds, six spawns from Adobe Creek channel, and four spawns from North Pond using a reference water and site waters. Selenium concentrations in eggs were 6.5 μg/g from Horsethief, 46 μg/g from Adobe Creek, 38 μg/g from North Pond, and 6.0 μg/g from brood stock. Eggs from young adults had a smaller diameter and higher moisture content than brood stock. There were no differences among the four sources in viability, survival, hatch, hatchability, or mortality of deformed embryos or larvae. Adobe Creek larvae had more deformed embryos in eggs held in site water than held in reference water. There were significant negative correlations between selenium concentrations in adult muscle plugs and percent hatch, egg diameter, and deformities in embryos. Results from this study suggest that selenium contamination in parts of the upper basin of the Colorado River should be a major concern to recovery efforts for endangered fish.

  14. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 ??g/L from 24-Road, 0.9 ??g/L from Horsethief, 5.5 ??g/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 ??g/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 ??g/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  15. Clementine: Colorado School of Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is fielding a team comprised of undergraduates in Computer Science or Engineering who are enrolled in the Robotics and AI Minor. The intent is to provide a forum for the students to (a) transfer what they have learned in the classroom to a more realistic setting, (b) meet with top researchers in the field, (c) have an undergraduate research experience, and (d) have fun. The students work with the team advisor and graduate students at CSM to integrate and modify code developed for NSF, ARPA, and NASA funded research projects. This will be the fourth year CSM has participated in the competition.

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Gravity Gradiometry Conference (14th) Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on February 11 - 12, 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-12

    SOURCES. FUTURE SUPERCONDUCTING NOISE: 0.07 Hz- , < 1 Hz SAMPLING RATE " OFFERS RESOLUTION OF MUCH SHORTER WAVELENGTHS AND *POSSIBLY NEW APPLICATIONS...Determination of Short Wavelength Gravity Variations, J. of the Astvoatic Sciemces , No. 4, pp. 329-344, Oct-Dec. 1979. 10 PAPER TITLE: EFFICIENT GRAVITY...It will include the areas adjacent to Niagara Falls, New York. The second site was picked for its excellent truth data coverage, limited topographic

  17. Cultural Resource Survey for the Consolidated Space Operations Center Project Near Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    short because of the lack of food and clothing. Though Pike did not make the summit, he was the first Anglo to describe the mountain and it I became...Settlement Systems, distinguishes between two types of hunting-gathering systems. One is classi- fied as Foragers who gather food on a daily basis and the...other is classified as Collectors who store some of their food (Blnford 1980:5-12). Binford distinguishes five site types for the Collector system

  18. Professional Pilots Meteorology Training Standards Conference Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on 13-14 April 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    part, they are the exceptions. Informal surveys have indicated that far too many newly licensed pilots do not have even a basic understanding of...aviation weather. Some in the industry believe that impressive advances in aircraft performance, weather forecasting, and detection might compensate for a...percent are weather related and this percentage has stayed nearly constant. To get a feeling for the effectiveness of our present method of instruction

  19. Moving Base Gravity/Gradiometer Conference (13th) Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on 12-13 February 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    11 - Organization Name Johns Hopkins Jose Latimer Jonathan Howland Paul Zucker Mobil Oil Perry Parks NADC John De Matteo Marvin May NRL John Brozena...a 0 <J < Lo w Noc U > F- >~ 0 LaSo 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 c a LU LU a.L-a . Z I 0 - aj LU I-- 0U CLC~ 00 CC z (13: 0 / 0 ZUCi U- ccol Cl) 0 C CD) z z zD 0

  20. Health Maintenance Organizations and Academic Medical Centers. Proceedings of a National Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, James I., Ed.; Nevins, Madeline M., Ed.

    In October 1980 a national conference on health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) was held by the Association of American Medical Colleges and supported by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, in response to inquiries about the advantages and disadvantages of AMC affiliation with or sponsorship of HMOs.…

  1. Colorado Springs, Colorado, Peterson Field. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-07-22

    2 ~ 2 , ___ £TOIAL ______ __ 13! ___ .71___ l17________ ll ib tF EA N*=--5ql...8217 .11 *1g0 o_ 0 1 ’ 1*4 2 _____ SA~ EXTREME VALUES 931 1 Cal u A-1 5- ING CGG/pF~c-SQN V -6b(FROM DAILY O$RYATIONS) STATION STATION NAME EA 24 ;. f...IVSNEXRM VLE 3 USAF 3rA XRMEVLE * AIR lfEAT-ER $EAVICEP.’AC STAIPON STAUtO% NAME EA A Of "’AL A14MUNTS Vt. It4Ci -ES JA. FEB. - MARQ APR. MAY 2’UN. JL. I

  2. Moving Base Gravity/Gradiometer Conference (12th) Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on 14-15 February 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    recorded simultaneously by a trailed proton precession magnetometer. Terrain clearance is recorded by narrow bean laser . All data are recorded digitally...Gulf Coast, U.S.A. The density contrasts were taken from Nettleton (1976; Figure 8-14). The calculated gravity anomalies, with and without caprock...gravity gradiometer surveys and interpreta- tion". Geophysics, vol. 43, p. 94-101. Nettleton , L.L., 1976, Gravity and Magnetics in Oil Prospecting

  3. 76 FR 72437 - Minor Boundary Revision at Colorado National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... at Colorado National Monument AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notification of... of Colorado National Monument is modified to include an additional two and forty-five hundredths (2... in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately adjacent to the current eastern boundary of Colorado National...

  4. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members and...

  5. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee...

  6. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee...

  7. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members and...

  8. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee...

  9. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee...

  10. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee...

  11. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members and...

  12. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members and...

  13. The Colorado Solar Wind Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsat, Tobin; Han, Jia; Horanyi, Mihaly; Ulibarri, Zach; Wang, Xu; Yeo, Lihsia

    2016-10-01

    The Colorado Solar Wind Experiment (CSWE) is a new device developed at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado. This large ion source is for studies of the interaction of solar wind plasma with planetary surfaces and cosmic dust, and for the investigation of plasma wake physics. With a plasma beam diameter of 12 cm at the source, ion energies of up to 1 keV, and ion flows of up to 1 mA/cm2, a large cross-section Kaufman Ion Source is used to create steady state plasma flow to model the solar wind in an experimental vacuum chamber. Chamber pressure can be reduced to 3e-5 Torr under operating conditions to suppress ion-neutral collisions and create a uniform ion velocity distribution. Diagnostic instruments such as a double Langmuir probe and an ion energy analyzer are mounted on a two-dimensional translation stage that allow the beam to be characterized throughout the chamber. Early experiments include the measurement of dust grain charging from the interaction with flowing plasma, and measurements of the plasma sheath created by the interaction of the flowing plasma impinging on a surface with a dipole magnetic field. This poster will describe the facility and the scientific results obtained to date.

  14. Energy Smart Colorado, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gitchell, John M.; Palmer, Adam L.

    2014-03-31

    Energy Smart Colorado is an energy efficiency program established in 2011 in the central mountain region of Colorado. The program was funded through a grant of $4.9 million, awarded in August 2010 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Program. As primary grant recipient, Eagle County coordinated program activities, managed the budget, and reported results. Eagle County staff worked closely with local community education and outreach partner Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability (now Walking Mountains Science Center) to engage residents in the program. Sub-recipients Pitkin County and Gunnison County assigned local implementation of the program in their regions to their respective community efficiency organizations, Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) in Pitkin County, and Office for Resource Efficiency (ORE) in Gunnison County. Utility partners contributed $166,600 to support Home Energy Assessments for their customers. Program staff opened Energy Resource Centers, engaged a network of qualified contractors, developed a work-flow, an enrollment website, a loan program, and a data management system to track results.

  15. Effects of Multimodal Approaches of Providing Academic Counseling Feedback on Counseling Outcomes Using the Colorado Educational Interest Indicator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED I E~ CTE JUL’ 6 i DEAN OFTHE FACULTY II UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY * COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 80840 i 9 0’ 20 I...187. Spend a vaication period on a large ftami 188. Join the bridge club at college 189. Be a cheerleader at college football games 190. Join the...class 338. Debate tea member Marching band amber 339. Chess team member Football tern member 340. Cheerleader Campus paper reporter 341. Class

  16. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

  17. National uranium resource evaluation. Raton Quadrangle New Mexico and Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.E.; Griswold, G.B.; Jacobsen, L.C.; Lessard, R.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria, the Raton Quadrangle (New Mexico and Colorado) contains one environment favorable for uranium deposits, the permeable arkosic sandstone members of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Sangre de Cristo Formation for either peneconcordant or roll-type deposits. The favorable parts of the Sangre de Cristo lie mostly in the subsurface in the Raton and Las Vegas Basins in the eastern part of the quadrangle. An area in the Costilla Peak Massif was investigated for uranium by determining geochemical anomalies in stream sediments and spring waters. Further work will be required to determine plutonic environment type. Environments unfavorable for uranium deposits include the Ogallala, Raton, and Vermejo Formations, the Trinidad Sandstone, the Pierre Shale, the Colorado Group, the Dakota Sandstone, the Morrison Formation, the Entrada and Glorieta Sandstones, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks, quartz-pebble conglomerates, pegmatities, and Tertiary granitic stocks.

  18. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1983-07-01

    The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

  19. Fun with Automobile Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    Simple measurements on car suspension systems and their analysis can raise student interest in the elementary discussion of the behavior of springs in oscillating systems. To understand these complicated oscillating systems and to interpret measurements properly, models may be used. Students find out how to make approximations and extract useful information from marginal data using common sense, basic physics, and simple software tools. Basic experiments on a physical model of a car suspension and on a passenger car, as well as the analysis of the data, will be presented. In particular, a value of the bounce mode frequency of a car was obtained using several approaches.

  20. Phytoplankton dynamics in three Rocky Mountain lakes, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Smith, R.L.; Bradbury, J.P.; Baron, J.S.; Spaulding, S.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985 seasonal changes in phytoplankton were studied in a system of three lakes in Loch Vale, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Three periods were evident: (1) A spring bloom, during snowmelt, of the planktonic diatom Asterionella formosa, (2) a mid-summer period of minimal algal abundance, and (3) a fall bloom of the blue-green alga Oscillatoria limnetica. Seasonal phytoplankton dynamics in these lakes are controlled partially by the rapid flushing rate during snowmelt and the transport of phytoplankton from the highest lake to the lower lakes by the stream, Icy Brook. During snowmelt, the A. formosa population in the most downstream lake has a net rate of increase of 0.34 d-1, which is calculated from the flushing rate and from the A. formosa abundance in the inflow from the upstream lake and in the downstream lake. Measurement of photosynthetic rates at different depths during the three periods confirmed the rapid growth of A. formosa during the spring. The decline in A. formosa after snowmelt may be related to grazing by developing zooplankton populations. The possible importance of the seasonal variations in nitrate concentrations were evaluated in situ enrichment experiments. For A. formosa and O. limnetica populations, growth stimulation resulted from 8- or 16-micromolar amendments of calcium nitrate and sulfuric acid, but the reason for this stimulation could not be determined from these experiments.

  1. Colorado School of Mines Society of Physics Students Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Shirley; Otzenberger, Marty

    2009-10-01

    Since the reinstatement of CSM's chapter of the Society of Physics Students last year, we have been dedicated to spreading the knowledge of physics through outreach while providing both social and professional events for students and the community. We did many things last year that we intend to repeat this year. In August we participate in Celebration of Mines, doing interesting demonstrations while informing new students about our organization. In autumn, a haunted physics lab is built, SPS and the CSM Physics Department hold Physics Week, and volunteers judge science fairs at local schools. In spring, a workshop is held for students to apply for summer internships and REUs and students enjoy a fun night of bowling. SPS also prepares demonstrations for the Associated Students of CSM to use in their Into the Streets volunteer event and co-organizes Mitchell Elementary School's Family Math and Science Night. Last year, we hosted the Colorado/Wyoming AAPT and SPS Zone 14 meeting. This year, we will host an E-days dunk tank and soapbox derby. At the end of the year, a department barbeque is held to finish off the spring semester. For our efforts, we accepted a Marsh White award for demonstrations in addition to a SOCK and outstanding chapter award from SPS national.

  2. Geologic map of the Grand Junction Quadrangle, Mesa County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Robert B.; Carrara, Paul E.; Hood, William C.; Murray, Kyle E.

    2002-01-01

    -angle reverse fault. The other locality displays a second similar asymmetric fold. No evidence of post-Laramide tilting or uplift exists here, but the antecedent Unaweep Canyon, only 30 km to the south-southwest of the map area, provides clear evidence of Late Cenozoic, if not Pleistocene, uplift. The major geologic hazards in the area include large landslides associated with the dip-slope-underlain, smectite-rich Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and overlying Dakota and Burro Canyon Formations. Active landslides affect the southern bank of the Colorado River where undercutting by the river and smectitic clays in the Mancos trigger landslides. The Wanakah, Morrison, and Dakota Formations and the Mancos Shale create a significant hazard to houses and other structures by containing expansive smectitic clay. In addition to seasonal spring floods associated with the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers, a serious flash flood hazard associated with sudden summer thunderstorms threatens the intermittent washes that drain the dip slope of the monocline.

  3. Comparability among four invertebrate sampling methods, Fountain Creek Basin, Colorado, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.; Brown, Krystal D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering and Colorado Springs Utilities, designed a study to determine if sampling method and sample timing resulted in comparable samples and assessments of biological condition. To accomplish this task, annual invertebrate samples were collected concurrently using four sampling methods at 15 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages in the Fountain Creek basin from 2010 to 2012. Collectively, the four methods are used by local (U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program) and State monitoring programs (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment) in the Fountain Creek basin to produce two distinct sample types for each program that target single-and multiple-habitats. This study found distinguishable differences between single-and multi-habitat sample types using both community similarities and multi-metric index values, while methods from each program within sample type were comparable. This indicates that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment methods were compatible with the cooperative monitoring program methods within multi-and single-habitat sample types. Comparisons between September and October samples found distinguishable differences based on community similarities for both sample types, whereas only differences were found for single-habitat samples when multi-metric index values were considered. At one site, differences between September and October index values from single-habitat samples resulted in opposing assessments of biological condition. Direct application of the results to inform the revision of the existing Fountain Creek basin U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program are discussed.

  4. USGS Colorado Water Science Center bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-12-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey Colorado Water Science Center conducts its water-resources activities primarily in Colorado in cooperation with more than 125 different entities. These activities include extensive data-collection efforts and studies of streamflow, water quality, and groundwater to address many specific issues of concern to Colorado water-management entities and citizens. The collected data are provided in the National Water Information System, and study results are documented in reports and information served on the Internet.

  5. Colorado geology then and now: following the route of the Colorado Scientific Society's 1901 trip through central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Beth

    2013-01-01

    In 1901, Charles Van Hise asked Samuel Emmons and Whitman Cross to organize a grand excursion across Colorado as part of the combined meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, GSA, and the Colorado Scientific Society (CSS). This trip replays part of that 10-day excursion across Colorado. Shortened to three days, this trip takes in some of the same sites as the 1901 trip, plus adds others of interest along the route where CSS members are reinventing geological interpretations. The trip will follow the precedent set in 1901; CSS members will serve as “site or stop hosts” in addition to the trip leader and drivers. While walking in the steps of the most famous of our profession we will also see some of the most magnificent scenery of Colorado.

  6. 76 FR 46288 - Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Cañon City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...; Carbon Monoxide and PM 10 Maintenance Plans' Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for Transportation... emissions budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes: ``PM10 Maintenance Plan for Ca on City... required to use the relevant motor vehicle emissions budgets for future transportation conformity...

  7. Aggregate supply and demand modeling using GIS methods for the front range urban corridor, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ahmet; Turner, Keith

    2004-07-01

    The combined use of allocation modeling and geographical information system (GIS) technologies for providing quantitative assessments of aggregate supply and demand is evaluated using representative data for the Front Range Urban Corridor (FRUC) in Colorado. The FRUC extends from the Colorado-Wyoming border to south of Colorado Springs, and includes Denver and the major urban growth regions of Colorado. In this area, aggregate demand is high and is increasing in response to population growth. Neighborhood opposition to the establishment of new pits and quarries and the depletion of many deposits are limiting aggregate supplies. Many sources are already covered by urban development or eliminated from production by zoning. Transport of aggregate by rail from distant resources may be required in the future. Two allocation-modeling procedures are tested in this study. Network analysis procedures provided within the ARC/INFO software, are unsatisfactory. Further aggregate allocation modeling used a model specifically designed for this task; a modified version of an existing Colorado School of Mines allocation model allows for more realistic market analyses. This study evaluated four scenarios. The entire region was evaluated with a scenario reflecting the current market and by a second scenario in which some existing suppliers were closed down and new potential suppliers were activated. The conditions within the Denver metropolitan area were studied before and after the introduction of three possible rail-to-truck aggregate distribution centers. GIS techniques are helpful in developing the required database to describe the Front Range Urban Corridor aggregate market conditions. GIS methods allow the digital representation of the regional road network, and the development of a distance matrix relating all suppliers and purchasers.

  8. Mercury and selenium in fish of Fountain Creek, Colorado (USA): possible sources and implications.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, D R; Herrmann, S J; Carsella, J S; McGarvy, C M; Foutz, H P; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Gregorich, J M; Turner, J A; Vanden Heuvel, B D

    2016-01-01

    Fountain Creek in Colorado USA is a major tributary that confluences with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado, the result being the tributary's influence on Arkansas River water quality affecting down-stream users. In a previous study, we found that bryophytes (aquatic plants) accumulated selenium in Fountain Creek watershed and this finding prompted us to investigate the extent of the metalloid in the whole-body tissues of fish. One hundred 11 fish (six species) were collected and analyzed for Se by inductively-coupled plasma emission mass spectrometry. Analysis of all analytical data also showed mercury in all of the fish whole bodies and selected tissues. There was a general increase in selenium but a decrease in mercury in fish with downstream travel-distance. The highest whole-body selenium was in Pueblo, Colorado (3393 µg/kg, dry weight; 906 µg/kg, wet weight); the highest mercury in fish was in the Monument Creek tributary north of Colorado Springs, Colorado (71 µg/kg, dry weight; 19 µg/kg, wet weight). In four tissues of 11 female fish captured, selenium was highest in the livers at eight sites but highest in the ovaries at three sites. Mercury was highest in the epaxial muscle at all sites. Selenium availability could be due to the watershed lithology and land uses; however, mercury could be carried by atmospheric deposition from coal-fired power plants and historic mining activities. Selenium in fish tissues and water samples were compared to U.S. national water quality criteria.

  9. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  10. FLUORINE IN COLORADO OIL SHALE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyni, John R.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Oil shale from the lower part of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, averages 0. 13 weight percent fluorine, which is about twice that found in common shales, but is the same as the average amount found in some oil shales from other parts of the world. Some fluorine may reside in fluorapatite; however, limited data suggest that cryolite may be quantitatively more important. To gain a better understanding of the detailed distribution of fluorine in the deeper nahcolite-bearing oil shales, cores were selected for study from two exploratory holes drilled in the northern part of the Piceance Creek Basin where the oil shales reach their maximum thickness and grade.

  11. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    DOEpatents

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  12. Spring viremia of carp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Bjorklund, H.V.; Essbauer, S.; Fijan, N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    pring viremia of carp (SVC) is an important disease affecting cyprinids, mainly common carp Cyprinus carpio. The disease is widespread in European carp culture, where it causes significant morbidity and mortality. Designated a notifiable disease by the Office International des Epizooties, SVC is caused by a rhabdovirus, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV). Affected fish show destruction of tissues in the kidney, spleen and liver, leading to hemorrhage, loss of water-salt balance and impairment of immune response. High mortality occurs at water temperatures of 10 to 17°C, typically in spring. At higher temperatures, infected carp develop humoral antibodies that can neutralize the spread of virus and such carp are protected against re-infection by solid immunity. The virus is shed mostly with the feces and urine of clinically infected fish and by carriers. Waterborne transmission is believed to be the primary route of infection, but bloodsucking parasites like leeches and the carp louse may serve as mechanical vectors of SVCV. The genome of SVCV is composed of a single molecule of linear, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA containing 5 genes in the order 3¹-NPMGL-5¹ coding for the viral nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and polymerase, respectively. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral proteins, and sequence homologies between the genes and gene junctions of SVCV and vesicular stomatitis viruses, have led to the placement of the virus as a tentative member of the genus Vesiculovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. These methods also revealed that SVCV is not related to fish rhabdoviruses of the genus Novirhabdovirus. In vitro replication of SVCV takes place in the cytoplasm of cultured cells of fish, bird and mammalian origin at temperatures of 4 to 31°C, with an optimum of about 20°C. Spring viremia of carp can be diagnosed by clinical signs, isolation of virus in cell culture and molecular methods. Antibodies directed

  13. The Geologic Story of Colorado National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1981-01-01

    From 1946 until about 1956 I carried out fieldwork intermittently on the geology and artesian water supply of the Grand Junction area, Colorado, the results of which have been published. The area mapped geologically contains about 332 square miles in the west-central part of Mesa County and includes all of Colorado National Monument. During the field work several successive custodians or superintendents and several park naturalists urged that upon completion of my professional paper I prepare a brief account of the geology of the Monument in terms understandable by laymen, and which could be sold at the Visitor Center. This I was happy to do and there resulted 'The geologic story of Colorado National Monument', published by the Colorado and Black Canyon Natural History Association in cooperation with the National Park Service. This report contained colored sketches by John R. Stacy and a colored cover, but the photographs and many of the drawings were reproduced in black and white.

  14. Professional Orientation of Colorado PR Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattimore, Dan L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Findings indicate that a majority of public relations practitioners are highly educated, have professional media backgrounds as part of their professional experience, and are paid better than newspaper personnel in Colorado. (RB)

  15. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  16. NASA UAVSAR Images Colorado Slumgullion Landslide

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-15

    This false-color, oblique perspective image of the Slumgullion landslide in southwestern Colorado depicting its surface motion was created by data acquired by NASA UAVSAR between two airplane flights in August 2011.

  17. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  18. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  19. Force levels of 23 nickel-titanium open-coil springs in compression testing.

    PubMed

    Brauchli, Lorenz M; Senn, Christiane; Ball, Judith; Wichelhaus, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Open-coil springs are commonly used auxiliaries in fixed orthodontic appliance therapy. Space opening for impacted or heavily crowded teeth as well as distalization of molars all require specific force levels. It is the aim of the current study to present an overview of the mechanical properties of currently available nickel titanium (NiTi) closed coil springs. Twenty-three NiTi open-coil springs were compressed by 25% and 50% of their original length at a controlled temperature of 36°C. Force deflection diagrams were registered using an Instron 3344 (Instron Corp, Wilmington, De). Five samples of each coil spring were measured and evaluated for their mean force as well as their superelastic characteristics. Almost all coil springs showed a linear behavior in the force deflection diagram. Only a few open-coil springs (GAC light, medium, and heavy [Dentsply GAC, Bohemia, NY] and RMO 12 × 45 [Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, Colorado]) showed a superelastic behavior with a clear force plateau, also indicated by their high ratio of variance. The results of the tested open-coil springs allow the clinician to choose springs with mean forces between 0.25 N (3M Unitek light; 3M Unitek, St. Paul, Minn) and 1.3 N (GAC heavy) for a compression of 25% and 0.64 N (3M Unitek light) to 2.9 N (OrthoOrganizers 14 × 37 [OrthoOrganizers, Carlsbad, Calif], Dentaurum Rematitan strong [Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany]) for a compression of 50%. Superelastic behavior was rarely observed with open-coil springs. The clinician can therefore not rely on the force range indicated without considering the amount of compression of the coil spring. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406 Colorado. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... 63-238 USDI-NPS Weminuche Wild 400,907 93-632 USDA-FS West Elk Wild 61,412 88-577 USDA-FS ...

  1. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406 Colorado. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... 63-238 USDI-NPS Weminuche Wild 400,907 93-632 USDA-FS West Elk Wild 61,412 88-577 USDA-FS ...

  2. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406 Colorado. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... 63-238 USDI-NPS Weminuche Wild 400,907 93-632 USDA-FS West Elk Wild 61,412 88-577 USDA-FS ...

  3. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406 Colorado. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... 63-238 USDI-NPS Weminuche Wild 400,907 93-632 USDA-FS West Elk Wild 61,412 88-577 USDA-FS ...

  4. 40 CFR 81.406 - Colorado.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Colorado. 81.406 Section 81.406... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.406 Colorado. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... 63-238 USDI-NPS Weminuche Wild 400,907 93-632 USDA-FS West Elk Wild 61,412 88-577 USDA-FS ...

  5. 1979 summary of coal resources in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Colorado, with 8 coal-bearing regions and 20 coal fields, contains at least 11 percent of the total remaining coal resources of the United States to a depth of 6000 feet. Colorado coals range from early Late Cretaceous to Eocene in age. The higher rank bituminous coals and the largest reserves generally are found in the Upper Cretaceous Dakota and Mesa Verde Groups/Formations in western Colorado. The younger coals, generally of lower rank (subbituminous a to lignite), are found in latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks in the Green River, North and South Park, Raton Mesa, and Denver coal regions. Marginal and premium grades of coking coal are found in the Carbondale, Crested Butte, and Somerset fields, Uinta coal region; in the Trinidad field, Raton Mesa region; and in the Durango field, San Juan River region. Colorado coals range in rank from lignite to anthracite; over 70 percent of the resource is bituminous, approximately 23 percent is subbituminous, 5 percent lignite, and less than one percent anthracite. Moisture, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents of Colorado coals vary considerably with rank from region to region. According to the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Colorado ranks seventh in the total U.S. demonstrated reserve base of coal (16.3 billion short tons) and fourth in the reserve base of bituminous coal. Furthermore, Colorado ranks first in the reserve base of underground-minable low sulphur bituminous coal. The Green River region produced over 9 million tons of the total 1978 state-wide coal production of 14.3 million tons. Projections for Colorado coal production through 1985 is in the order of 32.2 million tons per year.

  6. Temporal change in biological community structure in the Fountain Creek basin, Colorado, 2001-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, began a study to better understand the relations between environmental characteristics and biological communities in the Fountain Creek basin in order to aide water-resource management and guide future monitoring activities. To accomplish this task, environmental (streamflow, habitat, and water chemistry) and biological (fish and macroinvertebrate) data were collected annually at 24 sites over a 6- or 8-year period (fish, 2003 to 2008; macroinvertebrates, 2001 to 2008). For this report, these data were first analyzed to determine the presence of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure among years using nonparametric multivariate statistics. Where temporal change in the biological communities was found, these data were further analyzed using additional nonparametric multivariate techniques to determine which subset of selected streamflow, habitat, or water-chemistry variables best described site-specific changes in community structure relative to a gradient of urbanization. This study identified significant directional patterns of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure at 15 of 24 sites in the Fountain Creek basin. At four of these sites, changes in environmental variables were significantly correlated with the concurrent temporal change identified in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure (Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Monument Creek at Bijou Street at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bear Creek near Colorado Springs, Colo.; Fountain Creek at Security, Colo.). Combinations of environmental variables describing directional temporal change in the biota appeared to be site specific as no single variable dominated the results; however, substrate composition variables (percent substrate composition composed of sand, gravel, or cobble) collectively were present in 80 percent of the environmental

  7. Springing into Spring: Reading Games for the Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As spring arrives, more time is spent outdoors. Unfortunately, as spring fever hits, books and learning often take a backseat. The goal is for educators to find a way to re-engage learners. In this article, the author presents a seasonal story and game that can help catch students' attention by making learning both informative and entertaining.…

  8. THE EXPERIMENTAL TRANSMISSION OF COLORADO TICK FEVER.

    PubMed

    Florio, L; Stewart, M O; Mugrage, E R

    1944-09-01

    1. The symptoms, history of tick bite, characteristic fever curve, and white blood cell picture should enable the physician to make a diagnosis of Colorado tick fever in nearly every case. 2. The typical white blood cell picture is a depression of the total leucocytes with a shift to the left of the granulocytes. Basophilic cytoplasmic bodies appear occasionally in lymphocytes 3 to 4 days after clinical recovery. 3. The disease can be transmitted serially in human beings by parenteral injection of blood or serum. Such transfers have not resulted in decreased or increased virulence. 4. The naturally acquired and experimental cases of Colorado tick fever are identical in their manifestations. 5. An attack of Colorado tick fever confers a degree of definite immunity to the disease. 6. Colorado tick fever is not a mild form of Rocky Mountain spotted fever since individuals immunized with ground tick vaccine against Rocky Mountain spotted fever are still susceptible to Colorado tick fever. 7. Adult Dermacentor andersoni ticks allowed to feed on typical cases, then carried through to a new generation and fed on susceptible adults, failed to transmit the disease. 8. Colorado tick fever has been successfully transmitted to an experimental animal, the golden hamster.

  9. Brackish karstic springs model: application to Almiros spring in Crete.

    PubMed

    Maramathas, Athanasios; Maroulis, Zacharias; Marinos-Kouris, Dimitrios

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to simulate brackish karstic springs. Rainfall data constitutes model input information while output information is the discharge and the chloride concentration of the water versus time. The model was constructed by considering the mass and mechanical energy balance on the hydrodynamic analog, which includes three reservoirs outflowing in a tube that lies adjacent to the spring. Two reservoirs emulate the karstic system, and the third one emulates the sea. The discharge of the spring is given by the sum of the discharge of the reservoirs, and the chloride concentration by the solution of the mixing problem between the fresh and the salty water, which exists in the tube leading to the spring. The model is applied to the spring of Almiros at Heraklion, Crete, Greece. The agreement between model values and field measurements is very good for depletion periods and satisfactory for recharge periods.

  10. 78 FR 66695 - Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Area Power Administration Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest..., Colorado River Storage Project Manager, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center, 150 East Social.... Thomas Hackett, Rates Team Lead, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center, 150 East Social...

  11. Large springs of east Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Pao-chang P.; Criner, J.H.; Poole, J.L.

    1963-01-01

    Springs constitute an important source of water in east Tennessee, and many individual springs are capable of supplying the large quantities needed for municipal and industrial supplies. Most of the springs in east Tennessee issue from solution openings and fractured and faulted zones in limestone and dolomite of the Knox Group, Chickamauga Limestone, and Conasauga Group. The ability of these rocks to yield a sustained flow of water to springs is dependent on a system of interconnected openings through which water can infiltrate from the land surface and move to points of natural discharge. Ninety springs were selected for detailed study, and 84 of these are analyzed in terms of magnitude and variability of discharge. Of the 84 springs analyzed, 4 flow at an average rate of 10 to 100 cfs (cubic feet per second), 62 at an average rate of 1 to 10 cfs, and 18 at an average rate of 1 cfs or less. Of the 90 springs, 75 are variable in their discharge; that is, the ratio of their fluctuations to their average discharges exceeds 100 percent. Mathematical analysis of the flow recession curve of Mill Spring near Jefferson City shows that the hydrologic system contributing to the flow of the spring has an effective capacity of about 70 million cubic feet of water. The rate of depletion of this volume of water, in the absence of significant precipitation, averages 0.0056 cfs per day between the time when the hydrologic system is full and the time when the spring ceases to flow. From such a curve it is possible to determine at any time the residual volume of water remaining in the system and the expected rate of decrease in discharge from that time to cessation of flow. Correlation of discharge measurements of 22 springs with those of Mill Spring shows that rough approximations of discharge can be projected for springs for which few measurements are available. Seventeen of the springs analyzed in this manner show good correlation with Mill Spring: that is, their coefficients

  12. Shining a Light on College Remediation in Colorado: The Predictive Utility of the ACT for Colorado and the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefly, Dianne L.; Lovell, Cheryl D.; O'Brien, Jo McF.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine postsecondary readiness for 17,499 Colorado students by exploring the congruence between middle school and high school state assessment results (Colorado State Assessment Program) from 2007, ACT results from 2008 and the need for remediation for Colorado students who graduated from high school in the spring…

  13. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs (< 100) generally correlated with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Previous study (e.g., Manga, 1999) has shown groundwater responds on shorter time scales than the MTT, but of interest the results presented here indicate that relatively stable and old springs with long MTTs (> 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While

  14. Colorado School Finance Partnership: Report and Recommendations. Financing Colorado's Future: Assessing Our School Finance System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Colorado has emerged as a national leader in crafting innovative solutions for challenges facing its public school system. From implementing the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB) reforms to more recent legislation including standards and assessments for a preschool-through-college…

  15. A Bibliography of Colorado State University Imprints in the Colorado State University Libraries. Publication No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolesar, Andrew

    This bibliography brings together all the publications in the Colorado State University Library which bear the Colorado State University imprint. It consists of 1059 citations of scholarship, research, and literature which the University has published from 1970 through 1976. The arrangement of the bibliography is either by author or main entry as…

  16. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  17. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  18. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  19. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  20. Geochemical characterization of groundwater discharging from springs north of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, 2009–2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Tillman, Fred D; Anderson, Jessica R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Bills, Donald J.

    2017-08-01

    ,300 years old. Of the springs discharging water with radiocarbon age, Kanab and Side Canyon Springs contain tritium of more than 1.3 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), indicating they may contain a component of modern water recharged after 1952. Springs containing high values of tritium (greater than 5.1 pCi/L), which may suggest a significant component of modern water, include Willow (Hack), Saddle Horse, Cottonwood (Tuckup), Hotel, Bitter, Unknown, Hole in the Wall, and Hanging Springs. Fence and Rider Springs, located on the eastern end of the study area near the Colorado River, have distinctly different geochemical compositions compared to the other springs of the study. Additionally, water from Fence Spring has the highest 87Sr/86Sr for samples analyzed from this study with a value greater than those known in sedimentary rocks from the region. Strontium isotope data likely indicate that water discharging at Fence Spring has interacted with Precambrian basement rocks. Rider Spring had the most depleted values of stable O and H isotopes indicating that recharge, if recent, occurred at higher elevations or was recharged during earlier, cooler-climate conditions.

  1. Mallow Springs, County Cork, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, C. R.

    1996-03-01

    Because of its copious and reliable rainfall, Ireland has an abundance of springs. Many of the larger ones issue from the Carboniferous limestone that occurs in over 40% of the country. The spring water is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type with a temperature of about 10°C. In the 18th century, warm and cold springs were developed as spas in various parts of Ireland. The popularity of these springs was short and most were in major decline by 1850. Today only one cold spa at Lisdoonvarna, Co. Clare is still operating. Springs in Ireland were places of religious significance for the pre-Christian Druidic religion. In the Christian period they became holy wells, under the patronage of various saints. Cures for many different ailments were attributed to water from these wells.

  2. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  3. Geologic map of the Peach Springs 30' x 60' quadrangle, Mohave and Coconino counties, northwestern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Block, Debra L.; Dyer, Helen C.

    2006-01-01

    This map is a product of a cooperative project of the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management to provide geologic map coverage and regional geologic information for visitor services and resource management of Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Grand Canyon-Parashant-National Monument, and adjacent lands in northwestern Arizona. This map is a synthesis of previous and new geologic mapping that encompasses the Peach Springs 30' x 60' quadrangle, Arizona. The geologic data will support future geologic, biologic, hydrologic, and other science resource studies of this area conducted by the National Park Service, the Hualapai Indian Tribe, the Bureau of Land Management, the State of Arizona, and private organizations. The Colorado River and its tributaries have dissected the southwestern Colorado Plateau into what is now the southwestern part of Grand Canyon. The erosion of Grand Canyon has exposed about 426 m (1,400 ft) of Proterozoic crystalline metamorphic rocks and granite, about 1,450 m (4,760 ft) of Paleozoic strata, and about 300 m (1,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. Outcrops of Proterozoic crystalline rocks are exposed at the bottom of Grand Canyon at Granite Park from Colorado River Mile 207 to 209, at Mile 212, and in the Lower Granite Gorge from Colorado River Mile 216 to 262, and along the Grand Wash Cliffs in the southwest corner of the map area.

  4. Hydrologic data from Naval Oil Shale Reserves, Parachute Creek basin, northwestern Colorado, 1975-79

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patt, Ralph O.; Adams, D. Briane; Collins, Dannie L.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy, Naval Petroleum, and Oil Shale Reserves in the Parachute Creek drainage basin of western Colorado. It includes data from five surface-water gages, two automatic sediment samplers and two water-quality monitors. Instantaneous streamflow measurements were made at 63 sites on Parachute Creek tributaries to determine gain or loss of flow. Thirteen springs and nine surface-water sites were sampled and chemical analyses of these sites are included. From 1975 to 1979, 88 spring sites were inventoried; conductivity, temperature, pH, and discharge were measured. Climate data include maximum, minimum, and total daily solar radiation. Daily total precipitation is reported for three stations and snow-course data is reported for one site.

  5. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River.

    PubMed

    Osmundson, B C; May, T W; Osmundson, D B

    2000-05-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 microg/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 microg/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995.

  6. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): Relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osmundson, B.C.; May, T.W.; Osmundson, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 ??g/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 ??g/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995.

  7. Intake Procedures in Colorado Animal Shelters.

    PubMed

    Fagre, Anna; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Ruch-Gallie, Rebecca

    2017-05-05

    The purpose of this study was to describe intake procedures in Colorado animal shelters, compare infectious disease screening protocols in shelters taking in animals from out-of-state to shelters only accepting animals from Colorado, and analyze perceived risk of diseases in Colorado by responding shelter personnel. A questionnaire was designed and administered to shelter personnel across the state of Colorado via the survey tool SurveyMonkey© (http://www.surveymonkey.com) or a mailed hard copy. Information collected concerned general shelter characteristics and intake procedures performed in various circumstances as reported by responding shelter personnel. Only 12.5% (5/40) of respondents reported providing core vaccines to all animals upon intake at their shelter, with young age (65.0%; 26/40), pregnancy (55.0%; 22/40), and mild existing illness (40.0%; 16/40) being cited as the top reasons for not administering core vaccines. A significantly larger proportion of shelters taking animals in from around the U.S. screened for Dirofilaria immitis than shelters taking in animals only from within the state of Colorado (p = 0.001), though a majority of respondents considered cats and dogs to be at risk of heartworm and endoparasitic infection in the state of Colorado. Based on the results of this questionnaire, relatively few shelters test dogs and cats for infectious diseases and some of those utilize tests for diagnostic purposes rather than routine screening. Additionally, vaccination protocols in several shelters are not consistent with The Association of Shelter Veterinarians Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters. This study provides important information on intake procedures in Colorado animal shelters and highlights the importance of educating shelter staff on varying risk of infection based on the history and origin of the animal being taken in.

  8. Geothermal potential for commercial and industrial direct heat applications in Salida, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.; Galloway, M.J.; Gross, J.T.; Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    The Salida Geothermal Prospect (Poncha Hot Springs) was evaluated for industrial and commercial direct heat applications at Salida, Colorado, which is located approximately five miles east of Poncha Hot Springs. Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd., holds the geothermal leases on the prospect and the right-of-way for the main pipeline to Salida. The Poncha Hot Springs are located at the intersection of two major structural trends, immediately between the Upper Arkansas graben and the Sangre de Cristo uplift. Prominent east-west faulting occurs at the actual location of the hot springs. Preliminary exploration indicates that 1600 gpm of geothermal fluid as hot as 250/sup 0/F is likely to be found at around 1500 feet in depth. The prospective existing endusers were estimated to require 5.02 x 10/sup 10/ Btu per year, but the total annual amount of geothermal energy available for existing and future endusers is 28.14 x 10/sup 10/ Btu. The engineering design for the study assumed that the 1600 gpm would be fully utilized. Some users would be cascaded and the spent fluid would be cooled and discharged to nearby rivers. The economic analysis assumes that two separate businesses, the energy producer and the energy distributor, are participants in the geothermal project. The producer would be an existing limited partnership, with Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. as one of the partners; the distributor would be a new Colorado corporation without additional income sources. Economic evaluations were performed in full for four cases: the Base Case and three alternate scenarios. Alternate 1 assumes a three-year delay in realizing full production relative to the Base Case; Alternate 2 assumes that the geothermal reservoir is of a higher quality than is assumed for the Base Case; and Alternate 3 assumes a lower quality reservoir. 11 refs., 34 figs., 40 tabs.

  9. 1976 Big Thompson flood, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R. D.; Vandas, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the early evening of July 31, 1976, a large stationary thunderstorm released as much as 7.5 inches of rainfall in about an hour (about 12 inches in a few hours) in the upper reaches of the Big Thompson River drainage. This large amount of rainfall in such a short period of time produced a flash flood that caught residents and tourists by surprise. The immense volume of water that churned down the narrow Big Thompson Canyon scoured the river channel and destroyed everything in its path, including 418 homes, 52 businesses, numerous bridges, paved and unpaved roads, power and telephone lines, and many other structures. The tragedy claimed the lives of 144 people. Scores of other people narrowly escaped with their lives. The Big Thompson flood ranks among the deadliest of Colorado's recorded floods. It is one of several destructive floods in the United States that has shown the necessity of conducting research to determine the causes and effects of floods. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts research and operates a Nationwide streamgage network to help understand and predict the magnitude and likelihood of large streamflow events such as the Big Thompson Flood. Such research and streamgage information are part of an ongoing USGS effort to reduce flood hazards and to increase public awareness.

  10. Correlation of the Peach Springs Tuff, a large-volume Miocene ignimbrite sheet in California and Arizona ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Nielson, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Miller, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Peach Springs Tuff is a distinctive early Miocene ignimbrite deposit that was first recognized in western Arizona. Recent field studies and phenocryst analyses indicate that adjacent outcrops of similar tuff in the central and eastern Mojave Desert may be correlative. This proposed correlation implies that outcrops of the tuff are scattered over an area of at least 35 000 km2 from the western Colorado Plateau to Barstow, California, and that the erupted volume, allowing for posteruption crustal extension, was at least several hundred cubic kilometres. Thus, the Peach Springs Tuff may be a regional stratigraphic marker, useful for determining regional paleogeography and the time and extent of Tertiary crustal extension. -Authors

  11. Magnetic fabric, flow directions, and source area of the Lower Miocene Peach Springs Tuff in Arizona, California, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Wells, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Uses anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to define the flow fabric and possible source area of the Peach Springs Tuff, a widespread rhyolitic ash flow tuff in the Mojave Desert and Great Basin of California, Arizona, and Nevada. Lineation and imbrication indicate a source region near the southern tip of Nevada. The optimum intersection of magnetic lineations lies in the southern Black Mountains of Arizona on the eastern side of the Colorado River extensional corridor. -from Authors

  12. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  13. Comparison of mine waste assessment methods at the Rattler mine site, Virginia Canyon, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Phil L.; Smith, Kathleen S.; Wildeman, Thomas R.; Ranville, James F.

    2005-01-01

    In a joint project, the mine waste-piles at the Rattler Mine near Idaho Springs, Colorado, were sampled and analyzed by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). Separate sample collection, sample leaching, and leachate analyses were performed by both groups and the results were compared. For the study, both groups used the USGS sampling procedure and the USGS Field Leach Test (FLT). The leachates generated from these tests were analyzed for a suite of elements using ICP-AES (CSM) and ICP-MS (USGS). Leachate geochemical fingerprints produced by the two groups for composites collected from the same mine waste showed good agreement. In another set of tests, CSM collected another set of Rattler mine waste composite samples using the USGS sampling procedure. This set of composite samples was leached using the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (CDMG) leach test, and a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach test. Leachate geochemical fingerprints produced using these tests showed a variation of more than a factor of two from the geochemical fingerprints produced using the USGS FLT leach test. We have concluded that the variation in the results is due to the different parameters of the leaching tests and not due to the sampling or analytical methods.

  14. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  15. Climatology of extreme daily precipitation in Colorado and its diverse spatial and seasonal variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahoney, Kelly M.; Ralph, F. Martin; Walter, Klaus; Doesken, Nolan; Dettinger, Michael; Gottas, Daniel; Coleman, Timothy; White, Allen

    2015-01-01

    The climatology of Colorado’s historical extreme precipitation events shows a remarkable degree of seasonal and regional variability. Analysis of the largest historical daily precipitation totals at COOP stations across Colorado by season indicates that the largest recorded daily precipitation totals have ranged from less than 60 mm day−1 in some areas to more than 250 mm day−1 in others. East of the Continental Divide, winter events are rarely among the top 10 events at a given site, but spring events dominate in and near the foothills; summer events are most common across the lower-elevation eastern plains, while fall events are most typical for the lower elevations west of the Divide. The seasonal signal in Colorado’s central mountains is complex; high-elevation intense precipitation events have occurred in all months of the year, including summer, when precipitation is more likely to be liquid (as opposed to snow), which poses more of an instantaneous flood risk. Notably, the historic Colorado Front Range daily rainfall totals that contributed to the damaging floods in September 2013 occurred outside of that region’s typical season for most extreme precipitation (spring–summer). That event and many others highlight the fact that extreme precipitation in Colorado has occurred historically during all seasons and at all elevations, emphasizing a year-round statewide risk.

  16. Effects of climate change and land use on water resources in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Campbell, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    The health of the Colorado River watershed is critical to the socioeconomic and ecosystem well-being of the Southwestern United States. Water in springs, streams, and rivers supports a range of aquatic and riparian ecosystems that contain many endangered species. Terrestrial habitats support a wide array of plants and wildlife. In addition, this region is enjoyed by millions of people annually for its recreational and esthetic opportunities. The Colorado River provides water for about 25 million people and is used to irrigate 2.5 million acres of farmland. However, competition for this water is expected to increase as human populations dependent on this water are projected to increase to 38 million by 2020. Climate change is expected to further exacerbate water issues in this region. Drought in the Southwest during 2000-04, caused by both reduced precipitation and a series of the hottest years on record, resulted in streamflows lower than during the 1930s Dust Bowl or the 1950s. Increased temperatures alone are a major factor in reducing surface-water flows in this region. For instance, precipitation received during the winter of 2005 was at the 100-year average. However, low soil moisture and high January-July temperatures resulted in flows that were only 75 percent of average. Climate models predict future warmer temperatures and reduced precipitation in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), which would reduce water available to humans and ecosystems.

  17. 2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Lake Havasu on left, Colorado River on right below Parker Dam; View southeast from TV Hill above Whitsett Pump Plant. - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  18. Overview of the Colorado River Canyon from the helicopter pad. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Colorado River Canyon from the helicopter pad. View of the Nevada side where new bridge will cross canyon, view northwest - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  19. View of the Colorado River Canyon form the Nevada side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the Colorado River Canyon form the Nevada side showing the Nevada rim towers and portions of US 93, view south - Hoover Dam, Spanning Colorado River at Route 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  20. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado I. Adults.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A; Ken Weston, L; McDonald, Susan F

    2005-05-01

    Adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) were exposed to various selenium concentrations in ponds and isolated river channels of the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO, to determine effects on their growth and residue accumulation over an 11-month period. Adults at Horsethief ponds were fed a commercial diet, whereas fish at Adobe Creek channel and North Pond foraged on natural food items. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 2.2 microg/L in water, 0.1-1.4 microg/g in sediment, and 2.3-3.1 microg/g in food organisms (1.1 microg/g in commercial fish food), at Adobe Creek were 3.8 microg/L in water, 0.5-2.1 microg/g in sediment, and 4-56 microg/g in food organisms, and at North Pond were 9.5 microg/L in water, 7-55 microg/g in sediment, and 20-81 microg/g in food organisms. The selenium concentrations in muscle plugs from adults at Adobe Creek (11.7 microg/g, SD = 0.4, n = 6) and North Pond (16.6 microg/g, SD = 1.0, n = 6) were greater than at Horsethief (4.5 microg/g, SD = 0.2, n = 6). During a depuration period adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond lost 1-2% of their selenium burden in 32 days and 14-19% in 66 days. Selenium accumulated in razorback sucker above toxic thresholds reported in other studies, yet those residues were less than those reported in muscle plugs of 40% of wild razorback sucker caught in the Green River, Utah.