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Sample records for stearothermophilus 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

  1. 21 CFR 862.1565 - 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1565 Section 862.1565 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain liver diseases (such as hepatitis) and anemias. (b...

  2. The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Silva, A O; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-10-25

    This study is an attempt to relate in vivo use of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction in Escherichia coli with the characteristics of the enzyme determined in vitro. 1) The enzyme was obtained pure by affinity chromatography and kinetically characterized; as already known, ATP and fructose-1,6-P2 were inhibitors. 2) A series of isogenic strains were made in which in vivo use of thereaction might differ, e.g. a wild type strain versus a mutant lacking 6-phosphogluconate dehydrase, as grown on gluconate; a phosphoglucose isomerase mutant grown on glucose or glycerol. 3) The in vivo rate of use of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction was determined from measurements of growth rate and yield and from the specific activity of alanine after growth in 1-14C-labeled substrates. 4) The intracellular concentrations of 6-phosphogluconate, NADP+, fructose-1,6-P2, and ATP were measured for the strains in growth on several carbon sources. 5) The metabolite concentrations were used for assay of the enzyme in vitro. The results allow one to calculate how fast the reaction would function in vivo if ATP and fructose-1,6-P2 were its important effectors and if the in vitro assay conditions apply in vivo. The predicted in vivo rates ranged down to as low as one-tenth of the actual rates, and, accordingly, one cannot yet draw firm conclusions about how the reaction is actually controlled in vivo.

  3. Selective inhibition of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, Massimo; El-Bastawissy, Eman; Knaggs, Michael H.; Barrett, Michael P.; Hanau, Stefania; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2001-05-01

    A number of triphenylmethane derivatives have been screened against 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei and sheep liver. Some of these compounds show good inhibition of the enzymes and also selectivity towards the parasite enzyme. Modelling was undertaken to dock the compounds into the active sites of both enzymes. Using a combination of DOCK 3.5 and FLEXIDOCK a correlation was obtained between docking score and both activity for the enzymes and selectivity. Visualisation of the docked structures of the inhibitors in the active sites of the enzymes yielded a possible explanation of the selectivity for the parasite enzyme.

  4. Virtual fragment screening for novel inhibitors of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ruda, Gian Filippo; Campbell, Gordon; Alibu, Vincent P; Barrett, Michael P; Brenk, Ruth; Gilbert, Ian H

    2010-07-15

    The enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is a potential drug target for the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis. This enzyme has a polar active site to accommodate the phosphate, hydroxyl and carboxylate groups of the substrate, 6-phosphogluconate. A virtual fragment screen was undertaken of the enzyme to discover starting points for the development of inhibitors which are likely to have appropriate physicochemical properties for an orally bioavailable compound. A virtual screening library was developed, consisting of compounds with functional groups that could mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, but which have a higher pKa. Following docking, hits were clustered and appropriate compounds purchased and assayed against the enzyme. Three fragments were identified that had IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good ligand efficiencies. Based on these initial hits, analogues were procured and further active compounds were identified. Some of the fragments identified represent potential starting points for a medicinal chemistry programme to develop potent drug-like inhibitors of the enzyme. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. One-step purification of soluble recombinant human 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chan, Barden; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2013-11-01

    6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), the third enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, was recently identified as a novel target in human lung cancer. In this report, we present an expression and purification scheme of recombinant human 6PGD from Escherichia coli. Using a DE3 derivative strain expressing tRNAs for seven rare codons in E. coli called Rosetta2 (DE3), a large quantity of soluble human 6PGD can be expressed with an N-terminal histidine tag and purified by a one-step purification procedure to near homogeneity without denaturants or refolding. Three to seven milligrams of purified protein could be obtained from 100 ml of culture. This recombinant human 6PGD follows classic Michaelis-Menton saturation kinetics with respect to both substrates NADP(+) and 6-phosphogluconate. The respective k(cat) and K(m) were comparable to those of 6PGDs purified from mammalian tissues. Using this purified 6PGD enzyme, we devised an endpoint colorimetric assay suitable for high-throughput screening for human 6PGD inhibitors.

  6. Inhibition effects of some metal ions on the rat liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adem, Şevki; Kayhan, Naciye

    2016-04-01

    6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate path. The main functions of the pathway are the manufacture of the reduced coenzyme NADPH and the formation of ribose 5-phosphate for nucleic acid synthesis and nucleotide. Both NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate involve a critical biochemical process. Metals have been recognized as important toxic agents for living for a long time. It has been considered that they lead to in the emergence of many diseases. To evaluate whether metals is effect towards rat liver 6PGD, we apply various concentrations of metals and enzyme inhibition was analyzed using enzyme activity assays. The IC50 values of Pb+2, Cr+3, Co+2, Ni+2, Cd+2, and Va+2, metals on rat liver 6PGD were calculated as 138,138, 169, 214, 280, and 350 µM, respectively.

  7. Targeting 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin.

    PubMed

    Elf, S; Lin, R; Xia, S; Pan, Y; Shan, C; Wu, S; Lonial, S; Gaddh, M; Arellano, M L; Khoury, H J; Khuri, F R; Lee, B H; Boggon, T J; Fan, J; Chen, J

    2017-01-12

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is crucial for cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. We recently reported that targeting a key oxidative PPP enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), using our novel small-molecule 6PGD inhibitors Physcion and its derivative S3, shows anticancer effects. Notably, humans with genetic deficiency of either 6PGD or another oxidative PPP enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, exhibit non-immune hemolytic anemia upon exposure to aspirin and various antimalarial drugs. Inspired by these clinical observations, we examined the anticancer potential of combined treatment with 6PGD inhibitors and antimalarial drugs. We found that stable knockdown of 6PGD sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA). Combined treatment with DHA and Physcion activates AMP-activated protein kinase, leading to synergistic inhibition of human leukemia cell viability. Moreover, our combined therapy synergistically attenuates tumor growth in xenograft nude mice injected with human K562 leukemia cells and cell viability of primary leukemia cells from human patients, but shows minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells in mice as well as red blood cells and mononucleocytes from healthy human donors. Our findings reveal the potential for combined therapy using optimized doses of Physcion and DHA as a novel antileukemia treatment without inducing hemolysis.

  8. Chloroplast-localized 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is critical for maize endosperm starch accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Spielbauer, Gertraud; Li, Li; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Do, Phuc Thi; Fouquet, Romain; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gierl, Alfons; Settles, A. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Plants have duplicate versions of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) enzymes with a subset localized to the chloroplast. The chloroplast oxPPP provides NADPH and pentose sugars for multiple metabolic pathways. This study identified two loss-of-function alleles of the Zea mays (maize) chloroplast-localized oxPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). These mutations caused a rough endosperm seed phenotype with reduced embryo oil and endosperm starch. Genetic translocation experiments showed that pgd3 has separate, essential roles in both endosperm and embryo development. Endosperm metabolite profiling experiments indicated that pgd3 shifts redox-related metabolites and increases reducing sugars similar to starch-biosynthetis mutants. Heavy isotope-labelling experiments indicates that carbon flux into starch is altered in pgd3 mutants. Labelling experiments with a loss of cytosolic 6PGDH did not affect flux into starch. These results support the known role for plastid-localized oxPPP in oil synthesis and argue that amyloplast-localized oxPPP reactions are integral to endosperm starch accumulation in maize kernels. PMID:23530131

  9. Chloroplast-localized 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is critical for maize endosperm starch accumulation.

    PubMed

    Spielbauer, Gertraud; Li, Li; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Do, Phuc Thi; Fouquet, Romain; Fernie, Alisdair R; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gierl, Alfons; Settles, A Mark

    2013-05-01

    Plants have duplicate versions of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) enzymes with a subset localized to the chloroplast. The chloroplast oxPPP provides NADPH and pentose sugars for multiple metabolic pathways. This study identified two loss-of-function alleles of the Zea mays (maize) chloroplast-localized oxPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). These mutations caused a rough endosperm seed phenotype with reduced embryo oil and endosperm starch. Genetic translocation experiments showed that pgd3 has separate, essential roles in both endosperm and embryo development. Endosperm metabolite profiling experiments indicated that pgd3 shifts redox-related metabolites and increases reducing sugars similar to starch-biosynthetis mutants. Heavy isotope-labelling experiments indicates that carbon flux into starch is altered in pgd3 mutants. Labelling experiments with a loss of cytosolic 6PGDH did not affect flux into starch. These results support the known role for plastid-localized oxPPP in oil synthesis and argue that amyloplast-localized oxPPP reactions are integral to endosperm starch accumulation in maize kernels.

  10. Congenital 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia in a Spanish family.

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Colomer, D; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Aymerich, M; Merino, A; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and metabolic studies were performed in four members of a Spanish family with partial (50%) 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency. In all cases the activities of 6 phosphogluconolactone (6PGL) and glutathione reductase (GR) were normal, and the molecular characterization performed in the partially purified 6PGD from the propositus showed normal kinetic and electrophoretic patterns. Two females (the propositus and her sister) suffered from a well-compensated chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) and exhibited decreased RBC glutathione (GSH) stability with increased oxidative susceptibility, defined by enhanced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation "in vitro." The other two members of the family (the propositus's mother and brother) were clinically asymptomatic. In the propositus and her sister, RBC metabolism exhibited a markedly abnormal concentration of glycolytic intermediates, mainly characterized by striking increases in fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (50-fold), dihydroxiacetone-phosphate (20-fold) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (tenfold). Although the precise mechanism of the hemolysis in the two patients is unknown, the enhanced oxidative threat observed in their RBCs may interfere in some way with the glycolytic pathway function, leading to a marked increase in certain metabolic intermediates located before the glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) step. Since it seems that GA3PD half-life is modulated by fluctuations of the cytosolic redox status, an "in situ" approach was simulated by using permeabilized RBCs. In these conditions, GA3PD activity was significantly lower in the propositus and her sister than in the asymptomatic members of the family and the simultaneous normal control.

  11. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian; Lutterbey, Marie-Christin; Lansing, Hannes; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin; von Schaewen, Antje

    2016-05-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Purification of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves and investigation of some kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Demir, Hülya; Ciftçi, Mehmet; Küfrevioğlu, O Irfan

    2003-02-01

    In this study, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (E.C.1.1.44; 6PGD) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves, and analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps that are preparation of homogenate ammonium sulfate fractionation and on DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 49% and had a specific activity of 18.3 U (mg proteins)(-1) (Lehninger, A.L.; Nelson, D.L.; Cox, M.M. Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd Ed.; Worth Publishers Inc.: N.Y., 2000, 558-560). The overall purification was about 339-fold. A temperature of +4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured according to the Beutler method at 340 mn. In order to control the purification of the enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acrylamide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 97.5 kDa by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. A protein band corresponding to a subunit molecular weight of 24.1 kDa was obtained on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For the enzymes, the stable pH, optimum pH, and optimum temperature were found as 8.0, 8.0, and 50 degrees C, respectively. In addition, KM and Vmax values for NADP+ and G6-P at optimum pH and 25 degrees C were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk plots.

  14. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  15. High-throughput screening of coenzyme preference change of thermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; ...

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+,more » and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Furthermore, this screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.« less

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphate prodrugs of 4-phospho-D-erythronohydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ruda, Gian Filippo; Alibu, Vincent P; Mitsos, Christos; Bidet, Olivier; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Barrett, Michael P; Gilbert, Ian H

    2007-08-01

    We have previously reported the discovery of potent and selective inhibitors of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, the third enzyme of the phosphate pentose pathway, from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis. These inhibitors were charged phosphate derivatives with restricted capacity to enter cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of five different classes of prodrugs: phosphoramidate; bis-S-acyl thioethyl esters (bis-SATE); bis-pivaloxymethyl (bis-POM); CycloSaligenyl; and phenyl, S-acyl thioethyl mixed phosphate esters (mix-SATE). Prodrugs were studied for stability and activity against the intact parasites. Most prodrugs caused inhibition of the growth of the parasites. The activity of the prodrugs against the parasites appeared to be related to their stability in aqueous buffer.

  17. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  18. Coenzyme Engineering of a Hyperthermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with Its Application to Biobatteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm−2 and 0.255 mA cm−2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm−2. This study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries. PMID:27805055

  19. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase regulates tumor cell migration in vitro by regulating receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Barden; VanderLaan, Paul A.; Sukhatme, Vikas P.

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Expression of 6PGD positively correlates with advancing stage of lung carcinoma. •Knockdown of 6PGD by shRNA potently inhibits c-Met tyrosine phosphorylation. •Exogenous HGF fails to restore c-Met phosphorylation in cells with 6PGD knocked down. •6PGD knockdown results in inhibition of cell migration in vitro. •Constitutively active TPR-cMet significantly restores migration of cells without 6PGD. -- Abstract: 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is the third enzyme in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Recently, we reported that knockdown of 6PGD inhibited lung tumor growth in vitro and in a xenograft model in mice. In this study, we continued to examine the functional role of 6PGD in cancer. We show that 6PGD expression positively correlates with advancing stage of lung carcinoma. In search of functional signals related to 6PGD, we discovered that knockdown of 6PGD significantly inhibited phosphorylation of c-Met at tyrosine residues known to be critical for activity. This downregulation of c-Met phosphorylation correlated with inhibition of cell migration in vitro. Overexpression of a constitutively active c-Met specifically rescued the migration but not proliferation phenotype of 6PGD knockdown. Therefore, 6PGD appears to be required for efficient c-Met signaling and migration of tumor cells in vitro.

  20. Coenzyme Engineering of a Hyperthermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with Its Application to Biobatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-11-01

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm‑2 and 0.255 mA cm‑2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm‑2. This study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.

  1. Enzymatic and mRNA Transcript Response of Ovine 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD) in Respect to Different Milk Yield.

    PubMed

    Trivizaki, Stamatina; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, providing the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted both on enzymatic level and on molecular level. However, to our knowledge, any correlation between enzymatic activity and 6PGD gene expression pattern related to different physiological stages has not been yet reported. With this report, we tried to highlight if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to different milk yield. According to the determined enzymatic activities and adipocytes characteristics, ewes with low milk production possessed a greater (P ≤ .001) 6PGD activity and larger adipocytes than the highly productive ewes. Although 6PGD expression pattern was higher in low milk yield ewes than in ewes with high milk production, this difference was not found statistically significant. Thus, 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by so rapid and great/sizeable changes as it was observed for its respective enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post translation regulation may be involved in the regulation of the respective gene.

  2. Enzymatic and mRNA Transcript Response of Ovine 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD) in Respect to Different Milk Yield

    PubMed Central

    Trivizaki, Stamatina; Laliotis, George P.; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A.; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, providing the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted both on enzymatic level and on molecular level. However, to our knowledge, any correlation between enzymatic activity and 6PGD gene expression pattern related to different physiological stages has not been yet reported. With this report, we tried to highlight if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to different milk yield. According to the determined enzymatic activities and adipocytes characteristics, ewes with low milk production possessed a greater (P ≤ .001) 6PGD activity and larger adipocytes than the highly productive ewes. Although 6PGD expression pattern was higher in low milk yield ewes than in ewes with high milk production, this difference was not found statistically significant. Thus, 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by so rapid and great/sizeable changes as it was observed for its respective enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post translation regulation may be involved in the regulation of the respective gene. PMID:21188075

  3. Coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with its application to biobatteries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; ...

    2016-11-02

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-foldmore » reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm-2 and 0.255 mA cm-2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm-2. As a result, this study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.« less

  4. Autosomal factors with correlated effects on the activities of the glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C C; Williamson, J H; Cochrane, B J; Wilton, A N; Chasalow, F I

    1981-09-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of C. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.--Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.--These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence.

  5. Autosomal Factors with Correlated Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.; Williamson, J. H.; Cochrane, B. J.; Wilton, A. N.; Chasalow, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Isogenic lines, in which chromosomes sampled from natural populations of D. melanogaster are substituted into a common genetic background, were used to detect and partially characterize autosomal factors that affect the activities of the two pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD). The chromosome 3 effects on G6PD and 6PGD are clearly correlated; the chromosome 2 effects, which are not so great, also appear to be correlated, but the evidence in this case is not so strong. Examination of activity variation of ten other enzymes revealed that G6PD and 6PGD are not the only pair of enzymes showing a high positive correlation, but it is among the highest in both sets of lines. In addition, there was some evidence that the factor(s) affecting G6PD and 6PGD may also affect two other metabolically related enzymes, transaldolase and phosphoglucose isomerase.—Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate specific CRM levels for three of the enzymes studied: G6PD, 6PGD and ME. This experiment shows that a large part of the activity variation is accounted for by variation in CRM level (especially for chromosome 3 lines), but there remains a significant fraction of the genetic component of activity variation that is not explained by CRM level.—These results suggest that the autosomal factors are modifiers involved in regulation of the expression of the X-linked structural genes for G6PD and 6PGD, but a role in determining part of the enzymes' primary structure cannot be excluded with the present evidence. PMID:6804300

  6. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  7. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  8. The 2'-phosphate of NADP is responsible for proper orientation of the nicotinamide ring in the oxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by sheep liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Cook, Paul F

    2006-12-01

    Sheep liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase shows a high specificity for NADP, with a much lower affinity for NAD. Discrimination between NADP and NAD suggests that the interactions between the 2'-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase contribute most of the binding energy for NADP. There are three active site residues, Asn-32, Arg-33, and Thr-34, that hydrogen-bond to the 2'-phosphate of NADP according to the crystal structure of the E.Nbr(8)ADP complex. In this study alanine mutagenesis was used to probe the contribution of each of the three residues to binding the cofactor and to catalysis. All mutant enzymes exhibit no significant change in V/E(t) or K(6PG) but an increase in K(NADP) that ranges from 6- to 80-fold. All mutant enzymes also exhibit at least a 7-fold increase in the primary kinetic (13)C-isotope effect-1, indicating that the decarboxylation step has become more rate-limiting. Data are consistent with significant roles for Asn-32, Arg-33, and Thr-34 in providing binding energy for NADP, and more importantly, the 2'-phosphate of NADP is required for proper orientation of the cofactor to allow rotation about the N-glycosidic bond as it is reduced in the hydride transfer step.

  9. Improving ethanol yield in acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae by cofactor engineering of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and deletion of ALD6.

    PubMed

    Papapetridis, Ioannis; van Dijk, Marlous; Dobbe, Arthur P A; Metz, Benjamin; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-04-26

    Acetic acid, an inhibitor of sugar fermentation by yeast, is invariably present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates which are used or considered as feedstocks for yeast-based bioethanol production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been constructed, in which anaerobic reduction of acetic acid to ethanol replaces glycerol formation as a mechanism for reoxidizing NADH formed in biosynthesis. An increase in the amount of acetate that can be reduced to ethanol should further decrease acetic acid concentrations and enable higher ethanol yields in industrial processes based on lignocellulosic feedstocks. The stoichiometric requirement of acetate reduction for NADH implies that increased generation of NADH in cytosolic biosynthetic reactions should enhance acetate consumption. Replacement of the native NADP(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in S. cerevisiae by a prokaryotic NAD(+)-dependent enzyme resulted in increased cytosolic NADH formation, as demonstrated by a ca. 15% increase in the glycerol yield on glucose in anaerobic cultures. Additional deletion of ALD6, which encodes an NADP(+)-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, led to a 39% increase in the glycerol yield compared to a non-engineered strain. Subsequent replacement of glycerol formation by an acetate reduction pathway resulted in a 44% increase of acetate consumption per amount of biomass formed, as compared to an engineered, acetate-reducing strain that expressed the native 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and ALD6. Compared to a non-acetate reducing reference strain under the same conditions, this resulted in a ca. 13% increase in the ethanol yield on glucose. The combination of NAD(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase expression and deletion of ALD6 resulted in a marked increase in the amount of acetate that was consumed in these proof-of-principle experiments, and this concept is ready for further testing in industrial strains as well as in hydrolysates. Altering the cofactor

  10. High-throughput screening of coenzyme preference change of thermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Furthermore, this screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.

  11. Key Enzymes of the Semiphosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff Pathway in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii: Characterization of Glucose Dehydrogenase, Gluconate Dehydratase, and 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-6-Phosphogluconate Aldolase

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Jan-Moritz; Tästensen, Julia-Beate; Johnsen, Ulrike; Soppa, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii has been proposed to degrade glucose via the semiphosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff (spED) pathway. So far, the key enzymes of this pathway, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), gluconate dehydratase (GAD), and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase (KDPGA), have not been characterized, and their functional involvement in glucose degradation has not been demonstrated. Here we report that the genes HVO_1083 and HVO_0950 encode GDH and KDPGA, respectively. The recombinant enzymes show high specificity for glucose and KDPG and did not convert the corresponding C4 epimers galactose and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate at significant rates. Growth studies of knockout mutants indicate the functional involvement of both GDH and KDPGA in glucose degradation. GAD was purified from H. volcanii, and the encoding gene, gad, was identified as HVO_1488. GAD catalyzed the specific dehydration of gluconate and did not utilize galactonate at significant rates. A knockout mutant of GAD lost the ability to grow on glucose, indicating the essential involvement of GAD in glucose degradation. However, following a prolonged incubation period, growth of the Δgad mutant on glucose was recovered. Evidence is presented that under these conditions, GAD was functionally replaced by xylonate dehydratase (XAD), which uses both xylonate and gluconate as substrates. Together, the characterization of key enzymes and analyses of the respective knockout mutants present conclusive evidence for the in vivo operation of the spED pathway for glucose degradation in H. volcanii. IMPORTANCE The work presented here describes the identification and characterization of the key enzymes glucose dehydrogenase, gluconate dehydratase, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase and their encoding genes of the proposed semiphosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff pathway in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. The functional involvement of the three enzymes was

  12. Enzymatic and mRNA transcript response of ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in respect to different weights from weaning to four months of age.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Trivizaki, Stamatina; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-07-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, provides the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted not only on the enzymatic level, but also on molecular level elucidating its cDNA sequence. Herein, we tried to elucidate if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to two different weights from weaning to 4 months old. 18 male and 16 female lambs of Chios breed were randomly selected after weaning and assigned to two groups based on sex in a different experimental open-plan shed. Two subgroups were defined in each sex and they were slaughtered at 25 kg and 30 kg, respectively. Samples of adipose tissue (tail, perirenal and shoulder site) were collected and 6PGD enzymatic activity, gene expression, and characteristics of adipocytes were determined. According to the determined data, tail subcutaneous adipose tissue matures later than the others examined tissues and has a diminished lipogenic activity. A 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by analogous changes of its enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post transcription or/and post translation regulation may be involved.

  13. Coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with its application to biobatteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-11-02

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm-2 and 0.255 mA cm-2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm-2. As a result, this study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.

  14. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  15. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Purification of rat kidney glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase enzymes using 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity in a single chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), and glutathione reductase (GR) were purified from rat kidney in one chromatographic step consisting of the use of the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B by using different elution buffers. This purification procedure was accomplished with the preparation of the homogenate and affinity chromatography on 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B. The purity and subunit molecular weights of the enzymes were checked on SDS-PAGE and purified enzymes showed a single band on the gel. The native molecular weights of the enzymes were found with Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. Using this procedure, G6PG, having the specific activity of 32 EU/mg protein, was purified 531-fold with a yield of 88%; 6PGD, having the specific activity of 25 EU/mg protein, was purified 494-fold with a yield of 73%; and GR, having the specific activity of 33 EU/mg protein, was purified 477-fold with a yield of 76%. Their native molecular masses were estimated to be 144 kDa for G6PD, 110 kDa for 6PGD, and 121 kDa for GR and the subunit molecular weights were found to be 68, 56, and 61 kDa, respectively. A new modified method to purify G6PD, 6PGD, and GR, namely one chromatographic step using the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B, is described for the first time in this study. This procedure has several advantages for purification of enzymes, such as, rapid purification, produces high yield, and uses less chemical materials.

  17. Relationships between the H and A-O blood types, phosphohexose isomerase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase red cell enzyme systems and halothane sensitivity, and economic traits in a superior and an inferior selection line of swiss landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, P; Stranzinger, G; Schneebeli, H; Hagger, C; Künzi, N; Gerwig, C

    1984-12-01

    Associations between production traits and the genes for halothane sensitivity (HAL), S, A and H blood group systems and phosphohexose isomerase (PHI) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGD) enzyme systems were investigated in two lines of pigs selected for an index. The phenotypic variance-covariance matrix of the index included backfat thickness and daily gain, whereas the genetic variance-covariance matrix included daily gain, feed conversion and percentage of lean meat. The experiment was conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Animal Production and has been underway since 1973. The same index was applied but in two opposite directions to give a superior and inferior line in relation to the production traits. One hundred twenty-nine animals of the superior line in the seventh generation and 88 animals of the inferior line in the sixth generation were studied. Forty-two percent (54/129) of the animals of the superior line were halothane-positive. No animals in the inferior line were halothane reactors. Of the halothane-positive pigs, 70.4% (38/54) in the superior line had the HaHa and 94.4% (51/54) had the SsSs genotype, whereas only 4% (3/75) of the HaHa and 12% (9/75) of the SsSs pigs were halothane-negative. By practicing selection at the H and S loci, it seems possible to efficiently reduce halothane sensitivity in Swiss Landrace pigs. In pigs of the superior line, there were significant differences in percentage of lean meat, carcass length, pH1 (pH value at 45 min to 1 h postmortem, M. longissimus) and reflectance values among genotypes of the HAL, S and H systems and among some genotypes of the 6-PGD system. Poorest meat quality, highest percentage of lean meat and shortest carcass length were observed in pigs homozygous for the alleles HALn, Ss, Ha, PHIB and 6-PGDA. In the inferior line, these associations were absent. As the HAL locus is associated with the above mentioned production traits, linkage disequilibria may explain the

  18. Isolation and characterisation of the glycerol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Spencer, P; Bown, K J; Scawen, M D; Atkinson, T; Gore, M G

    1989-02-23

    A protocol for the rapid purification of the glycerol dehydrogenase (glycerol: NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.6) from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus has been developed using a combination of chromatographic techniques including affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-immobilised triazine dye (Procion red, HE3B, ICI). Substrate specificity has been examined and Km values determined. The protein has been shown to have an oligomeric Mr of approx. 180,000 and consists of four identical subunits of Mr 42,000. Exposure to chelating agents (e.g., EDTA) leads to total loss of activity; the EDTA-inactivated enzyme can be reactivated by Zn2+ and requires 1 mol equivalent of zinc per subunit for full catalytic activity. Other divalent cations such as Cd2+ and Co2+ will reactivate the apo-enzyme but yields an enzyme of lower specific activity. The enzyme binds 1 equivalent of NADH per subunit and during catalysis transfers the 4-pro-R hydride from the nicotinamide ring of the reduced-coenzyme to the substrate. Glycerol increases the dissociation constant for the interaction between NADH and Zn-metallo-glycerol dehydrogenase (ZnGDH) but has no effect on the equilibrium between NADH and metal-depleted enzyme.

  19. A double mutant of highly purified Geobacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase recognises l-mandelic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Binay, Barış; Sessions, Richard B; Karagüler, Nevin Gül

    2013-05-10

    Lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly Bacillus stearothermophilus) (bsLDH) has a crucial role in producing chirally pure hydroxyl compounds. α-Hydroxy acids are used in many industrial situations, ranging from pharmaceutical to cosmetic dermatology products. One drawback of this enzyme is its limited substrate specificity. For instance, l-lactate dehydrogenase exhibits no detectable activity towards the large side chain of 2-hydroxy acid l-mandelic acid, an α-hydroxy acid with anti-bacterial activity. Despite many attempts to engineer bsLDH to accept α-hydroxy acid substrates, there have been no attempts to introduce the industrially important l-mandelic acid to bsLDH. Herein, we describe attempts to change the reactivity of bsLDH towards l-mandelic acid. Using the Insight II molecular modelling programme (except 'program' in computers) and protein engineering techniques, we have successfully introduced substantial mandelate dehydrogenase activity to the enzyme. Energy minimisation modelling studies suggested that two mutations, T246G and I240A, would allow the enzyme to utilise l-mandelic acid as a substrate. Genes encoding for the wild-type and mutant enzymes were constructed, and the resulting bsLDH proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified using the TAGZyme system. Enzyme assays showed that insertion of this double mutation into highly purified bsLDH switched the substrate specificity from lactate to l-mandelic acid.

  20. Semi-Rational Design of Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-Lactate Dehydrogenase to Access Various Chiral α-Hydroxy Acids.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Birmingham, William R; Karagüler, Nevin Gül; Turner, Nicholas J; Binay, Barış

    2016-06-01

    Chiral α-hydroxy acids (AHAs) are rapidly becoming important synthetic building blocks, in particular for the production of pharmaceuticals and other fine chemicals. Chiral compounds of a variety of functionalities are now often derived using enzymes, and L-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (bsLDH) has the potential to be employed for the industrial synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids. Despite the thorough characterization of this enzyme, generation of variants with high activity on non-natural substrates has remained difficult and therefore limits the use of bsLDH in industry. Here, we present the engineering of bsLDH using semi-rational design as a method of focusing screening in a small and smart library for novel biocatalysts. In this study, six mutant libraries were designed in an effort to expand the substrate range of bsLDH. The eight variants identified as having enhanced activity toward the selected α-keto acids belonged to the same library, which targeted two positions simultaneously. These new variants now may be useful biocatalysts for chiral synthesis of α-hydroxy acids.

  1. Stability engineering of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase and application for the synthesis of a polyamide 12 precursor.

    PubMed

    Kirmair, Ludwig; Seiler, Daniel Leonard; Skerra, Arne

    2015-12-01

    The thermostable NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsADH) was exploited with regard to the biocatalytic synthesis of ω-oxo lauric acid methyl ester (OLAMe), a key intermediate for biobased polyamide 12 production, from the corresponding long-chain alcohol. Recombinant BsADH was produced in Escherichia coli as a homogeneous tetrameric enzyme and showed high activity towards the industrially relevant substrate ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) with K M = 86 μM and 44 U mg(-1). The equilibrium constant for HLAMe oxidation to the aldehyde (OLAMe) with NAD(+) was determined as 2.16 × 10(-3) from the kinetic parameters of the BsADH-catalyzed forward and reverse reactions. Since BsADH displayed limited stability under oxidizing conditions, the predominant oxidation-prone residue Cys257 was mutated to Leu based on sequence homology with related enzymes and computational simulation. This substitution resulted in an improved BsADH variant exhibiting prolonged stability and an elevated inactivation temperature. Semi-preparative biocatalysis at 60 °C using the stabilized enzyme, employing butyraldehyde for in situ cofactor regeneration with only catalytic amounts of NAD(+), yielded up to 23 % conversion of HLAMe to OLAMe after 30 min. In contrast to other oxidoreductases, no overoxidation to the dodecanoic diacid monomethyl ester was detected. Thus, the mutated BsADH offers a promising biocatalyst for the selective oxidation of fatty alcohols to yield intermediates for industrial polymer production.

  2. Structure of holo-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus at 1.8 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Skarzyński, T; Moody, P C; Wonacott, A J

    1987-01-05

    The structure of holo-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been crystallographically refined at 1.8 A resolution using restrained least-squares refinement methods. The final crystallographic R-factor for 93,120 reflexions with F greater than 3 sigma (F) is 0.177. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains a complete tetramer, the final model of which incorporates a total of 10,272 unique protein and coenzyme atoms together with 677 bound solvent molecules. The structure has been analysed with respect to molecular symmetry, intersubunit contacts, coenzyme binding and active site geometry. The refined model shows the four independent subunits to be remarkable similar apart from local deviations due to intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice. A number of features are revealed that had previously been misinterpreted from an earlier 2.7 A electron density map. Arginine at position 195 (previously thought to be a glycine) contributes to the formation of the anion binding sites in the active site pocket, which are involved in binding of the substrate and inorganic phosphates during catalysis. This residue seems to be structurally equivalent to the conserved Arg194 in the enzyme from other sources. In the crystal both of the anion binding sites are occupied by sulphate ions. The ND atom of the catalytically important His176 is hydrogen-bonded to the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of Ser177, thus fixing the plane of the histidine imidazole ring and preventing rotation. The analysis has revealed the presence of several internal salt-bridges stabilizing the tertiary and quaternary structure. A significant number of buried water molecules have been found that play an important role in the structural integrity of the molecule.

  3. The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: preparation and characterization of its binding to the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D S; Packman, L C; Allen, M D; Fuller, C; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Perham, R N

    1994-01-01

    The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase polypeptide chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was released by limited proteolysis from a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus binding domain) encoded by a subgene over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The domain was characterized by N-terminal sequence analysis, electrospray m.s. and c.d. spectroscopy. It was found to be identical in all respects to a chemically synthesized peptide of the same sequence. The association of the di-domain and binding domain (both natural and synthetic) with dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was analysed in detail and a tight binding was demonstrated. As judged by several different techniques, it was found that only one peripheral subunit-binding domain is bound to one dimer of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, implying that the association is highly anti-cooperative. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8280091

  4. The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: preparation and characterization of its binding to the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase component.

    PubMed

    Hipps, D S; Packman, L C; Allen, M D; Fuller, C; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Perham, R N

    1994-01-01

    The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase polypeptide chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was released by limited proteolysis from a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus binding domain) encoded by a subgene over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The domain was characterized by N-terminal sequence analysis, electrospray m.s. and c.d. spectroscopy. It was found to be identical in all respects to a chemically synthesized peptide of the same sequence. The association of the di-domain and binding domain (both natural and synthetic) with dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was analysed in detail and a tight binding was demonstrated. As judged by several different techniques, it was found that only one peripheral subunit-binding domain is bound to one dimer of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, implying that the association is highly anti-cooperative.

  5. Interaction of component enzymes with the peripheral subunit-binding domain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: stoichiometry and specificity in self-assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, I A; Perham, R N

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the pyruvate decarboxylase (E1) component and a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus peripheral subunit-binding domain) from the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2) component of the Bacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex was investigated. Only 1 mol of di-domain (binding domain) was bound to 1 mol of heterotetrameric E1 (alpha 2 beta 2) and the binding was without effect on the kinetic activity of E1. Similarly, the di-domain bound to separate E1 beta subunits at a maximal polypeptide chain ratio of 1:2, but no detectable interaction was found with the E1 alpha subunit. However, addition of the monomeric E1 alpha subunit to an E1 beta-di-domain complex generated a fully functional E1 (alpha 2 beta 2)-di-domain complex, indicating that the E1 beta subunit plays the critical part in binding the E1 component to the di-domain and suggesting that no chaperonin is needed in vitro to promote the assembly of the three separate proteins. Mixing the E1 and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3) components in the presence of di-domain revealed that E1 and E3 cannot bind simultaneously to the same molecule of di-domain, a new feature of the assembly pathway and an important factor in determining the ultimate structure of the assembled enzyme complex. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7702567

  6. Synthesis of cinnamyl alcohol from cinnamaldehyde with Bacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase as the isolated enzyme and in recombinant E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of the aroma chemical cinnamyl alcohol (CMO) by means of enzymatic reduction of cinnamaldehyde (CMA) was investigated using NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus both as an isolated enzyme, and in recombinant Escherichia coli whole cells. The influence of parameters such as reaction time and cofactor, substrate, co-substrate 2-propanol and biocatalyst concentrations on the bioreduction reaction was investigated and an efficient and sustainable one-phase system developed. The reduction of CMA (0.5 g/L, 3.8 mmol/L) by the isolated enzyme occurred in 3 h at 50 °C with 97% conversion, and yielded high purity CMO (≥98%) with a yield of 88% and a productivity of 50 g/genzyme. The reduction of 12.5 g/L (94 mmol/L) CMA by whole cells in 6 h, at 37 °C and no requirement of external cofactor occurred with 97% conversion, 82% yield of 98% pure alcohol and a productivity of 34 mg/gwet cell weight. The results demonstrate the microbial system as a practical and efficient method for larger-scale synthesis of CMO.

  7. Redesign of the coenzyme specificity in L-lactate dehydrogenase from bacillus stearothermophilus using site-directed mutagenesis and media engineering.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, N; Ryde, U; Bülow, L

    1999-10-01

    L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus is a redox enzyme which has a strong preference for NADH over NADPH as coenzyme. To exclude NADPH from the coenzyme-binding pocket, LDH contains a conserved aspartate residue at position 52. However, this residue is probably not solely responsible for the NADH specificity. In this report we examine the possibilities of altering the coenzyme specificity of LDH by introducing a range of different point mutations in the coenzyme-binding domain. Furthermore, after choosing the mutant with the highest selectivity for NADPH, we also investigated the possibility of further altering the coenzyme specificity by adding an organic solvent to the reaction mixture. The LDH mutant, I51K:D52S, exhibited a 56-fold increased specificity to NADPH over the wild-type LDH in a reaction mixture containing 15% methanol. Furthermore, the NADPH turnover number of this mutant was increased almost fourfold as compared with wild-type LDH. To explain the altered coenzyme specificity exhibited by the D52SI51K double mutant, molecular dynamics simulations were performed.

  8. Expression in Escherichia coli of a sub-gene encoding the lipoyl and peripheral subunit-binding domains of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Hipps, D S; Perham, R N

    1992-05-01

    A sub-gene encoding the N-terminal 170 residues of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed polypeptide consists of the lipoyl domain, inter-domain linker and peripheral subunit-binding domain; these were found to have folded into their native functional conformations as judged by reductive acetylation of the lipoyl domain, limited proteolysis of the linker region and ability to bind the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase dimer. The di-domain was largely (80%) unlipoylated; a small proportion (4%) was correctly modified with lipoic acid and the remainder (16%) was aberrantly modified with octanoic acid. A polyclonal antiserum was raised that recognized both the di-domain and the individual component domains. The 400 MHz 1H-n.m.r. spectrum of the di-domain showed resonances corresponding to those seen in spectra of the lipoyl domain, plus others characteristic of amino acid residues in the flexible linker region. Further, as yet unidentified, resonances are likely to be derived from the peripheral subunit-binding domain. The existence and independent folding of the peripheral subunit-binding domain is thus confirmed and its purification in large-scale amounts for detailed structural analysis is now possible.

  9. Expression in Escherichia coli of a sub-gene encoding the lipoyl and peripheral subunit-binding domains of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D S; Perham, R N

    1992-01-01

    A sub-gene encoding the N-terminal 170 residues of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed polypeptide consists of the lipoyl domain, inter-domain linker and peripheral subunit-binding domain; these were found to have folded into their native functional conformations as judged by reductive acetylation of the lipoyl domain, limited proteolysis of the linker region and ability to bind the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase dimer. The di-domain was largely (80%) unlipoylated; a small proportion (4%) was correctly modified with lipoic acid and the remainder (16%) was aberrantly modified with octanoic acid. A polyclonal antiserum was raised that recognized both the di-domain and the individual component domains. The 400 MHz 1H-n.m.r. spectrum of the di-domain showed resonances corresponding to those seen in spectra of the lipoyl domain, plus others characteristic of amino acid residues in the flexible linker region. Further, as yet unidentified, resonances are likely to be derived from the peripheral subunit-binding domain. The existence and independent folding of the peripheral subunit-binding domain is thus confirmed and its purification in large-scale amounts for detailed structural analysis is now possible. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1590756

  10. Quantitative Analysis of X Chromosome Effects on the Activities of the Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Naohiko; Laurie-Ahlberg, Cathy C.; Wilton, Alan N.; Emigh, Ted H.

    1986-01-01

    By combining 20 X chromosomes with five autosomal backgrounds, the relative importance of these factors with respect to the activity variations of G6PD and 6PGD in Drosophila melanogaster were investigated. Analysis of variance revealed that there exist significant X chromosome, autosomal background and genetic interaction effects. The effect of the X chromosome was due mainly to the two allozymic forms of each enzyme, but some within-allozyme effects were also detected. From the estimated variance components, it was concluded that the variation attributed to the autosomal background is much larger than the variation attributed to the X chromosome, even when the effect of the allozymes is included. The segregation of the allozymes seems to account for about 10% of the total activity variation of each enzyme. The variation due to the interaction between the X chromosome and the autosomal background is much smaller than variations attributed either to the X chromosome or to the autosomal background. The interaction effect is indicated by the change of the ranking of the X chromosomes for different autosomal backgrounds. Highly significant and positive correlation between G6PD and 6PGD activities was detected. Again, the contribution of the autosomal background to the correlation was much larger than that attributed to the X chromosome. PMID:3087815

  11. The bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway does not replace glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the lack of activity of iron-sulfur cluster enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Benisch, Feline; Boles, Eckhard

    2014-02-10

    Replacement of the glycolytic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP) would result in lower ATP production and therefore a lower biomass yield is expected that would further allow higher products yields in the fermentation of sugars. To establish catabolism of glucose via the EDP in S. cerevisiae requires expression of only two additional enzyme activities, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (PGDH) and KDPG aldolase. In this work, KDPG aldolase from Escherichia coli could be successfully expressed in the yeast cytosol with very high enzyme activity. Nevertheless, simultaneous expression of KDPG aldolase and a codon optimized PGDH gene of E. coli could not replace glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway in growth experiments. It could be shown that this was due to the very low enzyme activity of PGDH. This bacterial enzyme is a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster protein. Several attempts to improve the availability of iron-sulfur clusters or iron in the yeast cells, to attract the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery to Leu1-PGDH fusion proteins or to localize the PGDH in the mitochondria did not result in improved enzyme activities. From our results we conclude that establishing functional expression of iron-sulfur cluster enzymes will be a major task for the integration of the EDP and other biochemical pathways in yeast.

  12. Phospholipids from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Card, George L.; Georgi, Carl E.; Militzer, Walter E.

    1969-01-01

    The lipids of Bacillus stearothermophilus strain 2184 were extracted with chloroform-methanol and separated into neutral lipid and three phospholipid fractions by chromatography on silicic acid columns. The phospholipids were identified by specific staining reactions on silicic acid-impregnated paper, by chromatography of alkaline and acid hydrolysis products, and by determination of acyl ester:glycerol:nitrogen:phosphorus molar ratios. The total extractable lipid was 8% of the dry weight of whole cells and consisted of 30 to 40% neutral lipid and 60 to 70% phospholipid. The phospholipid consisted of diphosphatidyl glycerol (23 to 42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (22 to 39%), and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (21 to 32%). The concentrations of diphosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol were lower in 2-hr cells than in 4- and 8-hr cells. Whole cells were fractionated by sonic treatment and differential centrifugation. The total lipid content, expressed in per cent of dry weight of each fraction was: whole protoplasts, 10%; membrane fraction, 18%; 30,000 × g particulate fraction, 22%; and 105,000 × g particulate fraction, 26%. The relative phospholipid concentrations in each fraction were about the same. As had been previously reported, none of the phospholipid was stable to alkaline hydrolysis. Images PMID:5764328

  13. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  14. Cloning, expression, and isolation of the mannitol transport protein from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Henstra, S A; Tolner, B; ten Hoeve Duurkens, R H; Konings, W N; Robillard, G T

    1996-01-01

    A mannitol phosphotransferase system (PTS) was identified in Bacillus stearothermophilus by in vitro complementation with Escherichia coli EI, HPr, and IIA(Mtl). Degenerate primers based on regions of high amino acid similarity in the E. coli and Staphylococcus carnosus EII(Mt1) were used to develop a digoxigenin-labeled probe by PCR. Using this probe, we isolated three overlapping DNA fragments totaling 7.2 kb which contain the genes mtlA, mtlR, mtlF, and mtlD, encoding the mannitol IICB,a regulator, IIA, and a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. The mtl4 gene consists of 1,413 bp coding for a 471-amino-acid protein with a calculated mass of 50.1 kDa. The amino acid sequence shows high similarity with the sequence of IICB(Mtl) of S. carnosus and the IICB part of the IICBA(Mtl)s of E. coli and B. subtilis. The enzyme could be functionally expressed in E. coli by placing it behind the strong tac promoter. The rate of thermal inactivation at 60 degrees C of B. stearothermophilus HCB(Mt1) expressed in E. coli was two times lower than that of E. coli IICB(Mtl). IICB(Mtl) in B. stearothermophilus is maximally active at 85 degrees C and thus very thermostable. The enzyme was purified on Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid resin to greater than 95% purity after six histidines were fused to the C-terminal part of the transporter. PMID:8824601

  15. Growth kinetics of Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, R.M.; Subramanian, R.; Bly, M.J.; Winter, S.; Aronson, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219, a phenol-resistant thermophile, can convert phenol to the specialty chemical catechol. The growth kinetics of this organism were studied in batch, continuous, and immobilized-cell culture. Batch growth was insensitive to pH between 6.0 and 8.0, but little growth occurred at 5.5. In continuous culture on a dilute medium supplemented with 10 mM phenol, several steady states were achieved between dilution rates of 0.25 and 1.3 h{sup -1}. Phenol degradation was found to be uncoupled from growth. Immobilized cells grew rapidly in a rich medium, but cell viability plummeted following a switch to a dilute medium supplemented with 5 mM phenol.

  16. A dehydrogenase-mediated recycling system of NADPH in plant peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, F J; Barroso, J B; Sandalio, L M; Distefano, S; Palma, J M; Lupiáñez, J A; Del Río, L A

    1998-01-01

    The presence of the two NADP-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway has been investigated in plant peroxisomes from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. Both enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH; EC 1.1.1.44), were present in the matrix of leaf peroxisomes, and their kinetic properties were studied. G6PDH and 6PGDH showed a typical Michaelis-Menten kinetic saturation curve, and had specific activities of 12.4 and 29.6 mU/mg protein, respectively. The Km values of G6PDH and 6PGDH for glucose 6-phosphate and for 6-phosphogluconate were 107.3 and 10.2 microM, respectively. Dithiothreitol did not inhibit G6PDH activity. By isoelectric focusing of peroxisomal matrices, the G6PDH activity was resolved into three isoforms with isoelectric points of 5.55, 5.30 and 4.85. The isoelectric point of peroxisomal 6PGDH was 5.10. Immunoblot analyses of peroxisomal matrix with an antibody against yeast G6PDH revealed a single cross-reactive band of 56 kDa. Post-embedment, EM immunogold labelling of G6PDH confirmed that this enzyme was localized in the peroxisomal matrices, the thylakoid membrane and matrix of chloroplasts, and the cytosol. The presence of the two oxidative enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway in plant peroxisomes implies that these organelles have the capacity to reduce NADP+ to NADPH for its re-utilization in the peroxisomal metabolism. NADPH is particularly required for the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, which has been recently demonstrated in plant peroxisomes [Jiménez, Hernández, del Río and Sevilla (1997) Plant Physiol. 114, 275-284] and represents an important antioxidant protection system against H2O2 generated in peroxisomes. PMID:9480890

  17. Crystal structure of novel NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Lokanath, Neratur K; Ohshima, Noriyasu; Takio, Koji; Shiromizu, Ikuya; Kuroishi, Chizu; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-09-30

    3-Hydroxyisobutyrate, a central metabolite in the valine catabolic pathway, is reversibly oxidized to methylmalonate semialdehyde by a specific dehydrogenase belonging to the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase family. To gain insight into the function of this enzyme at the atomic level, we have determined the first crystal structures of the 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8: holo enzyme and sulfate ion complex. The crystal structures reveal a unique tetrameric oligomerization and a bound cofactor NADP+. This bacterial enzyme may adopt a novel cofactor-dependence on NADP, whereas NAD is preferred in eukaryotic enzymes. The protomer folds into two distinct domains with open/closed interdomain conformations. The cofactor NADP+ with syn nicotinamide and the sulfate ion are bound to distinct sites located at the interdomain cleft of the protomer through an induced-fit domain closure upon cofactor binding. From the structural comparison with the crystal structure of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, another member of the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase family, it is suggested that the observed sulfate ion and the substrate 3-hydroxyisobutyrate share the same binding pocket. The observed oligomeric state might be important for the catalytic function through forming the active site involving two adjacent subunits, which seems to be conserved in the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. A kinetic study confirms that this enzyme has strict substrate specificity for 3-hydroxyisobutyrate and serine, but it cannot distinguish the chirality of the substrates. Lys165 is likely the catalytic residue of the enzyme.

  18. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  19. Genetics of thermophilic bacteria. [Bacillus stearothermophilus:a2

    SciTech Connect

    Welker, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    Organisms adapted to high temperature have evolved a variety of unique solutions to the biochemical problems imposed by this environment. Adaptation is commonly used to describe the biochemical properties of organisms which have become adapted to their environment (genetic adaptation). It can also mean the direct response-at the cellular level-of an organism to changes in temperature (physiological adaptation). Thermophilic bacilli (strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus) can exhibit a variety of biochemical adaptations in response to changes in temperature. These include changes in the composition and stability of the membrane, metabolic potential, the transport of amino acids, regulatory mechanisms, ribose methylation of tRNA, protein thermostability, and nutritional requirements. The objectives of the research were to develop efficient and reliable genetic systems to analyze and manipulate B. Stearothermophilus, and to use these systems initiate a biochemical, molecular, and genetic investigations of genes that are required for growth at high temperature.

  20. Regulation of p-nitroanisole O-demethylation in perfused rat liver. Adenine nucleotide inhibition of NADP+-dependent dehydrogenases and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, F C; Evans, R K; Reinke, L A; Thurman, R G

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion of rat livers with 10 mM-fructose or pretreatment of the rat with 6-aminonicotinamide (70 mg/kg) 6 h before perfusion decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and increased the rate of p-nitroanisole O-demethylation. This increase was accompanied by a decrease in the free [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio calculated from concentrations of substrates assumed to be in near-equilibrium with isocitrate dehydrogenase. After pretreatment with 6-aminonicotinamide the [NADP+]/[NADPH] ratio also declined. Reduction of NADP+ during mixed-function oxidation may be explained by inhibition of of one or more NADPH-generating enzymes. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and "malic" enzyme, partially purified from livers of phenobarbital-treated rats, were inhibited by ATP and ADP. Inhibitor constants of ATP for the four dehydrogenases varied considerably, ranging from 9 micrometer for "malic" enzyme to 1.85 mM for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was also inhibited by ATP (Ki 2.8 mM) and by ADP (Ki 0.9 mM), but not by AMP. Concentrations of ATP and ADP that inhibited glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the reductase were comparable with concentrations in the intact liver. Thus agents that lower intracellular ATP may accelerate rates of mixed-function oxidation by a concerted mechanism involving deinhibition of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and one or more NADPH-generating enzymes. PMID:44195

  1. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  2. Effects of steam autoclave treatment on Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    Huesca-Espitia, L C; Suvira, M; Rosenbeck, K; Korza, G; Setlow, B; Li, W; Wang, S; Li, Y-Q; Setlow, P

    2016-11-01

    To determine the mechanism of autoclave killing of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores used in biological indicators (BIs) for steam autoclave sterilization, and rates of loss of spore viability and a spore enzyme used in BIs. Spore viability, dipicolinic acid (DPA) release, nucleic acid staining, α-glucosidase activity, protein structure and mutagenesis were measured during autoclaving of G. stearothermophilus spores. Loss of DPA and increases in spore core nucleic acid staining were slower than loss of spore viability. Spore core α-glucosidase was also lost more slowly than spore viability, although soluble α-glucosidase in spore preparations was lost more rapidly. However, spores exposed to an effective autoclave sterilization lost all viability and α-glucosidase activity. Apparently killed autoclaved spores were not recovered by artificial germination in supportive media, much spore protein was denatured during autoclaving, and partially killed autoclave-treated spore preparations did not acquire mutations. These results indicate that autoclave-killed spores cannot be revived, spore killing by autoclaving is likely by protein damage, and spore core α-glucosidase activity is lost more slowly than spore viability. This work provides insight into the mechanism of autoclave killing of spores of an organism used in BIs, and that a spore enzyme in a BI is more stable to autoclaving than spore viability. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Metabolism of phenol and cresols by Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Buswell, J A

    1975-01-01

    An obligate thermophilic strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus, strain PH24, isolated from industrial sediment by elective culture, grew readily at 55 C on phenol or on one of the isomers of cresol as the major carbon source. Intact cells grown in the presence of phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, or p-cresol were induced to oxidize, without lag, these substrates together with catechol, 3-methylcatechol, and 4-methylcatechol. Cell extracts prepared from B. stearothermophilus PH24 after growth in the presence of phenol converted phenol to catechol with a concomitant uptake of 1 mol of oxygen per mol of substrate in reaction mixtures supplemented with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. These preparations also catalyzed the oxidation of o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol and of m-cresol and p-cresol to 4-methylcatechol. Enzyme activity was inhibited by 1 mM p-chloromercuribenzoate and by 0.1 mM 0-phenanthroline. Catechol and the corresponding methylcatechol intermediates were further dissimilated by cell extracts of phenol-grown cells via the meta-cleavage route to yield 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and the respective methylated derivatives. PMID:1194230

  4. NADP-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis Roots Contributes in the Mechanism of Defence against the Nitro-Oxidative Stress Induced by Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B.; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    NADPH regeneration appears to be essential in the mechanism of plant defence against oxidative stress. Plants contain several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases including isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), and malic enzyme (ME). In Arabidopsis seedlings grown under salinity conditions (100 mM NaCl) the analysis of physiological parameters, antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) and content of superoxide radical (O2   ∙−), nitric oxide (NO), and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) indicates a process of nitro-oxidative stress induced by NaCl. Among the analysed NADPH-generating dehydrogenases under salinity conditions, the NADP-ICDH showed the maximum activity mainly attributable to the root NADP-ICDH. Thus, these data provide new insights on the relevance of the NADP-ICDH which could be considered as a second barrier in the mechanism of response against the nitro-oxidative stress generated by salinity. PMID:22649311

  5. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  6. Structure of the Apo Form of Bacillus stearothermophilus Phosphofructokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, Rockann; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Bruning, John B.; Sacchettini, James C.; Reinhart, Gregory D.

    2012-02-08

    The crystal structure of the unliganded form of Bacillus stearothermophilus phosphofructokinase (BsPFK) was determined using molecular replacement to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 3U39). The apo BsPFK structure serves as the basis for the interpretation of any structural changes seen in the binary or ternary complexes. When the apo BsPFK structure is compared with the previously published liganded structures of BsPFK, the structural impact that the binding of the ligands produces is revealed. This comparison shows that the apo form of BsPFK resembles the substrate-bound form of BsPFK, a finding that differs from previous predictions.

  7. Functional characterization of the galactan utilization system of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tabachnikov, Orly; Shoham, Yuval

    2013-02-01

    Type I galactan is a pectic polysaccharide composed of β-1,4 linked units of d-galactose and is part of the main plant cell wall polysaccharides, which are the most abundant sources of renewable carbon in the biosphere. The thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 possesses an extensive system for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides, including a 9.4-kb gene cluster, ganREFGBA, which encodes galactan-utilization elements. Based on enzyme activity assays, the ganEFGBA genes, which probably constitute an operon, are induced by short galactosaccharides but not by galactose. GanA is a glycoside hydrolase family 53 β-1,4-galactanase, active on high molecular weight galactan, producing galactotetraose as the main product. Homology modelling of the active site residues suggests that the enzyme can accommodate at least eight galactose molecules (at subsites -4 to +4) in the active site. GanB is a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4 galactosaccharides into galactose. Applying both GanA and GanB on galactan resulted in the full degradation of the polymer into galactose. The ganEFG genes encode an ATP-binding cassette sugar transport system whose sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanE, was shown to bind galacto-oligosaccharides. The utilization of galactan by G. stearothermophilus involves the extracellular galactanase GanA cleaving galactan into galacto-oligosaccharides that enter the cell via a specific transport system GanEFG. The galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by the intracellular β-galactosidase GanB into galactose, which is then metabolized into UDP-glucose via the Leloir pathway by the galKET gene products. Nucleotide sequence data have been deposited in the GenBank database under the accession number JF327803. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  8. Canine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: erythrocytic defects--osmotic fragility, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J; Forsyth, G W; Olexson, D W; Thatte, H S; Addis, P B

    1984-01-01

    Two dogs were diagnosed as malignant hyperthermia susceptible based on increased susceptibility (P less than 0.001) of biopsied muscle to caffeine-induced contracture. Erythrocytes from malignant hyperthermia and normal dogs were then examined for an antioxidant system deficiency. Values for serum muscle enzymes, reticulocytes and corpuscular hemoglobin were mildly elevated. Osmotic fragility was increased: hemolysis occurred at a NaCl concentration 10 mM higher than for normal dogs (P less than 0.001). A 35% glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (P less than 0.001) with a 40% compensatory increase (P less than 0.01) in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity was found. The membrane Ca2+-activated ATPase activity was abnormal: 100% increased with a 40% decreased Arrhenius activation energy (P less than 0.005) and increased thermostability. A 40% increased intracellular accumulation of total Ca2+ occurred in response to in vitro energy depletion in erythrocytes from one malignant hyperthermia dog (P less than 0.01). The multifactorial pattern of inheritance and the broad spectrum of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility are proposed to result from an antioxidant system deficit unmasking or aggravating an intrinsic muscle membrane anomaly. An individual from a family with a history of malignant hyperthermia or unexplained anesthetic death should be considered malignant hyperthermia susceptible if erythrocyte osmotic fragility is abnormal and there is a mild, unexplained elevation in serum creatine kinase. PMID:6150753

  9. Bacillus stearothermophilus contains a plasmid-borne gene for alpha-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, J R

    1983-01-01

    The gene for thermostable alpha-amylase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each alpha-amylase-producing colony contained at least a 9.7-kilobase-pair (kb) chimeric plasmid composed of the vector pBR322 and a common 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. B. stearothermophilus contains four plasmids with sizes from 12 kb to over 108 kb. Restriction endonuclease analysis of these naturally occurring plasmids showed they also contain a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. Cloning experiments with the four plasmids yielded alpha-amylase-producing E. coli that contained the same 9.7-kb chimeric plasmid. Restriction endonuclease analysis and further recombinant DNA experiments identified a 26-kb plasmid that contains the gene for alpha-amylase. A spontaneous mutant of B. stearothermophilus unable to produce alpha-amylase was missing the 26-kb plasmid but contained a 20-kb plasmid. A 6-kb deletion within the region of the 5.4-kb HindIII fragment yielded the 20-kb plasmid unable to code for alpha-amylase. A nick-translated probe for the alpha-amylase coding region did not hybridize to either plasmid or total cellular DNA from this mutant strain of B. stearothermophilus. These results demonstrate the gene for alpha-amylase is located exclusively on a 26-kb plasmid in B. stearothermophilus with no genetic counterpart present on the chromosome. Images PMID:6193526

  10. Purification and characterization of alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Okamoto, M; Nishibori, M; Ichimura, M; Sakiyama, J; Endo, H

    1999-06-01

    Soluble alkaline phosphatase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus was purified by a combination of chromatographic methods, and its properties were examined. The purified enzyme had specific activity of 4.43 micromol p-nitrophenol/min per mg of protein and seemed to be a single band on SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of 32 kDa. Its apparent Km for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was 1.114 mM. The enzyme exhibited an optimal pH of approx. 9.0 and exhibited its highest activity at 60-70 degrees C. It also showed a bivalent cation requirement for activity, with maximal enhancement in the presence of Mg2+. In addition, significant thermal stability was observed in comparison with counterparts from mesophiles. Its partial N-terminal sequence was T1FSIVAFDPATGELGIAVQ19 as estimated by automated Edman degradation method. A search on the SwissProt database did not reveal any similar protein sequences from other sources.

  11. Reproduction of Bacillus stearothermophilus as a Function of Temperature and Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yayanos, A. Aristides; Van Boxtel, R.; Dietz, Allan S.

    1983-01-01

    The colony-forming ability and the rate of reproduction of Bacillus stearothermophilus were determined as a function of temperature and pressure. Colonies were formed between 39 and 70°C at atmospheric pressure and between 54 and 67°C at 45 MPa. Colonies did not form at 55.9 MPa. The rate of reproduction in broth cultures decreased with increasing pressure at all temperatures. The rate of reproduction diminished rapidly with pressure above 10.4 MPa. Therefore, increased hydrostatic pressure was not sufficient to enable B. stearothermophilus to function beyond the temperature limiting growth and reproduction at atmospheric pressure, and B. stearothermophilus should grow in naturally or artificially warmed regions of the deep sea, where the pressure is less than approximately 50 MPa, although growth rates would be low above 10 MPa. PMID:16346444

  12. Cold plasma technology: bactericidal effects on Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angela D; McCombs, Gayle B; Akan, Tamer; Hynes, Wayne; Laroussi, Mounir; Tolle, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    Cold plasma, also known as Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (LTAPP) is a novel technology consisting of neutral and charged particles, including free radicals, which can be used to destroy or inactivate microorganisms. Research has been conducted regarding the effect of cold plasma on gram-positive bacteria; however, there is limited research regarding its ability to inactivate the spore-formers Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus. The purpose of this study was to determine if cold plasma inactivates G. stearothermophilus and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores. Nine hundred eighty-one samples were included in this study (762 experimental and 219 controls). Experimental samples were exposed indirectly or directly to cold plasma, before plating and incubating for 16 hours. Control samples were not exposed to cold plasma. The percentage-kill and cell number reductions were calculated from Colony Forming Units (CFU). Data were statistically analyzed at the .05 level using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis and Tukey's tests. There was a statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells receiving indirect and direct exposure (p=0.0001 and p=0.0013, respectively), as well as for B. cereus vegetative cells and spores (p=0.0001 for direct and indirect). There was no statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus spores receiving indirect exposure (p=0.7208) or direct exposure (p=0.0835). Results demonstrate that cold plasma exposure effectively kills G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores; however, G. stearothermophilus spores were not significantly inactivated.

  13. Analysis of the tryptophanase expression in Symbiobacterium thermophilum in a coculture with Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-O; Takano, Hideaki; Yamabe, Tomoya; Tamazawa, Satoshi; Ikemura, Hiroka; Ohishi, Takanori; Matsuda, Tohyo; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    The tryptophanase-positive Symbiobacterium thermophilum is a free-living syntrophic bacterium that grows effectively in a coculture with Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Our studies have shown that S. thermophilum growth depends on the high CO2 and low O2 condition established by the precedent growth of G. stearothermophilus. The use of an anoxic atmosphere containing high CO2 allows S. thermophilum to grow independently of G. stearothermophilus, but the cellular yield is ten times lower than that achieved in the coculture. In this study, we characterized the coculture-dependent expression and activity of tryptophanase in S. thermophilum. S. thermophilum cells accumulated a marked amount of indole in a coculture with G. stearothermophilus, but not in the bacterium's pure culture irrespective of the addition of tryptophan. S. thermophilum cells accumulated indole in its pure culture consisting of conditioned medium (medium supplied with culture supernatant of G. stearothermophilus). Proteomic analysis identified the protein specifically produced in the S. thermophilum cells grown in conditioned medium, which was a tryptophanase encoded by tna2 (STH439). An attempt to isolate the tryptophanase-inducing component from the culture supernatant of G. stearothermophilus was unsuccessful, but we did discover that the indole accumulation occurs when 10 mM bicarbonate is added to the medium. RT-PCR analysis showed that the addition of bicarbonate stimulated transcription of tna2. The transcriptional start site, identified within the tna2 promoter, was preceded by the -24 and -12 consensus sequences specified by an alternative sigma factor, σ(54). The evidence suggests that the transcription of some genes involved in amino acid metabolism is σ(54)-dependent, and that a bacterial enhancer-binding protein containing a PAS domain controls the transcription under the presence of high levels of bicarbonate.

  14. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A method of increasing test range and accuracy of bioindicators: Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Gunnel

    2003-01-01

    Spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus are very sensitive to changes in temperature. When validating sterilizing processes, the most common bioindicator (BI) is spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC12980 and ATCC7953 with about 10(6) spores /BI and a D121-value of about 2 minutes in water. Because these spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus do not survive at a F0-value above 12 minutes, it has not been possible to evaluate the agreement between the biological F-value (F(BIO)) and physical measurements (time and temperature) when the physical F0-value exceeds that limit. However, it has been proven that glycerin substantially increases the heat resistance of the spores, and it is possible to utilize that property when manufacturing BIs suitable to use in processes with longer sterilization time or high temperature (above 121 degrees C). By the method described, it is possible to make use of the sensitivity and durability of Geobacillus stearothermophilus' spores when glycerin has increased both test range and accuracy. Experience from years of development and validation work with the use of the highly sensitive glycerin-water-spore-suspension sensor (GWS-sensor) is reported. Validation of the steam sterilization process at high temperature has been possible with the use of GWS-sensors. It has also been shown that the spores in suspension keep their characteristics for a period of 19 months when stored cold (8 degrees C).

  16. Study of Two Bacteriophages of Bacillus stearothermophilus Strain NCA1518 1

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, R. D.; Fields, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Studies of bacteriophages GH5 and GH8 of Bacillus stearothermophilus strain NCA1518 revealed that their properties were sufficiently different from known phages and from each other to indicate that each was a different entity, although no major deviation was demonstrated. PMID:5014935

  17. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. (a) α-Amylase enzyme preparation is obtained from the...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. (a) α-Amylase enzyme preparation is obtained from the...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. (a) α-Amylase enzyme preparation is obtained from the...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. (a) α-Amylase enzyme preparation is obtained from the...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus. 184.1012 Section 184.1012 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  2. Substrate-Ligand Interactions in Geobacillus Stearothermophilus Nitric Oxide Synthase†

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mariam; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Crane, Brian R.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2012-01-01

    Ntric oxide synthase (NOS) generates NO via a sequential two-step reaction, L-arginine (L-Arg) → N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) → L-citrulline + NO. Each step of the reaction follows a distinct mechanism defined by the chemical environment introduced by each substrate bound to the heme active site. The dioxygen complex of the NOS enzyme from a thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (gsNOS), is unusually stable; hence it provides a unique model for the studies of the mechanistic differences between the two steps of the NOS reaction. By using CO as a structural probe, it was found that gsNOS exhibits two conformations in the absence of substrate, as indicated by the presence of two sets of the νFe-CO/νC-O modes in the resonance Raman spectra. In the νFe-CO versus νC-O inverse correlation plot, one set of the data falls on the correlation line characterized by mammalian NOSs (mNOS), whereas the other set of the data lies on a new correlation line defined by a bacterial NOS from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS), reflecting a difference in the proximal Fe-Cys bond strength in the two conformers of gsNOS. The addition of L-Arg stabilizes the conformer associated with the mNOS correlation line, whereas NOHA stabilizes the conformer associated with the bsNOS correlation line, although both substrates introduce a positive electrostatic potential to the distal heme pocket. To assess how substrate-binding affects the Fe-Cys bond strength, the frequency of the Fe-Cys stretching mode of gsNOS was monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy with 363.8 nm excitation. In the substrate-free form, the Fe-Cys stretching mode was detected at 342.5 cm−1 similar to that of bsNOS. The binding of L-Arg and NOHA brings about a small decrease and increase in the Fe-Cys stretching frequency, respectively. The implication of these unique structural features on the oxygen chemistry of NOS is discussed. PMID:18956884

  3. Substrate-ligand interactions in Geobacillus stearothermophilus nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Mariam; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Crane, Brian R; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2008-11-25

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) generates NO via a sequential two-step reaction [l-arginine (l-Arg) --> N-hydroxy-l-arginine (NOHA) --> l-citrulline + NO]. Each step of the reaction follows a distinct mechanism defined by the chemical environment introduced by each substrate bound to the heme active site. The dioxygen complex of the NOS enzyme from a thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (gsNOS), is unusually stable; hence, it provides a unique model for the studies of the mechanistic differences between the two steps of the NOS reaction. By using CO as a structural probe, we found that gsNOS exhibits two conformations in the absence of substrate, as indicated by the presence of two sets of nu(Fe-CO)/nu(C-O) modes in the resonance Raman spectra. In the nu(Fe-CO) versus nu(C-O) inverse correlation plot, one set of data falls on the correlation line characterized by mammalian NOSs (mNOS), whereas the other set of data lies on a new correlation line defined by a bacterial NOS from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS), reflecting a difference in the proximal Fe-Cys bond strength in the two conformers of gsNOS. The addition of l-Arg stabilizes the conformer associated with the mNOS correlation line, whereas NOHA stabilizes the conformer associated with the bsNOS correlation line, although both substrates introduce a positive electrostatic potential into the distal heme pocket. To assess how substrate binding affects Fe-Cys bond strength, the frequency of the Fe-Cys stretching mode of gsNOS was monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy with 363.8 nm excitation. In the substrate-free form, the Fe-Cys stretching mode was detected at 342.5 cm(-1), similar to that of bsNOS. The binding of l-Arg and NOHA brings about a small decrease and increase in the Fe-Cys stretching frequency, respectively. The implication of these unique structural features with respect to the oxygen chemistry of NOS is discussed.

  4. Solution structure of the HU protein from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Vis, H; Mariani, M; Vorgias, C E; Wilson, K S; Kaptein, R; Boelens, R

    1995-12-08

    The histone-like protein HU from Bacillus stearothermophilus is a dimer with a molecular mass of 19.5 kDa that is capable of bending DNA. An X-ray structure has been determined, but no structure could be established for a large part of the supposed DNA-binding beta-arms. Using distance and dihedral constraints derived from triple-resonance NMR data of a 13C/15N doubly-labelled HU protein 49 distance geometry structures were calculated, which were refined by means of restrained Molecular Dynamics. From this set a total of 25 refined structures were selected having low constraint energy and few constraint violations. The ensemble of 25 structures display a root-mea-square co-ordinate deviation of 0.36 A with respect to the average structure, calculated over the backbone heavy atoms of residues 2 to 54 and 75 to 90 (and residues 2' to 54' and 75' to 90' of the second monomer). The structure of the core is very similar to that observed in the X-ray structure, with a pairwise r.m.s.d. of 1.06 A. The structure of the beta-hairpin arm contains a double flip-over at the prolines in the two strands of the beta-arm. Strong 15N-NH heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that the beta-arm and especially the tip is flexible. This explains the disorder observed in the solution and X-ray structures of the beta-arm, in respect of the core of the protein. Overlayed onto itself the beta-arm is better defined, with an r.m.s.d. of 1.0 A calculated over the backbone heavy atoms of residues 54 to 59 and 69 to 74. The tip of the arm adopts a well-defined 4:6 beta-hairpin conformation similar to the iron co-ordinating beta-arms of rubredoxin.

  5. Differential response of NADP-dehydrogenases and carbon metabolism in leaves and roots of two durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars (Karim and Azizi) with different sensitivities to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bouthour, Donia; Kalai, Tawba; Chaffei, Haouari C; Gouia, Houda; Corpas, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) is a common Mediterranean species of considerable agronomic importance. Salinity is one of the major threats to sustainable agricultural production mainly because it limits plant productivity. After exposing the Karim and Azizi durum wheat cultivars, which are of agronomic significance in Tunisia, to 100mM NaCl salinity, growth parameters (dry weight and length), proline content and chlorophylls were evaluated in their leaves and roots. In addition, we analyzed glutathione content and key enzymatic activities, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH-generating system. The sensitivity index indicates that cv Karim was more tolerant to salinity than cv Azizi. This higher tolerance was corroborated at the biochemical level, as cv Karim showed a greater capacity to accumulate proline, especially in leaves, while the enzyme activities studied were differentially regulated in both organs, with NADP-ICDH being the only activity to be unaffected in all organs. In summary, the data indicate that higher levels of proline accumulation and the differential responses of some key enzymes involved in the carbon metabolism and NADPH regeneration contribute to the salinity tolerance mechanism and lead to increased biomass accumulation in cv Karim.

  6. Enzymatic Basis for Differentiation of Rhizobium into Fast- and Slow-Growing Groups

    PubMed Central

    Drets, G. Martinez-De; Arias, A.

    1972-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and other enzymes related to carbohydrate metabolism were studied in rhizobia. A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was detected in strains of the fast-growing group of Rhizobium but not in strains of the slow-growing group. An enzymatic differentiation of rhizobia was established. PMID:4400417

  7. INCIPIENT GERMINATION IN HEAVY SUSPENSIONS OF SPORES OF BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS AT SUBMINIMAL GROWTH TEMPERATURES

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Harold R.; Pallansch, Michael J.

    1963-01-01

    Curran, Harold R. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.), and Michael J. Pallansch. Incipient germination in heavy suspensions of spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus at subminimal growth temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 86:911–918. 1963.—By use of spore (plate) counts and permeability to stain, labilization was followed periodically in heavy suspensions of washed Bacillus stearothermophilus 1518 spores incubated at different temperatures. Although vegetative proliferation did not occur below 38 C, incipient germination was rapid down to 20 C and much slower and incomplete at 14 C. Dilution of the suspension materially reduced the degree and rate of labilization. The degree of washing and use of deionized water had no appreciable influence upon early development of the spores. The results are discussed from the point of view of the possible origin and nature of the germination stimulant. Images PMID:14080801

  8. Thermal Adaptation of Dihydrofolate Reductase from the Moderate Thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The thermal melting temperature of dihydrofolate reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsDHFR) is ∼30 °C higher than that of its homologue from the psychrophile Moritella profunda. Additional proline residues in the loop regions of BsDHFR have been proposed to enhance the thermostability of BsDHFR, but site-directed mutagenesis studies reveal that these proline residues contribute only minimally. Instead, the high thermal stability of BsDHFR is partly due to removal of water-accessible thermolabile residues such as glutamine and methionine, which are prone to hydrolysis or oxidation at high temperatures. The extra thermostability of BsDHFR can be obtained by ligand binding, or in the presence of salts or cosolvents such as glycerol and sucrose. The sum of all these incremental factors allows BsDHFR to function efficiently in the natural habitat of G. stearothermophilus, which is characterized by temperatures that can reach 75 °C. PMID:24730604

  9. Production and characterization of a mesophilic lipase isolated from Bacillus stearothermophilus AB-1.

    PubMed

    Abada, Emad Abd El-Moniem

    2008-04-15

    Using Bacillus stearothermophilus AB-1 isolated from air, the production of lipase was attempted along with its purification and characterization studies. When different carbon and nitrogen sources were supplemented in the culture medium, xylose, tryptophan, alanine, phenylalanine and potassium nitrate were found to be the best. During cultivation, the strain secreted most of its lipase content after 48 h. In particular, the lipase produced in the culture broth showed 300 U mL(-1) when cultivated at optimal temperature and pH of 35 degrees C and 7.5, respectively. The enzyme was purified using 60% ammonium sulfate precipitation and sephadex G200 column chromatography. The enzyme was stable up to 40 degrees C and in the range of pH 7-8. This research reports for the first time the characterization of mesophilic lipase from Bacillus stearothermophilus AB-1 isolated from air.

  10. Extraction of Copper from Malanjkhand Low-Grade Ore by Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sradhanjali; Sukla, Lala Behari; Mishra, Baroda Kanta

    2011-10-01

    Thermophilic bacteria are actively prevalent in hot water springs. Their potential to grow and sustain at higher temperatures makes them exceptional compare to other microorganism. The present study was initiated to isolate, identify and determine the feasibility of extraction of copper using thermophilic heterotrophic bacterial strain. Bacillus stearothermophilus is a thermophilic heterotrophic bacterium isolated from hot water spring, Atri, Orissa, India. This bacterium was adapted to low-grade chalcopyrite ore and its efficiency to solubilize copper from Malanjkhand low-grade ore was determined. The low-grade copper ore contains 0.27% Cu, in which the major copper-bearing mineral is chalcopyrite associated with other minerals present as minor phase. Variation in parameters such as pulp-density and temperatures were studied. After 30 days of incubation, it was found that Bacillus stearothermophilus solubilize copper up to 81.25% at pH 6.8 at 60°C.

  11. Isolation of Glucocardiolipins from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Beckedorf, Anke I.; Scheberl, Andrea; Zayni, Sonja; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-substituted cardiolipins account for about 4 mol% of total phospholipid extracted from exponentially grown cells of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a. Individual glucocardiolipin species exhibited differences in fatty acid substitution, with iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0 prevailing. The compounds were purified to homogeneity by a novel protocol and precharacterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:12426359

  12. Effect of storage temperature on the lag time of Geobacillus stearothermophilus individual spores.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Aguirre, Juan S; Lianou, Alexandra; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2017-10-01

    The lag times (λ) of Geobacillus stearothermophilus single spores were studied at different storage temperatures ranging from 45 to 59 °C using the Bioscreen C method. A significant variability of λ was observed among individual spores at all temperatures tested. The storage temperature affected both the position and the spread of the λ distributions. The minimum mean value of λ (i.e. 10.87 h) was observed at 55 °C, while moving away from this temperature resulted in an increase for both the mean and standard deviation of λ. A Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI) was fitted to the reverse mean λ, and the estimated values for the cardinal parameters Tmin, Tmax, Topt and the optimum mean λ of G. stearothermophilus were found to be 38.1, 64.2, 53.6 °C and 10.3 h, respectively. To interpret the observations, a probabilistic growth model for G. stearothermophilus individual spores, taking into account λ variability, was developed. The model describes the growth of a population, initially consisting of N0 spores, over time as the sum of cells in each of the N0 imminent subpopulations originating from a single spore. Growth simulations for different initial contamination levels showed that for low N0 the number of cells in the population at any time is highly variable. An increase in N0 to levels exceeding 100 spores results in a significant decrease of the above variability and a shorter λ of the population. Considering that the number of G. stearothermophilus surviving spores in the final product is usually very low, the data provided in this work can be used to evaluate the probability distribution of the time-to-spoilage and enable decision-making based on the "acceptable level of risk". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A thermostable, sequence-specific restriction endonuclease from Bacillus stearothermophilus: BstPI.

    PubMed Central

    Pugatsch, T; Weber, H

    1979-01-01

    A restriction endonuclease, BstPI, was purified from a strain of B. stearothermophilus, and its cleavage specificity was determined. The enzyme cleaves at palindromic sites of the general structure: (Formula: see text) where N.N' can be any base pair. It produces phosphorylated 5'-termini which are single stranded over a length of 5 nucleotides. Ends generated by cleavage with BstPI can be rejoined by DNA ligase. Images PMID:503858

  14. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  15. Folding domains and intramolecular ionic interactions of lysine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J M; Perham, R N

    1977-01-01

    1. Treatment with methyl acetimidate was used to probe the topography of several tetrameric glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases, in particular the holoenzymes from rabbit muscle and Bacillus stearothermophilus. During the course of the reaction with the rabbit muscle enzyme, the number of amino groups fell rapidly from the starting value of 27 per subunit to a value of approx. five per subunit. This number could be lowered further to values between one and two per subunit by a second treatment with methyl acetimidate. The enzyme remained tetrameric throughout and retained 50% of its initial catalytic activity at the end of the experiment. 2. Use of methyl [1-14C]acetimidate and small-scale methods of protein chemistry showed that only one amino group per subunit, that of lysine-306, was completely unavailable for reaction with imido ester in the native enzyme. This results is consistent with the structure of the highly homologous glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of lobster muscle deduced from X-ray-crystallographic analysis, since lysine-306 can be seen to form an intrachain ion-pair with aspartic acid-241 in the hydrophobic environment of a subunit-subunit interface. 3. Several other amino groups in the rabbit muscle enzyme that reacted only slowly with the reagent were also identified chemically. These were found to be located entirely in the C-terminal half of the polypeptides chain, which comprises a folding domain associated with catalytic activity and subunit contact in the three-dimensional structure. Slow reaction of these 'surface' amino groups with methyl acetimidate is attributed to intramolecular ionic interactions of the amino groups with neighbouring side-chain carboxyl groups, a conclusion that is compatible with the reported three-dimensional structure and with the dependence of the reaction of ionic stength. 4. Very similar results were obtained with the enzymes from B. stearothermophilus and from ox muscle and ox liver, supporting

  16. Gene cloning, sequence analysis, purification, and characterization of a thermostable aminoacylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Sakanyan, V; Desmarez, L; Legrain, C; Charlier, D; Mett, I; Kochikyan, A; Savchenko, A; Boyen, A; Falmagne, P; Pierard, A

    1993-01-01

    A genomic DNA fragment encoding aminoacylase activity of the eubacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus was cloned into Escherichia coli. Transformants expressing aminoacylase activity were selected by their ability to complement E. coli mutants defective in acetylornithine deacetylase activity, the enzyme that converts N-acetylornithine to ornithine in the arginine biosynthetic pathway. The 2.3-kb cloned fragment has been entirely sequenced. Analysis of the sequence revealed two open reading frames, one of which encoded the aminoacylase. B. stearothermophilus aminoacylase, produced in E. coli, was purified to near homogeneity in three steps, one of which took advantage of the intrinsic thermostability of the enzyme. The enzyme exists as homotetramer of 43-kDa subunits as shown by cross-linking experiments. The deacetylating capacity of purified aminoacylase varies considerably depending on the nature of the amino acid residue in the substrate. The enzyme hydrolyzes N-acyl derivatives of aromatic amino acids most efficiently. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of B. stearothermophilus aminoacylase with those of eubacterial acetylornithine deacylase, succinyldiaminopimelate desuccinylase, carboxypeptidase G2, and eukaryotic aminoacylase I suggests a common origin for these enzymes. Images PMID:8285691

  17. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that ...

  19. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL−1 at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg−1. The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0–8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t 1/2) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  20. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL(-1) at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg(-1). The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0-8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t₁/₂) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification.

  1. Biotransformation of 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides by immobilized Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Eliana C; Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and green bioprocess to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides using thermophilic bacteria is herein reported. Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT 43 showed a conversion rate of 90 and 83% at 2 h to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside and 2,6-diaminopurine riboside, respectively. The selected biocatalyst was successfully stabilized in an agarose matrix and used to produce up to 23.4 g of 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside in 240 h of process. These nucleoside analogues can be used as prodrug precursors or in antisense oligonucleotide synthesis.

  2. ATPase activity measurement of DNA replicative helicase from Bacillus stearothermophilus by malachite green method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mu; Wang, Ganggang

    2016-09-15

    The DnaB helicase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (DnaBBst) was a model protein for studying the bacterial DNA replication. In this work, a non-radioactive method for measuring ATPase activity of DnaBBst helicase was described. The working parameters and conditions were optimized. Furthermore, this method was applied to investigate effects of DnaG primase, ssDNA and helicase loader protein (DnaI) on ATPase activity of DnaBBst. Our results showed this method was sensitive and efficient. Moreover, it is suitable for the investigation of functional interaction between DnaB and related factors.

  3. Sequence of tRNALeu CmAA from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Pixa, G; Dirheimer, G; Keith, G

    1983-04-29

    The primary structure of Bacillus stearothermophilus tRNALeu was determined and found to be :pGCCGAUGs4UGGCGGAAUDGGCAGm1ACGCGCACGACUCmAAms2i6AA psi CGUGUGGGCUUUGCCCGUGUGGGT psi CGACUCCCACCAUCGGCACCA. The molecule has a large extraloop and contains only 8 minor nucleotides. There is a G at position 21 like in all other sequenced bacterial tRNAsLeu.m1A is in position 22, just before the D stem like in several other procaryotic tRNAs. The anticodon is CmAA and is adjacent to a ms2i6A in the 3'-direction.

  4. Cadmium Ion Biosorption by the Thermophilic Bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and G. thermocatenulatus

    PubMed Central

    Hetzer, Adrian; Daughney, Christopher J.; Morgan, Hugh W.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports surface complexation models (SCMs) for quantifying metal ion adsorption by thermophilic microorganisms. In initial cadmium ion toxicity tests, members of the genus Geobacillus displayed the highest tolerance to CdCl2 (as high as 400 to 3,200 μM). The thermophilic, gram-positive bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and G. thermocatenulatus were selected for further electrophoretic mobility, potentiometric titration, and Cd2+ adsorption experiments to characterize Cd2+ complexation by functional groups within and on the cell wall. Distinct one-site SCMs described the extent of cadmium ion adsorption by both studied Geobacillus sp. strains over a range of pH values and metal/bacteria concentration ratios. The results indicate that a functional group with a deprotonation constant pK value of approximately 3.8 accounts for 66% and 80% of all titratable sites for G. thermocatenulatus and G. stearothermophilus, respectively, and is dominant in Cd2+ adsorption reactions. The results suggest a different type of functional group may be involved in cadmium biosorption for both thermophilic strains investigated here, compared to previous reports for mesophilic bacteria. PMID:16751511

  5. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  6. Die another day: Fate of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are recognized as one of the most wet-heat resistant among aerobic spore-forming bacteria and are responsible for 35% of canned food spoilage after incubation at 55 °C. The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the fate of heat-treated survivor spores of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 in growth-preventing environment. G. stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated at four different conditions to reach one or two decimal reductions. Heat-treated spores were stored in nutrient broth at different temperatures and pH under growth-preventing conditions. Spore survival during storage was evaluated by count plating over a period of months. Results reveal that G. stearothermophilus spores surviving heat treatment lose their viability during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Two different subpopulations were observed during non-thermal inactivation. They differed according to the level of their resistance to storage stress, and the proportion of each subpopulation can be modulated by heat treatment conditions. Finally, tolerance to storage stress under growth-preventing conditions increases at refrigerated temperature and neutral pH regardless of heat treatment conditions. Such results suggest that spore inactivation due to heat treatment could be completed by storage under growth-preventing conditions.

  7. Bacterial metabolites from intra- and inter-species influencing thermotolerance: the case of Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Govea, Mayra Alejandra; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2016-11-28

    Bacterial metabolites with communicative functions could provide protection against stress conditions to members of the same species. Yet, information remains limited about protection provided by metabolites in Bacillus cereus and inter-species. This study investigated the effect of extracellular compounds derived from heat shocked (HS) and non-HS cultures of B. cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the thermotolerance of non-HS vegetative and sporulating B. cereus. Cultures of B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus were subjected to HS (42 or 65 °C respectively for 30 min) or non-HS treatments. Cells and supernatants were separated, mixed in a combined array, and then exposed to 50 °C for 60 min and viable cells determined. For spores, D values (85 and 95 °C) were evaluated after 120 h. In most cases, supernatants from HS B. cereus cultures added to non-HS B. cereus cells caused their thermotolerance to increase (D 50 12.2-51.9) when compared to supernatants from non-HS cultures (D 50 7.4-21.7). While the addition of supernatants from HS and non-HS G. stearothermophilus cultures caused the thermotolerance of non-HS cells from B. cereus to decrease initially (D 50 3.7-7.1), a subsequent increase was detected in most cases (D 50 18-97.7). In most cases, supernatants from sporulating G. stearothermophilus added to sporulating cells of B. cereus caused the thermotolerance of B. cereus 4810 spores to decline, whereas that of B. cereus 14579 increased. This study clearly shows that metabolites in supernatants from either the same or different species (such as G. stearothermophilus) influence the thermotolerance of B. cereus.

  8. The effect of bioindicator preparation and storage on thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; Ishii, Marina; Machoshvili, Irene Alexeevna; Marques, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    Paper strips inoculated with spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 were conventionally dried (lot 1) and lyophilized (lot 2); stored in defined environments of 32 and 86% relative humidity at 10, 25 and 33 degrees C for 210 d; and submitted to moist heat treatments at 121 degrees C. A significant decrease in thermal resistance from initial starting levels was found for lyophilized bioindicators stored at 86% relative humidity. The respective average D121 degrees C values were 1.55+/-0.05 and 1.37+/-0.10 min for lyophilized bioindicators stored at 32 and 86% relative humidity; and 1.65+/-0.15 min and 1.57+/-0.11 min for dried bioindicators stored in the same environments.

  9. Improving thermal and detergent stability of Bacillus stearothermophilus neopullulanase by rational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Ece, Selin; Evran, Serap; Janda, Jan-Oliver; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-06-01

    Neopullulanase, a glycosyl hydrolase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (bsNpl), is a potentially valuable enzyme for starch and detergent industries. However, as the protein is not active at elevated temperatures and high surfactant concentrations, we aimed to increase its stability by rational enzyme design. Nine potentially destabilizing cavities were identified in the crystal structure of the enzyme. Based on computational predictions, these cavities were filled by residues with bulkier side chains. The five Asp46Glu, Val239Leu, Val404Leu, Ser407Thr and Ala566Leu exchanges resulted in a drastic stabilization of bsNpl against inactivation by heat and detergents. The catalytic activity of the variants was identical to the wild-type enzyme.

  10. Characteristic views of E. coli and B. stearothermophilus 30S ribosomal subunits in the electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Stöffler-Meilicke, M

    1985-01-01

    Large sets of electron microscopic images of the 30S ribosomal subunits of Bacillus stearothermophilus (914 molecules) and Escherichia coli (422 molecules) were analysed with image processing techniques. Using computer alignment and a new multivariate statistical classification scheme, three predominant views of the subunit were found for both species. These views, which together account for approximately 90% of the population of images, were determined to a reproducible resolution of up to 1.7 nm, thus elucidating many new structural details. The angular spread of the molecular orientations around the three main stable positions is remarkably small (less than 8 degrees). Some of the current models for the small ribosomal subunit are incompatible with our new results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3908096

  11. Relief of Casein Inhibition of Bacillus stearothermophilus by Iron, Calcium, and Magnesium1

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, D. H.; Busta, F. F.; Warren, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus strain NCA 1518 Smooth in Dextrose Tryptone Agar (DTA) was inhibited by sodium caseinate. Binding studies indicated that sodium caseinate, when present in DTA, had the capacity to effect an iron deficiency which could cause inhibition of growth. Additions of essential cations, iron (1 mM), calcium (5 mM), magnesium (10 mM), or hydrogen ion (pH 5.7), relieved inhibition. Responses to and interactions among these relief factors were analyzed statistically. Equations were fitted to the data and were used to estimate responses to all treatment combinations within the ranges tested. Results from these studies indicated that calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen ion acted by decreasing the binding capacity of the protein for iron, rendering this metal available for metabolic needs. Evidence was obtained that ferrous rather than ferric iron was the limiting factor in DTA containing sodium caseinate. PMID:5694503

  12. Evaluation of a Bacillus stearothermophilus tube test as a screening tool for anticoccidial residues in poultry.

    PubMed

    Shitandi, Anakalo; Oketch, Aila; Mahungu, Symon

    2006-06-01

    A Bacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis C953 tube test was evaluated for its ability in detecting the residue of selected anticoccidial drugs in poultry, specially sulfamethazine, furazolidone, and amprolium. Various concentrations of each drug were injected into chicken liver and kidney tissues and these tissues were tested to determine the drug detection limits for each drug. The detection limit was defined as the drug concentration at which 95 % of the test results were interpreted as positive. The limits of detection in liver tissue were 0.35 microgram/ml for furazolidone, 0.70 microgram/ml for sulfamethazine and 7.80 microgram/ml for amprolium. In kidney tissues, they were 0.30 microgram/ml for furazolidone, 0.54 microgram/ml for sulfamethazine, and 7.6 microgram/ml for amprolium. It was concluded that this tube test could be used to screen for the residue of these three drugs in poultry.

  13. Evaluation of a Bacillus stearothermophilus tube test as a screening tool for anticoccidial residues in poultry

    PubMed Central

    Oketch, Aila; Mahungu, Symon

    2006-01-01

    A Bacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis C953 tube test was evaluated for its ability in detecting the residue of selected anticoccidial drugs in poultry, specically sulfamethazine, furazolidone, and amprolium. Various concentrations of each drug were injected into chicken liver and kidney tissues and these tissues were tested to determine the drug detection limits for each drug. The detection limit was defined as the drug concentration at which 95% of the test results were interpreted as positive. The limits of detection in liver tissue were 0.35 µg/ml for furazolidone, 0.70 µg/ml for sulfamethazine and 7.80 µg/ml for amprolium. In kidney tissues, they were 0.30 µg/ml for furazolidone, 0.54 µg/ml for sulfamethazine, and 7.6 µg/ml for amprolium. It was concluded that this tube test could be used to screen for the residue of these three drugs in poultry. PMID:16645344

  14. Bacillus stearothermophilus Neopullulanase Selective Hydrolysis of Amylose to Maltose in the Presence of Amylopectin

    PubMed Central

    Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kazuhisa; Takata, Hiroki; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The specificity of Bacillus stearothermophilus TRS40 neopullulanase toward amylose and amylopectin was analyzed. Although this neopullulanase completely hydrolyzed amylose to produce maltose as the main product, it scarcely hydrolyzed amylopectin. The molecular mass of amylopectin was decreased by only one order of magnitude, from approximately 108 to 107 Da. Furthermore, this neopullulanase selectively hydrolyzed amylose when starch was used as a substrate. This phenomenon, efficient hydrolysis of amylose but not amylopectin, was also observed with cyclomaltodextrinase from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain A2-5a and maltogenic amylase from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 27811. These three enzymes hydrolyzed cyclomaltodextrins and amylose much faster than pullulan. Other amylolytic enzymes, such as bacterial saccharifying α-amylase, bacterial liquefying α-amylase, β-amylase, and neopullulanase from Bacillus megaterium, did not exhibit this distinct substrate specificity at all, i.e., the preference of amylose to amylopectin. PMID:11916682

  15. Bleach-boosting effect of crude xylanase from Bacillus stearothermophilus SDX on wheat straw pulp.

    PubMed

    Garg, Gaurav; Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Mahajan, Ritu; Kaur, Amanjot; Sharma, Jitender

    2011-01-31

    Pretreatment of wheat straw pulp using cellulase-free xylanase produced from Bacillus stearothermophilus SDX at 60°C for 120min resulted in 4.75% and 22.31% increase in brightness and whiteness, respectively. Enzyme dose of 10U/g of oven dried pulp at pH 9 decreased the kappa number and permanganate number by 7.14% and 5.31%, respectively. Further chlorine dioxide and alkaline bleaching sequences (CDED(1)D(2)) resulted in 1.76% and 3.63% increase in brightness and whiteness, respectively. Enzymatic prebleaching of pulp decreased 20% of chlorine consumption without any decrease in brightness. Improvement in various pulp properties like viscosity, burst factor, burstness, breaking length, double fold, gurley porosity, tear factor, and tearness were also observed after bleaching of xylanase treated wheat straw pulp.

  16. Thermostable alpha-galactosidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621: cloning, sequencing and characterization.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, O; Watzlawick, H; Gehweiler, A; Mattes, R

    1999-07-01

    An alpha-galactosidase gene from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621 was cloned, sequenced, expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The Bacillus enzyme, designated AgaN, is similar to alpha-galactosidases of family 36 in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases. The enzyme was estimated to be a tetramer with a molecular mass of subunits 80.3 kDa. The purified AgaN is thermostable and has a temperature optimum of activity at 75 degrees C and a half-life of inactivation of 19 h at 70 degrees C. AgaN displays high affinity for oligomeric substrates such as melibiose and raffinose and is able to hydrolyze raffinose in the presence of 60% sucrose with high efficiency.

  17. Keratinous waste decomposition and peptide production by keratinase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11.

    PubMed

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Debski, Janusz; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    A keratinolytic proteinase was cloned from thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11 and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase (RecGEOker) with an estimated molecular weight of 57 kDa was purified and keratinase activity was measured. RecGEOker showed optimal activity at pH 9 and 60 °C. Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool > collagen > sodium caseinate > gelatin > and BSA in descending order. RecGEOker is applicable for efficient keratin waste biodegradation and can replace conventional non-biological hydrolysis processes. High-value small peptides obtained from enzymatic biodegradation by RecGEOker are suitable for industrial application in white and/or green biotechnology for use as major additives in various products.

  18. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  19. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry.

  20. Physicochemical characterization of tensio-active produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jara, Alícia M A T; Andrade, Rosileide F S; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active agents of microbial origin, and have a property of lowering the interfacial tension between two liquids. They act on the interface and are amphiphathic molecules; in with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic portions are present in the same molecule. However, the economics of producing biosurfactant has limited its commercial applications, and the costs can be reduced using cheap substrates or industrial waste. The present study showed the biosurfactant production using corn steep liquor and palm oil as carbon and nitrogen sources for reduction the costs of production. The biosurfactant production by Geobacillus stearothermophilus UCP 986 was carried out using optimized culture medium constituted by palm oil (7.5%) and corn steep liquor (4.5%) using Bioflo fermentor, at temperature of 45°C, during 32 h and agitation of 300 rpm. The biosurfactant showed a reduction of the water surface tension of 72-31 mN/m and interfacial tension of 0.3 mN/m. The biosurfactant was obtained from the net metabolic liquid by acetone precipitation corresponding to the yield of 2.3g/L. The isolate biosurfactant showed a CMC of 2.5% and non-ionic profile. The best emulsification index (E(24)) obtained was 87% using motor oil burned. The biosurfactant solution (2.5%) used in oil spreading test increases the viscosity of engine burning oil of 149.2% and 138.2% to vegetable fat post-frying, respectively. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometer indicated at 29.52 min a molecular weight of 207 Da and eight peaks by FT-IR identified the chemical structure of the biosurfactant produced by G. stearothermophilus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Occurrence of cold-labile NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Jahns, T

    1992-09-15

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GluDH; EC 1.4.1.3) inactivated by incubation at low temperatures was detected in several species of the genus Bacillus, including strains of B. cereus, B. laterosporus, B. lentus, B. panthotenicus, B. pasteurii, B. sphaericus, B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. Incubation of cell-free extracts of these strains at 0 degrees C resulted in an 80-100% inactivation of NAD-GluDH activity within 120 min. The addition of 20% glycerol protected the enzyme from this inactivation in the cold. Strains of B. fastidiosus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. megaterium and B. pumilus were found to lack NAD-GluDH activity.

  2. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  3. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  4. Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase that increases the production rate of D-tagatose.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Kim, J-H; Oh, H-J; Oh, D-K

    2006-07-01

    Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase used to increase the production rate of D-tagatose. A mutated gene was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using L-arabinose isomerase gene from G. stearothermophilus as a template and the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited the change of three amino acids (Met322-->Val, Ser393-->Thr, and Val408-->Ala), compared with the wild-type enzyme and was then purified to homogeneity. The mutated enzyme had a maximum galactose isomerization activity at pH 8.0, 65 degrees C, and 1.0 mM Co2+, while the wild-type enzyme had a maximum activity at pH 8.0, 60 degrees C, and 1.0-mM Mn2+. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited increases in D-galactose isomerization activity, optimum temperature, catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for D-galactose, and the production rate of D-tagatose from D-galactose. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase from G. stearothermophilus is valuable for the commercial production of D-tagatose. This work contributes knowledge on the characterization of a mutated L-arabinose isomerase, and allows an increased production rate for D-tagatose from D-galactose using the mutated enzyme.

  5. Toxicological effects of thiomersal and ethylmercury: Inhibition of the thioredoxin system and NADP{sup +}-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Juan; Branco, Vasco; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a strong toxicant affecting mainly the central nervous, renal, cardiovascular and immune systems. Thiomersal (TM) is still in use in medical practice as a topical antiseptic and as a preservative in multiple dose vaccines, routinely given to young children in some developing countries, while other forms of mercury such as methylmercury represent an environmental and food hazard. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of thiomersal (TM) and its breakdown product ethylmercury (EtHg) on the thioredoxin system and NADP{sup +}-dependent dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate pathway. Results show that TM and EtHg inhibited the thioredoxin system enzymes in purified suspensions, being EtHg comparable to methylmercury (MeHg). Also, treatment of neuroblastoma and liver cells with TM or EtHg decreased cell viability (GI{sub 50}: 1.5 to 20 μM) and caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the overall activities of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in cell lysates. Compared to control, the activities of Trx and TrxR in neuroblastoma cells after EtHg incubation were reduced up to 60% and 80% respectively, whereas in hepatoma cells the reduction was almost 100%. In addition, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by all mercurials, with inhibition intensity of Hg{sup 2+} > MeHg ≈ EtHg > TM (p < 0.05). Cell incubation with sodium selenite alleviated the inhibitory effects on TrxR and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the molecular mechanism of toxicity of TM and especially of its metabolite EtHg encompasses the blockage of the electrons from NADPH via the thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • TM and EtHg inhibit Trx and TrxR both in purified suspensions and cell lysates. • TM and EtHg also inhibit the activities of G6PDH and 6PGDH in cell lysates, • Co-exposure to selenite alleviates

  6. Plasma Decontamination: A Case Study on Kill Efficacy of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores on Different Carrier Materials.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Egmont; Novak, Wenzel; Allinson, Wilf; Wallis, Darren; Wood, Nigel; Awakowicz, Peter; Wunderlich, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A new technology to the pharmaceutical field is presented: surface decontamination by plasmas The technology is comparable to established barrier systems like e-beam, volatile hydrogen peroxide, or radiation inactivation of microbiological contaminations. This plasma technology is part of a fully automated and validated syringe filling line at a major pharmaceutical company and is in production operation. Incoming pre-sterilized syringe containers ("tubs") are processed by plasma, solely on the outside, and passed into the aseptic filling isolator upon successful decontamination. The objective of this article is to present the operating principles and develop and establish a validation routine on the basis of standard commercial biological indicators. Their decontamination efficacies are determined and correlated to the actual inactivation efficacy on the pharmaceutical packaging material.The reference setup is explained in detail and a short presentation of the cycle development and the relevant plasma control parameters is given, with a special focus on the in-process monitor determining the cycle validity. Different microbial inactivation mechanisms are also discussed and evaluated for their contribution and interaction to enhance plasma decontamination. A material-dependent inactivation behavior was observed. In order to be able to correlate the tub surface inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores to metallic biological indicators, a comparative study was performed. Through consistently demonstrating the linear inactivation behavior between the different materials, it becomes possible to develop an effective and time-saving validation scheme. The challenge in new decontamination systems lies in a thorough validation of the inactivation efficacy under different operating regimes. With plasma, as an ionized gas, a new barrier concept is introduced into pharmaceutical aseptic processing of syringes. The presented system operates in vacuum and only

  7. HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFN{gamma} production by CD4+ T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caivano, Antonella; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Buelow, Benjamin; Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D'Apice, Luciana; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F.; Haigwood, Nancy L.; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2010-11-25

    We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFN{gamma}. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFN{gamma}. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFN{gamma}-producing CD4+ T cells.

  8. HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFNγ production by CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Caivano, Antonella; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Buelow, Benjamin; Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D’Apice, Luciana; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F.; Haigwood, Nancy L.; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFNγ. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFNγ. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:20850858

  9. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-05-03

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L ..-->.. D and D..-->.. L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the ..cap alpha..-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of ..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in /sup 3/H/sub 2/O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis.

  10. [Thermal resistance of the spores of a Bac. stearothermophilus culture used for the preparation of bioindicators].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, N M; Shilova, S V; Motina, G L; Chaĭkovskaia, S M

    1982-02-01

    Thermostability of the spores of Bac. stearothermophilus in ampoules and capillaries in concentrations of 10(9), 10(8) and 10(6) cells per 1 ml of sodium chloride isotonic solution was determined at 119 to 124 degrees C with an interval of 1 degree C and an exposure time of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 minutes. The results were used for plotting the survival curves. The time of the microbial death in the ampoules and capillaries at all the temperatures was the same and the ampoules were chosen as the bioindicator vehicle because of their availability and convenience in exploitation. The survival curves may be used for determination of the optimal sterilization conditions. The spore concentration of the thermostable culture in the bioindicator should be equal or exceed the level of the object microbial contamination. In the present study the concentration of the test microbe spores in the bioindicator was 10(6)--10(8) cells/ml.

  11. The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-07-20

    The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

  12. Purification and characterization of a thermostable xylanase from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6.

    PubMed

    Khasin, A; Alchanati, I; Shoham, Y

    1993-06-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 produces an extracellular xylanase that was shown to optimally bleach pulp at pH 9 and 65 degrees C. The enzyme was purified and concentrated in a single adsorption step onto a cation exchanger and is made of a single polypeptide with an apparent M(r) of 43,000 (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Xylanase T-6 is an endoxylanase that completely degrades xylan to xylose and xylobiose. The pIs of the purified protein were 9 and 7 under native and denaturing conditions, respectively. The optimum activity was at pH 6.5; however, 60% of the activity was still retained at pH 10. At 65 degrees C and pH 7, the enzyme was stable for more than 10 h; at 65 degrees C and pH 9, the half-life of the enzyme was approximately 6 h. Kinetic experiments at 55 degrees C gave Vmax and Km values of 288 U/mg and 1.63 mg/ml, respectively. The enzyme had no apparent requirement for cofactors, and its activity was strongly inhibited by Zn2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+. Xylan completely protected the protein from inactivation by N-bromosuccinimide. The N-terminal sequence of the first 45 amino acids of the enzyme showed high homology with the N-terminal region of xylanase A from the alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain C-125.

  13. Electron transfer kinetics of caa3 oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus: a hypothesis for thermophilicity.

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrè, A; Watmough, N J; Giannini, S; Brunori, M; Konings, W N; Greenwood, C

    1999-01-01

    The O2 reaction and the reverse electron transfer of the thermophilic caa3 terminal oxidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus have been studied by laser flash-photolysis. The results show that both reactions, although studied at a temperature of 20 degreesC, far from the optimal temperature of > 60 degreesC for caa3, follow a kinetic behavior essentially identical to that observed with the electrostatic complex between mammalian cyt c and cyt c oxidase. In the O2 reaction cyt a and cyt a3 are very quickly oxidized; cyt a is then re-reduced via CuA, whereas cyt c oxidation is apparently rate-limited by the oxidation of CuA. Upon photodissociation of the mixed valence-CO caa3, reverse electron transfer from the binuclear center to cyt a3+ (tau1 = 3 micros) and CuA2+ (tau2 = 64 micros) is observed, while cyt c is not reduced by any detectable level. These results seem to rule out accounting for enzymatic thermophilicity by altered kinetics of intramolecular electron transfer involving the cyt center in the reduced configuration, which is very fast. On the basis of these results and previous data, we propose that thermophilicity involves an increased activation barrier for the reduction of cyt a3-CuB in the configuration typical of the oxidized site. PMID:9876155

  14. The purification and characterization of glucokinase from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Goward, C R; Hartwell, R; Atkinson, T; Scawen, M D

    1986-01-01

    Homogeneous glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated on the large scale by using four major steps: precipitation of extraneous material at pH 5.5, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, pseudo-affinity chromatography on Procion Brown H-3R-Sepharose 4B and gel filtration on Ultrogel AcA 34. The purified enzyme had a specific activity of about 330 units/mg of protein and was shown to exist as a dimer of subunit Mr 33,000. Kinetic parameters for the enzyme were determined with a variety of substrates. The glucokinase was highly specific for alpha-D-glucose, and the only other sugar substrate utilized was N-acetyl-alpha-D-glucosamine. The enzyme shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value of 150 microM for alpha-D-glucose. The glucokinase was maximally active at pH 9.0. PMID:3099754

  15. Crystal structures of Geobacillus stearothermophilus alpha-glucuronidase complexed with its substrate and products: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Golan, Gali; Shallom, Dalia; Teplitsky, Anna; Zaide, Galia; Shulami, Smadar; Baasov, Timor; Stojanoff, Vivian; Thompson, Andy; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2004-01-23

    Alpha-glucuronidases cleave the alpha-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and short xylooligomers as part of the hemicellulose degradation system. To date, all of the alpha-glucuronidases are classified as family 67 glycosidases, which catalyze the hydrolysis via the investing mechanism. Here we describe several high resolution crystal structures of the alpha-glucuronidase (AguA) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, in complex with its substrate and products. In the complex of AguA with the intact substrate, the 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid sugar ring is distorted into a half-chair conformation, which is closer to the planar conformation required for the oxocarbenium ion-like transition state structure. In the active site, a water molecule is coordinated between two carboxylic acids, in an appropriate position to act as a nucleophile. From the structural data it is likely that two carboxylic acids, Asp(364) and Glu(392), activate together the nucleophilic water molecule. The loop carrying the catalytic general acid Glu(285) cannot be resolved in some of the structures but could be visualized in its "open" and "closed" (catalytic) conformations in other structures. The protonated state of Glu(285) is presumably stabilized by its proximity to the negative charge of the substrate, representing a new variation of substrate-assisted catalysis mechanism.

  16. Gene cloning and characterization of alpha-glucuronidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus no. 236.

    PubMed

    Choi, I D; Kim, H Y; Choi, Y J

    2000-12-01

    The alpha-glucuronidase gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus No. 236 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene, designated aguA, encoded a 691-residue polypeptide with calculated molecular weight of 78,156 and pI of 5.34. The alpha-glucuronidase produced by a recombinant E. coli strain containing the aguA gene was purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized. The molecular weight of the alpha-glucuronidase was 77,000 by SDS-PAGE and 161,000 by gel filtration; the functional form of the alpha-glucuronidase therefore was dimeric. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme activity were pH 6.5 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme's half-life at 50 degrees C was 50 min. The values for the kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax were 0.78 mM and 15.3 U/mg for aldotriouronic acid [2-O-alpha-(4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyluronic)-D-xylobiose]. The alpha-glucuronidase acted mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers and did not release methylglucuronic acid from intact xylan. Nevertheless, synergism in the release of xylose from xylan was found when alpha-glucuronidase was added to a mixture of endoxylanase and beta-xylosidase.

  17. Enzyme-substrate complex structures of a GH39 beta-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Czjzek, Mirjam; Ben David, Alon; Bravman, Tsafrir; Shoham, Gil; Henrissat, Bernard; Shoham, Yuval

    2005-11-04

    Beta-D-Xylosidases are glycoside hydrolases that catalyse the release of xylose units from short xylooligosaccharides and are engaged in the final breakdown of plant cell-wall hemicelluloses. beta-D-Xylosidases are found in glycoside hydrolase families 3, 39, 43, 52 and 54. The first crystal structure of a GH39 beta-xylosidase revealed a multi-domain organization with the catalytic domain having the canonical (beta/alpha)8 barrel fold. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GH39 Geobacillus stearothermophilus beta-D-xylosidase, inactivated by a point mutation of the general acid-base residue E160A, in complex with the chromogenic substrate molecule 2,5-dinitrophenyl-beta-D-xyloside. Surprisingly, six of the eight active sites present in the crystallographic asymmetric unit contain the trapped covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, while two of them still contain the uncleaved substrate. The structural characterization of these two critical species along the reaction coordinate of this enzyme identifies the residues forming its xyloside-binding pocket as well as those essential for its aglycone recognition.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus Carboxylesterase Est55 and Its Activation of Prodrug CPT-11

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, Hosam E.; Tai, Phang C.; Lu, Chung-Dar; Weber, Irene T.

    2007-01-01

    Several mammalian carboxylesterases were shown to activate the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to produce SN-38, a topoisomerase inhibitor used in cancer therapy. However, the potential use of bacterial carboxylesterases, which have the advantage of high stability, has not been explored. We present the crystal structure of the carboxyesterase Est55 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus and evaluation of its enzyme activity on CPT-11. Crystal structures were determined at pH 6.2 and 6.8 and resolution of 2.0 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Est55 folds into three domains, a catalytic domain, an α/β domain and a regulatory domain. The structure is in an inactive form; the side chain of His409, one of the catalytic triad residues, is directed away from the other catalytic residues Ser194 and Glu310. Moreover, the adjacent Cys408 is triply oxidized and lies in the oxyanion hole, which would block the binding of substrate, suggesting a regulatory role. However, Cys408 is not essential for enzyme activity. Mutation of Cys408 showed that hydrophobic side chains were favorable, while polar serine was unfavorable for enzyme activity. Est55 was shown to hydrolyze CPT-11 into the active form SN-38. The mutant C408V provided a more stable enzyme for activation of CPT-11. Therefore, engineered thermostable Est55 is a candidate for use with irinotecan in enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. PMID:17239398

  19. Evolved beta-galactosidases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with improved transgalactosylation yield for galacto-oligosaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Placier, Gaël; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Rabiller, Claude; Mattes, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    A mutagenesis approach was applied to the beta-galactosidase BgaB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KVE39 in order to improve its enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides. A simple screening strategy, which was based on the reduction of the hydrolysis of a potential transglycosylation product (lactosucrose), provided mutant enzymes possessing improved synthetic properties for the autocondensation product from nitrophenyl-galactoside and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) from lactose. The effects of the mutations on enzyme activity and kinetics were determined. An change of one arginine to lysine (R109K) increased the oligosaccharide yield compared to that for the wild-type BgaB. Subsequently, saturation mutagenesis at this position demonstrated that valine and tryptophan further increased the transglycosylation performance of BgaB. During the transglycosylation reaction with lactose of the evolved beta-galactosidases, a major trisaccharide was formed. Its structure was characterized as beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucopyranoside (3'-galactosyl-lactose). At the lactose concentration of 18% (wt/vol), this trisaccharide was obtained in yields of 11.5% (wt/wt) with GP21 (BgaB R109K), 21% with GP637.2 (BgaB R109V), and only 2% with the wild-type BgaB enzyme. GP643.3 (BgaB R109W) was shown to be the most efficient mutant, with a 3'-galactosyl-lactose production of 23%.

  20. Physical Aggregation and Functional Reconstitution of Solubilized Membranes of Bacillus stearothermophilus1

    PubMed Central

    Kiszkiss, David F.; Downey, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Isolated membranes of Bacillus stearothermophilus 2184D can be disrupted by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). This disruption is attended by a decreased turbidity of membrane suspensions and a differential loss of activities of the electron transport system. Reduced methyl viologen (MVH)-nitrate reductase activity is insensitive to SDS treatment, whereas reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-nitrate reductase and cyanide-sensitive NADH oxidase activities are decreased by 80% at an SDS concentration of 0.5 mg/mg of membrane protein. NADH-menadione reductase activity is unaffected at this SDS concentration, but at higher detergent levels it also decreases in activity. The abilities of NADH to reduce and nitrate to oxidize the cytochrome components of the membrane were also decreased after SDS treatment. Dilution of solubilized membrane in buffer containing divalent cation results in formation of an aggregate with an increased turbidity and reconstituted NADH-nitrate reductase and cyanide-sensitive NADH oxidase activities. Of several cations tested, magnesium was the most effective, and the reconstitution process was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 7.4. Intact and aggregated membranes had similar densities and cytochrome contents, and the sensitivity of NADH-nitrate reductase to several inhibitors was similar in intact and reconstituted membranes. PMID:4333610

  1. Enhanced maltose production through mutagenesis of acceptor binding subsite +2 in Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yecheng; Duan, Xuguo; Wang, Lei; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-10

    Maltogenic amylases are used to decrease the maltotriose content of high maltose syrups. However, due to the interplay between the hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities of maltogenic amylases, the maltotriose contents of these syrups are still greater than that necessary for pure maltose preparation. In this study, the maltogenic amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus was engineered to decrease its transglycosylation activity with the expectation that this would enhance maltose production. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Trp 177 variants W177F, W177Y, W177L, W177N, and W177S. The transglycosylation activities of the mutant enzymes decreased as the hydrophilicity of the residue at position 177 increased. The mutant enzymes exhibited notable enhancements in maltose production, with a minimum of maltotriose contents of 0.2%, compared with 3.2% for the wild-type enzyme. Detailed characterization of the mutant enzymes suggests that the best of them, W177S, will deliver performance superior to that of the wild-type under industrial conditions.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a glutamine transport operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36: effect of temperature on regulation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Welker, N E

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a fragment of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome that contains two open reading frames (ORFs) whose products were detected only in cells of cultures grown in complex medium at high temperature. The nucleotide sequence of the two ORFs exhibited significant identity to the sequence of the glnQ and glnH loci of the glutamine transport system in enteric bacteria. In addition, growth response to glutamine, sensitivity to the toxic glutamine analog gamma-L-glutamylhydrazide, and glutamine transport assays with parental strain NUB3621 and mutant strain NUB36500, in which the ORF1 coding segment in the chromosome was interrupted with the cat gene, demonstrated that glnQ and glnH encode proteins that are active in the glutamine transport system in B. stearothermophilus. The inferred promoter for the glnQH operon exhibited a low homology to the -35 and -10 regions of the consensus promoter sequences of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli genes. In addition, the inferred promoter for the glnQH operon also exhibited a low homology with the consensus promoter sequence deduced from the sequences of the promoters of nine different genes from B. stearothermophilus. Transcription of the glnQH operon was activated in a nitrogen-rich medium at high temperature and inhibited under the same conditions at low temperature. Transcription of the glnQH operon was partially activated in a nitrogen-poor medium at low temperature. The region upstream from glnQ contains sequences that have a low homology with the nitrogen regulator I-binding sequences and the nitrogen-regulated promoters of enteric bacteria. The effect of temperature on the regulation of the glnQH operon is discussed. Images PMID:1856180

  3. Thermostable, alkaline and detergent-tolerant lipase from a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Moubayed, Nadine M S; Abid, Islam

    2015-04-01

    Lipases are the enzymes of choice for laundry detergent industries, owing to their triglyceride removing ability from the soiled fabric, which eventually reduces the usage of phosphate-based chemical cleansers in the detergent formulation. In this study, a novel thermo-alkaline lipase-producing strain identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from the soil samples of olive oil mill. Enhanced lipase production was observed at 55 degrees C, pH 11 and after 48 h of incubation. Among the substrates tested, xylose (a carbon source), peptone (a nitrogen source) and olive oil at a concentration of 1% were suitable substrates for enhancing lipase production. MgSO4 and Tween-80 were suitable substrates for maximizing lipase production. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single CM-Sephadex column chromatography and revealed molecular mass of 67 kDa. The enzyme (BL1) was active over a wide range of pH from 9.0 to 13.0, with an optimum at pH 11.0, exhibited maximal activity at 55 degreesC and retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation at 70 degrees C or pH 13 for 0.5 h or 24 h, respectively. The enzyme hydrolyzed both short and long-chain triacylglycerols at comparable rates. BL1 was studied in a preliminary evaluation for use in detergent formulation solutions. This novel lipase showed extreme stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants after pre-incubation for 1 h at 40 degrees C, and good stability towards oxidizing agents. Additionally, the enzyme showed excellent stability and compatibility with various commercial detergents, suggesting its potential as an additive in detergent formulations.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Axe2, an acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Alalouf, Onit; Solomon, Vered; Alhassid, Anat; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E; Chayan, Naomi E; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-04-01

    Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemi-cellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. Xylans, which are polymeric sugars that constitute a significant part of the plant biomass, are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at position 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyse the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the ability of main-chain hydrolysing enzymes to break down the sugar backbone units. As such, these enzymes play an important part in the hemi-cellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms that use plant biomass for growth. Interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their numerous potential biotechnological applications. An acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) of this type from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized. One of the crystal forms obtained (RB1) belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 213.1 Å. A full diffraction data set was collected to 1.85 Å resolution from flash-cooled crystals of the wild-type enzyme at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. A selenomethionine derivative of Axe2 has also been prepared and crystallized for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments. The crystals of the selenomethionine-derivatized Axe2 appeared to be isomorphous to those of the wild-type enzyme and enabled the measurement of a full 1.85 Å resolution diffraction data set at the selenium absorption edge and a full 1.70 Å resolution data set at a remote wavelength. These data are currently being used for three-dimensional structure determination of the Axe2 protein.

  5. Structural insights into methanol-stable variants of lipase T6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Dror, Adi; Kanteev, Margarita; Kagan, Irit; Gihaz, Shalev; Shahar, Anat; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic production of biodiesel by transesterification of triglycerides and alcohol, catalyzed by lipases, offers an environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to the chemically catalyzed process while using low-grade feedstocks. Methanol is utilized frequently as the alcohol in the reaction due to its reactivity and low cost. However, one of the major drawbacks of the enzymatic system is the presence of high methanol concentrations which leads to methanol-induced unfolding and inactivation of the biocatalyst. Therefore, a methanol-stable lipase is of great interest for the biodiesel industry. In this study, protein engineering was applied to substitute charged surface residues with hydrophobic ones to enhance the stability in methanol of a lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. We identified a methanol-stable variant, R374W, and combined it with a variant found previously, H86Y/A269T. The triple mutant, H86Y/A269T/R374W, had a half-life value at 70 % methanol of 324 min which reflects an 87-fold enhanced stability compared to the wild type together with elevated thermostability in buffer and in 50 % methanol. This variant also exhibited an improved biodiesel yield from waste chicken oil compared to commercial Lipolase 100L® and Novozyme® CALB. Crystal structures of the wild type and the methanol-stable variants provided insights regarding structure-stability correlations. The most prominent features were the extensive formation of new hydrogen bonds between surface residues directly or mediated by structural water molecules and the stabilization of Zn and Ca binding sites. Mutation sites were also characterized by lower B-factor values calculated from the X-ray structures indicating improved rigidity.

  6. Catalytic, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of stabilized Bacillus stearothermophilus alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Naby, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Samia A; Wehaidy, Hala R; El-Mahdy, Said A

    2017-03-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus alkaline protease was conjugated to several oxidized polysaccharides of different chemical structure. The conjugates were evaluated for the kinetic and thermodynamic stability. The conjugated enzyme with oxidized pectin had the highest retained activity (79.5%) and the highest half-life (T1/2) at 50°C and pH 9.0. Compared to the native protease, the conjugated preparation exhibited lower activation energy (Ea), lower deactivation constant rate (kd), higher T1/2, and higher D values (decimal reduction time) within the temperature range of 50-60°C. The thermodynamic parameters for irreversible inactivation of native and conjugated protease indicated that conjugation significantly decreased entropy (ΔS*) and enthalpy (ΔH*) of deactivation. The calculated value of activation energy for thermal denaturation (Ead) for the conjugated enzyme was 20.4KJmole(-1) higher over the native one. The results of thermodynamic analysis for substrate hydrolysis indicated that the enthalpy of activation (ΔH*) and free energy of activation (free energy of substrate binding) ΔG*E-S and (ΔG*), (free energy of transition state) ΔG*E-T values were lower for the modified protease. Similarly, there was significant improvement of kcat, kcat/Km values. The enzyme proved to be metalloprotease and significantly stimulated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) whereas Hg(2+), Fe(3+) Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited the enzyme activity. There was no pronounced effect on substrate specificity after conjugation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect on pH heating medium on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    López, M; González, I; Condón, S; Bernardo, A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the pH of heating medium on heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores (ATCC 7953, 12980, 15951 and 15952) were studied. The pH values tested were: 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 at temperatures of 115, 120, 125, 130 and 135 degrees C. It was found that at low treatment temperatures (115 degrees C) D-values decreased between 7- and 10-fold with 7953, 12980 and 15951 strains and about 23-fold with 15952 strain when pH dropped from 7.0 to 4.0. At highest treatment temperatures (135 degrees C) D-values obtained with pH 6.0 and 7.0 did not show any significant statistical differences (p > 0.05). z-Values appeared to be higher when the medium was acidified, ranging from 7.58 to 8.20 and 9.43 10.0 for spores suspended in McIlvaine buffer pH 7.0 and pH 4.0, respectively, although the difference was not statistically significant. Heat resistance of strain ATCC 7953 at 120, 128, and 135 degrees C in asparagus purée and tomato purée at pH 5.0 under continuous monitoring of pH was also determined. D-values obtained in asparagus purée were similar to those obtained in buffer at the same pH, whereas those observed in tomato purée were found to be lower.

  8. Inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores by alkaline hydrolysis applied to medical waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Sílvia C; Nunes, Olga C; Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Almeida, Manuel F

    2015-09-15

    Although alkaline hydrolysis treatment emerges as an alternative disinfection/sterilization method for medical waste, information on its effects on the inactivation of biological indicators is scarce. The effects of alkaline treatment on the resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were investigated and the influence of temperature (80 °C, 100 °C and 110 °C) and NaOH concentration was evaluated. In addition, spore inactivation in the presence of animal tissues and discarded medical components, used as surrogate of medical waste, was also assessed. The effectiveness of the alkaline treatment was carried out by determination of survival curves and D-values. No significant differences were seen in D-values obtained at 80 °C and 100 °C for NaOH concentrations of 0.5 M and 0.75 M. The D-values obtained at 110 °C (2.3-0.5 min) were approximately 3 times lower than those at 100 °C (8.8-1.6 min). Independent of the presence of animal tissues and discarded medical components, 6 log10 reduction times varied between 66 and 5 min at 100 °C-0.1 M NaOH and 110 °C-1 M NaOH, respectively. The alkaline treatment may be used in future as a disinfection or sterilization alternative method for contaminated waste.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of an enzyme hydrolyzing p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-glucoside from Bacillus stearothermophilus SA0301.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sato, Kimihiko; Suyama, Mikita; Sasaki, Jun; Nyamdawaa, Batbold; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus SA0301 produces an extracellular oligo-1,6-glucosidase (bsO16G) that also hydrolyzes p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-glucoside (Tonozuka et al., J. Appl. Glycosci., 45, 397-400 (1998)). We cloned a gene for an enzyme hydrolyzing p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-glucoside, which was different from the one mentioned above, from B. stearothermophilus SA0301. The k(0)/K(m) values of bsO16G for isomaltotriose and isomaltose were 13.2 and 1.39 s(-1).mM(-1) respectively, while the newly cloned enzyme did not hydrolyze isomaltotriose, and the k(0)/K(m) value for isomaltose was 0.81 s(-1).mM(-1). The primary structure of the cloned enzyme more closely resembled those of trehalose-6-phosphate hydrolases than those of oligo-1,6-glucosidases, and the cloned enzyme hydrolyzed trehalose 6-phosphate. An open reading frame encoding a protein homologous to the trehalose-specific IIBC component of the phopshotransferase system was also found upstream of the gene for this enzyme.

  10. Thermostable L-arabinose isomerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus IAM 11001 for D-tagatose production: gene cloning, purification and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lifang; Mu, Wanmeng; Jiang, Bo

    2010-06-01

    D-Tagatose, as one of the rare sugars, has been found to be a natural and safe low-calorie sweetener in food products and is classified as a GRAS substance. L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI, EC 5.3.1.4), catalysing the isomerisations of L-arabinose and D-galactose to L-ribulose and D-tagatose respectively, is considered to be the most promising enzyme for the production of D-tagatose. The araA gene encoding an L-AI from Bacillus stearothermophilus IAM 11001 was cloned, sequenced and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The gene is composed of 1491 bp nucleotides and codes for a protein of 496 amino acid residues. The recombinant L-AI was purified to electrophoretical homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was optimally active at 65 degrees C and pH 7.5 and had an absolute requirement for the divalent metal ion Mn(2+) for both catalytic activity and thermostability. The enzyme was relatively active and stable at acidic pH of 6. The bioconversion yield of D-galactose to D-tagatose by the purified L-AI after 12 h at 65 degrees C reached 36%. The purified L-AI from B. stearothermophilus IAM 11001 was characterised and shown to be a good candidate for potential application in D-tagatose production. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Walking dead: Permeabilization of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores under growth-preventing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Although heat treatment is probably the oldest and the most common method used to inactivate spores in food processes, the specific mechanism of heat killing of spores is still not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolution of the permeabilization and the viability of heat-treated spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated under various conditions of temperature and pH, and then stored under conditions of temperature and pH that prevent growth. Spore survival was evaluated by count plating immediately after heat treatment, and then during storage over a period of months. Flow cytometry analyses were performed to investigate the Syto 9 permeability of heat-treated spores. Sub-lethally heat-treated spores of G. stearothermophilus were physically committed to permeabilization after heat treatment. However, prolonged heat treatment may abolish the spore permeabilization and block heat-treated spores in the refractive state. However, viability loss and permeabilization during heat treatment seem to be two different mechanisms that occur independently, and the loss of permeabilization properties takes place at a much slower rate than spore killing. Under growth-preventing conditions, viable heat-treated spores presumably lose their viability due to the permeabilization phenomena, which makes them more susceptible to the action of adverse conditions precluding growth.

  12. Quantitative assessment of the risk of microbial spoilage in foods. Prediction of non-stability at 55 °C caused by Geobacillus stearothermophilus in canned green beans.

    PubMed

    Rigaux, Clémence; André, Stéphane; Albert, Isabelle; Carlin, Frédéric

    2014-02-03

    Microbial spoilage of canned foods by thermophilic and highly heat-resistant spore-forming bacteria, such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus, is a persistent problem in the food industry. An incubation test at 55 °C for 7 days, then validation of biological stability, is used as an indicator of compliance with good manufacturing practices. We propose a microbial risk assessment model predicting the percentage of non-stability due to G. stearothermophilus in canned green beans manufactured by a French company. The model accounts for initial microbial contaminations of fresh unprocessed green beans with G. stearothermophilus, cross-contaminations in the processing chain, inactivation processes and probability of survival and growth. The sterilization process is modeled by an equivalent heating time depending on sterilization value F₀ and on G. stearothermophilus resistance parameter z(T). Following the recommendations of international organizations, second order Monte-Carlo simulations are used, separately propagating uncertainty and variability on parameters. As a result of the model, the mean predicted non-stability rate is of 0.5%, with a 95% uncertainty interval of [0.1%; 1.2%], which is highly similar to data communicated by the French industry. A sensitivity analysis based on Sobol indices and some scenario tests underline the importance of cross-contamination at the blanching step, in addition to inactivation due to the sterilization process.

  13. POLYOL DEHYDROGENASES OF AZOTOBACTER AGILIS

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Leon; Marr, Allen G.

    1961-01-01

    Marcus, Leon (University of California, Davis), and Allen G. Marr. Polyol dehydrogenases of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 82:224–232. 1961.—Two soluble diphosphopyridine-linked polyol dehydrogenases are formed by Azotobacter agilis (A. vinelandii). The first, d-mannitol dehydrogenase is induced by d-mannitol and all of the pentitols except l-arabitol. Ribitol is an excellent inducer of mannitol dehydrogenase although it is not metabolized, nor does the enzyme act upon it. This allows study of the gratuitous induction of mannitol dehydrogenase. Of the polyols tested, mannitol dehydrogenase oxidizes d-mannitol, d-arabitol, d-rhamnitol, and perseitol, demonstrating its requirement for substrates bearing the d-manno configuration. The corresponding 2-ketoses, d-fructose, d-xylulose, and presumably d-rhamnulose, and perseulose are reduced. The second enzyme, l-iditol dehydrogenase is induced only by polyols containing the d-xylo configuration, i.e., sorbitol and xylitol. l-Iditol dehydrogenase oxidizes d-xylo polyols seven times faster than it does d-ribo polyols. Substrates oxidized include l-iditol, sorbitol, xylitol, and ribitol. The corresponding 2-ketoses, l-sorbose, d-fructose, d-xylulose, and d-ribulose, are reduced. The two polyol dehydrogenases have been separated and purified by chromatography on a modified cellulose ion exchanger. PMID:13766585

  14. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  15. Human aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1): biochemical characterization and immunohistochemical localization in the cornea.

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Aglaia; Estey, Tia; Manzer, Rizwan; Brown, Donald; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2003-01-01

    ALDH3A1 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) is expressed at high concentrations in the mammalian cornea and it is believed that it protects this vital tissue and the rest of the eye against UV-light-induced damage. The precise biological function(s) and cellular distribution of ALDH3A1 in the corneal tissue remain to be elucidated. Among the hypotheses proposed for ALDH3A1 function in cornea is detoxification of aldehydes formed during UV-induced lipid peroxidation. To investigate in detail the biochemical properties and distribution of this protein in the human cornea, we expressed human ALDH3A1 in Sf9 insect cells using a baculovirus vector and raised monoclonal antibodies against ALDH3A1. Recombinant ALDH3A1 protein was purified to homogeneity with a single-step affinity chromatography method using 5'-AMP-Sepharose 4B. Human ALDH3A1 demonstrated high substrate specificity for medium-chain (6 carbons and more) saturated and unsaturated aldehydes, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, which are generated by the peroxidation of cellular lipids. Short-chain aliphatic aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde and malondialdehyde, were found to be very poor substrates for human ALDH3A1. In addition, ALDH3A1 metabolized glyceraldehyde poorly and did not metabolize glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphoglucono-delta-lactone and 6-phosphogluconate at all, suggesting that this enzyme is not involved in either glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway. Immunohistochemistry in human corneas, using the monoclonal antibodies described herein, revealed ALDH3A1 expression in epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes, but not in endothelial cells. Overall, these cumulative findings support the metabolic function of ALDH3A1 as a part of a corneal cellular defence mechanism against oxidative damage caused by aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation. Both recombinant human ALDH3A1 and the highly specific monoclonal antibodies described in the present paper may prove to be useful in probing

  16. The Glucuronic Acid Utilization Gene Cluster from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    PubMed Central

    Shulami, Smadar; Gat, Orit; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Shoham, Yuval

    1999-01-01

    A λ-EMBL3 genomic library of Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 was screened for hemicellulolytic activities, and five independent clones exhibiting β-xylosidase activity were isolated. The clones overlap each other and together represent a 23.5-kb chromosomal segment. The segment contains a cluster of xylan utilization genes, which are organized in at least three transcriptional units. These include the gene for the extracellular xylanase, xylanase T-6; part of an operon coding for an intracellular xylanase and a β-xylosidase; and a putative 15.5-kb-long transcriptional unit, consisting of 12 genes involved in the utilization of α-d-glucuronic acid (GlcUA). The first four genes in the potential GlcUA operon (orf1, -2, -3, and -4) code for a putative sugar transport system with characteristic components of the binding-protein-dependent transport systems. The most likely natural substrate for this transport system is aldotetraouronic acid [2-O-α-(4-O-methyl-α-d-glucuronosyl)-xylotriose] (MeGlcUAXyl3). The following two genes code for an intracellular α-glucuronidase (aguA) and a β-xylosidase (xynB). Five more genes (kdgK, kdgA, uxaC, uxuA, and uxuB) encode proteins that are homologous to enzymes involved in galacturonate and glucuronate catabolism. The gene cluster also includes a potential regulatory gene, uxuR, the product of which resembles repressors of the GntR family. The apparent transcriptional start point of the cluster was determined by primer extension analysis and is located 349 bp from the initial ATG codon. The potential operator site is a perfect 12-bp inverted repeat located downstream from the promoter between nucleotides +170 and +181. Gel retardation assays indicated that UxuR binds specifically to this sequence and that this binding is efficiently prevented in vitro by MeGlcUAXyl3, the most likely molecular inducer. PMID:10368143

  17. Selective oxidation of glycerol to 1,3-dihydroxyacetone by covalently immobilized glycerol dehydrogenases with higher stability and lower product inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Martin, Javier; Acosta, Andreína; Berenguer, Jose; Guisan, Jose M; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH) catalyzes the regioselective oxidation of glycerol to yield 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA); an important building block in chemical industry. Three recombinant GlyDHs from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, from Citrobacter braakii and from Cellulomonas sp. were stabilized by covalent immobilization. The highest activity recoveries (40-50%) of the insoluble preparations were obtained by immobilizing these enzymes in presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Noteworthy, these immobilized preparations were more stable and less inhibited by DHA than their soluble counterparts. In particular, GlyDH from G.stearothermophilus immobilized on agarose activated with both amine and glyoxyl groups and crosslinked with dextran aldehyde was 3.7-fold less inhibited by DHA than its soluble form and retained 100% of its initial activity after 18h of incubation at 65°C and pH 7. This is one of the few examples where the same immobilization protocol has minimized enzyme product inhibition and maximized thermal stability.

  18. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  19. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Hazel; Eagon, R. G.

    1964-01-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25–30. 1964.—Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization. Images PMID:14197895

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant l-N-carbamoylase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; García-Pino, Abel; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Loris, Remy; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.; Gavira, Jose Antonio

    2008-01-01

    N-Carbamoyl-l-amino-acid amidohydrolases (l-N-carbamoylases; EC 3.5.1.87) hydrolyze the carbon–nitrogen bond of the ureido group in N-carbamoyl-l-α-amino acids. These enzymes are commonly used in the production of optically pure natural and non-natural l-amino acids using the ‘hydantoinase process’. Recombinant l-N-carbamoylase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43 has been expressed, purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. X-­ray data were collected to a resolution of 2.75 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 211.7, c = 43.1 Å and two subunits in the asymmetric unit. PMID:19052368

  1. Rational design of Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 L-arabinose isomerase: potential applications for D-tagatose production.

    PubMed

    Rhimi, Moez; Aghajari, Nushin; Juy, Michel; Chouayekh, Hichem; Maguin, Emmanuelle; Haser, Richard; Bejar, Samir

    2009-05-01

    L-arabinose isomerases catalyze the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose. With the aim of producing an enzyme optimized for D-tagatose production, three Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 L-arabinose isomerase mutants were constructed, purified and characterized. Our results indicate that mutant Q268K was significantly more acidotolerant and more stable at acidic pH than the wild-type enzyme. The N175H mutant has a broad optimal temperature range from 50 to 65 degrees C. With the aim of constructing an acidotolerant mutant working at relatively low temperatures we generated the Q268K/N175H construct. This double mutant displays an optimal pH in the range 6.0-7.0 and an optimal activity around 50-65 degrees C, temperatures at which the enzyme was stable without addition of metal ions.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a family 43 β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    SciTech Connect

    Brüx, Christian; Niefind, Karsten; Ben-David, Alon; Leon, Maya; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2005-12-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from G. stearothermophilus T-6, a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. Native and catalytic inactive mutants of the enzymes were crystallized in two different space groups, orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and tetragonal P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or the enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), using a sensitive cryoprotocol. The latter crystal form diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.2 Å. β-d-Xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) are hemicellulases that cleave single xylose units from the nonreducing end of xylooligomers. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (XynB3), a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. XynB3 is a 535-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 61 891 Da. Purified recombinant native and catalytic inactive mutant proteins were crystallized and cocrystallized with xylobiose in two different space groups, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 99.36, c = 258.64 Å) and P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or the enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2; unit-cell parameters a = b = 140.15, c = 233.11 Å), depending on the detergent. Transferring crystals to cryoconditions required a very careful protocol. Orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and tetragonal crystals to 2.2 Å.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Abp, a GH27 β-L-arabinopyranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Salama, Rachel; Solomon, Vered H; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a thermophilic soil bacterium that possesses an extensive system for the utilization of hemicellulose. The bacterium produces a small number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that cleave high-molecular-weight hemicellulolytic polymers into short decorated oligosaccharides, which are further hydrolysed into the respective sugar monomers by a battery of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular processing enzymes is β-L-arabinopyranosidase (Abp), which is capable of removing β-L-arabinopyranose residues from naturally occurring arabino-polysaccharides. As arabino-polymers constitute a significant part of the hemicellulolytic content of plant biomass, their efficient enzymatic degradation presents an important challenge for many potential biotechnological applications. This aspect has led to an increasing interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of this and related hemicellulases. Abp from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory, as part of its complete structure-function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with average unit-cell parameters a = 107.7, b = 202.2, c = 287.3 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.3 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for a high-resolution three-dimensional structure determination of Abp.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of GanB, a GH42 intracellular β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Hodaya V; Tabachnikov, Orly; Feinberg, Hadar; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-10-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a multi-enzyme system for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. The bacterium uses a number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that break down the high-molecular-weight polysaccharides into decorated oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides enter the cell and are further hydrolyzed into sugar monomers by a set of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular degrading enzymes is GanB, a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides to galactose. GanB and related enzymes therefore play an important part in the hemicellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms which use plant biomass for growth. The interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their potential biotechnological applications. GanB from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory as part of its complete structure-function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belong to the primitive orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with average crystallographic unit-cell parameters of a=71.84, b=181.35, c=196.57 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.45 and 2.50 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its E323A nucleophile catalytic mutant, respectively, as measured from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for the full three-dimensional crystal structure determination of GanB.

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  6. Efficient synthesis and secretion of a thermophilic alpha-amylase by protein-producing Bacillus brevis 47 carrying the Bacillus stearothermophilus amylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukagoshi, N; Iritani, S; Sasaki, T; Takemura, T; Ihara, H; Idota, Y; Yamagata, H; Udaka, S

    1985-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus brevis 47-5, carrying the Bacillus stearothermophilus alpha-amylase gene on pUB110 (pBAM101), synthesized the same alpha-amylase as the donor strain as determined by the enzyme's thermal stability and NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. Regardless of the host, the 34-amino acid signal peptide of the enzyme was processed at exactly the same site between two alanine residues. B. brevis 47-5(pBAM101) secreted the enzyme most efficiently of the hosts examined, 100, 15, and 5 times more than B. stearothermophilus, Escherichia coli HB101(pH1301), and B. subtilis 1A289(pBAM101), respectively. The efficient secretion of the enzyme in B. brevis 47-5(pBAM101) was suggested to be due to the unique properties of the cell wall of this organism. Images PMID:2999073

  7. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  8. [Regulation of citrate synthese in bacteria: Comparison of the action of various effectors on the enzymes of Rhodospirillum rurbum and Bacillus stearothermophilus].

    PubMed

    Higa, A I; Massarini, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study of the citrate synthases purified from the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum (Gram negative) and the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus (Gram positive) was made. The citrate synthase from R. rubrum was activated by KCl (6-fold at 0.1 M KCl) and, less effectively, by NaCl and NH4Cl. Its molecular weight was about 300,000. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by NADH, and this inhibition was counteracted by AMP. The citrate synthase from B. stearothermophilus was little affected by KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl, all of which activated by about 25% at 0.1 M. Its molecular weight was ca 100,000. The enzyme was not affected by NADH or AMP. Both citrate synthases were insensitive to alpah-oxoglutarate concentrations up to 5 mM, and were inhibited by ATP; the B. stearothermophilus enzyme was more strongly inhibited than the R. rubrum enzyme. In both cases the ATP inhibition was strictly competitive towards acetyl-CoA and non-competitive towards oxaloacetate. Both enzymes, in spite of the peculiar physiological properties of their bacterial sources, followed the close correlation between the properties of the citrate synthase and the taxonomical position of the microorganism, proposed by Weitzman and his co-workers.

  9. The Geobacillus stearothermophilus V iscS Gene, Encoding Cysteine Desulfurase, Confers Resistance to Potassium Tellurite in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Tantaleán, Juan C.; Araya, Manuel A.; Saavedra, Claudia P.; Fuentes, Derie E.; Pérez, José M.; Calderón, Iván L.; Youderian, Philip; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2003-01-01

    Many eubacteria are resistant to the toxic oxidizing agent potassium tellurite, and tellurite resistance involves diverse biochemical mechanisms. Expression of the iscS gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus V, which is naturally resistant to tellurite, confers tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli K-12, which is naturally sensitive to tellurite. The G. stearothermophilus iscS gene encodes a cysteine desulfurase. A site-directed mutation in iscS that prevents binding of its pyridoxal phosphate cofactor abolishes both enzyme activity and its ability to confer tellurite resistance in E. coli. Expression of the G. stearothermophilus iscS gene confers tellurite resistance in tellurite-hypersensitive E. coli iscS and sodA sodB mutants (deficient in superoxide dismutase) and complements the auxotrophic requirement of an E. coli iscS mutant for thiamine but not for nicotinic acid. These and other results support the hypothesis that the reduction of tellurite generates superoxide anions and that the primary targets of superoxide damage in E. coli are enzymes with iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:13129955

  10. Principles of quasi-equivalence and Euclidean geometry govern the assembly of cubic and dodecahedral cores of pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Tina; Ævarsson, Arnthor; Allen, Mark D.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Perham, Richard N.; de Kok, Aart; Hol, Wim G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (Mr of 5–10 million) is assembled around a structural core formed of multiple copies of dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2p), which exhibits the shape of either a cube or a dodecahedron, depending on the source. The crystal structures of the 60-meric dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase cores of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes were determined and revealed a remarkably hollow dodecahedron with an outer diameter of ≈237 Å, 12 large openings of ≈52 Å diameter across the fivefold axes, and an inner cavity with a diameter of ≈118 Å. Comparison of cubic and dodecahedral E2p assemblies shows that combining the principles of quasi-equivalence formulated by Caspar and Klug [Caspar, D. L. & Klug, A. (1962) Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 27, 1–4] with strict Euclidean geometric considerations results in predictions of the major features of the E2p dodecahedron matching the observed features almost exactly. PMID:9990008

  11. A glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homolog in Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed Central

    Anda, P; Gebbia, J A; Backenson, P B; Coleman, J L; Benach, J L

    1996-01-01

    A polyreactive monoclonal antibody recognized a 38.5-kDa polypeptide with amino-terminal sequence identity to conserved regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, and Borrelia hermsii, an agent of American relapsing fever. This monoclonal antibody also recognized GAPDH from other pathogenic spirochetes and other prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well. GAPDH activity was detected in sonicates of both B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii but not in live, intact organisms, indicating the possibility of a subsurface localization for the Borrelia GAPDH activity. Degenerate primers constructed from highly conserved regions of gapdh of other prokaryotes successfully amplified this gene homolog in both B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii. Nuclei acid and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of the 838-bp probes for each borrelia indicated 93.9% identity between B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii at the amino acid level. Amino acid identities of B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii with Bacillus stearothermophilus were 59.2% and 58.8% respectively. Southern hybridization studies indicated that the gene encoding GAPDH is located on the chromosome of each borrella. In other bacterial species, GAPDH has other functions in addition to its traditional enzymatic role in the glycolytic pathway. GAPDH may play a similar role in borrelias. PMID:8557349

  12. Structure-function relationships in Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Hodaya V; Tabachnikov, Orly; Lansky, Shifra; Salama, Rachel; Feinberg, Hadar; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2015-12-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a battery of degrading enzymes for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. A 9.4 kb gene cluster has recently been characterized in G. stearothermophilus that encodes a number of galactan-utilization elements. A key enzyme of this degradation system is Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides into galactose units, making it of high potential for various biotechnological applications. The Gan42B monomer is made up of 686 amino acids, and based on sequence homology it was suggested that Glu323 is the catalytic nucleophile and Glu159 is the catalytic acid/base. In the current study, the detailed three-dimensional structure of wild-type Gan42B (at 2.45 Å resolution) and its catalytic mutant E323A (at 2.50 Å resolution), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are reported. These structures demonstrate that the three-dimensional structure of the Gan42B monomer generally correlates with the overall fold observed for GH42 proteins, consisting of three main domains: an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain, a smaller mixed α/β domain, and the smallest all-β domain at the C-terminus. The two catalytic residues are located in the TIM-barrel domain in a pocket-like active site such that their carboxylic functional groups are about 5.3 Å from each other, consistent with a retaining mechanism. The crystal structure demonstrates that Gan42B is a homotrimer, resembling a flowerpot in general shape, in which each monomer interacts with the other two to form a cone-shaped tunnel cavity in the centre. The cavity is ∼35 Å at the wide opening and ∼5 Å at the small opening and ∼40 Å in length. The active sites are situated at the interfaces between the monomers, so that every two neighbouring monomers participate in the formation of each of the three active

  13. Wiring of PQQ-dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Laurinavicius, Valdas; Razumiene, Julija; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Ryabov, Alexander D

    2004-12-15

    The performance of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and two types of PQQ-glucose dehydrogenases in solution and when immobilized on the carbon paste electrodes modified with ferrocene derivatives is investigated. The immobilization of ADH consisting of PQQ and four hemes improves its stability up to 10 times. Both PQQ and heme moieties are involved in the electron transport from substrate to electrode. The ferrocene derivatives improve the electron transport 10-fold. Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter sp. 33, intracellular soluble glucose dehydrogenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus L.M.D. 79.41 (s-GDH), and the membrane-bound enzyme (m-GDH) from Erwinia sp. 34-1 were purified and investigated. Soluble and membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenases display different behavior during the immobilization on the modified carbon electrodes. The immobilization of s-GDH leads to a decrease in both stability and substrate specificity of the enzyme. This suggests that PQQ dissociates from the enzyme active center and operates as a free-diffusing mediator. The rate-limiting step of the process is likely the loading of PQQ onto the apo-enzyme. The immobilization of m-GDH leads to its substantial stabilization and improves the substrate specificity. The nature of m-GDH binding to the electrode surface is presumably similar to the binding to the cell membrane through its anchor-subunit. The enzyme operates as an enzyme and mediator complex.

  14. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  15. Thermal unfolding of phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase studied by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P; Orlov, V; Boschi-Muller, S; Talfournier, F; Asryants, R; Bulatnikov, I; Muronetz, V; Branlant, G; Nagradova, N

    1999-08-17

    Thermal unfolding parameters were determined for a two-domain tetrameric enzyme, phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and for its isolated NAD(+)-binding domain. At pH 8.0, the transition temperatures (t(max)) for the apoforms of the native Bacillus stearothermophilus GAPDH and the isolated domain were 78.3 degrees C and 61.9 degrees C, with calorimetric enthalpies (DeltaH(cal)) of 4415 and 437 kJ/mol (or 30.7 and 22.1 J/g), respectively. In the presence of nearly saturating NAD(+) concentrations, the t(max) and the DeltaH(cal) increased by 13.6 degrees C and by 2365 kJ/mol, respectively, for the native apoenzyme, and by 2.8 degrees C and 109 kJ/mol for the isolated domain. These results indicate that interdomain interactions are essential for NAD(+) to produce its stabilizing effect on the structure of the native enzyme. The thermal stability of the isolated NAD(+)-binding domain increased considerably upon transition from pH 6.0 to 8.0. By contrast, native GAPDH exhibited greater stability at pH 6.0; similar pH-dependencies of thermal stability were displayed by GAPDHs isolated from rabbit muscle and Escherichia coli. The binding of NAD(+) to rabbit muscle apoenzyme increased t(max) and DeltaH(cal) and diminished the widths of the DSC curves; the effect was found to grow progressively with increasing coenzyme concentrations. Alkylation of the essential Cys149 with iodoacetamide destabilized the apoenzyme and altered the effect of NAD(+). Replacement of Cys149 by Ser or by Ala in the B. stearothermophilus GAPDH produced some stabilization, the effect of added NAD(+) being basically similar to that observed with the wild-type enzyme. These data indicate that neither the ion pairing between Cys149 and His176 nor the charge transfer interaction between Cys149 and NAD(+) make any significant contribution to the stabilization of the enzyme's native tertiary structure and the accomplishment of NAD(+)-induced conformational changes. The H

  16. Thermostability enhancement and change in starch hydrolysis profile of the maltohexaose-forming amylase of Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 strain

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ali, Mamdouh; Khemakhem, Bassem; Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Bejar, Samir

    2005-01-01

    The implications of Asn315 and Val450 in the atypical starch hydrolysis profile of Bacillus stearothermophilus Amy (α-amylase) US100 have been suggested previously [Ben Ali, Mhiri, Mezghani and Bejar (2001) Enzyme Microb. Tech. 28, 537–542]. In order to confirm this hypothesis, three mutants were generated. Of these two have a single mutation, N315D or V450G, whereas the third contains both mutations. Analysis of the starch breakdown-profile of these three mutants, as well as of the wild-type, allowed us to conclude that each single mutation induces a small variation in the hydrolysis product. However, the major end product produced by the double mutant shifts from maltopentaose/maltohexaose to maltose/maltotriose, confirming the involvement of these two residues in starch hydrolysis. The superimposition of AmyUS100 model with that of Bacillus licheniformis shows in AmyUS100 an additional loop containing residues Ile214 and Gly215. Remarkably, the deletion of these two residues increases the half-life at 100 °C from 15 min to approx. 70 min. Moreover, this engineered amylase requires less calcium, 25 p.p.m. instead of 100 p.p.m., to reach maximal thermostability. PMID:16197365

  17. Aptamer biosensor for sensitive detection of toxin A of Clostridium difficile using gold nanoparticles synthesized by Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Liu, Yi; Xia, Yun; Xu, Huajian; Xie, Guoming

    2014-04-15

    A sensitive electrochemical biosensor was developed to detect toxin A (TOA) of Clostridium difficile based on an aptamer selected by the systematic evolution of ligands using exponential enrichment and gold nanoparticles (GNPS) synthesized by Bacillus stearothermophilus. The thiolated single-stranded DNA used as the capture probe (CP) was first self-assembled on a Nafion-thionine-GNPS-modified screen-printed electrode (SPE) through an Au-thiol interaction. The horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled aptamer probe (AP) was then hybridized to the complementary oligonucleotide of CP to form an aptamer-DNA duplex. In the absence of TOA, the aptamer-DNA duplex modified the electrode surface with HRP, so that an amperometric response was induced based on the electrocatalytic properties of thionine. This was mediated by the electrons that were generated in the enzymatic reaction of hydrogen peroxide under HRP catalysis. After the specific recognition of TOA, an aptamer-TOA complex was produced rather than the aptamer-DNA duplex, forcing the HRP-labeled AP to dissociate from the electrode surface, which reduced the catalytic capacity of HRP and reduced the response current. The reduction in the response current correlated linearly with the concentration of TOA in the range of 0-200 ng/mL. The detection limit was shown to be 1 nM for TOA. This biosensor was applied to the analysis of TOA and showed good selectivity, reproducibility, stability, and accuracy.

  18. How to Switch Off a Histidine Kinase: Crystal Structure of Geobacillus Stearothermophilus KinB with the Inhibitor Sda

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, M.; Lamour, V; Rajashankar, K; Gordiyenko, Y; Robinson, C; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    Entry to sporulation in bacilli is governed by a histidine kinase phosphorelay, a variation of the predominant signal transduction mechanism in prokaryotes. Sda directly inhibits sporulation histidine kinases in response to DNA damage and replication defects. We determined a 2.0-Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the intact cytoplasmic catalytic core [comprising the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer domain (DHp domain), connected to the ATP binding catalytic domain] of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus sporulation kinase KinB complexed with Sda. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that Sda binds to the base of the DHp domain and prevents molecular transactions with the DHp domain to which it is bound by acting as a simple molecular barricade. Sda acts to sterically block communication between the catalytic domain and the DHp domain, which is required for autophosphorylation, as well as to sterically block communication between the response regulator Spo0F and the DHp domain, which is required for phosphotransfer and phosphatase activities.

  19. Evolved β-Galactosidases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with Improved Transgalactosylation Yield for Galacto-Oligosaccharide Production▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Placier, Gaël; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Rabiller, Claude; Mattes, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    A mutagenesis approach was applied to the β-galactosidase BgaB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KVE39 in order to improve its enzymatic transglycosylation of lactose into oligosaccharides. A simple screening strategy, which was based on the reduction of the hydrolysis of a potential transglycosylation product (lactosucrose), provided mutant enzymes possessing improved synthetic properties for the autocondensation product from nitrophenyl-galactoside and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) from lactose. The effects of the mutations on enzyme activity and kinetics were determined. An change of one arginine to lysine (R109K) increased the oligosaccharide yield compared to that for the wild-type BgaB. Subsequently, saturation mutagenesis at this position demonstrated that valine and tryptophan further increased the transglycosylation performance of BgaB. During the transglycosylation reaction with lactose of the evolved β-galactosidases, a major trisaccharide was formed. Its structure was characterized as β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranoside (3′-galactosyl-lactose). At the lactose concentration of 18% (wt/vol), this trisaccharide was obtained in yields of 11.5% (wt/wt) with GP21 (BgaB R109K), 21% with GP637.2 (BgaB R109V), and only 2% with the wild-type BgaB enzyme. GP643.3 (BgaB R109W) was shown to be the most efficient mutant, with a 3′-galactosyl-lactose production of 23%. PMID:19666723

  20. Repair of hydrolytic DNA deamination damage in thermophilic bacteria: cloning and characterization of a Vsr endonuclease homolog from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Laging, Martin; Lindner, Eric; Fritz, Hans-Joachim; Kramer, Wilfried

    2003-01-01

    Hydrolytic deamination of 5-methyl cytosine in double stranded DNA results in formation of a T/G mismatch that—if left unrepaired—leads to a C→T transition mutation in half of the progeny. In addition to several mismatch-specific glycosylases that have been found in both pro- and eukaryotes to channel this lesion into base excision repair by removing the T from the mismatch, Vsr endonuclease from Escherichia coli has been described which initiates repair by an endonucleolytic strand incision 5′ to the mismatched T. We have isolated a gene coding for a homolog of E.coli Vsr endonuclease from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus H3 (Vsr.Bst) using a method that allows PCR amplification with degenerated primers of gene segments which code for only one highly conserved amino acid region. Vsr.Bst was produced heterologously in E.coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. Vsr.Bst specifically incises heteroduplex DNA with a preference for T/G mismatches. The selectivity of Vsr.Bst for the sequence context of the T/G mismatch appears less pronounced than for Vsr.Eco. PMID:12655008

  1. Repair of hydrolytic DNA deamination damage in thermophilic bacteria: cloning and characterization of a Vsr endonuclease homolog from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Laging, Martin; Lindner, Eric; Fritz, Hans-Joachim; Kramer, Wilfried

    2003-04-01

    Hydrolytic deamination of 5-methyl cytosine in double stranded DNA results in formation of a T/G mismatch that-if left unrepaired-leads to a C-->T transition mutation in half of the progeny. In addition to several mismatch-specific glycosylases that have been found in both pro- and eukaryotes to channel this lesion into base excision repair by removing the T from the mismatch, Vsr endonuclease from Escherichia coli has been described which initiates repair by an endonucleolytic strand incision 5' to the mismatched T. We have isolated a gene coding for a homolog of E.coli Vsr endonuclease from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus H3 (Vsr.Bst) using a method that allows PCR amplification with degenerated primers of gene segments which code for only one highly conserved amino acid region. Vsr.Bst was produced heterologously in E.coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. Vsr.Bst specifically incises heteroduplex DNA with a preference for T/G mismatches. The selectivity of Vsr.Bst for the sequence context of the T/G mismatch appears less pronounced than for Vsr.Eco.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a family 43 β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    PubMed Central

    Brüx, Christian; Niefind, Karsten; Ben-David, Alon; Leon, Maya; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    β-d-Xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) are hemicellulases that cleave single xylose units from the nonreducing end of xylooligomers. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (XynB3), a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. XynB3 is a 535-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 61 891 Da. Purified recombinant native and catalytic inactive mutant proteins were crystallized and cocrystallized with xylobiose in two different space groups, P21212 (unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 99.36, c = 258.64 Å) and P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212; unit-cell parameters a = b = 140.15, c = 233.11 Å), depending on the detergent. Transferring crystals to cryoconditions required a very careful protocol. Orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and tetragonal crystals to 2.2 Å. PMID:16511233

  3. Modification of ascorbic acid using transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase to enhance its oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Kyung; Lee, Soo-Bok; Park, Cheon-Seok; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Myo-Jeong; Baek, Jin-Sook; Roh, Hoe-Jin; Choi, Jin-Hwan; Choe, Eun-Ok; Ahn, Dong-Uk; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2002-05-22

    Ascorbic acid (1), a natural antioxidant, was modified by employing transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with maltotriose and acarbose as donor molecules to enhance its oxidative stability. The transglycosylation reaction with maltotriose as donor created mono- and di-glycosyl transfer products with an alpha-(1,6)-glycosidic linkage. In addition, two acarviosine-glucosyl transfer products were generated when transglycosylation was performed with acarbose as a donor. All transfer products were observed by TLC and HPLC, and purified by Q-sepharose anion exchange and Biogel P-2 gel permeation chromatographies. LC/MS and (13)C NMR analyses revealed that the structures of the transfer products were 6-O-alpha-D-glucosyl- (2) and 6-O-alpha-D-maltosyl-ascorbic acids (3) in the reaction of maltotriose, and 6-O-alpha-acarviosine-D-glucosyl- (4) and 2-O-alpha-acarviosine-D-glucosyl ascorbic acids (5) in the reaction of acarbose. The stability of the transglycosylated ascorbic acid derivatives was greatly enhanced against oxidation by Cu(2+) ion and ascorbate oxidase. Among them, compound 3 proved to be the most stable against in vitro oxidation. The antioxidant effects of glycosyl-derivatives of ascorbic acid on the lipid oxidation in cooked chicken breast meat patties indicated that they had antioxidant activities similar to that of ascorbic acid. It is suggested that the transglycosylated ascorbic acids can possibly be applied as effective antioxidants with improved stability in food, cosmetic, and other applications.

  4. The Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 surA gene encodes a thermophilic sucrase related to Bacillus subtilis SacA.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ferenci, T

    1996-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the surA gene, encoding a sucrase from Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36, was determined. surA was composed of 1338 bp and encoded 445 amino acid residues. The deduced polypeptide of M(r) 51519 showed strong sequence similarity to sucrose and sucrose phosphate hydrolases from Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Vibrio alginolyticus, and contained the 'sucrose box' residues thought to be important for catalysis of the transfer of fructose from sucrose. The enzyme was partially purified using affinity chromotography from extracts of Escherichia coli containing the cloned surA. SurA displayed an optimum temperature for sucrose hydrolysis of 55 degrees C and high stability. The M(r) of SurA determined by gel filtration was 105,000, which suggested that the active form of the enzyme is a dimer. SurA exhibited an apparent Km of 40 mM for sucrose but, unlike the homologous B. subtilis enzyme, had no detectable sucrose phosphate hydrolase activity.

  5. Hazard Inherent in Microbial Tracers: Reduction of Risk by the Use of Bacillus stearothermophilus Spores in Aerobiology

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Syed A.; Synek, E. J.; Westwood, J. C. N.; Neals, Pierrette

    1972-01-01

    The use of a „biological tracer” forms an essential part of many aerobiological experiments. Where release of such tracers is likely to result in deliberate or inadvertent human exposure, safety becomes a primary consideration in the selection of the tracer organism. Of the three most commonly used organisms, namely Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Serratia marcescens, only the first comes near to satisfying the need for nonpathogenicity and even it has been incriminated as a cause of human infection, sometimes with a fatal outcome. The relevant characteristics of B. stearothermophilus were, therefore, investigated. Because it can grow only at elevated temperatures (minimum 41 C; optimum 56 C), it should not pose a threat to human health and this view is supported by experimental evidence to be presented. It is extremely easy to grow and maintain in the laboratory, and spore suspensions are easily prepared and stored. It withstands the stresses of aerosolization and sampling and its stability in the aerosol state compares favorably with that of B. subtilis var. niger. PMID:4557557

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  7. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  8. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  9. The S-layer from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, E; Schocher, I; Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1995-01-01

    The S-layer lattice from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 completely covers the cell surface and exhibits oblique symmetry. During growth of B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 on starch medium, three amylases with molecular weights of 58,000, 98,000, and 184,000 were secreted into the culture fluid, but only the high-molecular-weight enzyme was found to be cell associated. Studies of interactions between cell wall components and amylases revealed no affinity of the high-molecular-weight amylase to isolated peptidoglycan. On the other hand, this enzyme was always found to be associated with S-layer self-assembly products or S-layer fragments released during preparation of spheroplasts by treatment of whole cells with lysozyme. The molar ratio of S-layer subunits to the bound amylase was approximately 8:1, which corresponded to one enzyme molecule per four morphological subunits. Immunoblotting experiments with polyclonal antisera against the high-molecular-weight amylase revealed a strong immunological signal in response to the enzyme but no cross-reaction with the S-layer protein or the smaller amylases. Immunogold labeling of whole cells with anti-amylase antiserum showed that the high-molecular-weight amylase is located on the outer face of the S-layer lattice. Because extraction of the amylase was possible without disintegration of the S-layer lattice into its constituent subunits, it can be excluded that the enzyme is incorporated into the crystal lattice and participates in the self-assembly process. Affinity experiments strongly suggest the presence of a specific recognition mechanism between the amylase molecules and S-layer protein domains either exposed on the outermost surface or inside the pores. In summary, results obtained in this study confirmed that the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase. PMID:7533757

  10. The identification of the acid-base catalyst of alpha-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6, a family 51 glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Shallom, Dalia; Belakhov, Valery; Solomon, Dmitry; Gilead-Gropper, Sara; Baasov, Timor; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2002-03-13

    The alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (AbfA T-6) belongs to the retaining family 51 glycoside hydrolases. The conserved Glu175 was proposed to be the acid-base catalytic residue. AbfA T-6 exhibits residual activity towards aryl beta-D-xylopyranosides. This phenomenon was used to examine the catalytic properties of the putative acid-base mutant E175A. Data from kinetic experiments, pH profiles, azide rescue, and the identification of the xylopyranosyl azide product provide firm support to the assignment of Glu175 as the acid-base catalyst of AbfA T-6.

  11. Improving the thermostability and enhancing the Ca(2+) binding of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-03-20

    The thermostability of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (AmyMH) without added Ca(2+) was improved through structure-based rational design in this study. Through comparison of a homologous model structure of AmyMH with the crystal structure of the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, Ser242, which located at the beginning of fourth α-helix of the central (β/α)8 barrel was selected for mutation to improve thermostability. In addition, an amide-containing side chain (Asn193) and a loop in domain B (ΔIG mutation), which have been proven to be important for thermostability in corresponding position of other α-amylases, were also investigated. Five mutants carrying the mutations ΔIG, N193F, S242A, ΔIG/N193F, and ΔIG/N193F/S242A were generated and their proteins characterized. The most thermostable mutant protein, ΔIG/N193F/S242A, exhibited a 26-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C compared to the wild-type enzyme without added Ca(2+). Mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A also exhibited substantially better activity and stability in the presence of the chelator EDTA, demonstrating enhanced Ca(2+) binding. These results suggest that mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A has potential for use in the industrial liquefaction of starch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from B. stearothermophilus. Comparison with other iron proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Patrick; Gayda, Jean-Pierre; Rao, K. Krishna

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus is studied in the range 1.2 to 40 K. This dependence is similar to that observed for the (2Fe-2S) ferredoxin from Spirulina maxima and can be interpreted with the same relaxation processes [J.P. Gayda, P. Bertrand, A. Deville, C. More, G. Roger, J.F. Gibson, and R. Cammack, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 581, 15 (1979)]. In particular, between 4 and 15 K, the data are well fitted by a second-order Raman process involving three-dimensional phonons, with a Debye temperature of about 60 K (45 cm-1). This would give an estimation of the highest frequency of the vibrations which can propagate through the three-dimensional proteinic medium. In the highest temperature range (T≳30 K) the results are interpreted with an Orbach process involving an excited level of energy 120 cm-1. This process could be induced by the localized vibrations of the active site. Finally, these results are compared to those recently reported for some hemoproteins [H.J. Stapleton, J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1456 (1980)]. Below 15 K, the temperature dependence of T1 for these samples is similar to that observed for the iron-sulfur proteins and may be interpreted in the same way. Our interpretation is compared to the fractal model proposed by Stapleton et al.

  13. A New Family of Carbohydrate Esterases Is Represented by a GDSL Hydrolase/Acetylxylan Esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus*

    PubMed Central

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-01-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for kcat and kcat/Km suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  14. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  15. Characterization of the Bacillus stearothermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase gene and its ability to complement copper/zinc superoxide dismutase deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, C; Van Kaer, L; Van Camp, W; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Dhaese, P

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant clones containing the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus were isolated with an oligonucleotide probe designed to match a part of the previously determined amino acid sequence. Complementation analyses, performed by introducing each plasmid into a superoxide dismutase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, allowed us to define the region of DNA which encodes the MnSOD structural gene and to identify a promoter region immediately upstream from the gene. These data were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. Since MnSOD is normally restricted to the mitochondria in eucaryotes, we were interested (i) in determining whether B. stearothermophilus MnSOD could function in eucaryotic cytosol and (ii) in determining whether MnSOD could replace the structurally unrelated copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) which is normally found there. To test this, the sequence encoding bacterial MnSOD was cloned into a yeast expression vector and subsequently introduced into a Cu/ZnSOD-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional expression of the protein was demonstrated, and complementation tests revealed that the protein was able to provide tolerance at wild-type levels to conditions which are normally restrictive for this mutant. Thus, in spite of the evolutionary unrelatedness of these two enzymes, Cu/ZnSOD can be functionally replaced by MnSOD in yeast cytosol. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:2407726

  16. Coproduction of thermostable amylase and beta-galactosidase enzymes by Geobacillus stearothermophilus SAB-40: aplication of Plackett-Burman design to evaluate culture requirements affecting enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Solimam, Nadia A

    2008-04-01

    A locally isolated thermophile, Geobacillus sp. SAB-40, producing thermostable extracellular amylase constitutively and an induced intracellular beta-galactosidase was characterized and identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis then revealed its closeness to Geobacillus stearothermophilus. To evaluate the effect of the culture conditions on the coproduction of both enzymes by G. stearothermophilus SAB-40, a Plackett-Burman fractional factorial design was applied to determine the impact of twenty variables. Among the tested variables, CaCl2, the incubation time, MgSO4.7H2O, and tryptone were found to be the most significant for encouraging amylase production. Lactose was found to promote beta-galactosidase production, whereas starch had a significantly negative effect on lactase production. Based on a statistical analysis, a preoptimized medium attained the maximum production of amylase and beta-galactosidase at 23.29 U/ml/min and 12,958 U/mg biomass, respectively, which was 3- and 2-fold higher than the yield of amylase and lactase obtained with the basal medium, respectively.

  17. The dacA gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus coding for D-alanine carboxypeptidase: cloning, structure and expression in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Despreaux, C W; Manning, R F

    1993-09-06

    The bacterial D-alanine carboxypeptidases (CPases) remove C-terminal D-alanyl residues from sugar-peptide cell wall precursors. The CPases have many characteristics in common with the high-M(r) penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) whose inhibition by beta-lactam antibiotics is lethal. The CPases are attractive as model PBPs, because of their relatively lower M(r) and higher activity in vitro. We have cloned and sequenced the Bacillus stearothermophilus gene (dacA) coding for a membrane-bound CPase. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of the gene is homologous to that of the Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis dacA loci, which also code for membrane-bound CPases. E. coli host cells lysed when expression of B. stearothermophilus dacA was induced. The same coding sequence was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, using the alcohol oxidase-1 (AOX1) promoter. Over 100 micrograms/ml of CPase was efficiently secreted into the medium after induction by methanol, without adversely affecting this host. The yeast product is indistinguishable from the native enzyme in structure and activity. The ability to secrete large amounts of heterologous protein and the lack of endogenous peptidoglycan metabolism makes P. pastoris an attractive candidate for the production of PBPs.

  18. Study of the influence of sporulation conditions on heat resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus used in the development of biological indicators for steam sterilization.

    PubMed

    Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Biological indicators are important tools in infection control via sterilization process monitoring. The use of a standardized spore crop with a well-defined heat resistance will guarantee the quality of a biological indicator. Ambient factors during sporulation can affect spore characteristics and properties, including heat resistance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the main sporulation factors responsible for heat resistance in Geobacillus stearothermophilus, a useful biological indicator for steam sterilization. A sequence of a three-step optimization of variables (initial pH, nutrient concentration, tryptone, peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, manganese sulfate, magnesium sulfate, calcium chloride and potassium phosphate) was carried out to screen those that have a significant influence on heat resistance of produced spores. The variable exerting greatest influence on G. stearothermophilus heat resistance during sporulation was found to be the initial pH. Lower nutrient concentration and alkaline pH around 8.5 tended to enhance decimal reduction time at 121 °C (D(121°C)). A central composite design enabled a fourfold enhancement in heat resistance, and the model obtained accurately describes positive pH and negative manganese sulfate concentration influence on spore heat resistance.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of a variant `Termamyl-like' Geobacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase at 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Offen, Wendy A; Viksoe-Nielsen, Anders; Borchert, Torben V; Wilson, Keith S; Davies, Gideon J

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-catalysed degradation of starch is central to many industrial processes, including sugar manufacture and first-generation biofuels. Classical biotechnological platforms involve steam explosion of starch followed by the action of endo-acting glycoside hydrolases termed α-amylases and then exo-acting α-glucosidases (glucoamylases) to yield glucose, which is subsequently processed. A key enzymatic player in this pipeline is the `Termamyl' class of bacterial α-amylases and designed/evolved variants thereof. Here, the three-dimensional structure of one such Termamyl α-amylase variant based upon the parent Geobacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase is presented. The structure has been solved at 1.9 Å resolution, revealing the classical three-domain fold stabilized by Ca2+ and a Ca2+-Na+-Ca2+ triad. As expected, the structure is similar to the G. stearothermophilus α-amylase but with main-chain deviations of up to 3 Å in some regions, reflecting both the mutations and differing crystal-packing environments.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the BseCI DNA methyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus in complex with its cognate DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetaniou, Evangelia G.; Kotsifaki, Dina; Providaki, Mary; Rina, Maria; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from B. stearothermophilus was crystallized as a complex with its cognate DNA. Crystals belong to space group P6 and diffract to 2.5 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from Bacillus stearothermophilus (EC 2.1.1.72), a 579-amino-acid enzyme, methylates the N6 atom of the 3′ adenine in the sequence 5′-ATCGAT-3′. M.BseCI was crystallized in complex with its cognate DNA. The crystals were found to belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87.0, c = 156.1 Å, β = 120.0° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets were collected at wavelengths of 1.1 and 2.0 Å to 2.5 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at 100 K.

  1. Predictive model to describe the combined effect of pH and NaCl on apparent heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Periago, P M; Fernández, P S; Salmerón, M C; Martínez, A

    1998-10-20

    The combined effect of pH and NaCl on the apparent thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores was studied. Spores were heated at different temperatures (115-125 degrees C) in mushroom substrate, acidified using glucono-delta-lactone to different pH levels (from 5.75 to 6.7), which contained concentrations of NaCl that ranged from 0.5 to 3% (w/v). The recovery medium was acidified to the same pH level and contained the same NaCl concentration as the heating menstruum. A factorial experimental design allowed a predictive model to be developed, which described the combined effect of heating temperature, pH and NaCl on the thermal resistance of B. stearothermophilus spores. Predictions from the model provided a valid description of the data used to generate the model, and agreed with observations from the literature and from an independent experiment performed using asparagus and bean substrates.

  2. Inhibition effects of furfural on alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Modig, Tobias; Lidén, Gunnar; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of furfural inhibition of the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; EC 1.1.1.1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AlDH; EC 1.2.1.5) and the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were studied in vitro. At a concentration of less than 2 mM furfural was found to decrease the activity of both PDH and AlDH by more than 90%, whereas the ADH activity decreased by less than 20% at the same concentration. Furfural inhibition of ADH and AlDH activities could be described well by a competitive inhibition model, whereas the inhibition of PDH was best described as non-competitive. The estimated K(m) value of AlDH for furfural was found to be about 5 microM, which was lower than that for acetaldehyde (10 microM). For ADH, however, the estimated K(m) value for furfural (1.2 mM) was higher than that for acetaldehyde (0.4 mM). The inhibition of the three enzymes by 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was also measured. The inhibition caused by HMF of ADH was very similar to that caused by furfural. However, HMF did not inhibit either AlDH or PDH as severely as furfural. The inhibition effects on the three enzymes could well explain previously reported in vivo effects caused by furfural and HMF on the overall metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting a critical role of these enzymes in the observed inhibition. PMID:11964178

  3. Characterization of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Caroline E.; Brocklehurst, Keith; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Warren, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    RALDH3 (retinal dehydrogenase 3) was characterized by kinetic and binding studies, protein engineering, homology modelling, ligand docking and electrostatic-potential calculations. The major recognition determinant of an RALDH3 substrate was shown to be an eight-carbon chain bonded to the aldehyde group whose kinetic influence (kcat/Km at pH 8.5) decreases when shortened or lengthened. Surprisingly, the β-ionone ring of all-trans-retinal is not a major recognition site. The dissociation constants (Kd) of the complexes of RALDH3 with octanal, NAD+ and NADH were determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The similarity of the Kd values for the complexes with NAD+ and with octanal suggests a random kinetic mechanism for RALDH3, in contrast with the ordered sequential mechanism often associated with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. Inhibition of RALDH3 by tri-iodothyronine binding in competition with NAD+, predicted by the modelling, was established kinetically and by immunoprecipitation. Mechanistic implications of the kinetically influential ionizations with macroscopic pKa values of 5.0 and 7.5 revealed by the pH-dependence of kcat are discussed. Analogies with data for non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans, together with the present modelled structure of the thioacyl RALDH3, suggest (a) that kcat characterizes deacylation of this intermediate for specific substrates and (b) the assignment of the pKa of the major ionization (approximating to 7.5) to the perturbed carboxy group of Glu280 whose conjugate base is envisaged as supplying general base catalysis to attack of a water molecule. The macroscopic pKa of the minor ionization (5.0) is considered to approximate to that of the carboxy group of Glu488. PMID:16241904

  4. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  5. Identification of a Long-range Protein Network That Modulates Active Site Dynamics in Extremophilic Alcohol Dehydrogenases*

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Zachary D.; Cun, Shujian; Klinman, Judith P.

    2013-01-01

    A tetrameric thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (ht-ADH) has been mutated at an aromatic side chain in the active site (Trp-87). The ht-W87A mutation results in a loss of the Arrhenius break seen at 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme and an increase in cold lability that is attributed to destabilization of the active tetrameric form. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are nearly temperature-independent over the experimental temperature range, and similar in magnitude to those measured above 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme. This suggests that the rigidification in the wild-type enzyme below 30 °C does not occur for ht-W87A. A mutation at the dimer-dimer interface in a thermolabile psychrophilic homologue of ht-ADH, ps-A25Y, leads to a more thermostable enzyme and a change in the rate-determining step at low temperature. The reciprocal mutation in ht-ADH, ht-Y25A, results in kinetic behavior similar to that of W87A. Collectively, the results indicate that flexibility at the active site is intimately connected to a subunit interaction 20 Å away. The convex Arrhenius curves previously reported for ht-ADH (Kohen, A., Cannio, R., Bartolucci, S., and Klinman, J. P. (1999) Nature 399, 496–499) are proposed to arise, at least in part, from a change in subunit interactions that rigidifies the substrate-binding domain below 30 °C, and impedes the ability of the enzyme to sample the catalytically relevant conformational landscape. These results implicate an evolutionarily conserved, long-range network of dynamical communication that controls C-H activation in the prokaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:23525111

  6. Cephalopod alcohol dehydrogenase: purification and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Rosario Fernández, M; Jörnvall, H; Moreno, A; Kaiser, R; Parés, X

    1993-08-16

    Octopus, squid and cuttle-fish organs were examined for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Only one form was detectable, with properties typical of mammalian class III alcohol dehydrogenase. The corresponding protein was purified from octopus and enzymatically characterized. Ion-exchange and affinity chromatography produced a pure protein in excellent yield (73%) after 1600-fold purification. Enzymatic parameters with several substrates were similar to those for the human class III alcohol dehydrogenase, demonstrating a largely conserved function of the enzyme through wide lines of divergence covering vertebrates, cephalopods and bacteria. The results establish the universal occurrence of class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its strictly conserved functional properties in separate living forms. The absence of other alcohol dehydrogenases in cephalopods is compatible with the emergence of the ethanol-active class I type at a later stage, in lineages leading to vertebrates.

  7. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  8. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Substrate specificities and inhibition studies.

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, R W; Fewson, C A

    1988-01-01

    The apparent Km and maximum velocity values of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were determined for a range of alcohols and aldehydes and the corresponding turnover numbers and specificity constants were calculated. Benzyl alcohol was the most effective alcohol substrate for benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase. Perillyl alcohol was the second most effective substrate, and was the only non-aromatic alcohol oxidized. The other substrates of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase were all aromatic in nature, with para-substituted derivatives of benzyl alcohol being better substrates than other derivatives. Coniferyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol were also substrates. Benzaldehyde was much the most effective substrate for benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II. Benzaldehydes with a single small substituent group in the meta or para position were better substrates than any other benzaldehyde derivatives. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II could also oxidize the aliphatic aldehydes hexan-1-al and octan-1-al, although poorly. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was substrate-inhibited by benzaldehyde when the assay concentration exceeded approx. 10 microM. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, but not benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, exhibited esterase activity with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. Both benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II were inhibited by the thiol-blocking reagents iodoacetate, iodoacetamide, 4-chloromercuribenzoate and N-ethylmaleimide. Benzyl alcohol or benzaldehyde respectively protected against these inhibitions. NAD+ also gave some protection. Neither benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase nor benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was inhibited by the metal-ion-chelating agents EDTA, 2,2'-bipyridyl, pyrazole or 2-phenanthroline. Neither enzyme was inhibited by a range of plausible metabolic inhibitors such as mandelate, phenylglyoxylate, benzoate, succinate, acetyl-CoA, ATP or ADP. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was

  9. Synthesis of pyruvate carboxylase from its apoenzyme and (+)-biotin in Bacillus stearothermophilus. Purification and properties of the apoenzyme and the holoenzyme synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Sundaram, T. K.; Dilks, Susan N.; Kornberg, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    1. Methods are described for the assay and purification of pyruvate apocarboxylase and pyruvate holocarboxylase synthetase from biotin-deficient Bacillus stearothermophilus. 2. Pyruvate apocarboxylase was obtained 200-fold purified and in a nearly homogeneous state; it closely resembled the holoenzyme of the thermophile in fractionation properties, electrophoretic mobility and molecular weight (estimated to be 350000 by gel filtration). 3. Pyruvate holocarboxylase synthetase, purified more than 50-fold, was estimated to have a molecular weight of approx. 40000. 4. The conversion of the purified apoenzyme into the holoenzyme required the presence of the synthetase, ATP (Km3.3×10−7m), (+)-biotin (Km7.5×10−8m) and Mg2+; it differed from the conversions effected by systems forming other carboxylases in mesophilic organisms in also requiring the presence of acetyl-CoA. ImagesFig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:5129257

  10. Structural basis for thermostability revealed through the identification and characterization of a highly thermostable phosphotriesterase-like lactonase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Aikens, John; Turner, Robert J.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mescar, Andrew D.

    2009-08-31

    A new enzyme homologous to phosphotriesterase was identified from the bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GsP). This enzyme belongs to the amidohydrolase family and possesses the ability to hydrolyze both lactone and organophosphate (OP) compounds, making it a phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL). GsP possesses higher OP-degrading activity than recently characterized PLLs, and it is extremely thermostable. GsP is active up to 100 C with an energy of activation of 8.0 kcal/mol towards ethyl paraoxon, and it can withstand an incubation temperature of 60 C for two days. In an attempt to understand the thermostability of PLLs, the X-ray structure of GsP was determined and compared to those of existing PLLs. Based upon a comparative analysis, a new thermal advantage score and plot was developed and reveals that a number of different factors contribute to the thermostability of PLLs.

  11. Biosynthesis of ω-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber.

    PubMed

    Siristova, Lucie; Luhovy, Radek; Sigler, Karel; Rezanka, Tomas

    2011-05-01

    Two thermophilic strains belonging to Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber, which naturally do not synthesize ω-alicyclic fatty acids (ω-FAs) were cultivated with cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl and cyclohexyl carboxylic acids. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid methyl and picolinyl esters showed that both strains are able to synthesize ω-FAs when cultivated with the appropriate precursor. The incorporation of cyclic acids influenced the whole FA composition as well as membrane fluidity. Membrane fluidity of intact cells was studied by measuring the fluorescence polarisation of the probe l,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene incorporated into membrane lipid bilayers. Cytoplasmic membrane became more fluid with increasing content of ω-FAs. This is caused by considerable changes in lipid packing within the membrane induced by the presence of ω-FAs not found in the natural environment of Geobacillus and Meiothermus strains.

  12. Modeling the combined effect of pH and temperature on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in a multicomponent food extract.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, W; Rodrigo, M; Martínez, A

    2001-10-01

    The combined effect of pH and temperature on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in an extract of complex food was studied. The results showed that, in general, reducing the pH reduced the heat resistance of the spores. Similarly, the value for the D parameter in the nonacidified extract was between 30 and 70% lower than the one obtained with double-distilled water. This result once again shows the importance of the substrate in inactivation studies of microorganisms. The experimental data were used to carry out a comparison of two predictive mathematical models of inactivation, one based on a multiparametric regression obtained in this study and the other obtained from the bibliography and based on a linear-Bigelow equation. Both models predict reasonably well, although the multiparametric model presented a slightly better accuracy factor (1.11) than the one obtained with the linear-Bigelow equation (1.13).

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  14. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  19. ISBst12, a novel type of insertion-sequence element causing loss of S-layer-gene expression in Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980.

    PubMed

    Egelseer, E M; Idris, R; Jarosch, M; Danhorn, T; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    2000-09-01

    The cell surface of the surface layer (S-layer)-carrying strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 is completely covered with an oblique lattice composed of the S-layer protein SbsC. In the S-layer-deficient strain, theS-layer gene sbsC was still present but was interrupted by a novel type of insertion sequence (IS) element designated ISBst12. The insertion site was found to be located within the coding region of the sbsC gene, 199 bp downstream from the translation start of SbsC. ISBst12 is 1612 bp long, bounded by 16 bp imperfect inverted repeats and flanked by a directly repeated 8 bp target sequence. ISBst12 contains an ORF of 1446 bp and is predicted to encode a putative transposase of 482 aa with a calculated theoretical molecular mass of 55562 Da and an isoelectric point of 9.13. The putative transposase does not exhibit a typical DDE motif but displays aHis-Arg-Tyr triad characteristic of the active site of integrases from the bacteriophage lambda Int family. Furthermore, two overlapping leucine-zipper motifs were identified at the N-terminal part of the putative transposase. As revealed by Southern blotting, ISBst12 was present in multiple copies in the S-layer-deficient strain as well as in the S-layer-carrying strain. Northern blotting indicated that S-layer gene expression is already inhibited at the transcriptional level, since no sbsC-specific transcript could be identified in the S-layer-deficient strain. By using PCR, ISBst12 was also detected in B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6, in its oxygen-induced strain variant PV72/p2 and in the S-layer-deficient strain PV72/T5.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gan1D, a GH1 6-phospho-β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T1

    PubMed Central

    Lansky, Shifra; Zehavi, Arie; Dann, Roie; Dvir, Hay; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T1 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains an extensive system for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. The bacterium uses a number of extracellular enzymes that break down the high-molecular-weight polysaccharides into short oligosaccharides, which enter the cell and are further hydrolyzed into sugar monomers by dedicated intracellular glycoside hydrolases. The interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these proteins originates mainly from the wide range of their potential biotechnological applications. Studying the different hemicellulolytic utilization systems in G. stearothermophilus T1, a new galactan-utilization gene cluster was recently identified, which encodes a number of proteins, one of which is a GH1 putative 6-phospho-β-galactosidase (Gan1D). Gan1D has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized as part of its comprehensive structure–function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with average crystallographic unit-cell parameters of a = 67.0, b = 78.1, c = 92.1 Å, α = 102.4, β = 93.5, γ = 91.7°. A full diffraction data set to 1.33 Å resolution has been collected for the wild-type enzyme, as measured from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for the detailed three-dimensional crystal structure analysis of Gan1D. PMID:24637762

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of alpha-D-glucuronidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, A; Shulami, S; Moryles, S; Zaide, G; Shoham, Y; Shoham, G

    1999-04-01

    alpha-D-Glucuronidases cleave the alpha-1,2-glycosidic bond of the 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronic acid side chain in xylan. Of the xylan-debranching hydrolases, these enzymes are the least studied and characterized. The alpha-glucuronidase gene (aguA) from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has been cloned, sequenced and overproduced in Escherichia coli. The gene encodes for a protein of 679 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 78480 and a pI of 5.42. alpha-Glucuronidase T-6 shows high homology to the alpha-glucuronidases of Thermotoga maritima (60% identity) and of Tri-choderma reesei (44% identity). Based on the amino-acid sequence similarity, it is likely that these enzymes represent a new class of glycosyl hydrolases. Crystallographic studies of alpha-glucuronidase T-6 were initiated to study the mechanism of catalysis, as well as to provide a structural basis for rational introduction of enhanced thermostability by site-specific mutagenesis. In this report, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the native alpha-glucuronidase T-6 enzyme is described. Two crystal forms were found suitable for detailed crystal structure analysis. The T1 form was obtained by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant and 2-propanol as an organic additive. The crystals belong to a primitive tetragonal crystal system (space group P41212 or P43212) with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 76.1 and c = 331.2 A. These crystals are mechanically strong, are stable in the X--ray beam and diffract X-rays to better than 2.4 A resolution. A full 3.0 A resolution diffraction data set (97.3% completeness, Rmerge 9.8%) has recently been collected on one crystal at room temperature using a rotating-anode X-ray source and an R-AXIS IIc imaging-plate detector. The M1 form was obtained and characterized by similar techniques. The best crystallization occurred at a slightly lower pH and a lower concentration of 2-propanol. The crystals belong to

  2. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  3. Asparagusate dehydrogenases and lipoyl dehydrogenase from asparagus mitochondria. Physical, chemical, and enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, H; Egami, F

    1976-06-25

    Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II and lipoyl dehydrogenase have been obtained in homogeneous state from asparagus mitochondria. They are flavin enzymes with 1 mol of FAD/mol of protein. Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II and lipoyl dehydrogenase have s20,w of 6.22 S, 6.39 S, and 5.91 S, respectively, and molecular weights of 111,000, 110,000, and 95,000 (sedimentation equilibrium) or 112,000, 112,000, and 92,000 (gel filtration). They are slightly acidic proteins with isoelectric points of 6.75, 5.75, and 6.80. Both asparagusate dehydrogenases catalyzed the reaction Asg(SH)2 + NAD+ equilibrium AsgS2 + NADH + H+ and exhibit lipoyl dehydrogenase and diaphorase activities. Lipoyl dehydrogenase is specific for lipoate and has no asparagusate dehydrogenase activity. NADP cannot replace NAD in any case. Optimum pH for substrate reduction of the three enzymes are near 5.9. Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II have Km values of 21.5 mM and 20.0 mM for asparagusate and 3.0 mM and 3.3 mM for lipoate, respectively. Lipoyl dehydrogenase activity of asparagusate dehydrogenases is enhanced by NAD and surfactants such as lecithin and Tween 80, but asparagusate dehydrogenase activity is not enhanced. Asparagusate dehydrogenases are strongly inhibited by mercuric ion, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. Amino acid composition of the three enzymes is presented and discussed.

  4. Shikimate dehydrogenase from Pinu sylvestris L. needles

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V.I.; Shein, I.V.

    1986-07-10

    Shikimate dehydrogenase was isolated by extraction from pine needles and partially purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate. In conifers, in contrast to other plants, all three isoenzymes of shikimate dehydrogenase exhibit activity not only with NADP/sup +/, but also with NAD/sup +/. The values of K/sub m/ for shikimate, when NADP/sup +/ and NAD/sup +/ are used as cofactors, are 0.22 and 1.13 mM, respectively. The enzyme is maximally active at pH 10 with both cofactors. It is suggested that NAD-dependent shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the initial reaction of the alternative pathway of the conversion of shikimic acid to hydroxybenzoic acid. The peculiarities of the organization and regulation of the initial reactions of the shikimate pathway in conifers and in plants with shikimate dehydrogenase absolutely specific for NADP are discussed.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  6. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  7. Modification of rock/fluid and fluid/fluid interfaces during MEOR processes, using two biosurfactant producing strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 and Enterobacter cloacae: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sarafzadeh, Pegah; Zeinolabedini Hezave, Ali; Mohammadi, Sahar; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2014-05-01

    During any microbial enhanced oil recovery process, both cells and the metabolic products of bacteria govern the tertiary oil recovery efficiency. However, very accurate examination is needed to find the functionality of these tiny creatures at different reservoir conditions. In this regard, the effect of cell structure on ultimate microbial recovery efficiency which is the most dominant mechanism based on the microorganism types (gram-negative or gram-positive) was systematically investigated. At the first stage, possible different active mechanisms using Bacillus stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 strain were tested using specially designed injection protocol, in situ and ex situ core flooding experiments, interfacial tension, viscosity, pH and Amott wettability index measurements. At the second stage, comparing functionality of B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 (a gram-positive type) with the previously examined strain namely Enterobacter cloacae as a gram-negative type, proposed this hypothesis that the cell structure significantly affects the interfacial behaviors. New designed protocols were utilized to check the individual effects of cells, bioproducts and interaction of these together on the oil/water and also fluids/rock interfaces. The final results showed that the cells of B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 adhere more into the oil/water interface compared to E. cloacae and change its rheological properties; e.g. its elastic properties which affect the ultimate microbial oil recovery efficiency. Eventually, contradicting results revealed that biosurfactant produced by E. cloacae was able to considerably reduce the interfacial tension and alter the wettability of the rock (to neutral conditions) while biosurfactant produced by B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 was not very effective.

  8. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  9. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  10. Digitalis metabolism and human liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W A; Vallee, B L

    1980-01-01

    Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: NAD" oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) catalyzes the oxidation of the 3 beta-OH group of digitoxigenin, digoxigenin, and gitoxigenin to their 3-keto derivatives, which have been characterized by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These studies have identified human liver alcohol dehydrogenase as the unknown NAD(H)-dependent liver enzyme specific for the free hydroxyl group at C3 of the cardiac genins; this hydroxyl is the critical site of the genins' enzymatic oxidation and concomitant pharmacological inactivation in humans. Several kinetic approaches have demonstrated that ethanol and the pharmacologically active components of the digitalis glycosides are oxidized with closely similar kcat/Km values at the same site on human liver alcohol dehydrogenase, for which they compete. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase thereby becomes an important biochemical link in the metabolism, pharmacology, and toxicology of ethanol and these glycosides, structurally unrelated agents that are both used widely. Both the competition of ethanol with these cardiac sterols and the narrow margin of safety in the therapeutic use of digitalis derivatives would seem to place at increased risk those individuals who receive digitalis and simultaneously consume large amounts of ethanol or whose alcohol dehydrogenase function is impaired. PMID:6987673

  11. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  12. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  13. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  14. The amino acidic substitution of cysteine 167 by serine (C167S) in BstVI restriction endonuclease of Bacillus stearothermophilus V affects its conformation and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Loyola, C; Saavedra, C; Gómez, I; Vásquez, C

    1999-03-01

    The restriction endonuclease BstVI from Bacillus stearothermophilus V contains three cysteine residues at positions 134, 167 and 180. Titration of Cys residues with DTNB showed that none of them are involved in disulphide bond formation. Cysteine triplets 134 and 167 were modified by recombinant PCR to introduce a serine residue in each case. The mutated genes were cloned into pGEM-T vector and transformed into E. coli JM109. Even though pGEM-T is not designed for expression, the mutant proteins were efficiently expressed in E. coli. The endonuclease carrying the mutation C134S was purified to homogeneity but appeared to be very unstable. In contrast, the C167S mutant enzyme was stable when pure and was studied biochemically. This mutant enzyme was as stable and resistant to protein-denaturing agents as the wild type enzyme. The activity of both enzymes was not affected by preincubations of 2 h at 80 degrees C. A short preincubation at 95 degrees C caused a complete inactivation of the mutant enzyme while the wild type endonuclease retained 30% of its activity. Moreover, the C167S BstVI was more susceptible to be hydrolyzed by proteinase K and trypsine compared to the wild type endonuclease. These results show that the substitution Cys --> Ser at position 167 affects the configuration and thermostability of BstVI restriction endonuclease.

  15. Suitability of thermal plasmas for large-area bacteria inactivation on temperature-sensitive surfaces - first results with Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulc, M.; Schein, S.; Schaup, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Schein, J.

    2017-04-01

    The application of thermal plasma for large-area bacteria inactivation on temperature-sensitive surfaces is not a common one. Nonetheless, there are thermal plasma generators which offer a high sheath homogeneity and have proven to be suitable for treatment of thermally sensitive materials in the past. To investigate the suitability of such plasmas, agar dishes plated with endospores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus have been treated with a long arc plasma generator called LARGE. The achieved results have been compared with a commercially available non-thermal plasma generator. A significant inactivation of the endospores could be observed only after 60 s of treatment with the thermal plasma source. This was not possible with the non-thermal generator. Moreover, no temperature damage or increase of the specimen could be detected. An attempt to determine the main agents responsible for the microbicidal effects have been made - the influence of plasma gas composition, discharge current and treatment time has been investigated. Significant improvements in the disinfection rates after adding small amounts of nitrogen to the plasma gas could be observed. A first discussion regarding the suitability of thermal plasmas for bacteria inactivation has been given.

  16. Comparative studies of S-layer proteins from Bacillus stearothermophilus strains expressed during growth in continuous culture under oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    The specific properties of S-layer proteins from three different Bacillus stearothermophilus strains revealing oblique, square, or hexagonal lattice symmetry were preserved during growth in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions in which glucose was used as the sole carbon source. When oxygen limitation was relieved, amino acids became metabolized, cell density increased, and different S-layer proteins from wild-type strains became rapidly replaced by a new common type of S-layer protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 97,000 which assembled into an identical oblique (p2) lattice type. During switching from wild-type strains to variants, patches of the S-layer lattices characteristics for wild-type strains, granular regions, and areas with oblique lattice symmetry could be observed on the surface of individual cells from all organisms. The granular regions apparently consisted of mixtures of the S-layer proteins from the wild-type strains and the newly synthesized p2 S-layer proteins from the variants. S-layer proteins from wild-type strains possessed identical N-terminal regions but led to quite different cleavage products upon peptide mapping, indicating that they are encoded by different genes. Chemical analysis including N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping showed that the oblique S-layer lattices synthesized under increased oxygen supply were composed of identical protein species. Images PMID:7961489

  17. Use of 'small but smart' libraries to enhance the enantioselectivity of an esterase from Bacillus stearothermophilus towards tetrahydrofuran-3-yl acetate.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Alberto; Gall, Markus G; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Thompson, Mark L; Schmidt, Marlen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2013-07-01

    Two libraries of simultaneous double mutations in the active site region of an esterase from Bacillus stearothermophilus were constructed to improve the enantioselectivity in the hydrolysis of tetrahydrofuran-3-yl acetate. As screening of large mutant libraries is hampered by the necessity for GC/MS analysis, mutant libraries were designed according to a 'small but smart' concept. The design of focused libraries was based on data derived from a structural alignment of 3317 amino acid sequences of α/β-hydrolase fold enzymes with the bioinformatic tool 3DM. In this way, the number of mutants to be screened was substantially reduced as compared with a standard site-saturation mutagenesis approach. Whereas the wild-type esterase showed only poor enantioselectivity (E = 4.3) in the hydrolysis of (S)-tetrahydrofuran-3-yl acetate, the best variants obtained with this approach showed increased E-values of up to 10.4. Furthermore, some variants with inverted enantiopreference were found. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  18. Secretory expression of thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus FI by using native signal peptide and α-factor secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Latiffi, Amaliawati Ahmad; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Basri, Mahiran

    2013-01-01

    The thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus F1 has high potential for industrial applications, and attempt to produce the enzyme in yeast for higher yield was undertaken. Secretory expression of F1 protease through yeast system could improve enzyme's capability, thus simplifying the purification steps. Mature and full genes of F1 protease were cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vectors (pGAPZαB and pPICZαB) and transformed into P. pastoris strains (GS115 and SMD1168H) via electroporation method. Recombinant F1 protease under regulation constitutive GAP promoter revealed that the highest expression was achieved after 72 h cultivation. While inducible AOX promoter showed that 0.5% (v/v) methanol was the best to induce expression. It was proven that constitutive expression strategy was better than inducible system. The α-secretion signal from the plasmid demonstrated higher secretory expression level of F1 protease as compared to native Open Reading Frame (ORF) in GS115 strain (GE6GS). Production medium YPTD was found to be the best for F1 protease expression with the highest yield of 4.13 U/mL. The protein was expressed as His-tagged fusion protein with a size about 34 kDa.

  19. Tagatose production by immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells containing Geobacillus stearothermophilus l-arabinose isomerase mutant in a packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun-Sook; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2005-01-01

    Using immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells containing Geobacillus stearothermophilus l-arabinose isomerase mutant (Gali 152), we found that the galactose isomerization reaction was maximal at 70 degrees C and pH 7.0. Manganese ion enhanced galactose isomerization to tagatose. The immobilized cells were most stable at 60 degrees C and pH 7.0. The cell and substrate concentrations and dilution rate were optimal at 34 g/L, 300 g/L, and 0.05 h(-1), respectively. Under the optimum conditions, the immobilized cell reactor with Mn2+ produced an average of 59 g/L tagatose with a productivity of 2.9 g/L.h and a conversion yield of 19.5% for the first 20 days. The operational stability of immobilized cells with Mn2+ was demonstrated, and their half-life for tagatose production was 34 days. Tagatose production was compared for free and immobilized enzymes and free and immobilized cells using the same mass of cells. Immobilized cells produced the highest tagatose concentration, indicating that cell immobilization was more efficient for tagatose production than enzyme immobilization.

  20. Application of artificial neural networks to describe the combined effect of pH and NaCl on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Esnoz, A; Periago, P M; Conesa, R; Palop, A

    2006-02-01

    A model for prediction of bacterial spore inactivation was developed. The influence of temperature, pH and NaCl on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was described using low-complexity, black box models based on artificial neural networks. Literature data were used to build and train the neural network, and new experimental data were used to evaluate it. The neural network models gave better predictions than the classical quadratic response surface model in all the experiments tried. When the neural networks were evaluated using new experimental data, also good predictions were obtained, providing fail-safe predictions of D values in all cases. The weights and biases values of neurons of the neural network that gave the best results are presented, so the reader can use the model for their own purposes. The use of this non-linear modelling technique makes it possible to describe more accurately interacting effects of environmental factors when compared with classical predictive microbial models.

  1. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  2. Kinetic analysis about the effects of neutral salts on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    The effects of salts on the rate constants of inactivation by heat of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 60.0 degrees C were measured. Different effects were observed at low and high salt concentrations. At high concentrations, some salts had stabilizing effects, while others were destabilizing. The effects of salts in the high concentration range examined can be described as follows: (decreased thermal stability) NaClO(4) < NaI = (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr < NH(4)Br < NaBr = KBr = CsBr = (no addition) < (CH(3))(4)NBr < KCl < KF < Na(2)SO(4) (increased thermal stability). The decreasing effect of NaClO(4) on YADH controlled the thermal stability of the enzyme absolutely and was not compensated by the addition of Na(2)SO(4), a salt which stabilized the enzyme. However, Na(2)SO(4) compensation did occur in response to the decrease in thermal stability caused by (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr. The rate constants of inactivation by heat (k (in)) of the enzyme were measured at various temperatures. Effective values of the thermodynamic activation parameters of thermal inactivation, activation of free energy (DeltaG (double dagger)), activation enthalpy (DeltaH (double dagger)), and activation entropy (DeltaS (double dagger)), were determined. The thermal stability of YADH in 0.8 M Na(2)SO(4) increased more than that of pyruvate kinase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, a moderate thermophile. The changes in the values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger) were great and showed a general compensatory tendency, with the exception of in the case of NaClO(4). The temperature for the general compensation effect (T (c)) was approximately 123 degrees C. With Na(2)SO(4), the thermal stability of YADH at a temperature below T (c) was greater than that in the absence of salt due to the higher values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger), respectively, and thus was an example of low-temperature enzymatic stabilization. With (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr, the thermal stability of YADH

  3. [Interaction of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Kotliar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-04-01

    The equilibrium and rate constants for interaction of the reduced and oxidized membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) with oxaloacetate were determined. The 10-fold decrease in the oxaloacetate affinity for the reduced enzyme was shown to be due to the 10-fold increase of the enzyme-inhibitor complex dissociation rate, which occurs upon its reduction. The rate of dissociation induced by succinate is 10 times higher than that induced by malonate in the submitochondrial particles, being equal in the soluble enzyme preparations. The rates of dissociation induced by malonate excess, or by the enzyme irreversibly utilizing oxaloacetate (transaminase in the presence of glutamate) are also equal. The data obtained suggest that succinate dehydrogenase interaction with succinate and oxaloacetate results from the competition for a single dicarboxylate-specific site. In submitochondrial particles all succinate dehydrogenase molecules are in redox equilibrium provided for by endogenous ubiquinone. No electronic equilibrium between the individual enzyme molecules exists, when succinate dehydrogenase is solubilized.

  4. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  5. Regulation of alternate peripheral pathways of glucose catabolism during aerobic and anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J C; Phibbs, P V

    1983-05-01

    Glucose may be converted to 6-phosphogluconate by alternate pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glucose is phosphorylated to glucose-6-phosphate, which is oxidized to 6-phosphogluconate during anaerobic growth when nitrate is used as respiratory electron acceptor. Mutant cells lacking glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are unable to catabolize glucose under these conditions. The mutant cells utilize glucose as effectively as do wild-type cells in the presence of oxygen; under these conditions, glucose is utilized via direct oxidation to gluconate, which is converted to 6-phosphogluconate. The membrane-associated glucose dehydrogenase activity was not formed during anaerobic growth with glucose. Gluconate, the product of the enzyme, appeared to be the inducer of the gluconate transport system, gluconokinase, and membrane-associated gluconate dehydrogenase. 6-Phosphogluconate is probably the physiological inducer of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and the dehydratase and aldolase of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Nitrate-linked respiration is required for the anaerobic uptake of glucose and gluconate by independently regulated transport systems in cells grown under denitrifying conditions.

  6. Analysis of the gluconate (gnt) operon of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Reizer, A; Deutscher, J; Saier, M H; Reizer, J

    1991-05-01

    The gluconate (gnt) operon of Bacillus subtilis includes the gntR, gntK, gntP, and gntZ genes, respectively encoding the transcriptional repressor of the operon, gluconate kinase, the gluconate permease, and an unidentified open reading frame (Fujita and Fujita, 1987). We have compared the proteins encoded by the gnt operon of B.subtilis with published sequences and showed that (i) the gluconate repressor is homologous to several putative regulatory proteins in Escherichia coli, (ii) the gluconate kinase of B. subtilis is homologous to xylulose kinase, glycerol kinase and fucose kinase in E. coli (20-26% identity; 12-59 S.D.), (iii) the gluconate permease exhibits a C-terminal domain which is homologous to a hydrophobic protein encoded by an unidentified open reading frame (dsdAp) which precedes the dsdA gene of E. coli (39% identity; 19 S.D.), and (iv) the gntZ gene product is homologous to 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases of other bacteria and of animals (48-56%; 82-178 S.D.), thereby suggesting that the B. subtilis gntZ encodes 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Several conserved regions of the sequenced 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases can serve as signature patterns of this protein. Computer analyses have indicated that the previously reported sequences of the porcine and ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases, as well as the hypothetical DsdAp protein, are probably erroneous. The probable reasons for the errors are reported along with the proposed revised sequences.

  7. Development of an amine dehydrogenase for synthesis of chiral amines.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Michael J; Vázquez-Figueroa, Eduardo; Woodall, Nicholas B; Moore, Jeffrey C; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2012-04-16

    A leucine dehydrogenase has been successfully altered through several rounds of protein engineering to an enantioselective amine dehydrogenase. Instead of the wild-type α-keto acid, the new amine dehydrogenase now accepts the analogous ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), which corresponds to exchange of the carboxy group by a methyl group to produce chiral (R)-1,3-dimethylbutylamine.

  8. Calculations of hydrogen tunnelling and enzyme catalysis: a comparison of liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresadern, Gary; McNamara, Jonathan P.; Mohr, Matthias; Wang, Hong; Burton, Neil A.; Hillier, Ian H.

    2002-06-01

    Although the potential energy barrier for hydrogen transfer is similar for the enzymes liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase, the degree of tunnelling is predicted to differ greatly, and is reflected by their primary kinetic isotope effects.

  9. [Thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase incorporated into highly concentrated gels].

    PubMed

    Kulis, Iu Iu

    1979-03-01

    The rate constants for inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase in solution at 65 degrees C (pH 7,5) are 0,72 and 0,013 min-1, respectively. The enzyme incorporation into acrylamide gels results in immobilized enzymes, whose residual activity is 18--25% of the original one. In 6,7% gels the rate of thermal inactivation for lactate dehydrogenase is decreased nearly 10-fold, whereas the inactivation rate for alcohol dehydrogenase is increased 4,6-fold as compared to the soluble enzymes. In 14% and 40% gels the inactivation constants for lactate dehydrogenase are 6,3.10(-3) and 5,9.10(-4) min-1, respectively. In 60% gels the thermal inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase is decelerated 3600-fold as compared to the native enzyme. The enthalpy and enthropy for the inactivation of the native enzyme are equal to 62,8 kcal/mole and 116,9 cal/(mole.grad.) for the native enzyme and those of gel-incorporated (6,7%) enzyme -- 38,7 kcal/mole and 42 cal/(mole.grad.), respectively. The thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in 60% gels is increased 12-fold. To prevent gel swelling, methacrylic acid and allylamine were added to the matrix, with subsequent treatment by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The enzyme activity of the modified gels is 2,7--3% of that for the 6,7% gels. The stability of lactate dehydrogenase in such gels is significantly increased. A mechanism of stabilization of the subunit enzymes in highly concentrated gels is discussed.

  10. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, N.L.; Ferry, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50..mu..mol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 ..mu..mol of coenzyme F/sub 420/ per min per mg of protein. The apparent K/sub m/ for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F/sub 420/, was 10-fold greater (63 ..mu..M) than for coenzyme F/sub 420/ (6 ..mu..M). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (K/sub m/ = 13 ..mu..M) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (K/sub m/ = 25 ..mu..M) with formate, but did not reduce NAD/sup +/ or NADP/sup +/. The reduction of NADP/sup +/ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F/sub 420/, and coenzyme F/sub 420/:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F/sub 420/. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55/sup 0/C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (K/sub i/ = 6 ..mu..M), azide (K/sub i/ = 39 ..mu..M),..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm.

  11. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Study of the combined effect of electro-activated solutions and heat treatment on the destruction of spores of Clostridium sporogenes and Geobacillus stearothermophilus in model solution and vegetable puree.

    PubMed

    Liato, Viacheslav; Labrie, Steve; Viel, Catherine; Benali, Marzouk; Aïder, Mohammed

    2015-10-01

    The combined effect of heat treatment and electro-activated solution (EAS) on the heat resistance of spores of Clostridium sporogenes and Geobacillus stearothermophilus was assessed under various heating and exposure time combinations. The acid and neutral EAS showed the highest inhibitory activity, indicating that these solutions may be considered as strong sporicidal disinfectants. These EAS were able to cause a reduction of ≥6 log of spores of C. sporogenes at 60 °C in only 1 min of exposition. For G. stearothermophilus spores, a reduction of 4.5 log was observed at 60 °C in 1 min, while in 5 min, ≥7 log CFU/ml reduction was observed. Inoculated puree of pea and corn were used as a food matrix for the determination of the heat resistance of these spores during the treatments in glass capillaries. The inactivation kinetics of the spores was studied in an oil bath. Combined treatment by EAS and temperature demonstrated a significant decrease in the heat resistance of C. sporogenes. The D100°C in pea puree with NaCl solution was 66.86 min while with acid and neutral EAS it was reduced down to 3.97 and 2.19 min, respectively. The spore of G. stearothermophilus displayed higher heat resistance as confirmed by other similar studies. Its D130°C in pea puree showed a decrease from 1.45 min in NaCl solution down to 1.30 and 0.93 min for acid and neutral EAS, respectively. The differences between the spores of these species are attributable to their different sensitivities with respect to pH, Redox potential and oxygen.

  13. Identification of Two Binding Domains, One for Peptidoglycan and Another for a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer, on the N-Terminal Part of the S-Layer Protein SbsB from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    PubMed Central

    Sára, Margit; Egelseer, Eva M.; Dekitsch, Christine; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    First studies on the structure-function relationship of the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p2 revealed the coexistence of two binding domains on its N-terminal part, one for peptidoglycan and another for a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). The peptidoglycan binding domain is located between amino acids 1 to 138 of the mature S-layer protein comprising a typical S-layer homologous domain. The SCWP binding domain lies between amino acids 240 to 331 and possesses a high serine plus glycine content. PMID:9852032

  14. Protein Engineering by Random Mutagenesis and Structure-Guided Consensus of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Lipase T6 for Enhanced Stability in Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Adi; Shemesh, Einav; Dayan, Natali

    2014-01-01

    The abilities of enzymes to catalyze reactions in nonnatural environments of organic solvents have opened new opportunities for enzyme-based industrial processes. However, the main drawback of such processes is that most enzymes have a limited stability in polar organic solvents. In this study, we employed protein engineering methods to generate a lipase for enhanced stability in methanol, which is important for biodiesel production. Two protein engineering approaches, random mutagenesis (error-prone PCR) and structure-guided consensus, were applied in parallel on an unexplored lipase gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. A high-throughput colorimetric screening assay was used to evaluate lipase activity after an incubation period in high methanol concentrations. Both protein engineering approaches were successful in producing variants with elevated half-life values in 70% methanol. The best variant of the random mutagenesis library, Q185L, exhibited 23-fold-improved stability, yet its methanolysis activity was decreased by one-half compared to the wild type. The best variant from the consensus library, H86Y/A269T, exhibited 66-fold-improved stability in methanol along with elevated thermostability (+4.3°C) and a 2-fold-higher fatty acid methyl ester yield from soybean oil. Based on in silico modeling, we suggest that the Q185L substitution facilitates a closed lid conformation that limits access for both the methanol and substrate excess into the active site. The enhanced stability of H86Y/A269T was a result of formation of new hydrogen bonds. These improved characteristics make this variant a potential biocatalyst for biodiesel production. PMID:24362426

  15. Probing the Essential Catalytic Residues and Substrate Affinity in the Thermoactive Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 l-Arabinose Isomerase by Site-Directed Mutagenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Rhimi, Moez; Juy, Michel; Aghajari, Nushin; Haser, Richard; Bejar, Samir

    2007-01-01

    The l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) from Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 is characterized by its high thermoactivity and catalytic efficiency. Furthermore, as opposed to the majority of l-arabinose isomerases, this enzyme requires metallic ions for its thermostability rather than for its activity. These features make US100 l-AI attractive as a template for industrial use. Based on previously solved crystal structures and sequence alignments, we identified amino acids that are putatively important for the US100 l-AI isomerization reaction. Among these, E306, E331, H348, and H447, which correspond to the suggested essential catalytic amino acids of the l-fucose isomerase and the l-arabinose isomerase from Escherichia coli, are presumed to be the active-site residues of US100 l-AI. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the mutation of these residues resulted in totally inactive proteins, thus demonstrating their critical role in the enzyme activity. A homology model of US100 l-AI was constructed, and its analysis highlighted another set of residues which may be crucial for the recognition and processing of substrates; hence, these residues were subjected to mutagenesis studies. The replacement of the D308, F329, E351, and H446 amino acids with alanine seriously affected the enzyme activities, and suggestions about the roles of these residues in the catalytic mechanism are given. The mutation F279Q strongly increased the enzyme's affinity for l-fucose and decreased the affinity for l-arabinose compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, showing the implication of this amino acid in substrate recognition. PMID:17337581

  16. Evidence that the N-terminal part of the S-layer protein from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 recognizes a secondary cell wall polymer.

    PubMed Central

    Ries, W; Hotzy, C; Schocher, I; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1997-01-01

    The S-layer of Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of identical protein subunits with a molecular weight of 97,000. The isolated S-layer subunits could bind and recrystallize into the oblique lattice on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi which consist of peptidoglycan of the A1gamma chemotype and a secondary cell wall polymer with an estimated molecular weight of 24,000. The secondary cell wall polymer could be completely extracted from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi with 48% HF, indicating the presence of phosphodiester linkages between the polymer chains and the peptidoglycan backbone. The cell wall polymer was composed mainly of GlcNAc and ManNAc in a molar ratio of 4:1, constituted about 20% of the peptidoglycan-containing sacculus dry weight, and was also detected in the fraction of the S-layer self-assembly products. Extraction experiments and recrystallization of the whole S-layer protein and proteolytic cleavage fragments confirmed that the secondary cell wall polymer is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits by the N-terminal part to the peptidoglycan-containing sacculi. In addition to this binding function, the cell wall polymer was found to influence the in vitro self-assembly of the guanidinium hydrochloride-extracted S-layer protein. Chemical modification studies further showed that the secondary cell wall polymer does not contribute significant free amino or carboxylate groups to the peptidoglycan-containing sacculi. PMID:9190804

  17. Immobilization of BSA, enzymes and cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus onto cellulose polygalacturonic acid and starch based graft copolymers containing maleic arhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Beddows, C.G.; Gil, M.H.; Guthrie, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Poly(maleic anhydride styrene) graft copolymers of cellulose, pectin polygalacturonic acid salt, calcium polygalacturonate, and starch were prepared and used to immobilize proteins. The cellulose grafts coupled quite appreciable quantities of acid phosphatase, glucose oxidase, and trypsin. However, the general retention of activity was somewhat disappointing. Further investigation with acid phosphatase showed that the amount of enzyme immobilized increased as the amount of anhydride in the graft copolymer increased but no such relationship existed for the enzymic activity. The cellulose graft copolymers were hydrolyzed and it appeared that the carboxyl group aided adsorption of the enzyme. Attempts to couple acid phosphatase using CMC through the free carboxyl groups, created by hydrolysis, gave only a small increase in the extent of protein coupling. However, the unhydrolyzed system gave a useful degree of immobilization of cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus, as did a poly(maleic anhydride/styrene)-cocellulose system. Attempts to improve the activity by using grafts based on other polysaccharide supports met with mixed success. Pectin products were soluble. Polygalacturonic acid products were partially soluble and extremely high levels of enzymic activity were obtained. This was probably due in part to the hydrophilic nature of the system, which also encouraged absorption of the enzyme. Attempts were made to reduce the solubility by using the calcium pectinate salt. Immobilization of acid phosphatase and trypsin resulted in increased protein coupling but relatively poor activities were attained. Calcium polygalacturonate was used to prepare an insoluble graft copolymeric system containing acrylonitrile-comaleic anhydride. The resulting gels gave excellent coupling with acid phosphatase which had a very good retention of activity.

  18. Calcium alginate matrix increases the stability and recycling capability of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-07-01

    Exploration of microbial pool from extremely diversified ecosystem is significantly important for various industrial applications. Bacterial communities from extreme habitats including volcanic vents, hot springs, and industrial sectors are eagerly explored for the isolation of thermophiles. Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29, isolated from blast furnace site of a steel processing industry, is capable of producing thermostable endo-β-1,4-xylanase. In the current study, this enzyme was immobilized within calcium alginate beads using entrapment technique. Amalgamation of sodium alginate (40.0 gL(-1)) and calcium chloride (0.4 M) was used for the formation of immobilized beads. It was observed that temperature (50 °C) and pH (7.0) optima of immobilized enzyme remained same, but enzyme-substrate reaction time increased from 5.0 to 30.0 min as compared to free enzyme. Diffusion limit of high molecular weight xylan (corncob) caused a decline in V max of immobilized enzyme from 4773 to 203.7 U min(-1), whereas K m value increased from 0.5074 to 0.5722 mg ml(-1) with reference to free enzyme. Immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase showed its stability even at high temperatures as compared to free enzyme and retained 18 and 9 % residual activity at 70 and 80 °C, respectively. Immobilized enzyme also exhibited sufficient recycling efficiency up to five reaction cycles which indicated that this enzyme can be a plausible candidate in paper and pulp industry.

  19. Isolation of two physiologically induced variant strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and characterization of their S-layer lattices.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Küpcü, S; Messner, P; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    During growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a in continuous culture on complex medium, the chemical properties of the S-layer glycoprotein and the characteristic oblique lattice were maintained only if glucose was used as the sole carbon source. With increased aeration, amino acids were also metabolized, accompanied by liberation of ammonium and by changes in the S-layer protein. Depending on the stage of fermentation at which oxygen limitation was relieved, two different variants, one with a more delicate oblique S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V1) and one with a square S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V2), were isolated. During the switch from the wild-type strain to a variant or from variant 3a/V2 to variant 3a/V1, monolayers of two types of S-layer lattices could be demonstrated on the surfaces of single cells. S-layer proteins from variants had different molecular sizes and a significantly lower carbohydrate content than S-layer proteins from the wild-type strain did. Although the S-layer lattices from the wild-type and variant strains showed quite different protein mass distributions in two- and three-dimensional reconstructions, neither the amino acid composition nor the pore size, as determined by permeability studies, was significantly changed. Peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing results strongly indicated that the three S-layer proteins are encoded by different genes and are not derived from a universal precursor form. Images PMID:8300538

  20. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  1. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  2. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  3. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  4. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  5. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  6. First Crystal Structure of l-Lysine 6-Dehydrogenase as an NAD-dependent Amine Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Fukuda, Junya; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    A gene encoding an l-lysine dehydrogenase was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme is the most thermostable l-lysine dehydrogenase yet described, with a half-life of 180 min at 100 °C. The product of the enzyme's catalytic activity is Δ1-piperideine-6-carboxylate, which makes this enzyme an l-lysine 6-dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.18) that catalyzes the reductive deamination of the ϵ- amino group and a type of NAD-dependent amine dehydrogenase. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined using the mercury-based multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion method at a resolution of 2.44 Å in the presence of NAD and sulfate ion. The asymmetric unit consisted of two subunits, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. Each monomer consisted of a Rossmann fold domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain, and the fold of the catalytic domain showed similarity to that of saccharopine reductase. Notably, the structures of subunits A and B differed significantly. In subunit A, the active site contained a sulfate ion that was not seen in subunit B. Consequently, subunit A adopted a closed conformation, whereas subunit B adopted an open one. In each subunit, one NAD molecule was bound to the active site in an anti-conformation, indicating that the enzyme makes use of pro-R-specific hydride transfer between the two hydrides at C-4 of NADH (type A specificity). This is the first description of the three-dimensional structure of l-lysine 6-dehydrogenase as an NAD-dependent amine dehydrogenase. PMID:20056607

  7. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    activity (p < .001). There were positive linear associations (p < . 01) between net dehydrogenase activity (dehydrogenase minus oxoreductase) and...Fragments ( ~ 3 grams ) of placentae from 7-8 fetuses from each of three gilts were removed and placed in ice cold sterile Eagle’s Minimum Essential...Females (n) Males Fetal weight ( grams ) 12 272.7 ± 20.7b 10 302.5 ± 12.8b Fetal length (mm) 12 185.9 ± 5.4 b 10 196.4± 4.8b Placental weight ( grams

  8. Effect of dimer dissociation on activity and thermostability of the alpha-glucuronidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: dissecting the different oligomeric forms of family 67 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Shallom, Dalia; Golan, Gali; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-10-01

    The oligomeric organization of enzymes plays an important role in many biological processes, such as allosteric regulation, conformational stability and thermal stability. alpha-Glucuronidases are family 67 glycosidases that cleave the alpha-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid and xylose units as part of an array of hemicellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes. Currently, two crystal structures of alpha-glucuronidases are available, those from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (AguA) and from Cellvibrio japonicus (GlcA67A). Both enzymes are homodimeric, but surprisingly their dimeric organization is different, raising questions regarding the significance of dimerization for the enzymes' activity and stability. Structural comparison of the two enzymes suggests several elements that are responsible for the different dimerization organization. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the alpha-glucuronidases AguA and GlcA67A can be classified into two distinct subfamilies of bacterial alpha-glucuronidases, where the dimer-forming residues of each enzyme are conserved only within its own subfamily. It seems that the different dimeric forms of AguA and GlcA67A represent the two alternative dimeric organizations of these subfamilies. To study the biological significance of the dimerization in alpha-glucuronidases, we have constructed a monomeric form of AguA by mutating three of its interface residues (W328E, R329T, and R665N). The activity of the monomer was significantly lower than the activity of the wild-type dimeric AguA, and the optimal temperature for activity of the monomer was around 35 degrees C, compared to 65 degrees C of the wild-type enzyme. Nevertheless, the melting temperature of the monomeric protein, 72.9 degrees C, was almost identical to that of the wild-type, 73.4 degrees C. It appears that the dimerization of AguA is essential for efficient catalysis and that the dissociation into monomers results in subtle conformational changes in the structure

  9. Influence of the Secondary Cell Wall Polymer on the Reassembly, Recrystallization, and Stability Properties of the S-Layer Protein from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    PubMed Central

    Sára, Margit; Dekitsch, Christine; Mayer, Harald F.; Egelseer, Eva M.; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP) from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 is mainly composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) and is involved in anchoring the S-layer protein via its N-terminal region to the rigid cell wall layer. In addition to this binding function, the SCWP was found to inhibit the formation of self-assembly products during dialysis of the guanidine hydrochloride (GHCl)-extracted S-layer protein. The degree of assembly (DA; percent assembled from total S-layer protein) that could be achieved strongly depended on the amount of SCWP added to the GHCl-extracted S-layer protein and decreased from 90 to 10% when the concentration of the SCWP was increased from 10 to 120 μg/mg of S-layer protein. The SCWP kept the S-layer protein in the water-soluble state and favored its recrystallization on solid supports such as poly-l-lysine-coated electron microscopy grids. Derived from the orientation of the base vectors of the oblique S-layer lattice, the subunits had bound with their charge-neutral outer face, leaving the N-terminal region with the polymer binding domain exposed to the ambient environment. From cell wall fragments about half of the S-layer protein could be extracted with 1 M GlcNAc, indicating that the linkage type between the S-layer protein and the SCWP could be related to that of the lectin-polysaccharide type. Interestingly, GlcNAc had an effect on the in vitro self-assembly and recrystallization properties of the S-layer protein that was similar to that of the isolated SCWP. The SCWP generally enhanced the stability of the S-layer protein against endoproteinase Glu-C attack and specifically protected a potential cleavage site in position 138 of the mature S-layer protein. PMID:9696762

  10. Effect of Dimer Dissociation on Activity and Thermostability of the α-Glucuronidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: Dissecting the Different Oligomeric Forms of Family 67 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Dalia; Golan, Gali; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    The oligomeric organization of enzymes plays an important role in many biological processes, such as allosteric regulation, conformational stability and thermal stability. α-Glucuronidases are family 67 glycosidases that cleave the α-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and xylose units as part of an array of hemicellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes. Currently, two crystal structures of α-glucuronidases are available, those from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (AguA) and from Cellvibrio japonicus (GlcA67A). Both enzymes are homodimeric, but surprisingly their dimeric organization is different, raising questions regarding the significance of dimerization for the enzymes' activity and stability. Structural comparison of the two enzymes suggests several elements that are responsible for the different dimerization organization. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the α-glucuronidases AguA and GlcA67A can be classified into two distinct subfamilies of bacterial α-glucuronidases, where the dimer-forming residues of each enzyme are conserved only within its own subfamily. It seems that the different dimeric forms of AguA and GlcA67A represent the two alternative dimeric organizations of these subfamilies. To study the biological significance of the dimerization in α-glucuronidases, we have constructed a monomeric form of AguA by mutating three of its interface residues (W328E, R329T, and R665N). The activity of the monomer was significantly lower than the activity of the wild-type dimeric AguA, and the optimal temperature for activity of the monomer was around 35°C, compared to 65°C of the wild-type enzyme. Nevertheless, the melting temperature of the monomeric protein, 72.9°C, was almost identical to that of the wild-type, 73.4°C. It appears that the dimerization of AguA is essential for efficient catalysis and that the dissociation into monomers results in subtle conformational changes in the structure which indirectly influence the active site region

  11. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  12. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  13. A lipoamide dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis has a lipoyl domain.

    PubMed

    Bringas, R; Fernandez, J

    1995-04-01

    A protein of molecular weight of 64 kDa (p64k) found in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis shows a high degree of homology with both the lipoyl domain of the acetyltransferase and the entire sequence of the lipoamide dehydrogenase, the E2 and E3 components of the dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes, respectively. The alignment of the p64k with lipoyl domains and lipoamide dehydrogenases from different species is presented. The possible implications of this protein in binding protein-dependent transport are discussed. This is the first lipoamide dehydrogenase reported to have a lipoyl domain.

  14. Placental glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Paik, S G; Park, H Y

    1994-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated in 300 Korean placentae using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. The allele frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were 0.537, 0.440 and 0.005, respectively, which were similar to those in Japanese. We also observed an anodal allele which was similar to the GDH4 originally reported in Chinese populations at a low frequency of 0.015. An additional new cathodal allele (named GDH6) was observed in the present study with a very low frequency of 0.003.

  15. Spectra of glutamate dehydrogenase with diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Hillar, M

    1978-02-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase displays hyperchromicity at 256 nm and at 276 nm upon binding of diethylstilbestrol. Increase in absorbancy is linear at both regions up to 250 micrometer DES, and becomes parabolic at higher concentration of DES. ADP in the presence of DES causes decrease in absorbancy at 256 nm; absorbancy at 276 nm increased by DES is not affected by ADP. DES prevents spectral effects produced by GTP (decrease in absorbancy at 254 nm and at 276 nm). ADP still decreases absorbancy at 254 nm, leaving the 276 nm region unchanged. ADP enhances spectral effects produced by GTP. GTP, however, prevents changes produced by ADP.

  16. Hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases of Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans.

    PubMed

    de Bok, F A M; Roze, E H A; Stams, A J M

    2002-08-01

    The syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans possesses two distinct formate dehydrogenases and at least three distinct hydrogenases. All of these reductases are either loosely membrane-associated or soluble proteins and at least one of the hydrogenases is located in the periplasm. These enzymes were expressed on all growth substrates tested, though the levels of each enzyme showed large variations. These findings suggest that both H2 and formate are involved in the central metabolism of the organism, and that both these compounds may serve as interspecies electron carriers during syntrophic growth on propionate.

  17. Identity of the subunits and the stoicheiometry of prosthetic groups in trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, A A; Papas, E J; Steenkamp, D J

    1983-01-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenases from bacterium W3A1 and Hyphomicrobium X and the dimethylamine dehydrogenase from Hyphomicrobium X were found to contain only one kind of subunit. The millimolar absorption coefficient of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster in trimethylamine dehydrogenase from bacterium W3A1 was estimated to be 14.8 mM-1 . cm-1 at 443 nm. From this value a 1:1 stoicheiometry of the prosthetic groups, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and the [4Fe-4S] cluster, was established. Millimolar absorption coefficients of the three enzymes were in the range 49.4-58.7 mM-1 . cm-1 at approx. 440 nm. This range of values is consistent with the presence of two [4Fe-4S] clusters and two flavin residues, for which the millimolar absorption coefficient had earlier been found to be 12.3 mM-1 . cm-1 at 437 nm. The N-terminal amino acid was alanine in each of the three enzymes. Sequence analysis of the first 15 residues from the N-terminus of dimethylamine dehydrogenase indicated a single unique sequence. Two identical subunits, each containing covalently bound 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and a [4Fe-4S] cluster, in each of the enzymes are therefore indicated. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882357

  18. Kinetic mechanism of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruguera, P; Lopez-Cabrera, A; Canela, E I

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of chicken-liver xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.2.1.37) has been studied. Steady-state results, obtained from a wide range of concentrations of substrates and products, were fitted by rational functions of degree 1:1, 1:2, 2:2 and 3:3 with respect to substrates, and 0:1, 1:1, 0:2 and 1:2 with regard to products, using a non-linear regression program which guarantees the fit. The goodness of fit was improved using a computer program that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design. The AIC and F tests were also used for model discrimination. For comparative purposes, the xanthine/oxygen oxidoreductase reaction was also studied. From the functions which give the maximum improvement, the complete rate equation was deduced. The significance of the terms was stated by the above methods. It was concluded that xanthine dehydrogenase requires a minimum mechanism of degree 1:1 for xanthine, 2:2 for NAD+, 1:1 for uric acid and 1:2 for NADH in the xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase reaction. These are the minimum degrees required but a rate equation of higher degree is not excluded. PMID:3422556

  19. Properties of a Purified Halophilic Malic Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, P. K.; Halvorson, H. Orin

    1965-01-01

    Holmes, P. K. (University of Illinois, Urbana), and H. Orin Halvorson. Properties of a purified halophilic malic dehydrogenase. J. Bacteriol. 90:316–326. 1965.—The malic dehydrogenase (MDH) from Halobacterium salinarium required high concentrations of monovalent ions for stability and activity. Studies of inactivation rates at different salt concentrations suggested that approximately 25% NaCl (w/v) is required to stabilize MDH. From 50 to 100% reactivation, depending on the salt concentration present during inactivation, could occur in 2.5 to 5 m NaCl or KCl. The optimal salt concentration for activity of MDH was a function of the pH, and ranged from 1 to 3 m NaCl or KCl. The effect of salt concentration on the pH-activity curves occurred chiefly below pH 7.0. Inactivation of MDH with heat or thiol reagents showed that the enzyme was more labile in the state induced by absence of salt. The activation of MDH by salts was attributed to a decreased rate of dissociation of MDH and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2). The inactivation of the enzyme in the absence of salt could be largely prevented by the presence of NADH2. The S20.w of MDH decreased threefold at low salt concentrations. The enzyme was assumed to be in its native compact configuration only in the presence of a high concentration of salt. PMID:14329442

  20. Structure of glycerol dehydrogenase from Serratia.

    PubMed

    Musille, Paul; Ortlund, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The 1.90 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of glycerol dehydrogenase derived from contaminating bacteria present during routine Escherichia coli protein expression is presented. This off-target enzyme showed intrinsic affinity for Ni(2+)-Sepharose, migrated at the expected molecular mass for the target protein during gel filtration and was crystallized before it was realised that contamination had occurred. In this study, it is shown that liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can efficiently identify the protein composition of crystals in a crystallization experiment as part of a structure-determination pipeline for an unknown protein. The high-resolution X-ray data enabled sequencing directly from the electron-density maps, allowing the source of contamination to be placed within the Serratia genus. Incorporating additional protein-identity checks, such as tandem LC-MS/MS, earlier in the protein expression, purification and crystallization workflow may have prevented the unintentional structure determination of this metabolic enzyme, which represents the first enterobacterial glycerol dehydrogenase reported to date.

  1. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  2. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  4. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  5. Isoenzyme characterization of Leishmania isolated from human cases with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis from the State of Campeche, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Canto-Lara, S B; Cardenas-Maruffo, M F; Vargas-Gonzalez, A; Andrade-Narvaez, F

    1998-04-01

    Seventy-five isolates from the State of Campeche, Mexico, an area endemic for localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL), were characterized by isoenzyme markers (glucose phosphate isomerase, mannose phospate isomerase, nucleoside hydrolase, phosphoglucomutase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase). Seventy (93.3%) were identified as Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana and 5 (6.7%) as L. (Viannia) braziliensis. This is the first report of authochthonus human LCL caused by L. (V.) braziliensis in the State of Campeche, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

  6. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  7. Cloning of the maltose phosphorylase gene from Bacillus sp. strain RK-1 and efficient production of the cloned gene and the trehalose phosphorylase gene from Bacillus stearothermophilus SK-1 in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yasutake, Nozomu; Oshima, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Tomita, Tetsuji; Miyoshi, Shinsuke; Yatake, Tsuneya

    2002-12-01

    The maltose phosphorylase (MPase) gene of Bacillus sp. strain RK-1 was cloned by PCR with oligonucleotide primers designed on the basis of a partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme. The MPase gene consisted of 2,655 bp encoding a theoretical protein with a Mr of 88,460, and had no secretion signal sequence, although most of the MPase activity was detected in the culture supernatant of RK-1. This cloned MPase gene and the trehalose phosphorylase (TPase) gene from Bacillus stearothermophilus SK-1 were efficiently expressed intracellularly under the control of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase promoter in Bacillus subtilis. The production yields were estimated to be more than 2 g of enzyme per liter of medium, about 250 times the production of the original strains, in a simple shake flask. About 60% of maltose was converted into trehalose by the simultaneous action of both enzymes produced in B. subtilis.

  8. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  9. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  10. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  11. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  12. The dihydroorotate dehydrogenases: Past and present.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Calil, Felipe Antunes; Feliciano, Patricia Rosa; Pinheiro, Matheus Pinto; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-06-27

    The flavoenzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase catalyzes the stereoselective oxidation of (S)-dihydroorotate to orotate in the fourth of the six conserved enzymatic reactions involved in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Inhibition of pyrimidine metabolism by selectively targeting DHODHs has been exploited in the development of new therapies against cancer, immunological disorders, bacterial and viral infections, and parasitic diseases. Through a chronological narrative, this review summarizes the efforts of the scientific community to achieve our current understanding of structural and biochemical properties of DHODHs. It also attempts to describe the latest advances in medicinal chemistry for therapeutic development based on the selective inhibition of DHODH, including an overview of the experimental techniques used for ligand screening during the process of drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  14. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  15. Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme patterns in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Reidarson, T H; McBain, J; Dalton, L M

    1999-06-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme activity was analyzed in cetaceans. Animals that were treated by i.m. injection and others that received azole therapy had distinctly different LDH isoenzyme profiles. A third distinctive pattern was occasionally observed in clinically normal animals with elevations in total transaminase and LDH activity levels. DH isoenzyme activity patterns were not affected by mild or moderate hemolysis, refrigeration after 24 hr, or freezing for 24 hr with subsequent thawing. However, severe hemolysis produced artifactual changes similar to those observed in individuals that received injections but of a lesser magnitude. DH isoenzyme activity patterns may provide useful corroboration of other clinical findings when diagnostic modalities are limited, especially to differentiate nonspecific enzyme elevation from nonpathologic elevations in serum enzyme concentrations due to i.m. injections or azole therapy.

  16. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  17. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  18. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Sun, Lihan; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Numerous conditions promote oxidative stress, leading to the build-up of reactive aldehydes that cause cell damage and contribute to cardiac diseases. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important enzymes that eliminate toxic aldehydes by catalysing their oxidation to non-reactive acids. The review will discuss evidence indicating a role for a specific ALDH enzyme, the mitochondrial ALDH2, in combating oxidative stress by reducing the cellular ‘aldehydic load’. Epidemiological studies in humans carrying an inactive ALDH2, genetic models in mice with altered ALDH2 levels, and small molecule activators of ALDH2 all highlight the role of ALDH2 in cardioprotection and suggest a promising new direction in cardiovascular research and the development of new treatments for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20558439

  19. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  20. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A.; Biehl, R.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.; Richter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  1. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  2. Kinetic studies of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, A H; Dickinson, F M

    1979-01-01

    Initial-rate studies were made of the oxidation of L-glutamate by NAD+ and NADP+ catalysed by highly purified preparations of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase. With NAD+ as coenzyme the kinetics show the same features of coenzyme activation as seen with the bovine liver enzyme [Engel & Dalziel (1969) Biochem. J. 115, 621--631]. With NADP+ as coenzyme, initial rates are much slower than with NAD+, and Lineweaver--Burk plots are linear over extended ranges of substrate and coenzyme concentration. Stopped-flow studies with NADP+ as coenzyme give no evidence for the accumulation of significant concentrations of NADPH-containing complexes with the enzyme in the steady state. Protection studies against inactivation by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate indicate that NAD+ and NADP+ give the same degree of protection in the presence of sodium glutarate. The results are used to deduce information about the mechanism of glutamate oxidation by the enzyme. Initial-rate studies of the reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by NADH and NADPH catalysed by dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase showed that the kinetic features of the reaction are very similar with both coenzymes, but reactions with NADH are much faster. The data show that a number of possible mechanisms for the reaction may be discarded, including the compulsory mechanism (previously proposed for the enzyme) in which the sequence of binding is NAD(P)H, NH4+ and 2-oxoglutarate. The kinetic data suggest either a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism or the compulsory mechanism with the binding sequence NH4+, NAD(P)H, 2-oxoglutarate. However, binding studies and protection studies indicate that coenzyme and 2-oxoglutarate do bind to the free enzyme. PMID:35153

  3. Variants of glycerol dehydrogenase having D-lactate dehydrogenase activity and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides methods of designing and generating glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH) variants that have altered function as compared to a parent polypeptide. The present invention further provides nucleic acids encoding GlyDH polypeptide variants having altered function as compared to the parent polypeptide. Host cells comprising polynucleotides encoding GlyDH variants and methods of producing lactic acids are also provided in various aspects of the invention.

  4. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  5. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  6. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  7. Functional characterization of the phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the archaeon Methanothermus fervidus by comparative molecular modelling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Talfournier, F; Colloc'h, N; Mornon, J P; Branlant, G

    1999-10-01

    Phosphorylating archaeal D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GraP-DHs) share only 15-20% identity with their glycolytic bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts. Unlike the latter which are NAD-specific, archaeal GraP-DHs exhibit a dual-cofactor specificity with a marked preference for NADP. In the present study, we have constructed a three-dimensional model of the Methanothermus fervidus GraP-DH based upon the X-ray structures of the Bacillus stearothermophilus and Escherichia coli GraP-DHs. The overall structure of the archaeal enzyme is globally similar to homology modelling-derived structures, in particular for the cofactor binding domain, which might adopt a classical Rossmann fold. M. fervidus GraP-DH can be considered as a dimer of dimers which exhibits negative and positive cooperativity in binding the coenzymes NAD and NADP, respectively. As expected, the differences between the model and the templates are located mainly within the loops. Based on the predictions derived from molecular modelling, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to characterize better the cofactor binding pocket and the catalytic domain. The Lys32Ala, Lys32Glu and Lys32Asp mutants led to a drastic increase in the Km value for NADP (i.e. 165-, 500- and 1000-fold, respectively), thus demonstrating that the invariant Lys32 residue is one of the most important determinants favouring the adenosine 2'-PO42- binding of NADP. The involvement of the side chain of Asn281, which was postulated to play a role equivalent to that of the Asn313 of bacterial and eukaryotic GraP-DHs in fixing the position of the nicotinamide ring in a syn orientation [Fabry, S. & Hensel, R. (1988) Gene 64, 189-197], was ruled out. Most of the amino acids involved in catalysis and in substrate recognition in bacterial and eukaryotic GraP-DHs are not conserved in the archaeal enzyme except for the essential Cys149. Inspection of our model suggests that side chains of invariant residues Asn150, Arg176, Arg177 and

  8. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  16. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  18. Protein engineering reveals ancient adaptive replacements in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Golding, G. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary analysis indicates that eubacterial NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) first evolved from an NAD-dependent precursor about 3.5 billion years ago. Selection in favor of utilizing NADP was probably a result of niche expansion during growth on acetate, where isocitrate dehydrogenase provides 90% of the NADPH necessary for biosynthesis. Amino acids responsible for differing coenzyme specificities were identified from x-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase and the distantly related Thermus thermophilus NAD-dependent isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Site-directed mutagenesis at sites lining the coenzyme binding pockets has been used to invert the coenzyme specificities of both enzymes. Reconstructed ancestral sequences indicate that these replacements are ancestral. Hence the adaptive history of molecular evolution is amenable to experimental investigation. PMID:9096353

  19. Glucose oxidation and PQQ-dependent dehydrogenases in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Tina; Schleyer, Ute; Merfort, Marcel; Bringer-Meyer, Stephanie; Görisch, Helmut; Sahm, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is famous for its rapid and incomplete oxidation of a wide range of sugars and sugar alcohols. The organism is known for its efficient oxidation of D-glucose to D-gluconate, which can be further oxidized to two different keto-D-gluconates, 2-keto-D-gluconate and 5-keto-D-gluconate, as well as 2,5-di-keto-D-gluconate. For this oxidation chain and for further oxidation reactions, G. oxydans possesses a high number of membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In this review, we focus on the dehydrogenases involved in D-glucose oxidation and the products formed during this process. As some of the involved dehydrogenases contain pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a cofactor, also PQQ synthesis is reviewed. Finally, we will give an overview of further PQQ-dependent dehydrogenases and discuss their functions in G. oxydans ATCC 621H (DSM 2343). Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  1. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  2. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar.

  3. Quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases: structure, function, and physiology.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirohide; Mathews, F Scott; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2004-08-01

    Quino(hemo)protein alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) that have pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as the prosthetic group are classified into 3 groups, types I, II, and III. Type I ADH is a simple quinoprotein having PQQ as the only prosthetic group, while type II and type III ADHs are quinohemoprotein having heme c as well as PQQ in the catalytic polypeptide. Type II ADH is a soluble periplasmic enzyme and is widely distributed in Proteobacteria such as Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Comamonas, etc. In contrast, type III ADH is a membrane-bound enzyme working on the periplasmic surface solely in acetic acid bacteria. It consists of three subunits that comprise a quinohemoprotein catalytic subunit, a triheme cytochrome c subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function. The catalytic subunits of all the quino(hemo)protein ADHs have a common structural motif, a quinoprotein-specific superbarrel domain, where PQQ is deeply embedded in the center. In addition, in the type II and type III ADHs this subunit contains a unique heme c domain. Various type II ADHs each have a unique substrate specificity, accepting a wide variety of alcohols, as is discussed on the basis of recent X-ray crystallographic analyses. Electron transfer within both type II and III ADHs is discussed in terms of the intramolecular reaction from PQQ to heme c and also from heme to heme, and in terms of the intermolecular reaction with azurin and ubiquinone, respectively. Unique physiological functions of both types of quinohemoprotein ADHs are also discussed.

  4. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  5. Elusive transition state of alcohol dehydrogenase unveiled.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2010-05-25

    For several decades the hydride transfer catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase has been difficult to understand. Here we add to the large corpus of anomalous and paradoxical data collected for this reaction by measuring a normal (> 1) 2 degrees kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for the reduction of benzaldehyde. Because the relevant equilibrium effect is inverse (< 1), this KIE eludes the traditional interpretation of 2 degrees KIEs. It does, however, enable the development of a comprehensive model for the "tunneling ready state" (TRS) of the reaction that fits into the general scheme of Marcus-like models of hydrogen tunneling. The TRS is the ensemble of states along the intricate reorganization coordinate, where H tunneling between the donor and acceptor occurs (the crossing point in Marcus theory). It is comparable to the effective transition state implied by ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory. Properties of the TRS are approximated as an average of the individual properties of the donor and acceptor states. The model is consistent with experimental findings that previously appeared contradictory; specifically, it resolves the long-standing ambiguity regarding the location of the TRS (aldehyde-like vs. alcohol-like). The new picture of the TRS for this reaction identifies the principal components of the collective reaction coordinate and the average structure of the saddle point along that coordinate.

  6. Malic dehydrogenase locus of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Smith-Sonneborn, J

    1980-04-01

    A search was undertaken for naturally occurring genetic markers for use in clonal aging studies of Paramecium tetraurelia. Clonal age is defined as the number of cell divisions since the last sexual process. Autogamy (self-fertilization) is a sexual process which can occur in aging lines, resulting in homozygosity and initiation of the next generation. Such "illicit" autogamies must be detected and eliminated from the aged clone. With codominant alleles, heterozygous aging lines can be established which will express a phenotype distinguishable from that of either parental type and autogamy can then be monitored by the appearance of either segregant homozygous phenotype. However, very few codominant alleles are available in this species. Electrophoretic mobilities of malic dehydrogenase (MDH) were assayed in 11 stocks of Paramecium tetraurelia by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nine stocks showed a single-banded "stock 51" type, while stock 174 and stock 29 each exhibited unique mobility. Crosses between stock 51 and the deviant stocks revealed distinct three-banded patterns indicative of heterozygosity of the F1 generation. In the autogamous F2 generation, 1:1 segregation of the parental types were recovered. The pattern of inheritance is consistent with codominant alleles and Mendelian inheritance. These naturally occurring biochemical markers are stable with increasing clonal age and are therefore useful genetic markers for studies of cellular aging.

  7. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  8. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  9. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  10. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  11. Elusive transition state of alcohol dehydrogenase unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2010-01-01

    For several decades the hydride transfer catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase has been difficult to understand. Here we add to the large corpus of anomalous and paradoxical data collected for this reaction by measuring a normal (> 1) 2° kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for the reduction of benzaldehyde. Because the relevant equilibrium effect is inverse (< 1), this KIE eludes the traditional interpretation of 2° KIEs. It does, however, enable the development of a comprehensive model for the “tunneling ready state” (TRS) of the reaction that fits into the general scheme of Marcus-like models of hydrogen tunneling. The TRS is the ensemble of states along the intricate reorganization coordinate, where H tunneling between the donor and acceptor occurs (the crossing point in Marcus theory). It is comparable to the effective transition state implied by ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory. Properties of the TRS are approximated as an average of the individual properties of the donor and acceptor states. The model is consistent with experimental findings that previously appeared contradictory; specifically, it resolves the long-standing ambiguity regarding the location of the TRS (aldehyde-like vs. alcohol-like). The new picture of the TRS for this reaction identifies the principal components of the collective reaction coordinate and the average structure of the saddle point along that coordinate. PMID:20457944

  12. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. C.; Lai, Michael P. Y.; Leung, Kevin S. N.

    1968-01-01

    In a Chinese population 1,000 full-term male neonates and a further 117 jaundiced neonates of both sexes were studied in an investigation of the frequency of deficiency of erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). This enzyme was found to be deficient in 3·6% of male neonates. Correlation of the results with the birthplace of the 602 mothers who were known to come from Kwangtung province showed no significant differences in the frequency of the deficiency between certain parts of the province. The deficiency of G6PD in hemizygous males is profound but it is not associated with erythrocyte acid monophosphoesterase deficiency in Chinese in Hong Kong. The G6PD deficiency accounts for 15·4% of all the 117 cases of neonatal jaundice. The relative importance of G6PD deficiency as a cause of neonatal jaundice does not differ materially in male and female mutants. Neonatal jaundice can occur in all genotypes of G6PD mutation in Chinese. PMID:5697334

  14. Halophile aldehyde dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Joo, Won-A; Cho, Chang-Won; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2006-01-01

    Halobacterium salinarum is a member of the halophilic archaea. In the present study, H. salinarum was cultured at various NaCl concentrations (3.5, 4.3, and 6.0 M NaCl), and its proteome was determined and identificated via proteomics technique. We detected 14 proteins which were significantly down-regulated in 3.5 M and/or 6 M NaCl. Among the identified protein spots, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was selected for evaluation with regard to its potential applications in industry. The most effective metabolism function exhibited by ALDH is the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. The ALDH gene from H. salinarum (1.5 kb fragment) was amplified by PCR and cloned into the E. coli strain, BL21 (DE3), with the pGEX-KG vector. We subsequently analyzed the enzyme activity of the recombinant ALDH (54 kDa) at a variety of salt concentrations. The purified recombinant ALDH from H. salinarum exhibited the most pronounced activity at 1 M NaCl. Therefore, the ALDH from H.salinarum is a halophilic enzyme, and may prove useful for applications in hypersaline environments.

  15. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  16. [Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase as tumour markers and factors intensifying carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kedra, Bogusław; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-06-01

    Numerous experiments have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in cells of various cancers and play role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, between colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa. We have also investigated the serum activity of these enzymes in colorectal cancer patients as potential tumour markers. The activities of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH were measured in the: cancer tissue, healthy colonic mucosa and serum of 42 patients with colorectal cancer. For the measurement of the activity of class I ADH isoenzyme and ALDH activity the fluorometric methods was employed. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes was measured by the photometric method. The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase and class I of ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH had higher activities in cancer tissue but the differences were not statistically significant. The activity of ALDH was significantly lower in the cancer cells. The activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes in colorectal cancer tissue were not significantly higher in drinkers than in non-drinkers. Additionally we observed statistically significant increasing activity of class I ADH isoenzymes in the sera of patients with colorectal cancer. For this reason the total ADH activity was also significantly increased. The activities of ADH III and ADH IV isoenzymes and ALDH were unchanged in the sera of patients. There were no marked differences in activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes between drinkers and non-drinkers (with colorectal cancer). The differences in activities of total ADH and class I ADH isoenzymes between colorectal cancer tissues and healthy mucosa might be a factor of ethanol metabolism disorders, which can intensify carcinogenesis. The increased total

  17. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  18. Enzymatic Transformation of Morphine by Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas testosteroni

    PubMed Central

    Liras, Paloma; Kasparian, Stephen S.; Umbreit, Wayne W.

    1975-01-01

    Enzyme preparations from Pseudomonas testosteroni containing α- and β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyzed the oxidation of morphine and codeine by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Morphine was converted in relatively low yield into 14-hydroxymorphinone probably via morphinone as an intermediate. Codeine was converted to codeinone and 14-hydroxycodeinone. Only the conversions at the 6-position were carried out by the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Hydroxylation at the 14-position did occur spontaneously (or enzymatically with a contaminating enzyme) after oxidation at the 6-position. PMID:172013

  19. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S

    1978-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues activates liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the oxidation of primary alcohols, but decreases the activity of the enzyme towards secondary alcohols. The modification also desensitizes the dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition at high alcohol concentrations. Steady-state kinetic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase over a wide range of alcohol concentrations suggest that alcohol oxidation proceeds via a random addition of coenzyme and substrate with a pathway for the formation of the productive enzyme-NADH-alcohol complex. To facilitate the analyses of the effects of methylation on liver alcohol dehydrogenase and factors affecting them, new operational kinetic parameters to describe the results at high substrate concentration were introduced. The changes in the dehydrogenase activity on alkylation were found to be associated with changes in the maximum velocities that are affected by the hydrophobicity of alkyl groups introduced at lysine residues. The desensitization of alkylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition is identified with a decrease in inhibitory Michaelis constants for alcohols and this is favoured by the steric effects of substituents at the lysine residues. PMID:697732

  20. The Genetics of Alcohol Metabolism: Role of Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Variants

    PubMed Central

    Edenberg, Howard J.

    2007-01-01

    The primary enzymes involved in alcohol metabolism are alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Both enzymes occur in several forms that are encoded by different genes; moreover, there are variants (i.e., alleles) of some of these genes that encode enzymes with different characteristics and which have different ethnic distributions. Which ADH or ALDH alleles a person carries influence his or her level of alcohol consumption and risk of alcoholism. Researchers to date primarily have studied coding variants in the ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes that are associated with altered kinetic properties of the resulting enzymes. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C alleles encode particularly active ADH enzymes, resulting in more rapid conversion of alcohol (i.e., ethanol) to acetaldehyde; these alleles have a protective effect on the risk of alcoholism. A variant of the ALDH2 gene encodes an essentially inactive ALDH enzyme, resulting in acetaldehyde accumulation and a protective effect. It is becoming clear that noncoding variants in both ADH and ALDH genes also may influence alcohol metabolism and, consequently, alcoholism risk; the specific nature and effects of these variants still need further study. PMID:17718394

  1. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  2. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  3. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  4. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  6. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site.

  7. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  8. Regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S J; Ridge, S A; Cassidy, J; McLeod, H L

    1999-09-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is responsible for degradation of the pyrimidines uracil and thymine and the inactivation of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil. DPD activity is highly variable in cancer populations, and this variation may influence the antitumor efficacy of 5-fluorouracil. However, little is known about the regulation of DPD mRNA expression in any tissues. Using a reverse transcription competitive PCR assay, we quantified DPD mRNA levels in 10 matched colorectal tumors and adjacent normal mucosae and 7 colorectal liver metastases and adjacent normal livers. Lower levels of DPD mRNA expression were observed in colorectal tumor compared with adjacent normal colon mucosa (median, 0.01 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). DPD mRNA expression was also lower in metastases than adjacent normal liver tissue (median, 0.11 versus 1.17 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.001). DPD mRNA expression was higher in normal liver than normal colonic mucosa (median, 1.17 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). A significant relationship was observed between DPD mRNA and catalytic activity (r(s) = 0.66, P<0.001). The tumor:normal ratio for DPD mRNA, protein, and activity was relatively stable in liver (0.25, 0.55, and 0.51, respectively) but varied considerably in colon (0.085, 0.9, and 1.25, respectively), consistent with enhanced translation of DPD transcript in primary colorectal tumor. This suggests that DPD can be regulated at the levels of both transcription and translation.

  9. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  10. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  11. Purification and characterization of benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, R M; Fewson, C A

    1989-01-01

    Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by DEAE-Sephacel, phenyl-Sepharose and f.p.l.c. gel-filtration chromatography. The enzyme was homogeneous and completely free from the isofunctional enzyme benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, as judged by denaturing and non-denaturing polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The subunit Mr value was 56,000 (determined by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis). Estimations of the native Mr value by gel-filtration chromatography gave values of 141,000 with a f.p.l.c. Superose 6 column, but 219,000 with Sephacryl S300. Chemical cross-linking of the enzyme subunits indicated that the enzyme is tetrameric. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I was activated more than 100-fold by K+, Rb+ and NH4+, and the apparent Km for K+ was 11.2 mM. The pH optimum in the presence of K+ was 9.5 and the pI of the enzyme was 5.55. The apparent Km values for benzaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.69 microM and 96 microM respectively, and the maximum velocity was approx. 110 mumol/min per mg of protein. Various substituted benzaldehydes were oxidized at significant rates, and NADP+ was also used as cofactor, although much less effectively than NAD+. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I had an NAD+-activated esterase activity with 4-nitrophenol acetate as substrate, and the dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by a range of thiol-blocking reagents. The absorption spectrum indicated that there was no bound cofactor or prosthetic group. Some of the properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other aldehyde dehydrogenases, specifically the very similar isofunctional enzyme benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from the same organism. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2597133

  12. Direct transfer of NADH between alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase: fact or misinterpretation?

    PubMed

    Srivastava, D K; Smolen, P; Betts, G F; Fukushima, T; Spivey, H O; Bernhard, S A

    1989-09-01

    Following the criticism by Chock and Gutfreund [Chock, P.B. & Gutfreund, H. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 8870-8874], that our proposal of direct transfer of NADH between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-GDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) was based on a misinterpretation of the kinetic data, we have reinvestigated the transfer mechanism between this enzyme pair. By using the "enzyme buffering" steady-state kinetic technique [Srivastava, D.K. & Bernhard, S.A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 4538-4545], we examined the mechanism (random diffusion vs. direct transfer) of transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle alpha-GDH and pig heart LDH. The steady-state data reveal that the LDH-NADH complex and the alpha-GDH-NADH complex can serve as substrate for the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction and the LDH-catalyzed reaction, respectively. This is consistent with the direct-transfer mechanism and inconsistent with a mechanism in which free NADH is the only competent substrate for either enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The discrepancy between this conclusion and that of Chock and Gutfreund comes from (i) their incorrect measurement of the Km for NADH in the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction, (ii) inadequate design and range of the steady-state kinetic experiments, and (iii) their qualitative assessment of the prediction of the direct-transfer mechanism. Our transient kinetic measurements for the transfer of NADH from alpha-GDH to LDH and from LDH to alpha-GDH show that both are slower than predicted on the basis of free equilibration of NADH through the aqueous environment. The decrease in the rate of equilibration of NADH between alpha-GDH and LDH provides no support for the random-diffusion mechanism; rather, it suggests a direct interaction between enzymes that modulates the transfer rate of NADH. Thus, contrary to Chock and Gutfreund's conclusion, all our experimental data compel us to propose, once again, that

  13. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  14. Renal inner medullary choline dehydrogenase activity: characterization and modulation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E B; Hebert, S C

    1989-01-01

    Betaine belongs to the trimethylamine class of osmolytes (osmotically active substances believed to play an important role in cell volume homeostasis) and has recently been identified in the inner medulla of the mammalian kidney. Trimethylamines accumulate in the renal inner medulla during hypertonic stress, and betaine content in the inner medulla has been shown recently to increase during hypernatremia, yet the mechanisms governing the modulation of trimethylamine content and, in particular, of betaine content are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the renal inner medullas of three separate rat strains. Choline dehydrogenase is the enzyme that catalyzes the first of two successive oxidation steps in the biosynthetic conversion of choline to betaine. The presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the inner medulla suggests that betaine accumulation in the inner medulla may result, at least in part, through in situ synthesis. The Km and Vmax of the reaction in the inner medullas of Long-Evans rats are 4.7 +/- 0.5 mM and 36.9 +/- 5.0 nmol.mg protein-1.min-1, respectively. These values are similar to the characteristics of choline dehydrogenase in mammalian liver. During hypernatremia, when betaine content of the inner medulla has been shown to increase 1.5-fold, choline dehydrogenase activity remains unchanged (or slightly increased), whereas enzyme activity in the cortex increases approximately 50%. Possible mechanisms of inner medullary betaine accumulation are discussed.

  15. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  16. Quantitative cytochemical measurement of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B

    1976-08-25

    A system has been developed for the quantitative measurment of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in tissue sections. An obstacle to the histochemical study of this enzyme has been the fact that the substrate, gylceraldehyde 3-phosphate, is very unstable. In the present system a stable compound, fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, is used as the primary substrate and the demonsatration of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity depends on the conversion of this compound into the specific substrate by the aldolase present in the tissue. The characteristics of the dehydrogenase activity resulting from the addition of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, resemble closely the known properties of purified glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Use of polyvinyl alcohol in the reaction medium prevents release of enzymes from the sections, as occurs in aqueous media. Although in this study intrinsic aldolase activity was found to be adequate for the rapid conversion of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate into the specific substrate for the dehydrogenase, the use of exogenous aldolase may be of particular advantage in assessing the intergrity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway.

  17. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-09-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect.

  18. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-01-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect. PMID:9292989

  19. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  20. Participation of phosphofructokinase, malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in capacitation and acrosome reaction of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Breininger, E; Dubois, D; Pereyra, V E; Rodriguez, P C; Satorre, M M; Cetica, P D

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the enzymatic activity of phosphofructokinase (PFK), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in boar spermatozoa and study their participation in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction. Enzymatic activity of these enzymes was determined spectrophotometrically in extracts of boar spermatozoa. Sperm suspensions were incubated in the presence of bicarbonate (40 mM), a well-known capacitation inducer, or follicular fluid (30%), as an acrosome reaction inducer, and different concentrations of oxoglutarate, oxalomalate and hydroxymalonate, inhibitors of PFK, IDH and MDH, respectively. Capacitation percentages were determined by the fluorescence technique of chlortetracycline (CTC), and true acrosome reaction was determined by trypan blue and differential-interferential contrast, optical microscopy. The activity of PFK in boar spermatozoa enzymatic extracts was 1.70 ± 0.19 U/10(10) spermatozoa, the activity of NAD- and NADP-dependent IDH was 0.111 ± 0.005 U/10(10) and 2.22 ± 0.14 U/10(10) spermatozoa, respectively, and the activity of MDH was 4.24 ± 0.38 U/10(10) spermatozoa. The addition of the specific inhibitors of these enzymes prevented sperm capacitation and decreased sperm motility during capacitation and inhibited the acrosome reaction (AR), without affecting the sperm motility during this process. Our results demonstrate the participation of PFK, IDH and MDH in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction in boar spermatozoa, contributing to elucidate the mechanisms that produce energy necessary for these processes in porcine spermatozoa. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Metabolism of Red Beet Slices I. Effects of Washing 1

    PubMed Central

    Reed, D. J.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1966-01-01

    The changes in relative participation of pathways of glucose catabolism in red beet slices during washing have been examined using specifically 14C labeled glucoses. Washing of these slices brings about an increase in participation of the pentose phosphate pathway. The composition of the washing medium influences slightly the extent of change in pathway participation. The activity level of certain enzymes participating in the initial stages of glucose catabolism has been measured in fresh and washed beet slices. Fresh slices which barely metabolized gluconate were found to have very little 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Washing brings about a dramatic increase in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity and this increase was accompanied by a marked increase in the ability of the slices to metabolize gluconate. In red beet slices the TPNH generated via pentose phosphate pathway appears to be utilized for biosynthetic reductions rather than as respiratory substrate. PMID:16656302

  2. Radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis compared for identifying autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Harff, G A; Backer, E T

    1990-12-14

    Variant electrophoretic patterns of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were studied. By radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, immunoglobulin and light chain class of autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase were identified in nine sera: seven of these sera demonstrated IgG (5 lambda, 2 kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase. We conclude that radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis are equally effective for identifying auto-antibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in serum. Radial immunodiffusion, however, is easier to perform than immunoelectrophoresis.

  3. Double-ternary complex affinity chromatography: preparation of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lange, L G; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-19

    A general affinity chromatographic method for alcohol dehydrogenase purification has been developed by employing immobilized 4-substituted pyrazole derivatives that isolate the enzyme through formation of a specific ternary complex. Sepharose 4B is activated with 300 mg of cyanogen bromide/ml of packed gel and coupled to 4-[3-(N-6-aminocaproyl)aminopropyl]pyrazole. From crude liver extracts in 50 mM phosphate-0.37 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pH 7.5, alcohol dehydrogenase is optimally bound at a capacity of 4-5 mg of enzyme/ml of gel. Addition of ethanol, propanol, or butanol, 500 mM, results in the formation of a second ternary complex, which allows the elution of bound enzyme in high yield and purity. This double-ternary complex affinity chromatography has been applied successfully to human, horse, rat, and rabbit liver extracts to isolate the respective homogeneous alcohol dehydrogenases.

  4. Asymmetric oxidoreductions catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwald, J.; Wirz, B.; Scollar, M.P.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1986-10-15

    A methodology is developed for the use of alcohol dehydrogenase (and other NAD/sup +//NADH-dependent enzymes) as catalysts in organic solvents. The enzyme and the cofactor are deposited onto the surface of glass beads which are then suspended in a water-immiscible organic solvent containing the substrate. Both NADH and NAD/sup +/ are efficiently regenerated in such a system with alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol and reduction of isobutyraldehyde, respectively; cofactor turnover numbers of 10/sup 5/ to greater than 10/sup 6/ have been obtained. With use of asymmetric oxidoreductions catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in isopropyl ether, optically active (ee of 95 to 100%) alcohols and ketones have been prepared on a 1 to 10 mmol scale.

  5. Metabolism of glycyrrhetic acid by rat liver microsomes: glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Akao, T; Akao, T; Kobashi, K

    1990-02-06

    Glycyrrhetic acid, derived from a main component of liquorice, was converted to 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid reversibly by rat liver homogenates in the presence of NADPH or NADP+. Glycyrrhetic acid-oxidizing and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid-reducing activities were localized in microsomes among the subcellular fractions of rat liver. Glycyrrhetic acid-oxidizing activity and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid-reducing activities showed pH optima at 6.3 and 8.5, respectively, and required NADP+ or NAD+ and NADPH or NADH, respectively, indicating that these activities were due to glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase. The dehydrogenase was not solubilized from the membranes by the treatment with 1 M NaCl or sonication, indicating that the enzyme is a membrane component. The dehydrogenase was solubilized with detergents such as Emalgen 913, Triton X-100 and sodium cholate, and then separated from 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (5 beta-androstan-3 beta-ol-17-one-oxidizing activity) by butyl-Toyopearl 650 M column chromatography. Partially purified enzyme catalyzed the reversible reaction between glycyrrhetic acid and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid, but was inactive toward 3-epiglycyrrhetic acid and other steroids having the 3 beta-hydroxyl group. The enzyme required NADP+ and NADPH for the highest activities of oxidation and reduction, respectively, and NAD+ and NADH for considerable activities, similar to the results with microsomes. From these results the enzyme is defined as glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase, being quite different from 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of Ruminococcus sp. from human intestine, which is active for both glycyrrhetic acid and steroids having the 3 beta-hydroxyl group.

  6. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  7. The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in cancer metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vatrinet, Renaud; Leone, Giulia; De Luise, Monica; Girolimetti, Giulia; Vidone, Michele; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is a well-established hallmark of cancer. At the hub of various metabolic pathways deeply integrated within mitochondrial functions, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex represents a major modulator of electron transport chain activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux, and is a pivotal enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming following a cancer cell's change in bioenergetic requirements. By contributing to the control of α-ketoglutarate levels, dynamics, and oxidation state, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is also essential in modulating the epigenetic landscape of cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss the manifold roles that this TCA enzyme and its substrate play in cancer.

  8. Purification of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, K; Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1996-05-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver are oxomolybdenum enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid and sulfite to sulfate, respectively. Independent purification protocols have been previously described for both enzymes. Here we describe a procedure by which xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase are purified simultaneously from the same batch of fresh chicken liver. Also, unlike the protocols described earlier, this procedure avoids the use of acetone extraction as well as a heat step, thus minimizing damage to the molybdenum centers of the enzymes.

  9. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  10. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  11. Differential energetic metabolism during Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation. I. Citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Osuna, A; Lupiañez, J A

    1988-11-15

    The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes citrate synthase (citrate oxaloacetatelyase, EC 4.1.3.7), NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (threo-Ds-isocitrate:NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42), and succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: FAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1) as well as their kinetic behavior in the two developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi at insect vector stage, epimastigotes and infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, were studied. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate a higher mitochondrial metabolism in the metacyclic forms as is shown by the extraordinary enhanced activities of metacyclic citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. In epimastigotes, the specific activities of citrate synthase at variable concentrations of oxalacetate and acetyl-CoA were 24.6 and 26.6 mU/mg of protein, respectively, and the Michaelis constants were 7.88 and 6.84 microM for both substrates. The metacyclic enzyme exhibited the following kinetic parameters: a specific activity of 228.4 mU/mg and Km of 3.18 microM for oxalacetate and 248.5 mU/mg and 2.75 microM, respectively, for acetyl-CoA. NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase specific activities for epimastigotes and metacyclics were 110.2 and 210.3 mU/mg, whereas the apparent Km's were 47.9 and 12.5 microM, respectively. No activity for the NAD-dependent isozyme was found in any form of T. cruzi differentiation. The particulated succinate dehydrogenase showed specific activities of 8.2 and 39.1 mU/mg for epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, respectively, although no significant changes in the Km (0.46 and 0.48 mM) were found. The cellular role and the molecular mechanism that probably take place during this significant shift in the mitochondrial metabolism during the T. cruzi differentiation have been discussed.

  12. Effects of lactate dehydrogenase suppression and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase overexpression on cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-won; Cho, Il Taeg; Kim, Tae Soo; Bae, Gun Won; Kim, Ik-Hwan; Kim, Ick Young

    2006-03-01

    In order to conduct a physiological functional study of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), we engineered a CHO dhfr(-) cell, by overexpressing either the anti-sense LDH-A RNA (anti-LDH cells) or GPDH (GP3 cells), or both (GP3/anti-LDH cells). LDH activity in the cell cytosol, and lactate content and pHe change in the growth media were found to decrease according to the order: cell lines GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH > GP3 > CHO. Intracellular ATP contents, representing the extent of respiration rate, also decreased, according to a rank order as follows: GP3 > CHO > GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH. We also attempted to identify and characterize any physiological changes occurring in the cells which harbored diverse metabolic pathways. First, anti-LDH cells with heightened respiration rates were found to display a higher degree of sensitivity to the prooxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH), and the mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, antimycin A, than the GPDH-expressing cells (GP3 and GP3/anti-LDH), which have a lower respiration rate. Second, the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells (anti-LDH and GP3/anti-LDH) evidenced a higher degree of resistance to apoptosis by cell-cell contact inhibition, and a faster doubling time ( approximately 19 h compared with approximately 26 h) than the CHO and GP3 cells. Additionally, cell growth in an extended culture under HCO(3) (-)-free conditions to induce a steep acidification could be maintained with the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells, but could not be maintained with the CHO and GP3 cells. Third, we observed that the most appropriate cell line for the optical production of a certain therapeutic protein (Tissue-Plasminogen Activator) was the GP3/anti-LDH cells. Collectively, our data indicate a variety of physiological roles for LDH and GPDH, including cellular acidosis, oxidoresistance, apoptosis by both acidosis and cell-cell contact inhibition, cell growth, and the generation of

  13. Evidence that adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can effect microsomal P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Foster, Christy A; Mick, Gail J; Wang, Xudong; McCormick, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    The role of adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in providing reducing equivalents to P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum is uncertain. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase resides in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and co-localizes with the bidirectional enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase likely provides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 with NADPH electrons via channeling. Intracellularly, two compartmentalized reactions generate NADPH upon oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate: cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and microsomal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because some endoplasmic reticulum enzymes require an electron donor (NADPH), it is conceivable that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase serves in this capacity for these pathways. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, we examined whether hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase generates reduced pyridine nucleotide for pivotal adrenal microsomal P450 enzymes. 21-hydroxylase activity was increased with glucose-6-phosphate and, also, glucose and glucosamine-6-phosphate. The latter two substrates are only metabolized by hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that requisite NADPH for 21-hydroxylase activity was not via glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Moreover, dihydroepiandrostenedione, a non-competitive inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, did not curtail activation by glucose-6-phosphate. Finally, the most compelling observation was that the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transport inhibitor, chlorogenic acid, blunted the activation by glucose-6-phosphate of both 21-hydroxylase and 17-hydroxylase indicating that luminal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can supply NADPH for these enzymes. Analogous kinetic observations were found with microsomal 17-hydroxylase. These findings indicate that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can be a source, but not exclusively so, of NADPH

  14. Phanerochaete chrysosporium Cellobiohydrolase and Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Transcripts in Wood

    PubMed Central

    Vallim, Marcelo A.; Janse, Bernard J. H.; Gaskell, Jill; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; Cullen, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The transcripts of structurally related cellobiohydrolase genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium-colonized wood chips were quantified. The transcript patterns obtained were dramatically different from the transcript patterns obtained previously in defined media. Cellobiose dehydrogenase transcripts were also detected, which is consistent with the hypothesis that such transcripts play an important role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9572973

  15. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1380 Section 862.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isocitric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1420 Section 862.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  18. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  19. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R; Aghaabdollahian, S; Mofid, M R; Ghaemi, Y; Abedi, D

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  1. Distribution of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The somewhat surprising report that storage proteins and oil are non-uniformly distributed in the cotyledons of developing soybeans prompted us to determine the spatial distribution of the mitochondrial and plastidial forms of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). It has been proposed that pla...

  2. Red Algal Bromophenols as Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Daisuke; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2013-01-01

    Five bromophenols isolated from three Rhodomelaceae algae (Laurencia nipponica, Polysiphonia morrowii, Odonthalia corymbifera) showed inhibitory effects against glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Among them, the symmetric bromophenol dimer (5) showed the highest inhibitory activity against G6PD. PMID:24152564

  3. Molecular properties of succinate dehydrogenase isolated from Micrococcus luteus (lysodeikticus).

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, B A; Owen, P

    1983-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) of Micrococcus luteus was selectively precipitated from Triton X-100-solubilized membranes by using specific antiserum. The precipitated enzyme contained equimolar amounts of four polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 72,000, 30,000, 17,000, and 15,000. The 72,000 polypeptide possessed a covalently bound flavin prosthetic group and appeared to be strongly antigenic as judged by immunoprinting experiments. Low-temperature absorption spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b556 in the antigen complex. By analogy with succinate dehydrogenase purified from other sources, the 72,000 and 30,000 polypeptides were considered to represent subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme, whereas one (or both) of the low-molecular-weight polypeptides was attributed to the apoprotein of the b-type cytochrome. A succinate dehydrogenase antigen cross-reacting with the M. luteus enzyme complex could be demonstrated in membranes of Micrococcus roseus, Micrococcus flavus, and Sarcina lutea, but not in the membranes isolated from a wide variety of other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:6402500

  4. Purification and properties of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, M S; Patterson, R A; Hartley, B S

    1979-01-01

    An Escherichia coli K12 strain was constructed that synthesized elevated quantities of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase; the enzyme accounted for about 5% of the soluble protein in this strain. Some 280 mg of enzyme was purified from 180 g of cell paste. The purified enzyme was active as a monomer of 46,000 mol.wt. The amino acid composition and kinetic constants of the enzyme for D-arabitol and D-mannitol are reported. The apparent Km for D-mannitol was more than 3-fold that for D-arabitol, whereas the maximum velocities with both substrates were indistinguishable. The enzyme purified from the E. coli K12 construct was indistinguishable by the criteria of molecular weight, electrophoretic mobility in native polyacrylamide gel and D-mannitol/D-arabitol activity ratio from D-arabitol dehydrogenase synthesized in wild-type K. aerogenes. Purified D-arabitol dehydrogenase showed no immunological cross-reaction with K. aerogenes ribitol dehydrogenase. During electrophoresis in native polyacrylamide gels, oxidation by persulphate catalysed the formation of inactive polymeric forms of the enzyme. Dithiothreitol and pre-electrophoresis protected against this polymerization. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:393250

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1670 - Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system. 862.1670 Section 862.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.... Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders such as...

  7. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  13. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  14. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  15. Catalytic Mechanism of Short Ethoxy Chain Nonylphenol Dehydrogenase Belonging to a Polyethylene Glycol Dehydrogenase Group in the GMC Oxidoreductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ohta, Takeshi; Kawabata, Takeshi; Kawai, Fusako

    2013-01-01

    Ethoxy (EO) chain nonylphenol dehydrogenase (NPEO-DH) from Ensifer sp. AS08 and EO chain octylphenol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida share common molecular characteristics with polyethylene glycol (PEG) dehydrogenases (PEG-DH) and comprise a PEG-DH subgroup in the family of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductases that includes glucose/alcohol oxidase and glucose/choline dehydrogenase. Three-dimensional (3D) molecular modeling suggested that differences in the size, secondary structure and hydropathy in the active site caused differences in their substrate specificities toward EO chain alkylphenols and free PEGs. Based on 3D molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to introduce mutations into potential catalytic residues of NPEO-DH. From steady state and rapid kinetic characterization of wild type and mutant NPEO-DHs, we can conclude that His465 and Asn507 are directly involved in the catalysis. Asn507 mediates the transfer of proton from a substrate to FAD and His465 transfers the same proton from the reduced flavin to an electron acceptor. PMID:23306149

  16. NADH dehydrogenase-like behavior of nitrogen-doped graphene and its application in NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensing.

    PubMed

    Gai, Pan-Pan; Zhao, Cui-E; Wang, Ying; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-12-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensing platform for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent dehydrogenase catalysis was designed using the nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), which had properties similar to NADH dehydrogenase (CoI). NG mimicked flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in CoI and efficiently catalyzed NADH oxidation. NG also acted as an electron transport "bridge" from NADH to the electrode due to its excellent conductivity. In comparison with a bare gold electrode, an 800 mV decrease in the overpotential for NADH oxidation and CoI-like behavior were observed at NG-modified electrode, which is the largest decrease in overpotential for NADH oxidation reported to date. The catalytic rate constant (k) for the CoI-like behavior of NG was estimated to be 2.3×10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is much higher than that of other previously reported FMN analogs. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of NG was 26 μM, which is comparable to the Km of CoI (10 μM). Electrodes modified with NG and NG/gold nanoparticals/formate dehydrogenase (NG/AuNPs/FDH) showed excellent analytical performance for the detection of NADH and formate. This electrode fabrication strategy could be used to create a universal biosensing platform for developing NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inducible UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) locates to vascular tissue and has alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, C; Bolwell, G P

    1996-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is responsible for channelling UDP-glucose into the pool of UDP-sugars utilized in the synthesis of wall matrix polysaccharides and glycoproteins. It has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean by a combination of hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, gel filtration and dye-ligand chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit of Mr 40,000. Km values were measured for UDP-glucose as 5.5 +/- 1.4 mM and for NAD+ as 20 +/- 3 microM. It was subject to inhibition by UDP-xylose. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity co-purified with alcohol dehydrogenase activity from suspension-cultured cells, elicitor-treated cells and elongating hypocotyls, even when many additional chromatographic steps were employed subsequently. The protein from each source was resolved into virtually identical patterns of isoforms on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/PAGE. However, a combination of peptide mapping and sequence analysis, gel analysis using activity staining and kinetic analysis suggests that both activities are a function of the same protein. An antibody was raised and used to immunolocalize UDP-glucose dehydrogenase to developing xylem and phloem of French bean hypocotyl. Together with data published previously, these results are consistent with an important role in the regulation of carbon flux into wall matrix polysaccharides.

  18. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  19. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  20. Derivatives of cinnamic acid interact with the nucleotide binding site of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Effects on the dehydrogenase reaction and stimulation of esterase activity by nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Poole, R C; Bowden, N J; Halestrap, A P

    1993-04-22

    A wide variety of cinnamic acid derivatives are inhibitors of the low Km mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Two of the most potent inhibitors are alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide (Ki0.6 microM) and alpha-cyano-3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamonitrile (Ki2.6 microM). With propionaldehyde as substrate the inhibition by these compounds was competitive with respect to NAD+. alpha-Fluorocinnamate was a much less effective inhibitor of the enzyme, with mixed behaviour towards NAD+, but with a major competitive component. These cinnamic acid derivatives were ineffective as inhibitors of the aldehyde dehydrogenase-catalysed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, but inhibited the ability of NAD+ and NADH to activate this activity. Inhibition of the stimulation of esterase activity was competitive with respect to NAD+ and NADH, and the derived Ki values were the same as for inhibition of dehydrogenase activity. NAD+, but not acetaldehyde, could elute the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase from alpha-cyanocinnamate-Sepharose, to which the enzyme binds specifically (Poole RC and Halestrap AP, Biochem J 259: 105-110, 1989). The cinnamic acid derivatives have little effect on lactate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase or a high Km aldehyde dehydrogenase present in rat liver mitochondria. It is concluded that some cinnamic acid derivatives are potent inhibitors of the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase, by competing with NAD+/NADH for binding to the enzyme. They are much less effective as inhibitors of other NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

  1. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit D and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutation analysis in canine phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Holt, D E; Henthorn, P; Howell, V M; Robinson, B G; Benn, D E

    2014-07-01

    Phaeochromocytomas (PCs) are tumours of the adrenal medulla chromaffin cells. Paragangliomas (PGLs) arise in sympathetic ganglia (previously called extra-adrenal PCs) or in non-chromaffin parasympathetic ganglia cells that are usually non-secretory. Parenchymal cells from these tumours have a common embryological origin from neural crest ectoderm. Several case series of canine PCs and PGLs have been published and a link between the increased incidence of chemoreceptor neoplasia in brachycephalic dog breeds and chronic hypoxia has been postulated. A similar link to hypoxia in man led to the identification of germline heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) and subsequently SDHA, SDHB and SDHC in similar tumours. We investigated canine PCs (n = 6) and PGLs (n = 2) for SDHD and SDHB mutations and in one PGL found a somatic SDHD mutation c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) in exon 4, which was not present in normal tissue from this brachycephalic dog. Two PCs were heterozygous for both c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) mutation and an exon 3 silent variant c.291G>A. We also identified the heterozygous SDHB exon 2 mutation c.113G>A (p.Arg38Gln) in a PC. These results illustrate that genetic mutations may underlie tumourigenesis in canine PCs and PGLs. The spontaneous nature of these canine diseases and possible association of PGLs with hypoxia in brachycephalic breeds may make them an attractive model for studying the corresponding human tumours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Determinants of the Cofactor Specificity of Ribitol Dehydrogenase, a Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha

    2012-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD+ (S156D, [kcat/Km,NAD]/[kcat/Km,NADP] = 10.9, where Km,NAD is the Km for NAD+ and Km,NADP is the Km for NADP+). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP+ as the cofactor (S156H, [kcat/Km,NAD]/[kcat/Km,NADP] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156. PMID:22344653

  3. Molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ribitol dehydrogenase, a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-05-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD(+) (S156D, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 10.9, where K(m)(,NAD) is the K(m) for NAD(+) and K(m)(,NADP) is the K(m) for NADP(+)). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP(+) as the cofactor (S156H, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156.

  4. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase C correlates with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yibo; Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Yu, Yajie; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Pu; Li, Shuang; Bao, Meiling; Yang, Jie; Qin, Chao; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase C is an isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase and a member of the cancer-testis antigens family. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of lactate dehydrogenase C and its basic mechanisms in renal cell carcinoma. First, a total of 133 cases of renal cell carcinoma samples were analysed in a tissue microarray, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analyses were performed to investigate the correlation between lactate dehydrogenase C expression and renal cell carcinoma progression. Lactate dehydrogenase C protein levels and messenger RNA levels were significantly upregulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues, and the patients with positive lactate dehydrogenase C expression had a shorter progression-free survival, indicating the oncogenic role of lactate dehydrogenase C in renal cell carcinoma. In addition, further cytological experiments demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase C could prompt renal cell carcinoma cells to produce lactate, and increase metastatic and invasive potential of renal cell carcinoma cells. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase C could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In summary, these findings showed lactate dehydrogenase C was associated with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma and played a pivotal role in the migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase C may act as a novel biomarker for renal cell carcinoma progression and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  5. [Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on the dehydrogenase activities of respiration and photosynthetic metabolism in barley seedlings].

    PubMed

    Voytsekovskaya, S A; Astafurova, T P; Verkhoturova, G S; Postovalova, V M

    2015-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia effects on enzymes of photosynthesis and respiration metabolism were explored in 8-day old seedlings of barley Hordeum vulgare L. in the dark or light. 16-hour exposure in rarified atmosphere that causes reductions of partial pressure of air gases and, consequently, hypobaric hypoxia (P(air) = 8.3 κPa, pO2 = 1.7 κPa, pCO2 = 0.003 κPa) up-regulated the activities of piruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP x N-glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase both in the dark and light. NAD- and NAD-N-malate dehydrogenase activities were down-regulated. Levels of NAD- and NAD x H- malate dehydrogenases were decreased. Activation of the NADP-malic enzyme activity, invariably high activity of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase and growth of NADP x N- glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase are considered as a mechanism of barley seedlings adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia.

  6. Reconstitution of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes: analysis of protein X involvement and interaction of homologous and heterologous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, S J; Khan, S S; McCartney, R G; Miller, C; Lindsay, J G

    1996-01-01

    Optimal conditions for rapid and efficient reconstitution of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity are demonstrated by using an improved method for the dissociation of the multienzyme complex into its constituent E1 (substrate-specific 2-oxoacid decarboxylase) and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) components and isolated E2/X (where E2 is dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase) core assembly. Selective cleavage of the protein X component of the purified E2/X core with the proteinase arg C decreases the activity of the reconstituted complex to residual levels (i.e. 8-12%); however, significant recovery of reconstitution is achieved on addition of a large excess (i.e. 50-fold) of parent E3. N-terminal sequence analysis of the truncated 35,000-M(r) protein X fragment locates the site of cleavage by arg C at the extreme N-terminal boundary of a putative E3-binding domain and corresponds to the release of a 15,000-M(r) N-terminal fragment comprising both the lipoyl and linker sequences. In native PDC this region of protein X is shown to be partly protected from proteolytic attack by the presence of E3. Recovery of complex activity in the presence of excess E3 after arg C treatment is thought to result from low-affinity interactions with the partly disrupted subunit-binding domain on X and/or the intact analogous subunit binding domain on E2. Contrasting recoveries for arg C-modified E2/X/E1 core, and untreated E2/E1 core of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, reconstituted with excess bovine heart E3, pig heart E3 or yeast E3 point to subtle differences in subunit interactions with heterologous E3s and offer an explanation for the inability of previous investigators to achieve restoration of PDC function after selective proteolysis of the protein X component. PMID:8870656

  7. Purification and preliminary characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase from Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Creaser, E H; Porter, R L; Britt, K A; Pateman, J A; Doy, C H

    1985-01-01

    Aspergillus alcohol dehydrogenase is produced in response to growth in the presence of a wide variety of inducers, of which the most effective are short-chain alcohols and ketones, e.g. butan-2-one and propan-2-ol. The enzyme can be readily extracted from fresh or freeze-dried cells and purified to homogeneity on Blue Sepharose in a single step by using specific elution with NAD+ and pyrazole. The pure enzyme has Mr 290 000 by electrophoresis or gel filtration; it is a homopolymer with subunit Mr 37 500 by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate; its amino acid composition corresponds to Mr 37 900, and the native enzyme contains one zinc atom per subunit. The enzyme is NAD-specific and has a wide substrate activity in the forward and reverse reactions; its activity profile is not identical with those of other alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:3156582

  8. A specific radiochemical assay for pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Small, C; Jones, M E

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies of pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase have been conducted using a spectrophotometric method to monitor substrate-dependent NAD(P)H production. For the assay of the mammalian enzyme, the spectrophotometric assay was found to be unacceptable for kinetic studies as the production of NAD(P)H was nonlinear with time and protein concentration. An assay which measures radiolabeled glutamate production by this enzyme in the presence of NAD+ from radiolabeled pyrroline-5-carboxylate has been developed. Separation of substrate from product is achieved by column chromatography using Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin. The product isolated by this procedure was identified as glutamate. This new assay is linear with time and protein concentration and gives reproducible results. The assay is not influenced by competing enzyme activities, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, in a liver homogenate so that quantitative conversion of pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate is observed.

  9. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  10. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-07-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  11. NADH dehydrogenase subunit genes in the mitochondrial DNA of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, J; Fukuhara, H

    1994-01-01

    The genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits of respiratory complex I have not been identified so far in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of yeasts. In the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis, we found six new open reading frames whose sequences were unambiguously homologous to those of the genes known to code for NADH dehydrogenase subunit proteins of different organisms, i.e., ND1, ND2, ND3, ND4L, ND5, and ND6. The gene for ND4 also appears to be present, as judged from hybridization experiments with a Podospora gene probe. Specific transcripts from these open reading frames (ND genes) could be detected in the mitochondria. Hybridization experiments using C. parapsilosis genes as probes suggested that ND genes are present in the mtDNAs of a wide range of yeast species including Candida catenulata, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula polymorpha, and others. Images PMID:7521869

  12. Pressure regulation of malic dehydrogenase in reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Klyachko, N L; Levashov, P A; Levashov, A V; Balny, C

    1999-01-27

    Malic dehydrogenase (MDH) studied in water and reversed micelles upon pressure application revealed a difference in catalysis. Whereas MDH in water appeared to be not sensitive to the pressure increasing, the catalytic activity of MDH in reversed micelles showed bell-shaped dependencies both on pressure and surfactant hydration degree, w0. The catalytic activity of MDH was found to be maximal under moderate pressure equal to 300-500 bar and at w0 approximately 14 with the difference between lowest and highest levels of the catalytic activity amounted to about 10 times. The work presented demonstrates for the first time the co-operative effect of reversed micelles and pressure application to malic dehydrogenase leading to the enzyme regulation that cannot be realized in aqueous solution. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Ethanol in the Stems of Trees 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.; Stringer, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation in plants is usually thought to be a transient phenomenon, brought about by environmental limitations to oxygen availability, or by structural constraints to oxygen transport. The vascular cambium of trees is separated from the air by the outer bark and secondary phloem, and we hypothesized that the cambium may experience sufficient hypoxia to induce anaerobic fermentation. We found high alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the cambium of several tree species. Mean activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in Populus deltoides was 165 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram fresh weight in May. Pyruvate decarboxylase activity was also present in the cambium of P. deltoides, with mean activity of 26 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram fresh weight in May. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was not present in any tree species we examined. Contrary to our expectation, alcohol dehydrogenase activity was inversely related to bark thickness in Acer saccharum and unrelated to bark thickness in two Populus species. Bark thickness may be less important in limiting oxygen availability to the cambium than is oxygen consumption by rapidly respiring phloem and cambium in actively growing trees. Ethanol was present in the vascular cambium of all species examined, with mean concentrations of 35 to 143 nanomoles per gram fresh weight, depending on species. Ethanol was also present in xylem sap and may have been released from the cambium into the transpiration stream. The presence in the cambium of the enzymes necessary for fermentation as well as the products of fermentation is evidence that respiration in the vascular cambium of trees may be oxygen-limited, but other biosynthetic origins of ethanol have not been ruled out. PMID:16666209

  14. Enantioselective oxidation of aldehydes catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Könst, Paul; Merkens, Hedda; Kara, Selin; Kochius, Svenja; Vogel, Andreas; Zuhse, Ralf; Holtmann, Dirk; Arends, Isabel W C E; Hollmann, Frank

    2012-09-24

    Teaching old dogs new tricks: Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) may be established redox biocatalysts but they still are good for a few surprises. ADHs can be used to oxidize aldehydes, and this was demonstrated by the oxidative dynamic kinetic resolution of profens. In the presence of a suitable cofactor regeneration system, this reaction can occur with high selectivity. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  16. Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert C. Piper, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Flow, Incorporated Portland, Oregon 97201...Phase 11 (24 Mar 95 - 23 Mar 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum DAMD...that infected patients become ill. Four species of Plasmodium infect humans. P. falciparum accounts for -85 % of the world’s malaria. P. falciparum is

  17. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by fluorescamine.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Jay, E G; Garcia, C

    1993-12-01

    Fluorescamine rapidly inactivated membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the enzyme by this reagent was prevented by succinate and malonate, suggesting that the group modified by fluorescamine was located at the active site. The modification of the active site sulfhydryl group by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) did not alter the inhibitory action of fluorescamine. However, the protective effect of malonate against fluorescamine inhibition was abolished in the enzyme modified at the thiol.

  18. Reappraisal of the Regulation of Lactococcal l-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Niel, Ed W. J.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Martin, Rani; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    2004-01-01

    Lactococcal lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) are coregulated at the substrate level by at least two mechanisms: the fructose-1,6-biphosphate/phosphate ratio and the NADH/NAD ratio. Among the Lactococcus lactis species, there are strains that are predominantly regulated by the first mechanism (e.g., strain 65.1) or by the second mechanism (e.g., strain NCDO 2118). A more complete model of the kinetics of the regulation of lactococcal LDH is discussed. PMID:15006814

  19. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  20. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  1. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  2. Daidzin: a potent, selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-02-15

    Human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-I) is potently, reversibly, and selectively inhibited by an isoflavone isolated from Radix puerariae and identified as daidzin, the 7-glucoside of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone. Kinetic analysis with formaldehyde as substrate reveals that daidzin inhibits ALDH-I competitively with respect to formaldehyde with a Ki of 40 nM, and uncompetitively with respect to the coenzyme NAD+. The human cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme (ALDH-II) is nearly 3 orders of magnitude less sensitive to daidzin inhibition. Daidzin does not inhibit human class I, II, or III alcohol dehydrogenases, nor does it have any significant effect on biological systems that are known to be affected by other isoflavones. Among more than 40 structurally related compounds surveyed, 12 inhibit ALDH-I, but only prunetin and 5-hydroxydaidzin (genistin) combine high selectivity and potency, although they are 7- to 15-fold less potent than daidzin. Structure-function relationships have established a basis for the design and synthesis of additional ALDH inhibitors that could both be yet more potent and specific.

  3. Metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis by inhibiting mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Erion, Derek M; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Zhang, Xian-Man; Braddock, Demetrios T; Albright, Ronald A; Prigaro, Brett J; Wood, John L; Bhanot, Sanjay; MacDonald, Michael J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, Joao-Paulo; Lee, Hui-Young; Cline, Gary W; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2014-06-26

    Metformin is considered to be one of the most effective therapeutics for treating type 2 diabetes because it specifically reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis without increasing insulin secretion, inducing weight gain or posing a risk of hypoglycaemia. For over half a century, this agent has been prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide, yet the underlying mechanism by which metformin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that metformin non-competitively inhibits the redox shuttle enzyme mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, resulting in an altered hepatocellular redox state, reduced conversion of lactate and glycerol to glucose, and decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Acute and chronic low-dose metformin treatment effectively reduced endogenous glucose production, while increasing cytosolic redox and decreasing mitochondrial redox states. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in rats resulted in a phenotype akin to chronic metformin treatment, and abrogated metformin-mediated increases in cytosolic redox state, decreases in plasma glucose concentrations, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production. These findings were replicated in whole-body mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase knockout mice. These results have significant implications for understanding the mechanism of metformin's blood glucose lowering effects and provide a new therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

  4. Purification and characterization of dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase from dog liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakanishi, M; Deyashiki, Y; Hara, A; Matsuura, K; Ohya, I

    1994-09-01

    High NADP(+)-linked dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in dog liver cytosol, from which a dimeric enzyme composed of M(r) 39,000 subunits was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme oxidized trans-cyclohexanediol, and trans-dihydrodiols of benzene and naphthalene, the [1R,2R]-isomers of which were selectively oxidized. In the reverse reaction in the presence of NADPH as a coenzyme, the enzyme reduced alpha-dicarbonyl compounds, such as methylglyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosone, and diacetyl, and some compounds with a carbonyl group, such as glyceraldehyde, lactaldehyde, and acetoin. 4-Hydroxyphenylketones and ascorbates inhibited the enzyme. The results of steady-state kinetic analyses indicated that the reaction proceeds through an ordered bi bi mechanism with the coenzyme binding to the free enzyme, and suggested that the inhibitors bind to the enzyme-NADP+ binary complex. The dimeric enzyme was detected in liver and kidney of dog, and was immunochemically similar to the dimeric enzymes from monkey kidney, rabbit lens, and pig liver. The sequences (total 127 amino acid residues) of eight peptides derived on enzymatic digestion of the dog liver enzyme did not show significant similarity with the primary structures of members of the aldo-keto reductase and short chain dehydrogenase superfamilies, which include monomeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase, respectively.

  5. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  6. Inhibition of porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Rodríguez, Jesús A; Figueroa-Soto, Ciria G; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa M

    2010-01-01

    Renal hyperosmotic conditions may produce reactive oxygen species, which could have a deleterious effect on the enzymes involved in osmoregulation. Hydrogen peroxide was used to provoke oxidative stress in the environment of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in vitro. Enzyme activity was reduced as hydrogen peroxide concentration was increased. Over 50% of the enzyme activity was lost at 100 μM hydrogen peroxide at two temperatures tested. At pH 8.0, under physiological ionic strength conditions, peroxide inhibited the enzyme. Initial velocity assays of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (0-200 μM) showed noncompetitive inhibition with respect to NAD(+) or to betaine aldehyde at saturating concentrations of the other substrate at pH 7.0 or 8.0. Inhibition data showed that apparent V(max) decreased 40% and 26% under betaine aldehyde and NAD(+) saturating concentrations at pH 8.0, while at pH 7.0 V(max) decreased 40% and 29% at betaine aldehyde and NAD(+) saturating concentrations. There was little change in apparent Km(NAD) at either pH, while Km(BA) increased at pH 7.0. K(i) values at pH 8 and 7 were calculated. Our results suggest that porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase could be inhibited by hydrogen peroxide in vivo, thus compromising the synthesis of glycine betaine.

  7. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity.

  8. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  9. Levels of Alpha-Glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase, Triosephosphate Isomerase and Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase in Muscles of the Cockroach, ’Periplaneta americana’ L.,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The level of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is slightly higher in leg muscle than in thoracic muscle of the American cockroach, Periplaneta ... americana . Triosephosphate isomerase in leg muscle is about twice that of thoracic muscle. There is little lactic acid dehydrogenase in both muscles. (Author)

  10. A quantitative histochemical study of lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the membrana granulosa of the ovulatory follicle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Enelow, R

    1983-11-01

    Using a microdensitometer, lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities were measured in the membrana granulosa of the rat ovulatory follicle. Ovaries were removed on each day of the oestrous cycle; oestrus, dioestrus-1, dioestrus-2, and proestrus; and enzyme activities measured in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in four regions within it: peripheral (PR), antral (AR), cumulus oophorus (CO) and corona radiata (CR). Throughout the cycle, lactate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR. On oestrus, lactate dehydrogenase activity was progressively less in AR, CO and CR. On dioestrus-1, activity was identical in AR and CO and less in CR. On dioestrus-2, activity was greater in AR than in CO or CR. By proestrus, activity was equal in AR, CO and CR. In the membrana granulosa as a whole, and in each region, lactate dehydrogenase activity declined as ovulation approached. In contrast, succinate dehydrogenase activity in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in PR was constant throughout the cycle. Activity fluctuated in the other regions. Succinate dehydrogenase activity on oestrus was greatest in PR, less in AR and CO and least in CR. On the remaining days, succinate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR and less but equal in the remainder of the membrana granulosa.

  11. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  12. Cloning, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes for aromatic amine dehydrogenase from Alcaligenes faecalis and evolution of amine dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Chistoserdov, A Y

    2001-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the aromatic amine utilization (aau) gene region from Alcaligenes faecalis contained nine genes (orf-1, aauBEDA, orf-2, orf-3, orf-4 and hemE) transcribed in the same direction. The aauB and aauA genes encode the periplasmic aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) large and small subunit polypeptides, respectively, and were homologous to mauB and mauA, the genes for the large and small subunits of methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). aauE and aauD are homologous to mauE and mauD and apparently carry out the same function of transport and folding of the small subunit polypeptide in the periplasm. No analogues of the mauF, mauG, mauL, mauM and mauN genes responsible for biosynthesis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone (the prosthetic group of amine dehydrogenases) were found in the aau cluster. orf-2 was predicted to encode a small periplasmic monohaem c-type cytochrome. No biological function can be assigned to polypeptides encoded by orf-1, orf-3 and orf-4 and mutations in these genes appeared to be lethal. Mutants generated by insertions into mauD were not able to use phenylethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine as a source of carbon and phenylethylamine, 3'-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) and tyramine as a source of nitrogen, indicating that AADH is the only enzyme involved in utilization of primary amines in A. faecalis. AADH genes are present in Alcaligenes xylosoxydans subsp. xylosoxydans, but not in other beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of amine dehydrogenases (MADH and AADH) indicated that AADH and MADH evolutionarily diverged before separation of proteobacteria into existing subclasses.

  13. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  14. Cloning and cDNA sequence of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component of human. cap alpha. -ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, G.; Raefsky-Estrin, C.; Carothers, D.J.; Pepin, R.A.; Javed, A.A.; Jesse, B.W.; Ganapathi, M.K.; Samols, D.; Patel, M.S.

    1988-03-01

    cDNA clones comprising the entire coding region for human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase have been isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The cDNA sequence of the largest clone consisted of 2082 base pairs and contained a 1527-base open reading frame that encodes a precursor dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of 509 amino acid residues. The first 35-amino acid residues of the open reading frame probably correspond to a typical mitochondrial import leader sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence of the mature protein, starting at the residue number 36 of the open reading frame, is almost identical (>98% homology) with the known partial amino acid sequence of the pig heart dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The cDNA clone also contains a 3' untranslated region of 505 bases with an unusual polyadenylylation signal (TATAAA) and a short poly(A) track. By blot-hybridization analysis with the cDNA as probe, two mRNAs, 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases in size, have been detected in human tissues and fibroblasts, whereas only one mRNA (2.4 kilobases) was detected in rat tissues.

  15. Structural Insights into the Drosophila melanogaster Retinol Dehydrogenase, a Member of the Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Alexander, Nathan S.; Babino, Darwin; Leung, Nicole Y.; Montell, Craig; Banerjee, Surajit; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore of visual pigments isomerizes upon interaction with a photon, initiating a downstream cascade of signaling events that ultimately lead to visual perception. 11-cis-Retinylidene is regenerated through enzymatic transformations collectively called the visual cycle. The first and rate-limiting enzymatic reaction within this cycle, i.e., the reduction of all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol, is catalyzed by retinol dehydrogenases. Here, we determined the structure of Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenase (PDH) isoform C that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family. This is the first reported structure of a SDR that possesses this biologically important activity. Two crystal structures of the same enzyme grown under different conditions revealed a novel conformational change of the NAD+ cofactor, likely representing a change during catalysis. Amide hydrogen–deuterium exchange of PDH demonstrated changes in the structure of the enzyme upon dinucleotide binding. In D. melanogaster, loss of PDH activity leads to photoreceptor degeneration that can be partially rescued by transgenic expression of human RDH12. Based on the structure of PDH, we analyzed mutations causing Leber congenital amaurosis 13 in a homology model of human RDH12 to obtain insights into the molecular basis of RDH12 disease-causing mutations. PMID:27809489

  16. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution.

  17. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. )

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  18. High-fat diet enhanced retinal dehydrogenase activity, but suppressed retinol dehydrogenase activity in liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mian; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhong, Ze-yu; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has shown that hyperlipidemia is associated with retinoid dyshomeostasis. In liver, retinol is mainly oxidized to retinal by retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) and alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), further converted to retinoic acid by retinal dehydrogenases (RALDHs). The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-fat diet (HFD) induced hyperlipidemia affected activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs in rats. Results showed that retinol levels in liver, kidney and adipose tissue of HFD rats were significantly increased, while plasma retinol and hepatic retinal levels were markedly decreased. HFD rats exhibited significantly downregulated hepatic ADHs/RDHs activity and Adh1, Rdh10 and Dhrs9 expression. Oppositely, hepatic RALDHs activity and Raldh1 expression were upregulated in HFD rats. In HepG2 cells, treatment of HFD rat serum inhibited ADHs/RDHs activity and induced RALDHs activity. Among the tested abnormally altered components in HFD rat serum, cholesterol reduced ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while induced RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression in HepG2 cells. Contrary to the effect of cholesterol, cholesterol-lowering agent pravastatin upregulated ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while suppressed RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia oppositely altered activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs, which is partially due to the elevated cholesterol levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The amino acid sequence of ribitol dehydrogenase-F, a mutant enzyme with improved xylitol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Homsi-Brandeburgo, M I; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Ward, R J; Giglio, J R; Hartley, B S

    1999-05-01

    A mutant ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH-F) was purified from Klebsiella aerogenes strain F which evolved from the wild-type strain A under selective pressure to improve growth on xylitol, a poor substrate used as sole carbon source. The ratio of activities on xylitol (500 mM) and ribitol (50 mM) was 0.154 for RDH-F compared to 0.033 for the wild-type (RDH-A) enzyme. The complete amino acid sequence of RDH-F showed the mutations. Q60 for E60 and V215 for L215 in the single polypeptide chain of 249 amino acid residues. Structural modeling based on homologies with two other microbial dehydrogenases suggests that E60 --> Q60 is a neutral mutation, since it lies in a region far from the catalytic site and should not cause structural perturbations. In contrast, L215 --> V215 lies in variable region II and would shift a loop that interacts with the NADH cofactor. Another improved ribitol dehydrogenase, RDH-D, contains an A196 --> P196 mutation that would disrupt a surface alpha-helix in region II. Hence conformational changes in this region appear to be responsible for the improved xylitol specificity.

  20. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (−)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (−)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (−)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (−)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. PMID:26953347

  1. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Chirality of the hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alizade, M A; Gaede, K; Brendel, K

    1976-08-01

    The stereochemistry of the hydrogen transfer to NAD catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase (ribitol:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.56) from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-mannitol-1-phosphate:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.17) from Escherichia coli was investigated. [4-3H]NAD was enzymatically reduced with nonlabelled ribitol in the presence of ribitol dehydrogenase and with nonlabelled D-mannitol 1-phosphate and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. In both cases the [4-3H]-NADH produced was isolated and the chirality at the C-4 position determined. It was found that after the transfer of hydride, the label was in both reactions exclusively confined to the (4R) position of the newly formed [4-3H]NADH. In order to explain these results, the hydrogen transferred from the nonlabelled substrates to [4-3H]NAD must have entered the (4S) position of the nicotinamide ring. These data indicate for both investigated inducible dehydrogenases a classification as B or (S) type enzymes. Ribitol also can be dehydrogenated by the constitutive A-type L-iditol dehydrogenase (L-iditol:NAD 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.14) from sheep liver. When L-iditol dehydrogenase utilizes ribitol as hydrogen donor, the same A-type classification for this oxidoreductase, as expected, holds true. For the first time, opposite chirality of hydrogen transfer to NAD in one organic reaction--ribitol + NAD = D-ribu + NADH + H--is observed when two different dehydrogenases, the inducible ribitol dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae and the constitutive L-iditol dehydrogenase from sheep liver, are used as enzymes. This result contradicts the previous generalization that the chirality of hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme for the same reaction is independent of the source of the catalyzing enzyme.

  3. Evidence that an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment triggers the release of a cell-associated high-molecular-weight amylase in Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980.

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, E M; Schocher, I; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1996-01-01

    During growth on starch medium, the S-layer-carrying Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and an S-layer-deficient variant each secreted three amylases, with identical molecular weights of 58,000, 122,000, and 184,000, into the culture fluid. Only the high-molecular-weight amylase (hmwA) was also identified as cell associated. Extraction and reassociation experiments showed that the hmwA had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and to the S-layer surface, but the interactions with the peptidoglycan-containing layer were stronger than those with the S-layer surface. For the S-layer-deficient variant, no changes in the amount of cell-associated and free hmwA could be observed during growth on starch medium, while for the S-layer-carrying strain, cell association of the hmwA strongly depended on the growth phase of the cells. The maximum amount of cell-associated hmwA was observed 3 h after inoculation, which corresponded to early exponential growth. The steady decrease in cell-associated hmwA during continued growth correlated with the appearance and the increasing intensity of a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 60,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This protein had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and was identified as an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment which did not result from proteolytic cleavage of the whole S-layer protein but seems to be a truncated copy of the S-layer protein which is coexpressed with the hmwA under certain culture conditions. During growth on starch medium, the N-terminal S-layer protein fragment was integrated into the S-layer lattice, which led to the loss of its regular structure over a wide range and to the loss of amylase binding sites. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that the N-terminal part of the S-layer protein is responsible for the anchoring of the subunits to the peptidoglycan-containing layer, while the surface-located C-terminal half

  4. Interaction of the crystalline bacterial cell surface layer protein SbsB and the secondary cell wall polymer of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72 assessed by real-time surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Mader, Christoph; Huber, Carina; Moll, Dieter; Sleytr, Uwe B; Sára, Margit

    2004-03-01

    The interaction between S-layer protein SbsB and the secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP) of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 was investigated by real-time surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology. The SCWP is an acidic polysaccharide that contains N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylmannosamine, and pyruvic acid. For interaction studies, recombinant SbsB (rSbsB) and two truncated forms consisting of either the S-layer-like homology (SLH) domain (3SLH) or the residual part of SbsB were used. Independent of the setup, the data showed that the SLH domain was exclusively responsible for SCWP binding. The interaction was found to be highly specific, since neither the peptidoglycan nor SCWPs from other organisms nor other polysaccharides were recognized. Data analysis from that setup in which 3SLH was immobilized on a sensor chip and SCWP represented the soluble analyte was done in accordance with a model that describes binding of a bivalent analyte to a fixed ligand in terms of an overall affinity for all binding sites. The measured data revealed the presence of at least two binding sites on a single SCWP molecule with a distance of about 14 nm and an overall Kd of 7.7 x 10(-7) M. Analysis of data from the inverted setup in which the SCWP was immobilized on a sensor chip was done in accordance with an extension of the heterogeneous-ligand model, which indicated the existence of three binding sites with low (Kd = 2.6 x 10(-5) M), medium (Kd = 6.1 x 10(-8) M), and high (Kd = 6.7 x 10(-11) M) affinities. Since in this setup 3SLH was the soluble analyte and the presence of small amounts of oligomers in even monomeric protein solutions cannot be excluded, the high-affinity binding site may result from avidity effects caused by binding of at least dimeric 3SLH. Solution competition assays performed with both setups confirmed the specificity of the protein-carbohydrate interaction investigated.

  5. Dynamics in oxygen-induced changes in S-layer protein synthesis from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72 and the S-layer-deficient variant T5 in continuous culture and studies of the cell wall composition.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Kuen, B; Mayer, H F; Mandl, F; Schuster, K C; Sleytr, U B

    1996-01-01

    Stable synthesis of the hexagonally ordered (p6) S-layer protein from the wild-type strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72 could be achieved in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions when glucose was used as the sole carbon source. Depending on the adaptation of the wild-type strain to low oxygen supply, the dynamics in oxygen-induced changes in S-layer protein synthesis was different when the rate of aeration was increased to a level that allowed dissimilation of amino acids. If oxygen supply was increased at the beginning of continuous culture, synthesis of the p6 S-layer protein from the wild-type strain (encoded by the sbsA gene) was immediately stopped and replaced by that of a new type of S-layer protein (encoded by the sbsB gene) which assembled into an oblique (p2) lattice. In cells adapted to a prolonged low oxygen supply, first, low-level p2 S-layer protein synthesis and second, synchronous synthesis of comparable amounts of both types of S-layer proteins could be induced by stepwise increasing the rate of aeration. The time course of changes in S-layer protein synthesis was followed up by immunogold labelling of whole cells. Synthesis of the p2 S-layer protein could also be induced in the p6-deficient variant T5. Hybridization data obtained by applying the radiolabelled N-terminal and C-terminal sbsA fragments and the N-terminal sbsB fragment to the genomic DNA of all the three organisms indicated that changes in S-layer protein synthesis were accompanied by chromosomal rearrangement. Chemical analysis of peptidoglycan-containing sacculi and extraction and recrystallization experiments revealed that at least for the wild-type strain, a cell wall polymer consisting of N-acetylglucosamine and glucose is responsible for binding of the p6 S-layer protein to the rigid cell wall layer. PMID:8606191

  6. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from halophilic archaebacteria: purification and properties of the enzyme from halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, J.J.; McQuattie, A.; Stevenson, K.J.

    1986-07-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria possess dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity but apparently lack the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of which it is usually an integral component. In this paper, the purification of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Halobacterium halobium is reported. The enzyme is a dimer with a polypeptide chain M/sub r/ of 58,000 (+/-3000). The amino acid composition of the enzyme is compared with those of the eubacterial and eukaryotic dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, and evidence is presented to suggest that the N-terminal amino acid of the H. halobium enzyme is blocked. Chemical modification with the trivalent arsenical reagent (p-aminophenyl)dichloroarsine indicates the involvement of a reversibly reducible disulfide bond in the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. The possible metabolic role of this dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in the absence of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is discussed.

  7. Isolation, sequence, and characterization of the Cercospora nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the Cercospora nicotianae gene for the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme phytoene dehydrogenase. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed it has greater than 50% identity with its counterpart in Neurospora crassa and approximately 30% identity with prokaryotic phytoene dehydrogenases and is related, but more distantly, to phytoene dehydrogenases from plants and cyanobacteria. Our analysis confirms that phytoene dehydrogenase proteins fall into two groups: those from plants and cyanobacteria and those from eukaryotic and noncyanobacter prokaryotic microbes. Southern analysis indicated that the C. nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene is present in a single copy. Extraction of beta-carotene, the sole carotenoid accumulated by C. nicotianae, showed that both light- and dark-grown cultures synthesize carotenoids, but higher levels accumulate in the light. Northern (RNA) analysis of poly(A)+ RNA, however, showed no differential accumulation of phytoene dehydrogenase mRNA between light- and dark-grown fungal cultures. Images PMID:8085820

  8. Central carbon metabolism in marine bacteria examined with a simplified assay for dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weiwei; Wang, Shizhen; Zhou, Xiaofen; Fang, Baishan

    2013-06-01

    A simplified assay platform was developed to measure the activities of the key oxidoreductases in central carbon metabolism of various marine bacteria. Based on microplate assay, the platform was low-cost and simplified by unifying the reaction conditions of enzymes including temperature, buffers, and ionic strength. The central carbon metabolism of 16 marine bacteria, involving Pseudomonas, Exiguobacterium, Marinobacter, Citreicella, and Novosphingobium were studied. Six key oxidoreductases of central carbon metabolism, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, and isocitrate dehydrogenase were investigated by testing their activities in the pathway. High activity of malate dehydrogenase was found in Citreicella marina, and the specific activity achieved 22 U/mg in cell crude extract. The results also suggested that there was a considerable variability on key enzymes' activities of central carbon metabolism in some strains which have close evolutionary relationship while they adapted to the requirements of the niche they (try to) occupy.

  9. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of mammalian L-threonine 3-dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Alasdair J

    2002-01-01

    Background In mammals, L-threonine is an indispensable amino acid. The conversion of L-threonine to glycine occurs through a two-step biochemical pathway involving the enzymes L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase. The L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase enzyme has been purified and characterised, but the L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase gene has not previously been identified in mammals. Results Transcripts for L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase from both the mouse and pig are reported. The ORFs of both L-threonine dehydrogenase cDNAs encode proteins of 373 residues (41.5 kDa) and they share 80% identity. The mouse gene is located on chromosome 14, band C. The amino-terminal regions of these proteins have characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence and are related to the UDP-galactose 4-epimerases, with both enzyme families having an amino-terminal NAD+ binding domain. That these cDNAs encode threonine dehydrogenases was shown, previously, by tiling 13 tryptic peptide sequences, obtained from purified L-threonine dehydrogenase isolated from porcine liver mitochondria, on to the pig ORF. These eukaryotic L-threonine dehydrogenases also have significant similarity with the prokaryote L-threonine dehydrogenase amino-terminus peptide sequence of the bacterium, Clostridium sticklandii. In murine tissues, the expression of both L-threonine dehydrogenase and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase mRNAs were highest in the liver and were also present in brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, skeletal muscle, spleen and testis. Conclusions The first cloning of transcripts for L-threonine dehydrogenase from eukaryotic organisms are reported. However, they do not have any significant sequence homology to the well-characterised Escherichia coli L-threonine dehydrogenase. PMID:12097150

  10. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  11. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-08-15

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP(+ )isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1(R148H) mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1 Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities.

  12. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-08-15

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling.

  13. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  14. A novel nicotinoprotein aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in polyethylene glycol degradation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, T; Tani, A; Kimbara, K; Kawai, F

    2005-09-01

    A gene (pegC) encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was located 3.4 kb upstream of a gene encoding polyethylene glycol (PEG) dehydrogenase (pegA) in Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus strain 103. ALDH was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified on a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column. The recombinant enzyme was a homotetramer consisting of four 46.1-kDa subunits. The alignment of the putative amino acid sequence of the cloned enzyme showed high similarity with a group of NAD(P)-dependent ALDHs (identity 36-52%); NAD-binding domains (Rossmann fold and four glycine residues) and catalytic residues (Glu225 and Cys259) were well conserved. The cofactor, which was extracted from the purified enzyme, was tightly bound to the enzyme and identified as NADP. The enzyme contained 0.94 mol NADP per subunit. The enzyme was activated by Ca(2+), but by no other metals; no metal (Zn, Fe, Mg, or Mn) was detected in the purified recombinant enzyme. Activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuric benzoate, and heavy metals such as Hg, Cu, Pb and Cd, indicating that a cysteine residue is involved in the activity. Enzyme activity was independent of N,N-dimethyl-p-nitrosoaniline as an electron acceptor. Trans-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)-cinnamaldehyde was not oxidized as a substrate, but the compound worked as an inhibitor for the enzyme, as did pyrazole. The enzyme acted on n-aldehydes C(2)-C(14)) and PEG-aldehydes. Thus the enzyme was concluded to be a novel Ca(2+)-activating nicotinoprotein (NADP-containing) PEG-aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in the degradation of PEG in S. macrogoltabidus strain 103.

  15. [Dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase (DPD)--a toxicity marker for 5-fluorouracil?].

    PubMed

    Jedrzychowska, Adriana; Dołegowska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In proceedings relating to patients suffering from cancer, an important step is predicting response and toxicity to treatment. Depending on the type of cancer, physicians use the generally accepted schema of treatment, for example pharmacotherapy. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most widely used anticancer drug in chemotherapy for colon, breast, and head and neck cancer. Patients with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency, which is responsible for the metabolism of 5-FU, may experience severe side effects during treatment, and even death. In many publications the need for determining the activity of DPD is discussed, which would protect the patient from the numerous side effects of treatment. However, in practice these assays are not done routinely, despite the high demand. In most cases, a genetic test is used to detect changes in the gene encoding DPD (such as in the USA), but because of the large number of mutations the genetic test cannot be used as a screening test. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity has been shown to have high variability among the general population, with an estimated proportion of at least 3-5% of individuals showing low or deficient DPD activity. In this publication we presents data about average dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase activity in various populations of the world (e.g. Japan, Ghana, Great Britain) including gender differences and collected information about the possibility of determination of DPD activity in different countries. Detection of reduced DPD activity in patients with planned chemotherapy will allow a lower dosage of 5-FU or alternative treatment without exposing them to adverse reactions.

  16. Lactate Dehydrogenase C and Energy Metabolism in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Odet, Fanny; Gabel, Scott A.; Williams, Jason; London, Robert E.; Goldberg, Erwin; Eddy, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that disruption of the germ cell-specific lactate dehydrogenase C gene (Ldhc) led to male infertility due to defects in sperm function, including a rapid decline in sperm ATP levels, a decrease in progressive motility, and a failure to develop hyperactivated motility. We hypothesized that lack of LDHC disrupts glycolysis by feedback inhibition, either by causing a defect in renewal of the NAD+ cofactor essential for activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, sperm (GAPDHS), or an accumulation of pyruvate. To test these hypotheses, nuclear magnetic resonance analysis was used to follow the utilization of labeled substrates in real time. We found that in sperm lacking LDHC, glucose consumption was disrupted, but the NAD:NADH ratio and pyruvate levels were unchanged, and pyruvate was rapidly metabolized to lactate. Moreover, the metabolic disorder induced by treatment with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibitor sodium oxamate was different from that caused by lack of LDHC. This supported our earlier conclusion that LDHA, an LDH isozyme present in the principal piece of the flagellum, is responsible for the residual LDH activity in sperm lacking LDHC, but suggested that LDHC has an additional role in the maintenance of energy metabolism in sperm. By coimmunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified 27 proteins associated with LDHC. A majority of these proteins are implicated in ATP synthesis, utilization, transport, and/or sequestration. This led us to hypothesize that in addition to its role in glycolysis, LDHC is part of a complex involved in ATP homeostasis that is disrupted in sperm lacking LDHC. PMID:21565994

  17. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R. Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2. These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP+ isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1R148H mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1. Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities. PMID:27427385

  18. Steroleosin, a sterol-binding dehydrogenase in seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Jen; Tai, Sorgan S K; Peng, Chi-Chung; Tzen, Jason T C

    2002-04-01

    Besides abundant oleosin, three minor proteins, Sop 1, 2, and 3, are present in sesame (Sesamum indicum) oil bodies. The gene encoding Sop1, named caleosin for its calcium-binding capacity, has recently been cloned. In this study, Sop2 gene was obtained by immunoscreening, and it was subsequently confirmed by amino acid partial sequencing and immunological recognition of its overexpressed protein in Escherichia coli. Immunological cross recognition implies that Sop2 exists in seed oil bodies of diverse species. Along with oleosin and caleosin genes, Sop2 gene was transcribed in maturing seeds where oil bodies are actively assembled. Sequence analysis reveals that Sop2, tentatively named steroleosin, possesses a hydrophobic anchoring segment preceding a soluble domain homologous to sterol-binding dehydrogenases/reductases involved in signal transduction in diverse organisms. Three-dimensional structure of the soluble domain was predicted via homology modeling. The structure forms a seven-stranded parallel beta-sheet with the active site, S-(12X)-Y-(3X)-K, between an NADPH and a sterol-binding subdomain. Sterol-coupling dehydrogenase activity was demonstrated in the overexpressed soluble domain of steroleosin as well as in purified oil bodies. Southern hybridization suggests that one steroleosin gene and certain homologous genes may be present in the sesame genome. Comparably, eight hypothetical steroleosin-like proteins are present in the Arabidopsis genome with a conserved NADPH-binding subdomain, but a divergent sterol-binding subdomain. It is indicated that steroleosin-like proteins may represent a class of dehydrogenases/reductases that are involved in plant signal transduction regulated by various sterols.

  19. Buformin suppresses the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akiko; Kubota, Masafumi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-01

    The biguanides metformin and buformin, which are clinically used for diabetes mellitus, are known to improve resistance to insulin in patients. Biguanides were reported to cause lactic acidosis as a side effect. Since the mechanism of the side effect still remains obscure, we have examined genes whose expression changes by treating HepG2 cells with buformin in order to elucidate the mechanisms of the side effect. A subtraction cDNA library was constructed by the method of suppressive subtractive hybridization and the screening of the library was performed with cDNA probes prepared from HepG2 cells treated with or without buformin for 12 h. The expression of the gene and the protein obtained by the screening was monitored by real-time RT-PCR with specific primers and Western blotting with specific antibody. The amounts of ATP and NAD+ were determined with luciferase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. We found that expression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) gene was suppressed by treating HepG2 cells with 0.25 mM buformin for 12 h as a result of the library screening. The decrease in the expression depended on the treatment period. The amount of GAPD protein also decreased simultaneously with the suppression of the gene expression by the treatment with buformin. The amount of ATP and NAD+ in the HepG2 cells treated with buformin decreased to 10 and 20% of the control, respectively. These observations imply that the biguanide causes deactivation of the glycolytic pathway and subsequently the accumulation of pyruvate and NADH and a decrease in NAD+. Therefore, the reaction equilibrium catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase leans towards lactate production and this may result in lactic acidosis.

  20. [The role of hepatic and erythrocyte aldehyde dehydrogenase in the development of burn toxemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A G

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to examine catalytic properties of non-specific aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver and erythrocyte as the main markers of endogenous intoxication after burn. Enzymatic activity was assayed from changes in the rate of NADH synthesis during acetaldehyde oxidation. Burn was shown to decrease it both in the liver and in erythrocytes which resulted in the accumulation of toxic aldehydes and the development of intoxication. Simultaneous fall in alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities is supposed to contribute to the decrease of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity as a result of thermal injury.

  1. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  2. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Sakuko; Muramatsu, Hisashi; Nakajima, Takanori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Misono, Haruo; Nagata, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3) were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienyl)serine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2. PMID:21048868

  3. Characteristics of butanol metabolism in alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deermice.

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, J A; Kato, S; Lieber, C S

    1989-01-01

    Deermice lacking the low-Km alcohol dehydrogenase eliminated butan-1-ol, a substrate for microsomal oxidation but not for catalase, at 117 mumol/min per kg body wt. Microsomal fractions and hepatocytes metabolized butan-1-ol also (Vmax. = 6.7 nmol/min per nmol of cytochrome P-450, Km = 0.85 mM; Vmax. = 5.3 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, Km = 0.71 mM respectively). These results are consistent with alcohol oxidation by the microsomal system in these deermice. PMID:2930472

  4. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  6. Desensitization of glutamate dehydrogenase by reaction of tyrosne residues.

    PubMed

    Price, N C; Radda, G K

    1969-09-01

    1. The reaction of glutamate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole and with tetranitromethane leads to modification of tyrosine residues. 2. Modification of 1 tyrosine residue/subunit does not affect the enzymic activity but decreases the response of the enzyme to the allosteric inhibitor, GTP. 3. The physical properties of the enzyme (sedimentation coefficient and optical rotatory dispersion) remain unaltered. 4. GTP partially protects against desensitization. 5. The diminished responses of the modified enzymes to GTP are also detected by using the fluorescence of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate as a conformational probe. 6. Difficulties that generally arise in chemical modifications from inhomogeneous distributions of products are discussed.

  7. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  8. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria.

  9. Catalytically active monomers of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Muronetz, V I; Klyachko, N L; Nagradova, N K

    1998-04-01

    Monomeric forms of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase have been prepared using two different experimental approaches: (1) covalent immobilization of a tetramer on a solid support via a single subunit with subsequent dissociation of non-covalently bound subunits in the presence of urea, and (2) entrapment of monomeric species into reversed micelles of Aerosol OT in octane. Isolated monomers were shown to be catalytically active, exhibiting KM values close to the parameters characteristic of the tetrameric forms. Like tetramers, isolated monomers did not use NADP7 as a coenzyme.

  10. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biehl, Ralf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Monkenbusch, Michael; Falus, Peter; Préost, Sylvain; Merkel, Rudolf; Richter, Dieter

    2008-09-01

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  11. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  12. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  13. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  14. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  15. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2) is a hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH) and molecular target for treating primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Summitt, Candice B.; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Parsonage, Derek; Holmes, Ross P.; Lowther, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias (PH), types 1–3, are disorders of glyoxylate metabolism that result in increased oxalate production and calcium oxalate stone formation. The breakdown of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (Hyp) from endogenous and dietary sources of collagen makes a significant contribution to the cellular glyoxylate pool. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2), historically known as hydroxyproline oxidase, is the first step in the hydroxyproline catabolic pathway and represents a drug target to reduce the glyoxylate and oxalate burden of PH patients. This study is the first report of the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human PRODH2. Evaluation of a panel of N-terminal and C-terminal truncation variants indicated that residues 157–515 contain the catalytic core with one FAD molecule. The 12-fold higher kcat/Km value of 0.93 M−1·s−1 for Hyp over Pro demonstrates the preference for Hyp as substrate. Moreover, an anaerobic titration determined a Kd value of 125 μM for Hyp, a value ~1600-fold lower than the Km value. A survey of ubiquinone analogues revealed that menadione, duroquinone, and CoQ1 reacted more efficiently than oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor during catalysis. Taken together, these data and the slow reactivity with sodium sulfite support that PRODH2 functions as a dehydrogenase and most likely utilizes CoQ10 as the terminal electron acceptor in vivo. Thus, we propose that the name of PRODH2 be changed to hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH). Three Hyp analogues were also identified to inhibit the activity of HYPDH, representing the first steps toward the development of a novel approach to treat all forms of PH. PMID:25697095

  16. Structural organization of the human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene (SORD)

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, T.; Carper, D.; Popescu, N.C.

    1995-03-01

    The primary structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) was determined by cDNA and genomic cloning. The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA covers 2471 bp including an open reading frame that yields a protein of 356 amino acid residues. The gene structure of SORD spans approximatley 30 kb divided into 9 exons and 8 introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.1 by in situ hybridization. Two transcription initiation sites were detected. Three Sp1 sites and a repetitive sequence (CAAA){sub 5} were observed in the 5{prime} noncoding region; no classical TATAA or CCAAT elements were found. The related alcohol dehydrogenases and {zeta}-crystallin have the same gene organization split by 8 introns, but no splice points coincide between SORD and these gene types. The deduced amino acid sequence of the SORD structure differs at a few positions from the directly determined protein sequence, suggesting allelic forms of the enzyme. High levels of SORD transcripts were observed in lens and kidney, as judged from Northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  19. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to enzyme "substrate" interactions: (i) which form of the substrate system serves as the preferential substrate and (ii) which form acts to inhibit the enzyme? Thus the relative concentrations of the forms of these substrate systems (keto, hydrated, enol) may provide a form of metabolic control. In this light, the present article considers the reduction of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADH. This reaction is inhibited by relatively high concentrations of pyruvate and the physiological significance of this inhibition has been a subject of controversy for many years. Summarized in this article are data from the literature pertaining to the interactions of keto, hydrated, and enol pyruvate with lactate dehydrogenase. Biochemistry instructors and their students are invited to review such pertinent articles so that they also may evaluate the possibility that the "substrate" inhibition of the isoenzymes in the heart muscle may be, under certain conditions, relevant as a form of metabolic control.

  20. Structural analysis of fungus-derived FAD glucose dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakai, Genki; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first three-dimensional structure of fungus-derived glucose dehydrogenase using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as the cofactor. This is currently the most advanced and popular enzyme used in glucose sensor strips manufactured for glycemic control by diabetic patients. We prepared recombinant nonglycosylated FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) derived from Aspergillus flavus (AfGDH) and obtained the X-ray structures of the binary complex of enzyme and reduced FAD at a resolution of 1.78 Å and the ternary complex with reduced FAD and D-glucono-1,5-lactone (LGC) at a resolution of 1.57 Å. The overall structure is similar to that of fungal glucose oxidases (GOxs) reported till date. The ternary complex with reduced FAD and LGC revealed the residues recognizing the substrate. His505 and His548 were subjected for site-directed mutagenesis studies, and these two residues were revealed to form the catalytic pair, as those conserved in GOxs. The absence of residues that recognize the sixth hydroxyl group of the glucose of AfGDH, and the presence of significant cavity around the active site may account for this enzyme activity toward xylose. The structural information will contribute to the further engineering of FADGDH for use in more reliable and economical biosensing technology for diabetes management. PMID:26311535

  1. Enzymatic urea adaptation: lactate and malate dehydrogenase in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Laganà, G; Bellocco, E; Mannucci, C; Leuzzi, U; Tellone, E; Kotyk, A; Galtieri, A

    2006-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) electrophoretic tissue patterns of two different orders of Elasmobranchii: Carchariniformes (Galeus melanostomus and Prionace glauca) and Squaliformes (Etmopterus spinax and Scymnorinus licha) were studied. The number of loci expressed for these enzymes was the same of other elasmobranch species. Differences in tissue distribution were noted in LDH from G. melanostomus due to the presence of an additional heterotetramer in the eye tissue. There were also differences in MDH. In fact, all the tissues of E. spinax and G. melanostomus showed two mitochondrial bands. Major differences were noted in the number of isozymes detected in the four compared elasmobranchs. The highest polymorphism was observed in E. spinax and G. melanostomus, two species that live in changeable environmental conditions. The resistance of isozymes after urea treatment was examined; the resulting patterns showed a quite good resistance of the enzymes, higher for LDH than MDH, also at urea concentration much greater than physiological one. These results indicated that the total isozyme resistance can be considered higher in urea accumulators (such as elasmobranchs) than in the non-accumulators (such as teleosts).

  2. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2005-09-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100 microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100 microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1 microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5 microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  3. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Lanisnik Rizner, Tea

    2005-08-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone, all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  4. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  5. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  6. New model for polymerization of oligomeric alcohol dehydrogenases into nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Kyani, Anahita; Goliaei, Bahram; Ahmadian, Shahin; Sheibani, Nader

    2010-02-01

    Polymerization and self-assembly of proteins into nanoaggregates of different sizes and morphologies (nanoensembles or nanofilaments) is a phenomenon that involved problems in various neurodegenerative diseases (medicine) and enzyme instability/inactivity (biotechnology). Thermal polymerization of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (dimeric) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (tetrameric), as biotechnological ADH representative enzymes, was evaluated for the development of a rational strategy to control aggregation. Constructed ADH nuclei, which grew to larger amorphous nanoaggregates, were prevented via high repulsion strain of the net charge values. Good correlation between the variation in scattering and lambda(-2) was related to the amorphousness of the nanoaggregated ADHs, shown by electron microscopic images. Scattering corrections revealed that ADH polymerization was related to the quaternary structural changes, including delocalization of subunits without unfolding, i.e. lacking the 3D conformational and/or secondary-ordered structural changes. The results demonstrated that electrostatic repulsion was not only responsible for disaggregation but also caused a delay in the onset of aggregation temperature, decreasing maximum values of aggregation and amounts of precipitation. Together, our results demonstrate and propose a new model of self-assembly for ADH enzymes based on the construction of nuclei, which grow to formless nanoaggregates with minimal changes in the tertiary and secondary conformations.

  7. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF TWO GLYCOLYTIC DEHYDROGENASES IN WHITE SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. Dariush; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1966-01-01

    The cytochemical localization, by conventional methods, of lactate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases is limited, firstly, by the solubility of these enzymes in aqueous media and, secondly, by the dependence of the final electron flow from reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to the tetrazolium on tissue diaphorase activity: localization is therefore that of the diaphorase, which in rabbit adductor magnus is mitochondrial. NADH has been found to have great affinity to bind in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and, therefore, if it is generated freely in the incubation media containing 2,2',5,5'-tetra-p-nitrophenyl-3,3'-(3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-phenylene)-ditetrazolium chloride (TNBT) and N-methyl phenazonium methyl sulfate (PMS), it can bind there and cause a false staining. Since such a production of NADH can readily occur in the incubation media for glycolytic dehydrogenases due to diffusion of these soluble enzymes from tissue sections, the prevention of enzyme solubilization is extremely important. Fixation in formaldehyde prevented such enzyme diffusion, while at the same time sufficient activity persisted to allow for adequate staining. The incubation media contained PMS, so that the staining system was largely independent of tissue diaphorase activity. Application of these methods to adductor magnus of rabbit revealed by light microscopy, for both enzymes, a fine network which was shown by electron microscopy to represent staining of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Mitochondria also reacted. These findings add further support for the notion that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is probably involved in glycolytic activity. PMID:4288329

  8. Interaction of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase monomer with phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, K A; Patel, H V; Freeman, K B; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1979-01-01

    The association between bovine and porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and phospholipid vesicles was investigated. At concentrations at which malate dehydrogenase exists as a dimer, entrapment within the aqueous compartment but not binding of the 14C-labelled enzyme was observed. The dissociated enzyme was labile to moderate heat and to p-chloromercuribenzoate, but in both cases inactivation was decreased by incubation with suspensions of charged phospholipid vesicles. This suggested an interaction between enzyme subunits and phospholipid, and this was confirmed by direct binding measurements and by studies that followed changes in the fluorescein-labelled enzyme. The circular-dichroism spectra of the enzyme indicated a high alpha-helix content, and suggested that a small conformational change occurred when the enzyme dissociated. Fluorescence data also suggested less-rigid molecules after dissociation. A possible mechanism, based on the flexibility of enzyme monomer and its interaction with phospholipids, by which mitochondrial matrix enzymes are specifically localized in cells, is discussed. PMID:435273

  9. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  10. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  11. Increased salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in non-reticular oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Mansourian, Arash; Shanbehzadeh, Najmeh; Kia, Seyed Javad; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder. One of the malignant transformation markers is cancer stem cells. One of the proposed marker for the detection of cancer stem cells's in head and neck cancer is aldehyde dehydrogenase. Recently it is shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression in tissue samples is associated with oral lichen planus malignant transformation. This study evaluates salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in oral lichen planus. Thirty patients and 30 age and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Oral lichen planus was diagnosed based on the modified World Health Organization criteria. Subjects in the case group were divided into reticular and non-reticular forms. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected at 10-12 AM. Saliva concentrations of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 were measured by ELISA. The differences between aldehyde dehydrogenase levels in the oral lichen planus group compared with the control group were not significant but aldehyde dehydrogenase in non-reticular oral lichen planus was significantly higher than that of the reticular form. This is a cross-sectional study, thus longitudinal studies in oral lichen planus may present similar or different results. The mechanism of malignant transformation in oral lichen planus is not defined. Previous analyses revealed that the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression is significantly correlated with increased risk of transformation. This finding is consistent with our results because in the erosive and ulcerative forms of oral lichen planus, which have an increased risk of transformation, salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 was overexpressed. A higher salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase level in non-reticular oral lichen planus can be a defensive mechanism against higher oxidative stress in these groups. Aldehyde dehydrogenase may be one of the malignant transformation markers in oral lichen planus. Further studies are needed for introducing aldehyde dehydrogenase as a prognostic

  12. Creation of a thermostable NADP⁺-dependent D-amino acid dehydrogenase from Ureibacillus thermosphaericus strain A1 meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Doi, Katsumi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-09-01

    A thermostable, NADP(+)-dependent D: -amino acid dehydrogenase (DAADH) was created from the meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus strain A1 by introducing five point mutations into amino acid residues located in the active site. The recombinant protein, expressed in Escherichia coli, was purified to homogeneity using a two-step separation procedure and then characterized. In the presence of NADP(+), the protein catalyzed the oxidative deamination of several D: -amino acids, including D: -cyclohexylalanine, D: -isoleucine and D: -2-aminooctanoate, but not meso-diaminopimelate, confirming the creation of a NADP(+)-dependent DAADH. For the reverse reaction, the corresponding 2-oxo acids were aminated in the presence of NADPH and ammonia. In addition, the D: -amino acid dehydrogenase showed no loss of activity at 65 °C, indicating the mutant enzyme was more thermostable than its parental meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase.

  13. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  14. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  15. Formation of homo- and heterooligomeric supramolecular structures by D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in reversed micelles of aerosol OT in octane.

    PubMed

    Levashov, A V; Ugolnikova, A V; Ivanov, M V; Klyachko, N L

    1997-07-01

    The supramolecular structure of oligomeric enzymes can be specifically regulated by changing the size of an inner cavity of Aerosol OT reversed micelles in octane. Both D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reveal an ability to exist and function in monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric forms (homooligomers). Various heterooligomeric complexes, in particular, GAPDH monomer--LDH monomer, GAPDH dimer--LDH tetramer were detected in reversed micelles.

  16. A 'random steady-state' model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdi, T. S.; Hatfield, G. W.; Mjolsness, E. D.

    2010-03-01

    The multienzyme complexes, pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, involved in the central metabolism of Escherichia coli consist of multiple copies of three different enzymes, E1, E2 and E3, that cooperate to channel substrate intermediates between their active sites. The E2 components form the core of the complex, while a mixture of E1 and E3 components binds to the core. We present a random steady-state model to describe catalysis by such multienzyme complexes. At a fast time scale, the model describes the enzyme catalytic mechanisms of substrate channeling at a steady state, by polynomially approximating the analytic solution of a biochemical master equation. At a slower time scale, the structural organization of the different enzymes in the complex and their random binding/unbinding to the core is modeled using methods from equilibrium statistical mechanics. Biologically, the model describes the optimization of catalytic activity by substrate sharing over the entire enzyme complex. The resulting enzymatic models illustrate the random steady state (RSS) for modeling multienzyme complexes in metabolic pathways.

  17. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  18. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  19. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  20. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Mroczko, Barbara; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-10-01

    The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and class I isoenzymes is significantly higher in colorectal cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnosing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) as tumor markers for colorectal cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 182 patients with colorectal cancer before treatment and from 160 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric, but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of colorectal cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 76%, specificity 82%, AND positive and negative predictive values were 85 and 74%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. The area under ROC curve for ADH I was 0.72. The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as marker for colorectal cancer.