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Sample records for stem cells effect

  1. Effect of aging on stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Sheng, Matilda HC; Wasnik, Samiksha; Baylink, David J; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the remarkable self-renewal ability and are capable of differentiating into multiple diverse cells. There is increasing evidence that the aging process can have adverse effects on stem cells. As stem cells age, their renewal ability deteriorates and their ability to differentiate into the various cell types is altered. Accordingly, it is suggested aging-induced deterioration of stem cell functions may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the various aging-associated disorders. Understanding the role of the aging process in deterioration of stem cell function is crucial, not only in understanding the pathophysiology of aging-associated disorders, but also in future development of novel effective stem cell-based therapies to treat aging-associated diseases. This review article first focuses on the basis of the various aging disease-related stem cell dysfunction. It then addresses the several concepts on the potential mechanism that causes aging-related stem cell dysfunction. It also briefly discusses the current potential therapies under development for aging-associated stem cell defects. PMID:28261550

  2. Stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behr, Björn; Ko, Sae Hee; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-10-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines and are classified according to their origin and their ability to differentiate. Enormous potential exists in use of stem cells for regenerative medicine. To produce effective stem cell-based treatments for a range of diseases, an improved understanding of stem cell biology and better control over stem cell fate are necessary. In addition, the barriers to clinical translation, such as potential oncologic properties of stem cells, need to be addressed. With renewed government support and continued refinement of current stem cell methodologies, the future of stem cell research is exciting and promises to provide novel reconstructive options for patients and surgeons limited by traditional paradigms.

  3. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  4. Effects of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Liao, Susan; Ng, Clarisse CH; Chan, Casey K; Raghunath, Michael; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can self renew indefinitely and differentiate into several somatic cells given the correct environmental cues. In the stem cell niche, stem cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are crucial for different cellular functions, such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Recently, in addition to chemical surface modifications, the importance of nanometric scale surface topography and roughness of biomaterials has increasingly becoming recognized as a crucial factor for cell survival and host tissue acceptance in synthetic ECMs. This review describes the influence of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes. PMID:21607108

  5. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  6. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  7. Effect of cell culture using chitosan membranes on stemness marker genes in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Tian, Xiaojun; Yuan, Yan; Song, Zhixiu; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Xia; Li, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is a promising treatment for diseases of the nervous system. However, MSCs often lose their stemness and homing abilities when cultured in conventional two‑dimensional (2D) systems. Consequently, it is important to explore novel culture methods for MSC-based therapies in clinical practice. To investigate the effect of a cell culture using chitosan membranes on MSCs, the morphology of MSCs cultured using chitosan membranes was observed and the expression of stemness marker genes was analyzed. We demonstrated that MSCs cultured using chitosan membranes form spheroids. Additionally, the expression of stemness marker genes, including Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, increased significantly when MSCs were cultured using chitosan membranes compared with 2D culture systems. Finally, MSCs cultured using chitosan membranes were found to have an increased potential to differentiate into nerve cells and chrondrocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MSCs cultured on chitosan membranes maintain their stemness and homing abilities. This finding may be further investigated for the development of novel cell-based therapies for diseases involving neuron-like cells and chondrogenesis.

  8. Effects of inflammation on stem cells: together they strive?

    PubMed Central

    Kizil, Caghan; Kyritsis, Nikos; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation entails a complex set of defense mechanisms acting in concert to restore the homeostatic balance in organisms after damage or pathogen invasion. This immune response consists of the activity of various immune cells in a highly complex manner. Inflammation is a double-edged sword as it is reported to have both detrimental and beneficial consequences. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammation on stem cell activity, focusing primarily on neural stem/progenitor cells in mammals and zebrafish. We also give a brief overview of the effects of inflammation on other stem cell compartments, exemplifying the positive and negative role of inflammation on stemness. The majority of the chronic diseases involve an unremitting phase of inflammation due to improper resolution of the initial pro-inflammatory response that impinges on the stem cell behavior. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of crosstalk between the inflammatory milieu and tissue-resident stem cells is an important basis for clinical efforts. Not only is it important to understand the effect of inflammation on stem cell activity for further defining the etiology of the diseases, but also better mechanistic understanding is essential to design regenerative therapies that aim at micromanipulating the inflammatory milieu to offset the negative effects and maximize the beneficial outcomes. PMID:25739812

  9. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  10. The effects of hypoxia on the stemness properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Kaneko, Satoru; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that culture under hypoxia has beneficial effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, there are limitations to achieving a stable condition in conventional hypoxic CO2 incubators. DPSCs are a unique type of MSCs which are promising in many regenerative therapies. In this study, we investigated the ideal hypoxic culture environment for DPSCs using a new system that can provide controlled O2 environment. The effects of hypoxia (3%, 5%) on the stemness properties of DPSCs. Their morphology, proliferation rate, expression of stem cell markers, migration ability, mRNA expression of angiogenic/neurotrophic factors and immunomodulatory genes were evaluated and compared. Additionally, the effect of the discrete secretome on proliferation, migration, and neurogenic induction was assessed. Hypoxic DPSCs were found to be smaller in size and exhibited larger nuclei. 5% O2 significantly increased the proliferation rate, migration ability, expression of stem cell markers (CXCR4 and G-CSFR), and expression of SOX2, VEGF, NGF, and BDNF genes of DPSCs. Moreover, secretome collected from 5%O2 cultures displayed higher stimulatory effects on proliferation and migration of NIH3T3 cells and on neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. These results demonstrate that 5%O2 may be ideal for enhancing DPSCs growth, stem cell properties, and secretome trophic effect. PMID:27739509

  11. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    PubMed Central

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  12. Effects of Telomerase and Telomere Length on Epidermal Stem Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Ignacio; Cayuela, María L.; Blasco, María A.

    2005-08-01

    A key process in organ homeostasis is the mobilization of stem cells out of their niches. We show through analysis of mouse models that telomere length, as well as the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants in the mobilization of epidermal stem cells. Telomere shortening inhibited mobilization of stem cells out of their niche, impaired hair growth, and resulted in suppression of stem cell proliferative capacity in vitro. In contrast, Tert overexpression in the absence of changes in telomere length promoted stem cell mobilization, hair growth, and stem cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of telomeres and telomerase on stem cell biology anticipate their role in cancer and aging.

  13. Effect of Reishi polysaccharides on human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2010-12-15

    The polysaccharide fraction of Ganoderma lucidum (F3) was found to benefit our health in many ways by influencing the activity of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, F3 was found to promote the adipose tissue MSCs' aggregation and chondrosphere formation, with the increase of CAM (N-CAM, I-CAM) expressions and autokine (BMP-2, IL-11, and aggrecan) secretions, in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay. In a stem cell expansion culture, it possesses the thrombopoietin (TPO) and GM-CSF like functions to enhance the survival/renewal abilities of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs). F3 was found to promote the dendrite growth of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the expression of cell adhesion molecules in the formation of immature dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, F3 exhibited inhibitory effects on blood endothelial progenitor (EPC) colony formation, with concomitant reduction of cell surface endoglin (CD105) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) marker expressions, in the presence of angiogenic factors. A further cytokine array analysis revealed that F3 indeed inhibited the angiogenin synthesis and enhanced IL-1, MCP-1, MIP-1, RANTES, and GRO productions in the blood EPC derivation culture. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the polysaccharide fraction of G. lucidum F3 exhibits cytokine and chemokine like functions which are beneficial to human tissue stem/progenitor cells by modulating their CAM expressions and biological activities. These findings provide us a better the observation that F3 glycopolysaccharides indeed possesses anti-angiogenic and immune-modulating functions and promotes hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing for better human tissue protection, reducing disease progression and health.

  14. Suspension culture of pluripotent stem cells: effect of shear on stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kevin C; Rodrigues, Beatriz; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant promise, the routine usage of suspension cell culture to manufacture stem cell-derived differentiated cells has progressed slowly. Suspension culture is an innovative way of either expanding or differentiating cells and sometimes both are combined into a single bioprocess. Its advantages over static 2D culturing include a homogeneous and controllable culture environment and producing a large quantity of cells in a fraction of time. This feature makes suspension cell culture ideal for use in stem cell research and eventually ideal in the large-scale production of differentiated cells for regenerative medicine. Because of their tremendous differentiation capacities and unlimited growth properties, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in particular are considered potential sources for future cell-replacement therapies. Currently, expansion of PSCs is accomplished in 2D, which only permits a limited amount of cell growth per culture flask before cells need to be passaged. However, before stem cells can be applied clinically, several aspects of their expansion, such as directed growth, but also differentiation, need to be better controlled. This review will summarize recent advantages in suspension culture of PSCs, while at the same time highlighting current challenges.

  15. Decellularized ECM effects on human mesenchymal stem cell stemness and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rao Pattabhi, Sudhakara; Martinez, Jessica S; Keller, Thomas C S

    2014-01-01

    Microenvironment extracellular matrices (ECMs) influence cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. The ECMs of different microenvironments have distinctive compositions and architectures. This investigation addresses effects ECMs deposited by a variety of cell types and decellularized with a cold-EDTA protocol have on multipotent human mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (hMSC) behavior and differentiation. The cold-EDTA protocol removes intact cells from ECM, with minimal ECM damage and contamination. The decellularized ECMs deposited by cultured hMSCs, osteogenic hMSCs, and two smooth muscle cell (SMC) lines were tested for distinctive effects on the behavior and differentiation of early passage ('naïve') hMSC plated and cultured on the decellularized ECMs. Uninduced hMSC decellularized ECM enhanced naïve hMSC proliferation and cell motility while maintaining stemness. Decellularized ECM deposited by osteogenic hMSCs early in the differentiation process stimulated naïve hMSCs osteogenesis and substrate biomineralization in the absence of added dexamethasone, but this osteogenic induction potential was lower in ECMs decellularized later in the osteogenic hMSC differentiation process. Decellularized ECMs deposited by two smooth muscle cell lines induced naïve hMSCs to become smooth muscle cell-like with distinctive phenotypic characteristics of contractile and synthetic smooth muscle cells. This investigation demonstrates a useful approach for obtaining functional cell-deposited ECM and highlights the importance of ECM specificity in influencing stem cell behavior.

  16. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells (skeletal stem cells) Cell-based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed differentiation DNA Ectoderm Embryo Embryoid ...

  17. Effects of nitric oxide on stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2015-12-01

    The use of stem cells as a research tool and a therapeutic vehicle has demonstrated their great potential in the treatment of various diseases. With unveiling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) universally present at various levels in nearly all types of body tissues, the potential therapeutic implication of nitric oxide (NO) has been magnified, and thus scientists have explored new treatment strategies involved with stem cells and NO against various diseases. As the functionality of NO encompasses cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems, NO is involved in stem cell differentiation, epigenetic regulation and immune suppression. Stem cells trigger cellular responses to external signals on the basis of both NO specific pathways and concerted action with endogenous compounds including stem cell regulators. As potency and interaction of NO with stem cells generally depend on the concentrations of NO and the presence of the cofactors at the active site, the suitable carriers for NO delivery is integral for exerting maximal efficacy of stem cells. The innovative utilization of NO functionality and involved mechanisms would invariably alter the paradigm of therapeutic application of stem cells. Future prospects in NO-involved stem cell research which promises to enhance drug discovery efforts by opening new era to improve drug efficacy, reduce drug toxicity and understand disease mechanisms and pathways, were also addressed.

  18. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  19. Divergent effects of supraphysiologic Notch signals on leukemia stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Mark Y; Shestova, Olga; Xu, Lanwei; Aster, Jon C; Pear, Warren S

    2013-02-07

    The leukemia stem cell (LSC) hypothesis proposes that a subset of cells in the bulk leukemia population propagates the leukemia.We tested the LSC hypothesis in a mouse model of Notch-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in which the tumor cells were largely CD4+ CD8+ T cells. LSC activity was enriched but rare in the CD8+ CD4 HSA(hi) immature single-positive T-cell subset. Although our murine T-ALL model relies on transduction of HSCs, we were unable to isolate Notch-activated HSCs to test for LSC activity. Further analysis showed that Notch activation in HSCs caused an initial expansion of hematopoietic and T-cell progenitors and loss of stem cell quiescence, which was followed by progressive loss of long-term HSCs and T-cell production over several weeks. Similar results were obtained in a conditional transgenic model in which Notch activation is induced in HSCs by Cre recombinase. We conclude that although supraphysiologic Notch signaling in HSCs promotes LSC activity in T-cell progenitors, it extinguishes self-renewal of LT-HSCs. These results provide further evidence for therapeutically targeting T-cell progenitors in T-ALL while also underscoring the need to tightly regulate Notch signaling to expand normal HSC populations for clinical applications.

  20. Stress and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  1. The Effects of Graphene Nanostructures on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Kanakia, Shruti; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of two-dimensional graphene nanostructures; graphene nano-onions (GNOs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONPs) on viability, and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Cytotoxicity of GNOs, GONRs, and GONPs dispersed in distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)] (DSPE-PEG), on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSCs), and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) was assessed by AlamarBlue and Calcein AM viability assays at concentrations ranging from 5–300 μg/ml for 24 or 72 hours. Cytotoxicity of the 2D graphene nanostructures was found to be dose dependent, not time dependent, with concentrations less than 50 μg/ml showing no significant differences compared to untreated controls. Differentiation potential of adMSCs to adipocytes and osteoblasts, --characterized by Oil Red O staining and elution, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium matrix deposition and Alizarin Red S staining-- did not change significantly when treated with the three graphene nanoparticles at a low (10 μg/ml) and high (50 μg/ml) concentration for 24 hours. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal Raman spectroscopy indicated cellular uptake of only GNOs and GONPs. The results lay the foundation for the use of these nanoparticles at potentially safe doses as ex vivo labels for MSC-based imaging and therapy. PMID:24674462

  2. The effects of graphene nanostructures on mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Yahfi; Rashkow, Jason T; Lalwani, Gaurav; Kanakia, Shruti; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of two-dimensional graphene nanostructures; graphene nano-onions (GNOs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONPs) on viability, and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Cytotoxicity of GNOs, GONRs, and GONPs dispersed in distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)] (DSPE-PEG), on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSCs), and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) was assessed by AlamarBlue and Calcein AM viability assays at concentrations ranging from 5 to 300 μg/ml for 24 or 72 h. Cytotoxicity of the 2D graphene nanostructures was found to be dose dependent, not time dependent, with concentrations less than 50 μg/ml showing no significant differences compared to untreated controls. Differentiation potential of adMSCs to adipocytes and osteoblasts, - characterized by Oil Red O staining and elution, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium matrix deposition and Alizarin Red S staining - did not change significantly when treated with the three graphene nanoparticles at a low (10 μg/ml) and high (50 μg/ml) concentration for 24 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal Raman spectroscopy indicated cellular uptake of only GNOs and GONPs. The results lay the foundation for the use of these nanoparticles at potentially safe doses as ex vivo labels for MSC-based imaging and therapy.

  3. Effects of heavy ions on cycling stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Michael P.; Holahan, E. Vincent; Ainsworth, E. John

    Murine marrow stem cells assayed with the spleen colony assay have been shown to be largely in a noncycling state, Go. In the unirradiated animal where these spleen-colony forming units (CFUs) transit normally between a non-proliferative state and active proliferation, exposure to a sufficient dose of ionizing radiation increases the frequency (probability) of this transition. For low-LET irradiation, marrow stem cells are not induced into cycle until a threshold dose is achieved. This dose appears to be in the range 50 to 100 cGy, inducing proliferation in an all-or-nothing manner. For irradiation with heavy charged-particles, however, the threshold dose is dependent on mass and energy. Irradiation with particles of sufficient mass and energy stimulates active proliferation even at the smallest doses tested, 5 cGy. Further, this response does not appear to result from an all-or-nothing effect. Rather, individual animals with intermediate levels of stem cell cycling have been observed. These data support the notion that locally controlled hemopoiesis can be affected by local deposition of radiation damage.

  4. The Modulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf-Eldin, Wessam E.; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; Mahmoud, Marwa; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bone formation has been extensively demonstrated through several in vitro and in vivo studies. However, few studies addressed the effect of MSCs on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Under physiological conditions, MSCs support osteoclastogenesis through producing the main osteoclastogenic cytokines, RANKL and M-CSF. However, during inflammation, MSCs suppress osteoclast formation and activity, partly via secretion of the key anti-osteoclastogenic factor, osteoprotegerin (OPG). In vitro, co-culture of MSCs with osteoclasts in the presence of high concentrations of osteoclast-inducing factors might reflect the in vivo inflammatory pathology and prompt MSCs to exert an osteoclastogenic suppressive effect. MSCs thus seem to have a dual effect, by stimulating or inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, depending on the inflammatory milieu. This effect of MSCs on osteoclast formation seems to mirror the effect of MSCs on other immune cells, and may be exploited for the therapeutic potential of MSCs in bone loss associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26823668

  5. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Fu, Qibin; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yang, Gen; Konishi, Teruaki; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Wang, Yugang

    2015-03-01

    Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells enhance the systemic effects of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Farias, Virgínea; O'Valle, Francisco; Lerma, Borja Alonso; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; López-Peñalver, Jesús J; Nieto, Ana; Santos, Ana; Fernández, Beatriz Irene; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Ruiz-Ruiz, María Carmen; Guirado, Damián; Schmidt, Thomas; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2015-10-13

    The outcome of radiotherapy treatment might be further improved by a better understanding of individual variations in tumor radiosensitivity and normal tissue reactions, including the bystander effect. For many tumors, however, a definitive cure cannot be achieved, despite the availablity of more and more effective cancer treatments. Therefore, any improvement in the efficacy of radiotherapy will undoubtedly benefit a significant number of patients. Many experimental studies measure a bystander component of tumor cell death after radiotherapy, which highlights the importance of confirming these observations in a preclinical situation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for use in the treatment of cancers as they are able to both preferentially home onto tumors and become incorporated into their stroma. This process increases after radiation therapy. In our study we show that in vitro MSCs, when activated with a low dose of radiation, are a source of anti-tumor cytokines that decrease the proliferative activity of tumor cells, producing a potent cytotoxic synergistic effect on tumor cells. In vivo administration of unirradiated mesenchymal cells together with radiation leads to an increased efficacy of radiotherapy, thus leading to an enhancement of short and long range bystander effects on primary-irradiated tumors and distant-non-irradiated tumors. Our experiments indicate an increased cell loss rate and the decrease in the tumor cell proliferation activity as the major mechanisms underlying the delayed tumor growth and are a strong indicator of the synergistic effect between RT and MSC when they are applied together for tumor treatment in this model.

  7. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  8. Effects of Triclosan on Neural Stem Cell Viability and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo Kyung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Bang, Minji; Choi, Chang Soon; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial or sanitizing agent used in personal care and household products such as toothpaste, soaps, mouthwashes and kitchen utensils. There are increasing evidence of the potentially harmful effects of triclosan in many systemic and cellular processes of the body. In this study, we investigated the effects of triclosan in the survivability of cultured rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Cortical cells from embryonic day 14 rat embryos were isolated and cultured in vitro. After stabilizing the culture, triclosan was introduced to the cells with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM and in varied time periods. Thereafter, cell viability parameters were measured using MTT assay and PI staining. TCS decreased the cell viability of treated NSC in a concentration-dependent manner along with increased expressions of apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, while reduced expression of Bcl2. To explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of TCS in NSC, we measured the activation of MAPKs and intracellular ROS. TCS at 50 μM induced the activations of both p38 and JNK, which may adversely affect cell survival. In contrast, the activities of ERK, Akt and PI3K, which are positively correlated with cell survival, were inhibited. Moreover, TCS at this concentration augmented the ROS generation in treated NSC and depleted the glutathione activity. Taken together, these results suggest that TCS can induce neurodegenerative effects in developing rat brains through mechanisms involving ROS activation and apoptosis initiation. PMID:26759708

  9. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2, CALR, or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC.

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cells enhance the systemic effects of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Farias, Virgínea; O'Valle, Francisco; Lerma, Borja Alonso; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; López-Peñalver, Jesús J.; Nieto, Ana; Santos, Ana; Fernández, Beatriz Irene; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Ruiz-Ruiz, María Carmen; Guirado, Damián; Schmidt, Thomas; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of radiotherapy treatment might be further improved by a better understanding of individual variations in tumor radiosensitivity and normal tissue reactions, including the bystander effect. For many tumors, however, a definitive cure cannot be achieved, despite the availablity of more and more effective cancer treatments. Therefore, any improvement in the efficacy of radiotherapy will undoubtedly benefit a significant number of patients. Many experimental studies measure a bystander component of tumor cell death after radiotherapy, which highlights the importance of confirming these observations in a preclinical situation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for use in the treatment of cancers as they are able to both preferentially home onto tumors and become incorporated into their stroma. This process increases after radiation therapy. In our study we show that in vitro MSCs, when activated with a low dose of radiation, are a source of anti-tumor cytokines that decrease the proliferative activity of tumor cells, producing a potent cytotoxic synergistic effect on tumor cells. In vivo administration of unirradiated mesenchymal cells together with radiation leads to an increased efficacy of radiotherapy, thus leading to an enhancement of short and long range bystander effects on primary-irradiated tumors and distant-non-irradiated tumors. Our experiments indicate an increased cell loss rate and the decrease in the tumor cell proliferation activity as the major mechanisms underlying the delayed tumor growth and are a strong indicator of the synergistic effect between RT and MSC when they are applied together for tumor treatment in this model. PMID:26378036

  11. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  12. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anticancer Phytochemicals on Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisun; Hlatky, Lynn; Jeong, Yong-Seob; Kim, Dohoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide helpful insights for the development of therapeutic or preventive strategies against cancers. Dietary phytochemicals with anticancer properties are promising candidates and have selective impact on CSCs. This review summarizes the influence of phytochemicals on heterogeneous cancer cell populations as well as on specific targeting of CSCs. PMID:27376325

  13. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  14. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Third-generation human mesenchymal stem cells were irradiated with different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields, including 5, 25, 50, 75, 100, and 150 Hz, with a field intensity of 1.1 mT, for 30 minutes per day for 21 days. Changes in human mesenchymal stem cell morphology were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin expression were also determined to evaluate human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.Different effects were observed on human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast induction following exposure to different pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies. Levels of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation increased when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 5 hz to 50 hz, but the effect was weaker when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 50 Hz to 150 hz. The most significant effect on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation was observed at of 50 hz.The results of the current study show that pulsed electromagnetic field frequency is an important factor with regard to the induction of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, a pulsed electromagnetic field frequency of 50 Hz was the most effective at inducing human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

  15. Effect of Radiofrequency Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gläser, Katharina; Rohland, Martina; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten; Stopper, Helga; Hintzsche, Henning

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency range is ubiquitous, mainly due to the worldwide use of mobile communication devices. With improving technologies and affordability, the number of cell phone subscriptions continues to increase. Therefore, the potential effect on biological systems at low-intensity radiation levels is of great interest. While a number of studies have been performed to investigate this issue, there has been no consensus reached based on the results. The goal of this study was to elucidate the extent to which cells of the hematopoietic system, particularly human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), were affected by mobile phone radiation. We irradiated HSC and HL-60 cells at frequencies used in the major technologies, GSM (900 MHz), UMTS (1,950 MHz) and LTE (2,535 MHz) for a short period (4 h) and a long period (20 h/66 h), and with five different intensities ranging from 0 to 4 W/kg specific absorption rate (SAR). Studied end points included apoptosis, oxidative stress, cell cycle, DNA damage and DNA repair. In all but one of these end points, we detected no clear effect of mobile phone radiation; the only alteration was found when quantifying DNA damage. Exposure of HSC to the GSM modulation for 4 h caused a small but statistically significant decrease in DNA damage compared to sham exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first published study in which putative effects (e.g., genotoxicity or influence on apoptosis rate) of radiofrequency radiation were investigated in HSC. Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields did not affect cells of the hematopoietic system, in particular HSC, under the given experimental conditions.

  16. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-04

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age.

  17. MtDNA depleted PC3 cells exhibit Warburg effect and cancer stem cell features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yali; Lu, Jie; Axcrona, Karol; Eide, Lars; Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Peng, Qian; Wang, Junbai; Zhang, Hongquan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Reducing mtDNA content was considered as a critical step in the metabolism restructuring for cell stemness restoration and further neoplastic development. However, the connections between mtDNA depletion and metabolism reprograming-based cancer cell stemness in prostate cancers are still lack of studies. Here, we demonstrated that human CRPC cell line PC3 tolerated high concentration of the mtDNA replication inhibitor ethidium bromide (EtBr) and the mtDNA depletion triggered a universal metabolic remodeling process. Failure in completing that process caused lethal consequences. The mtDNA depleted (MtDP) PC3 cells could be steadily maintained in the special medium in slow cycling status. The MtDP PC3 cells contained immature mitochondria and exhibited Warburg effect. Furthermore, the MtDP PC3 cells were resistant to therapeutic treatments and contained greater cancer stem cell-like subpopulations: CD44+, ABCG2+, side-population and ALDHbright. In conclusion, these results highlight the association of mtDNA content, mitochondrial function and cancer cell stemness features. PMID:27248169

  18. Effects of melatonin and its analogues on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiaqi; Tu, Yalin; Chen, Jingkao; Tan, Dunxian; Liu, Xingguo; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-01-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells which are capable of self-replication and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSCs are found in two main regions in the adult brain: the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The recent discovery of NSCs in the adult mammalian brain has fostered a plethora of translational and preclinical studies to investigate novel approaches for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Melatonin is the major secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland and shows both a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms from bacteria to humans and a great functional versatility. Recently, accumulated experimental evidence showed that melatonin plays an important role in NSCs, including its proliferation, differentiation and survival, which are modulated by many factors including MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, histone acetylation, neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and apoptotic genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the beneficial effects of melatonin on NSCs and further to discuss the potential usage of melatonin and its derivatives or analogues in the treatment of CNS neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Effect of silver nanoparticles on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Köller, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are one of the fastest growing products in nano-medicine due to their enhanced antibacterial activity at the nanoscale level. In biomedicine, hundreds of products have been coated with Ag-NP. For example, various medical devices include silver, such as surgical instruments, bone implants and wound dressings. After the degradation of these materials, or depending on the coating technique, silver in nanoparticle or ion form can be released and may come into close contact with tissues and cells. Despite incorporation of Ag-NP as an antibacterial agent in different products, the toxicological and biological effects of silver in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of both ionic and nanoparticulate silver on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and on the secretion of the respective differentiation markers adiponectin, osteocalcin and aggrecan. Results: As shown through laser scanning microscopy, Ag-NP with a size of 80 nm (hydrodynamic diameter) were taken up into hMSCs as nanoparticulate material. After 24 h of incubation, these Ag-NP were mainly found in the endo-lysosomal cell compartment as agglomerated material. Cytotoxicity was observed for differentiated or undifferentiated hMSCs treated with high silver concentrations (≥20 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≥1.5 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions) but not with low-concentration treatments (≤10 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≤1.0 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions). Subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NP and Ag+ ions impaired the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas chondrogenic differentiation was unaffected after 21 d of incubation. In contrast to aggrecan, the inhibitory effect of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by a decrease in the secretion of specific

  20. Effect of Azadirachta indica leaf methanol extracts on stem cell reproduction.

    PubMed

    González-Garza, M Teresa; Codinach, Margarita; Alcaraz, Citlali; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Cruz-Vega, Delia E

    2007-04-01

    Methanol extracts of Azadirachta indica leaves at concentration from 0.1 to 40 microg/ml showed in vitro an stimulatory activity in stem cell reproduction. These results suggest that the effect of methanol leaf extracts on stem cell reproduction could be of benefit to improve health.

  1. Development of an invitro technique to use mouse embryonic stem cell in evaluating effects of xenobiotics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal has been to develop a high-throughput, in vitro technique for evaluating the effects of xenobiotics using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We began with the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST), which is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combin...

  2. Modulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells on leucocytes and leukemic cells: A double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Low, Jun How; Ramdas, Premdass; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have drawn much attention amongst stem cell researchers in the past few decades. The ability of the MSC to differentiate into cells of mesodermal and non-mesodermal origins has made them an attractive approach for cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine. The MSCs have immunosuppressive activities that may have considerable therapeutic values in autoimmune diseases. However, despite the many beneficial effects reported, there is a growing body of evidence, which suggests that MSCs could be a culprit of enhanced tumour growth, metastasis and drug resistance in leukaemia, via some modulatory effects. Many controversies regarding the interactions between MSCs and leukaemia still exist. Furthermore, the role of MSCs in leukemogenesis and its progression remain largely unknown. Hence it is important to understand how the MSCs modulate leukaemia before these cells could be safely used in the treatment of leukaemia patients.

  3. Neurogenic Effects of Cell-Free Extracts of Adipose Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Jae-Jun; Yang, Seungwon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies are regarded as promising treatments for neurological disorders, and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a feasible source of clinical application of stem cell. Recent studies have shown that stem cells have a therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of various illnesses through paracrine action. To examine the effects of cell components of ASCs on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated cell-free extracts of ASCs (CFE-ASCs) containing various components with brain-derived NSCs. To elucidate the effects of CFE-ASCs in NSC proliferation, we treated mouse subventricular zone-derived cultured NSCs with various doses of CFE-ASCs. As a result, CFE-ASCs were found to induce the proliferation of NSCs under conditions of growth factor deprivation in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). CFE-ASCs increase the expression of neuron and astrocyte differentiation markers including Tuj-1 (p<0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (p<0.01) without altering the cell’s fate in differentiating NSCs. In addition, treatment with CFE-ASCs induces an increase in neurite numbers (p<0.01) and lengths of NSCs (p<0.05). Furthermore, CFE-ASCs rescue the hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction of NSCs’ viability (p<0.05) and neurite branching (p<0.01). Findings from our study indicate that CFE-ASCs support the survival, proliferation and differentiation of NSCs accompanied with neurite outgrowth, suggesting that CFE-ASCs can modulate neurogenesis in the central nervous system. PMID:26859291

  4. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  5. The effect of stem cell factor on proliferation of human endometrial CD146+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Fayazi, Mehri; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ziaei, Saeideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stem cell factor (SCF) is a transcriptional factor which plays crucial roles in normal proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of stem cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the proliferation effect of different concentrations of SCF on expansion of human endometrial CD146+ cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, total populations of isolated human endometrial suspensions after fourth passage were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) into CD146+ cells. Human endometrial CD146+ cells were karyotyped and tested for the effect of SCF on proliferation of CD146+ cells, then different concentrations of 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 ng/ml was carried out and mitogens-stimulated endometrial CD146+ cells proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Results: Chromosomal analysis showed a normal metaphase spread and 46XX karyotype. The proliferation rate of endometrial CD146+ cells in the presence of 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 ng/ml SCF were 0.945±0.094, 0.962±0.151, 0.988±0.028, 1.679±0.012 and 1.129±0.145 respectively. There was a significant increase in stem/ stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by 50 ng/ml than other concentrations of SCF (p=0.01). Conclusion: The present study suggests that SCF could have effect on the proliferation and cell survival of human endometrial CD146+ cells and it has important implications for medical sciences and cell therapies. PMID:27525327

  6. Effects of whole genome duplication on cell size and gene expression in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, Hiroyuki; FUJII, Wataru; KUSAKABE, Ken Takeshi; KISO, Yasuo; KANO, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in ploidy tend to influence cell physiology, which in the long-term, contribute to species adaptation and evolution. Polyploid cells are observed under physiological conditions in the nerve and liver tissues, and in tumorigenic processes. Although tetraploid cells have been studied in mammalian cells, the basic characteristics and alterations caused by whole genome duplication are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to acquire basic knowledge about the effect of whole genome duplication on the cell cycle, cell size, and gene expression. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that cell cycle subpopulations in mouse tetraploid embryonic stem cells (TESCs) were similar to those in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We performed smear preparations and flow cytometric analysis to identify cell size alterations. These indicated that the relative cell volume of TESCs was approximately 2.2–2.5 fold that of ESCs. We also investigated the effect of whole genome duplication on the expression of housekeeping and pluripotency marker genes using quantitative real-time PCR with external RNA. We found that the target transcripts were 2.2 times more abundant in TESCs than those in ESCs. This indicated that gene expression and cell volume increased in parallel. Our findings suggest the existence of a homeostatic mechanism controlling the cytoplasmic transcript levels in accordance with genome volume changes caused by whole genome duplication. PMID:27569766

  7. Effects of Wnt3a on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Liwei; Zhou Jiaxi; Peng Sha; Li Juxue; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui

    2008-04-11

    Epidermal stem cells maintain development and homeostasis of mammalian epidermis throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Wnt3a and Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling on proliferation and differentiation of human fetal epidermal stem cells. We found both Wnt3a and active {beta}-catenin, two key members of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, were expressed in human fetal epidermis and epidermal stem cells. In addition, Wnt3a protein can promote proliferation and inhibit differentiation of epidermal stem cells in vitro culture. Our results suggest that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays important roles in human fetal skin development and homeostasis, which also provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in human epidermis.

  8. Effects of Polymer Surfaces on Proliferation and Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sisi; Liao, Wenbin; Ma, Yupo; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam; Stony Brook Medical Center Collaboration; Stony Brook Dental Schoo Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Currently, proliferation and differentiation of stem cell is usually accomplished either in vivo, or on chemical coated tissue culture petri dish with the presence of feeder cells. Here we investigated whether they can be directly cultured on polymeric substrates, in the absence of additional factors. We found that mouse embryonic stem cells did not require gelatin and could remain in the undifferentiated state without feeder cells at least for four passages on partially sulfonated polystyrene. The modulii of cells was measured and found to be higher for cells plated directly on the polymer surface than for those on the same surface covered with gelatin and feeder cells. When plated with feeder cells, the modulii was not sensitive to gelatin. Whereas the differentiation properties of human bone marrow stem cells, which are not adherent, are less dependent on either chemical or mechanical properties of the substrate. However, they behave differently on different toughness hydrogels as oppose to on polymer coated thin films.

  9. Potent Paracrine Effects of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Doxorubicin-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Liao, Songyan; Wang, Weixin; Wang, Junwen; Li, Xiang; Ding, Yue; Liang, Yingmin; Gao, Fei; Yang, Mo; Fu, Qingling; Xu, Aimin; Chai, Yuet-Hung; He, Jia; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lian, Qizhou

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can protect cardiomyocytes against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) through paracrine effects. Nonetheless the paracrine effects of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iPSC-MSCs) on AIC are poorly understood. In vitro studies reveal that doxorubicin (Dox)-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) are significantly reduced when treated with conditioned medium harvested from BM-MSCs (BM-MSCs-CdM) or iPSC-MSCs (iPSC-MSCs-CdM). Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, NRCMs treated with iPSC-MSCs-CdM exhibit significantly less ROS and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Transplantation of BM-MSCs-CdM or iPSC-MSCs-CdM into mice with AIC remarkably attenuated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and dilatation. Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, iPSC-MSCs-CdM treatment showed better alleviation of heart failure, less cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis. Analysis of common and distinct cytokines revealed that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) were uniquely overpresented in iPSC-MSC-CdM. Immunodepletion of MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM dramatically decreased cardioprotection. Injection of GDF-15/MIF cytokines could partially reverse Dox-induced heart dysfunction. We suggest that the potent paracrine effects of iPSC-MSCs provide novel “cell-free” therapeutic cardioprotection against AIC, and that MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM are critical for these enhanced cardioprotective effects. PMID:26057572

  10. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  11. The effects of hypoxia on in vitro culture of dental-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Chagastelles, Pedro; Pranke, Patricia; Casagrande, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    The culture of cells under hypoxia is considered one of the hot topics of tissue engineering, especially when exploring the proliferation capacity, a critical step for cellular-based therapies. The use of in vitro hypoxic environment aims to simulate the oxygen concentrations found in stem cell niches. Dental tissues are attractive sources of stem cells, as they are obtained from discarded tissue, after third molar extraction and exfoliation deciduous teeth, respectively. However, small amounts of cells are obtained from these sources. Thus, optimizing the in vitro conditions for proliferation and differentiation of these cells is essential for future regenerative strategies. This review presents a summary of the results regarding the effect of hypoxia on dental-derived stem cells after an electronic search on PubMed databases. The studies show increased differentiation potential and paracrine action of dental-derived stem cells under hypoxic environment. There are controversies related to proliferation of dental-derived stem cells under induced hypoxia. The lack of standardization in cell culture techniques contributes to these biases and future studies should describe in more detail the protocols used. The knowledge regarding the effect of hypoxia on dental-derived stem cells needs further clarification for assisting the clinical application of these cells.

  12. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  13. Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  14. Vanillin attenuates negative effects of ultraviolet A on the stemness of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, See-Hyoung; Kim, Mi Ok; Lim, Inhwan; Kang, Mingyeong; Oh, Sae Woong; Jung, Kwangseon; Jo, Dong Gyu; Cho, Il-Hoon; Lee, Jongsung

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation induces various changes in cell biology. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vanillin on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of vanillin were also examined. The results revealed that vanillin attenuated UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs evidenced by increased proliferative activity in BrdU incorporation assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes (OCT4, NANOG and SOX2) in response to vanillin treatment. UVA-induced reduction in mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly recovered by vanillin. In addition, the antagonizing effect of vanillin on UVA was found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings showed that vanillin could improve the reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA. The effect of vanillin is mediated by upregulating HIF-1α via inhibiting PGE2-cAMP signaling. Therefore, vanillin might be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  15. Synergistic Effect of Immunoliposomal Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Glioblastoma Stem Cell-Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dae Hwan; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Jung Seok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Jin-Seok

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma stem cells have been shown to confer chemoresistance and radioresistance, leading to angiogenesis and the recurrence of tumors in glioblastoma multiforme. Combination therapy targeting glioblastoma stem cells and anti-angiogenesis has been a focus of treatment strategies because of the enhanced efficacy achieved by dual inhibition of tumor proliferation and nutrient delivery. In this study, glioblastoma stem cells and glioblastoma stem cell-induced angiogenesis in glioblastoma multiforme were challenged by combined treatment with anti-CD133 monoclonal antibody conjugated liposomes encapsulating gemcitabine and bevacizumab. Both liposomal encapsulation and conjugation of an anti-CD133 antibody significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine toward glioblastoma stem cells in vitro. Moreover, combined treatment with this gemcitabine formulation and bevacizumab significantly inhibited tube formation, migration, and proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. The antitumor efficacy of immunoliposomal gemcitabine and bevacizumab combination therapy in a xenograft model was significantly greater than that of monotherapy, presumably reflecting the enhanced effects on glioblastoma stem cells themselves and glioblastoma stem cell-induced angiogenesis caused by synergistic interactions between the two drugs. Moreover, combination therapy prolonged the mean survival time of xenografted mice. Taken altogether, our results suggest that combined therapy with immunoliposomal gemcitabine and bevacizumab shows promise for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  16. Oncogenic effects of miR-10b in glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guessous, Fadila; Alvarado-Velez, Melissa; Marcinkiewicz, Lukasz; Zhang, Ying; Kim, Jungeun; Heister, Simon; Kefas, Benjamin; Godlewski, Jakub; Schiff, David; Purow, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs and cancer stem cells have emerged as critical players in glioblastoma, one of the deadliest human cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of microRNA-10b in glioblastoma cells and stem cells. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed a correlation between high miR-10b levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. We measured the levels of miR-10b and found that it is upregulated in human glioblastoma tissues, glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines as compared to normal human tissues or astrocytes. Inhibition of miR-10b with a specific antagomir inhibited the proliferation of glioblastoma established and stem cell lines. Inhibition of miR-10b strongly reduced cell invasion and migration in glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines while overexpression of miR-10b induced cell migration and invasion. We also investigated several predicted targets of miR-10b but could not verify any of them experimentally. Additionally, miR-10b inhibition significantly decreased the in vivo growth of stem cell-derived orthotopic GBM xenografts. Altogether, our findings confirm the oncogenic effects of miR-10b in GBM cells and show for the first time a role of this microRNA in GBM stem cells. Targeting miR-10b might therefore inhibit glioblastoma stem cells, which are thought to be at the origin of glioblastoma and to contribute its recurrence and resistance to therapy. PMID:23307328

  17. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  18. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Nail stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sellheyer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Our knowledge on stem cells of the hair follicle has increased exponentially after the bulge was characterized as the stem cell niche two decades ago. In contrast, little is known about stem cells in the nail unit. Whereas hair follicles are plentiful and easy to access, the human body has only twenty nails and they are rarely biopsied. Therefore, examining fetal material offers unique advantages. In the following mini-review, our current knowledge on nail stem cells is summarized and analogies to the hair follicle stem cells are drawn.

  20. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... develops and ages, the number and type of stem cells changes. Totipotent cells are no longer present after dividing into the cells that generate the placenta and umbilical cord. Pluripotent cells ... organs and tissues. The stem cells that stay in your body throughout your ...

  1. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  2. The hematopoietic growth factor "erythropoietin" enhances the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, M I; Kassem, L A; Yassin, N A; El Din, M A Gamal; Zekri, M; Attia, M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction and by deposition of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. The study investigated the therapeutic effect of combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin on Alzheimer's disease. Five groups of mice were used: control group, Alzheimer's disease was induced in four groups by a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.8 mg kg(-1) lipopolysaccharide and divided as follows: Alzheimer's disease group, mesenchymal stem cells treated group by injecting mesenchymal stem cells into the tail vein (2 x 10(6) cells), erythropoietin treated group (40 microg kg(-1) b.wt.) injected intraperitoneally 3 times/week for 5 weeks and mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin treated group. Locomotor activity and memory were tested using open field and Y-maze. Histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical studies, morphometric measurements were examined in brain sections of all groups. Choline transferase activity, brain derived neurotrophic factor expression and mitochondrial swellings were assessed in cerebral specimens. Lipopolysaccharide decreased locomotor activity, memory, choline transferase activity and brain derived neurotrophic factor. It increased mitochondrial swelling, apoptotic index and amyloid deposition. Combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin markedly improved all these parameters. This study proved the effective role of mesenchymal stem cells in relieving Alzheimer's disease symptoms and manifestations; it highlighted the important role of erythropoietin in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. The Regulatory Effects of Long Noncoding RNA-ANCR on Dental Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qian; Chen, Xiaolin; Jiang, Wenkai; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) have been recognized as important regulators in diverse biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, stem cell proliferation, and differentiation. Previous study has demonstrated that lncRNA-ANCR (antidifferentiation ncRNA) plays a key role in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs). However, little is known about the role of ANCR in regulating other types of dental tissue-derived stem cells (DTSCs) behaviours (including proliferation and multiple-potential of differentiation). In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of lncRNA-ANCR on the proliferation and differentiation (including osteogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation) of DTSCs, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), PDLSCs, and stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP) by downregulation of lncRNA-ANCR. We found that downregulation of ANCR exerted little effect on proliferation of DPSCs and SCAP but promoted the osteogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation of DTSCs. These data provide an insight into the regulatory effects of long noncoding RNA-ANCR on DTSCs and indicate that ANCR is a very important regulatory factor in stem cell differentiation. PMID:27648074

  4. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC.

  5. [Effects of catalase on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Shi, Ying-Xu; Xie, Yin-Liang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the growth and multiple differentiation potential of human umbilical cord tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) transfected by a retroviral vector with catalase (CAT) gene. The UC-MSCs cultured in vitro were transfected by using pMSCV carrying GFP (pMSCV-GFP) and pMSCV carrying CAT (pMSCV-GFP-CAT) respectively, then the MSC-GFP cell line and MSC-GFP-CAT cell line were obtained by sorting of flow cytometry. The GFP expression was observed by a fluorescent microscopy at 48 hours after CAT gene transfection. The GFP+ cells were sorted by flow cytometry. The activity of CAT in GFP+ cells was detected by catalase assay kit. The proliferative capacity of transfected UC-MSCs was determined by cell counting kit-8. The differentiation ability of gene-transfected GFP+ cells into osteogenesis and adipogenesis was observed by von Kossa and oil red O staining. The results indicated that green fluorescence in UC-MSCs was observed at 48 hours after transfection, and the fluorescence gradually enhanced to a steady level on day 3. The percentage of MSCs-GFP was (25.54+/-8.65)%, while the percentage of MSCs-GFP-CAT was (35.4+/-18.57)%. The activity of catalase in UC-MSCs, MSCs-GFP, MSCs-GFP-CAT cells were 19.5, 20.3, 67.2 U, respectively. The transfected MSCs-GFP-CAT could be induced into osteoblasts and adipocytes. After 21 days, von Kossa staining showed induced osteoblasts. Many lipid droplets with high refractivity occurred in cytoplasm of the transfected UC-MSCs, and showed red fat granules in oil red O staining cells. There were no significant differences between transfected and non-transfected UC-MSCs cells (p>0.05). It is concluded that UC-MSCs are successfully transfected by retrovirus carrying GFP or CAT gene, the activity of catalase increased by 3.4-fold. The transfected UC-MSCs maintain proliferation potential and ability of differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes.

  6. Lithium chloride has a biphasic effect on prostate cancer stem cells and a proportional effect on midkine levels

    PubMed Central

    Erguven, Mine; Oktem, Gulperi; Kara, Ali Nail; Bilir, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most frequent type of cancer in men worldwide and the levels of differentiation growth factor midkine (MK) are increased in PCa. Cancer and/or the treatment process itself may lead to psychiatric disorders. Lithium chloride (LiCl) has anti-manic properties and has been used in cancer therapy; however, it has a queried safety profile. In addition, cancer stem cells are responsible for the heterogeneous phenotype of tumor cells; they are involved in progression, metastasis, recurrence and therapy resistance in various cancer types. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of different concentrations of LiCl on PCa stem cells (whether a shift from tumorigenic to non-tumorigenic cells occurs) and to determine if these results can be explained through changes in MK levels. Monolayer and spheroid cultures of human prostate stem cells and non-stem cells were incubated with low (1, 10 µM) and high (100, 500 µM) concentrations of LiCl for 72 h. Cell proliferation, apoptotic indices, MK levels and ultrastructure were evaluated. Cells stimulated with low concentrations showed high proliferation, low apoptotic indices, high MK levels and more healthy ultrastructure. Opposite results were obtained at high concentrations. Furthermore, stem cells were more sensitive to stimulation and more resistant to inhibition than non-stem cells. LiCl exhibited concentration-dependent effects on stem cell and non-stem cell groups. MK levels were not involved in the biphasic effect of LiCl; however, they were proportionally affected. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to show the effect of LiCl on PCa stem cells through MK. PMID:27703531

  7. The effects of secretion factors from umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui-Xing; Xu, Liang-Liang; Rui, Yun-Feng; Huang, Shuo; Lin, Si-En; Xiong, Jiang-Hui; Li, Ying-Hui; Lee, Wayne Yuk-Wai; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Factors synthesized by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contain various growth factors, cytokines, exosomes and microRNAs, which may affect the differentiation abilities of MSCs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of secretion factors of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on osteogenesis of human bone marrow derived MSCs (hBMSCs). The results showed that 20 μg/ml hUCMSCs secretion factors could initiate osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs without osteogenic induction medium (OIM), and the amount of calcium deposit (stained by Alizarin Red) was significantly increased after the hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment. Real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the expression of osteogenesis-related genes including ALP, BMP2, OCN, Osterix, Col1α and Runx2 were significantly up-regulated following hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment. In addition, we found that 10 μg hUCMSCs secretion factors together with 2×10(5) hBMSCs in the HA/TCP scaffolds promoted ectopic bone formation in nude mice. Local application of 10 μg hUCMSCs secretion factors with 50 μl 2% hyaluronic acid hydrogel and 1×10(5) rat bone marrow derived MSCs (rBMSCs) also significantly enhanced the bone repair of rat calvarial bone critical defect model at both 4 weeks and 8 weeks. Moreover, the group that received the hUCMSCs secretion factors treatment had more cartilage and bone regeneration in the defect areas than those in the control group. Taken together, these findings suggested that hUCMSCs secretion factors can initiate osteogenesis of bone marrow MSCs and promote bone repair. Our study indicates that hUCMSCs secretion factors may be potential sources for promoting bone regeneration.

  8. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  9. Effects of hTERT immortalization on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ikbale, El-Ayachi; Goorha, Sarita; Reiter, Lawrence T; Miranda-Carboni, Gustavo A

    2016-03-01

    These data relate to the differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and DPSC immortalized by constitutively expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) through both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages (i.e. to make bone producing and fat producing cells from these dental pulp stem cells). The data augment another study to characterize immortalized DPSC for the study of neurogenetic "Characterization of neurons from immortalized dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders" [1]. Two copies of one typical control cell line (technical replicates) were used in this study. The data represent the differentiation of primary DPSC into osteoblast cells approximately 60% more effectively than hTERT immortalized DPSC. Conversely, both primary and immortalized DPSC are poorly differentiated into adipocytes. The mRNA expression levels for both early and late adipogenic and osteogenic gene markers are shown.

  10. Effect of cell density on adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxu; Guo, Likun; Wozniak, Michal J; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xingdong; Chen, Guoping

    2009-04-10

    The effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated by using a patterning technique to induce the formation of a cell density gradient on a micropatterned surface. The adipogenic differentiation of MSCs at a density gradient from 5 x 10(3) to 3 x 10(4) cells/cm2 was examined. Lipid vacuoles were observed at all cell densities after 1-3 weeks of culture in adipogenic differentiation medium although the lipid vacuoles were scarce at the low cell density and abundant at the high cell density. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that adipogenesis marker genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4) were detected in the MSCs cultured at all cell densities. The results suggest that there was no apparent effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

  11. Effect of cell density on adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongxu; Guo, Likun; Wozniak, Michal J.; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xingdong; Chen, Guoping

    2009-04-10

    The effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated by using a patterning technique to induce the formation of a cell density gradient on a micropatterned surface. The adipogenic differentiation of MSCs at a density gradient from 5 x 10{sup 3} to 3 x 10{sup 4} cells/cm{sup 2} was examined. Lipid vacuoles were observed at all cell densities after 1-3 weeks of culture in adipogenic differentiation medium although the lipid vacuoles were scarce at the low cell density and abundant at the high cell density. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that adipogenesis marker genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4) were detected in the MSCs cultured at all cell densities. The results suggest that there was no apparent effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

  12. Cinnamon effectively inhibits the activity of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Su, M C; Zhao, R B; Ouyang, H M; Dong, X D; Hu, P; Pei, Q; Lu, J; Li, Z F; Zhang, C R; Yang, T-H

    2016-08-19

    Cinnamon is the main component of Sanyangxuedai, which is one of the effective traditional Chinese medicines for treating malignancies. Leukemia is a prevalent malignant disease that Sanyangxuedai has been used to treat. Although successful in several studies, there is a lack of solid evidence as to why Sanyangxuedai has an effect on leukemia, and little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the active ingredients of cinnamon were isolated, purified, and identified. The transwell transport pool formed with the Caco-2 cell model was used to filter the active ingredients of cinnamon by simulating the gastrointestinal barrier in vitro. Moreover, the cell morphology, cell cycle status, apoptosis status, and antigenic variation of the cell surface antigens were observed and measured in K562 cells after treatment with the active ingredients of cinnamon. Our results showed that 50-75 μM was a safe concentration of cinnamon extract for treatment of K562 cells for 72 h. The cinnamon extract caused growth inhibition of K562 cells. Cinnamon extract seemed to arrest the cells at the G1 stage and increased the apoptosis rate significantly. Interestingly, cinnamon extract treatment upregulated the expression of erythroid and myeloid differentiation antigens and downregulated that of the megakaryocytic differentiation antigens in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cinnamon extract from Sanyangxuedai may be effective for treating leukemia.

  13. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  14. Effect of BMP-2 Delivery Mode on Osteogenic Differentiation of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Ki-Suk; Jang, Hyon-Seok; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of stem cells is an important strategy for regeneration of defective tissue in stem cell therapy. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a well-known osteogenic differentiation factor that stimulates stem cell signaling pathways by activating transmembrane type I and type II receptors. However, BMPs have a very short half-life and may rapidly lose their bioactivity. Thus, a BMP delivery system is required to take advantage of an osteoinductive effect for osteogenic differentiation. Previously, BMP delivery has been designed and evaluated for osteogenic differentiation, focusing on carriers and sustained release system for delivery of BMPs. The effect of the delivery mode in cell culture plate on osteogenic differentiation potential was not evaluated. Herein, to investigate the effect of delivery mode on osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs in this study, we fabricated bottom-up release and top-down release systems for culture plate delivery of BMP-2. And also, we selected Arg-Gly-Asp- (RGD-) conjugated alginate hydrogel for BMP-2 delivery because alginate is able to release BMP-2 in a sustained manner and it is a biocompatible material. After 7 days of culture, the bottom-up release system in culture plate significantly stimulated alkaline phosphate activity of human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells. The present study highlights the potential value of the tool in stem cell therapy. PMID:28197209

  15. Effects of hyperthermia and radiation on mouse testis stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.O.; Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.; West, J.

    1981-11-01

    The response of mouse testis stem cells to hyperthermia and combined hyperthermia-radiation treatments was assayed by spermatogenic colony regrowth, sperm head counts, testis weight loss, and fertility. With the use of spermatogenic colony assay, thermal enhancement ratios at an isosurvival level of 0.1 were 1.27 at 41 degrees, 1.80 at 42 degrees, and 3.97 at 43 degrees for testes exposed to heat for 30 min prior to irradiation. Sperm head counts were reduced by heat alone from a surviving fraction of 0.58 at 41 degrees to 0.003 at 42.5-43.5 degrees. Curves for sperm head survival measured 56 days after the testes had been heated for 30 min prior to irradiation were biphasic and showed a progressive downward displacement to lower survival with increasing temperature. The 41, 42, and 43 degrees curves were displaced downward by factors of 2, 58, and 175, respectively. The proportion of animals remaining sterile after 30 min of heat (41-43 degrees) and the median sterility period in days increased with increasing temperature. The minimum sperm count necessary to regain fertility was 13% of the normal mouse level.

  16. Activation of cardiac progenitor cells through paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Chiaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Yamahara, Kenichi; Hagino, Ikuo; Mori, Hidezo; Sawa, Yoshiki; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2008-09-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) transplantation has been proved to be promising strategy to treat the failing heart. The effect of MSC transplantation is thought to be mediated mainly in a paracrine manner. Recent reports have suggested that cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) reside in the heart. In this study, we investigated whether MSC had paracrine effects on CPC in vitro. CPC were isolated from the neonatal rat heart using an explant method. MSC were isolated from the adult rat bone marrow. MSC-derived conditioned medium promoted proliferation of CPC and inhibited apoptosis of CPC induced by hypoxia and serum starvation. Chemotaxis chamber assay demonstrated that MSC-derived conditioned medium enhanced migration of CPC. Furthermore, MSC-derived conditioned medium upregulated expression of cardiomyocyte-related genes in CPC such as {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). In conclusion, MSC-derived conditioned medium had protective effects on CPC and enhanced their migration and differentiation.

  17. Effect of T3 hormone on neural differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat; Mardani, Mohammad; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Ebrahim

    2014-12-01

    Human adult stem cells, which are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into other cell types, can be isolated from various tissues. There are no ethical and rejection problems as in the case of embryonic stem cells, so they are a promising source for cell therapy. The human body contains a great amount of adipose tissue that contains high numbers of mesenchymal stem cells. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) could be easily induced to form neuron-like cells, and because of its availability and abundance, we can use it for clinical cell therapy. On the other hand, T3 hormone as a known neurotropic factor has important impressions on the nervous system. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of T3 treatment on neural differentiation of hADSCs. ADSCs were harvested from human adipose tissue, after neurosphere formation, and during final differentiation, treatment with T3 was performed. Immunocytochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting techniques were used for detection of nestin, MAP2, and GFAP markers in order to confirm the effects of T3 on neural differentiation of hADSCs. Our results showed an increase in the number of glial cells but reduction in neuronal cells number fallowing T3 treatment.

  18. Stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Józkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2011-11-01

    Multiple populations of stem cells have been indicated to potentially participate in regeneration of injured organs. Especially, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and recently inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS) receive a marked attention from scientists and clinicians for regenerative medicine because of their high proliferative and differentiation capacities. Despite that ESC and iPS cells are expected to give rise into multiple regenerative applications when their side effects are overcame during appropriate preparation procedures, in fact their most recent application of human ESC may, however, reside in their use as a tool in drug development and disease modeling. This review focuses on the applications of stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology. We discuss possible relevance of pluripotent cell stem populations in developing physiological models for any human tissue cell type useful for pharmacological, metabolic and toxicity evaluation necessary in the earliest steps of drug development. The present models applied for preclinical drug testing consist of primary cells or immortalized cell lines that show limitations in terms of accessibility or relevance to their in vivo counterparts. The availability of renewable human cells with functional similarities to their in vivo counterparts is the first landmark for a new generation of cell-based assays. We discuss the approaches for using stem cells as valuable physiological targets of drug activity which may increase the strength of target validation and efficacy potentially resulting in introducing new safer remedies into clinical trials and the marketplace. Moreover, we discuss the possible applications of stem cells for elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The knowledge about the mechanisms governing the development and progression of multitude disorders which would come from the cellular models established based on stem cells, may give rise to new therapeutical strategies for such diseases. All

  19. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Adipocyte-Derived Stem Cells in Rat.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Moon, Jeremiah H; Yeerna, Huwate; Boström, Kristina I

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the adipose tissue and mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose stroma and other tissues. Previous reports suggest that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is involved in diabetic complications, at the same time playing an important role in the maintenance of stem cells. In this study, we used rats transgenic for human islet amyloid polypeptide (HIP rats), a model of type 2 diabetes, to study the effect of diabetes on adipocyte-derived stem cells, referred to as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. Our results show that BMP4 expression in inguinal adipose tissue is significantly increased in HIP rats compared to controls, whereas matrix Gla protein (MGP), an inhibitor of BMP4 is decreased as determined by quantitative PCR, and immunofluorescence. In addition, adipose vascularity and expression of multiple endothelial cell markers was increased in the diabetic tissue, visualized by immunofluorescence for endothelial markers. The endothelial markers co-localized with the enhanced BMP4 expression, suggesting that vascular cells play a role BMP4 induction. The DFAT cells are multipotent stem cells derived from white mature adipocytes that undergo endothelial and adipogenic differentiation. DFAT cells prepared from the inguinal adipose tissue in HIP rats exhibited enhanced proliferative capacity compared to wild type. In addition, their ability to undergo both endothelial cell and adipogenic lineage differentiation was enhanced, as well as their response to BMP4, as assessed by lineage marker expression. We conclude that the DFAT cells are affected by diabetic changes and may contribute to the adipose dysfunction in diabetes.

  20. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  1. Dosage and cell line dependent inhibitory effect of bFGF supplement in human pluripotent stem cell culture on inactivated human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tara; Marquez, Maribel; Blanco, Giselle; Zhao, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Many different culture systems have been developed for expanding human pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs). In general, 4-10 ng/ml of bFGF is supplemented in culture media in feeder-dependent systems regardless of feeder cell types, whereas in feeder-free systems, up to 100 ng/ml of bFGF is required for maintaining long-term culture on various substrates. The amount of bFGF required in native hESCs growth niche is unclear. Here we report using inactivated adipose-derived human mesenchymal stem cells as feeder cells to examine long-term parallel cultures of two hESCs lines (H1 and H9) and one hiPSCs line (DF19-9-7T) in media supplemented with 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml of bFGF for up to 23 passages, as well as parallel cultures of H9 and DF19 in media supplemented with 4, 20 or 100 ng/ml bFGF for up to 13 passages for comparison. Across all cell lines tested, bFGF supplement demonstrated inhibitory effect over growth expansion, single cell colonization and recovery from freezing in a dosage dependent manner. In addition, bFGF exerted differential effects on different cell lines, inducing H1 and DF19 differentiation at 4 ng/ml or higher, while permitting long-term culture of H9 at the same concentrations with no apparent dosage effect. Pluripotency was confirmed for all cell lines cultured in 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml bFGF excluding H1-4 ng, as well as H9 cultured in 4, 20 and 100 ng/ml bFGF. However, DF19 demonstrated similar karyotypic abnormality in both 0 and 4 ng/ml bFGF media while H1 and H9 were karyotypically normal in 0 ng/ml bFGF after long-term culture. Our results indicate that exogenous bFGF exerts dosage and cell line dependent effect on human pluripotent stem cells cultured on mesenchymal stem cells, and implies optimal use of bFGF in hESCs/hiPSCs culture should be based on specific cell line and its culture system.

  2. Effects of surface molecular chirality on adhesion and differentiation of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiang; Hu, Yiwen; Cao, Bin; Peng, Rong; Ding, Jiandong

    2013-12-01

    Chirality is one of the most fascinating and ubiquitous cues in nature, especially in life. The effects of chiral surfaces on stem cells have, however, not yet been revealed. Herein we examined the molecular chirality effect on stem cell behaviors. Self assembly monolayers of L- or D-cysteine (Cys) were formed on a glass surface coated with gold. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow of rats exhibited more adhering preference and thus less cell spreading on the L surface than on the d one at the confluent condition. More protein adsorption was observed on the L surface after immersed in cell culture medium with fetal bovine serum. After osteogenic and adipogenic co-induction at the confluent condition, a larger proportion of cells became osteoblasts on the d surface, while the adipogenic fraction on the L surface was found to be higher than on the D surface. In order to interpret how this chirality effect worked, we fabricated Cys microislands of two sizes on the non-fouling poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel to pre-define the spreading areas of single cells. Then the differentiation extents did not exhibit a significant difference between L and D surfaces under a given area of microislands, yet very significant differences of osteogenesis and adipogenesis were found between different areas. So, the molecular chirality influenced stem cells, probably via favored adsorption of natural proteins on the L surface, which led to more cell adhesion; and the larger cell spreading area with higher cell tension in turn favored osteogenesis rather than adipogenesis. As a result, this study reveals the molecular chirality on material surfaces as an indirect regulator of stem cells.

  3. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  4. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  5. Haploidentical Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Role of NK Cells and Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Moretta, Lorenzo; Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Moretta, Francesca; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells play an important role in the immune responses against cancer and viral infections. In addition, NK cells have been shown to exert a key role in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation for the therapy of high-risk leukemias. The anti-leukemia effect is mostly related to the presence of "alloreactive" NK cells, i.e., mature KIR(+) NK cells that express inhibitory KIR mismatched with HLA class I (KIR-L) of the patient. In addition, an important role is played by certain activating KIR (primarily, but not only, KIR2DS1) upon interaction with their HLA class I ligand (C2 alleles). In general, the presence of activating KIR correlates with a better prognosis. Beside the infusion of "pure" CD34(+) cells, a novel protocol has been recently developed in which depletion of αβ T cells and CD19(+) B cells makes it possible to infuse into the patient, together with donor CD34(+) HSCs, important effector cells including mature PB NK cells and γδ T cells. Recent studies revealed that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation may induce rapid NK cell maturation and greatly influence the NK receptor repertoire. The remarkable expansion of a subset expressing the activating receptor NKG2C, together with a more efficient virus-specific effector response after rechallenge with CMV (i.e., antigen specificity), and the longevity of the expanded population are all features consistent with an adaptive type of response and support the notion of a memory-like activity of NK cells.

  6. Curative effect of combined lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, and stem cell transplantation on decompensated hepatitis B cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Yan, Y; Zhou, J; Huang, L W; He, C P; Ling, K; Zhou, H C; Wen, Q M; Wang, X M

    2014-02-21

    This study assessed the clinical efficacy of lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil combined with autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation as treatment for patients with hepatitis B and decompensated liver cirrhosis. In total, 77 patients with hepatitis B and decompensated liver cirrhosis were randomly divided into two groups. Under general symptomatic and supportive treatment, the patients in group A (37 cases) were treated with lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil, whereas those in group B (40 cases) were treated with autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation in combination with lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil. After 4 weeks of treatment, the liver function indicators and clinical signs and symptoms of the patients in group B improved more significantly than those of patients in group A. Lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil in combination with autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation effectively prevented hepatitis B virus infection and bone marrow stem cell damage. This combination treatment facilitates the differentiation of bone marrow stem cells into normal liver cells to restore liver structure and improve liver function, thereby improving the quality of life of patients.

  7. The effect of salinomycin on ovarian cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyewon; Kim, Yu-Hwan; Kwon, Myoung; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do

    2016-01-01

    Objective The identification of cancer stem-like cells is a recent development in ovarian cancer. Compared to other cancer cells, cancer stem-like cells present more chemo-resistance and more aggressive characteristics. They play an important role in the recurrence and drug resistance of cancer. Therefore, the target therapy of cancer stem-like cell may become a promising and effective approach for ovarian cancer treatment. It may also help to provide novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Methods The OVCAR3 cell line was cultured under serum-free conditions to produce floating spheres. The CD44+CD117+ cell line was isolated from the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 by using immune magnetic-activated cell sorting system. The expression of stemness genes such as OCT3/4, NANOG and SOX2 mRNA were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. OVCAR3 parental and OVCAR3 CD44+CD117+ cells were grown in different doses of paclitaxel and salinomycin to evaluate the effect of salinomycin. And growth inhibition of OVCAR3 CD44+CD117+ cells by paclitaxel combined with salinomycin was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results Tumor spheroids generated from the OVCAR3 cell line are shown to have highly enriched CD44 and CD117 expression. Treatment with a combination of paclitaxel and salinomycin demonstrated growth inhibition of OVCAR3 CD44+CD117+ cells. Conclusion The present study is a detailed investigation on the expression of CD44 and CD117 in cancer stem cells and evaluates their specific tumorigenic characteristics in ovarian cancer. This study also demonstrates significant growth inhibition of cancer stem-like cells by paclitaxel combined with salinomycin. Identification of these cancer stem-like cell markers and growth inhibition effect of salinomycin may be the next step to the development of novel target therapy in ovarian cancer. PMID:27462592

  8. The effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-04-01

    Lithium has been used in modern psychiatry for more than 65 years, constituting a cornerstone for the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. A number of biological properties of lithium have been discovered, including its hematological, antiviral and neuroprotective effects. In this article, a systematic review of the effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells is presented. The beneficial effects of lithium on the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and growth factors have been reported since 1970s. Lithium improves homing of stem cells, the ability to form colonies and HSC self-renewal. Lithium also exerts a favorable influence on the proliferation and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Studies on the effect of lithium on neurogenesis have indicated an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and enhanced mitotic activity of Schwann cells. This may be connected with the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of lithium, reflected in an improvement in synaptic plasticity promoting cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis. In clinical studies, lithium treatment increases cerebral gray matter, mainly in the frontal lobes, hippocampus and amygdala. Recent findings also suggest that lithium may reduce the risk of dementia and exert a beneficial effect in neurodegenerative diseases. The most important mediators and signaling pathways of lithium action are the glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Recently, to study of bipolar disorder pathogenesis and the mechanism of lithium action, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) obtained from bipolar patients have been used.

  9. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  10. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants A ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  11. Adult stem cell therapy: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Moraleda, Jose M; Blanquer, Miguel; Bleda, Patricia; Iniesta, Paqui; Ruiz, Francisco; Bonilla, Sonia; Cabanes, Carmen; Tabares, Lucía; Martinez, Salvador

    2006-12-01

    Adult stem cells may be an invaluable source of plastic cells for tissue regeneration. The bone marrow contains different subpopulations of adult stem cells easily accessible for transplantation. However the therapeutic value of adult stem cell is a question of debate in the scientific community. We have investigated the potential benefits of adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of demyelinating and motor neuron diseases. Our results suggest that transplantation of HSC have direct and indirect neuroregenerative and neuroprotective effects.

  12. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Karen R; Smith, Lee B; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S; Chambers, Thomas J G; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O'Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L M; Anderson, Richard A; Sharpe, Richard M

    2014-05-06

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk.

  13. Effects of salinomycin on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scherzed, A; Hackenberg, S; Froelich, K; Rak, K; Technau, A; Radeloff, A; Nöth, U; Koehler, C; Hagen, R; Kleinsasser, N

    2013-04-26

    Various hypotheses on the origin of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist, including that CSCs develop from transformed human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). Since the polyether antibiotic salinomycin selectively kills CSCs, the present study aims to elucidate the effects of salinomycin on normal hBMSC. The immunophenotype of hBMSC after salinomycin exposure was observed by flow cytometry. The multi-differentiation capacity of hBMSC was evaluated by Oil Red O and van Kossa staining. Cytotoxic effects of salinomycin were monitored by the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] (MTT) assay. Furthermore, spheroid formation and migration capacity were assessed. There were no differences in the immunophenotype and multi-differentiation capacity of hBMSC induced by salinomycin treatment. Cytotoxic effects were observed at concentrations of 30 μM and above. Neither the migration capability nor the ability to form spheroids was affected. Essential functional properties of hBMSC were unaffected by salinomycin. However, dose-dependent cytotoxicity effects could be observed. Overall, low dose salinomycin showed no negative effects on hBMSC. Since mesenchymal stem cells from various sources respond differently, further in vitro studies are needed to clarify the effect of salinomycin on tissue-specific stem cells.

  14. Effect of stromal-cell-derived factor 1 on stem-cell homing and tissue regeneration in ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askari, Arman T.; Unzek, Samuel; Popovic, Zoran B.; Goldman, Corey K.; Forudi, Farhad; Kiedrowski, Matthew; Rovner, Aleksandr; Ellis, Stephen G.; Thomas, James D.; DiCorleto, Paul E.; Topol, Eric J.; Penn, Marc S.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial regeneration via stem-cell mobilisation at the time of myocardial infarction is known to occur, although the mechanism for stem-cell homing to infarcted tissue subsequently and whether this approach can be used for treatment of ischaemic cardiomyopathy are unknown. We investigated these issues in a Lewis rat model (ligation of the left anterior descending artery) of ischaemic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: We studied the effects of stem-cell mobilisation by use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) with or without transplantation of syngeneic cells. Shortening fraction and myocardial strain by tissue doppler imaging were quantified by echocardiography. FINDINGS: Stem-cell mobilisation with filgrastim alone did not lead to engraftment of bone-marrow-derived cells. Stromal-cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), required for stem-cell homing to bone marrow, was upregulated immediately after myocardial infarction and downregulated within 7 days. 8 weeks after myocardial infarction, transplantation into the peri-infarct zone of syngeneic cardiac fibroblasts stably transfected to express SDF-1 induced homing of CD117-positive stem cells to injured myocardium after filgrastim administration (control vs SDF-1-expressing cardiac fibroblasts mean 7.2 [SD 3.4] vs 33.2 [6.0] cells/mm2, n=4 per group, p<0.02) resulting in greater left-ventricular mass (1.24 [0.29] vs 1.57 [0.27] g) and better cardiac function (shortening fraction 9.2 [4.9] vs 17.2 [4.2]%, n=8 per group, p<0.05). INTERPRETATION: These findings show that SDF-1 is sufficient to induce therapeutic stem-cell homing to injured myocardium and suggest a strategy for directed stem-cell engraftment into injured tissues. Our findings also indicate that therapeutic strategies focused on stem-cell mobilisation for regeneration of myocardial tissue must be initiated within days of myocardial infarction unless signalling for stem-cell homing is re-established.

  15. Molecular effect of ethanol during neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeffrey J; Duan, Lewei; Tu, Thanh G; Elie, Omid; Kim, Yiyoung; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Elashoff, David; Kim, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Potential teratogenic effects of alcohol on fetal development have been documented. Especially studies have demonstrated deleterious effect of ethanol exposure on neuronal development in animal models and on the maintenance and differentiation of neuronal precursor cells derived from stem cells. To better understand molecular effect of alcohol on the process of neural differentiation, we have performed gene expression microarray analysis on human embryonic stem cells being directed to neural rosettes and neural precursor cells in the presence of ethanol treatment. Here we provide detailed experimental methods, analysis and information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE56906. Our data provide scientific insight on potential molecular effects of fetal alcohol exposure on neural differentiation of early embryo development.

  16. In vitro Osteogenic impulse effect of Dexamethasone on periodontal ligament stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Roozegar, Mohamad Ali; Mohammadi, Tayebeh Malek; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Hashemian, Amirreza; Amraei, Mansur; Hoshmand, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Periodontium is a complex organ composed of mineralized epithelial and connective tissue. Dexamethasone could stimulate proliferation of osteoblast and fibroblasts. This study aimed to assess the osteogenic effect of dexamethasone on periodental ligament (PDL) stem cells. PDL stem cells were collected from periodontal ligament tissue of root of extracted premolar of young and healthy people. The stem cells were cultured in α-MEM Medium in three groups, one group with basic medium contains (α- MEM and FBS 10 % and 50 mmol of β_ gelisrophosphat and L_ ascorbic acid µg/ml), the second group: basic medium with dexamethasone and the third one: basic medium without any osteogenic stimulant. Mineralization of cellular layer was analyzed with Alizarin red stain method. Osteogenic analysis was done by Alkaline phosphates and calcium test. These analysis indicated that the amount of intra-cellular calcium and alkaline phosphates in the Dexamethasone group was far more than the control and basic group (P<0.05). The results of Alizarin red stain indicated more mineralization of cultured cells in Dexamethasone group (P<0.05). The study results showed that Dexamethasone has significant osteogenic effect on PDL stem cells and further studies are recommended to evaluate its effect on treatment of bone disorders. PMID:25848170

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  18. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  19. Imatinib has deleterious effects on differentiating spermatogonia while sparing spermatogonial stem cell self renewal.

    PubMed

    Heim, Crystal; Minniear, Kayla; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2011-05-01

    Imatinib mesylate is among a growing number of effective cancer drugs that provide molecularly targeted therapy; however, imatinib causes reproductive defects in rodents. The availability of an in vitro system for screening the effect of drugs on spermatogenesis would be beneficial. The imatinib targets, KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB), were shown here to be expressed in "germline stem" (GS) cell cultures that contain spermatogonia, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). GS cell cultures were utilized to determine whether imatinib affects SSC self renewal or differentiation. GS cells grown in imatinib retained self renewal based on multiple assays, including transplantation. However, growth in imatinib led to decreased numbers of differentiated spermatogonia and reduced culture growth consistent with the known requirement for KIT in survival and proliferation of spermatogonia. These results build upon the in vivo studies and support the possibility of utilizing GS cell cultures for preclinical drug tests.

  20. Brief report: Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells are an effective cell source for therapeutic liver repopulation.

    PubMed

    Espejel, Silvia; Eckardt, Sigrid; Harbell, Jack; Roll, Garrett R; McLaughlin, K John; Willenbring, Holger

    2014-07-01

    Parthenogenesis is the development of an oocyte without fertilization. Mammalian parthenogenetic (PG) embryos are not viable, but can develop into blastocysts from which embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been derived in mouse and human. PG ESCs are frequently homozygous for alleles encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. MHC homozygosity permits much more efficient immune matching than MHC heterozygosity found in conventional ESCs, making PG ESCs a promising cell source for cell therapies requiring no or little immune suppression. However, findings of restricted differentiation and proliferation of PG cells in developmental chimeras have cast doubt on the potential of PG ESC derivatives for organ regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we determined whether PG ESC derivatives are effective in rescuing mice with lethal liver failure due to deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah). In developmental chimeras generated by injecting wild-type PG ESCs into Fah-deficient blastocysts, PG ESCs differentiated into hepatocytes that could repopulate the liver, provide normal liver function, and facilitate long-term survival of adult mice. Moreover, after transplantation into adult Fah-deficient mice, PG ESC-derived hepatocytes efficiently engrafted and proliferated, leading to high-level liver repopulation. Our results show that--despite the absence of a paternal genome--PG ESCs can form therapeutically effective hepatocytes.

  1. Stem Cell Organoid Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E.; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies. PMID:26748754

  2. Engineering Stem Cell Organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-07

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies.

  3. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  4. Typical and atypical stem cells in the brain, vitamin C effect and neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nualart, Francisco; Salazar, Katterine; Oyarce, Karina; Cisternas, Pedro; Jara, Nery; Silva-Álvarez, Carmen; Pastor, Patricia; Martínez, Fernando; García, Andrea; García-Robles, María de los Ángeles; Tapia, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are considered a valuable cellular resource for tissue replacement therapies in most brain disorders. Stem cells have the ability to self-replicate and differentiate into numerous cell types, including neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. As a result, stem cells have been considered the "holy grail" of modern medical neuroscience. Despite their tremendous therapeutic potential, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate their differentiation. In this review, we analyze stem cells in embryonic and adult brains, and illustrate the differentiation pathways that give origin to most brain cells. We also evaluate the emergent role of the well known anti-oxidant, vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation. We believe that a complete understanding of all molecular players, including vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation will positively impact on the use of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Potential therapeutic effect of the secretome from human uterine cervical stem cells against both cancer and stromal cells compared with adipose tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Bermúdez, María A.; Lamelas, Maria Luz; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Schneider, José; Perez-Fernandez, Roman; Vizoso, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidences indicate that tumor development and progression towards a malignant phenotype depend not only on cancer cells themselves, but are also deeply influenced by tumor stroma reactivity. The present study uses mesenchymal stem cells from normal human uterine cervix (hUCESCs), isolated by the minimally invasive method of routine Pap cervical smear, to study their effect on the three main cell types in a tumor: cancer cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Administration of hUCESCs-conditioned medium (CM) to a highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line and to human breast tumors with high cell proliferation rates had the effect of reducing cell proliferation, modifying the cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, and decreasing invasion. In a xenograft mouse tumor model, hUCESCs-CM reduced tumor growth and increased overall survival. In cancer-associated fibroblasts, administration of hUCESCs-CM resulted in reduced cell proliferation, greater apoptosis and decreased invasion. In addition, hUCESCs-CM inhibited and reverted macrophage differentiation. The analysis of hUCESCs-CM (fresh and lyophilized) suggests that a complex paracrine signaling network could be implicated in the anti-tumor potential of hUCESCs. In light of their anti-tumor potential, the easy cell isolation method, and the fact that lyophilization of their CM conserves original properties make hUCESCs good candidates for experimental or clinical applications in anticancer therapy. PMID:25296979

  6. Potential therapeutic effect of the secretome from human uterine cervical stem cells against both cancer and stromal cells compared with adipose tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eiró, Noemí; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Bermúdez, María A; Lamelas, Maria Luz; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Schneider, José; Perez-Fernandez, Roman; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2014-11-15

    Evidences indicate that tumor development and progression towards a malignant phenotype depend not only on cancer cells themselves, but are also deeply influenced by tumor stroma reactivity. The present study uses mesenchymal stem cells from normal human uterine cervix (hUCESCs), isolated by the minimally invasive method of routine Pap cervical smear, to study their effect on the three main cell types in a tumor: cancer cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Administration of hUCESCs-conditioned medium (CM) to a highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line and to human breast tumors with high cell proliferation rates had the effect of reducing cell proliferation, modifying the cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, and decreasing invasion. In a xenograft mouse tumor model, hUCESCs-CM reduced tumor growth and increased overall survival. In cancer-associated fibroblasts, administration of hUCESCs-CM resulted in reduced cell proliferation, greater apoptosis and decreased invasion. In addition, hUCESCs-CM inhibited and reverted macrophage differentiation. The analysis of hUCESCs-CM (fresh and lyophilized) suggests that a complex paracrine signaling network could be implicated in the anti-tumor potential of hUCESCs. In light of their anti-tumor potential, the easy cell isolation method, and the fact that lyophilization of their CM conserves original properties make hUCESCs good candidates for experimental or clinical applications in anticancer therapy.

  7. Stem cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Seeking the Prometheus effect.

    PubMed

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Laurent, Geoff; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by dramatic alterations in lung architecture associated to an exaggerated inflammatory process, alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, endothelial dysfunction and extracellular matrix destruction due to a protease and anti-protease imbalance. In addition a significant inflammatory spillover into systemic circulation has been suggested to be responsible for a wide range of fatal comorbidities. In view of the current disappointing status of available pharmaceutical agents, there is an urgent need for alternative more effective therapeutic approaches that will fulfill the unmet need of modulating both local and systemic inflammation and at the same time accelerate alveolar epithelial and endothelial turnover intervening into disease natural course and not only relieving patient's symptoms. Regenerative medicine based on stem cells properties represents one promising option with several fruitful therapeutic applications in patients with COPD. Nevertheless, despite relative enthusiasm arising from experimental data, application of stem cell therapy in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by several safety concerns arising from the major lack of knowledge on the fate of exogenously administrated stem cells within the COPD lung as well as the mechanisms regulating activation of resident progenitor cells. The above evidence coupled with the rather disappointing results emerging from the first stem cell clinical trials in COPD patients underline the need for careful study design by setting realistic goals to assess efficacy such as biomarkers that reflect clinically inconspicuous alterations of the disease molecular phenotype before rigid conclusions can be safely drawn.

  8. [On plant stem cells and animal stem cells].

    PubMed

    You, Yun; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of plant and animal stem cells can highlight core aspects of stem-cell biology. In both kingdoms, stem cells are defined by their clonogenic properties and are maintained by intercellular signals. The signaling molecules are different in plants and animals stem cell niches, but the roles of argonaute and polycomb group proteins suggest that there are some molecular similarities.

  9. Anti-aging effects of vitamin C on human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Seung-Yup; Huh, Yul; Liu, Hung-Ching; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2013-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have arisen as a source of cells for biomedical research due to their developmental potential. Stem cells possess the promise of providing clinicians with novel treatments for disease as well as allowing researchers to generate human-specific cellular metabolism models. Aging is a natural process of living organisms, yet aging in human heart cells is difficult to study due to the ethical considerations regarding human experimentation as well as a current lack of alternative experimental models. hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) bear a resemblance to human cardiac cells and thus hPSC-derived CMs are considered to be a viable alternative model to study human heart cell aging. In this study, we used hPSC-derived CMs as an in vitro aging model. We generated cardiomyocytes from hPSCs and demonstrated the process of aging in both human embryonic stem cell (hESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived CMs. Aging in hESC-derived CMs correlated with reduced membrane potential in mitochondria, the accumulation of lipofuscin, a slower beating pattern, and the downregulation of human telomerase RNA (hTR) and cell cycle regulating genes. Interestingly, the expression of hTR in hiPSC-derived CMs was not significantly downregulated, unlike in hESC-derived CMs. In order to delay aging, vitamin C was added to the cultured CMs. When cells were treated with 100 μM of vitamin C for 48 h, anti-aging effects, specifically on the expression of telomere-related genes and their functionality in aging cells, were observed. Taken together, these results suggest that hPSC-derived CMs can be used as a unique human cardiomyocyte aging model in vitro and that vitamin C shows anti-aging effects in this model.

  10. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  11. [Effects of endothelial cells on renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells].

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwu; Su, Le; Mino, Junying

    2007-10-01

    It is well established that neural stem cells (NSCs) are not randomly distributed throughout the brain, but rather are concentrated around blood vessels. Although NSCs lie in a vascular niche, there is no direct evidence for a functional relationship between the NSCs and blood vessel component cells. It is reported that endothelial cells release soluble factors that stimulate the self-renewal of NSCs, inhibit their differentiation, and enhance their neuron production. Endothelial coculture can activate Notch to promote self-renewal. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a significant role in neural cells; it stimulates the growth and differentiation of astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, beyond their traditional role as structural components of blood vessels, endothelial cells are not only critical component of the neural stem cell niche, but they also are able to enhance neurogenesis, possibly through the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  12. Effects of tacrolimus on morphology, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from gingiva tissue

    PubMed Central

    HA, DONG-HO; YONG, CHUL SOON; KIM, JONG OH; JEONG, JEE-HEON; PARK, JUN-BEOM

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus is a 23-membered macrolide lactone with potent immunosuppressive activity that is effective in the prophylaxis of organ rejection following kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Tacrolimus also exerts a variety of actions on bone metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of tacrolimus on the morphology and viability of human stem cells derived from the gingiva. Gingival-derived stem cells were grown in the presence of tacrolimus at final concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 100 µg/ml. The morphology of the cells was viewed under an inverted microscope and the cell viability was analyzed using Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Alizarin Red S staining was used to assess mineralization of treated cells. The control group showed spindle-shaped, fibroblast-like morphology and the shapes of the cells in 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml tacrolimus were similar to those of the control group. All groups except the 100 µg/ml group showed increased cell proliferation over time. Cultures grown in the presence of tacrolimus at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml were not identified to be significantly different compared with the control at days 1, 3 and 5 using the CCK-8 assays. Increased mineralized deposits were noted with increased incubation time. Treatment with tacrolimus from 0.001 to 1 µg/ml led to an increase in mineralization compared with the control group. Within the limits of this study, tacrolimus at the tested concentrations (ranging from 0.001 to 10 µg/ml) did not result in differences in the viability of stem cells derived from gingiva; however it did enhance osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. PMID:27177273

  13. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stimulated by antiestrogens. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor involve changes of both proliferation and...self-renewal capabilities of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER- positive breast cancer stem/progenitor...potent tumor-seeding efficiency. . Fig 3. The effects of antiestrogens on the differentiation of ER-positive breast cancer stem cells expressing

  14. Stem Cells for Neurovascular Repair in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Dailey, Travis; Tajiri, Naoki; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kim, Dae Won; Pabon, Mibel; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells exert therapeutic effects against ischemic stroke via transplantation of exogenous stem cells or stimulation of endogenous stem cells within the neurogenic niches of subventricular zone and subgranular zone, or recruited from the bone marrow through peripheral circulation. In this paper, we review the different sources of stem cells that have been tested in animal models of stroke. In addition, we discuss specific mechanisms of action, in particular neurovascular repair by endothelial progenitor cells, as key translational research for advancing the clinical applications of stem cells for ischemic stroke. PMID:24077523

  15. Pioglitazone Effect on Glioma Stem Cell Lines: Really a Promising Drug Therapy for Glioblastoma?

    PubMed Central

    Butta, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most frequent malignant brain tumors. Current therapies do not provide real solutions to this pathology. Their failure can be ascribed to a cell subpopulation with stem-like properties called glioma stem cells (GSCs). Therefore, new therapeutic strategies GSC-targeted are needed. PPARγ, a nuclear receptor involved in lipid metabolism, has already been indicated as a promising target for antineoplastic therapies. Recent studies have reported that synthetic PPARγ agonists, already in clinical use for the treatment of type II diabetes, exhibit antineoplastic effects in a wide range of malignant tumor cells, including glioma cells. We investigated the effect of the synthetic PPARγ agonist Pioglitazone on viability, proliferation, morphology, and differentiation in six GSC lines isolated from GBM patients. We also analyzed Pioglitazone-induced changes in transcriptional levels of Wnt/β catenin related genes. Results showed that response to Pioglitazone was heterogeneous inducing an evident decrease of cell viability and proliferation only in a subset of GSC lines. We did not find any sign of cell differentiation neither observing cell morphology nor analyzing the expression of stemness and differentiation markers. Moreover, Wnt/β signaling pathway was only mildly affected from a transcriptional point of view after Pioglitazone exposure. PMID:27313600

  16. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Adipocyte-Derived Stem Cells in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jumabay, Medet; Moon, Jeremiah H.; Yeerna, Huwate; Boström, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the adipose tissue and mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose stroma and other tissues. Previous reports suggest that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4 is involved in diabetic complications, at the same time playing an important role in the maintenance of stem cells. In this study, we used rats transgenic for human islet amyloid polypeptide (HIP rats), a model of type 2 diabetes, to study the effect of diabetes on adipocyte-derived stem cells, referred to as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. Our results show that BMP4 expression in inguinal adipose tissue is significantly increased in HIP rats compared to controls, whereas matrix Gla protein (MGP), an inhibitor of BMP4 is decreased as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In addition, adipose vascularity and expression of multiple endothelial cell markers was increased in the diabetic tissue, visualized by immunofluorescence for endothelial markers. The endothelial markers co-localized with the enhanced BMP4 expression, suggesting that vascular cells play a role BMP4 induction. The DFAT cells are multipotent stem cells derived from white mature adipocytes that undergo endothelial and adipogenic differentiation. DFAT cells prepared from the inguinal adipose tissue in HIP rats exhibited enhanced proliferative capacity compared to wild type. In addition, their ability to undergo both endothelial cell and adipogenic lineage differentiation was enhanced, as well as their response to BMP4, as assessed by lineage marker expression. We conclude that the DFAT cells are affected by diabetic changes and may contribute to the adipose dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25854185

  17. The Effects of Space Flight and Microgravity on the Growth and Differentiation of PICM-19 Pig Liver Stem Cells.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to answer the question, what effects would microgravity have on the growth, differentiation, and function on liver stem cells, the ARS-PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line was cultured in space aboard space shuttle Endeavor for the 16 days of mission STS-126. The liver is among the few organs ...

  18. Long-Term Effects of Stem Cells on Total-Body Irradiated Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalkina, M. V.; Alchinova, I. B.; Yakovenko, E. N.; Medvedeva, Yu S.; Saburina, I. N.; Karganov, M. Yu

    2017-01-01

    C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation in a sublethal dose of 7.5 Gy. In 3 hours injection 106/mouse of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells stem cells intravenously to experimental group was done. Methods used: body weight measurement, open field behavior, subfraction composition of blood serum (laser correlation spectroscopy, LCS), histological examination of the spleen, liver, and pancreas, count of T and B cells, white blood formula. After 1.5 and 3 months the general trend towards intermediate position of the parameters observed in the experimental between those in intact and irradiated controls attests to partial protective/restorative effects of the injected cells.

  19. REPAIR EFFECTS OF UMBILICAL CORD MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS ON PODOCYTE DAMAGE OF IgA NEPHROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D W; Qiu, H; Mei, Y M; Fu, H; Zheng, H G

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the influence of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UMSC) on stem cell homing and glomerular mesangial cell (GMC) after intravenous injection performed on mice tails with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and its possible mechanism, which provide a new way and theoretical basis for the application of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in kidney disease treatment. Specific pathogen free (SPF) male Kunming mice were randomly divided into groups. A complex method applying bovine serum albumin (BSA) gavage, hypodermic injection of CCl4 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used for building IgAN mice model. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cluster of differentiation (CD) 44 were observed by Masson staining and detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC) to confirm homing and location of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Moreover, Western Blot was used for detecting VEGF and CTGF so as to explore the possible mechanism of applying UMSC in treating IgAN. Masson staining indicated that fibrosis degree of MSCs in treatment group was significantly lower than in negative control group after stem cell treatment. Routine urine test explained that proteinuria in treatment group were (7.15±0.31), (4.87±0.22), (2.95±0.16) g/24 h and (12.00±1.38) g/24 h in model group (P less than 0.05). MSCs were observed to be located in glomerulus and renal interstitium by IHC detection of CD44 and IHC qualitative observation of VEGF and CTGF had different positive expressions in three groups. Furthermore, different expressions of VEGF and CTGF were observed quantitatively by Western Blot. Fibrosis degree of renal tissue relieves, hematuresis and proteinuria eases and IgAN symptoms obviously improve after UMSC treatment, which hints that the treatment of HUMSC has protective effect on IgAN mice model.

  20. Anticancer effects of cinnamic acid in lung adenocarcinoma cell line h1299-derived stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Zeng, Fang; Xu, Liyun; Zhou, Jihang; Liu, Xiaoguang; Le, Hanbo

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a lethal solid tumor with poor prognosis because of its high metastasis and resistance to current therapies. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) were suggested to be major contributors to tumorigenicity and cancer relapse. However, therapeutic targets for lung cancer-related CSCs remain undetermined. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether cinnamic acid (CINN) exerts an antitumor activity against sphere-derived lung CSCs. In this study, CSCs were isolated from the non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 as tumor spheres under CSC-selective conditions, and found to have increased tumorigenicity, chemoresistance, and higher expression of both embryonic stem cell-related and drug resistance-related genes compared with parental cells. These observations are consistent with the notion that CSCs are tumorigenic, display the ability to self-renew, and generate differentiated progeny that constitute the majority of cells in tumors. Treatment of sphere-derived stem cells with CINN could diminish their CSC-like abilities by decreasing their proliferation and invasive abilities and facilitating their differentiation into CD133-negative cells. Furthermore, CINN treatment increased the sensitivity of CSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs through apoptosis. Of note, xenotransplantation experiments revealed that CINN combined with cisplatin had a synergistic effect in inhibiting the tumorigenicity of CSCs. In summary, our study clearly revealed the presence of a population of sphere-forming cells with stem-like properties among H1299 cells and CINN can attenuate CSC properties of this stem-like cell population. The potential of CINN should be verified further in future studies of anti-CSC therapy.

  1. Effects of Feeder Cells on Dopaminergic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenqiang; Ma, Yanlin; Chen, Zhibin; Liu, Qian; Li, Qi; Kong, Deyan; Yuan, Kunxiong; Hu, Lan; Wang, Tan; Chen, Xiaowu; Peng, Yanan; Jiang, Weimin; Yu, Yanhong; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) are used for the culture of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). MEFs and HFFs differed in their capacity to support the proliferation and pluripotency of hESCs and could affect cardiac differentiation potential of hESCs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of MEFs and HFFs feeders on dopaminergic differentiation of hESCs lines. To minimize the impact of culture condition variation, two hESCs lines were cultured on mixed feeder cells (MFCs, MEFs: HFFs = 1:1) and HFFs feeder, respectively, and then were differentiated into dopaminergic (DA) neurons under the identical protocol. Dopaminergic differentiation was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, quantitative fluorescent real-time PCR, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and patch clamp. Our results demonstrated that these hESCs-derived neurons were genuine and functional DA neurons. However, compared to hESCs line on MFCs feeder, hESCs line on HFFs feeder had a higher proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells and expressed higher levels of FOXA2, PITX3, NURR1, and TH genes. In addition, the values of threshold intensity and threshold membrane potential of DA neurons from hESCs line on HFFs feeder were lower than those of DA neurons from hESCs line on the MFCs feeder. In conclusion, HFFs feeder not only facilitated the differentiation of hESCs cells into dopaminergic neurons, but also induced hESCs-derived DA neurons to express higher electrophysiological excitability. Therefore, feeder cells could affect not only dopaminergic differentiation potential of different hESCs lines, but also electrophysiological properties of hESCs-derived DA neurons. PMID:28066186

  2. Feedback Regulation in a Cancer Stem Cell Model can Cause an Allee Effect.

    PubMed

    Konstorum, Anna; Hillen, Thomas; Lowengrub, John

    2016-04-01

    The exact mechanisms of spontaneous tumor remission or complete response to treatment are phenomena in oncology that are not completely understood. We use a concept from ecology, the Allee effect, to help explain tumor extinction in a model of tumor growth that incorporates feedback regulation of stem cell dynamics, which occurs in many tumor types where certain signaling molecules, such as Wnts, are upregulated. Due to feedback and the Allee effect, a tumor may become extinct spontaneously or after therapy even when the entire tumor has not been eradicated by the end of therapy. We quantify the Allee effect using an 'Allee index' that approximates the area of the basin of attraction for tumor extinction. We show that effectiveness of combination therapy in cancer treatment may occur due to the increased probability that the system will be in the Allee region after combination treatment versus monotherapy. We identify therapies that can attenuate stem cell self-renewal, alter the Allee region and increase its size. We also show that decreased response of tumor cells to growth inhibitors can reduce the size of the Allee region and increase stem cell densities, which may help to explain why this phenomenon is a hallmark of cancer.

  3. Feedback Regulation in a Cancer Stem Cell Model can Cause an Allee Effect

    PubMed Central

    Konstorum, Anna; Hillen, Thomas; Lowengrub, John

    2016-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of spontaneous tumor remission or complete response to treatment are phenomena in oncology that are not completely understood. We use a concept from ecology, the Allee effect, to help explain tumor extinction in a model of tumor growth that incorporates feedback regulation of stem cell dynamics, which occurs in many tumor types where certain signaling molecules, such as Wnts, are upregulated. Due to feedback and the Allee effect, a tumor may become extinct spontaneously or after therapy even when the entire tumor has not been eradicated by the end of therapy. We quantify the Allee effect using an ‘Allee index’ that approximates the area of the basin of attraction for tumor extinction. We show that effectiveness of combination therapy in cancer treatment may occur due to the increased probability that the system will be in the Allee region after combination treatment versus monotherapy. We identify therapies that can attenuate stem cell self-renewal, alter the Allee region and increase its size. We also show that decreased response of tumor cells to growth inhibitors can reduce the size of the Allee region and increase stem cell densities, which may help to explain why this phenomenon is a hallmark of cancer. PMID:27113934

  4. Effects of the polymeric niche on neural stem cell characteristics during primary culturing.

    PubMed

    Haubenwallner, Stefan; Katschnig, Matthias; Fasching, Ulrike; Patz, Silke; Trattnig, Christa; Andraschek, Natascha; Grünbacher, Gerda; Absenger, Markus; Laske, Stephan; Holzer, Clemens; Balika, Werner; Wagner, Manuela; Schäfer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    The polymeric niche encountered by cells during primary culturing can affect cell fate. However, most cell types are primarily propagated on polystyrene (PS). A cell type specific screening for optimal primary culture polymers particularly for regenerative approaches seems inevitable. The effect of physical and chemical properties of treated (corona, oxygen/nitrogen plasma) and untreated cyclic olefin polymer (COP), polymethymethacrylate (PMMA), PP, PLA, PS, PC on neuronal stem cell characteristics was analyzed. Our comprehensive approach revealed plasma treated COP and PMMA as optimal polymers for primary neuronal stem cell culturing and propagation. An increase in the number of NT2/D1 cells with pronounced adhesion, metabolic activities and augmented expression of neural precursor markers was associated to the plasma treatment of surfaces of COP and PMMA with nitrogen or oxygen, respectively. A shift towards large cell sizes at stable surface area/volume ratios that might promote the observed increase in metabolic activities and distinct modulations in F-actin arrangements seem to be primarily mediated by the plasma treatment of surfaces. These results indicate that the polymeric niche has a distinct impact on various cell characteristics. The selection of distinct polymers and the controlled design of an optimized polymer microenvironment might thereby be an effective tool to promote essential cell characteristics for subsequent approaches.

  5. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  6. Stem cell strategies, future and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2003-01-01

    The use of stem cells for neuroreplacement therapy is no longer science fiction--it is science fact. We have succeeded in the development of neural and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to produce neural cells in the brain. We have seen the improvement of cognitive function in a memory-impaired aged animal model following stem cell transplantation. These results may promise a bright future for stem cell strategies. Before we begin to think about clinical applications beyond the present preclinical studies or even consider the pathophysiological environments of individual diseases, we must address and weigh the factors that may affect stem cell biology. Here, we not only show the potential for therapeutic applications for stem cell strategies in neuropathological conditions, but we also discuss the effects on the biology of stem cells of those factors that are altered under disease conditions.

  7. Poly(ester-urethane) scaffolds: effect of structure on properties and osteogenic activity of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kiziltay, Aysel; Marcos-Fernandez, Angel; San Roman, Julio; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui L; Hasirci, Vasif; Hasirci, Nesrin

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of structure (design and porosity) on the matrix stiffness and osteogenic activity of stem cells cultured on poly(ester-urethane) (PEU) scaffolds. Different three-dimensional (3D) forms of scaffold were prepared from lysine-based PEU using traditional salt-leaching and advanced bioplotting techniques. The resulting scaffolds were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury porosimetry and mechanical testing. The scaffolds had various pore sizes with different designs, and all were thermally stable up to 300 °C. In vitro tests, carried out using rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering, demonstrated better viability and higher cell proliferation on bioplotted scaffolds compared to salt-leached ones, most probably due to their larger and interconnected pores and stiffer nature, as shown by higher compressive moduli, which were measured by compression testing. Similarly, SEM, von Kossa staining and EDX analyses indicated higher amounts of calcium deposition on bioplotted scaffolds during cell culture. It was concluded that the design with larger interconnected porosity and stiffness has an effect on the osteogenic activity of the stem cells.

  8. Effect of gold nanoparticles on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Yvonne; Gorjup, Erwin; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Büchel, Claudia; von Briesen, Hagen; Thielecke, Hagen

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are very attractive for biomedical products. However, there is a serious lack of information concerning the biological activity of nanosized gold in human tissue cells. An influence of nanoparticles on stem cells might lead to unforeseen consequences to organ and tissue functions as long as all cells arising from the initial stem cell might be subsequently damaged. Therefore the effect of negatively charged gold nanoparticles (9 and 95 nm), which are certified as reference material for preclinical biomedical research, on the adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is investigated here. Bone marrow hMSCs are chosen as differentiation model since bone marrow hMSCs are well characterized and their differentiation into the adipogenic lineage shows clear and easily detectable differentiation. In this study effects of gold nanoparticles on adipogenic differentiation are analyzed regarding fat storage and mitochondrial activity after different exposure times (4-21 days). Using time lapse microscopy the differentiation progress under chronically gold nanoparticle treatment is continuously investigated. In this preliminary study, chronically treatment of adipogenic differentiating hMSCs with gold nanoparticles resulted in a reduced number and size of lipid vacuoles and reduced mitochondrial activity depending on the applied concentration and the surface charge of the particles.

  9. The effects of microenvironment on wound healing by keratinocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Han; Fu, Keng-Yen; Hong, Po-Da; Ma, Hsu; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Jiang-Chuan; Huang, Kun-Lun; Dai, Lien-Guo; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Yi-Hsin Chan, James; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo; Dai, Niann-Tzyy

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into various cell types, including keratinocyte-like cells, within suitable microniches. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of culture media, cell coculture, and a tissue-engineering biocomposite on the differentiation of mouse ESCs (MESCs) into keratinocyte-like cells and applied these cells to a surgical skin wound model. MESCs from BALB/c mice (ESC26GJ), which were transfected using pCX-EGFP expressing green fluorescence, were used to track MESC-derived keratinocytes. Weak expression of the keratinocyte early marker Cytokeratin 14 (CK-14) was observed up to 12 days when MESCs were cultured in a keratinocyte culture medium on tissue culture plastic and on a gelatin/collagen/polycaprolactone (GCP) biocomposite. MESCs cocultured with human keratinocyte cells (HKCs) also expressed CK-14, but did not express CK-14 when cocultured with human fibroblast cells (HFCs). Furthermore, CK-14 expression was observed when MESCs were cocultured by seeding HKCs or HFCs on the same or opposite side of the GCP biocomposite. The highest CK-14 expression was observed by seeding MESCs and HKCs on the same side of the GCP composite and with HFCs on the opposite side. To verify the effectiveness of wound healing in vivo, adipose-derived stem cells were applied to treat surgical wounds in nude mice. An obvious epidermis multilayer and better collagen deposition during wound healing were observed, as assessed by Masson staining. This study demonstrated the potential of keratinocyte-like differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells for use in promoting wound closure and skin regeneration.

  10. Effects of High-Temperature-Pressure Polymerized Resin-Infiltrated Ceramic Networks on Oral Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, Ali; Berbar, Tsouria; Le Goff, Stéphane; Berdal, Ariane; Sadoun, Michael; Fournier, Benjamin P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The development of CAD—CAM techniques called for new materials suited to this technique and offering a safe and sustainable clinical implementation. The infiltration of resin in a ceramic network under high pressure and high temperature defines a new class of hybrid materials, namely polymer infiltrated ceramics network (PICN), for this purpose which requires to be evaluated biologically. We used oral stem cells (gingival and pulpal) as an in vitro experimental model. Methods Four biomaterials were grinded, immersed in a culture medium and deposed on stem cells from dental pulp (DPSC) and gingiva (GSC): Enamic (VITA®), Experimental Hybrid Material (EHM), EHM with initiator (EHMi) and polymerized Z100™ composite material (3M®). After 7 days of incubation; viability, apoptosis, proliferation, cytoskeleton, inflammatory response and morphology were evaluated in vitro. Results Proliferation was insignificantly delayed by all the tested materials. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in presence of resin based composites (MTT assay), however no detectable apoptosis and some dead cells were detected like in PICN materials. Cell morphology, major cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix components were not altered. An intimate contact appeared between the materials and cells. Clinical Significance The three new tested biomaterials did not exhibit adverse effects on oral stem cells in our experimental conditions and may be an interesting alternative to ceramics or composite based CAD—CAM blocks. PMID:27196425

  11. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Gene Expression of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Repair of Bone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jazayeri, Maryam; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Haghighipour, Nooshin; Bolouri, Bahram; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Farokhi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Most people experience bone damage and bone disorders during their lifetimes. The use of autografts is a suitable way for injury recovery and healing. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key players in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their proliferation potential and multipotent differentiation ability enable MSCs to be considered as appropriate cells for therapy and clinical applications. Differentiation of stem cells depends on their microenvironment and biophysical stimulations. The aim of this study is to analyze the effects of an electromagnetic field on osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. Materials and Methods In this experimental animal study, we assessed the effects of the essential parameters of a pulsatile electromagnetic field on osteogenic differentiation. The main purpose was to identify an optimum electromagnetic field for osteogenesis induction. After isolating MSCs from male Wistar rats, passage-3 (P3) cells were exposed to an electromagnetic field that had an intensity of 0.2 millitesla (mT) and frequency of 15 Hz for 10 days. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed the mesenchymal identity of the isolated cells. Pulsatile electromagnetic field-stimulated cells were examined by immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Electromagnetic field stimulation alone motivated the expression of osteogenic genes. This stimulation was more effective when combined with osteogenic differentiation medium 6 hours per day for 10 days. For the in vivo study, an incision was made in the cranium of each animal, after which we implanted a collagen scaffold seeded with stimulated cells into the animals. Histological analysis revealed bone formation after 10 weeks of implantation. Conclusion We have shown that the combined use of chemical factors and an electromagnetic field was more effective for inducing osteogenesis. These elements have synergistic effects and are beneficial for bone tissue engineering

  12. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  13. Vitamin D Effects on Osteoblastic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Dental Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Adriana; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Porro, Chiara; Trotta, Teresa; Grano, Maria

    2016-01-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active metabolite of vitamin D (Vit D), increases intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate, maintaining a correct balance of bone remodeling. Vit D has an anabolic effect on the skeletal system and is key in promoting osteoblastic differentiation of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) from bone marrow. MSCs can be also isolated from the immature form of the tooth, the dental bud: Dental Bud Stem Cells (DBSCs) are adult stem cells that can effectively undergo osteoblastic differentiation. In this work we investigated the effect of Vit D on DBSCs differentiation into osteoblasts. Our data demonstrate that DBSCs, cultured in an opportune osteogenic medium, differentiate into osteoblast-like cells; Vit D treatment stimulates their osteoblastic features, increasing the expression of typical markers of osteoblastogenesis like RUNX2 and Collagen I (Coll I) and, in a more important way, determining a higher production of mineralized matrix nodules. PMID:27956902

  14. Pleiotropic effects of transforming growth factor-β in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coomes, Stephanie M; Moore, Bethany B

    2010-12-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a pleiotropic cytokine with beneficial and detrimental effects posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. TGF-β is increased in specific sites postengraftment and can suppress immune responses and maintain peripheral tolerance. Thus, TGF-β may promote allograft acceptance. However, TGF-β is also the central pathogenic cytokine in fibrotic disease and likely promotes pneumonitis. Although TGF-β can enhance leukocyte recruitment and IgA production, it inhibits both innate and adaptive immune cell function and antiviral host defense posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. This review will focus on the current understanding of TGF-β biology and the numerous ways it can impact outcomes posttransplant.

  15. Effect of Dexamethasone, Insulin and EGF on the Myogenic Potential on Human Endometrial Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Jalali Tehrani, Hora; Parivar, Kazem; Ai, Jafar; Kajbafzadeh, Abdolmohammad; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Human endometrium contains mesenchymal stem cells (eMSC) which have the ability to differentiate into three cell lineages and the potential in therapeutic applications. We hypothesize that using environmental induction in culture media such as dexamethasone, human recombinant insulin and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) can differentiate endometrial stem cells into myoblast. These agents have a broad range of effects in myoblast differentiation in-vitro. We used immunohystochemistry analysis and RT –PCR to evaluate the presence of skeletal muscle - specific proteins some of which are expressed in the early stage of differentiation including myoD and Desmin which expressed at later stages of differentiation. In conclusion eMSC can differentiate in culture media which contains above mentioned factors and use for therapeutic purpose in muscular degenerative disease. PMID:25237362

  16. Therapeutic effects of adipose-derived stem cells pretreated with pioglitazone in an emphysema mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yoonki; Kim, You-Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    There is no therapy currently available that influences the natural history of disease progression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although stem cell therapy is considered a potential therapeutic option in COPD, there are no clinical trials proving definitive therapeutic effects in patients with COPD. Recently, it was reported that pioglitazone might potentiate the therapeutic effects of stem cells in patients with heart or liver disease. To test the capacity of pioglitazone pretreatment of stem cells for emphysema repair, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of pioglitazone-pretreated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) on elastase-induced or cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in mice. We also investigated the mechanisms of action of pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs. Pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs had a more potent therapeutic effect than non-pretreated ASCs in the repair of both elastase-induced and smoke-induced emphysema models (mean linear intercept, 78.1±2.5 μm vs 83.2±2.6 μm in elastase models and 75.6±1.4 μm vs 80.5±3.2 μm in smoke models, P<0.05). Furthermore, we showed that pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production both in vitro and in mouse lungs in the smoke-induced emphysema model. Pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs may have more potent therapeutic effects than non-pretreated ASCs in emphysema mouse models. PMID:27765950

  17. Therapeutic effects of adipose-derived stem cells pretreated with pioglitazone in an emphysema mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoonki; Kim, You-Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-10-21

    There is no therapy currently available that influences the natural history of disease progression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although stem cell therapy is considered a potential therapeutic option in COPD, there are no clinical trials proving definitive therapeutic effects in patients with COPD. Recently, it was reported that pioglitazone might potentiate the therapeutic effects of stem cells in patients with heart or liver disease. To test the capacity of pioglitazone pretreatment of stem cells for emphysema repair, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of pioglitazone-pretreated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) on elastase-induced or cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in mice. We also investigated the mechanisms of action of pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs. Pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs had a more potent therapeutic effect than non-pretreated ASCs in the repair of both elastase-induced and smoke-induced emphysema models (mean linear intercept, 78.1±2.5 μm vs 83.2±2.6 μm in elastase models and 75.6±1.4 μm vs 80.5±3.2 μm in smoke models, P<0.05). Furthermore, we showed that pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production both in vitro and in mouse lungs in the smoke-induced emphysema model. Pioglitazone-pretreated ASCs may have more potent therapeutic effects than non-pretreated ASCs in emphysema mouse models.

  18. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  19. Effects of Cimicifugae Rhizoma on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Bo-Bae; Ko, Youngkyung; Jeong, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jun-Beom

    2017-01-01

    Cimicifugae Rhizoma, a herb with a long history of use in traditional Oriental medicine is reported to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-complement and anticancer effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Cimicifugae Rhizoma extracts on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human stem cells derived from gingiva. Stem cells derived from gingiva were grown in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma at final concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml. Cell proliferation analyses were performed at day 15. For osteogenic differentiation experiments, the stem cells were cultured in osteogenic media containing β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid-2-phosphate and dexamethasone, and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by analysis of osteocalcin expression at 21 days. For adipogenic differentiation experiments, the stem cells were grown in adipogenic induction medium, and the adipogenic differentiation was evaluated by analysis of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein at day 14. The cultures grown in the presence of 0.1 µg/ml Cimicifugae Rhizoma showed a significant increase in cellular proliferation at day 15 compared with the control group. The relative osteogenic differentiation in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma for the 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml groups was 171.5±13.7, 125.6±28.7 and 150.5±9.0, respectively, when that of the untreated control group on day 21 was considered to be 100%. The relative adipogenic differentiation at day 14 of the 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml groups in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma was 97.5±15.0, 102.9±12.8 and 87.0±6.8%, respectively when that of the untreated control group on day 14 was considered to be 100%. Within the limits of this study, Cimicifugae Rhizoma increased the proliferation of stem cells derived from the gingiva, and low concentrations of Cimicifugae Rhizoma may increase the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. PMID:28352313

  20. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Gong, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1) improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2) identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3) development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress. PMID:22399855

  1. Multipotent Stem Cell and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Khanlarkhani, Neda; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Najafi, Atefeh; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Sobhani, Aligholi

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing and undifferentiated cell types that can be differentiate into functional cells. Stem cells can be classified into two main types based on their source of origin: Embryonic and Adult stem cells. Stem cells also classified based on the range of differentiation potentials into Totipotent, Pluripotent, Multipotent, and Unipotent. Multipotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types within one particular lineage. There are plentiful advantages and usages for multipotent stem cells. Multipotent Stem cells act as a significant key in procedure of development, tissue repair, and protection. The accessibility and adaptability of these amazing cells create them a great therapeutic choice for different part of medical approaches, and it becomes interesting topic in the scientific researches to found obvious method for the most advantageous use of MSC-based therapies. Recent studies in the field of stem cell biology have provided new perspectives and opportunities for the treatment of infertility disorders.

  2. The effect of diabetes on the wound healing potential of adipose-tissue derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Yun Ho; Jun, Young Joon; Yoo, Gyeol; Rhie, Jong Won

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether diabetes mellitus affects the wound-healing-promoting potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells, we designed a wound-healing model using diabetic mice. We compared the degree of wound healing between wounds treated with normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells and wounds treated with diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells. We evaluated the wound-healing rate, the epithelial tongue distance, the area of granulation tissue, the number of capillary and the number of Ki-67-stained cells. The wound-healing rate was significantly higher in the normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells group than in the diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells group; it was also significantly higher in the normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells group than in the control group. Although the diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells group showed a better wound-healing rate than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. Similar trends were observed for the other parameters examined: re-epithelisation and keratinocyte proliferation; granulation tissue formation; and dermal regeneration. However, with regard to the number of capillary, diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells retained their ability to promote neovasculisation and angiogenesis. These results reflect the general impairment of the therapeutic potential of diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells in vivo.

  3. Effective elimination of liver cancer stem-like cells by CD90 antibody targeted thermosensitive magnetoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; An, Li Y.; Miao, Qin F.; Li, Feng M.; Han, Yong; Wang, Hui X.; Liu, Dang P.; Chen, Rong; Tang, Sha Q.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the use of thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TMs) loaded with magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and the anti-cancer stem cell marker CD90 (CD90@TMs) to target and kill CD90+ liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs). Methods The hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Huh7 was used to separate CD90+ LCSCs by magnetic-activated cell sorting. CD90@TMs was characterized and their ability to target CD90+ LCSCs was determined. Experiments were used to investigate whether CD90@TMs combined with magnetic hyperthermia could effectively eliminate CD90+ LCSCs. Results The present study demonstrated that CD90+ LCSCs with stem cells properties were successfully isolated. We also successfully prepared CD90@TMs that was almost spherical and uniform with an average diameter of 130±4.6 nm and determined that magnetic iron oxide could be incorporated and retained a superparamagnetic response. CD90@TMs showed good targeting and increased inhibition of CD90+ LCSCs in vitro and in vivo compared to TMs. Conclusion CD90@TMs can be used for controlled and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs, which may offer a promising alternative for HCC therapy. PMID:27145285

  4. Stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cottler-Fox, Michele H; Lapidot, Tsvee; Petit, Isabelle; Kollet, Orit; DiPersio, John F; Link, Dan; Devine, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Successful blood and marrow transplant (BMT), both autologous and allogeneic, requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) capable of homing to the marrow cavity and regenerating a full array of hematopoietic cell lineages in a timely fashion. At present, the most commonly used surrogate marker for HPCs is the cell surface marker CD34, identified in the clinical laboratory by flow cytometry. Clinical studies have shown that infusion of at least 2 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg recipient body weight results in reliable engraftment as measured by recovery of adequate neutrophil and platelet counts approximately 14 days after transplant. Recruitment of HPCs from the marrow into the blood is termed mobilization, or, more commonly, stem cell mobilization. In Section I, Dr. Tsvee Lapidot and colleagues review the wide range of factors influencing stem cell mobilization. Our current understanding focuses on chemokines, proteolytic enzymes, adhesion molecules, cytokines and stromal cell-stem cell interactions. On the basis of this understanding, new approaches to mobilization have been designed and are now starting to undergo clinical testing. In Section II, Dr. Michele Cottler-Fox describes factors predicting the ability to mobilize the older patient with myeloma. In addition, clinical approaches to improving collection by individualizing the timing of apheresis and adjusting the volume of blood processed to achieve a desired product are discussed. Key to this process is the daily enumeration of blood CD34(+) cells. Newer methods of enumerating and mobilizing autologous blood HPCs are discussed. In Section III, Dr. John DiPersio and colleagues provide data on clinical results of mobilizing allogeneic donors with G-CSF, GM-CSF and the combination of both as relates to the number and type of cells collected by apheresis. Newer methods of stem cell mobilization as well as the relationship of graft composition on immune reconstitution

  5. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  6. Effects of mesenchymal stem cell-derived cytokines on the functional properties of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kamprom, Witchayaporn; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Supokawej, Aungkura; Wattanapanitch, Methichit; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) is a potential source for cell therapy due to its property to promote tissue repair. Although, it has been known that hMSCs promote tissue repair via angiogenic cytokines, the interaction between hMSC-derived cytokines and the endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which play an important role in tissue neovascularization, is poorly characterized. We investigate the effect of cytokine released from different sources of hMSCs including bone marrow and gestational tissues on the EPC functions in vitro. The migration, extracellular matrix invasion and vessel formation of EPCs were studied in the presence or absence of cytokines released from various sources of hMSCs using transwell culture system. The migration of EPCs was highest when co-culture with secretory factors from placenta-derived hMSCs (PL-hMSCs) compared to those co-culture with other sources of hMSCs. For invasion and vessel formation, secretory factors from bone marrow-derived hMSCs (BM-hMSCs) could produce the maximal enhancement compared to other sources. We further identified the secreted cytokines and found that the migratory-enhancing cytokine from PL-hMSCs was PDGF-BB while the enhancing cytokine from BM-hMSCs on invasion was IGF-1. For vessel formation, the cytokines released from BM-hMSCs were IGF1 and SDF-1. In conclusion, hMSCs can release angiogenic cytokines which increase the migration, invasion and vessel forming capacity of EPCs. We can then use hMSCs as a source of angiogenic cytokines to induce neovascularization in injured/ischemic tissues.

  7. The effect of PVDF-TrFE scaffolds on stem cell derived cardiovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Hitscherich, Pamela; Wu, Siliang; Gordan, Richard; Xie, Lai-Hua; Arinzeh, Treena; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-07-01

    Recently, electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) scaffolds have been developed for tissue engineering applications. These materials have piezoelectric activity, wherein they can generate electric charge with minute mechanical deformations. Since the myocardium is an electroactive tissue, the unique feature of a piezoelectric scaffold is attractive for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. In this study, we examined the cytocompatibility and function of pluripotent stem cell derived cardiovascular cells including mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mES-CM) and endothelial cells (mES-EC) on PVDF-TrFE scaffolds. MES-CM and mES-EC adhered well to PVDF-TrFE and became highly aligned along the fibers. When cultured on scaffolds, mES-CM spontaneously contracted, exhibited well-registered sarcomeres and expressed classic cardiac specific markers such as myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, and connexin43. Moreover, mES-CM cultured on PVDF-TrFE scaffolds responded to exogenous electrical pacing and exhibited intracellular calcium handling behavior similar to that of mES-CM cultured in 2D. Similar to cardiomyocytes, mES-EC also demonstrated high viability and maintained a mature phenotype through uptake of low-density lipoprotein and expression of classic endothelial cell markers including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and the arterial specific marker, Notch-1. This study demonstrates the feasibility of PVDF-TrFE scaffold as a candidate material for developing engineered cardiovascular tissues utilizing stem cell-derived cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1577-1585. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of Cimicifugae Rhizoma on the morphology and viability of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, SU-HYEON; LEE, JI-EUN; KIM, BO-BAE; KO, YOUNGKYUNG; PARK, JUN-BEOM

    2015-01-01

    Cimicifugae Rhizoma is a traditional herbal medicine used to treat various diseases in Korea, China and Japan. Cimicifugae Rhizoma is primarily derived from Cimicifuga heracleifolia Komarov or Cimicifuga foetida Linnaeus. Cimicifugae Rhizoma has been used as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic remedy. The present study was performed to evaluate the extracts of Cimicifugae Rhizoma on the morphology and viability of human stem cells derived from gingiva. Stem cells derived from gingiva were grown in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma at final concentrations that ranged from 0.001 to 1,000 µg/ml. The morphology of the cells was viewed under an inverted microscope and the analysis of cell proliferation was performed using a Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Under an optical microscope, the control cells exhibited a spindle-shaped, fibroblast-like morphology. The shapes of the cells in the groups treated with 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml Cimicifugae Rhizoma were similar to the shapes in the control group. Significant alterations in morphology were noted in the 100 and 1,000 µg/ml groups when compared with the control group. The cells in the 100 and 1,000 µg/ml groups were rounder, and fewer cells were present. The cultures that were grown in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma at a concentration of 0.001 µg/ml on day 1 had an increased CCK-8 value. The cultures grown in the presence of Cimicifugae Rhizoma at a concentration of 10 µg/ml on day 7 had a reduced CCK-8 value. Within the limits of this study, Cimicifugae Rhizoma influenced the viability of stem cells derived from the gingiva, and its direct application onto oral tissues may have adverse effects at high concentrations. The concentration and application time of Cimicifugae Rhizoma should be meticulously controlled to obtain optimal results. PMID:26622366

  9. Differential effect of water-soluble chitin on collagen synthesis of human bone marrow stem cells and human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Yon; Park, Jung-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Park, Wonse; Jeon, Dong-Won; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) represent a promising regenerative material because of their mutipotency, including their ability to regenerate collagenous soft tissues. We previously found that water-soluble chitin (WSC) enhances the ability of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) to synthesize collagen tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WSC on hBMSCs and hPDLSCs for the collagen synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. hBMSCs and hPDLSCs were isolated and expanded with or without 0.3 mg/mL WSC. A series of in vitro and in vivo analyses were performed to evaluate their characteristics as stem cell populations. Then, collagen and hydroxyproline assays were conducted using both in vitro and in vivo assay models, and the real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the expression of collagen-related markers. WSC-treated and nontreated hBMSCs and hPDLSCs were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, and histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were conducted after 8 weeks. The in vitro results showed that those cells possessed the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. The amount of soluble collagen synthesized was significantly greater in WSC-treated hBMSCs than in the nontreated group; conversely, treatment of hPDLSCs with WSC decreased the formation of soluble collagen. The amount of insoluble collagen synthesized was greater in the WSC-treated groups than in the nontreated groups for both hBMSCs and hPDLSCs. The hydroxyproline contents of the regenerated soluble and insoluble collagens were similar. The expressions of mRNA for collagen types I-V, hyaluronic acid synthase 1 (HAS1), HAS2, and HAS3, and the LOX family were higher in WSC-treated hPDLSCs than in the nontreated group, whereas WSC increased the expression of collagen type III and decreased that of collagen type I in hBMSCs. The histology and immunohistochemistry results revealed that WSC significantly increased the amount of collagen

  10. Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    The Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit, held in New York, included topics covering new commercial developments in the research field of stem cell-based therapies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on embryonic and adult stem cells, stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of orthopedic and cardiovascular indications and inflammatory diseases, as well as technologies for processing and storing stem cells. Investigational therapies discussed include placental expanded (PLX) cells (Pluristem Therapeutics Inc), StemEx (Gamida-Teva Joint Venture/Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd) and remestemcel-L (Osiris Therapeutics Inc/Genzyme Corp/JCR Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd/ Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd).

  11. Effects of heat shock on survival, proliferation and differentiation of mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Masahiro; Suzuki, Asami; Nakayama, Takashi; Akama, Kuniko; Watanabe, Masaru; Inoue, Nobuo

    2014-02-01

    Hyperthermia during pregnancy is a significant cause of reproductive problems ranging from abortion to congenital defects of the central nervous system (CNS), including neural tube defects and microcephaly. Neural stem cells (NSCs) can proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia, playing a key role in the formation of the CNS. Here, we examined the effects of heat shock on homogeneous proliferating NSCs derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. After heat shock at 42 °C for 20 min, the proliferating NSCs continued to proliferate, although subtle changes were observed in gene expression and cell survival and proliferation. In contrast, heat shock at 43 °C caused a variety of responses: the up-regulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSP), induction of apoptosis, temporal inhibition of cell proliferation and retardation of differentiation. Finally, effects of heat shock at 44 °C were severe, with almost all cells disappearing and the remaining cells losing the capacity to proliferate and differentiate. These temperature-dependent effects of heat shock on NSCs may be valuable in elucidating the mechanisms by which hyperthermia during pregnancy causes various reproductive problems.

  12. Effects of inflorescence stem structure and cell wall components on the mechanical strength of inflorescence stem in herbaceous peony.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Han, Chenxia; Tao, Jun; Wang, Jing; Hao, Zhaojun; Geng, Qingping; Du, Bei

    2012-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is a traditional famous flower, but its poor inflorescence stem quality seriously constrains the development of the cut flower. Mechanical strength is an important characteristic of stems, which not only affects plant lodging, but also plays an important role in stem bend or break. In this paper, the mechanical strength, morphological indices and microstructure of P. lactiflora development inflorescence stems were measured and observed. The results showed that the mechanical strength of inflorescence stems gradually increased, and that the diameter of inflorescence stem was a direct indicator in estimating mechanical strength. Simultaneously, with the development of inflorescence stem, the number of vascular bundles increased, the vascular bundle was arranged more densely, the sclerenchyma cell wall thickened, and the proportion of vascular bundle and pith also increased. On this basis, cellulose and lignin contents were determined, PlCesA3, PlCesA6 and PlCCoAOMT were isolated and their expression patterns were examined including PlPAL. The results showed that cellulose was not strictly correlated with the mechanical strength of inflorescence stem, and lignin had a significant impact on it. In addition, PlCesA3 and PlCesA6 were not key members in cellulose synthesis of P. lactiflora and their functions were also different, but PlPAL and PlCCoAOMT regulated the lignin synthesis of P. lactiflora. These data indicated that PlPAL and PlCCoAOMT could be applied to improve the mechanical strength of P. lactiflora inflorescence stem in genetic engineering.

  13. Effects of Inflorescence Stem Structure and Cell Wall Components on the Mechanical Strength of Inflorescence Stem in Herbaceous Peony

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Daqiu; Han, Chenxia; Tao, Jun; Wang, Jing; Hao, Zhaojun; Geng, Qingping; Du, Bei

    2012-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is a traditional famous flower, but its poor inflorescence stem quality seriously constrains the development of the cut flower. Mechanical strength is an important characteristic of stems, which not only affects plant lodging, but also plays an important role in stem bend or break. In this paper, the mechanical strength, morphological indices and microstructure of P. lactiflora development inflorescence stems were measured and observed. The results showed that the mechanical strength of inflorescence stems gradually increased, and that the diameter of inflorescence stem was a direct indicator in estimating mechanical strength. Simultaneously, with the development of inflorescence stem, the number of vascular bundles increased, the vascular bundle was arranged more densely, the sclerenchyma cell wall thickened, and the proportion of vascular bundle and pith also increased. On this basis, cellulose and lignin contents were determined, PlCesA3, PlCesA6 and PlCCoAOMT were isolated and their expression patterns were examined including PlPAL. The results showed that cellulose was not strictly correlated with the mechanical strength of inflorescence stem, and lignin had a significant impact on it. In addition, PlCesA3 and PlCesA6 were not key members in cellulose synthesis of P. lactiflora and their functions were also different, but PlPAL and PlCCoAOMT regulated the lignin synthesis of P. lactiflora. These data indicated that PlPAL and PlCCoAOMT could be applied to improve the mechanical strength of P. lactiflora inflorescence stem in genetic engineering. PMID:22606025

  14. Biological effects and mechanisms of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhixian; Pan, Xinghua; Zhou, Kaihua; Bi, Hong; Wang, Liyan; Yu, Lu; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most frequent chronic respiratory disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, worldwide. Given that the foremost risk factor leading to the development of COPD is cigarette smoke, the initial treatment for COPD is smoking cessation. Even after smoking cessation, inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress can persist and continue to contribute to COPD. Although current therapies for COPD (which are primarily based on anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids, theophylline and bronchodilators) reduce airway obstruction, limit COPD exacerbation and improve the patient's health-related quality-of-life, none can prevent disease progression or reduce mortality. Recent advances in stem cell research have provided novel insight into the potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of several pulmonary diseases. This review article discusses the biological effects and mechanisms of action of MSC transplantation in COPD, and highlights the foundation that MSCs provide for novel therapeutic approaches in COPD.

  15. Monitoring the effect of mechanical stress on mesenchymal stem cell collagen production by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Li, Tsung-Hsien; Liu, Yuan; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Tissue engineering is emerging as a promising method for repairing damaged tissues. Due to cartilage's common wear and injury, in vitro production of cartilage replacements have been an active area of research. Finding the optimal condition for the generation of the collagen matrix is crucial in reproducing cartilages that closely match those found in human. Using multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy we monitored the effect of mechanical stress on mesenchymal stem cell collagen production. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the form of pellets were cultured and periodically placed under different mechanical stress by centrifugation over a period of four weeks. The differently stressed samples were imaged several times during the four week period, and the collagen production under different mechanical stress is characterized.

  16. Aging and Replicative Senescence Have Related Effects on Human Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Bork, Simone; Horn, Patrick; Krunic, Damir; Walenda, Thomas; Diehlmann, Anke; Benes, Vladimir; Blake, Jonathon; Huber, Franz-Xaver; Eckstein, Volker; Boukamp, Petra; Ho, Anthony D.

    2009-01-01

    The regenerative potential diminishes with age and this has been ascribed to functional impairments of adult stem cells. Cells in culture undergo senescence after a certain number of cell divisions whereby the cells enlarge and finally stop proliferation. This observation of replicative senescence has been extrapolated to somatic stem cells in vivo and might reflect the aging process of the whole organism. In this study we have analyzed the effect of aging on gene expression profiles of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC). MSC were isolated from bone marrow of donors between 21 and 92 years old. 67 genes were age-induced and 60 were age-repressed. HPC were isolated from cord blood or from mobilized peripheral blood of donors between 27 and 73 years and 432 genes were age-induced and 495 were age-repressed. The overlap of age-associated differential gene expression in HPC and MSC was moderate. However, it was striking that several age-related gene expression changes in both MSC and HPC were also differentially expressed upon replicative senescence of MSC in vitro. Especially genes involved in genomic integrity and regulation of transcription were age-repressed. Although telomerase activity and telomere length varied in HPC particularly from older donors, an age-dependent decline was not significant arguing against telomere exhaustion as being causal for the aging phenotype. These studies have demonstrated that aging causes gene expression changes in human MSC and HPC that vary between the two different cell types. Changes upon aging of MSC and HPC are related to those of replicative senescence of MSC in vitro and this indicates that our stem and progenitor cells undergo a similar process also in vivo. PMID:19513108

  17. Aging and replicative senescence have related effects on human stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Bork, Simone; Horn, Patrick; Krunic, Damir; Walenda, Thomas; Diehlmann, Anke; Benes, Vladimir; Blake, Jonathon; Huber, Franz-Xaver; Eckstein, Volker; Boukamp, Petra; Ho, Anthony D

    2009-06-09

    The regenerative potential diminishes with age and this has been ascribed to functional impairments of adult stem cells. Cells in culture undergo senescence after a certain number of cell divisions whereby the cells enlarge and finally stop proliferation. This observation of replicative senescence has been extrapolated to somatic stem cells in vivo and might reflect the aging process of the whole organism. In this study we have analyzed the effect of aging on gene expression profiles of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC). MSC were isolated from bone marrow of donors between 21 and 92 years old. 67 genes were age-induced and 60 were age-repressed. HPC were isolated from cord blood or from mobilized peripheral blood of donors between 27 and 73 years and 432 genes were age-induced and 495 were age-repressed. The overlap of age-associated differential gene expression in HPC and MSC was moderate. However, it was striking that several age-related gene expression changes in both MSC and HPC were also differentially expressed upon replicative senescence of MSC in vitro. Especially genes involved in genomic integrity and regulation of transcription were age-repressed. Although telomerase activity and telomere length varied in HPC particularly from older donors, an age-dependent decline was not significant arguing against telomere exhaustion as being causal for the aging phenotype. These studies have demonstrated that aging causes gene expression changes in human MSC and HPC that vary between the two different cell types. Changes upon aging of MSC and HPC are related to those of replicative senescence of MSC in vitro and this indicates that our stem and progenitor cells undergo a similar process also in vivo.

  18. Xenobiotic effects on intestinal stem cell proliferation in adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L) workers.

    PubMed

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R; Fahrbach, Susan E; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species.

  19. Xenobiotic Effects on Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Adult Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R.; Fahrbach, Susan E.; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species. PMID:24608542

  20. Effect of Corilagin on the Proliferation and NF-κB in U251 Glioblastoma Cells and U251 Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Tao; Li, Gen-Hua; Li, Zheng-You; Feng, Song; Liu, Xue-Qin; Han, Guang-Kui; Zhang, Hao; Qin, Xian-Yun; Zhang, Ran; Nie, Quan-Min; Jin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study is to explore the effect of corilagin on the proliferation and NF-κB signaling pathway in U251 glioblastoma cells and U251 glioblastoma stem-like cells. Methods. CD133 positive U251 glioblastoma cells were separated by immunomagnetic beads to isolate glioblastoma stem-like cells. U251 cells and stem-like cells were intervened by different corilagin concentrations (0, 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL) for 48 h, respectively. Cell morphology, cell counting kit-8 assay, flow cytometry, dual luciferase reporter assay, and a western blot were used to detect and analyze the cell proliferation and cell cycle and investigate the expression of IKBα protein in cytoplasm and NF-κB/p65 in nucleus. Results. Corilagin inhibited the cell proliferation of U251 cells and their stem-like cells and the inhibition role was stronger in U251 stem-like cells (P < 0.05). The cell cycle was arrested at G2/M phase in the U251 cells following corilagin intervention; the proportion of cells in G2/M phase increased as the concentration of corilagin increased (P < 0.05). The U251 stem-like cells were arrested at the S phase following treatment with corilagin; the proportion of cells in the S phase increased as the concentration of corilagin increased (P < 0.05). The ratio of dual luciferase activities of U251 stem-like cells was lower than that of U251 cells in the same corilagin concentration. With increasing concentrations of corilagin, the IKBα expression in cytoplasm of U251 cells and U251 stem-like cells was increased, but the p65 expression in nucleus of U251 cells and U251 stem-like cells was decreased (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Corilagin can inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and glioblastoma stem-like cells; the inhibition on glioblastoma stem-like cell proliferation is stronger than glioblastoma cells. This different result indicates that the effect of corilagin on U251 cells and U251 stem-like cells may have close relationships with mechanism of cell

  1. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants A A A What's in this article? ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  2. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  3. Effect of heparin on the biological properties and molecular signature of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ling; Camilleri, Emily T; Helledie, Torben; Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Titmarsh, Drew M; Chua, Ren Jie; Dreesen, Oliver; Dombrowski, Christian; Rider, David A; Galindo, Mario; Lee, Ian; Hong, Wanjin; Hui, James H; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cool, Simon M

    2016-01-15

    Chronic use of heparin as an anti-coagulant for the treatment of thrombosis or embolism invokes many adverse systemic events including thrombocytopenia, vascular reactions and osteoporosis. Here, we addressed whether adverse effects might also be directed to mesenchymal stem cells that reside in the bone marrow compartment. Harvested human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were exposed to varying doses of heparin and their responses profiled. At low doses (<200 ng/ml), serial passaging with heparin exerted a variable effect on hMSC proliferation and multipotentiality across multiple donors, while at higher doses (≥ 100 μg/ml), heparin supplementation inhibited cell growth and increased both senescence and cell size. Gene expression profiling using cDNA arrays and RNA-seq analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of low-dose heparin on signaling pathways essential to hMSC growth and differentiation (including the TGFβ/BMP superfamily, FGFs, and Wnts). Cells serially passaged in low-dose heparin possess a donor-dependent gene signature that reflects their altered phenotype. Our data indicate that heparin supplementation during the culturing of hMSCs can alter their biological properties, even at low doses. This warrants caution in the application of heparin as a culture supplement for the ex vivo expansion of hMSCs. It also highlights the need for careful evaluation of the bone marrow compartment in patients receiving chronic heparin treatment.

  4. Effect of heparin on the biological properties and molecular signature of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ling; Camilleri, Emily T.; Helledie, Torben; Samsonraj, Rebekah M.; Titmarsh, Drew M.; Chua, Ren Jie; Dreesen, Oliver; Dombrowski, Christian; Rider, David A.; Galindo, Mario; Lee, Ian; Hong, Wanjin; Hui, James H.; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Cool, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic use of heparin as an anti-coagulant for the treatment of thrombosis or embolism invokes many adverse systemic events including thrombocytopenia, vascular reactions and osteoporosis. Here, we addressed whether adverse effects might also be directed to mesenchymal stem cells that reside in the bone marrow compartment. Harvested human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were exposed to varying doses of heparin and their responses profiled. At low doses (<200 ng/ml), serial passaging with heparin exerted a variable effect on hMSC proliferation and multipotentiality across multiple donors, while at higher doses (≥100 µg/ml), heparin supplementation inhibited cell growth and increased both senescence and cell size. Gene expression profiling using cDNA arrays and RNA-seq analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of low-dose heparin on signaling pathways essential to hMSC growth and differentiation (including the TGFβ/BMP superfamily, FGFs, and Wnts). Cells serially passaged in low-dose heparin possess a donor-dependent gene signature that reflects their altered phenotype. Our data indicate that heparin supplementation during the culturing of hMSCs can alter their biological properties, even at low doses. This warrants caution in the application of heparin as a culture supplement for the ex vivo expansion of hMSCs. It also highlights the need for careful evaluation of the bone marrow compartment in patients receiving chronic heparin treatment. PMID:26484394

  5. Evaluation of Late Effects of Heavy-Ion Radiation on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S.R.; Behravesh, E.; Huff, J.L.; Johnson, F.

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective of this recently funded study is to utilize well-characterized model test systems to assess the impact of pluripotent stem cell differentiation on biological effects associated with high-energy charged particle radiation. These stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have the potential for differentiation into bone, cartilage, fat, tendons, and other tissue types. The characterization of the regulation mechanisms of MSC differentiation to the osteoblastic lineage by transcription factors, such as Runx2/Cbfa1 and Osterix, and osteoinductive proteins such as members of the bone morphogenic protein family are well established. More importantly, for late biological effects, MSCs have been shown to contribute to tissue restructuring and repair after tissue injury. The complex regulation of and interactions between inflammation and repair determine the eventual outcome of the responses to tissue injury, for which MSCs play a crucial role. Additionally, MSCs have been shown to respond to reactive oxygen species, a secondary effector of radiation, by differentiating. With this, we hypothesized that differentiation of MSCs can alter or exacerbate the damage initiated by radiation, which can ultimately lead to late biological effects of misrepair/fibrosis which may ultimately lead to carcinogenesis. Currently, studies are underway to examine high-energy X-ray radiation at low and high doses, approximately 20 and 200 Rad, respectively, on cytogenetic damage and gene modulation of isolated MSCs. These cells, positive for MSC surface markers, were obtained from three persons. In vitro cell samples were harvested during cellular proliferation and after both cellular recovery and differentiation. Future work will use established in vitro models of increasing complexity to examine the value of traditional 2D tissue-culture techniques, and utilize 3D in vitro tissue culture techniques that can better assess late effects associated with

  6. [Stem cell colloquy: conclusion].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, Maurice

    2002-10-01

    The stem cell data presented and discussed during the symposium raise the hope that important medical progress can be made in several fields: neuro-degenerative diseases, those linked to cellular deficit, some aspects of aging linked to cellular degeneration, and the treatment of cancers that may harm normal tissues at risk of being infiltrated by malignant cells. Three main types of stem cells are available. (i) Those present in normal adult tissue: contrary to what was believed, some data suggest that certain adult stem cells have a great plasticity (they can differentiate into cells different from those in tissues from which they were taken) and can proliferate in vitro without losing their properties. Nevertheless, their use faces several obstacles: in ill or elderly subjects, then these cells can be limited in number or not multiply well in vitro. In this case, auto-grafting of the cells cannot be used. They must be sought in another subject, and allo-grafting causes difficult and sometimes insoluble problems of immunological tolerance. (ii) Embryonic stem cells from surplus human embryos, obtained by in vitro fertilisation, which the parents decide not to use: these cells have a great potential for proliferation and differentiation, but can also encounter problems of immunological intolerance. (iii) Cells obtained from cell nuclear transfer in oocytes: these cells are well tolerated, since they are genetically and immunologically identical to those of the host. All types of stem cells can be obtained with them. However, they do present problems. For obtaining them, female oocytes are needed, which could lead to their commercialization. Moreover, the first steps for obtaining these cells are identical to those used in reproductive cloning. It therefore appears that each type of cell raises difficult scientific and practical problems. More research is needed to overcome these obstacles and to determine which type of stem cell constitutes the best solution for

  7. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

    PubMed

    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM) 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM) 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  8. Effect of Antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on Human Embryonic Stem Cells Undifferentiated Status, Pluripotency, Cell Viability and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of PlasmocinTM and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days PlasmocinTM 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with PlasmocinTM 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that PlasmocinTM and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal. PMID:23936178

  9. Effects of hypergravity on adipose-derived stem cell morphology, mechanical property and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Tavakolinejad, Alireza; Rabbani, Mohsen; Janmaleki, Mohsen

    2015-08-21

    Alteration in specific inertial conditions can lead to changes in morphology, proliferation, mechanical properties and cytoskeleton of cells. In this report, the effects of hypergravity on morphology of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) are indicated. ADSCs were repeatedly exposed to discontinuous hypergravity conditions of 10 g, 20 g, 40 g and 60 g by utilizing centrifuge (three times of 20 min exposure, with an interval of 40 min at 1 g). Cell morphology in terms of length, width and cell elongation index and cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules were analyzed by image processing. Consistent changes observed in cell elongation index as morphological change. Moreover, cell proliferation was assessed and mechanical properties of cells in case of elastic modulus of cells were evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy. Increase in proliferation and decrease in elastic modulus of cells are further results of this study. Staining ADSC was done to show changes in cytoskeleton of the cells associated to hypergravity condition specifically in microfilament and microtubule components. After exposing to hypergravity, significant changes were observed in microfilaments and microtubule density as components of cytoskeleton. It was concluded that there could be a relationship between changes in morphology and MFs as the main component of the cells. - Highlights: • Hypergravity (10 g, 20 g, 40 g and 60 g) affects on adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs). • ADSCs after exposure to the hypergravity are more slender. • The height of ADSCs increases in all test groups comparing their control group. • Hypergravity decreases ADSCs modulus of elasticity and cell actin fiber content. • Hypergravity enhances proliferation rate of ADSCs.

  10. Neural stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parati, E A; Pozzi, S; Ottolina, A; Onofrj, M; Bez, A; Pagano, S F

    2004-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells are present in the majority of mammalian tissues where they are a renewable source of specialized cells. According to the several biological portions from which multipotent stem cells can be derived, they are characterized as a) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from the pluripotent inner-cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyste-stage embryo; b) multipotent fetal stem cells (FSCs) from aborted fetuses; and c) adult stem cells (ASCs) localized in small zones of several organs known as "niche" where a subset of tissue cells and extracellular substrates can indefinitely house one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny production in vivo. ECSs have an high self-renewing capacity, plasticity and pluripotency over the years. Pluripotency is a property that makes a stem cell able to give rise to all cell type found in the embryo and adult animals.

  11. The Effect of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Vitamin D3 Induced Monocytic Differentiation of U937 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Molaeipour, Zahra; Shamsasanjan, Karim; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbari; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Sabaghi, Fatemeh; Saleh, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key components of the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) niche. They control the process of hematopoiesis by secreting regulatory cytokines, growth factors and expression of important cell adhesion molecules for cell-tocell interactions. In this research, we have investigated the effect of bone marrow derived MSCs on monocytic differentiation of U937 cells line. Methods: U937 cells were cultured in both direct co-culture with MSCs and MSCs conditioned medium (C.M) driven. This study used 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(VitD3) as inductor of monocytic differentiation and U937 cells treated with VitD3 morphology was examined by Wright Giemsa staining. CD14 monocytic differentiation marker was measured by flow cytometry and monocytic gene expression was assessed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR). Results: The results of flow cytometric analysis showed that CD14 expression of U937 increased. The higher effect of MSCs co-culture on CD14 expression in U937 cells was observed, compared to the conditioned medium. Among ten monocytic related genes which were screened that was observed increase in 5 genes in which CXCR4 and CSF2RA showed significant increase. Conclusion: The results obtained show that MSCs have supportive effect on the monocytic differentiation of U937 cells. However, a distinct mechanism of that remains unclear. PMID:27123414

  12. Stem Cells and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent findings in stem cell biology have resulted in new opportunities for the treatment of reproductive disease. Endometrial regeneration can be driven by bone marrow derived stem cells. This finding has potential implications for the treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the etiology of endometriosis. The ovaries have been shown to contain stem cells that form oocytes in adults and can be cultured in vitro to develop mature oocytes. Stem cells from the fetus have been demonstrated to lead to microchimerism in the mother and implicated in several maternal diseases. Additionally the placenta may be another source of hematopoietic stem cell. Finally endometrial derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into non-reproductive tissues. While we are just beginning to understand stem cells and many key questions remain, the potential advantages of stem cells in reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:19208782

  13. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; ...

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicatesmore » minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.« less

  14. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-01

    We report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. We propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression. PMID:23378916

  15. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim O.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  16. Adverse Late and Long-Term Treatment Effects in Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Kara

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become the standard of care for many malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases that don't respond to traditional therapy. There are two types: autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT), in which an individual's stem cells are collected, stored, and infused back into that person; and allogeneic transplantation (allo-HSCT), in which healthy donor stem cells are infused into a recipient whose bone marrow has been damaged or destroyed. There have been numerous advancements in this field, leading to marked increases in the number of transplants performed annually. This article--the first of several on cancer survivorship--focuses on the care of adult allo-HSCT survivors because of the greater complexity of their posttransplant course. The author summarizes potential adverse late and long-term treatment-related effects, with special focus on the evaluation and management of several cardiovascular disease risk factors that can occur either independently or concurrently as part of the metabolic syndrome. These risk factors are potentially modifiable with appropriate nursing interventions and lifestyle modifications.

  17. [Effects of different culture system of isolating and passage of sheep embryonic stem-like cells].

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Liu, Chousheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xinzhuang

    2008-07-01

    In this research, we use mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder layers. To eliminate the influence of serum and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditioned medium (ESCCM) on self-renewal of sheep embryonic stem-like cells, knockout serum replacement (KSR) was used to replace serum, then supplanted with ESCCM for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells. We found when inner cell masses (ICMs) cultured in the control group with medium supplanted with fetal bovine serum (FBS), sheep ES-like cells could not survive for more than 3 passages. However, sheep embryonic stem-like cells could remain undifferentiated for 5 passages when cultured in the medium that FBS was substituted by KSR. The result indicates that KSR culture system was more suitable for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells compared to FBS culture system. Finally we applied medium with 15% KSR as basic medium supplanted with 40% ESCCM as a new culture system to isolate sheep embryonic stem-like cells, we found one embryonic stem-like cell line still maintained undifferentiating for 8 passages, which characterized with a normal and stable karyotype and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that it is suitable to culture sheep ICM in the new culture system with 15% KSR as basic medium and supplanted with 40% ESCCM, which indicated that mouse ES cells might secrete factors playing important roles in promoting sheep ES-like cells' self-renewal.

  18. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  19. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  20. Anti-tumoral effect of desmethylclomipramine in lung cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Giacobbe, Arianna; Compagnone, Mirco; Eramo, Adriana; De Maria, Ruggero; Peschiaroli, Angelo; Melino, Gerry

    2015-07-10

    Lung cancer is the most feared of all cancers because of its heterogeneity and resistance to available treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cell population responsible for lung cancer chemoresistance and are a very good model for testing new targeted therapies. Clomipramine is an FDA-approved antidepressant drug, able to inhibit in vitro the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch and potentiate the pro-apoptotic effects of DNA damaging induced agents in several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI), the active metabolite of Clomipramine, on the CSCs homeostasis. We show that DCMI inhibits lung CSCs growth, decreases their stemness potential and increases the cytotoxic effect of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Being DCMI an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, we also verified the effect of Itch deregulation on CSCs survival. We found that the siRNA-mediated depletion of Itch induces similar anti-proliferative effects on lung CSCs, suggesting that DCMI might exert its effect, at least in part, by inhibiting Itch. Notably, Itch expression is a negative prognostic factor in two primary lung tumors datasets, supporting the potential clinical relevance of Itch inhibition to circumvent drug resistance in the treatment of lung cancer.

  1. Anti-tumoral effect of desmethylclomipramine in lung cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Giacobbe, Arianna; Compagnone, Mirco; Eramo, Adriana; De Maria, Ruggero; Peschiaroli, Angelo; Melino, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most feared of all cancers because of its heterogeneity and resistance to available treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cell population responsible for lung cancer chemoresistance and are a very good model for testing new targeted therapies. Clomipramine is an FDA-approved antidepressant drug, able to inhibit in vitro the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch and potentiate the pro-apoptotic effects of DNA damaging induced agents in several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI), the active metabolite of Clomipramine, on the CSCs homeostasis. We show that DCMI inhibits lung CSCs growth, decreases their stemness potential and increases the cytotoxic effect of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Being DCMI an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, we also verified the effect of Itch deregulation on CSCs survival. We found that the siRNA-mediated depletion of Itch induces similar anti-proliferative effects on lung CSCs, suggesting that DCMI might exert its effect, at least in part, by inhibiting Itch. Notably, Itch expression is a negative prognostic factor in two primary lung tumors datasets, supporting the potential clinical relevance of Itch inhibition to circumvent drug resistance in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26219257

  2. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravana Kumar Sampath; Perumal, Saraswathi; Rajagopalan, Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% confluence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intravenous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacrificed for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions. PMID:25422634

  3. Cancer Stem Cell Theory and the Warburg Effect, Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Nicola; Borziani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 100 years, many studies have been performed to determine the biochemical and histopathological phenomena that mark the origin of neoplasms. At the end of the last century, the leading paradigm, which is currently well rooted, considered the origin of neoplasms to be a set of genetic and/or epigenetic mutations, stochastic and independent in a single cell, or rather, a stochastic monoclonal pattern. However, in the last 20 years, two important areas of research have underlined numerous limitations and incongruities of this pattern, the hypothesis of the so-called cancer stem cell theory and a revaluation of several alterations in metabolic networks that are typical of the neoplastic cell, the so-called Warburg effect. Even if this specific “metabolic sign” has been known for more than 85 years, only in the last few years has it been given more attention; therefore, the so-called Warburg hypothesis has been used in multiple and independent surveys. Based on an accurate analysis of a series of considerations and of biophysical thermodynamic events in the literature, we will demonstrate a homogeneous pattern of the cancer stem cell theory, of the Warburg hypothesis and of the stochastic monoclonal pattern; this pattern could contribute considerably as the first basis of the development of a new uniform theory on the origin of neoplasms. Thus, a new possible epistemological paradigm is represented; this paradigm considers the Warburg effect as a specific “metabolic sign” reflecting the stem origin of the neoplastic cell, where, in this specific metabolic order, an essential reason for the genetic instability that is intrinsic to the neoplastic cell is defined. PMID:24857919

  4. Cancer stem cell theory and the warburg effect, two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Pacini, Nicola; Borziani, Fabio

    2014-05-19

    Over the last 100 years, many studies have been performed to determine the biochemical and histopathological phenomena that mark the origin of neoplasms. At the end of the last century, the leading paradigm, which is currently well rooted, considered the origin of neoplasms to be a set of genetic and/or epigenetic mutations, stochastic and independent in a single cell, or rather, a stochastic monoclonal pattern. However, in the last 20 years, two important areas of research have underlined numerous limitations and incongruities of this pattern, the hypothesis of the so-called cancer stem cell theory and a revaluation of several alterations in metabolic networks that are typical of the neoplastic cell, the so-called Warburg effect. Even if this specific "metabolic sign" has been known for more than 85 years, only in the last few years has it been given more attention; therefore, the so-called Warburg hypothesis has been used in multiple and independent surveys. Based on an accurate analysis of a series of considerations and of biophysical thermodynamic events in the literature, we will demonstrate a homogeneous pattern of the cancer stem cell theory, of the Warburg hypothesis and of the stochastic monoclonal pattern; this pattern could contribute considerably as the first basis of the development of a new uniform theory on the origin of neoplasms. Thus, a new possible epistemological paradigm is represented; this paradigm considers the Warburg effect as a specific "metabolic sign" reflecting the stem origin of the neoplastic cell, where, in this specific metabolic order, an essential reason for the genetic instability that is intrinsic to the neoplastic cell is defined.

  5. Paracrine effect of CXCR4-overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells on ischemic heart injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Zheng; Li, Ying-Lan; Huang, Wei; Cai, Wen-Feng; Liang, Jialiang; Paul, Christian; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Meifeng; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yigang

    2017-03-01

    It has been reported that CXCR4-overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC(CX4) ) can repair heart tissue post myocardial infarction. This study aims to investigate the MSCCX4-derived paracrine cardio-protective signaling in the presence of myocardial infarction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were divided into 3 groups: MSC only, MSC(CX4) , and CXCR4 gene-specific siRNA-transduced MSC. Mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to hypoxia, and then MSCs-conditioned culture medium was incubated with neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes, respectively. Cell proliferation-regulating genes were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In vitro: The number of cardiomyocytes undergoing DNA synthesis, cytokinesis, and mitosis was increased to a greater extent in MSC(CX4) medium-treated group than control group, while this proproliferative effect was reduced in CXCR4 gene-specific siRNA-transduced MSC-treated cells. Accordingly, the maximal enhancement of vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclin 2, and transforming growth factor-β2 was observed in hypoxia-exposed MSC(CX4) . In vivo: MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and engrafted into injured myocardium in rats. The number of EGFP and CD31 positive cells in the MSC(CX4) group was significantly increased than other 2 groups, associated with the reduced left ventricular (LV) fibrosis, the increased LV free wall thickness, the enhanced angiogenesis, and the improved contractile function. CXCR4 overexpression can mobilize MSCs into ischemic area, whereby these cells can promoted angiogenesis and alleviate LV remodeling via paracrine signaling mechanism.

  6. Protective effects of HGF gene-expressing human mesenchymal stem cells in acetaminophen-treated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Ho; You, Dong Hun; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) secrete a great variety of cytokines that have beneficial paracrine actions. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes proliferation in several cell types. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of HGF gene-transfected MSC (HGF-MSC) in acetaminophen (AAP)-treated hepatocytes. We transfected the HGF gene into MSCs and confirmed HGF expression by RT-PCR and western blot. The concentration of HGF in HGF-MSC conditioned media (HGFCM) was upregulated compared with that in control MSCCM samples. Cell viability was increased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. Expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptosis protein, was increased and expression of pro-apoptosis proteins (Bad, Bik and Bid) was decreased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. HGF-MSC had protective effects on AAP-induced hepatocyte damage by enhancing proliferation. These results suggest that HGF-expressing MSCs may provide regenerative potential for liver cell damage.

  7. Effect of sertraline on proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Jahromi, Maliheh; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs are commonly employed for anxiety and mood disorders. Sertraline is extensively used as antidepressant in clinic. In addition, adipose tissue represents an abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may be useful for autologous transplantation. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we assessed the effect of antidepressant drug Sertraline on the proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs using MTT assay and immunofluorescence technique respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that 0.5 μM Sertraline significantly increased the proliferation rate of hADSCs induced cells (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Sertraline treatment during neurogenic differentiation could be decreased the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Nestin-positive cells, but did not significantly effect on the percentage of MAP2 positive cells. Conclusion: Overall, our data show that Sertraline can be promoting proliferation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs after 6 days post-induction, while Sertraline inhibits gliogenesis of induced hADSCs. PMID:24800186

  8. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Osteogenesis of Human Alveolar Bone-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, KiTaek; Hexiu, Jin; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Cho, Woo Jae; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMFs) on the proliferation and differentiation of human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs). Osteogenesis is a complex series of events involving the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to generate new bone. In this study, we examined not merely the effect of ELF-PEMFs on cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization of the extracellular matrix but vinculin, vimentin, and calmodulin (CaM) expressions in hABMSCs during osteogenic differentiation. Exposure of hABMSCs to ELF-PEMFs increased proliferation by 15% compared to untreated cells at day 5. In addition, exposure to ELF-PEMFs significantly increased ALP expression during the early stages of osteogenesis and substantially enhanced mineralization near the midpoint of osteogenesis within 2 weeks. ELF-PEMFs also increased vinculin, vimentin, and CaM expressions, compared to control. In particular, CaM indicated that ELF-PEMFs significantly altered the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The results indicated that ELF-PEMFs could enhance early cell proliferation in hABMSCs-mediated osteogenesis and accelerate the osteogenesis. PMID:23862141

  9. Synergetic effects of DNA methylation and histone modification during mouse induced pluripotent stem cell generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiying; Weng, Rong; Lan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xudong; Liu, Qidong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lu, Chenqi; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation (H3K27me3) have been reported as major barriers to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) generation using four core transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, termed OSKM). Here, to illustrate the possibility of deriving iPSCs via demethylation, as well as the exact effects of DNA methylation and histone modification on gene expression regulation, we performed RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of ES cells and iPSCs derived by demethylation with miR-29b or shDnmt3a, and carried out integrated analyses. Results showed that OSKM + miR-29b-iPSC was more close to ES cells than the others, and up-regulated genes typically presented with methylated CpG-dense promoters and H3K27me3-enriched regions. The differentially expressed genes caused by introduction of DNA demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming mainly focus on stem cell associated GO terms and KEGG signaling pathways, which may decrease the tumorigenesis risk of iPSCs. These findings indicated that DNA methylation and histone methylation have synergetic effects on regulating gene expression during iPSC generation, and demethylation by miR-29b is better than shDnmt3a for iPSC quality. Furthermore, integrated analyses are superior for exploration of slight differences as missed by individual analysis. PMID:28155862

  10. Effects of hypoxia on the immunomodulatory properties of human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C M; Liu, J; Zhao, J Y; Xiao, L; An, S; Gou, Y C; Quan, H X; Cheng, Q; Zhang, Y L; He, W; Wang, Y T; Yu, W J; Huang, Y F; Yi, Y T; Chen, Y; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    The environment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is hypoxic, which plays an important role in maintaining their self-renewal potential and undifferentiated state. MSCs have been proven to possess immunomodulatory properties and have been used clinically to treat autoimmune diseases. Here, we tested the effects of hypoxia on the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs and examined its possible underlying mechanisms. We found that hypoxic stimulation promoted the immunomodulatory properties of human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hGMSCs) by enhancing the suppressive effects of hGMSCs on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The proliferation of PBMCs was significantly inhibited, while the apoptosis of PBMCs was increased, which was associated with the Fas ligand (FasL) expression of hGMSCs. The in vivo study showed that systemically infused hGMSCs could enhance skin wound repair, and 24-h hypoxic stimulation significantly promoted the reparative capacity of hGMSCs. For mechanism, hGMSC treatment inhibited the local inflammation of injured skin by suppressing the inflammatory cells, reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), which was promoted by hypoxia. Hypoxia preconditioning may be a good optimizing method to promote the potential of MSCs for the future cell-based therapy.

  11. Stem cell cultivation in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, Maria Margarida; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have generated great interest in the scientific and medical communities, and stem cells in particular are very appealing for regenerative medicine, drug screening and other biomedical applications. These unspecialized cells have unlimited self-renewal capacity and the remarkable ability to produce mature cells with specialized functions, such as blood cells, nerve cells or cardiac muscle. However, the actual number of cells that can be obtained from available donors is very low. One possible solution for the generation of relevant numbers of cells for several applications is to scale-up the culture of these cells in vitro. This review describes recent developments in the cultivation of stem cells in bioreactors, particularly considerations regarding critical culture parameters, possible bioreactor configurations, and integration of novel technologies in the bioprocess development stage. We expect that this review will provide updated and detailed information focusing on the systematic production of stem cell products in compliance with regulatory guidelines, while using robust and cost-effective approaches.

  12. Effects of Angular Frequency During Clinorotation on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Carlos; Yew, Alvin G.; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Ground-based microgravity simulation can reproduce the apparent effects of weightlessness in spaceflight using clinostats that continuously reorient the gravity vector on a specimen, creating a time-averaged nullification of gravity. In this work, we investigated the effects of clinorotation speed on the morphology, cytoarchitecture, and migration behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Methods: We compared cell responses at clinorotation speeds of 0, 30, 60, and 75 rpm over 8 hours in a recently developed lab-on-chip-based clinostat system. Time lapse light microscopy was used to visualize changes in cell morphology during and after cessation of clinorotation. Cytoarchitecture was assessed by actin and vinculin staining, and chemotaxis was examined using time lapse light microscopy of cells in NGF (100 ng/ml) gradients. Results: Among clinorotated groups, cell area distributions indicated a greater inhibition of cell spreading with higher angular frequency (p is less than 0.005), though average cell area at 30 rpm after 8 hours became statistically similar to control (p = 0.794). Cells at 75rpm clinorotation remained viable and were able to re-spread after clinorotation. In chemotaxis chambers clinorotation did not alter migration patterns in elongated cells, but most clinorotated cells exhibited cell retraction, which strongly compromised motility.

  13. Effects of p21 Gene Down-Regulation through RNAi on Antler Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qianqian; Wang, Datao; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle is an integral part of cell proliferation, and consists mainly of four phases, G1, S, G2 and M. The p21 protein, a cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, plays a key role in regulating cell cyclevia G1 phase control. Cells capable of epimorphic regeneration have G2/M accumulation as their distinctive feature, whilst the majority of somatic cells rest at G1 phase. To investigate the role played byp21 in antler regeneration, we studied the cell cycle distribution of antler stem cells (ASCs), via down-regulation of p21 in vitro using RNAi. The results showed that ASCs had high levels of p21 mRNA expression and rested at G1 phase, which was comparable to the control somatic cells. Down-regulation of p21 did not result in ASC cell cycle re-distribution toward G2/M accumulation, but DNA damage and apoptosis of the ASCs significantly increased and the process of cell aging was slowed. These findings suggest that the ASCs may have evolved to use an alternative, p21-independent cell cycle regulation mechanism. Also a unique p21-dependent inhibitory effect may control DNA damage as a protective mechanism to ensure the fast proliferating ASCs do not become dysplastic/cancerous. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the role played by p21 in the ASCs could give insight into a mammalian system where epimorphic regeneration is initiated whilst the genome stability is effectively maintained. PMID:26308075

  14. Materials as stem cell regulators

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  15. Materials as stem cell regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  16. The effect of extracellular acidosis on the behaviour of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Massa, A; Perut, F; Chano, T; Woloszyk, A; Mitsiadis, T A; Avnet, S; Baldini, N

    2017-04-03

    The stem cell fraction of a cell population is finely tuned by stimuli from the external microenvironment. Among these stimuli, a decrease of extracellular pH (pHe) may occur in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including hypoxia and inflammation. In this study, by using bone marrow stem cells and dental pulp stem cells, we provided evidence that extracellular acidosis endows the maintenance of stemness in mesenchymal cells. Indeed, continuous exposure for 21 d to low pHe (6.5-6.8) conditions impaired the osteogenic differentiation of both cell types. Moreover, the exposure to low pHe, for 1 and up to 7 d, induced the expression of stemness-related genes and proteins, drove cells to reside in the quiescent G0 alert state and enhanced their ability to form floating spheres. The pre-conditioning with extracellular acidosis for 7 d did not affect the differentiation potential of dental pulp stem cells since, when the cells were cultured again at physiological pHe, their multilineage potential was almost unmodified. Our data provided evidence of the role of extracellular acidosis as a modulator of the stemness of mesenchymal cells. This condition is commonly found both in systemic and local bone conditions, hence underlining the relevance of this phenomenon for a better comprehension of bone healing and regeneration.

  17. Combinatorial effect of substratum properties on mesenchymal stem cell sheet engineering and subsequent multi-lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yingnan; Menon, Nishanth V; Goh, Ghim Hian; Lee, Ann Charlene; Chan, Vincent; Zhang, Yilei; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-09-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been exploited as an alternative approach in tissue regeneration and the use of stem cells to generate cell sheets has further showed its potential in stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration. There exist vast interests in developing strategies to enhance the formation of stem cell sheets for downstream applications. It has been proved that stem cells are sensitive to the biophysical cues of the microenvironment. Therefore we hypothesized that the combinatorial substratum properties could be tailored to modulate the development of cell sheet formation and further influence its multipotency. For validation, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) of different combinatorial substratum properties (including stiffness, roughness and wettability) were created, on which the human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were cultured to form cell sheets with their multipotency evaluated after induced differentiation. The results showed that different combinatorial effects of these substratum properties were able to influence BMSC behavior such as adhesion, spreading and proliferation during cell sheet development. Collagen formation within the cell sheet was enhanced on substrates with lower stiffness, higher hydrophobicity and roughness, which further assisted the induced chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, respectively. These findings suggested that combinatorial substratum properties had profound effects on BMSC cell sheet integrity and multipotency, which had significant implications for future biomaterials and scaffold designs in the field of BMSC-mediated tissue regeneration.

  18. Effect of Antioxidants and Apoptosis Inhibitors on Cryopreservation of Murine Germ Cells Enriched for Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-An; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Bang-Jin; Jung, Sang-Eun; Pang, Myeong-Geol; Ryu, Buom-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are germline stem cells that serve as the foundation of spermatogenesis to maintain fertility throughout a male’s lifetime. To treat male infertility using stem cell banking systems and transplantation, it is important to be able to preserve SSCs for long periods of time. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop an optimal cryopreservation protocol for SSCs using antioxidants and apoptosis inhibitors in freezing medium. No differences were observed compared to controls when SSCs were cryopreserved in the presence of apoptosis inhibitors by themselves. However, mouse germ cells cryopreserved in basal medium containing the antioxidant hypotaurine (14 mM) resulted in significantly greater proliferation potential and mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, treatment groups with combinations containing 200 mM trehalose and 14 mM hypotaurine showed higher proliferation rates compared to controls. In addition, several serum free conditions were evaluated for SSC cryopreservation. Treatment media containing 10% or 20% knockout serum replacement resulted in similar cryopreservation results compared to media containing FBS. SSC transplantation was also performed to confirm the functionality of SSCs frozen in 14 mM hypotaurine. Donor SSCs formed normal spermatogenic colonies and sperm in the recipient testis. These data indicate that inclusion of 14 mM hypotaurine in cryopreservation media is an effective way to efficiently cryopreserve germ cells enriched for SSCs and that knockout serum replacement can replace FBS in germ cell cryopreservation media. PMID:27548381

  19. PEDF & stem cells: niche vs. nurture.

    PubMed

    Fitchev, Philip; Chung, Chuhan; Plunkett, Beth A; Brendler, Charles B; Crawford, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional 50kD secreted glycoprotein emerging as a key factor in stem cell renewal. Characteristics of the stem cell niche can be highly dependent on location, access to the vasculature, oxygen tension and neighboring cells. In the neural stem cell (NSC) niche, specifically the subventricular zone, PEDF actively participates in the self renewal process and promotes stemness by upregulating Notch signaling effectors Hes1 and Hes5. The local vascular endothelial cells and ependymal cells are the likely sources of PEDF for the NSC while mesenchymal and retinal stem cells can actually produce PEDF. The opposing actions of PEDF and VEGF on various cells are recapitulated in the NSC niche. Intraventricular injection of PEDF promotes stem cell renewal, while injection of VEGF prompts differentiation and neurogenesis in the subventricular zone. Enhancing the expression of PEDF in stem cells has promising therapeutic implications. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing PEDF effectively inhibited pathologic angiogenesis in the murine eye and these same cells suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma growth. As a protein with bioactivities in nearly all normal organ systems, it is likely that PEDF will continue to gain visibility as an essential component in the development and delivery of novel stem cell-based therapies to combat disease.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells, aging and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Chiara; Berardi, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue maintenance and regeneration is dependent on stem cells and increasing evidence has shown to decline with age. Stem cell based-aging is thought to influence therapeutic efficacy. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in tissue regeneration. Here, we discuss the effects of age-related changes on MSC properties considering their possible use in research or regenerative medicine. PMID:23738303

  1. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into many ... they also retain the ability to produce more stem cells, a process termed self-renewal. There are multiple ...

  2. Effect of Hypoxia on the Differentiation and the Self-Renewal of Metanephrogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaopeng; Song, Nana; He, Jianqiang; Yu, Xiaofang; Guo, Jia; Jiao, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and influential factor in development. The embryonic kidney is exposed to a hypoxic environment throughout its development. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays vital roles in the differentiation and self-renewal of metanephrogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MMSCs) from which the kidney is derived. Thus, we hypothesized that hypoxia can regulate the differentiation and pluripotency of MMSCs through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. To test this hypothesis, MMSCs from rats at embryonic day 18.5 were cultured in normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. The effects of hypoxia on differentiation, stemness, proliferation, and apoptosis of cultured MMSCs and on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway were tested. Our results revealed that the hypoxic condition increased the number of epithelial cells (E-cadherin+ or CK18+) as well the expression of markers of renal tubule epithelia cells (CDH6, Aqp1, and OPN), decreased the number and proliferation of stem cells (SIX-2+ or CITED1+), and induced apoptosis. Additionally, hypoxia reduced the expression of Wnt4 as well as its downstream molecules β-catenin, LEF-1, and Axin2. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by LiCl or BIO modified the effects of hypoxia on the differentiation and self-renewal of MMSCs. Thus, we concluded that hypoxia induces the differentiation and inhibits the self-renewal of MMSCs by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The observations further our understanding of the effects of hypoxia on kidney. PMID:28194187

  3. The effect of the immune system on ovarian function and features of ovarian germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haifeng; Li, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Tuochen; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Huang, Jian; Pan, Zezheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in maintaining organism homeostasis, the immune system also plays a crucial role in the modulation of ovarian function, as it regulates ovarian development, follicular maturation, ovulation and the formation of the corpus luteum. Ovarian germline stem cells are pluripotent stem cells derived from the ovarian cortex that can differentiate into ovarian germ cells and primary granulosa cells. Recent work has demonstrated that the proliferation and differentiation of ovarian germline stem cells is regulated in part by immune cells and their secreted factors. This paper reviews the role of the immune system in the regulation of ovarian function, the relationship between immune components and ovarian germline stem cells and current research efforts in this field.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mononuclear Cells From Cord Blood: Cotransplantation Provides a Better Effect in Treating Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Yu, Hong; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cotransplanting mononuclear cells from cord blood (CB-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as treatment for myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CD34+ cells or MSCs separately has been shown effective in treating MI, but the effect of cotransplanting CB-MNCs and MSCs is not clear. In this study, MSCs were separated by their adherence to the tissue culture. The morphology, immunophenotype, and multilineage potential of MSCs were analyzed. CB-MNCs were separated in lymphocyte separation medium 1.077. CD34+ cell count and viability were analyzed by flow cytometry. Infarcted male Sprague-Dawley rats in a specific-pathogen-free grade were divided into four treatment groups randomly: group I, saline; group II, CB-MNCs; group III, MSCs; and group IV, CB-MNCs plus MSCs. The saline, and CB-MNCs and/or MSCs were injected intramyocardially in infarcted rats. Their cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The myocardial capillary density was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both cell types induced an improvement in the left ventricular cardiac function and increased tissue cell proliferation in myocardial tissue and neoangiogenesis. However, CB-MNCs plus MSCs were more effective in reducing the infarct size and preventing ventricular remodeling. Scar tissue was reduced significantly in the CB-MNCs plus MSCs group. MSCs facilitate engraftment of CD34+ cells and immunomodulation after allogeneic CD34+ cell transplantation. Cotransplanting MSCs and CB-MNCs might be more effective than transplanting MSCs or CB-MNCs separately for treating MI. This study contributes knowledge toward effective treatment strategies for MI. Significance This study assessed cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+ cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) in a rat model. The results demonstrate that MSCs and mononuclear cells from cord blood may have synergistic effects and

  5. Bystander Effect Fuels Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells to Quickly Attenuate Early Stage Neurological Deficits After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Auston; Huang, Lei; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Kim, Hye-Sun; Hamblin, Milton H.

    2015-01-01

    Present therapies for stroke rest with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the sole licensed antithrombotic on the market; however, tPA’s effectiveness is limited in that the drug not only must be administered less than 3–5 hours after stroke but often exacerbates blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage and increases hemorrhagic incidence. A potentially promising therapy for stroke is transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (hiPSC-NSCs). To date, the effects of iPSCs on injuries that take place during early stage ischemic stroke have not been well studied. Consequently, we engrafted iPSC-NSCs into the ipsilesional hippocampus, a natural niche of NSCs, at 24 hours after stroke (prior to secondary BBB opening and when inflammatory signature is abundant). At 48 hours after stroke (24 hours after transplant), hiPSC-NSCs had migrated to the stroke lesion and quickly improved neurological function. Transplanted mice showed reduced expression of proinflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α), microglial activation, and adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1) and attenuated BBB damage. We are the first to report that engrafted hiPSC-NSCs rapidly improved neurological function (less than 24 hours after transplant). Rapid hiPSC-NSC therapeutic activity is mainly due to a bystander effect that elicits reduced inflammation and BBB damage. Significance Clinically, cerebral vessel occlusion is rarely permanent because of spontaneous or thrombolytic therapy-mediated reperfusion. These results have clinical implications indicating a much extended therapeutic window for transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (hiPSC-NSCs; 24 hours after stroke as opposed to the 5-hour window with tissue plasminogen activator [tPA]). In addition, there is potential for a

  6. Therapeutic effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhua; Zhang, Qinfen; Li, Wei; Nie, Dekang; Chen, Weiwei; Xu, Chunxiang; Yi, Xin; Shi, Jinhong; Tian, Meiling; Qin, Jianbing; Jin, Guohua; Tu, Wenjuan

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells has been studied in several diseases. However, the possibility that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be used to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) has not yet been investigated. This study focuses on the potential therapeutic effect of hUCMSC transplantation in a rat model of HIE. Dermal fibroblasts served as cell controls. HIE was induced in neonatal rats aged 7 days. hUCMSCs labeled with Dil were then transplanted into the models 24 hr or 72 hr post-HIE through the peritoneal cavity or the jugular vein. Behavioral testing revealed that hUCMSC transplantation but not the dermal fibroblast improved significantly the locomotor function vs. vehicle controls. Animals receiving cell grafts 24 hr after surgery showed a more significant improvement than at 72 hr. More hUCMSCs homed to the ischemic frontal cortex following intravenous administration than after intraperitoneal injection. Differentiation of engrafted cells into neurons was observed in and around the infarct region. Gliosis in ischemic regions was significantly reduced after hUCMSC transplantation. Administration of ganglioside (GM1) enhanced the behavioral recovery on the base of hUCMSC treatment. These results demonstrate that intravenous transplantation of hUCMSCs at an early stage after HIE can improve the behavior of hypoxic-ischemic rats and decrease gliosis. Ganglioside treatment further enhanced the recovery of neurological function following hUCMSC transplantation.

  7. The Combined Effect of Substrate Stiffness and Surface Topography on Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingnan; Yang, Zheng; Law, Jaslyn Bee Khuan; He, Ai Yu; Abbas, Azlina A; Denslin, Vinitha; Kamarul, Tunku; Hui, James H P; Lee, Eng Hin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is guided by contact with the physical microenvironment, influence by both topography and mechanical properties of the matrix. In this study, the combined effect of substratum nano-topography and mechanical stiffness in directing mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis was investigated. Three polyesters of varying stiffness were thermally imprinted to create nano-grating or pillar patterns of the same dimension. The surface of the nano-patterned substrate was coated with chondroitin sulfate (CS) to provide an even surface chemistry, with cell-adhesive and chondro-inductive properties, across all polymeric substrates. The surface characteristic, mechanical modulus, and degradation of the CS-coated patterned polymeric substrates were analyzed. The cell morphology adopted on the nano-topographic surfaces were accounted by F-actin distribution, and correlated to the cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation outcomes. Results show that substratum stiffness and topographical cues affected MSC morphology and aggregation, and influenced the phenotypic development at the earlier stage of chondrogenic differentiation. Hyaline-like cartilage with middle/deep zone cartilage characteristics was generated on softer pillar surface, while on stiffer nano-pillar material MSCs showed potential to generate constituents of hyaline/fibro/hypertrophic cartilage. Fibro/superficial zone-like cartilage could be derived from nano-grating of softer stiffness, while stiffer nano-grating resulted in insignificant chondrogenesis. This study demonstrates the possibility of refining the phenotype of cartilage generated from MSCs by manipulating surface topography and material stiffness.

  8. Effects of hypergravity on adipose-derived stem cell morphology, mechanical property and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tavakolinejad, Alireza; Rabbani, Mohsen; Janmaleki, Mohsen

    2015-08-21

    Alteration in specific inertial conditions can lead to changes in morphology, proliferation, mechanical properties and cytoskeleton of cells. In this report, the effects of hypergravity on morphology of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) are indicated. ADSCs were repeatedly exposed to discontinuous hypergravity conditions of 10 g, 20 g, 40 g and 60 g by utilizing centrifuge (three times of 20 min exposure, with an interval of 40 min at 1 g). Cell morphology in terms of length, width and cell elongation index and cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules were analyzed by image processing. Consistent changes observed in cell elongation index as morphological change. Moreover, cell proliferation was assessed and mechanical properties of cells in case of elastic modulus of cells were evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy. Increase in proliferation and decrease in elastic modulus of cells are further results of this study. Staining ADSC was done to show changes in cytoskeleton of the cells associated to hypergravity condition specifically in microfilament and microtubule components. After exposing to hypergravity, significant changes were observed in microfilaments and microtubule density as components of cytoskeleton. It was concluded that there could be a relationship between changes in morphology and MFs as the main component of the cells.

  9. Protective Effects and Mechanisms of Salvianolic Acid B Against H₂O₂-Induced Injury in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Tao; Pang, Mao; Rong, Limin; Liu, Chang; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate into neural lineages. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a commonly used, traditional Chinese medicine for enhancing neuroprotective effects, and has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. Here, we explore the potential mechanism of Sal B in protecting iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) against H2O2-induced injury. iPSCs were induced into NSCs, iPSC-derived NSCs were treated with 50 μM Sal B for 24.5 h and 500 μM H2O2 for 24 h. The resulting effects were examined by flow cytometry analysis, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and western blotting. Upon H2O2 exposure, Sal B significantly promoted cell viability and stabilization of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Sal B also visibly decreased the cell apoptotic ratio. In addition, Sal B markedly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, and phosphospecific signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3), and increased the level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 in iPSC-derived NSCs induced by H2O2. These results suggest that Sal B protects iPSC-derived NSCs against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The mechanisms of this stress tolerance may be attributed to modulation of the MMP/TIMP system and inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway.

  10. [Bioethical challenges of stem cell tourism].

    PubMed

    Ventura-Juncá, Patricio; Erices, Alejandro; Santos, Manuel J

    2013-08-01

    Stem cells have drawn extraordinary attention from scientists and the general public due to their potential to generate effective therapies for incurable diseases. At the same time, the production of embryonic stem cells involves a serious ethical issue concerning the destruction of human embryos. Although adult stem cells and induced pluripotential cells do not pose this ethical objection, there are other bioethical challenges common to all types of stem cells related particularly to the clinical use of stem cells. Their clinical use should be based on clinical trials, and in special situations, medical innovation, both of which have particular ethical dimensions. The media has raised unfounded expectations in patients and the public about the real clinical benefits of stem cells. At the same time, the number of unregulated clinics is increasing around the world, making direct offers through Internet of unproven stem cell therapies that attract desperate patients that have not found solutions in standard medicine. This is what is called stem cells tourism. This article reviews this situation, its consequences and the need for international cooperation to establish effective regulations to prevent the exploitation of patients and to endanger the prestige of legitimate stem cell research.

  11. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Parekkadan, Biju; Milwid, Jack M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are being clinically explored as a new therapeutic for treating a variety of immune-mediated diseases. First heralded as a regenerative therapy for skeletal tissue repair, MSCs have recently been shown to modulate endogenous tissue and immune cells. Preclinical studies of the mechanism of action suggest that the therapeutic effects afforded by MSC transplantation are short-lived and related to dynamic, paracrine interactions between MSCs and host cells. Therefore, representations of MSCs as drug-loaded particles may allow for pharmacokinetic models to predict the therapeutic activity of MSC transplants as a function of drug delivery mode. By integrating principles of MSC biology, therapy, and engineering, the field is armed to usher in the next generation of stem cell therapeutics. PMID:20415588

  13. Transcriptomic analyses of the anti-adipogenic effects of oleuropein in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Casado-Díaz, Antonio; Anter, Jaouad; Müller, Sören; Winter, Peter; Quesada-Gómez, José Manuel; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-03-22

    Extra virgin olive oil has positive effects on health. Oleuropein is a polyphenolic compound present in olive-tree leaves, fruits (olives) and olive oil. It is responsible for the relevant organoleptic and biological properties of olive oil, including antiadipogenic properties. Thus, the effects of oleuropein on the adipogenesis of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells were studied by transcriptomics and differential gene-expression analyses. Oleuropein could upregulate expression of 60% of adipogenesis-repressed genes. Besides, it could activate signaling pathways such as Rho and β-catenin, maintaining cells at an undifferentiated stage. Our data suggest that mitochondrial activity is reduced by oleuropein, mostly during adipogenic differentiation. These results shed light on oleuropein activity on cells, with potential application as a "nutraceutical" for the prevention and treatment of diseases such as obesity and osteoporosis.

  14. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  15. Effect of dentin treatment on proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minjeong; Pang, Nan-Sim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is an excellent bactericidal agent, but it is detrimental to stem cell survival, whereas intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) promote the survival and proliferation of stem cells. This study evaluated the effect of sequential NaOCl and Ca[OH]2 application on the attachment and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Materials and Methods DPSCs were obtained from human third molars. All dentin specimens were treated with 5.25% NaOCl for 30 min. DPSCs were seeded on the dentin specimens and processed with additional 1 mg/mL Ca[OH]2, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment, file instrumentation, or a combination of these methods. After 7 day of culture, we examined DPSC morphology using scanning electron microscopy and determined the cell survival rate with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. We measured cell adhesion gene expression levels after 4 day of culture and odontogenic differentiation gene expression levels after 4 wk using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results DPSCs did not attach to the dentin in the NaOCl-treated group. The gene expression levels of fibronectin-1 and secreted phosphoprotein-1 gene in both the Ca[OH]2- and the EDTA-treated groups were significantly higher than those in the other groups. All Ca[OH]2-treated groups showed higher expression levels of dentin matrix protein-1 than that of the control. The dentin sialophosphoprotein level was significantly higher in the groups treated with both Ca[OH]2 and EDTA. Conclusions The application of Ca[OH]2 and additional treatment such as EDTA or instrumentation promoted the attachment and differentiation of DPSCs after NaOCl treatment. PMID:26587415

  16. Metformin and Ara-a Effectively Suppress Brain Cancer by Targeting Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H.; Nokkari, Amaly; Itani, Muhieddine M.; Chamaa, Farah; Bahmad, Hisham; Monzer, Alissar; El-Merahbi, Rabih; Daoud, Georges; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas H.; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gliomas and neuroblastomas pose a great health burden worldwide with a poor and moderate prognosis, respectively. Many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant brain tumors. Of interest, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway was found to be associated with tumorigenesis and tumor survival, leading to many studies on AMPK drugs, especially Metformin, and their potential role as anti-cancer treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of slowly-dividing, treatment-resistant, undifferentiated cancer cells that are being discovered in a multitude of cancers. They are thought to be responsible for replenishing the tumor with highly proliferative cells and increasing the risk of recurrence. Methods: Metformin and 9-β-d-Arabinofuranosyl Adenine (Ara-a) were used to study the role of the AMPK pathway in vitro on U251 (glioblastoma) and SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cell lines. Results: We found that both drugs are able to decrease the survival of U251 and SH-SY5Y cell lines in a 2D as well as a 3D culture model. Metformin and Ara-a significantly decreased the invasive ability of these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these drugs decreased the sphere-forming units (SFU) of U251 cells, with Ara-a being more efficient, signifying the extinction of the CSC population. However, if treatment is withdrawn before all SFUs are extinguished, the CSCs regain some of their sphere-forming capabilities in the case of Metformin but not Ara-a treatment. Conclusion: Metformin and Ara-a have proved to be effective in the treatment of glioblastomas and neuroblastomas, in vitro, by targeting their cancer stem/progenitor cell population, which prevents recurrence. PMID:26635517

  17. Effect of Cell Origin and Timing of Delivery for Stem Cell-Based Bone Tissue Engineering Using Biologically Functionalized Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Dosier, Christopher R.; Uhrig, Brent A.; Willett, Nick J.; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Li, Mon-Tzu Alice; Stevens, Hazel Y.; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite progress in bone tissue engineering, the healing of critically sized diaphyseal defects remains a clinical challenge. A stem cell-based approach is an attractive alternative to current treatment techniques. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of adult stem cells to enhance bone formation when co-delivered with the osteoinductive factor bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in a biologically functionalized hydrogel. First, adipose and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs and BMMSCs) were screened for their potential to form bone when delivered in an RGD functionalized alginate hydrogel using a subcutaneous implant model. BMMSCs co-delivered with BMP-2 produced significantly more mineralized tissue compared with either ADSCs co-delivered with BMP-2 or acellular hydrogels containing BMP-2. Next, the ability of BMMSCs to heal a critically sized diaphyseal defect with a nonhealing dose of BMP-2 was tested using the alginate hydrogel as an injectable cell carrier. The effect of timing of therapeutic delivery on bone regeneration was also tested in the diaphyseal model. A 7 day delayed injection of the hydrogel into the defect site resulted in less mineralized tissue formation than immediate delivery of the hydrogel. By 12 weeks, BMMSC-loaded hydrogels produced significantly more bone than acellular constructs regardless of immediate or delayed treatment. For immediate delivery, bridging of defects treated with BMMSC-loaded hydrogels occurred at a rate of 75% compared with a 33% bridging rate for acellular-treated defects. No bridging was observed in any of the delayed delivery samples for any of the groups. Therefore, for this cell-based bone tissue engineering approach, immediate delivery of constructs leads to an overall enhanced healing response compared with delayed delivery techniques. Further, these studies demonstrate that co-delivery of adult stem cells, specifically BMMSCs, with BMP-2 enhances bone regeneration in a

  18. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cells on the growth of HepG2 and Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaohui; Matsumoto, Rena; Yang, Pengyuan; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) accumulate at carcinomas and have a great impact on cancer cell's behavior. Here we demonstrated that hMSCs could display both the promotional and inhibitive effects on growth of HepG2 and Hela cells by using the conditioned media, indirect co-culture, and cell-to-cell co-culture. Cell growth was increased following the addition of lower proportion of hMSCs while decreased by treatment of higher proportion of hMSCs. We also established a novel noninvasive label way by using internalizing quantum dots (i-QDs) for study of cell-cell contact in the co-culture, which was effective and sensitive for both tracking and distinguishing different cells population without the disturbance of cells. Furthermore, we investigated the role of hMSCs in regulation of cell growth and showed that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways were involved in hMSC-mediated cell inhibition and proliferation. Our findings suggested that hMSCs regulated cancer cell function by providing a suitable environment, and the discovery from the study would provide some clues for development of effective strategy for hMSC-based cancer therapies.

  19. Effect of undifferentiated versus hepatogenic partially differentiated mesenchymal stem cells on hepatic and cognitive functions in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Elberry, Dalia Azmy; Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; Esmail, Reham Shehab El Nemr; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Gamal, Maha Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the outcome of chronic liver injury. The current study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells versus in vitro partially differentiated mesenchymal stem cells on liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. 50 adult male albino rats constituted the animal model and were divided into the following groups: control, thioacetamide, undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and hepatocyte growth factor-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells groups. Cognitive assessment was achieved by open field test and Y-maze task. We measured serum alanine aminotransferase, albumin and transforming growth factor-beta1, gene expression of α-smooth muscle actin, matrix metalloprotein-2, its tissue inhibitor and apoptotic markers: Bax and Bcl2, brain glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, and dopaminergic receptors. PMID:28337098

  20. The effects of poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface silanization on the mesenchymal stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Lee, Min Hui Adeline; Zhang, Yilei; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices have become very popular for on-chip cell investigation. Maintenance of mammalian cell adhesion on the substrate surface is crucial in determining the cell viability, proliferation and differentiation. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of PDMS is unfavourable for cell culture, causing cells to eventually dislodge from the surface. Although physically adsorbed matrix proteins can promote initial cell adhesion, this effect is usually short-lived. To address this critical issue, in this study, we employed (3-aminopropyl) triethoxy silane (APTES) and cross-linker glutaraldehyde (GA) chemistry to immobilize collagen type 1 (Col1) on PDMS. These modified surfaces are highly efficient to support the adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with no deterioration of their potency. Significant changes of the native PDMS surface properties were observed with the proposed surface functionalization, and MSC adhesion was improved on PDMS surfaces modified with APTES + GA + Protein. Therefore, this covalent surface modification could generate a more biocompatible platform for stabilized cell adhesion. Furthermore, this modification method facilitated long-term cell attachment, which is favourable for successful induction of osteogenesis and cell sheet formation with an increased expression of osteogenic biomarkers and comparable extracellular matrix (ECM) constituent biomarkers, respectively. The surface silanization can be applied to PDMS-based microfluidic systems for long-term study of cellular development. Similar strategies could also be applied to several other substrate materials by appropriate combinations of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and ECM proteins.

  1. Effect of the WWOX gene on the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in human ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongchao; Tong, Jianye; Lin, Xiaoman; Han, Qiuyu; Huang, Hongxiang

    2015-08-01

    In order to examine new ideas for gene therapy in ovarian cancer, the specific mechanism underlying the effects of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in human ovarian cancer stem cells was investigated. Ovarian cancer stem cells were transfected with a eukaryotic expression vector carrying the WWOX gene in vitro (recombinant plasmid) and cells transfected with the empty plasmid (empty plasmid) or untransfected cells were used as controls. Stably transfected cells were screened and amplified in culture and the WWOX protein was detected by western blot analysis in the three groups of cells. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, cyclin D1, CDK4 and apoptosis-related protein Wnt-5α and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect alterations in the mRNA expression levels of caspase-3. The results demonstrated that the WWOX protein was stably expressed in cells of the recombinant plasmid group, but was not detected in cells of the empty plasmid group and the control group. Cell proliferation at each time point decreased significantly in the recombinant plasmid group compared with the empty plasmid group and the control group. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase in the recombinant plasmid group was significantly higher than that of cells in the empty plasmid group and the control group. The rate of apoptosis in the recombinant plasmid group was significantly higher than that of cells in the empty plasmid group and the control group. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of cyclin E, CDK2, cyclin D1 and CDK4 in the recombinant plasmid group were significantly lower than those in the empty plasmid group and the control group; however, the expression levels of Wnt-5α and JNK were significantly higher

  2. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangseon; Cho, Jae Youl; Soh, Young-Jin; Lee, Jienny; Shin, Seoung Woo; Jang, Sunghee; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  3. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jienny; Shin, Seoung Woo; Jang, Sunghee; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA. PMID:25909857

  4. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  5. In Vitro Effect of 30 nm Silver Nanoparticles on Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Kienzle, Arne; Liu, Xujie; Müller, Werner E G; Elkhooly, Tarek A; Feng, Qingling

    2016-03-01

    With the combined use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in bone tissue engineering, more knowledge of the effects of Ag NPs on hMSCs is required. Up to date, researches mainly focused on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Ag NPs, only few studies discussed their influence on the differentiation of stem cells, especially adipogenic differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro uptake of 30 nm PVP-coated Ag NPs in hMSCs and their effects on cell viability, cell morphology and adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. HMSCs were exposed to Ag NPs at concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/mL for 24 hours and at concentrations of 5 and 10 μg/mL throughout the whole differentiation period. Results of cell viability showed that Ag NPs caused time- and dose-dependent toxicity in hMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the uptake of Ag NPs into cytoplasm of hMSCs. No influence on cell morphology was observed. The 30 nm sized Ag NPs had no effects on adiponectin secretion, lipid droplet formation and the expression of adipogenic marker genes. It is concluded that under our experimental conditions, 30 nm PVP-coated Ag NPs do not influence the adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro. The present results provide a reference for the usage of 30 nm Ag NPs in the presence of hMSCs in bone tissue engineering.

  6. Stem cells can form gap junctions with cardiac myocytes and exert pro-arrhythmic effects

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Nicoline W.; Coronel, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has been suggested to be a promising option for regeneration of injured myocardium, for example following a myocardial infarction. For clinical use cell-based therapies have to be safe and applicable and are aimed to renovate the architecture of the heart. Yet for functional and coordinated activity synchronized with the host myocardium stem cells have to be capable of forming electrical connections with resident cardiomyocytes. In this paper we discuss whether stem cells are capable of establishing functional electrotonic connections with cardiomyocytes and whether these may generate a risk for arrhythmias. Application of stem cells in the clinical setting with outcomes concerning arrhythmogenic safety and future perspectives will also briefly be touched upon. PMID:25400586

  7. Pro-differentiating effects of a synthetic flavagline on human teratocarcinomal cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Emhemmed, Fathi; Ali Azouaou, Sarah; Zhao, Qian; Appert-Collin, Aline; Bennasroune, Amar; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Muller, Christian D; Désaubry, Laurent; Fuhrmann, Guy

    2016-12-15

    As initiators of the carcinogenic process, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered as new targets for anti-cancer therapies. However, these cells are hidden in the cancer bulk and remain relatively insensitive to chemotherapy, which targets their proliferative capacities. Alternatively, growing evidences have pointed out that a differentiation therapy could adversely affect these cells, which consequently should lose their self-renewal properties and become less aggressive. In order to evaluate the differentiation potential of an emerging class of anti-cancer drugs, we used the poorly differentiated teratocarcinomal cell as a model of Oct4-expressing CSC and determined the molecular mechanisms induced by the highly active flavagline FL3. The drug, administrated at sublethal concentration and for long period, was able to downregulate the expression levels of the stemness factors Oct4 and Nanog at both transcriptional and translational levels, concomitantly with a decrease of clonogenicity. The appearance of specific neural markers further demonstrated the differentiation properties of FL3. Interestingly, an expression of active caspase-3 and an upregulation of the expression of the germ cell nuclear factor were observed in treated cells; this suggests that the suppression of Oct4 expression required for the induction of differentiation involves overlapping mechanisms of protein degradation and gene repression. Finally, this study shows that FL3, like all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), acts as a differentiation inducer of teratocarcinomal cells. Thus, FL3 offers an alternative possibility for cancer treatment since it could target the carcinogenic process by inducing the differentiation of ATRA-resistant and Oct4-expressing CSCs, without toxic side effects on normal cells.

  8. Effects of umbilical cord blood stem cells on healing factors for diabetic foot injuries.

    PubMed

    Çil, N; Oğuz, E O; Mete, E; Çetinkaya, A; Mete, G A

    2017-01-01

    The use of stem or progenitor cells from bone marrow, or peripheral or umbilical cord blood is becoming more common for treatment of diabetic foot problems. These cells promote neovascularization by angiogenic factors and they promote epithelium formation by stimulating cell replication and migration under certain pathological conditions. We investigated the role of CD34 + stem cells from human umbilical cord blood in wound healing using a rat model. Rats were randomly divided into a control group and two groups with diabetes induced by a single dose of 55 mg/kg intraperitoneal streptozocin. Scarred areas 5 mm in diameter were created on the feet of all rats. The diabetic rats constituted the diabetes control group and a diabetes + stem cell group with local injection into the wound site of 0.5 × 106 CD34 + stem cells from human umbilical cord blood. The newly formed skin in the foot wounds following CD34 + stem cell treatment showed significantly improvement by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining, and were closer to the wound healing of the control group than the untreated diabetic animals. The increase in FGF expression that accompanied the local injection of CD34 + stem cells indicates that FGF stimulation helped prevent apoptosis. Our findings suggest a promising new treatment approach to diabetic wound healing.

  9. The antisenescence effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde on adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Karthyayani; Lin, Yi-Chun; Wen, Tung-Chou; Hsieh, Jeanne; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liu, Jen-Wei; Lin, Po-Cheng; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2015-01-01

    As assuring cell quality is an essential parameter for the success of stem cell therapy, the impact of various senescence-inducing stress signals, and strategies to circumvent them, has been an important area of focus in stem cell research. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the capacity of Trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) in reversing stress-induced senescence and maintaining the quality of stem cells in a chemically (H2O2)-induced cell senescence model. Because of the availability and the promising application potential in regenerative medicine, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were chosen for the study. We found that H2O2 treatment resulted in the expression of senescence characteristics in the ADSCs, including decreased proliferation rate, increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, decreased silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog (SIRT1) expression, and decreased telomerase activity. However, TC treatment was sufficient to rescue or reduce the effects of H2O2 induction, ultimately leading to an increased proliferation rate, a decrease in the percentage of SA-β-gal-positive cells, upregulation of SIRT1 expression, and increased telomerase activity of the senescent ADSCs at the cellular level. Moreover, a chemically induced liver fibrosis animal model was used to evaluate the functionality of these rescued cells in vivo. Liver dysfunction was established by injecting 200 mg/kg thioacetamide (TAA) intraperitoneally into Wistar rats every third day for 60 days. The experimental rats were separated into groups: normal group (rats without TAA induction), sham group (without ADSC transplantation), positive control group (transplanted with normal ADSCs), H2O2 group (transplanted with H2O2-induced senescent ADSCs), and H2O2 + TC group (transplanted with ADSCs pretreated with H2O2 and then further treated with TC). In the transplantation group, 1 × 10(6) human ADSCs were introduced into each rat via direct liver injection

  10. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  11. Mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroprotective effects of combined therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Feng; Li, Qifeng; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation. In this study, we determined if mild hypothermia (27–28°C) can increase the survival rate of neural stem cells (1.0 × 105/μL) transplanted into neonatal mice with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Long-term effects on neurological functioning of the mice were also examined. After mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation, we observed decreased expression levels of inflammatory factor nuclear factor-kappa B and apoptotic factor caspase-3, reduced cerebral infarct volumes, increased survival rate of transplanted cells, and marked improvements in neurological function. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation are superior to those of monotherapy. Moreover, our findings suggest that the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are achieved by anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25422635

  12. The Effects of Zoledronic Acid in the Bone and Vasculature Support of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Soki, Fabiana N.; Li, Xin; Berry, Janice; Koh, Amy; Sinder, Benjamin P.; Qian, Xu; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Taichman, Russell S.; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are maintained in a tightly regulated bone microenvironment constituted by a rich milieu of cells. Bone cells such as osteoblasts are associated with niche maintenance as regulators of the endosteal microenvironment. Bone remodeling also plays a role in HSC mobilization although it is poorly defined. The effects of zoledronic acid (ZA), a potent bisphosphonate that inhibits bone resorption, were investigated on bone marrow cell populations focusing on HSCs, and the endosteal and vascular niches in bone. ZA treatment significantly increased bone volume and HSCs in both young and adult mice (4 week and 4 month old, respectively). ZA increased vessel numbers with no overall change in vascular volume in bones of young and had no effect on vasculature in adult mice. Since both young and adult mice had increased HSCs and bone mass with differing vasculature responses, this suggests that ZA indirectly supports HSCs via the osteoblastic niche and not the vascular niche. Additionally, gene expression in Lin- cells demonstrated increased expression of self-renewal-related genes Bmi1 and Ink4a suggesting a role of ZA in the modulation of cell commitment and differentiation toward a long-term self-renewing cell. Genes that support the osteoblastic niche, BMP2 and BMP6 were also augmented in ZA treated mice. In conclusion, ZA-induced HSC expansion occurs independent of the vascular niche via indirect modulation of the osteoblastic niche. PMID:22833499

  13. The Effects of Soluble Growth Factors on Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Inside of Fibrin Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Willerth, Stephanie M.; Faxel, Tracy E.; Gottlieb, David I.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the effects of different growth factors on the survival and differentiation of murine embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitor cells (ESNPCs) seeded inside of fibrin scaffolds. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were cultured for 8 days in suspension, retinoic acid was applied for the final 4 days to induce ESNPC formation, and then the EBs were seeded inside of 3 dimensional (3D) fibrin scaffolds. Scaffolds were cultured in the presence of media containing different doses of the following growth factors: neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-AA), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and sonic hedgehog (Shh). The cell phenotypes were characterized using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemistry after 14 days of culture. Cell viability was also assessed at this time point. Shh (10 ng/mL) and NT-3 (25 ng/mL) produced the largest fractions of neurons and oligodendrocytes while PDGF (2 and 10 ng/mL) and bFGF (10 ng/mL) produced an increase in cell viability after 14 days of culture. Combinations of growth factors were tested based on the results of the individual growth factor studies to determine their effect on cell differentiation. The incorporation of ESNPCs and growth factors into fibrin scaffolds may serve as potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:17585170

  14. The effect of Kisspeptin-10 on mesenchymal stem cells migration in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Golzar, Fatemeh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Bahrambeigi, Vahid; Rafiee, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kisspeptins (kp) activate a receptor coupled to a Gαq subunit (GPR54 or KiSS-1R) receptor to perform a variety of functions, including inhibition of cell motility, chemotaxis, and metastasis. In this study we have investigated whether kp-10, the most potent member of the kisspeptin family, can modulate CXCR4 (C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4) expression and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) migration that may influence the development of tumors. Materials and Methods: We compared the directional migration of MSCs treated with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 for 24 hours and no treated cells using an in vitro transmembrane migration assay. In addition, Chloromethylbenzamido Dialkylacarbocyanine (CM-Dil) labeled adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells treated with 10-100 or 500 nM kp-10 and no treated cells were transfused via the tail vein to the melanoma tumor bearing C57BL/6 mice. After 24 hours, the mice were scarified, the tumors were dissected, and the tumor cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry for detection of CM-Dil+ MSCs. Results: We have found that kp-10 increased the MSCs migration at 100 nM, while it decreased the MSCs migration at 500 nM, both in vitro and in vivo, with a significant increase of CXCR4 expression at 100 nM kp-10 compared to the no treated cells, but it had no significant difference between the various concentrations of kp-10. Conclusion: Thus, our data showed that kp-10 can differently affect MSCs migration in various concentrations, probably through different effects on CXCR4 expression in various concentrations. PMID:25709985

  15. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Dong, Delu; Chen, Yaoyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2) were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  16. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  17. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties.

  18. Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes

    PubMed Central

    Grácio, Filipe; Cabral, Joaquim; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient and may be dominated by stochastic effects. In this work we build mass-action models of the core regulatory elements controlling stem cell induction and maintenance. The models include not only the network of transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, but also important epigenetic regulatory features of DNA methylation and histone modification. We show that the network topology reported in the literature is consistent with the observed experimental behavior of bistability and inducibility. Based on simulations of stem cell generation protocols, and in particular focusing on changes in epigenetic cellular states, we show that cooperative and independent reaction mechanisms have experimentally identifiable differences in the dynamics of reprogramming, and we analyze such differences and their biological basis. It had been argued that stochastic and elite models of stem cell generation represent distinct fundamental mechanisms. Work presented here suggests an alternative possibility that they represent differences in the amount of information we have about the distribution of cellular states before and during reprogramming protocols. We show further that unpredictability and variation in reprogramming decreases as the cell progresses along the induction process, and that identifiable groups of cells with elite-seeming behavior can come about by a stochastic process. Finally we show how different mechanisms and kinetic properties impact the prospects of improving the efficiency of iPS cell generation protocols. PMID:23667423

  19. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  20. Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Raffaella; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bottai, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialized world) is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success. This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. PMID:25364724

  1. An acute negative bystander effect of γ-irradiated recipients on transplanted hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Liang, Paulina H; Cheng, Haizi; XuFeng, Richard; Yuan, Youzhong; Zhang, Peng; Smith, Clayton A; Cheng, Tao

    2012-04-12

    Ultimate success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) depends not only on donor HSCs themselves but also on the host environment. Total body irradiation is a component in various host conditioning regimens for HSCT. It is known that ionizing radiation exerts "bystander effects" on nontargeted cells and that HSCs transplanted into irradiated recipients undergo proliferative exhaustion. However, whether irradiated recipients pose a proliferation-independent bystander effect on transplanted HSCs is unclear. In this study, we found that irradiated mouse recipients significantly impaired the long-term repopulating ability of transplanted mouse HSCs shortly (∼ 17 hours) after exposure to irradiated hosts and before the cells began to divide. There was an increase of acute cell death associated with accelerated proliferation of the bystander hematopoietic cells. This effect was marked by dramatic down-regulation of c-Kit, apparently because of elevated reactive oxygen species. Administration of an antioxidant chemical, N-acetylcysteine, or ectopically overexpressing a reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme, catalase, improved the function of transplanted HSCs in irradiated hosts. Together, this study provides evidence for an acute negative, yet proliferation-independent, bystander effect of irradiated recipients on transplanted HSCs, thereby having implications for HSCT in both experimental and clinical scenarios in which total body irradiation is involved.

  2. Cytotoxic effects of acrylonitrile on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaochun; Sun, Min; Xie, Yan; Zhai, Wei; Zhu, Wei; Ma, Rui; Lu, Rongzhu; Xu, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acrylonitrile (ACN) on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC‑MSCs) remain unknown. The proliferation, differentiation, clonogenicity and apoptosis effects of ACN and/or N‑acetyl‑L‑cysteine (NAC) on hUC‑MSCs were investigated. The results showed that although ACN at a concentration of 0.1 µg/ml did not affect proliferation or the morphology of hUC‑MSCs compared with the control, osteogenic differentiation and the positive rate of alkaline phosphatase staining in the experimental group were significantly lower compared with the control (P<0.01). All of the effects of ACN were counteracted using NAC, a typical antioxidant. Using a flow cytometry assay, it was observed that ACN induced apoptosis in hUC‑MSCs. The results indicated that the toxic effect produced by ACN on hUC‑MSCs is based on a redox mechanism.

  3. Stem cells in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soler, María José; José Tomas, Ortiz-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    renal failure. The mechanisms underlining this beneficial effect are still a matter of debate. Thus, therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the regenerative potential of stem cells based on the administration of ex vivo expanded SCs or stimulating expansion and differentiation of local progenitor/SC populations are another exciting area of future research.

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  5. Cytotoxic effects of 4-methylimidazole on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Li, Tao; Ding, Yanling; Sun, Lingxian; Tu, Tao; Zhou, Fangfang; Qi, Wenkai; Jiang, Xinyi; Fang, Jie; Hu, Jiabo; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MI) is found in a great number of food products. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) revealed that 4-MI is carcinogenic and can also cause anemia and weight loss. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are able to support hematopoiesis and migrate to the site of tumors. To investigate whether 4-MI has an impact on MSCs, we have measured the ability of cell (osteoblast, adipocyte) proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, gene expression, migration and differentiation between control group and the 4-MI group. The results showed that higher concentrations of 4-MI (≥150 μg/ml) had significant effects on BMSCs viability while lower concentrations (≤100 μg/ml) had no significant effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, differentiation, and expression of relevant marker genes of hematopoietic cytokines, including TPO, SCF, VEGF and FLt3. The results also indicated that 4-MI (≤100 μg/ml) may have no significant effect on the biological characteristics of MSCs. Low concentration of 4-MI in foods and beverages have no toxic effect on BMSCs. The anemia and weight loss of animals caused by 4-MI may not be due to its effect on BMSCs. PMID:26692921

  6. Effects of silver nanoparticles on human and rat embryonic neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Mahmood, Meena; Xu, Yang; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Hansen, Deborah K.; Inselman, Amy; Casciano, Daniel; Patterson, Tucker A.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Silver nano-particles (Ag-NPs) are becoming increasingly prevalent in consumer products as antibacterial agents. The increased use of Ag NP-enhanced products will almost certainly increase environmental silver levels, resulting in increased exposures and the potential for increased adverse reactions including neurotoxic effects. In the present study, embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) from human and rat fetuses (gestational day-16) were used to determine whether Ag-NPs are capable of causing developmental neurotoxicity. The NSCs were cultured in serum free medium supplemented with appropriate growth factors. On the eighth day in vitro (DIV 8), the cells were exposed to Ag-NPs at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, and 20 μg/ml for 24 h. The cultured cells then were characterized by NSC markers including nestin and SOX2 and a variety of assays were utilized to determine the effects of Ag-NPs on NSC proliferation and viability and the underlying mechanisms associated with these effects. The results indicate that mitochondrial viability (MTT metabolism) was substantially attenuated and LDH release was increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Ag-NPs-induced neurotoxicity was further confirmed by up-regulated Bax protein expression, an increased number of TUNEL-positively stained cells, and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS). NSC proliferation was also significantly decreased by Ag-NPs. Co-administration of acetyl-L-carnitine, an antioxidant agent, effectively blocked the adverse effects associated with Ag-NP exposure. PMID:25904840

  7. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  8. Hypoxia-mimicking bioactive glass regenerative effects on dental stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd; Azevedo, Maria; Mohamad, Hasmaliza; Autefage, Hélène

    2016-12-01

    Vascularization is an important aspect of tissue regeneration. Hypoxia, low oxygen concentration, is a known stimulus for the release of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) which play important roles in vascularization. The current study aimed to assess the effect of a cobalt-containing bioactive glass (BG) in stimulating hypoxia and promoting vascularization. To incorporate cobalt into BG, 1 mol% of calcium was substituting with cobalt, and this formulation was compared to the one without cobalt. Both BGs were processed via melt-derived method. The BG powders with particle size less than 38 µm were incubated with cell culture medium for 4 hours at 37°C on continuous rolling, and then the medium was filtered using 0.22 µm syringe filters. Prior to use, the BG-conditioned media were supplemented with 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum and 1% (v/v) antibiotic-antimycotic, and were allowed to equilibrate overnight inside a CO2 incubator. The conditioned media were used on human dental stem cells (stem cells from permanent (DPSC) and deciduous (SHED) teeth) and assessed for their capacity to stimulate the release of angiogenic factors from the cells. The results showed that cobalt ions were released from the cobalt-containing BG, following partial dissolution of the glasses in cell culture medium, and promoted VEGF release from the cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of cobalt in BG may have potential to be used for tissue regeneration by promoting vascularization through the activation of hypoxia pathway and the release of VEGF.

  9. Photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue and red light. Effects on hydraulic and cell wall properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kigel, J.; Cosgrove, D.J. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park )

    1991-04-01

    The underlying mechanism of photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue (BL) and red light (RL) was studied in etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska). Brief BL irradiations resulted in fast transient inhibition of elongation, while a delayed (lay approximately 60 minutes) but prolonged inhibition was observed after brief RL. Possible changes in the hydraulic and wall properties of the growing cells during photoinhibition were examined. Cell sap osmotic pressure was unaffected by BL and RL, but both irradiations increased turgor pressure by approximately 0.05 megapascal (pressure-probe technique). Cell wall yielding was analyzed by in vivo stress relaxation (pressure-block technique). BL and RL reduced the initial rate of relaxation by 38 and 54%, while the final amount of relaxation was decreased by 48 and 10%, respectively. These results indicate that RL inhibits elongation mainly by lowering the wall yield coefficient, while most of the inhibitory effect of BL was due to an increase of the yield threshold. Mechanical extensibility of cell walls (Instron technique) was decreased by BL and RL, mainly due to a reduction in the plastic component of extensibility. Thus, photoinhibitions of elongation by both BL and RL are achieved through changes in cell wall properties, and are not due to effects on the hydraulic properties of the cell.

  10. Photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue and red light: effects on hydraulic and cell wall properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kigel, J.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue (BL) and red light (RL) was studied in etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska). Brief BL irradiations resulted in fast transient inhibition of elongation, while a delayed (lag approximately 60 minutes) but prolonged inhibition was observed after brief RL. Possible changes in the hydraulic and wall properties of the growing cells during photoinhibition were examined. Cell sap osmotic pressure was unaffected by BL and RL, but both irradiations increased turgor pressure by approximately 0.05 megapascal (pressure-probe technique). Cell wall yielding was analyzed by in vivo stress relaxation (pressure-block technique). BL and RL reduced the initial rate of relaxation by 38 and 54%, while the final amount of relaxation was decreased by 48 and 10%, respectively. These results indicate that RL inhibits elongation mainly by lowering the wall yield coefficient, while most of the inhibitory effect of BL was due to an increase of the yield threshold. Mechanical extensibility of cell walls (Instron technique) was decreased by BL and RL, mainly due to a reduction in the plastic component of extensibility. Thus, photoinhibitions of elongation by both BL and RL are achieved through changes in cell wall properties, and are not due to effects on the hydraulic properties of the cell.

  11. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Christoffer Galito, Sara Pijuan Anneren, Cecilia

    2012-02-15

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  12. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-07-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5(+) stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5(+) stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre(ERT2) × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ(+) crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5(+) stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool.

  13. Transplantation of Heterospheroids of Islet Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Effective Angiogenesis and Antiapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Youn; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Han, Jin; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Haque, Muhammad R.; Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Noh, Myungkyung

    2015-01-01

    Although islet transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for type 1 diabetes, there are efficiency concerns that are attributed to poor engraftment of transplanted islets. Hypoxic condition and delayed vasculogenesis induce necrosis and apoptosis of the transplanted islets. To overcome these limitations in islet transplantation, heterospheroids (HSs), which consist of rat islet cells (ICs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were transplanted to the kidney and liver. The HSs cultured under the hypoxic condition system exhibited a significant increase in antiapoptotic gene expression in ICs. hMSCs in the HSs secreted angiogenic and antiapoptotic proteins. With the HS system, ICs and hMSCs were successfully located in the same area of the liver after transplantation of HSs through the portal vein, whereas the transplantation of islets and the dissociated hMSCs did not result in localization of transplanted ICs and hMSCs in the same area. HS transplantation resulted in an increase in angiogenesis at the transplantation area and a decrease in the apoptosis of transplanted ICs after transplantation into the kidney subcapsule compared with transplantation of islet cell clusters (ICCs). Insulin production levels of ICs were higher in the HS transplantation group compared with the ICC transplantation group. The HS system may be a more efficient transplantation method than the conventional methods for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25344077

  14. (Re)defining stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Stanley

    2006-03-01

    Stem-cell nomenclature is in a muddle! So-called stem cells may be self-renewing or emergent, oligopotent (uni- and multipotent) or pluri- and totipotent, cells with perpetual embryonic features or cells that have changed irreversibly. Ambiguity probably seeped into stem cells from common usage, flukes in biology's history beginning with Weismann's divide between germ and soma and Haeckel's biogenic law and ending with contemporary issues over the therapeutic efficacy of adult versus embryonic cells. Confusion centers on tissue dynamics, whether stem cells are properly members of emerging or steady-state populations. Clarity might yet be achieved by codifying differences between cells in emergent populations, including embryonic stem and embryonic germ (ES and EG) cells in tissue culture as opposed to self-renewing (SR) cells in steady-state populations.

  15. Graft-vs.-lymphoma effect in an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Shizuru, J A

    1999-01-01

    It is known that an important curative benefit of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BAMT) in the treatment of hematolymphoid malignancies is a graft-vs.-tumor (GVT) effect. GVT activity has been attributed to mature immune cells contained within the graft because T-cell depletion of bone marrow results in increased rates of disease relapse post-transplantation. We previously demonstrated successful engraftment of highly purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplanted across major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers in mice. In the present study, we have developed a preclinical model of allogeneic HSC transplantation into lymphoma-inoculated mice, allowing us to directly test whether purified HSCs have measurable GVT activity. We then performed cotransfer studies of HSCs with purified immune cells to identify which population(s) confers tumor protection and the mechanism by which such cells suppress tumor growth. MHC-mismatched donor-recipient combinations were studied. All of the GVT activity was contained in the CD8+ cell fraction and, at the doses of CD8+ cells tested, tumor protection was separable from acute graft-vs.-host disease (aGVHD). Although there appears to be no functional difference between BM- and splenic-derived CDS8+ cells with regard to GVT activity without aGVHD, this was not the case for purified CD3+ cells. CD3+ cells derived from BM were tumor protective, whereas transplantation of equivalent doses of CD3+ cells purified from spleen resulted in lethal GVHD. The mechanism by which the GVT-conferring cells protect recipient mice from tumors was studied using immune defective mice as donors. We found that an intact pathway of perforin-dependent cytolysis, as well as an intact Fas-ligand pathway, is required in order to exert maximal anti-tumor activity.

  16. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  17. Salinomycin exerts anticancer effects on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cancer stem cells via modulation of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Ma, Wei; Mao, Jun; Yu, Xiaotang; Hou, Zhenhuan; Fan, Shujun; Song, Bo; Wang, Huan; Li, Jiazhi; Kang, Le; Liu, Pixu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Lianhong

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer tissue contains a small population of cells that have the ability to self-renew, these cells are known as breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The Hedgehog signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, its aberrant activation has been shown to contribute to the development of breast cancer, making this pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Salinomycin (Sal) is a novel identified cancer stem cells (CSCs) killer, however, the molecular basis for its anticancer effects is not yet clear. In the current study, Sal's ability to modulate the activity of key elements in the Hedgehog pathway was examined in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, as well as in a subpopulation of cancer stem cells identified within this cancer cell line. We show here that Sal inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration while also inducing apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, in a subpopulation of MCF-7 cells with the CD44(+)/CD24(-) markers and high ALDH1 levels indicative of BCSCs, modulators of Hedgehog signaling Smo and Gli1 were significantly down-regulated upon treatment with Sal. These results demonstrate that Sal also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of BCSCs, further establishing it as therapeutically relevant in the context of breast cancers and also indicating that modulation of Hedgehog signaling is one potential mechanism by which it exerts these anticancer effects.

  18. Effects of the EVCAM chemical validation library on differentiation using marker gene expression in lmouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay was used to profile the effects of the ECVAM EST validation chemical library (19 compounds) on J1 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC). PCR-based TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) provided a high-content assessment of al...

  19. Chemopreventive effect of PSP through targeting of prostate cancer stem cell-like population.

    PubMed

    Luk, Sze-Ue; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Liu, Ji; Lee, Davy Tak-Wing; Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Ma, Stephanie; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Chan, Franky Leung; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested that prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer initiation as well as disease progression. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are only effective in targeting the more differentiated cancer cells and spare the CSCs. Here, we report that PSP, an active component extracted from the mushroom Turkey tail (also known as Coriolus versicolor), is effective in targeting prostate CSCs. We found that treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 with PSP led to the down-regulation of CSC markers (CD133 and CD44) in a time and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, PSP treatment not only suppressed the ability of PC-3 cells to form prostaspheres under non-adherent culture conditions, but also inhibited their tumorigenicity in vivo, further proving that PSP can suppress prostate CSC properties. To investigate if the anti-CSC effect of PSP may lead to prostate cancer chemoprevention, transgenic mice (TgMAP) that spontaneously develop prostate tumors were orally fed with PSP for 20 weeks. Whereas 100% of the mice that fed with water only developed prostate tumors at the end of experiment, no tumors could be found in any of the mice fed with PSP, suggesting that PSP treatment can completely inhibit prostate tumor formation. Our results not only demonstrated the intriguing anti-CSC effect of PSP, but also revealed, for the first time, the surprising chemopreventive property of oral PSP consumption against prostate cancer.

  20. Effects of addictive drugs on adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chi; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) undergo a series of developmental processes before giving rise to newborn neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in adult neurogenesis. During the past decade, the role of NSPCs has been highlighted by studies on adult neurogenesis modulated by addictive drugs. It has been proven that these drugs regulate the proliferation, differentiation and survival of adult NSPCs in different manners, which results in the varying consequences of adult neurogenesis. The effects of addictive drugs on NSPCs are exerted via a variety of different mechanisms and pathways, which interact with one another and contribute to the complexity of NSPC regulation. Here, we review the effects of different addictive drugs on NSPCs, and the related experimental methods and paradigms. We also discuss the current understanding of major signaling molecules, especially the putative common mechanisms, underlying such effects. Finally, we review the future directions of research in this area. PMID:26468052

  1. Effects of extracts of Salvadora persica on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh sadat; Moezizadeh, Maryam; Javand, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Efficacy of an ideal antimicrobial agent depends on its ability to eliminate microorganisms while causing minimal toxicity to host cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ethanolic and water extracts of Salvadora persica (SP) on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, the effects of seven concentrations of ethanolic and water extracts of SP (ranging from 5.75 mg/ml to 0.08 mg/ml) on hDPSCs were evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Water extract of SP only had cytotoxic effect at 5.75 mg/ml concentration; and caused significant cell proliferation at 1.43-0.08 mg/ml concentrations at 24 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h, only 0.17 and 0.08 mg/ml concentrations caused significant cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Ethanolic extract of SP at 5.75-1.43 mg/ml concentrations showed severe cytotoxic effects at 24 and 48 h. Other concentrations had no significant effects on cells (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The highest concentrations of both water and ethanolic extracts of SP had cytotoxic effects on hDPSCs. Water extract of SP has favorable effects on cell proliferation at specific concentrations in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26180418

  2. Effects of Matrix Metalloproteinases on the Performance of Platelet Fibrin Gel Spiked With Cardiac Stem Cells in Heart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Deliang; Tang, Junnan; Hensley, Michael Taylor; Li, Taosheng; Caranasos, Thomas George; Zhang, Tianxia

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and biomaterials have been studied for therapeutic cardiac repair. Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of platelet fibrin gel and cardiac stem cells when cotransplanted into rodent hearts with myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in such protection. Thus, the present study is designed to elucidate the effects of MMP inhibition on the therapeutic benefits of intramyocardial injection of platelet fibrin gel spiked with cardiac stem cells (cell-gel) in a rat model of acute MI. In vitro, broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 undermines cell spreading and cardiomyocyte contraction. In a syngeneic rat model of myocardial infarction, MMP inhibition blunted the recruitment of endogenous cardiovascular cells into the injected biomaterials, therefore hindering de novo angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis. Echocardiography and histology 3 weeks after treatment revealed that metalloproteinase inhibition diminished the functional and structural benefits of cell-gel in treating MI. Reduction of host angiogenesis, cardiomyocyte cycling, and MMP-2 activities was evident in animals treated with GM6001. Our findings suggest that MMPs play a critical role in the therapeutic benefits of platelet fibrin gel spiked with cardiac stem cells for treating MI. Significance In this study, the effects of matrix metalloproteinase inhibition on the performance of platelet gel spiked with cardiac stem cells (cell-gel) for heart regeneration are explored. The results demonstrate that matrix metalloproteinases are required for cell-gel to exert its benefits in cardiac repair. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases reduces cell engraftment, host angiogenesis, and recruitment of endogenous cardiovascular cells in rats with heart attack. PMID:27112177

  3. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Witt, Michelle R; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone-formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express FSH-R, to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1-3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short-term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones.

  4. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tourkova, Irina L.; Witt, Michelle R.; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J.; Blair, Harry C.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in FSH-R null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R), to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1–3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones. PMID:25118101

  5. Effectiveness of autologous serum as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in adipose-derived stem cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehoon; Chung, Jee-Hyeok; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Ki-Wan; Kim, Sukwha; Chang, Hak

    2013-09-01

    In cell culture, medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum is commonly used, and it is widely known that fetal bovine serum supplies an adequate environment for culture and differentiation of stem cells. Nevertheless, the use of xenogeneic serum can cause several problems. We compared the effects of four different concentrations of autologous serum (1, 2, 5, and 10%) on expansion and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells using 10% fetal bovine serum as a control. The stem cells were grafted on nude mice and the in vivo differentiation capacity was evaluated. The isolation of adipose-derived stem cells was successful irrespective of the culture medium. The proliferation potential was statistically significant at passage 2, as follows: 10% autologous serum > 10% fetal bovine serum = 5% autologous serum > 2% autologous serum = 1% autologous serum. The differentiation capacity appeared statistically significant at passage 4, as follows: 10% fetal bovine serum > 10% autologous serum = 5% autologous serum > 2% autologous serum = 1% autologous serum. Ten percent autologous serum and 10% fetal bovine serum had greater differentiation capacity than 1 and 2% autologous serum in vivo, and no significant difference was observed between the groups at ≥ 5% concentration at 14 weeks. In conclusion, 10% autologous serum was at least as effective as 10% fetal bovine serum with respect to the number of adipose-derived stem cells at the end of both isolation and expansion, whereas 1 and 2% autologous serum was inferior.

  6. The effect of stem cell proliferation regulators demonstrated with an in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Pragnell, I B; Wright, E G; Lorimore, S A; Adam, J; Rosendaal, M; DeLamarter, J F; Freshney, M; Eckmann, L; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N

    1988-07-01

    Spleen colony formation after transplantation of bone marrow cells into irradiated mice has been used as an assay for hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S), but has serious limitations intrinsic to an in vivo assay. In this report we describe experiments using an in vitro clonogenic assay that is especially suitable for studies of stem cell regulation as defined growth factors and normal untreated bone marrow can be used. We have demonstrated that the colony-forming cells have proliferative properties in common with CFU-S and respond to specific proliferation regulators previously detected using the spleen colony assay.

  7. Activin and TGF-β effects on brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Griselda; Velasco, Iván

    2012-11-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family members are ubiquitously expressed, participating in the regulation of many processes in different cell types both in embryonic and adult stages. Several members of this family, including Activins, TGF-β1-3 and Nodal, have been implicated in the development and maintenance of various organs, in which stem cells play important roles. Although TGF-β was initially considered an injury-related cytokine, it became clear that not only TGF-β, but other members of this family, play critical roles in morphogenesis and cell lineage specification. During brain development, Activin and TGF-βs as well as their cognate receptors, are expressed in different patterns. The roles of Activin and TGF-β during CNS development are sometimes contradictory, because these proteins present different actions depending on the cell type and the context. The aim of this review is to summarize current information on the actions of TGF-β members during developing brain, and also on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPC). We focus on the TGF-β subgroup, specifically on the effects of TGF-β1 and Activin A. In the first section we describe the main characteristics of the ligands, its receptors as well as the proteins and mechanisms involved in signaling. Next, we discuss the main advances concerning TGF-β1 and Activin actions during brain development and their roles in NSPC fate decision and neuroprotection both in vitro and in vivo. The emerging picture from these studies suggests that these growth factors can be used to manipulate neurogenesis and might help to achieve restoration after brain deterioration.

  8. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on induced skeletal muscle chemodenervation atrophy in adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Azza S; Al-Ghonemy, Nabila M; Ahmed, Samah M; Mohamed, Samar R

    2017-04-01

    The present research was conducted to evaluate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) as a potential therapeutic tool for improvement of skeletal muscle recovery after induced chemodenervation atrophy by repeated local injection of botulinum toxin-A in the right tibialis anterior muscle of adult male albino rats. Forty five adult Wistar male albino rats were classified into control and experimental groups. Experimental group was further subdivided into 3 equal subgroups; induced atrophy, BM-MSCs treated and recovery groups. Biochemical analysis of serum LDH, CK and Real-time PCR for Bcl-2, caspase 3 and caspase 9 was measured. Skeletal muscle sections were stained with H and E, Mallory trichrome, and Immunohistochemical reaction for Bax and CD34. Improvement in the skeletal muscle histological structure was noticed in BM-MSCs treated group, however, in the recovery group, some sections showed apparent transverse striations and others still affected. Immunohistochemical reaction of Bax protein showed strong positive immunoreaction in the cytoplasm of muscle fibers in the induced atrophy group. BM-MSCs treated group showed weak positive reaction while the recovery group showed moderate reaction in the cytoplasm of muscle fibers. Immunohistochemical reaction for CD34 revealed occasional positive CD34 stained cells in the induced atrophy group. In BM-MSCs treated group, multiple positive CD34 stained cells were detected. However, recovery group showed some positive CD34 stained cells at the periphery of the muscle fibers. Marked improvement in the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles after BM-MSCs therapy. Hence, stem cell therapy provides a new hope for patients suffering from myopathies and severe injuries.

  9. Diverse effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on the differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rajarshi; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Das, Anjan Kumar; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2012-04-01

    In vitro disease modeling using pluripotent stem cells can be a fast track screening tool for toxicological testing of candidate drug molecules. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is one of the most commonly used solvents in drug screening. In the present investigation, we exposed 14- to 21-day-old embryoid bodies (EBs) to three different concentrations of DMSO [0.01% (low dose), 0.1% (medium dose) and 1.0% (high dose)] to identify the safest dose that could effectively be used as solvent. We found that DMSO treatment substantially altered the morphology and attachment of cells in concurrence with a significant reduction in cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression studies revealed a selective downregulation of key markers associated with stemness (Oct-4, Sox-2, Nanog and Rex-1); ectoderm (Nestin, TuJ1, NEFH and Keratin-15); mesoderm (HAND-1, MEF-2C, GATA-4 and cardiac-actin); and endoderm (SOX-17, HNF-3β, GATA-6 and albumin), indicating an aberrant and untimely differentiation trajectory. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and histological analyses demonstrated substantial decrease in the levels of albumin and CK-18 proteins coupled with a massive reduction in the number of cells positive for PAS staining, implicating reduced deposits of glycogen. Our study advocates for the first time that DMSO exposure not only affects the phenotypic characteristics but also induces significant alteration in gene expression, protein content and functionality of the differentiated hepatic cells. Overall, our experiments warrant that hESC-based assays can provide timely alerts about the outcome of widespread applications of DMSO as drug solvent, cryoprotectant and differentiating agent.

  10. Stem cell responses after radiation exposure: A key to the evaluation and prediction of its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fliedner, T.M.; Paul, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.P.

    1996-06-01

    A biomathematical model of granulocytopoiesis is described and used to analyze the blood granulocyte changes seen in the blood of dogs and humans after continuous and after acute external radiation exposure. This allows to relate the cell change pattern seen to the extent of stem cell damage in the hematopoietic bone marrow distributed as semiautonomous units throughout the skeletal bones. The model is described briefly and consists of 8 cellular and 2 regulatory compartments and is described by 37 differential equations. With the help of this model, it can be shown that the chronic radiation exposure of dogs at a rate of between 0.003 and 0.12 Gy per day results in a system failure with subsequent death of the animal, if the stem cell pool decreases below 2.5% of its normal content. In human beings exposed to a single radiation exposure (as seen in radiation accidents) the simulation of the granulocyte pattern results in the finding that a reduction of the stem pool to 5-10% of normal is compatible with the assumption of its {open_quotes}reversible{close_quotes} damage (to be treated by conventional replacement therapy including cytokines), whereas the reduction of blood granulocytes to levels of less than 200-300 per mm{sup 3} on day 5-6 after exposure indicates that no stem cells remain from which a spontaneous regeneration could occur and hence would require a substitution therapy by stem cell transplantation. The same model was used to correlate the changing granulocyte pattern seen after autologous blood stem cell transfusion in patients treated with supralethal radiochemo conditioning regimen. The results indicate a proportionality of progenitor cells in the transfusate with the calculated stem cell number of the modeling exercise. It is proposed to use the pattern of granulocyte changes in the blood as a principal indicator to predict the outcome of a radiation exposure and to select appropriate therapeutic strategies. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Regenerative Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Spermatogenesis of Infertile Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Vahdati, Akbar; Fathi, Alireza; Hajihoseini, Mehrdokht; Aliborzi, Ghaem; Hosseini, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infertility is a serious social problem in advanced nations, with male factor in half of all cases of infertility. This study was conducted to determine the regenerative effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells in spermatogenesis of infertile hamster. METHODS Twelve adult male hamsters were equally divided into azoospermic and control groups. Busulfan was intraperitoneally used for induction of azoospermia, while the right testis was treated with bone marrow-derived stem cells (106 BM-SCs), labeled with sterile trypan blue, 35 days after busulfan injection. The left testis served as positive control for azoospermia. Sixty days after cell transplantation, the animals were euthanized and both testes were removed and evaluated histologically. RESULTS BM-SCs were spindle-shaped, adherent to the culture flasks and had positive expression of CD29 and CD73 and negative expression of CD45. Alcian blue staining confirmed differentiation of BM-SCs into chondrocytes. Karyotyping denoted to stability of chromosomes. Treatment with busulfan in seminiferous tubules resulted into distruption of spermatogenesis. After two months in busulfan treatment group, seminiferous tubular atrophy and germinal epitheliums degenerations were noticed with no spermatozoa in epididymis. After treatment of busulfan group with BM-SCs, spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes, spermatids and sperms were present in seminiferous tubules. CONCLUSION As cell transplantation in seminiferous tubules resulted into a rapid repair of pathological changes, BM-SCs can be recommended an effective treatment measure in azoospermia. It seems that more studies are necessary to confirm the use of this technique in treatment of azoospermia and infertility in human. PMID:28289609

  12. Effect of hypoxia on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and its potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman

    2017-02-21

    Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) are an ideal cell source for regenerative medicine due to their capabilities of multipotency and the readily accessibility of adipose tissue. They have been found residing in a relatively low oxygen tension microenvironment in the body, but the physiological condition has been overlooked in most studies. In light of the escalating need for culturing hASCs under their physiological condition, this review summarizes the most recent advances in the hypoxia effect on hASCs. We first highlight the advantages of using hASCs in regenerative medicine and discuss the influence of hypoxia on the phenotype and functionality of hASCs in terms of viability, stemness, proliferation, differentiation, soluble factor secretion, and biosafety. We provide a glimpse of the possible cellular mechanism that involved under hypoxia and discuss the potential clinical applications. We then highlight the existing challenges and discuss the future perspective on the use of hypoxic-treated hASCs.

  13. The effects of intestinal tract bacterial diversity on mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Littmann, Eric R.; Morjaria, Sejal; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Viale, Agnes; Dahi, Parastoo B.; Ponce, Doris M.; Barker, Juliet N.; Giralt, Sergio; van den Brink, Marcel; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly diverse bacterial populations inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and modulate host inflammation and promote immune tolerance. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the gastrointestinal mucosa is damaged, and colonizing bacteria are impacted, leading to an impaired intestinal microbiota with reduced diversity. We examined the impact of intestinal diversity on subsequent mortality outcomes following transplantation. Fecal specimens were collected from 80 recipients of allo-HSCT at the time of stem cell engraftment. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were characterized, and microbial diversity was estimated using the inverse Simpson index. Subjects were classified into high, intermediate, and low diversity groups and assessed for differences in outcomes. Mortality outcomes were significantly worse in patients with lower intestinal diversity; overall survival at 3 years was 36%, 60%, and 67% for low, intermediate, and high diversity groups, respectively (P = .019, log-rank test). Low diversity showed a strong effect on mortality after multivariate adjustment for other clinical predictors (transplant related mortality: adjusted hazard ratio, 5.25; P = .014). In conclusion, the diversity of the intestinal microbiota at engraftment is an independent predictor of mortality in allo-HSCT recipients. These results indicate that the intestinal microbiota may be an important factor in the success or failure in allo-HSCT. PMID:24939656

  14. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  15. Enhancing spontaneous stem cell healing (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAGUIRE, GREG; FRIEDMAN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are distributed throughout the human body and are responsible to a great extent for the body’s ability to maintain and heal itself. Accumulating data since the 1990s regarding stem cells have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells are not restricted to their ability to differentiate and are more likely due to their ability to release a multitude of molecules. Recent studies indicated that ≤80% of the therapeutic benefit of adult stem cells is manifested by the stem cell released molecules (SRM) rather than the differentiation of the stem cells into mature tissue. Stem cells may release potent combinations of factors that modulate the molecular composition of the cellular milieu to evoke a multitude of responses from neighboring cells. A multitude of pathways are involved in cellular and tissue function and, when the body is in a state of disease or trauma, a multitude of pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of that disease or trauma. Therefore, stem cells represent a natural systems-based biological factory for the production and release of a multitude of molecules that interact with the system of biomolecular circuits underlying disease or tissue damage. Currently, efforts are aimed at defining, stimulating, enhancing and harnessing SRM mechanisms, in order to develop systems-based methods for tissue regeneration, develop drugs/biologics or other therapeutics and enhance the release of SRM into the body for natural healing through proper dietary, exercise and other lifestyle strategies. PMID:24649089

  16. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  17. Effects of equiaxial strain on the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells without using biochemical reagents.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, F S; Jazayeri, M; Ghahari, P; Haghighipour, N

    2014-09-01

    During orthodontic treatments, applied mechanical forces create strain and result in tooth movement through the alveolar bone. This response to mechanical strain is a fundamental biological reaction. The present study evaluated the effect of equiaxial strain within the range of orthodontic forces on the osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Following isolation and culture of hDPSCs, 3rd passage cells were transferred on a silicone membrane covered with collagen. Cell adhesion to the membrane was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cells were divided into three groups: the first group was placed in a conventional culture medium, transferred to an equiaxial stretching device (3% strain for 2 weeks). The positive control was placed in an osteogenic medium with no mechanical strain. The negative control group was placed in the conventional culture medium with no mechanical strain either. Study groups were evaluated for expression ofosteogenic markers (Alkaline phosphatase and Osteopontin) with immunofluorescence and real time PCR. SEM images revealed optimal adhesion of cells to the silicone membrane. Immunofluorescence study demonstrated that osteocalcin expression occurred after 2 weeks in the two groups under mechanical and chemical signals. After application of equiaxial strain, level of expression of osteogenic markers was significantly higher than in the negative and positive control groups. Based on the study results, static equiaxial strain which mimics the types of orthodontic forces can result in differentiation of hDPSCs to osteoblasts. The results obtained may be used in cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  18. TRAIL-engineered pancreas-derived mesenchymal stem cells: characterization and cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moniri, M R; Sun, X-Y; Rayat, J; Dai, D; Ao, Z; He, Z; Verchere, C B; Dai, L-J; Warnock, G L

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy owing to their tumor-oriented homing capacity and the feasibility of autologous transplantation. Currently, pancreatic cancer patients face a very poor prognosis, primarily due to the lack of therapeutic strategies with an effective degree of specificity. Anticancer gene-engineered MSCs specifically target tumor sites and can produce anticancer agents locally and constantly. This study was performed to characterize pancreas-derived MSCs and investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on pancreatic cancer cells under different culture conditions. Pancreas-derived MSCs exhibited positive expression on CD44, CD73, CD95, CD105, negative on CD34 and differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. TRAIL expression was assessed by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Different patterns of TRAIL receptor expression were observed on the pancreatic cancer cell lines, including PANC1, HP62, ASPC1, TRM6 and BXPC3. Cell viability was assessed using a real-time monitoring system. Pancreatic cancer cell death was proportionally related to conditioned media from MSC(nsTRAIL) and MSC(stTRAIL). The results suggest that MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells and that this effect can be potentiated by TRAIL-transfection on death receptor-bearing cell types.

  19. Antineoplastic effects and mechanisms of micheliolide in acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-er; Song, He-nan; Yang, Ming; Liu, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Zi-xiang; Li, Ying-hui; Gao, Ying-dai

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) greatly contribute to the initiation, relapse, and multidrug resistance of leukemia. Current therapies targeting the cell cycle and rapidly growing leukemic cells, including conventional chemotherapy, have little effect due to the self-renewal and differentiated malignant cells replenishment ability of LSCs despite their scarce supply in the bone marrow. Micheliolide (MCL) is a natural guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone (GSL) which was discovered in michelia compressa and michelia champaca plants, and has been shown to exert selective cytotoxic effects on CD34+CD38− LSCs. In this study, we demonstrate that DMAMCL significantly prolongs the lifespan of a mouse model of human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Mechanistic investigations further revealed that MCL exerted its cytotoxic effects via inhibition of NF-κB expression and activity, and by generating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying MCL-induced cytotoxicity of LSCs, and support further preclinical investigations of MCL-related therapies for the treatment of AML. PMID:27542251

  20. Cellular quiescence in mammary stem cells and breast tumor stem cells: got testable hypotheses?

    PubMed

    Harmes, David C; DiRenzo, James

    2009-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is a state of reversible cell cycle arrest and has more recently been shown to be a blockade to differentiation and to correlate with resistance to cancer chemotherapeutics and other xenobiotics; features that are common to adult stem cells and possibly tumor stem cells. The biphasic kinetics of mammary regeneration, coupled to its cyclic endocrine control suggest that mammary stem cells most likely divide during a narrow window of the regenerative cycle and return to a state of quiescence. This would enable them to retain their proliferative capacity, resist differentiation signals and preserve their prolonged life span. There is accumulating evidence that mammary stem cells and other adult stem cells utilize quiescence for this purpose, however the degree to which tumor stem cells do so is largely unknown. The retained proliferative capacity of mammary stem cells likely enables them to accumulate and harbor mutations that lead to breast cancer initiation. However it is currently unclear if these causative lesions lead to defective or deranged quiescence in mammary stem cells. Evidence of such effects could potentially lead to the development of diagnostic systems that monitor mammary stem cell quiescence or activation. Such systems may be useful for the evaluation of patients who are at significant risk of breast cancer. Additionally quiescence has been postulated to contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. This review aims to evaluate what is known about the mechanisms governing cellular quiescence and the role of tumor stem cell quiescence in breast cancer recurrence.

  1. Synergistic effects of CoCl(2) and ROCK inhibition on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Legros, Hélène; Valable, Samuel; Duchatelle, Pascal; Lecocq, Myriam; Petit, Edwige; Nicole, Olivier; Bernaudin, Myriam

    2006-07-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) constitute an interesting cellular source to promote brain regeneration after neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, several studies suggested that oxygen-dependent gene expression is of crucial importance in governing the essential steps of neurogenesis such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In this context, we analysed the effect of the HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1) activation-mimicking agent CoCl(2) on MSCs. CoCl(2) treatment increased the expression of the anti-proliferative gene BTG2/PC3 and decreased cyclin D1 expression. Expression of HIF-1alpha and its target genes EPO, VEGF and p21 was also upregulated. These changes were followed by inhibition of cell proliferation and morphological changes resulting in neuron-like cells, which had increased neuronal marker expression and responded to neurotransmitters. Echinomycin, a molecule inhibiting HIF-1 DNA-binding activity, blocked the CoCl(2) effect on MSCs. Additionally, by using Y-27632, we demonstrated that Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibition potentiated CoCl(2)-induced MSC differentiation in particular into dopaminergic neuron-like cells as attested by its effect on tyrosine hydroxylase expression. Altogether, these results support the ability of MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in response to CoCl(2), an effect that might act, in part, through HIF-1 activation and cell-cycle arrest, and which is potentiated by inhibition of ROCK.

  2. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  3. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  4. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  5. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  6. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  7. Effects of Hypoxia and Chitosan on Equine Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, J.; Wagoner Johnson, A.

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan opens new perspectives in regenerative medicine as it enhances the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) through formation of spheroids. Hypoxia has also been proposed to enhance stemness and survival of MSCs after in vivo implantation. These characteristics are relevant to the development of an off-the-shelf source of allogenic cells for regenerative therapy of tendinopathies. Umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCM-MSCs) offer an abundant source of immature and immunoprivileged stem cells. In this study, equine UCM-MSCs (eqUCM-MSCs) conditioned for 3 and 7 days on chitosan films at 5% oxygen were compared to eqUCM-MSCs under standard conditions. Equine UCM-MSCs formed spheroids on chitosan but yielded 72% less DNA than standard eqUCM-MSCs. Expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Nanog was 4 to 10 times greater in conditioned cells at day 7. Fluorescence-labeled cells cultured for 7 days under standard conditions or on chitosan films under hypoxia were compared in a bilateral patellar tendon defect model in rats. Fluorescence was present in all treated tendons, but the modulus of elasticity under tension was greater in tendons treated with conditioned cells. Chitosan and hypoxia affected cell yield but improved the stemness of eqUCM-MSCs and their contribution to the healing of tissues. Given the abundance of allogenic cells, these properties are highly relevant to clinical applications and outweigh the negative impact on cell proliferation. PMID:27379167

  8. Generation of Novel Thyroid Cancer Stem-Like Cell Clones: Effects of Resveratrol and Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Heather; Yu, Xiao-Min; Harrison, April D; Larrain, Carolina; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Jidong; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an aggressive and highly lethal cancer for which conventional therapies have proved ineffective. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) represent a small fraction of cells in the cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are responsible for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis. We characterized CSCs in thyroid carcinomas and generated clones of CSC lines. Our study showed that anaplastic thyroid cancers had significantly more CSCs than well-differentiated thyroid cancers. We also showed that Aldefluor-positive cells revealed significantly higher expression of stem cell markers, self-renewal properties, thyrosphere formation, and enhanced tumorigenicity. In vivo passaging of Aldefluor-positive cells resulted in the growth of larger, more aggressive tumors. We isolated and generated two clonal spheroid CSC lines derived from anaplastic thyroid cancer that were even more enriched with stem cell markers and more tumorigenic than the freshly isolated Aldefluor-positive cells. Resveratrol and valproic acid treatment of one of the CSC lines resulted in a significant decrease in stem cell markers, Aldefluor expression, proliferation, and invasiveness, with an increase in apoptosis and thyroid differentiation markers, suggesting that these cell lines may be useful for discovering new adjuvant therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers. For the first time, we have two thyroid CSC lines that will be useful tools for the study of thyroid CSC targeted therapies.

  9. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

  10. Epigenetic Targeting of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cell (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC towards a differentiated phenotype, by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH+ OC cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH+ cells, including their tumor initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced re-expression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by re-programming residual cancer stem-like cells. Further, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  11. Mitochondrial transfer of mesenchymal stem cells effectively protects corneal epithelial cells from mitochondrial damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuelin; Wong, David Sai Hung; Li, Qing; Tse, Hung-fat; Xu, Goufeng; Yu, Zhendong; Lian, Qizhou

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can donate mitochondria to airway epithelial cells and rescue mitochondrial damage in lung injury. We sought to determine whether MSCs could donate mitochondria and protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the cornea. Co-culturing of MSCs and corneal epithelial cells (CECs) indicated that the efficiency of mitochondrial transfer from MSCs to CECs was enhanced by Rotenone (Rot)-induced oxidative stress. The efficient mitochondrial transfer was associated with increased formation of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) between MSCs and CECs, tubular connections that allowed direct intercellular communication. Separation of MSCs and CECs by a transwell culture system revealed no mitochiondrial transfer from MSCs to CECs and mitochondrial function was impaired when CECs were exposed to Rot challenge. CECs with or without mitochondrial transfer from MSCs displayed a distinct survival capacity and mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate. Mechanistically, increased filopodia outgrowth in CECs for TNT formation was associated with oxidative inflammation-activated NFκB/TNFαip2 signaling pathways that could be attenuated by reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Furthermore, MSCs grown on a decellularized porcine corneal scaffold were transplanted onto an alkali-injured eye in a rabbit model. Enhanced corneal wound healing was evident following healthy MSC scaffold transplantation. And transferred mitochondria was detected in corneal epithelium. In conclusion, mitochondrial transfer from MSCs provides novel protection for the cornea against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage. This therapeutic strategy may prove relevant for a broad range of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27831562

  12. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  13. Effect of selegiline on neural stem cells differentiation: a possible role for neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh, Kambiz; Nikzaban, Mehrnoush; Moloudi, Mohammad Raman; Izadpanah, Esmael

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The stimulation of neural stem cells (NSCs) differentiation into neurons has attracted great attention in management of neurodegenerative disease and traumatic brain injury. It has been reported that selegiline could enhance the morphologic differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the effects of selegiline on NSCs differentiation with focus on the role of neurotrophic factor gene expression. Materials and Methods: The NSCs were isolated from lateral ventricle of C57 mice brain. The cells were exposed to selegiline in nano to micromolar concentrations for 24 hr or 72 hr. In order to assay the effect of selegiline on NSCs differentiation into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, immunocytochemical techniques were utilized. Samples were exposed to specific antibodies against neurons (β tubulin), astrocytes (GFAP) and oligodendrocytes (OSP). The expression of BDNF, NGF and NT3 genes was investigated using Real-Time PCR. Results: Our findings revealed that selegiline increased NSCs differentiation into neurons at 10-7 and 10-8 M and decreased the differentiation into astrocytes at 10-9, while oligodendrocyte did not significantly change in any of the used concentrations. In addition data analyses showed that selegiline increased BDNF, NGF and NT3 gene expression at 24 hr, but did not change them in the other time of exposure (72 hr) except 10-7 M concentration of selegiline, which increased NT3 expression. Conclusion: Our results indicate selegiline induced the differentiation of NSCs into neurons and in this context the role of neurotrophic factors is important and should be considered. PMID:26221478

  14. Klotho, stem cells, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders. PMID:26346243

  15. Klotho, stem cells, and aging.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders.

  16. Effects of substrate stiffness on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2014-07-01

    Substrate mechanical properties, in addition to biochemical signals, have been shown to modulate cell phenotype. In this study, we inspected the effects of substrate stiffness on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from adult human bone marrow differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. A chemically modified extracellular matrix derived and highly biocompatible hydrogel, based on thiol functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-SH) and thiol functionalized recombinant human gelatin (Gtn-SH), which can be crosslinked by poly (ethylene glycol) tetra-acrylate (PEGTA), was used as a model system. The stiffness of the hydrogel was controlled by adjusting the crosslinking density. Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured on the hydrogels with different stiffness under adipogenic and osteogenic conditions. Oil Red O staining and F-actin staining were applied to assess the change of cell morphologies under adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, respectively. Gene expression of cells was determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as a function of hydrogel stiffness. Results support the hypothesis that adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs are inclined to occur on substrate with stiffness similar to their in vivo microenvironments.

  17. Effect of bovine pericardial extracellular matrix scaffold niche on seeded human mesenchymal stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Wong, Maelene L.; Griffiths, Leigh G.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on generation of unfixed bovine pericardium (BP) extracellular matrix (ECM) for clinical application. However, the extent to which maintenance of native ECM niche is capable of directing behavior of repopulating cells remains relatively unexplored. By exploiting the sidedness of BP scaffolds (i.e., serous or fibrous surface), this study aims to determine the effect of ECM niche preservation on cellular repopulation using different scaffold generation methods. BP underwent either sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) decellularization or stepwise, solubilization-based antigen removal using amidosulfobetaine-14 (ASB-14). SDS scaffolds were toxic to repopulating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scanning electron microscopy revealed distinct surface ultrastructure of ASB-14 scaffolds based on native BP sidedness. Basement membrane structures on the serous side stimulated hMSC cell monolayer formation, whereas fibrous side facilitated cell penetration into scaffold. Additionally, serous side seeding significantly increased hMSC adhesion and proliferation rate compared to the fibrous side. Furthermore, scaffold ECM niche stimulated sidedness dependent differential hMSC human leukocyte antigen expression, angiogenic and inflammatory cytokine secretion. This work demonstrates that ECM scaffold preparation method and preservation of BP side-based niches critically affects in vitro cell growth patterns and behavior, which has implications for use of such ECM biomaterials in clinical practice. PMID:27845391

  18. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  19. [Effect of polymeric scaffolds on attachment and growth of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Jia, Xiaozhen; Wang, Shuhong; Wu, Zhigang; Pan, Kefeng

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the effect of three kinds of polymeric scaffolds on attachment, proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the cells were different polymeric scaffolds of PLA-PEG, PLA, PLGA, respectively. The proliferation of cell was evaluated by cell count; the attachment and morphology of BMSCs were observed by SEM; and differentiation was detected by alkaline phosphatase activity, fluorescence, and RT-PCR methods. Results showed that the cells in PLGA group spread better among BMSCs adhered to the three polymeric scaffolds. The activity of ALP was detected after 3 days culture in these three groups. There were no significant differences between PLA-PEG and PLGA groups, but the activity of ALP was higher than PLA group. The gene expressions of osteocalicin and collagen I were also observed in the early culture time. Calcium nodes formation in these polymeric scaffolds were detected. BMSC spreading first, then overlapping growth and secretion of matrix around the bottom and surface of scaffolds were observed through SEM. In summary, PLA-PEG and PLGA are better polymeric scaffolds for the bone tissue engineering, compared with PLA.

  20. Biological effects of low-level laser irradiation on umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Wang, Hong; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Weichao; Wang, Chao; Chen, Zhuying

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) can enhance stem cell (SC) activity by increasing migration and proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLI on proliferation, enzymatic activity, and growth factor production in human umbilical cord mesenchymal SCs (hUC-MSCs) as well as the underlying mechanisms. hUC-MSCs were assigned to a control group (non-irradiation group) and three LLLI treatment groups (635 nm group, 808 nm group, and 635/808 nm group). Laser power density and energy density of 20 mW/cm2 and 12 J/cm2, respectively, were used for each experiment. The proliferation rate was higher in the 635 nm as compared to the other groups. LLLI at 808 nm did not induce cell proliferation. ROS levels in cells exposed to 635, 808, and 635/808 nm radiation were increased by 52.81%, 26.89%, and 21.15%, respectively, relative to the control group. CAT, tGPx, and SOD activity was increased. LLLI at 808 nm increased the levels of IL-1, IL-6, and NFκB but not VEGF. LLLI improved hUC-MSCs function and increased antioxidant activity. Dual-wavelength LLLI had more potent effects on hUC-MSCs than single-wavelength treatment. LLLI has potential applications in the preconditioning of hUC-MSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, which could improve the regenerative capacity of cells.

  1. Preferential targeting of cancer stem cells in the radiosensitizing effect of ABT-737 on HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Gilormini, Marion; Malesys, Céline; Armandy, Emma; Manas, Patrick; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Magné, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Ardail, Dominique

    2016-03-29

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are common human malignancies with poor clinical outcomes. The 5-year survival rates for patients with advanced stage HNSCC have not changed appreciably in the past few decades, underscoring a dire need for improved therapeutic options. HNSCC is frequently characterized by overexpression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Increased levels of these anti-apoptotic proteins have been associated with radio- and chemoresistance and poor clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate combined effects of radiation and ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic molecule, in HNSCC. Although ABT-737, as a single agent, was largely ineffective at promoting HNSCC cell death, we found that combining ABT-737 and radiation induced strong synergistic apoptosis in HNSCC cell lines and delayed tumoral growth in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that ABT-737, alone or in combination with radiation, can efficiently eliminate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Altogether, our results indicate that therapy targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members could be a highly effective potential adjuvant to radiotherapy capable of targeting CSCs in HNSCC and therefore overcoming cancer recurrence and metastasis.

  2. Heterochronic parabiosis for the study of the effects of aging on stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Conboy, Irina M.; Rando, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is unmistakable and undeniable in mammals. Interestingly, mice develop cataracts, muscle atrophy, osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes and cognitive deficits after just 2–3 postnatal years, while it takes seven or more decades for the same age-specific phenotypes to develop in humans. Thus, chronological age corresponds differently with biological age in metazoan species and although many theories exist, we do not understand what controls the rate of mammalian aging. One interesting idea is that species-specific rate of aging represents a ratio of tissue attrition to tissue regeneration. Furthermore, current findings suggest that the age-imposed biochemical changes in the niches of tissue stem cells inhibit performance of this regenerative pool, which leads to the decline of tissue maintenance and repair. If true, slowing down stem cell and niche aging, thereby promoting tissue regeneration, could slow down the process of tissue and organismal aging. In this regard, recent studies of heterochronic parabiosis provide important clues as to the mechanisms of stem cell aging and suggest novel strategies for enhancing tissue repair in the old. Here we review current literature on the relationship between the vigor of tissue stem cells and the process of aging, with an emphasis on the rejuvenation of old tissues by the extrinsic modifications of stem cell niches. PMID:22617385

  3. Effect of nanodiamond modification of siloxane surfaces on stem cell behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keremidarska, M.; Hikov, T.; Radeva, E.; Pramatarova, L.; Krasteva, N.

    2014-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for use in many cell therapies and tissue engineering due to their remarkable potential to replicate indefinitely and differentiate into various cell types. Many efforts have been put to study the factors controlling stem cell differentiation. However, still little knowledge has been gained to what extent biomaterials properties influence stem cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. Research utilizing bone marrow-derived MSCs has concentrated on development of specific materials which can enhance specific differentiation of stem cells e.g. osteogenic and chondrogenic. In the present work we have modified an organosilane, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) with detonation nanodiamond (DND) particles aiming to improve adhesion, growth and osteodifferentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells. HMDS/DND films were deposited on cover glass using two approaches: premixing of both compounds, followed by plasma polymerization (PP) and PP of HMDS followed by plasma deposition of DND particles. We did not observe however an increase in rMSCs adhesion and growth on DND-modified PPHMDS surfaces compared to unmodified PPHMDS. When we studied alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which is a major sign for early osteodifferentiation, we found the highest ALP activity on the PPHMDS/DND material, prepared by consequent deposition while on the other composite material ALP activity was the lowest. These results suggested that DND-modified materials were able to control osteodifferention in MSCs depending on the deposition approach. Modification of HMDS with DND particles by consequent plasma deposition seems to be a promising approach to produce biomaterials capable to guide stem cell differentiation toward osteoblasts and thus to be used in bone tissue engineering.

  4. International stem cell tourism and the need for effective regulation. Part II: Developing sound oversight measures and effective patient support.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Cynthia B; Cohen, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    Part I of this article, published in the March 2010 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, traces and addresses the provision of unproven stem cell treatments in Russia and India, examines the concept of innovative treatment, and concludes that stronger regulations are needed to protect the health and informed choices of patients. The current paper, Part II, proposes that the regulatory frameworks for the development of safe and efficacious treatments in effect in the United States and the United Kingdom provide examples of strong oversight measures from which countries seeking to obtain international credibility for their biotechnological competence could draw when developing regulations for stem cell treatments. Major sources of information available to persons who consider receiving such unproven treatments are explored in order to understand and address their concerns. The paper concludes with proposed measures to inform those considering the pursuit of unproven stem cell treatments abroad more accurately about their efficacy and safety and provide them with improved medical and social support in their home countries.

  5. The Effects of Hypoxia on U937 Cell Line in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Zahedi, Sarah; Kazemi, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are the most important members of Bone Marrow (BM) milieu. MSCs affect different kinds of cells, particularly malignant cells of hematologic malignancies, but the effects of MSCs are unclear exactly. Here we analyzed the effects of derived Umbilical Cord Blood-MSCs on proliferation, cell death and some surface markers of U937 cell line in a Co-culture system with MSCs. Methods: Here we designed Co-culture systems as a model of BM milieu. We cultured U937 cells on UCB-MSCs and MSCs Conditioned Medium (C.M) driven and then treated U937 cells with optimum concentration of chloride cobalt (CoCl2) as a hypoxia-mimetic agent. In addition, we applied suitable concentrations of H2O2 to induce cell death. Proliferation rate, cell death rate and some surface markers of hypoxic U937 cells were analyzed by MTT assay, flow cytometry and Real Time-PCR were flown respectively. Results: UCB-MSCs showed supportive effects on U937 proliferation rate in normoxia and hypoxia. Lethal effect of H2O2 suppressed in the presence of UCB-MSCs in hypoxia and normoxia. Among CD11a, CD14, CD49d, CD54 and CD116 markers, CD49d was down regulated in presence of UCB-MSCs and CD116 was up regulated in hypoxia. Other markers didn’t show any significant changes. Conclusion: This work provides evidences that MSCs play critical roles in U937 cells biology. These observations shed new light on MSCs roles and demonstrated that MSCs should be regarded as an important member of BM milieu in several clinical applications such as BM transplantation prognosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:28101472

  6. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of pericytes to the neural stem cell niche has not been defined. Here, we describe a rapid FACS purification strategy to simultaneously isolate primary endothelial cells and pericytes from brain microregions of nontransgenic mice using CD31 and CD13 as surface markers. We compared the effect of purified vascular cells from a neurogenic (V-SVZ) and non-neurogenic brain region (cortex) on the V-SVZ stem cell lineage in vitro. Endothelial and pericyte diffusible signals from both regions differentially promote the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of qNSCs, aNSCs, and TACs. Unexpectedly, diffusible cortical signals had the most potent effects on V-SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, highlighting the intrinsic capacity of non-neurogenic vasculature to support stem cell behavior. Finally, we identify PlGF-2 as an endothelial-derived mitogen that promotes V-SVZ cell proliferation. This purification strategy provides a platform to define the functional and molecular contribution of vascular cells to stem cell niches and other brain regions under different physiological and pathological states. PMID:25788671

  8. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on hypoxia-induced desensitization of β2-adrenergic receptors in rat osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, AKIRA; YOSHITANI, KAZUHIRO; SHIMIZU, TAKAMASA; AKAHANE, MANABU; FUJII, HIROMASA; TSUKAMOTO, SHINJI; KONDO, YUMIKO; HONOKI, KANYA; IMANO, MOTOHIRO; TANAKA, YASUHITO

    2012-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) mediates the effects of chronic stress in several neoplasms, however, β2AR signaling is impaired by hypoxia in various tissues. While hypoxia is a common feature significant in the progression of solid tumors, little is known about the effect of hypoxia on β2AR signaling in the tumor microenvironment. Previously, it has been reported that the systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) increased the engraftment and metastatic colonization of rat osteosarcoma (OS) cells. In the current study, the effect of MSCs on the hypoxia-induced desensitization of the β2AR in OS cells was investigated. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and isoproterenol increased the cellular proliferation of the rat OS cell line COS1NR and rat MSCs in a dose-dependent and β2AR antagonist-sensitive manner. While isoproterenol had significant proliferative effects on MSCs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, COS1NR cells did not respond under hypoxic conditions. A sensitivity assay for the β2AR revealed that hypoxia impaired the sensitivity of COS1NR cells, whereas hypoxia did not affect MSCs. An immunoassay revealed no significant change in the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) in COS1NR cells, whilst an immunoassay demonstrated a 15% increase in MSCs following isoproterenol stimulation. In COS1NR cells co-cultured with MSCs under hypoxic conditions, isoproterenol caused a significant increase in proliferation and this effect was inhibited by an anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody. A tumor formation assay in syngeneic rats revealed that the systemic administration of MSCs enhances the growth of OS and the effect of MSCs was inhibited by IL-6 neutralization. In conclusion, MSCs are resistant to the hypoxia-induced desensitization to β2AR. Hypoxia caused a siginificant desensitization of the β2AR in COS1NR cells alone, whereas MSCs may support tumor progression through cellular interactions. PMID:23205094

  9. The Therapeutic Effect of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shiwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Fu, Kai; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) against radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). Female rats were divided into 4 groups: (a) controls, consisting of nontreated rats; (b) radiation-treated rats; (c) radiation-treated rats receiving AdMSCs; and (d) radiation-treated rats receiving AdMSCs conditioned medium. AdMSCs or AdMSCs conditioned medium was injected into the muscular layer of bladder 24 h after radiation. Twelve weeks after radiation, urinary bladder tissue was collected for histological assessment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after metabolic cage investigation. At the 1 w, 4 w, and 8 w time points following cells injection, 3 randomly selected rats in RC group and AdMSCs group were sacrificed to track injected AdMSCs. Metabolic cage investigation revealed that AdMSCs showed protective effect for radiation-induced bladder dysfunction. The histological and ELISA results indicated that the fibrosis and inflammation within the bladder were ameliorated by AdMSCs. AdMSCs conditioned medium showed similar effects in preventing radiation-induced bladder dysfunction. In addition, histological data indicated a time-dependent decrease in the number of AdMSCs in the bladder following injection. AdMSCs prevented radiation induced bladder dysfunction and histological changes. Paracrine effect might be involved in the protective effects of AdMSCs for RIBI. PMID:27051426

  10. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of a cell-free extract derived from human adipose stem cells in experimental stroke models.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Daejong; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Ban, Jae-Jun; Park, Dong-Kyu; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Kim, Byung Sun; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Jeong-Min; Won, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2013-06-01

    A recent study suggested that a cell-free extract of human adipose stem cells (hASCs-E) has beneficial effects on neurological diseases by modulating the host environment. Here, we investigated the effects of hASCs-E in several experimental models of stroke in vitro (oxygen and glucose deprivation, OGD) and in vivo (transient or permanent focal cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage, ICH). Ischemia was induced in vitro in Neuro2A cells, and the hASCs-E was applied 24h before the OGD or concurrently. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by unilateral intraluminal thread occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rats for 90min or permanently, or by unilateral MCA microsurgical direct electrocoagulation in mice. The ICH model was induced with an intracerebral injection of collagenase in rats. The hASCs-E was intraperitoneally administered 1h after the stroke insults. Treatment of the hASCs-E led to a substantially high viability in the lactate dehydrogenase and WST-1 assays in the in vitro ischemic model. The cerebral ischemic and ICH model treated with hASCs-E showed decreased ischemic volume and reduced brain water content and hemorrhage volume. The ICH model treated with hASCs-E exhibited better performance on the modified limb placing test. The expression of many genes related to inflammation, immune response, and cell-death was changed substantially in the ischemic rats or neuronal cells treated with the hASCs-E. These results reveal a neuroprotective role of hASCs-E in animal models of stroke, and suggest the feasible application of stem cell-based, noninvasive therapy for treating stroke.

  12. Stem cells for spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer’s disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  13. Stem Cells behind the Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B.; Darido, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells sustain the adult skin for a lifetime through self-renewal and the production of committed progenitors. These stem cells generate progeny that will undergo terminal differentiation leading to the development of a protective epidermal barrier. Whereas the molecular mechanisms that govern epidermal barrier repair and renewal have been extensively studied, pathways controlling stem cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Asymmetric cell divisions, small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), chromatin remodeling complexes, and multiple differentiation factors tightly control the balance of stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and disruption of this balance leads to skin diseases. In this review, we summarize and discuss current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating epidermal stem and progenitor cell differentiation, and explore new relationships for maintenance of skin barrier function. PMID:23812084

  14. [Stem cell therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2009-03-01

    Medicine will be faced with a major challenge in coming years, namely how to treat for tissue dysfunction due to disease and aging There are two basic options: drug therapy and cell therapy. Stem cells have been the subject of intense speculation and controversy for several years, as they open up radically new therapeutic possibilities. Classical drugs can only smoothen consequences of tissue dysfunction, whereas cell therapy has the potential to restore tissue function by providing fresh cells. Cell therapy is totally different from organ transplantation, which can only benefit a limited number of patients. The use of the generic term "stem cells" to designate a whole variety of cell types that are present throughout life, is a source of confusion and ambiguity. It will take years of cognitive research to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern a stem cell's multi- or totipotent status before we can fully exploit this therapeutic tool to the full. The younger a stem cell the greater its potential and, probably, the more durable its benefits, but the use of embryonic stem cells raises ethical issues. The redundancy or equivalence of diferent categories of cells is another source of controversy, yet researchers must be able to study stem cells in all their diversity, as complementary rather than competitive alternatives, in an acceptable ethical and regulatory environment. We briefly describe the three types of stem cells: pluripotent embryonic stem cells, fetal and adult stem cells, and pluripotent reprogrammed adult somatic cells. Only the former two categories have physiological functions: the first gives rise to tissues and organs while the second maintains tissue function during adulthood

  15. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.

  16. Novel Cryopreservation Method for the Effective Collection of Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Yusuke; Tatehara, Seiko; Fukushima, Tatsuhiro; Tokuyama-Toda, Reiko; Yasuhara, Rika; Mishima, Kenji; Satomura, Kazuhito

    2017-03-17

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are an attractive cell source for use in cell-based therapy, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering because DPSCs have high cell proliferation ability and multi-differentiation capacity. However, several problems are associated with the collection and preservation of DPSCs for future cell-based therapy. In addition, the isolation of DPSCs for cryopreservation is time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation method for dental pulp tissues that can isolate suitable DPSCs after thawing cryopreserved tissue. Using the novel cryopreservation method, dental pulp tissues were cultured on adhesion culture dishes for 5 days and then cryopreserved. After thawing, the cryopreserved dental pulp tissue fragments exhibited cell migration. We evaluated each property of DPSCs isolated using the novel cryopreservation method (DPSCs-NCM) and the explant method alone without cryopreservation (DPSCs-C). DPSCs-NCM had the same proliferation capacity as DPSCs-C. FACS analysis indicated that both DPSCs-NCM and DPSCs-C were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers at the same level but negative for hematopoietic cell markers. Moreover, both DPSCs-NCM and DPSCs-C could differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic cells during culture in each induction medium. These results suggest that DPSCs-NCM may be mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, our novel method might allow for easy and less expensive cryopreservation of DPSCs, thereby providing suitable DPSCs for use in patients in future cell-based therapies.

  17. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  18. [Studies of the primary effects of chronic clinostatting of embryonal mice stem cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, N A; Manuilova, E S; Grivennikov, I A; Tarantul, V Z; Buravkova, L B

    2006-01-01

    Effects of randomized gravity vector (clinostatting) on embryonal stem cells (ESC) of mice were evaluated in vitro with respect to proliferation, proliferative potential, and differentiability. Colony formation remained normal up to hour 72 of clinostatting; however, further exposure led to fusion of the ESC colonies. No reliable shifts in the proliferative activity were found, whereas morphometric analysis showed different dynamics of the ESC colonies size in specific periods of the experiment comparing with the control. Evaluation of the ESC proliferative potential after the experiment revealed a trend upward in the number of colonies when compared with the dynamic and static controls. However, the number of resulted EBs in the control tended upward contrary to EBs formed under the conditions of clinostatting and continuous agitation pointing to the importance of local medium conditioning at the beginning of ESC differentiation.

  19. How I treat late effects in adults after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Jagasia, Shubhada; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2011-01-01

    More than 25 000 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (allo-HCTs) are expected to be performed worldwide in 2010, a number that has been increasing yearly. With broadening indications, more options for allo-HCT, and improvement in survival, by 2020 there may be up to half a million long-term survivors after allo-HCT worldwide. These patients have increased risks for various late complications, which can cause morbidity and mortality. Most long-term survivors return to the care of their local hematologists/oncologists or primary care physicians, who may not be familiar with specialized monitoring recommendations for this patient population. The purpose of this article is to describe practical approaches to screening for and managing these late effects, with the goal of reducing preventable morbidity and mortality associated with allo-HCT. PMID:21193694

  20. The advantages of hair follicle pluripotent stem cells over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Multipotent adult stem cells have many potential therapeutic applications. Our recent findings suggest that hair follicles are a promising source of easily accessible multipotent stem cells. Stem cells in the hair follicle area express the neural stem cell marker nestin, suggesting that hair-follicle stem cells and neural stem cells have common features. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can form neurons and other cell types, and thus adult hair follicle stem cells could have important therapeutic applications, particularly for neurologic diseases. Transplanted hair follicle stem cells promote the functional recovery of injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Recent findings suggest that direct transplantation of hair-follicle stem cells without culture can promote nerve repair, which makes them potentially clinically practical. Human hair follicle stem cells as well as mouse hair follicle stem cells promote nerve repair and can be applied to test the hypothesis that human hair follicle stem cells can provide a readily available source of neurologically therapeutic stem cells. The use of hair follicle stem cells for nerve regeneration overcomes critical problems of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells in that the hair follicle stem cells are multipotent, readily accessible, non-oncogenic, and are not associated with ethical issues.

  1. EpCAM is a putative stem marker in retinoblastoma and an effective target for T-cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Moutushy; Kandalam, Mallikarjuna; Harilal, Anju; Verma, Rama Shenkar; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Swaminathan, Sethuraman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The molecular markers cluster of differentiation (CD)24, CD44, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are widely used, individually or in combination, to characterize some types of cancer stem cells. In this study we characterized the EpCAM+ retinoblastoma (RB) cells for their cancer stem-like properties in vitro. Additionally, we targeted RB tumor cells via redirecting T cells using bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody. Methods Flow cytometry was used to study the co-expression of EpCAM with putative cancer stem cell markers, such as CD44, CD24, and ABCG2, in RB primary tumors. In vitro methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, invasion assay, and neurosphere formation assay were performed to characterize EpCAM+ cells for their cancer stem/progenitor cell-like properties. We assessed the in vitro efficacy of bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody on RB tumor cell proliferation and validated the results by evaluating effector cytokine production in the culture medium with the ELISA method. Results EpCAM was co-expressed with all cancer stem cell markers (CD44, CD24, and ABCG2) in primary RB tumors. EpCAM+ cells showed significantly higher proliferative invasive potential and neurosphere formation in vitro compared to EpCAM– Y79 cells. EpCAM+ cells showed higher β-catenin expression compared to EpCAMˉ cells. EpCAM×CD3 significantly retarded proliferation of RB primary tumor cells. EpCAM×CD3 effectively induced the secretion of effector cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and also perforin levels by pre-activated lymphocytes. Conclusions EpCAM might be a novel cancer stem cell marker in RB. EpCAM×CD3 antibody redirecting T cells to attack RB tumor cells may prove effective in RB management. Further preclinical studies are needed to confirm the initial findings of our study. PMID:22328825

  2. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional) of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism - where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem cell therapies that

  3. Tumor acidosis enhances cytotoxic effects and autophagy inhibition by salinomycin on cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Paola; Dyczynski, Matheus; Sbrana, Francesca Vittoria; Karlgren, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Ma, Ran; Hartman, Johan; Bajalica-Lagercrantz, Svetlana; Grander, Dan; Kharaziha, Pedram; De Milito, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Sustained autophagy contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cancer cells to hypoxic and acidic microenvironments. Since cells in such environments are resistant to conventional cytotoxic drugs, inhibition of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in clinical oncology. We previously reported that the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor under clinical investigation is strongly impaired in acidic tumor environments, due to poor uptake of the drug, a phenomenon widely associated with drug resistance towards many weak bases. In this study we identified salinomycin (SAL) as a potent inhibitor of autophagy and cytotoxic agent effective on several cancer cell lines under conditions of transient and chronic acidosis. Since SAL has been reported to specifically target cancer-stem cells (CSC), we used an established model of breast CSC and CSC derived from breast cancer patients to examine whether this specificity may be associated with autophagy inhibition. We indeed found that CSC-like cells are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition compared to cells not expressing CSC markers. We also report that the ability of SAL to inhibit mammosphere formation from CSC-like cells was dramatically enhanced in acidic conditions. We propose that the development and use of clinically suitable SAL derivatives may result in improved autophagy inhibition in cancer cells and CSC in the acidic tumor microenvironment and lead to clinical benefits. PMID:27248168

  4. Effects of Notch-1 down-regulation on malignant behaviors of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gong-ling; Tian, Ye; Lu, Chong; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Xiang-wang; Guo, Ya-wen; Wang, Long-qiang; Du, Qiu-li; Liu, Chun-ping

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the effect of Notch-1 signaling on malignant behaviors of breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). BCSCs were enriched by using serum-free medium and knocked out of Notch-1 by using a lentiviral vector. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to detect the Notch-1 expression levels in breast cancer cell lines and BCSCs, and flow cytometry to detect the proportion of BCSCs in BCSC spheres. The BCSC self-renewal, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity were examined by the tumor microsphere-forming assay and transwell assay and after xenotransplantation. The results showed that the Notch-1 silencing reduced the number of BCSC spheres, the proportion of BCSCs, and the number of cells penetrating through the transwell membrane. It also decreased the size of tumors that were implanted in the nude mice. These results suggest that Notch-1 signaling is intimately linked to the behaviors of BCSCs. Blocking Notch-1 signaling can inhibit the malignant behaviors of BCSCs, which may provide a promising therapeutical approach for breast cancer.

  5. Effect of Hypoxia-regulated Polo-like Kinase 3 (Plk3) on Human Limbal Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; González, Sheyla; Dai, Wei; Deng, Sophie; Lu, Luo

    2016-08-05

    Hypoxic conditions in the cornea affect epithelial function by activating Polo-like kinase 3 (Plk3) signaling and the c-Jun·AP-1 transcription complex, resulting in apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells. Hypoxic stress in the culture conditions also regulates limbal stem cell growth and fate. In this study, we demonstrate that there is a differential response of Plk3 in hypoxic stress-induced primary human limbal stem (HLS) and corneal epithelial (HCE) cells, resulting in different pathways of cell fate. We found that hypoxic stress induced HLS cell differentiation by down-regulating Plk3 activity at the transcription level, which was opposite to the effect of hypoxic stress on Plk3 activation to elicit HCE cell apoptosis, detected by DNA fragmentation and TUNEL assays. Hypoxic stress-induced increases in c-Jun phosphorylation/activation were not observed in HLS cells because Plk3 expression and activity were suppressed in hypoxia-induced HLS cells. Instead, hypoxic stress-induced HLS cell differentiation was monitored by cell cycle analysis and measured by the decrease and increase in p63 and keratin 12 expression, respectively. Hypoxic stress-induced Plk3 signaling to regulate c-Jun activity, resulting in limbal stem cell differentiation and center epithelial apoptosis, was also found in the corneas of wild-type and Plk3(-/-)-deficient mice. Our results, for the first time, reveal the differential effects of hypoxic stress on Plk3 activity in HLS and HCE cells. Instead of apoptosis, hypoxic stress suppresses Plk3 activity to protect limbal stem cells from death and to allow the process of HLS cell differentiation.

  6. Long-term immunomodulatory effect of amniotic stem cells in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Sul; Kim, Hyun Sook; Park, Ji-Min; Kim, Han Wool; Park, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Hyun-Seob; Lim, Dae Seog; Lee, Tae Hee; Chopp, Michael; Moon, Jisook

    2013-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) plays a major role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and neuroinflammatory processes mediated by Aβ plaque-induced microglial cells and astrocytes contribute to AD pathogenesis. The present study examined human placenta amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs), which have potent immunomodulatory and paracrine effects in a Tg2576 (APPswe) transgenic mouse model of AD. AMSCs secreted high levels of transforming growth factor-β under in vitro inflammatory environment conditions. Six weeks after the intravenous injection of AMSCs, APPswe mice showed evidence of improved spatial learning, which significantly correlated with the observation of fewer Aβ plaques in brain. The number of ED1-positive phagocytic microglial cells associated with Aβ plaques was higher in AMSC-injected mice than in phosphate-buffered saline-injected mice, and the level of Aβ-degrading enzymes (matrix metallopeptidase-9 and insulin-degrading enzyme) was also significantly higher. Furthermore, the level of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, was lower and that of anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, was higher in AMSC-injected mice than phosphate-buffered saline-injected mice. These effects lasted until 12 weeks after AMSC injection. Taken together, these results collectively suggest that injection of AMSCs might show significant long-lasting improvement in AD pathology and memory function via immunomodulatory and paracrine mechanisms.

  7. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future.

  8. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: treating cancer like an infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ozsvari, Bela; Lisanti, Camilla L; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-03-10

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent

  9. Contrasting effect of perlecan on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Fumio; Fukunaga, Shigeharu

    2014-03-01

    Perlecan, a basement membrane component, shows diverse functions in different organs and tissues. However, the role of perlecan in differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been barely investigated. In this study, we examined the effect of perlecan on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro by adding extrinsic perlecan to culture media or blocking the function of intrinsic perlecan expressed into culture media by differentiating MSCs. Extrinsic perlecan suppressed adipogenic differentiation; however, it promoted osteogenic differentiation. These functions were further confirmed by a study of blocking intrinsic perlecan. Perlecan treated with heparitinase-I also showed the suppressive effect on adipogenic differentiation. In contrast, the promotive effect on osteogenic differentiation was found to be heparan sulfate-dependent. Intrinsic perlecan was suggested to be effective at the late stage of adipogenic differentiation by a study of perlecan-blocking performed at distinct periods, but was suggested to be effective at the early stage of osteogenic differentiation. Our results showed perlecan has contrasting effect on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs due to its diverse actions. Based on these outcomes, we recognized that employing extrinsic perlecan or blocking intrinsic perlecan is effective for regulating adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by restricting its direction.

  10. Mathematical modelling of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: effects of altered stem cell dynamics on cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine-labelled cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebell, Frederik; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the adult hippocampus, neurogenesis—the process of generating mature granule cells from adult neural stem cells—occurs throughout the entire lifetime. In order to investigate the involved regulatory mechanisms, knockout (KO) experiments, which modify the dynamic behaviour of this process, were conducted in the past. Evaluating these KOs is a non-trivial task owing to the complicated nature of the hippocampal neurogenic niche. In this study, we model neurogenesis as a multicompartmental system of ordinary differential equations based on experimental data. To analyse the results of KO experiments, we investigate how changes of cell properties, reflected by model parameters, influence the dynamics of cell counts and of the experimentally observed counts of cells labelled by the cell division marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We find that changing cell proliferation rates or the fraction of self-renewal, reflecting the balance between symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions, may result in multiple time phases in the response of the system, such as an initial increase in cell counts followed by a decrease. Furthermore, these phases may be qualitatively different in cells at different differentiation stages and even between mitotically labelled cells and all cells existing in the system. PMID:24598209

  11. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The medical use of low level laser (LLL) irradiation has been occurring for decades, primarily in the area of tissue healing and inflammatory conditions. Despite little mechanistic knowledge, the concept of a non-invasive, non-thermal intervention that has the potential to modulate regenerative processes is worthy of attention when searching for novel methods of augmenting stem cell-based therapies. Here we discuss the use of LLL irradiation as a "photoceutical" for enhancing production of stem cell growth/chemoattractant factors, stimulation of angiogenesis, and directly augmenting proliferation of stem cells. The combination of LLL together with allogeneic and autologous stem cells, as well as post-mobilization directing of stem cells will be discussed. PMID:20158898

  12. Effect of Wnt Signaling on the Differentiation of Islet β-Cells from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hefei; Ren, Yu; Hu, Xiao; Ma, Min; Wang, Xiao; Liang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt signaling is critical for pancreatic development and islet function; however, its precise effects on the development and function of the β-cells remain controversial. Here we examined mRNA and protein expression of components of the Wnt signaling throughout the differentiation of islet β-cells from adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). After induction, ADSCs expressed markers of β-cells, including the insulin, PDX1, and glucagon genes, and the PDX1, CK19, nestin, insulin, and C-peptide proteins, indicating their successful differentiation. Compared with pancreatic adult stem cells (PASCs), the quantities of insulin, GLUT2, and Irs2 mRNA decreased, whereas Gcg, Gck, and Irs1 mRNA increased. Over time, during differentiation, insulin mRNA and protein expression increased, Gcg and Gck mRNA expression increased, Irs1 mRNA expression decreased and then increased, and Irs2 mRNA increased and then decreased (all P < 0.05). The expression of Dvl-2, LRP5, and GSK3β mRNA as well as the Dvl-2, GSK3β, and p-GSK3β proteins also increased (P < 0.05). Expression of TCF7L2 (6–10 d) and β-catenin mRNA as well as the β-catenin protein increased but not significantly (P > 0.05). Our results indicate that the Wnt signaling is activated during ADSC differentiation into islet β-cells, but there was no obvious enrichment of nonphosphorylated β-catenin protein. PMID:28303247

  13. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  14. Effects of low frequency electromagnetic field on proliferation of human epidermal stem cells: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingsheng; Li, Xinping; Bai, Liming; Uchida, Kenzo; Bai, Wenfang; Wu, Bo; Xu, Weicheng; Zhu, Hongxiang; Huang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the proliferation of epidermal stem cells, human epidermal stem cells (hESC) were isolated, expanded ex vivo, and then exposed to a low frequency EMF. The test and control cells were placed under the same environment. The test cells were exposed for 30 min/day to a 5 mT low frequency EMF at 1, 10, and 50 Hz for 3, 5, or 7 days. The effects of low frequency EMF on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and cell-surface antigen phenotype were investigated. Low frequency EMF significantly enhanced the proliferation of hESC in the culture medium in a frequency-dependent manner, with the highest cell proliferation rate at 50 Hz (P < 0.05). Exposure to a low frequency EMF significantly increased the percentage of cells at the S phase of the cell cycle, coupled with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G1 phase (P < 0.05) but the effect was not frequency dependent. The percentage of CD29(+) /CD71(-) cells remained unchanged in the low frequency EMF-exposed hESC. The results suggested that low frequency EMF influenced hESC proliferation in vitro, and this effect was related to the increased proportion of cells at the S phase.

  15. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  16. Effect of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) on proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Qun; Lu, Yan; Li, Hui-Juan; Cheng, Xing-Bo

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) on proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and the underlying mechanism. Bone marrow cell proliferation was determined by WST-8 assay using Cell Counting Kit-8 under the intervention of AGEs. In addition, the content of maldondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also measured. The proliferation activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was significantly inhibited when AGEs were added to culture medium, and this effect was dose-dependent and time-dependent. As the concentration of AGEs-bovine serum albumin increased, the content of intracellular MDA was significantly increased, but the activity of SOD in cell homogenates was significantly suppressed, which also showed a dose-dependent manner. AGEs could significantly inhibit the proliferation of MSCs in vitro by improving the oxidative stress in MSCs and breaking the homeostasis of intracellular environment.

  17. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  18. Comparative effects of chlorhexidine and essential oils containing mouth rinse on stem cells cultured on a titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Beom; Lee, Gil; Yun, Byeong Gon; Kim, Chang-Hyen; Ko, Youngkyung

    2014-04-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) and Listerine (LIS), an essential oil compound, are the two commonly used adjunctive agents for mechanical debridement, for reducing the bacterial load in the treatment of peri-implant inflammation. However, antimicrobial agents have been reported to be cytotoxic to the alveolar bone cells and gingival epithelial cells. The present study was performed to examine the effects of antiseptics CHX and LIS, on the morphology and proliferation of stem cells. Stem cells derived from the buccal fat pad were grown on machined titanium discs. Each disc was immersed in CHX or LIS for 30 sec, 1.5 min or 4.5 min. Cell morphology was evaluated with a confocal laser microscope and the viability of the cells was quantitatively analyzed with the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). The untreated cells attached to the titanium discs demonstrated well-organized actin cytoskeletons. No marked alterations in the cytoskeletal organization were observed in any of the treated groups. The treatment with CHX and LIS of the titanium discs decreased the viability of the cells grown on the treated discs (P<0.05). The stem cells derived from the buccal fat pad were sensitive to CHX and LIS, and a reduction in cellular viability was observed when these agents were applied to the discs for 30 sec. Further studies are required to determine the optimal application time and concentration of this antimicrobial agent for maximizing the reduction of the bacterial load and minimizing the cytotoxicity to the surrounding cells.

  19. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    PubMed

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  20. Diverse effects of type II collagen on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Huang, Huei-Mei; Leu, Sy-Jye; Yang, Charng-Bin; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Type II collagen is known to modulate chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, MSCs from human bone marrow aspirates were used to study the modulating effects of type II collagen on MSC differentiation during the early stages of osteogenesis and adipogenesis. With osteogenic induction, MSCs cultured on the type II collagen-coated surface showed an enhanced calcium deposition level with increasing mRNA expressions of RUNX2, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. A synthetic integrin binding peptide, which specifically interacts with the I-domain of α(1)β(1)/α(2)β(1) integrins significantly blocks the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen. MSCs attached on the type II collagen-coated plates exhibited expanded cell morphology with increasing spreading area, and the pretreatment of cells with integrin α(1)β(1) or α(2)β(1)-blocking antibody reduced the effect. The phosphorylation levels of FAK, ERK, and JNK significantly increased in the MSCs that attached on the type II collagen-coated plates. On the contrary, the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen was diminished by JNK and MEK inhibitors. Furthermore, type II collagen blocked the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs, and this effect is rescued by JNK and MEK inhibitors. In conclusion, type II collagen facilitates osteogenesis and suppresses adipogenesis during early stage MSC differentiation. Such effects are integrin binding-mediated and conducted through FAK-JNK and/or FAK-ERK signaling cascades. These results inspire a novel strategy encompassing type II collagen in bone tissue engineering.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Maria A; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Eiro, Noemi; Gonzalez, Francisco; Saa, Jorge; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells (CM-hUCESCs) in uveitis. To do that, uveitis was induced in rats after footpad injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccaride (LPS). Human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells after LPS challenge were used to test anti-inflammatory effect of CM-hUCESCs 'ìn vitro'. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interkeukin-6, interkeukin-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and the anti-inflammatory interkeukin-10. Leucocytes from aqueous humor (AqH) were quantified in a Neubauer chamber, and eye histopathological analysis was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Additionally, using a human cytokine antibody array we evaluated CM-hUCESCs to determine mediating proteins. Results showed that administration of CM-hUCESCs significantly reduced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines both 'in vitro' and 'in vivo', and decreased leucocytes in AqH and ocular tissues. High levels of cytokines with anti-inflammatory effects were found in CM-hUCESCs, suggesting a possible role of these factors in reducing intraocular inflammation. In summary, treatment with CM-hUCESCs significantly reduces inflammation in uveitis. Our data indicate that CM-hUCESCs could be regarded as a potential therapeutic agent for patients suffering from ocular inflammation.

  2. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  3. Effects of genetically engineered stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-beta or carboxyl esterase on the growth of LNCaP rrostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kim, Yun-Bae; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-09-28

    The risk of prostate cancer has been increasing in men by degrees. To develop a new prostate cancer therapy, we used a stem cell-derived gene directed prodrug enzyme system using human neural stem cells (hNSCs) that have a tumor-tropic effect. These hNSCs were transduced with the therapeutic genes for bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD), alone or in combination with the one encoding human interferon-beta (IFN-β) or rabbit carboxyl esterase (CE) to generate HB1.F3.CD, HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β, and HB1.F3.CE cells, respectively. CD enzyme can convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the activated form 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In addition, CE enzyme can convert the prodrug CPT-11 into a toxic agent, SN-38. In our study, the human stem cells were found to migrate toward LNCaP human prostate cancer cells rather than primary cells. This phenomenon may be due to interactions between chemoattractant ligands and receptors, such as VEGF/VEGFR2 and SCF/c-Kit, expressed as cancer and stem cells, respectively. The HB1.F3.CE, HB.F3.CD, or HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells significantly reduced the LNCaP cell viability in the presence of the prodrugs 5-FC or CPT-11. These results indicate that stem cells expressing therapeutic genes can be used to develop a new strategy for selectively treating human prostate cancer.

  4. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response.

  5. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  6. The postnatal origin of adult neural stem cells and the effects of glucocorticoids on their genesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia; Trejo, José L

    2015-02-15

    The relevance of adult neurogenesis in hippocampal function is well documented, as is the potential impact stress has on the adult neurogenic niche. Adult born neurons are generated from neural precursors in the dentate gyrus (DG), although the point in postnatal development that these cell precursors originate is not known. This is particularly relevant if we consider the effects stress may have on the development of neural precursors, and whether such effects on adult neurogenesis and behavior may persist in the long-term. We have analyzed the proportion of neural precursors in the adult murine hippocampus born on specific days during postnatal development using a dual birth-dating analysis, and we assessed their sensitivity to dexamethasone (DEX) on the peak day of cell generation. We also studied the consequences of postnatal DEX administration on adult hippocampal-dependent behavior. Postnatal day 6 (P6) is a preferred period for proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) to become the precursors that remain in a proliferative state throughout adulthood. This window is independent of gender, the cell's location in the DG granule cell layer or their rostro-caudal position. DEX administration at P6 reduces the size of the adult NSC pool in the DG, which is correlated with poor learning/memory capacity and increased anxiety-like behavior. These results indicate that aNSCs are generated non-uniformly during postnatal development, with peak generation on day P6, and that stress receptor activation during the key period of postnatal NSC generation has a profound impact on both adult hippocampal neurogenesis and behavior.

  7. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention.

  8. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  9. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  10. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27657126

  11. Effects of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray Extract on Adipocyte Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Sorrenti, Valeria; Santangelo, Rosa; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Calabrese, Giovanna; Genovese, Carlo; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Ragusa, Salvatore; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray (Asteraceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. There is increasing interest on the in vivo protective effects of natural compounds contained in plants against oxidative damage caused from reactive oxygen species. In the present study the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of aqueous, methanol and dichloromethane extracts of leaves of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray were determined; furthermore, free radical scavenging capacity of each extract and the ability of these extracts to inhibit in vitro plasma lipid peroxidation were also evaluated. Since oxidative stress may be involved in trasformation of pre-adipocytes into adipocytes, to test the hypothesis that Tithonia extract may also affect adipocyte differentiation, human mesenchymal stem cell cultures were treated with Tithonia diversifolia aqueous extract and cell viability, free radical levels, Oil-Red O staining and western bolt analysis for heme oxygenase and 5'-adenosine monophoshate-activated protein kinase were carried out. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray exhibits interesting health promoting properties, resulting both from its free radical scavenger capacity and also by induction of protective cellular systems involved in cellular stress defenses and in adipogenesis of mesenchymal cells. PMID:25848759

  12. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemic volume‐controlled photothrombotic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun‐Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee‐Hoon; Seo, Young‐Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Various animal models of stroke have been developed to simulate the human stroke with the development of the ischemic method facilitates preclinical stroke research. The photothrombotic ischemia model, based on the intravascular photochemical reaction, is widely used for in vivo studies. However, this study has limitations, which generated a relatively small‐sized infarction model on superficial cortex compared to that of the MCAO stroke model. In this study, the photothorombosis mouse model is adapted and the optimum conditions for generation of cell death and deficits with high reproducibility is determined. The extent of damage within the cortex was assessed by infarct volume and cellular/behavioral analyses. In this model, the neural cell death and inflammatory responses is detected; moreover, the degree of behavioral impairment is correlated with the brain infarct volume. Further, to enhance the understanding of neural repair, the effect of neural differentiation by transplantation of human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) is analyzed. The authors demonstrated that transplantation of BM‐MSCs promoted the neural differentiation and behavioral performance in their photothrombosis model. Therefore, this research was meaningful to provide a stable animal model of stroke with low variability. Moreover, this model will facilitate development of novel MSC‐based therapeutics for stroke. PMID:27440447

  13. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of amlodipine besylate and benidipine hydrochloride on oxidative stress-injured neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na-Young; Choi, Hojin; Park, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Eun-Hye; Yu, Hyun-Jeung; Lee, Kyu-Yong; Joo Lee, Young; Koh, Seong-Ho

    2014-03-10

    Hypertension is associated with oxidative stress. Amlodipine besylate (AB) and benidipine hydrochloride (BH), which are Ca(2+) antagonists, have been reported to reduce oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of AB and BH on oxidative stress-injured neural stem cells (NSCs), with a focus on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. After treatment with H2O2, the viability of NSCs decreased in a concentration-dependent manner; however, co-treatment with AB or BH restored the viability of H2O2-injured NSCs. H2O2 increased free radical production and apoptosis in NSCs, whereas co-treatment with AB or BH attenuated these effects. To evaluate the effects of AB or BH on the H2O2-inhibited proliferation of NSCs, we performed BrdU labeling and colony formation assays and found that NSC proliferation decreased upon H2O2 treatment but that combined treatment with AB or BH restored this proliferation. Western blot analysis showed that AB and BH increased the expression of cell survival-related proteins that were linked with the PI3K and ERK pathways but decreased the expression of cell death-related proteins. To investigate whether the PI3K and ERK pathways were directly involved in the neuroprotective effects of AB and BH on H2O2-treated NSCs, NSCs were pretreated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, or the ERK inhibitor, FR180204, which significantly blocked the effects of AB and BH. Together, our results suggest that AB and BH restore the H2O2-inhibited viability and proliferation of NSCs by inhibiting oxidative stress and by activating the PI3K and ERK pathways.

  15. Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Reik, Wolf; Surani, M Azim

    2015-11-02

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in the germline and imprinting cycle. Germ cells show extensive epigenetic programming in preparation for the generation of the totipotent state, which in turn leads to the establishment of pluripotent cells in blastocysts. The latter are the cells from which pluripotent embryonic stem cells are derived and maintained in culture. Following blastocyst implantation, postimplantation epiblast cells develop, which give rise to all somatic cells as well as primordial germ cells, the precursors of sperm and eggs. Pluripotent stem cells in culture can be induced to undergo differentiation into somatic cells and germ cells in culture. Understanding the natural cycles of epigenetic reprogramming that occur in the germline will allow the generation of better and more versatile stem cells for both therapeutic and research purposes.

  16. Bone repair and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  17. Effectiveness of Partner Social Support Predicts Enduring Psychological Distress after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rini, Christine; Redd, William H.; Austin, Jane; Mosher, Catherine E.; Meschian, Yeraz Markarian; Isola, Luis; Scigliano, Eileen; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Labay, Larissa E.; Rowley, Scott; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors who are 1 to 3 years posttransplant are challenged by the need to resume valued social roles and activities--a task that may be complicated by enduring transplant-related psychological distress common in this patient population. The present study investigated whether transplant…

  18. GPCRs in Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    DOZE, VAN A.; PEREZ, DIANNE M.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues of the body cannot only repair themselves, but also self-renew, a property mainly due to stem cells and the various mechanisms that regulate their behavior. Stem cell biology is a relatively new field. While advances are slowly being realized, stem cells possess huge potential to ameliorate disease and counteract the aging process, causing its speculation as the next panacea. Amidst public pressure to advance rapidly to clinical trials, there is a need to understand the biology of stem cells and to support basic research programs. Without a proper comprehension of how cells and tissues are maintained during the adult life span, clinical trials are bound to fail. This review will cover the basic biology of stem cells, the various types of stem cells, their potential function, and the advantages and disadvantages to their use in medicine. We will next cover the role of G-protein coupled receptors in the regulation of stem cells and their potential in future clinical applications. PMID:23415095

  19. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  20. Effects of nanoporous anodic titanium oxide on human adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Malec, Katarzyna; Góralska, Joanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Głowacz, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Brzewski, Pawel; Sulka, Grzegorz D; Jaskuła, Marian; Wybrańska, Iwona

    The aim of current bone biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, successful, and rapid healing. Titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopedic, and reconstructive surgery. A series of studies has indicated that cells can respond not only to the chemical properties of the biomaterial, but also, in particular, to the changes in surface topography. Nanoporous materials remain in focus of scientific queries due to their exclusive properties and broad applications. One such material is nanostructured titanium oxide with highly ordered, mutually perpendicular nanopores. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (TiO2) films were fabricated by a three-step anodization process in propan-1,2,3-triol-based electrolyte containing fluoride ions. Adipose-derived stem cells offer many interesting opportunities for regenerative medicine. The important goal of tissue engineering is to direct stem cell differentiation into a desired cell lineage. The influence of nanoporous TiO2 with pore diameters of 80 and 108 nm on cell response, growth, viability, and ability to differentiate into osteoblastic lineage of human adipose-derived progenitors was explored. Cells were harvested from the subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue by a simple, minimally invasive, and inexpensive method. Our results indicate that anodic nanostructured TiO2 is a safe and nontoxic biomaterial. In vitro studies demonstrated that the nanotopography induced and enhanced osteodifferentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells from the abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue.

  1. Effects of nanoporous anodic titanium oxide on human adipose derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Malec, Katarzyna; Góralska, Joanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Głowacz, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Brzewski, Pawel; Sulka, Grzegorz D; Jaskuła, Marian; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current bone biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, successful, and rapid healing. Titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopedic, and reconstructive surgery. A series of studies has indicated that cells can respond not only to the chemical properties of the biomaterial, but also, in particular, to the changes in surface topography. Nanoporous materials remain in focus of scientific queries due to their exclusive properties and broad applications. One such material is nanostructured titanium oxide with highly ordered, mutually perpendicular nanopores. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (TiO2) films were fabricated by a three-step anodization process in propan-1,2,3-triol-based electrolyte containing fluoride ions. Adipose-derived stem cells offer many interesting opportunities for regenerative medicine. The important goal of tissue engineering is to direct stem cell differentiation into a desired cell lineage. The influence of nanoporous TiO2 with pore diameters of 80 and 108 nm on cell response, growth, viability, and ability to differentiate into osteoblastic lineage of human adipose-derived progenitors was explored. Cells were harvested from the subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue by a simple, minimally invasive, and inexpensive method. Our results indicate that anodic nanostructured TiO2 is a safe and nontoxic biomaterial. In vitro studies demonstrated that the nanotopography induced and enhanced osteodifferentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells from the abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue. PMID:27789947

  2. Adult stem cells: hopes and hypes of regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Dulak, Józef; Szade, Krzysztof; Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells that can differentiate into specialized cell type(s). Pluripotent stem cells, i.e. embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) differentiate into cells of all three embryonic lineages. Multipotent stem cells, like hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), can develop into multiple specialized cells in a specific tissue. Unipotent cells differentiate only into one cell type, like e.g. satellite cells of skeletal muscle. There are many examples of successful clinical applications of stem cells. Over million patients worldwide have benefited from bone marrow transplantations performed for treatment of leukemias, anemias or immunodeficiencies. Skin stem cells are used to heal severe burns, while limbal stem cells can regenerate the damaged cornea. Pluripotent stem cells, especially the patient-specific iPSC, have a tremendous therapeutic potential, but their clinical application will require overcoming numerous drawbacks. Therefore, the use of adult stem cells, which are multipotent or unipotent, can be at present a more achievable strategy. Noteworthy, some studies ascribed particular adult stem cells as pluripotent. However, despite efforts, the postulated pluripotency of such events like "spore-like cells", "very small embryonic-like stem cells" or "multipotent adult progenitor cells" have not been confirmed in stringent independent studies. Also plasticity of the bone marrow-derived cells which were suggested to differentiate e.g. into cardiomyocytes, has not been positively verified, and their therapeutic effect, if observed, results rather from the paracrine activity. Here we discuss the examples of recent studies on adult stem cells in the light of current understanding of stem cell biology.

  3. The Effects of Endocrine Disruptors on Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Marjorie E.; Strong, Amy L.; McLachlan, John A.; Burow, Matthew E.; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are prevalent in the environment, and epidemiologic studies have suggested that human exposure is linked to chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. In vitro experiments have further demonstrated that EDCs promote changes in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), leading to increases in adipogenic differentiation, decreases in osteogenic differentiation, activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increases in oxidative stress, and epigenetic changes. Studies have also shown alteration in trophic factor production, differentiation ability, and immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs, which have significant implications to the current studies exploring MSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications and the treatment of inflammatory conditions. Thus, the consideration of the effects of EDCs on MSCs is vital when determining potential therapeutic uses of MSCs, as increased exposure to EDCs may cause MSCs to be less effective therapeutically. This review focuses on the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation effects of EDCs as these are most relevant to the therapeutic uses of MSCs in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and inflammatory conditions. This review will highlight the effects of EDCs, including organophosphates, plasticizers, industrial surfactants, coolants, and lubricants, on MSC biology. PMID:28119665

  4. Epithelial stem cells and intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nick

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian intestine is comprised of an epithelial layer that serves multiple functions in order to maintain digestive activity as well as intestinal homeostasis. This epithelial layer contains highly proliferative stem cells which facilitate its characteristic rapid regeneration. How these stem cells contribute to tissue repair and normal homeostasis are actively studied, and while we have a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cellular locations that underlie stem cell regulation in this tissue, much still remains undiscovered. This review describes epithelial stem cells in both intestinal and non-intestinal tissues, as well as the strategies that have been used to further characterize the cells. Through a discussion of the current understanding of intestinal self-renewal and tissue regeneration in response to injury, we focus on how dysregulation of critical signaling pathways results in potentially oncogenic aberrations, and highlight issues that should be addressed in order for effective intestinal cancer therapies to be devised.

  5. Stem cells and combinatorial science.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yue Qin; Wong, Wan Qing; Yap, Yan Wen; Orner, Brendan P

    2007-09-01

    Stem cell-based technologies have the potential to help cure a number of cell degenerative diseases. Combinatorial and high throughput screening techniques could provide tools to control and manipulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review chronicles historic and recent progress in the stem cell field involving both pluripotent and multipotent cells, and it highlights relevant cellular signal transduction pathways. This review further describes screens using libraries of soluble, small-molecule ligands, and arrays of molecules immobilized onto surfaces while proposing future trends in similar studies. It is hoped that by reviewing both the stem cell and the relevant high throughput screening literature, this paper can act as a resource to the combinatorial science community.

  6. Global irradiation effects, stem cell genes and rare transcripts in the planarian transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Galloni, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the closest relatives of the totipotent primordial cell, which is able to spawn millions of daughter cells and hundreds of cell types in multicellular organisms. Stem cells are involved in tissue homeostasis and regeneration, and may play a major role in cancer development. Among animals, planarians host a model stem cell type, called the neoblast, which essentially confers immortality. Gaining insights into the global transcriptional landscape of these exceptional cells takes an unprecedented turn with the advent of Next Generation Sequencing methods. Two Digital Gene Expression transcriptomes of Schmidtea mediterranea planarians, with or without neoblasts lost through irradiation, were produced and analyzed. Twenty one bp NlaIII tags were mapped to transcripts in the Schmidtea and Dugesia taxids. Differential representation of tags in normal versus irradiated animals reflects differential gene expression. Canonical and non-canonical tags were included in the analysis, and comparative studies with human orthologs were conducted. Transcripts fell into 3 categories: invariant (including housekeeping genes), absent in irradiated animals (potential neoblast-specific genes, IRDOWN) and induced in irradiated animals (potential cellular stress response, IRUP). Different mRNA variants and gene family members were recovered. In the IR-DOWN class, almost all of the neoblast-specific genes previously described were found. In irradiated animals, a larger number of genes were induced rather than lost. A significant fraction of IRUP genes behaved as if transcript versions of different lengths were produced. Several novel potential neoblast-specific genes have been identified that varied in relative abundance, including highly conserved as well as novel proteins without predicted orthologs. Evidence for a large body of antisense transcripts, for example regulated antisense for the Smed-piwil1 gene, and evidence for RNA shortening in irradiated animals is presented

  7. Effect of hypoxia on porphyrin metabolism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Poleshko, A G; Lobanok, E S; Volotovskii, I D

    2014-05-01

    Under hypoxic conditions, aminolevulinic acid-induced accumulation of porphyrin pigments and increase in heme content was observed in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The expression of transferrin receptor CD71 responsible for Fe(2+) transport into the cell was also enhanced. Blockade of porphyrin-transporting protein ABCG2 with fumitremorgin C under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia induced accumulation of porphyrin pigments; in hypoxia, these changes were more pronounced.

  8. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  9. Effect of nano-structured bioceramic surface on osteogenic differentiation of adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lunguo; Lin, Kaili; Jiang, Xinquan; Fang, Bing; Xu, Yuanjin; Liu, Jiaqiang; Zeng, Deliang; Zhang, Maolin; Zhang, Xiuli; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering strategies to construct vascularized bone grafts potentially revolutionize the treatment of massive bone loss. The surface topography of the grafts plays critical roles on bone regeneration, while adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are known for their capability to promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis when applied to bone defects. In the present study, the effects of hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramic scaffolds with nanosheet, nanorod, and micro-nano-hybrid (the hybrid of nanorod and microrod) surface topographies on attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, as well as the expression of angiogenic factors of rat ASCs were systematically investigated. The results showed that the HAp bioceramic scaffolds with the micro-/nano-topography surfaces significantly enhanced cell attachment and viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression levels of osteogenic markers and angiogenic factors of ASCs. More importantly, the biomimetic feature of the hierarchical micro-nano-hybrid surface topography showed the highest stimulatory effect. The activation in Akt signaling pathway was observed in ASCs cultured on HAp bioceramics with nanorod, and micro-nano-hybrid surface topographies. Moreover, these induction effects could be repressed by Akt signaling pathway inhibitor LY294002. Finally, the in vivo bone regeneration results of rat critical-sized calvarial defect models confirmed that the combination of the micro-nano-hybrid surface and ASCs could significantly enhance both osteogenesis and angiogenesis as compared with the control HAp bioceramic scaffold with traditional smooth surface. Our results suggest that HAp bioceramic scaffolds with micro-nano-hybrid surface can act as cell carrier for ASCs, and consequently combine with ASCs to construct vascularized tissue-engineered bone.

  10. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  11. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Hyun, Jin-Won; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2011-07-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133{sup +} cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  13. Dental stem cells and their sources.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, Christine M; Botero, Tatiana M

    2012-07-01

    The search for more accessible mesenchymal stem cells than those found in bone marrow has propelled interest in dental tissues. Human dental stem/progenitor cells (collectively termed dental stem cells [DSCs]) that have been isolated and characterized include dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. Common characteristics of these cell populations are the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. In vitro and animal studies have shown that DSCs can differentiate into osseous, odontogenic, adipose, endothelial, and neural-like tissues.

  14. Enamel Matrix Derivative has No Effect on the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groeneveldt, Lisanne C.; Knuth, Callie; Witte-Bouma, Janneke; O’Brien, Fergal J.; Wolvius, Eppo B.; Farrell, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of large bone defects due to trauma, tumor resection, or congenital abnormalities is challenging. Bone tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising treatment option. However, the quantity and quality of engineered bone tissue are not sufficient to fill large bone defects. The aim of this study was to determine if the addition of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) improves in vitro chondrogenic priming of MSCs to ultimately improve in vivo MSC mediated endochondral bone formation. Methods: MSCs were chondrogenically differentiated in 2.0 × 105 cell pellets in medium supplemented with TGFβ3 in the absence or presence of 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL EMD. Samples were analyzed for gene expression of RUNX2, Col II, Col X, and Sox9. Protein and glycoaminoglycan (GAG) production were also investigated via DMB assays, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity were also assessed. Results: The addition of EMD did not negatively affect chondrogenic differentiation of adult human MSCs. EMD did not appear to alter GAG production or expression of chondrogenic genes. Osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation were also unaffected though a trend toward decreased adipogenic gene expression was observed. Conclusion: EMD does not affect chondrogenic differentiation of adult human MSCs. As such the use of EMD in combination with chondrogenically primed MSCs for periodontal bone tissue repair is unlikely to have negative effects on MSC differentiation. PMID:25229057

  15. Effects of Substrate Mechanics on Contractility of Cardiomyocytes Generated from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hazeltine, Laurie B.; Simmons, Chelsey S.; Salick, Max R.; Lian, Xiaojun; Badur, Mehmet G.; Han, Wenqing; Delgado, Stephanie M.; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro; Crone, Wendy C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-) derived cardiomyocytes have potential applications in drug discovery, toxicity testing, developmental studies, and regenerative medicine. Before these cells can be reliably utilized, characterization of their functionality is required to establish their similarity to native cardiomyocytes. We tracked fluorescent beads embedded in 4.4–99.7 kPa polyacrylamide hydrogels beneath contracting neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiomyocytes generated from hPSCs via growth-factor-induced directed differentiation to measure contractile output in response to changes in substrate mechanics. Contraction stress was determined using traction force microscopy, and morphology was characterized by immunocytochemistry for α-actinin and subsequent image analysis. We found that contraction stress of all types of cardiomyocytes increased with substrate stiffness. This effect was not linked to beating rate or morphology. We demonstrated that hPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility responded appropriately to isoprenaline and remained stable in culture over a period of 2 months. This study demonstrates that hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes have appropriate functional responses to substrate stiffness and to a pharmaceutical agent, which motivates their use in further applications such as drug evaluation and cardiac therapies. PMID:22649451

  16. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bingchuan; Gu, Ping; Wang, Wenting; Dong, Ci; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Huimiao; Qiu, Fucheng; Han, Rui; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yan, Baoyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) hold substantial promise for the treatment of ischemic neurological disease, but few clinical data are currently available about its therapeutic effects in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). This study is to evaluate the effects of hUC-MSCs transplantation on patients with HIE. Methods A total 22 patients with HIEwere randomly divided into hUC-MSCs transplantation group (n = 12) and control group (n = 10). After isolation, hUC-MSCs were cultured for 3 to 5 passages in vitro and then intravenously administered to HIE patients in the transplantation group, while the control group received routine treatment only. The outcomes of HIE patients were evaluated at designated time points by clinical assessment scales, including NIHSS, Barthel Index, MMSE, HAMA24, HAMD14 and UPDRS. Results: hUC-MSCs were identified by morphological analysis and flow cytometry assays before clinic transplantation. No significant differences of demographic characteristics were observed between the two groups of subjects. Compared to the control group, hUC-MSCs transplantation markedly improved the outcomes of HIE patients leading to better recovery of neurological function, cognition ability, emotional reaction and extrapyramidal function. No significant adverse effects were found in subjects with hUC-MSCs transplantation during a 180-day follow-up period. Conclusion: These data suggest that hUC-MSCs therapy markedly improves the outcomes of patients with HIE, which is potential for the routine treatment of ischemic neurological disease. PMID:27508046

  17. Bronchoalveolar sublineage specification of pluripotent stem cells: effect of dexamethasone plus cAMP-elevating agents and keratinocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Katsirntaki, Katherina; Mauritz, Christina; Olmer, Ruth; Schmeckebier, Sabrina; Sgodda, Malte; Puppe, Verena; Eggenschwiler, Reto; Duerr, Julia; Schubert, Susanne C; Schmiedl, Andreas; Ochs, Matthias; Cantz, Tobias; Salwig, Isabelle; Szibor, Marten; Braun, Thomas; Rathert, Christian; Martens, Andreas; Mall, Marcus A; Martin, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory progenitors can be efficiently generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, further targeted differentiation into bronchoalveolar sublineages is still in its infancy, and distinct specifying effects of key differentiation factors are not well explored. Focusing on airway epithelial Clara cell generation, we analyzed the effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone plus cAMP-elevating agents (DCI) on the differentiation of murine embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into bronchoalveolar epithelial lineages, and whether keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) might further influence lineage decisions. We demonstrate that DCI strongly induce expression of the Clara cell marker Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP). While KGF synergistically supports the inducing effect of DCI on alveolar markers with increased expression of surfactant protein (SP)-C and SP-B, an inhibitory effect on CCSP expression was shown. In contrast, neither KGF nor DCI seem to have an inducing effect on ciliated cell markers. Furthermore, the use of iPSCs from transgenic mice with CCSP promoter-dependent lacZ expression or a knockin of a YFP reporter cassette in the CCSP locus enabled detection of derivatives with Clara cell typical features. Collectively, DCI was shown to support bronchoalveolar specification of mouse PSCs, in particular Clara-like cells, and KGF to inhibit bronchial epithelial differentiation. The targeted in vitro generation of Clara cells with their important function in airway protection and regeneration will enable the evaluation of innovative cellular therapies in animal models of lung diseases.

  18. [Protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Zhen; Yin, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jia-Yu; Wei, Bo-Xiong; Zhan, Yu; Yu, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Qu, Jia; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice. Human bone marrow MSC were isolated, ex vivo expanded, and identified by cell biological tests. Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with (60)Co γ-ray at a single dose of 6 Gy, and received different doses of human MSC and MSC lysates or saline via tail veins. The survival of mice was record daily, and the femurs and spleens were harvested on day 9 and 16 for pathologic examination. The histological changes were observed and the cellularity was scored. The results showed that the estimated survival time of MSC- and MSC lysate-treated mice was comparable to that of controls. The hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of mice that received high-dose (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates was partially restored on day 9 and the capacity of hemopoietic tissue and cellularity scorings were significantly elevated as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). Proliferative nudes were also obviously observed in the spleens of mice that received high-dose of MSC or MSC lysates on d 9 after irradiation. The histological structures of the spleen and bone marrow of the mice that received high-doses (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates were restored to normal, the cell proliferation displayed extraordinarily active. Further, the cellularity scores of the bone marrow were not significantly different between the high-dose MSC and MSC lysate-treated mice. It is concluded that the bone marrow MSC can promote the hematopoietic recovery of the irradiated mice, which probably is associated with the bioactive materials inherently existed in bone marrow cells.

  19. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Prevention or Treatment of Excessive Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    Excessive scars, including keloids and hypertrophic scars, result from aberrations in the process of physiologic wound healing. An exaggerated inflammatory process is one of the main pathophysiological contributors. Scars may cause pain, and pruritis, limit joint mobility, and cause a range of cosmetic deformities that affect the patient's quality of life. Extensive research has been done on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation that has resulted in the plethora of treatment and prevention methods practiced today. Mesenchymal stem cells, among their multifunctional roles, are known regulators of inflammation and have been receiving attention as a major candidate for cell therapy to treat or prevent excessive scars. This paper extensively reviews the body of research examining the mechanism and potential of stem cell therapy in the treatment of excessive scars. PMID:26839566

  20. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: Treating cancer like an infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Camilla L.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of “stemness”, independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point – a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known “side-effect”, which could be harnessed instead as a “therapeutic effect”. Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally

  1. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperbaric oxygenation was shown to increase bone healing in a rabbit model. However, little is known about the regulatory factors and molecular mechanism involved.We hypothesized that the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on bone formation is mediated via increases in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which are regulated by Wnt signaling. Methods The phenotypic characterization of the MSCs was analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. To investigate the effects of HBO on Wnt signaling and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, mRNA and protein levels of Wnt3a, beta-catenin, GSK-3beta, Runx 2, as well as alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and the intensity of von Kossa staining were analyzed after HBO treatment. To investigate the effects of HBO on Wnt processing and secretion, the expression of Wntless and vacuolar ATPases were quantified after HBO treatment. Results Cells expressed MSC markers such as CD105, CD146, and STRO-1. The mRNA and protein levels of Wnt3a, β-catenin, and Runx 2 were up-regulated, while GSK-3β was down-regulated after HBO treatment. Western blot analysis showed an increased β-catenin translocation with a subsequent stimulation of the expression of target genes after HBO treatment. The above observation was confirmed by small interfering (si)RNA treatment. HBO significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and the intensity of von Kossa staining of osteogenically differentiated MSCs. We further showed that HBO treatment increased the expression of Wntless, a retromer trafficking protein, and vacuolar ATPases to stimulate Wnt processing and secretion, and the effect was confirmed by siRNA treatment. Conclusions HBO treatment increased osteogenic differentiation of MSCs via regulating Wnt processing, secretion, and signaling. PMID:24568330

  2. Effects of ECM protein micropatterns on the migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunghoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Eunsoo; Hong, Nari; Sun, Woong; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-08-12

    The migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are believed to be strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the stem cell niche. In vitro culture platform, which involves the specific spatial distribution of ECM protein, could offer novel tools for better understanding of aNSC behavior in the spatial pattern of ECM proteins. In this work, we applied soft-lithographic technique to design simple and reproducible laminin (LN)-polylysine cell culture substrates and investigated how aNSCs respond to the various spatial distribution of laminin, one of ECM proteins enriched in the aNSC niche. We found that aNSC preferred to migrate and attach to LN stripes, and aNSC-derived neurons and astrocytes showed significant difference in motility towards LN stripes. By changing the spacing of LN stripes, we were able to control the alignment of neurons and astrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to investigate the differential cellular responses of aNSCs on ECM protein (LN) and cell adhesive synthetic polymer (PDL) using surface micropatterns. Our findings would provide a deeper understanding in astrocyte-neuron interactions as well as ECM-stem cell interactions.

  3. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on laser-induced retinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Lingjun; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaorong

    2014-05-27

    Stem cell therapy has shown encouraging results for neurodegenerative diseases. The retina provides a convenient locus to investigate stem cell functions and distribution in the nervous system. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by systemic transplantation in a laser-induced retinal injury model. MSCs from C57BL/6 mice labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected via the tail vein into mice after laser photocoagulation. We found that the average diameters of laser spots and retinal cell apoptosis were decreased in the MSC-treated group. Interestingly, GFP-MSCs did not migrate to the injured retina. Further examination revealed that the mRNA expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were lower in the injured eyes after MSC transplantation. Our results suggest that intravenously injected MSCs have the ability to inhibit retinal cell apoptosis, reduce the inflammatory response and limit the spreading of damage in the laser-injured retina of mice. Systemic MSC therapy might play a role in neuroprotection, mainly by regulation of the intraocular microenvironment.

  4. Paracrine proangiopoietic effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived purified CD133+ cells--implications for stem cell therapies in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Mierzejewska, Kasia; Marlicz, Wojciech; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Greco, Nicholas J; Tendera, Michal; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2013-02-01

    CD133+ cells purified from hematopoietic tissues are enriched mostly for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, but also contain some endothelial progenitor cells and very small embryonic-like stem cells. CD133+ cells, which are akin to CD34+ cells, are a potential source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. However, the lack of convincing donor-derived chimerism in the damaged organs of patients treated with these cells suggests that the improvement in function involves mechanisms other than a direct contribution to the damaged tissues. We hypothesized that CD133+ cells secrete several paracrine factors that play a major role in the positive effects observed after treatment and tested supernatants derived from these cells for the presence of such factors. We observed that CD133+ cells and CD133+ cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) express mRNAs for several antiapoptotic and proangiopoietic factors, including kit ligand, insulin growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin-8. These factors were also detected in a CD133+ cell-derived conditioned medium (CM). More important, the CD133+ cell-derived CM and MVs chemoattracted endothelial cells and display proangiopoietic activity both in vitro and in vivo assays. This observation should be taken into consideration when evaluating clinical outcomes from purified CD133+ cell therapies in regenerative medicine.

  5. Effect of Aminated Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles on the Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kang, Min-Sil; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive nanoparticles (MBNs) have been developed as promising additives to various types of bone or dentin regenerative material. However, biofunctionality of MBNs as dentin regenerative additive to dental materials have rarely been studied. We investigated the uptake efficiency of MBNs-NH2 with their endocytosis pathway and the role of MBNs-NH2 in odontogenic differentiation to clarify inherent biofunctionality. MBNs were fabricated by sol-gel synthesis, and 3% APTES was used to aminate these nanoparticles (MBNs-NH2) to reverse their charge from negative to positive. To characterize the MBNs-NH2, TEM, XRD, FTIR, zeta(ξ)-potential measurements, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis were performed. After primary cultured rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) were incubated with various concentrations of MBNs-NH2, stem cell viability (24 hours) with or without differentiated media, internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs (~4 hours) via specific endocytosis pathway, intra or extracellular ion concentration and odontoblastic differentiation (~28 days) were investigated. Incubation with up to 50 μg/mL of MBNs-NH2 had no effect on rDPSCs viability with differentiated media (p>0.05). The internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs was determined about 92% after 4 hours of incubation. Uptake was significantly decreased with ATP depletion and after 1 hour of pre-treatment with the inhibitor of macropinocytosis (p<0.05). There was significant increase of intracellular Ca and Si ion concentration in MBNs-NH2 treated cells compared to no-treated counterpart (p<0.05). The expression of odontogenic-related genes (BSP, COL1A, DMP-1, DSPP, and OCN) and the capacity for biomineralization (based on alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining) were significantly upregulated with MBNs-NH2. These results indicate that MBNs-NH2 induce odontogenic differentiation of rDPSCs and may serve as a potential dentin regenerative additive to dental material for promoting

  6. Stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun

    2007-06-01

    The aim of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease is to reconstruct nigro-striatal neuronal pathways using endogenous neural stem/precursor cells or grafted dopaminergic neurons. As an alternative, transplantation of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons into the striatum has been attempted, with the aim of stimulating local synapse formation and/or release of dopamine and cytokines from grafted cells. Candidate stem cells include neural stem/precursor cells, embryonic stem cells and other stem/precursor cells. Among these, embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that proliferate extensively, making them a good potential donor source for transplantation. However, tumor formation and ethical issues present major problems for embryonic stem cell therapy. This review describes the current status of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease, as well as future research approaches from a clinical perspective.

  7. Effects of flavopiridol on critical regulation pathways of CD133high/CD44high lung cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozok Cetintas, Vildan; Acikgoz, Eda; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Demir, Kenan; Oktem, Gulperi; Tezcanli Kaymaz, Burçin; Oltulu, Fatih; Aktug, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Flavopiridol a semisynthetic flavone that inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and has growth-inhibitory activity and induces a blockade of cell-cycle progression at G1-phase and apoptosis in numerous human tumor cell lines and is currently under investigation in phase II clinical trials. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are comprised of subpopulation of cells in tumors that have been proposed to be responsible for recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of flavopiridol in cancer stem cell cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in CSCs. Methods: The cells were treated with flavopiridol to determine the inhibitory effect. Cell viability and proliferation were determined by using the WST-1 assay. Caspase activity and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the evaluation of apoptosis, cell cytoskeleton, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. The effects of flavopiridol on the cell cycle were also evaluated. Flow cytometric analysis was used to detect the percentages of CSCs subpopulation. We analyzed the gene expression patterns to predict cell cycle and cell cytoskeleton in CSCs by RT-PCR. Results: Flavopiridol-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis at the IC50 dose, resulting in a significant increase expression of caspases activity. Cell cycle analyses revealed that flavopiridol induces G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Flavopiridol significantly decreased the mRNA expressions of the genes that regulate the cell cytoskeleton and cell cycle components and cell motility in CSCs. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Flavopiridol has activity against lung CSCs and may be effective chemotherapeutic molecule for lung cancer treatment. PMID:27787370

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-02

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead.

  9. Non-thermal effects of terahertz radiation on gene expression in mouse stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Chong, Shou; Dagon, Yossi; Booshehri, Layla G.; Mielke, Charles H.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, terahertz radiation sources are increasingly being exploited in military and civil applications. However, only a few studies have so far been conducted to examine the biological effects associated with terahertz radiation. In this study, we evaluated the cellular response of mesenchymal mouse stem cells exposed to THz radiation. We apply low-power radiation from both a pulsed broad-band (centered at 10 THz) source and from a CW laser (2.52 THz) source. Modeling, empirical characterization, and monitoring techniques were applied to minimize the impact of radiation-induced increases in temperature. qRT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in the transcriptional activity of selected hyperthermic genes. We found that temperature increases were minimal, and that the differential expression of the investigated heat shock proteins (HSP105, HSP90, and CPR) was unaffected, while the expression of certain other genes (Adiponectin, GLUT4, and PPARG) showed clear effects of the THz irradiation after prolonged, broad-band exposure. PMID:21991556

  10. Differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells into cells with a neural phenotype: diverse effects of two specific treatments

    PubMed Central

    Scintu, Franca; Reali, Camilla; Pillai, Rita; Badiali, Manuela; Sanna, Maria Adele; Argiolu, Francesca; Ristaldi, Maria Serafina; Sogos, Valeria

    2006-01-01

    Background It has recently been demonstrated that the fate of adult cells is not restricted to their tissues of origin. In particular, it has been shown that bone marrow stem cells can give rise to cells of different tissues, including neural cells, hepatocytes and myocytes, expanding their differentiation potential. Results In order to identify factors able to lead differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage, we isolated stromal cells from human adult bone marrow (BMSC). Cells were treated with: (1) TPA, forskolin, IBMX, FGF-1 or (2) retinoic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol (BME). Treatment (1) induced differentiation into neuron-like cells within 24 hours, while a longer treatment was required when using retinoic acid and BME. Morphological modifications were more dramatic after treatment (1) compared with treatment (2). In BMSC both treatments induced the expression of neural markers such as NF, GFAP, TUJ-1 and neuron-specific enolase. Moreover, the transcription factor Hes1 increased after both treatments. Conclusion Our study may contribute towards the identification of mechanisms involved in the differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage. PMID:16483379

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Human Adipose Stem Cell-Derived Extract in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Gye Sun; Im, Wooseok; Shim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Mijung; Kim, Myung-Jin; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Seong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Manho; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating human neurodegenerative disease. The precise pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain uncertain, and as of yet, there is no effective cure. Human adipose stem cells (hASC) can be easily obtained during operative procedures. hASC have a clinically feasible potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders, since cytosolic extract of hASC contain a number of essential neurotrophic factors. In this study, we investigated effects of hASC extract on the SOD1 G93A mouse model of ALS and in vitro test. Administration of hASC extract improved motor function and prolonged the time until symptom onset, rotarod failure, and death in ALS mice. In the hASC extracts group, choline acetyltransferase immunostaining in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord showed a large number of motor neurons, suggesting normal morphology. The neuroprotective effect of hASC extract in ALS mice was also suggested by western blot analysis of spinal cord extract from ALS mice and in vitro test. hASC extract treatment significantly increased expression of p-Akt, p-CREB, and PGC-1α in SOD1 G93A mouse model and in vitro test. Our results indicated that hASC extract reduced apoptotic cell death and recovered mutant SOD1-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, hASC extract reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that hASC extract exert a potential therapeutic action in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of ALS and in vitro test. These findings suggest that hASC hold promise as a novel therapeutic strategy for treating ALS.

  12. Effective combination of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and minocycline in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Minocycline ameliorates the clinical severity of MS and exhibits antiinflammatory, neuroprotective activities, and good tolerance for long-term use, whereas it is toxic to the CNS. Recently, the immunomodulation and neuroprotection capabilities of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were shown in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study, we evaluated whether the combination of hBM-MSCs and a low-dose minocycline could produce beneficial effects in EAE mice. Methods The sensitivity of hBM-MSCs to minocycline was determined by an established cell-viability assay. Minocycline-treated hBM-MSCs were also characterized with flow cytometry by using MSC surface markers and analyzed for their multiple differentiation capacities. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by using immunization with MOG35-55. Immunopathology assays were used to detect the inflammatory cells, demyelination, and neuroprotection. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/interleukin-10 (IL-10), the hallmark cytokines that direct Th1 and Th2 development, were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to elucidate the cell apoptosis in the spinal cords of EAE mice. Results Minocycline did not affect the viability, surface phenotypes, or differentiation capacity of hBM-MSCs, while minocycline affected the viability of astrocytes at a high dose. In vivo efficacy experiments showed that combined treatment, compared to the use of minocycline or hBM-MSCs alone, resulted in a significant reduction in clinical scores, along with attenuation of inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration. Moreover, the combined treatment with hBM-MSCs and minocycline enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory

  13. Effects of low-level laser therapy on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, Ana Paula; JUNQUEIRA, Marina de Azevedo; MARQUES, Nádia Carolina Teixeira; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; SAKAI, Vivien Thiemy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-Level Laser Therapy stimulates the proliferation of a variety of types of cells. However, very little is known about its effect on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). Objective This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different laser therapy energy densities on SHED viability and proliferation. Material and Methods SHED were irradiated according to the groups: I (1.2 J/cm2 - 0.5 mW – 10 s), II (2.5 J/cm2 – 10 mW – 10 s), III (3.7 J/cm2 – 15 mW – 10 s), IV (5.0 J/cm2 – 20 mW – 10 s), V (6.2 J/cm2 – 25 mW – 10 s), and VI (not irradiated – control group). Cell viability was assessed 6 and 24 h after irradiation measuring the mitochondrial activity and using the Crystal Violet assay. Cell proliferation was assessed after 24, 48, and 72 h of irradiation by SRB assay. Results MTT assay demonstrated differences from 6 to 24 hours after irradiation. After 24 h, groups I and IV showed higher absorbance values than those of control group. Crystal Violet assay showed statistically differences in the absorbance rate from 6 to 24 h after irradiation for groups III and VI. At 24 h after irradiation, Group III absorbance rate was greater than that of groups I, II, and IV. Group VI absorbance rate was greater than that of groups I and IV. SRB assay showed that the group I had higher rates than those of groups II, III, V, and VI, at 24 h after irradiation. After 48 h, group I exhibited the greatest cell proliferation rate followed by groups III, V, and VI. After 72 h, group III exhibited the lowest cell proliferation rate than those of groups II, IV, and V. Conclusions The Low-Level Laser Therapy energy densities used in this study did not cause loss of cell viability and stimulated SHED proliferation within the parameters described in this study. PMID:27556203

  14. Effects of Intravenous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells in 3-Acetylpyridine-Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Herranz, Antonio S.; Reimers, Diana; Montero Vega, Teresa; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Richart López, Luis Alberto; Bazán, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias include a heterogeneous group of infrequent diseases characterized by lack of motor coordination caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. Current therapies are based on the use of drugs that correct some of the molecular processes involved in their pathogenesis. Although these treatments yielded promising results, there is not yet an effective therapy for these diseases. Cell replacement strategies using human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HuUCBMCs) have emerged as a promising approach for restoration of function in neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential therapeutic activity of HuUCBMCs in the 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP) rat model of cerebellar ataxia. Intravenous administered HuUCBMCs reached the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. Grafted cells reduced 3-AP-induced neuronal loss promoted the activation of microglia in the brain stem, and prevented the overexpression of GFAP elicited by 3-AP in the cerebellum. In addition, HuUCBMCs upregulated the expression of proteins that are critical for cell survival, such as phospho-Akt and Bcl-2, in the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. As all these effects were accompanied by a temporal but significant improvement in motor coordination, HuUCBMCs grafts can be considered as an effective cell replacement therapy for cerebellar disorders. PMID:23150735

  15. Therapeutic Effect of Ligustilide-Stimulated Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Thromboembolic Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kang; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Huang, Pi-Chun; Lin, Po-Cheng; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a result of cerebral ischemia that triggers a cascade of both physiological and biochemical events. No effective treatment is available for stroke; however, stem cells have the potential to rescue tissue from the effects of stroke. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are an abundant source of adult stem cells; therefore, ADSC therapy can be considered as a future strategy for regenerative medicine. However, more research is required to improve the effectiveness of transplanted ADSCs as a treatment for stroke in the mouse stroke model. Ligustilide, isolated from the herb Angelica sinensis, exhibits a protective effect on neurons and inhibits inflammation. We also demonstrated that ligustilide treatment increases the expression levels of homing factors such as SDF-1 and CXCR4. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of ADSC transplantation and ligustilide treatment in a mouse thromboembolic stroke model by behavioral tests, including beam walking, locomotor activity, and rotarod analysis. ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide were transplanted into the brains of stroke mice. The results showed that the therapeutic effect of ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide was better than that of ADSCs without ligustilide pretreatment. There was no difference between the recovery of mice treated by ADSC transplantation combined with subcutaneous ligustilide injection and that of mice treated only with ADSCs. The TUNEL assay showed fewer apoptotic cells in the brains of mice transplanted with ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide as well as in those without pretreatment. In summary, pretreatment of ADSCs with ligustilide improves the therapeutic efficacy of ADSC transplantation. The results of this study will help improve stem cell therapies being developed for future clinical applications.

  16. Effects of decellularized matrices derived from periodontal ligament stem cells and SHED on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Zhu, Shaoyue; Xu, Jianguang; Yuan, Changyong; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-04-01

    A major bottleneck to the therapeutic applications of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are their limited proliferative capacity ex vivo and tendency to undergo senescence. This may be partly due to the sub-optimal in vitro culture milieu, which could be improved by an appropriate extracellular matrix substratum. This study therefore examined decellularized matrix (DECM) from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), as potential substrata for DPSC culture. Both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM promoted rapid adhesion and spreading of newly-seeded DPSC compared to bare polystyrene (TCPS), with vinculin immunocytochemistry showing expression of more focal adhesions by newly-adherent DPSC cultured on DECM versus TCPS. Culture of DPSC on SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM yielded higher proliferation of cell numbers compared to TCPS. The qRT-PCR data showed significantly higher expression of nestin by DPSC cultured on DECM versus the TCPS control. Osteogenic differentiation of DPSC was enhanced by culturing on PDLSC-DECM and SHED-DECM versus TCPS, as demonstrated by alizarin red S staining for mineralized calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase assay and qRT-PCR analysis of key osteogenic marker expression. Hence, both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM could enhance the ex vivo culture of DPSC under both non-inducing and osteogenic-inducing conditions.

  17. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  18. Stem cells, tissue engineering and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the clinical utility of stem cells in periodontal regeneration by reviewing relevant literature that assesses the periodontal-regenerative potential of stem cells. We consider and describe the main stem cell populations that have been utilized with regard to periodontal regeneration, including bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the main dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations: periodontal ligament stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle precursor cells. Research into the use of stem cells for tissue regeneration has the potential to significantly influence periodontal treatment strategies in the future.

  19. [Progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Zhu, He; Hao, Jie; Zhou, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all types of cells in the body and therefore have great application potential in regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. In recent years, stem cell technology has made great progress, and induced pluripotent stem cell technology revolutionizes the whole stem cell field. At the same time, stem cell research in our country has also achieved great progress and becomes an indispensable power in the worldwide stem cell research field. This review mainly focuses on the research progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine in our country since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, including induced pluripotent stem cells, transdifferentiation, haploid stem cells, and new gene editing tools.

  20. Tracking stem cells in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chemaly, Elie R; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Frangioni, John V; Hajjar, Roger J

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells are a promising approach to cardiovascular therapeutics. Animal experiments have assessed the fate of injected stem cells through ex vivo methods on sacrificed animals. Approaches are needed for in vivo tracking of stem cells. Various imaging techniques and contrast agents for stem cell tracking will be reviewed.

  1. Immunomodulation effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on acute graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Lou, Rui; Huang, Fen; Peng, Yanwen; Jiang, Zujun; Huang, Ke; Wu, Xiuli; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Xiao, Yang; Sun, Jing; Li, Yangqiu; Xiang, Peng; Liu, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major cause of death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study evaluated the immunomodulation effects of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow of a third-party donor for refractory aGVHD. Forty-seven patients with refractory aGVHD were enrolled: 28 patients receiving MSC and 19 patients without MSC treatment. MSCs were given at a median dose of 1 × 10(6) cells/kg weekly until patients got complete response or received 8 doses of MSCs. After 125 doses of MSCs were administered, with a median of 4 doses (range, 2 to 8) per patient, overall response rate was 75% in the MSC group compared with 42.1% in the non-MSC group (P = .023). The incidence of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus infections, and tumor relapse was not different between the 2 groups during aGVHD treatment and follow-up. The incidence and severity of chronic GVHD in the MSC group were lower than those in the non-MSC group (P = .045 and P = .005). The ratio of CD3(+)CD4(+)/CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells, the frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), and the levels of signal joint T cell-receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) after MSCs treatment were higher than those pretreatment. MSC-treated patients exhibited higher Tregs frequencies and sjTRECs levels than those in the non-MSC group at 8 and 12 weeks after treatment. MSCs derived from bone marrow of a third-party donor are effective to refractory aGVHD. It might reduce the incidence and severity of chronic GVHD in aGVHD patients by improving thymic function and induction of Tregs but not increase the risks of infections and tumor relapse.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient’s medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future. PMID:27390452

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient's medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future.

  4. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  5. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on cryopreservation of porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs).

    PubMed

    Ock, Sun-A; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a commonly used cryoprotectant in cryopreservation procedures, is detrimental to viability of cells. In this view point, a comparative study was carried out to evaluate the effect of DMSO on porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs). We compared the viability, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay, expression of Bak and Bcl2 genes, Bcl2 protein antigen, and CD90 in pMSCs cryopreserved with 5%, 10%, and 20% DMSO. pMSCs isolated from bone marrow were characterized by alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of transcription factors, such as Oct 3/4, Nanog, and Sox2. The cells were then cryopreserved by cooling at a rate of -1°C/min in a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. The results of survival of pMSCs cryopreserved at 5% DMSO were comparable to control group (fresh pMSCs). The survival and the number of colonies formed in cryopreserved pMSCs were inversely proportional to the concentration of DMSO. The number of colonies formed in pMSCs cryopreserved with all concentrations of DMSO was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than the control group. An increased tendency for Bak and Bcl2 gene expression was noticed in cryopreserved pMSCs at 3 h postthawing compared to control group. There was a close resemblance in higher level of expression of CD90 between control and cryopreserved pMSCs. Because there was no considerable difference in the results of pMSCs cryopreserved at 5% and 10% DMSO, this study strongly suggests the use of 5% DMSO in cryopreservation of pMSCs as an alternative to conventional 10% DMSO.

  6. Therapeutic effects of stem cells and substrate reduction in juvenile Sandhoff mice.

    PubMed

    Arthur, J R; Lee, J P; Snyder, E Y; Seyfried, T N

    2012-06-01

    Sandhoff Disease (SD) involves the CNS accumulation of ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2 (GA2) due to inherited defects in the β-subunit gene of β-hexosaminidase A and B (Hexb gene). Substrate reduction therapy, utilizing imino sugar N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ), reduces ganglioside biosynthesis and levels of stored GM2 in SD mice. Intracranial transplantation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) can provide enzymatic cross correction, to help reduce ganglioside storage and extend life. Here we tested the effect of NSCs and NB-DGJ, alone and together, on brain β-hexosaminidase activity, GM2, and GA2 content in juvenile SD mice. The SD mice received either cerebral NSC transplantation at post-natal day 0 (p-0), intraperitoneal injection of NB-DGJ (500 mg/kg/day) from p-9 to p-15, or received dual treatments. The brains were analyzed at p-15. β-galactosidase staining confirmed engraftment of lacZ-expressing NSCs in the cerebral cortex. Compared to untreated and sham-treated SD controls, NSC treatment alone provided a slight increase in Hex activity and significantly decreased GA2 content. However, NSCs had no effect on GM2 content when analyzed at p-15. NB-DGJ alone had no effect on Hex activity, but significantly reduced GM2 and GA2 content. Hex activity was slightly elevated in the NSC + drug-treated mice. GM2 and GA2 content in the dual treated mice were similar to that of the NB-DGJ treated mice. These data indicate that NB-DGJ alone was more effective in targeting storage in juvenile SD mice than were NSCs alone. No additive or synergistic effect between NSC and drug was found in these juvenile SD mice.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells: the fibroblasts’ new clothes?

    PubMed Central

    Haniffa, Muzlifah A.; Collin, Matthew P.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Dazzi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are adherent stromal cells, initially isolated from the bone marrow, characterized by their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues such as bone, cartilage and fat. They have also been shown to suppress immune responses in vitro. Because of these properties, mesenchymal stem cells have recently received a very high profile. Despite the dramatic benefits reported in early phase clinical trials, their functions remain poorly understood. Particularly, several questions remain concerning the origin of mesenchymal stem cells and their relationship to other stromal cells such as fibroblasts. Whereas clear gene expression signatures are imprinted in stromal cells of different anatomical origins, the anti-proliferative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts and their potential to differentiate appear to be common features between these two cell types. In this review, we summarize recent studies in the context of historical and often neglected stromal cell literature, and present the evidence that mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts share much more in common than previously recognized. PMID:19109217

  8. Stem cell potential of the mammalian gonad

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Feng; Barsoum, Ivraym; Gupta, Rupesh; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Yao, Humphrey Hung-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential for therapeutic application because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into different cell types. Gonads, which consist of somatic cells and germ cells, are the only organs capable of transmitting genetic materials to the offspring. Germ-line stem cells and somatic stem cells have been found in the testis; however, the presence of stem cells in the ovary remains controversial. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on whether stem cell properties are present in the different cell types of male and female gonads and their implications on stem cell research. PMID:19482665

  9. Role of Oxidative Stress in Stem, Cancer, and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The term ‘‘oxidative stress” refers to a cell’s state characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is one of the most important regulatory mechanisms for stem, cancer, and cancer stem cells. The concept of cancer stem cells arose from observations of similarities between the self-renewal mechanism of stem cells and that of cancer stem cells, but compared to normal stem cells, they are believed to have no control over the cell number. ROS have been implicated in diverse processes in various cancers, and generally the increase of ROS in cancer cells is known to play an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. Additionally, ROS have been considered as the most significant mutagens in stem cells; when elevated, blocking self-renewal and at the same time, serving as a signal stimulating stem cell differentiation. Several signaling pathways enhanced by oxidative stress are suggested to have important roles in tumorigenesis of cancer or cancer stem cells and the self-renewal ability of stem or cancer stem cells. It is now well established that mitochondria play a prominent role in apoptosis and increasing evidence supports that apoptosis and autophagy are physiological phenomena closely linked with oxidative stress. This review elucidates the effect and the mechanism of the oxidative stress on the regulation of stem, cancer, and cancer stem cells and focuses on the cell signaling cascades stimulated by oxidative stress and their mechanism in cancer stem cell formation, as very little is known about the redox status in cancer stem cells. Moreover, we explain the link between ROS and both of apoptosis and autophagy and the impact on cancer development and treatment. Better understanding of this intricate link may shed light on mechanisms that lead to better modes of cancer treatment. PMID:24281098

  10. Programmable Mechanobioreactor for Exploration of the Effects of Periodic Vibratory Stimulus on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cashion, Avery T.; Caballero, Montserrat; Halevi, Alexandra; Pappa, Andrew; Dennis, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A programmable bioreactor using a voice-coil actuator was developed to enable research on the effects of periodic vibratory stimulus on human and porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We hypothesized that low frequency vibrations would result in a cartilage phenotype and higher frequency vibrations would result in a bone phenotype. The mechanical stimulation protocol is adjusted from a computer external to the incubator via a USB cable. Once programmed, the embedded microprocessor and sensor system on the bioreactor execute the protocol independent of the computer. In each test, a sinusoidal stimulus was applied to a culture plate in 1-min intervals with a 15-min rest following each, for a total of 15 h per day for 10 days. Frequencies of 1 and 100 Hz were applied to cultures of both human and porcine umbilical cord–derived MSCs. Chondrogenesis was determined by Alcian blue staining for glycosaminoglycans and an increased differentiation index (ratio of mRNA for collagen II and collagen I). Osteogenic differentiation was indicated with Alizarin red for calcium staining and increased bone morphogenetic protein 2 mRNA. One-hertz stimulation resulted in a cartilage phenotype for both human and porcine MSCs, while 100-Hz stimulation resulted in a bone phenotype. PMID:24570842

  11. Multielectrode Array (MEA) Assay for Profiling Electrophysiological Drug Effects in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mike

    2016-05-04

    More relevant and reliable preclinical cardiotoxicity tests are required to improve drug safety and reduce the cost of drug development. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hSC-CMs) provide a potential model for the development of superior assays for preclinical drug safety screening. One such hSC-CM assay that has shown significant potential for enabling more predictive drug cardiac risk assessment is the MEA assay. The Multi-electrode Array (MEA) assay is an electrophysiology-based technique that uses microelectrodes embedded in the culture surface of each well to measure fluctuations in extracellular field potential (FP) generated from spontaneously beating hSC-CMs. Perturbations to the recorded FP waveform can be used as an unbiased method of predicting the identity of ion channel(s) impacted on drug exposure. Here, a higher throughput MEA assay using hSC-CMs in 48-well MEA plates is described for profiling compound-induced effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. Techniques for preparing hSC-CM monolayers in MEA plates and methods to contextualize MEA assay experimental results are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. HIF2α/EFEMP1 cascade mediates hypoxic effects on breast cancer stem cell hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun; Nam, Jeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) have been shown to contribute to tumor growth, metastasis, and recurrence. They are also markedly resistant to conventional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation. Recent studies have suggested that hypoxia is one of the prominent micro-environmental factors that increase the self-renewal ability of BCSCs, partially by enhancing CSC phenotypes. Thus, the identification and development of new therapeutic approaches based on targeting the hypoxia-dependent responses in BCSCs is urgent. Through various in vitro studies, we found that hypoxia specifically up-regulates BCSC sphere formation and a subset of CD44+/CD24−/low CSCs. Hypoxia inducible factors 2α (HIF2α) depletion suppressed CSC-like phenotypes and CSC-mediated drug resistance in breast cancer. Furthermore, the stimulatory effects of hypoxia-induced HIF2α on BCSC sphere formation were successfully attenuated by epidermal growth factor-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) knockdown. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF2α mediates hypoxia-induced cancer growth/metastasis and that EFEMP1 is a downstream effector of hypoxia-induced HIF2α during breast tumorigenesis. PMID:27270657

  13. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  14. Effects of Graphene Quantum Dots on the Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Mou, Xiaoning; Li, Jianhua; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Tang, Wei; Sang, Yuanhua; Gil, Pilar Rivera; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The influence of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on key characteristics of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) phenotype (i.e., self-renewal, differentiation potential, and pluripotency) is systematically investigated in this work. First, the viability and impact of GQDs on the self-renewal potential of MSCs is evaluated in order to determine a threshold for the exposing dose. Second, GQDs uptake by MSCs is confirmed due to the excellent fluorescent properties of the particles. They exhibit a homogenous cytoplasmatic distribution that increases with the time and concentration. Third, the impact of GQDs on the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs is deeply characterized. An enhanced activity of alkaline phosphatase promoted by GQDs indicates early activation of osteogenesis. This is also confirmed upon GQD-induced up-regulation of phenotypically related osteogenic genes (Runx2, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) and specific biomarkers expression (osteopontin and osteocalcin). GQDs also effectively enhance the formation of calcium-rich deposits characteristics of osteoblasts. Furthermore, genes microarray results indicate that the enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by GQDs is in progress through a bone morphogenetic protein and transforming growth factor-β relative signaling pathways. Finally, intracytoplasmatic lipid detection shows that GQDs can also promote the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs, thus confirming the prevalence of their pluripotency potential.

  15. Effect of adipose tissue-derived stem cell injection in a rat model of urethral fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sangkum, Premsant; Yafi, Faysal A.; Kim, Hogyoung; Bouljihad, Mostafa; Ranjan, Manish; Datta, Amrita; Mandava, Sree Harsha; Sikka, Suresh C; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the therapeutic effect of adi-pose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in a rat model of urethral fibrosis. Methods: Eighteen (18) male Sprague-Dawley rats (300‒350 g) were divided into three groups: (1) sham (saline injection); (2) urethral fibrosis group (10 μg transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) injection); and (3) ADSCs group (10 μg TGF-β1 injection plus 2 × 105 ADSCs). Rat ADSCs were harvested from rat inguinal fat pads. All study animals were euthanized at two weeks after urethral injection. Following euthanasia, rat urethral tissue was harvested for histologic evaluation. Type I and III collagen levels were quantitated by Western blot analysis. Results: TGF-β1 injection induced significant urethral fibrosis and increased collagen type I and III expression (p<0.05). Significant decrease in submucosal fibrosis and collagen type I and III expression were noted in the ADSCs group compared with the urethral fibrosis group (p<0.05). TGF-β1 induced fibrotic changes were ameliorated by injection of ADSCs. Conclusions: Local injection of ADSCs in a rat model of urethral fibrosis significantly decreased collagen type I and III. These findings suggest that ADSC injection may prevent scar formation and potentially serve as an adjunct treatment to increase the success rate of primary treatment for urethral stricture disease. Further animal and clinical studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27790299

  16. Protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine on propofol-induced toxicity in embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Sadovova, Natalya; Fogle, Charles M; Patterson, Tucker A; Hanig, Joseph P; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Propofol is a widely used general anesthetic. A growing body of data suggests that perinatal exposure to general anesthetics can result in long-term deleterious effects on brain function. In the developing brain there is evidence that general anesthetics can cause cell death, synaptic remodeling, and altered brain cell morphology. Acetyl-L-carnitine (L-Ca), an anti-oxidant dietary supplement, has been reported to prevent neuronal damage from a variety of causes. To evaluate the ability of L-Ca to protect against propofol-induced neuronal toxicity, neural stem cells were isolated from gestational day 14 rat fetuses and on the eighth day in culture were exposed for 24h to propofol at 10, 50, 100, 300 and 600 μM, with or without L-Ca (10 μM). Markers of cellular proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell death/damage and oxidative damage were monitored to determine: (1) the effects of propofol on neural stem cell proliferation; (2) the nature of propofol-induced neurotoxicity; (3) the degree of protection afforded by L-Ca; and (4) to provide information regarding possible mechanisms underlying protection. After propofol exposure at a clinically relevant concentration (50 μM), the number of dividing cells was significantly decreased, oxidative DNA damage was increased and a significant dose-dependent reduction in mitochondrial function/health was observed. No significant effect on lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) release was observed at propofol concentrations up to 100 μM. The oxidative damage at 50 μM propofol was blocked by L-Ca. Thus, clinically relevant concentrations of propofol induce dose-dependent adverse effects on rat embryonic neural stem cells by slowing or stopping cell division/proliferation and causing cellular damage. Elevated levels of 8-oxoguanine suggest enhanced oxidative damage [reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation] and L-Ca effectively blocks at least some of the toxicity of propofol, presumably by scavenging oxidative species and/or reducing

  17. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  18. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  19. What's missing? Discussing stem cell translational research in educational information on stem cell "tourism".

    PubMed

    Master, Zubin; Zarzeczny, Amy; Rachul, Christen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tourism is a growing industry in which patients pursue unproven stem cell therapies for a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. It is a challenging market to regulate due to a number of factors including its international, online, direct-to-consumer approach. Calls to provide education and information to patients, their families, physicians, and the general public about the risks associated with stem cell tourism are mounting. Initial studies examining the perceptions of patients who have pursued stem cell tourism indicate many are highly critical of the research and regulatory systems in their home countries and believe them to be stagnant and unresponsive to patient needs. We suggest that educational material should include an explanation of the translational research process, in addition to other aspects of stem cell