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  1. Telecommunication system for children undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kazumi; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakata, Nobuhiro; Takizawa, Masaomi; Ohso, Keiko; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Koike, Kenichi

    2011-12-01

    Isolation in a germ-free unit is a stressful experience for pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To reduce the psychological distress of such children, a Web-based telecommunications system was developed. The authors developed a telecommunication system that linked a laminar air flow (LAF) room that had a high efficiency particulate air filter with the hospital school/patients' homes via the Internet. Fifteen children isolated in the LAF room for allogeneic HSCT were enrolled in this study. The present study evaluated whether the system was feasible for the patients during the acute phase of HSCT. In 10 patients, the proportion of days when they telecommunicated with teachers and/or other patients in the hospital school was 64.6 ± 32.3%. The telecommunication with the hospital school facilitated the continuation of school study under teachers' guidance, reducing the problem of lost schooling. In 13 patients, the proportion of days when they telecommunicated with their homes was 68.0 ± 34.8%. Ten of them frequently telecommunicated with their family members (especially siblings), and three patients called out to their pets at home. The incidence of telecommunication on the days when the patients had HSCT-related symptoms including vomiting did not differ from that of telecommunication on the days when no symptoms were evident. A telecommunication system linked to a hospital school and/or the patients' homes is feasible for children undergoing HSCT, and may improve their health-related quality of life. A larger, prospective study is required to evaluate whether the telecommunication system can reduce HSCT-associated psychological and psychiatric symptoms. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  3. Iron Overload in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pullarkat, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) frequently have iron overload resulting from chronic transfusion therapy for anemia. In some cases, for example, in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and thalassemia, this can be further exacerbated by increased absorption of iron from the gut as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis. Accumulating evidence has established the negative impact of elevated pretransplantation serum ferritin, a surrogate marker of iron overload, on overall survival and nonrelapse mortality after HSCT. Complications of HSCT associated with iron overload include increased bacterial and fungal infections as well as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome and possibly other regimen-related toxicities. Based on current evidence, particular attention should be paid to prevention and management of iron overload in allogeneic HSCT candidates, especially in patients with thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The pathophysiology of iron overload in the HSCT patient and optimum strategies to deal with iron overload during and after HSCT require further study. PMID:20871852

  4. Adjustment in Parents of Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindwall, Jennifer J.; Russell, Kathy; Huang, Qinlei; Zhang, Hui; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Alderfer, Melissa; Phipps, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric stem cell transplant (SCT) is a demanding procedure for children and parents. Interventions to promote positive adjustment of parents in this setting are needed. Method 171 patient/parent dyads from 4 sites received one of 3 interventions to reduce SCT-related distress: a child intervention with massage and humor therapy, an identical child intervention plus a parent intervention with massage and relaxation/imagery, or standard care. Parents completed weekly self-report measures of distress and positive affect during the acute phase of treatment (weeks −1 through +6), and measures of depression, posttraumatic stress (PTSD), and benefit-finding at baseline and week +24. Results No significant differences across treatment arms were observed on repeated measures of parental distress. There was a marginally significant effect of the child intervention on parental positive affect. Over time, parental distress decreased significantly and positive affect increased significantly in all groups. Similarly, there were no significant intervention effects on the global adjustment outcomes of depression, PTSD, and benefit finding. However, reports of depression and PTSD decreased significantly and reports of benefit-finding increased significantly from baseline to week +24 for all groups. Conclusion Across all study arms, parent adjustment improved over time, suggesting that parents demonstrate a transient period of moderately elevated distress at the time of their child’s admission for transplant, followed by rapid improved to normative levels of adjustment. Similar to results previously reported for their children, these parents appear resilient to the challenges of transplant. PMID:24434783

  5. Adjustment in parents of children undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Jennifer J; Russell, Kathy; Huang, Qinlei; Zhang, Hui; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Alderfer, Melissa; Phipps, Sean

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a demanding procedure for children and parents. Interventions to promote positive adjustment of parents in this setting are needed. A total of 171 patient-parent dyads from 4 sites received 1 of 3 interventions to reduce SCT-related distress: a child intervention with massage and humor therapy, an identical child intervention plus a parent intervention with massage and relaxation/imagery, or standard care. Parents completed weekly self-report measures of distress and positive affect during the acute phase of treatment (weeks -1 through +6); and measures of depression, posttraumatic stress (PTSD), and benefit finding at baseline and week +24. No significant differences across treatment arms were observed on repeated measures of parental distress. There was a marginally significant effect of the child intervention on parental positive affect. Over time, parental distress decreased significantly and positive affect increased significantly in all groups. Similarly, there were no significant intervention effects on the global adjustment outcomes of depression, PTSD, and benefit finding. However, reports of depression and PTSD decreased significantly and reports of benefit finding increased significantly from baseline to week +24 for all groups. Across all study arms, parent adjustment improved over time, suggesting that parents demonstrate a transient period of moderately elevated distress at the time of their child's admission for transplantation, followed by rapid improved to normative levels of adjustment. Similar to results previously reported for their children, these parents appear resilient to the challenges of transplantation. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  7. Retrospective analysis of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Simondsen, Katherine A; Reed, Michael P; Mably, Mary S; Zhang, Yang; Longo, Walter L

    2013-12-01

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant are at a high risk for infection-related mortality in the immediate post-transplantation phase. Prophylaxis with a fluoroquinolone is now recommended to reduce this risk with the stipulation that surveillance for increased fluoroquinolone resistance Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea be conducted. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 48 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and received a fluoroquinolone for prophylaxis and 48 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant who did not receive a fluoroquinolone for prophylaxis. All patients received the same standard antifungal, antiviral and anti-pneumocystis prophylaxis. Patients receiving fluoroquinolone prophylaxis had a lower incidence of febrile neutropenia than those not receiving prophylaxis, though the difference was not found to be statistically significant (83% vs. 67%, p = 0.098). Similar non-significant improvements in the number of positive cultures recovered during an episode of febrile neutropenia and antimicrobial days were noted. No significant increase in fluoroquinolone resistance, Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea, or in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections were noted. Our single institution experience with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients supports continuation of this practice. Expansion to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients may be appropriate based on guideline recommendations and our institution-specific experience with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

  8. Poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization affects long-term outcomes in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moreb, Jan S; Byrne, Michael; Shugarman, Ilicia; Zou, Fei; Xiong, Sican; May, William S; Norkin, Maxim; Hiemenz, John; Brown, Randall; Cogle, Christopher; Wingard, John R; Hsu, Jack W

    2017-05-29

    Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization is routinely undertaken prior to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A number of studies have identified risk factors for poor PBSC mobilization, however, little data exists to correlate mobilization with disease-specific outcomes in this patient population. Prospective work in MM has demonstrated similar outcomes in a homogenous patient population. In this single institution analysis, we retrospectively studied the impact of poor PBSC mobilization on progression free survival (PFS) and OS in MM patients undergoing PBSC mobilization. Poor mobilizers are defined as patients that collected < 4 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg over maximum of 5 apheresis days, or those that required ≥2 mobilization cycles to achieve this target. We confirm that poor PBSC mobilization is significantly associated with a shortened PFS (P = .0012) and OS (P = .0005) compared with good mobilizers. Our univariate analysis also shows that independent risk factors for poor mobilization include male gender, higher ideal body weight, and a greater median number of lines of chemotherapy prior to PBSC mobilization. However, by multivariate analysis, only number of prior lines of chemotherapy remains significantly predictive of poor mobilization (Odds ratio 1.857, P = .0095). The use of high-dose G-CSF (> 10 mcg/kg/day) and/or plerixafor can significantly improve mobilization and ASCT chances in this population. These data indicate that poor mobilization can be predictable and is associated with more aggressive disease biology and worse outcomes, warranting intensive post-ASCT management. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Distress prior to undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: demographic and symptom correlations and establishing a baseline

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sean Robinson; Hobson, Mary Elizabeth; Haig, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Distress can arise from physical and/or psychosocial impairments and has been documented in patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the outpatient setting. It has not been evaluated in inpatients admitted to undergo the transplant, nor has potential correlations with length of hospital stay, physical function, and pain after receiving the transplant. Objectives To measure distress in patients admitted to the hospital to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to evaluate potential correlations with length of hospital stay, physical function, pain, and depression/anxiety. Methods Eighty patients were given a questionnaire to report levels of distress and physical and psychosocial functioning. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the relationship of demographic and transplant factors with length of stay (LOS), distress, presence of pain, and depression/anxiety. Results Patients reported pretransplant distress with an average score of 2.2 out of 10, and 16 out of 80 patients reported clinically relevant distress. Pain was reported by 42.5% of patients, and 28.8% reported depression/anxiety. Physical functioning was generally high. Distress was correlated with depression/anxiety (P-value <0.01) and pain (0.04) but not with LOS, physical function, patient age, or transplant type. Conclusion LOS after receiving stem cell transplant was not related to pretransplant distress. Distress exists pretransplant but is generally low. Pain and the presence of depression/anxiety may be risk factors for distress. Measuring distress prior to transplant gives a baseline from which to measure changes, potentially leading to earlier intervention. PMID:27695376

  10. Resilience in Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation: Results of a Complementary Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Peasant, Courtney; Barrera, Maru; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Huang, Qinlei; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT) are thought to be at risk for increased distress, adjustment difficulties, and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQL). We report results of a multisite trial designed to improve psychological adjustment and HRQL in children undergoing SCT. METHODS: A total of 171 patients and parents from 4 sites were randomized to receive a child-targeted intervention; a child and parent intervention; or standard care. The child intervention included massage and humor therapy; the parent intervention included massage and relaxation/imagery. Outcomes included symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress, HRQL, and benefit finding. Assessments were conducted by patient and parent report at admission and SCT week+24. RESULTS: Across the sample, significant improvements were seen on all outcomes from admission to week+24. Surprisingly, patients who had SCT reported low levels of adjustment difficulties at admission, and improved to normative or better than average levels of adjustment and HRQL at week+24. Benefit finding was high at admission and increased at week+24; however, there were no statistically significant differences between intervention arms for any of the measures. CONCLUSIONS: Although the results do not support the benefits of these complementary interventions in pediatric SCT, this may be explained by the remarkably positive overall adjustment seen in this sample. Improvements in supportive care, and a tendency for patients to find benefit in the SCT experience, serve to promote positive outcomes in children undergoing this procedure, who appear particularly resilient to the challenge. PMID:22311995

  11. Prognostic Understanding, Quality of Life, and Mood in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Traeger, Lara; Kuzmuk, Kailyn; Eusebio, Justin; Vandusen, Harry; Keenan, Tanya; Shin, Jennifer; Gallagher, Emily R.; Greer, Joseph A.; Pirl, William F.; Jackson, Vicki A.; Ballen, Karen K; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; McAfee, Steven; Dey, Bimalangshu; Chen, Yi-Bin A.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how patients undergoing stem cell transplantation (HCT) and their family caregivers (FC) perceive their prognosis. We examined prognostic understanding in patients undergoing HCT and their FC and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) and mood. We conducted a longitudinal study of patients (and FC) hospitalized for HCT. We used a questionnaire to measure participants’ prognostic understanding and asked the oncologists to estimate patients’ prognosis prior to HCT. We assessed QOL and mood weekly and evaluated the relationship between prognostic understanding and QOL and mood using multivariable linear mixed models. We enrolled 90 patients undergoing (autologous n=30); myeloablative (n=30) or reduced intensity allogeneic (n=30)) HCT. 88.9% of patients and 87.1% of FC reported it is ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ important to know about prognosis. However, 77.6% of patients and 71.7% of FC reported a discordance and more optimistic prognostic perception compared to the oncologist (P’s < 0.0001). Patients with a concordant prognostic understanding with their oncologists reported worse QOL (β = −9.4, P = 0.01) and greater depression at baseline (β = 1.7, P = 0.02) and over time ((β = 1.2, P < 0.0001). Therefore, Interventions are needed to improve prognostic understanding, while providing patients with adequate psychological support. PMID:25961772

  12. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of palifermin to prevent mucositis among patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nooka, Ajay K; Johnson, Heather R; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Flowers, Christopher R; Langston, Amelia; Steuer, Conor; Graiser, Michael; Ali, Zahir; Shah, Nishi N; Rangaraju, Sravanti; Nickleach, Dana; Gao, Jingjing; Lonial, Sagar; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-06-01

    Trials have shown benefits of palifermin in reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with total body irradiation (TBI)-based conditioning regimens. Similar outcome data are lacking for patients receiving non-TBI-based regimens. We performed a retrospective evaluation on the pharmacoeconomic benefit of palifermin in the setting of non-TBI-based conditioning and autologous HSCT. Between January 2002 and December 2010, 524 patients undergoing autologous HSCT for myeloma (melphalan 200 mg/m²) and lymphoma (high-dose busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide) as preparative regimen were analyzed. Use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was significantly lower in the palifermin-treated groups (myeloma: 13% versus 53%, P < .001; lymphoma: 46% versus 68%, P < .001). Median total transplant charges were significantly higher in the palifermin-treated group, after controlling for inflation (myeloma: $167,820 versus $143,200, P < .001; lymphoma: $168,570 versus $148,590, P < .001). Palifermin treatment was not associated with a difference in days to neutrophil engraftment, length of stay, and overall survival and was associated with an additional cost of $5.5K (myeloma) and $14K (lymphoma) per day of PCA avoided. Future studies are suggested to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of palifermin compared with other symptomatic treatments to reduce transplant toxicity using validated measures for pain and quality of life.

  13. Iron overload in patients with acute leukemia or MDS undergoing myeloablative stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T; Rhodes, Joanna; Sainvil, Marie-Michele; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P; Hearsey, Doreen; Neufeld, Ellis J; Fleming, Mark D; Steen, Hanno; Anderson, Damon; Kwong, Raymond Y; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H

    2011-06-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) commonly have an elevated serum ferritin prior to HSCT, which has been associated with increased mortality after transplantation. This has led to the suggestion that iron overload is common and deleterious in this patient population. However, the relationship between serum ferritin and parenchymal iron overload in such patients is unknown. We report a prospective study of 48 patients with acute leukemia (AL) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) undergoing myeloablative HSCT, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate liver iron content (LIC) and cardiac iron. The median (and range) pre-HSCT value of serum ferritin was 1549 ng/mL (20-6989); serum hepcidin, 59 ng/mL (10-468); labile plasma iron, 0 LPI units (0.0-0.9). Eighty-five percent of patients had hepatic iron overload (HIO), and 42% had significant HIO (LIC ≥5.0 mg/gdw). Only 1 patient had cardiac iron overload. There was a strong correlation between pre-HSCT serum ferritin and estimated LIC (r = .75), which was mostly dependent on prior transfusion history. Serum hepcidin was appropriately elevated in patients with HIO. Labile plasma iron elevation was rare. A regression calibration analysis supported the hypothesis that elevated pre-HSCT LIC is significantly associated with inferior post-HSCT survival. These results contribute to our understanding of the prevalence, mechanism, and consequences of iron overload in HSCT.

  14. Narrative Based Medicine as a tool for needs assessment of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Gianpaolo; Sansone, Vincenza; Rea, Teresa; Artioli, Giovanna; Botti, Stefano; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Ferri, Paola; Masi, Daniela; Risitano, Antonio Maria; Simeone, Silvio; La Sala, Rachele

    2017-03-14

    In the last years we have seen an ever increasing number of patients with haematologic disorders who need hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The whole sector of HSCT results, infact to be in a continous scientific and technological clinical progress, offering a very advanced care. Despite this, some aspects are underconsidered, some of which could be fundamental to determine the success of the care pathway, such as the experience of the illness by the patient. Using a Narrative Based Medicine approach we wanted to investigate clinical, psychosocial and organizational aspects of the patient's journey whilst undergoing HSCT. Various narrative interviews were conducted using non-structured approach. Results were analysed by thematic contents. Psycological dimension is the most compromised: above all emerged sentiments of oppression linked to the isolation period in the Low Bacterial Load (LBL) room. To note are also the different dynamics with which the patients perceive the organisation and hospital structures, and how much these factors can influence their care experience. Results suggest the need in clinical practice of an integration between qualitative and clinical approach, so as to permit the psychosocial and relational necessities to emerge, often unexpressed by patients undergoing HSCT.

  15. Complementary Therapies for Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant: Report of A Multisite Trial

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Sean; Barrera, Maru; Vannatta, Kathryn; Xiong, Xiaoping; Doyle, John J; Alderfer, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Children undergoing stem cell transplant (SCT) experience high levels of somatic distress and mood disturbance. This trial evaluated the efficacy of complementary therapies (massage, humor therapy, relaxation/imagery) for reducing distress associated with pediatric SCT. Methods Across 4 sites, 178 pediatric patients scheduled to undergo SCT were randomized to a child-targeted intervention involving massage and humor therapy (HPI-C), the identical child intervention plus a parent intervention involving massage and relaxation/imagery (HPI-CP) or standard care (SC). Randomization was stratified by site, age, and type of transplant. The interventions began at admission and continued through SCT week +3. Primary outcomes included patient and parent reports of somatic distress and mood disturbance obtained weekly from admission through week +6 using the BASES scales. Secondary outcomes included length of hospitalization, time to engraftment, and usage of narcotic analgesic and antiemetic medications. Results A mixed model approach was used to assess longitudinal trends of patient and parent-report outcomes and test differences between groups on these measures. Significant changes across time were observed on all patient and parent-report outcomes. However, no significant differences between treatment arms were found on the primary outcomes. Similarly, no signficant between group differences were noted on any of the medical variables as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Results of this multi-site trial failed to document significant benefits of complementary interventions in the pediatric SCT setting. PMID:20626016

  16. Pros and cons of splenectomy in patients with myelofibrosis undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deeg, H J

    2001-03-01

    During fetal development, the spleen is a major hemopoietic organ. In the adult human, this task is relinquished to the bone marrow. However, under the stress of certain pathologic conditions, extramedullary hemopoiesis may again occur in the spleen. This is especially true for diseases of the marrow, in particular, myeloproliferative disorders such as agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, which is associated with severe fibrosis of the marrow space. At the same time, the spleen sequesters blood cells and contributes to peripheral blood cytopenias, which may improve following splenectomy. However, success is unpredictable, and the operative mortality of splenectomy is on the order of 10%. As a growing number of patients undergo hemopoietic stem cell transplantation as definitive therapy for myelofibrosis, the decision on splenectomy has additional ramifications since the spleen plays an important role in the kinetics of engraftment of donor cells and in immune reconstitution. We conclude from our analysis of available information that the benefit of splenectomy is difficult to predict, although after transplantation splenectomized patients have faster hemopoietic recovery. It appears that the most important indication for splenectomy in these patients is the relief of symptoms from massive spleen enlargement.

  17. Chemoablated mouse seminiferous tubular cells enriched for very small embryonic-like stem cells undergo spontaneous spermatogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sandhya; Patel, Hiren; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2015-04-18

    Extensive research is ongoing to empower cancer survivors to have biological parenthood. For this, sperm are cryopreserved prior to therapy and in younger children testicular biopsies are cryopreserved with a hope to mature the germ cells into sperm later on for assisted reproduction. In addition, lot of hope was bestowed on pluripotent embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into sperm and oocytes. However, obtaining functional gametes from pluripotent stem cells still remains a distant dream and major bottle-neck appears to be their inefficient differentiation into primordial germ cells (PGCs). There exists yet another population of pluripotent stem cells termed very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) in adult body organs including gonads. We have earlier reported that busulphan (25 mg/Kg) treatment to 4 weeks old mice destroys actively dividing cells and sperm but VSELs survive and differentiate into sperm when a healthy niche is provided in vivo. Mouse testicular VSELs that survived busulphan treatment were cultured for 3 weeks. A mix of surviving cells in seminiferous tubules (VSELs, possibly few spermatogonial stem cells and Sertoli cells) were cultured using Sertoli cells conditioned medium containing fetal bovine serum, follicle stimulating hormone and with no additional growth factors. Stem cells underwent proliferation and clonal expansion in culture and spontaneously differentiated into sperm whereas Sertoli cells attached and provided a somatic support. Transcripts specific for various stages of spermatogenesis were up-regulated by qRT-PCR studies on day 7 suggesting VSELs (Sca1) and SSCs (Gfra) proliferate (Pcna), undergo spermatogenesis (spermatocyte specific marker prohibitin), meiosis (Scp3) and differentiate into sperm (post-meiotic marker protamine). Process of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis was replicated in vitro starting with testicular cells that survived busulphan treatment. We have earlier reported similar

  18. Tracking in vivo dynamics of NK cells transferred in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Killig, Monica; Friedrichs, Birte; Meisig, Johannes; Gentilini, Chiara; Blüthgen, Nils; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Labopin, Myriam; Basara, Nadezda; Pfrepper, Christian; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Uharek, Lutz; Romagnani, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haploSCT) offers an alternative treatment option for advanced leukemia patients lacking a HLA-compatible donor. Transfer of NK cells represents a promising therapeutic option in combination with SCT, as NK cells can promote graft versus leukemia with low risk of GVH disease. In this study, we show results from a phase I/II trial in which 24 acute myeloid leukemia patients underwent haploSCT in combination with early transfer of unmodified NK cells and observed a promising 2-year overall survival rate of 37%. By performing immunomonitoring and subsequent principal component analysis, we tracked donor NK-cell dynamics in the patients and distinguished between NK cells reconstituting from CD34(+) precursors, giving rise over time to a continuum of multiple differentiation stages, and adoptively transferred NK cells. Transferred NK cells displayed a mature phenotype and proliferated in vivo during the early days after haploSCT even in the absence of exogenous IL-2 administration. Moreover, we identified the NK-cell phenotype associated with in vivo expansion. Thus, our study indicates a promising path for adoptive transfer of unmodified NK cells in the treatment of high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. IV busulfan dose individualization in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant: limited sampling strategies.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L Lee; Sibbald, Cathryn; Schechter, Tal; Ansari, Marc; Gassas, Adam; Théorêt, Yves; Kassir, Nastya; Champagne, Martin A; Doyle, John

    2008-05-01

    We currently calculate area under the busulfan concentration time curve (AUC) using 7 plasma busulfan concentrations (AUC7) drawn after the first of 16 i.v. busulfan doses given as a 2-hour infusion every 6 hours. The aim of this study was to develop and validate limited sampling strategies (LSSs) using 3 or fewer busulfan concentration values with which to reliably calculate AUC in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Children in the development group (44) received i.v. busulfan at Sick Kids; the validation group consisted of 35 children who received care at CHU Ste-Justine. Busulfan doses given and subsequent plasma busulfan concentrations were recorded. LSSs using 1 to 3 concentration-time points were developed using multiple linear regression. LSS were considered to be acceptable when adjusted r(2) > 0.9, mean bias <15% and precision <15%. Extent of agreement between the AUC7 values and the LSS AUC was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman (BA) analysis. Agreement was considered to be excellent when the lower limit of the 95% confidence limit of the ICC exceeded 0.9 and when the limits of agreement in the BA analysis were +/-15% for both AUC and dose. Administration of the theoretic adjusted busulfan doses based on each LSS was simulated and cases where the resulting AUC was >1500 or <900 microM x min were noted. LSSs using 1, 2, or 3 plasma busulfan concentrations were developed that showed excellent agreement with AUC7 and adjusted busulfan doses. In the validation sample, only the 2- and 3-point LSSs demonstrated acceptable precision and lack of bias. LSSs using 2 or 3 plasma busulfan concentrations can be used to reliably estimate busulfan AUC after IV administration in children undergoing HSCT.

  20. Triple Staining Including FOXA2 Identifies Stem Cell Lineages Undergoing Hepatic and Biliary Differentiation in Cirrhotic Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Rogler, Charles E; Bebawee, Remon; Matarlo, Joe; Locker, Joseph; Pattamanuch, Nicole; Gupta, Sanjeev; Rogler, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations have reported many markers associated with human liver stem/progenitor cells, "oval cells," and identified "niches" in diseased livers where stem cells occur. However, there has remained a need to identify entire lineages of stem cells as they differentiate into bile ducts or hepatocytes. We have used combined immunohistochemical staining for a marker of hepatic commitment and specification (FOXA2 [Forkhead box A2]), hepatocyte maturation (Albumin and HepPar1), and features of bile ducts (CK19 [cytokeratin 19]) to identify lineages of stem cells differentiating toward the hepatocytic or bile ductular compartments of end-stage cirrhotic human liver. We identified large clusters of disorganized, FOXA2 expressing, oval cells in localized liver regions surrounded by fibrotic matrix, designated as "micro-niches." Specific FOXA2-positive cells within the micro-niches organize into primitive duct structures that support both hepatocytic and bile ductular differentiation enabling identification of entire lineages of cells forming the two types of structures. We also detected expression of hsa-miR-122 in primitive ductular reactions expected for hepatocytic differentiation and hsa-miR-23b cluster expression that drives liver cell fate decisions in cells undergoing lineage commitment. Our data establish the foundation for a mechanistic hypothesis on how stem cell lineages progress in specialized micro-niches in cirrhotic end-stage liver disease.

  1. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of palifermin to prevent mucositis among patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Langston, Amelia; Steuer, Conor; Graiser, Michael; Ali, Zahir; Shah, Nishi N.; Rangaraju, Sravanti; Nickleach, Dana; Gao, Jingjing; Lonial, Sagar; Waller, Edmund K.

    2014-01-01

    Prior trials have shown benefits ofpalifermin in reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with total body irradiation (TBI)-based conditioning regimens. Similar outcomes data are lacking for patients receiving non-TBI-based regimens. We performed a retrospective evaluation on the pharmacoeconomic benefit of palifermin in the setting of non-TBI-based conditioning and autologous HSCT. 524 patients that underwent autologous HSCT for myeloma (melphalan 200 mg/m2) and lymphoma (high-dose busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide)as preparative regimen between January 2002 and December 2010 were analyzed. Usage of patient controlled analgesia (PCA) was significantly lower in the palifermin-treated groups (myeloma: 13% vs. 53%; p<0.001; lymphoma: 46% vs. 68%; p<0.001).Median total transplant charges were significantly higher in the palifermin-treated group, after controlling for inflation (myeloma: $167,820 vs. $143,200, p<0.001; lymphoma: $168,570 vs. $148,590, p<0.001). Palifermin treatment was not associated with a difference in days to neutrophil engraftment, length of stay and overall survival; and was associated with an additional cost of $5.5K (myeloma) and $14K (lymphoma) per day of PCA avoided. Future studies are suggested to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of palifermin compared with other symptomatic treatments to reduce transplant toxicity using validated measures for pain and quality of life. PMID:24607557

  2. Stomatitis-related pain in women with breast cancer undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Fall-Dickson, Jane M; Mock, Victoria; Berk, Ronald A; Grimm, Patricia M; Davidson, Nancy; Gaston-Johansson, Fannie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to describe stomatitis-related pain in women with breast cancer undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The hypotheses that significant, positive relationships would exist between oral pain and stomatitis, state anxiety, depression, and alteration in swallowing were tested. Stomatitis, sensory dimension of oral pain, and state anxiety were hypothesized to most accurately predict oral pain overall intensity. Thirty-two women were recruited at 2 East Coast comprehensive cancer centers. Data were collected on bone marrow transplantation day +7 +/- 24 hours using Painometer, Oral Mucositis Index-20, Oral Assessment Guide, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, and stepwise multiple regression. All participants had stomatitis; 47% had oral pain, with a subset reporting continuous moderate to severe oral pain despite pain management algorithms. Significant, positive associations were seen between oral pain, stomatitis, and alteration in swallowing and between oral pain with swallowing and alteration in swallowing. Oral pain was not significantly correlated with state anxiety and depression. Oral sensory and affective pain intensity most accurately predicted oral pain overall intensity. Future research needs to explore factors that affect perception and response to stomatitis-related oropharyngeal pain and individual patient response to opioid treatment.

  3. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation in girls undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant: experience of a single centre.

    PubMed

    Biasin, E; Salvagno, F; Berger, M; Nesi, F; Quarello, P; Vassallo, E; Evangelista, F; Marchino, G L; Revelli, A; Benedetto, C; Fagioli, F

    2015-09-01

    Fertility after childhood haemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a major concern. Conditioning regimens before HSCT present a high risk (>80%) of ovarian failure. Since 2000, we have proposed cryopreservation of ovarian tissue to female patients undergoing HSCT at our centre, to preserve future fertility. After clinical and haematological evaluation, the patients underwent ovarian tissue collection by laparoscopy. The tissue was analysed by histologic examination to detect any tumour contamination and then frozen following the slow freezing procedure and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. From August 2000 to September 2013, 47 patients planned to receive HSCT, underwent ovarian tissue cryopreservation. The median age at diagnosis was 11.1 years and at the time of procedure it was 13 years, respectively. Twenty-four patients were not pubertal at the time of storage, whereas 23 patients had already experienced menarche. The median time between laparoscopy and HSCT was 25 days. Twenty-six out of 28 evaluable patients (93%) developed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism at a median time of 23.3 months after HSCT. One patient required autologous orthotopic transplantation that resulted in one live birth. Results show a very high rate of iatrogenic hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, highlighting the need for fertility preservation in these patients.

  4. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  5. Defibrotide for the management of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in patients who undergo haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coutsouvelis, John; Avery, Sharon; Dooley, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Carl; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, previously known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD/SOS), is a complication in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Severe VOD/SOS, including progression to multi-organ failure, has resulted in a mortality of greater than 80%. Defibrotide's varying pharmacological actions, particularly on endothelial cells, make it is a useful agent to consider for prophylaxis and treatment of VOD/SOS. Barriers to its routine use include the high acquisition cost and the fact that neither the oral or parenteral formulations are licensed products in many countries at this time. This review summarises available literature on the use of defibrotide in the management of VOD/SOS. Publications consist predominantly of single centre cohort studies and case series. Available evidence indicates that defibrotide is effective in the management of VOD/SOS. Using defibrotide prophylaxis should also be considered, especially in the paediatric setting, where there are available results from a large, open label, randomized controlled trial. Patient outcome data from the larger studies and compassionate programs can inform consensus recommendations on dosing regimen and criteria for the treatment of VOD/SOS with defibrotide in the adult population. The reviewed literature indicates an effective and safe dose for treatment is 25mg/kg/day, continued for at least 14days or until complete response is achieved. Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose and duration of treatment in both paediatric patients and adults. Recent recommendations and a phase 3 trial using historical controls indicate that defibrotide should be included as a pharmacotherapy option in protocols guiding management of VOD/SOS.

  6. Reproductive issues in patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: an update.

    PubMed

    Guida, Maurizio; Castaldi, Maria Antonietta; Rosamilio, Rosa; Giudice, Valentina; Orio, Francesco; Selleri, Carmine

    2016-11-01

    In 1963 George Mathé announced to the world that he had cured a patient of leukaemia by means of a bone-marrow transplant. Since than much progress has been made and nowadays Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is considered the most effective treatment of numerous severe haematological diseases. Gynaecological complications in HSCT women represent a serious concern for these patients, but often underestimated by clinicians in the view of Overall Survival. The main gynaecological complications of HSCT are represented by: premature ovarian failure (POF), thrombocytopenia-associated menorrhagia, genital symptoms or sexual problems in course of chronic GVHD (cGVHD), osteoporosis, secondary solid tumours due to immunosuppressive drugs to treat cGVHD and severity of cGVHD, and fertility and pregnancy issues. In particular fertility-related issues are always more relevant for patients, whose life expectation is constantly growing up after HSCT.Thus, taking care of a patient undergoing HSCT should primarily include gynaecological evaluation, even before conditioning regimen or chemotherapy for the underlying malignancy, as, in our opinion, it is of great importance to ensure a complete diagnostic work-up and intervention options to guarantee maximum reproductive health and a better quality of life in HSCT women.The present review aims at describing principal features of the aforementioned gynaecological complications of HSCT, and to define, on the basis of current international literature, a specific protocol for the prevention, diagnosis, management and follow-up of gynaecological complications of both autologous and heterologous transplantation, before and after the procedure.

  7. [Drug interaction of voriconazole-cyclosporine in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (2013-2014)].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Romina; Torres, Juan P; Salas, Carolina; Gajardo, Iván; Palma, Julia; Catalán, Paula; Santolaya, M Elena; Morales, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Drug interactions (DI) in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are common and clinically significant, highlighting: anticonvulsants, voriconazole (VCZ) and cyclosporine (CsA), which require monitoring. To describe the interactions between CsA-VCZ in children undergoing HSCT. Retrospective, descriptive study in immunocompromised children hospitalized since January 2013 to December 2014 at Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Hospital Dr. Luis Calvo Mackenna, who received CsA and VCZ. The median age was 5 years (3-6) and the median weight was 20 kg (17-30). Sixtythree baseline drug levels were analyzed, of those, 27 were CsA drug levels obtained previous to using VCZ and 36 were CsA drug levels collected concomitantly with VCZ. In the group CsA previous to VCZ, the CsA dose was 4.6 ± 2.6 (mg/ kg/ day) and the CsA average level was 188.8 ± 84.1 (μg/ml). In the group of CsA concomitantly with VCZ, the dose of CsA was 5.5 ± 3.0 (mg/ kg/day) (p = 0.07) and CsA average level was significantly higher: 232.5 ± 106.7 (μg/ml) (p = 0.04). This study shows an increased level of CsA when it is used together with VCZ. Therapeutic drug monitoring could improve the management of the DI and optimize the co-administration of CsA and VCZ.

  8. The Efficacy of an Oral Elemental Diet in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Takanobu; Tsushita, Natsuko; Imai, Kanae; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Miyao, Kotaro; Sakemura, Reona; Kato, Tomonori; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Yoshitaka; Sawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are well known to cause severe gastrointestinal toxicities that often disturb the oral intake of the patients followed by poor nutrition and life-threatening infection. An oral elemental diet (ED) is an easily consumed and assimilated form of liquid nutrients mainly composed of amino acids. It alleviates the digestive loading from the intestine and is mainly used for enteral nutritional support in patients with Crohn's disease. We herein report, for the first time, the efficacy of ED for patients undergoing HSCT. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of ED in a prospective cohort study. The primary endpoint for this study was the hospitalization period. The secondary endpoint was the occurrence of oral mucositis, nausea, diarrhea and fever. Patients A total of 73 patients were consecutively enrolled between March 2011 and March 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent autologous HSCT and 50 patients underwent allogeneic HSCT. The first 21 patients did not receive ED (non-ED group; NEG) while in the successive 52 patients (ED group; EG), oral ED was started before conditioning and was continued until 28 days after transplantation. Results The patient characteristics were similar between the two groups. The mean duration of ED administration for EG was 28.7 days (range, 3-37 days), and the mean total-dose of ED administration was 1904 g (range, 240-2,960 g). The median hospitalization period was significantly shorter in EG compared to NEG, (34 days vs. 50 days; p=0.007). Grade 3-4 oral mucositis occurred less in EG than NEG (25% vs. 48%; p=0.06). Conclusion Oral ED may promote an early mucosal recovery and thereby shorten the duration of hospitalization. PMID:27980254

  9. Stem cell regulatory gene expression in human adult dental pulp and periodontal ligament cells undergoing odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Wu, Liping; Xiao, Yin

    2009-10-01

    During development and regeneration, odontogenesis and osteogenesis are initiated by a cascade of signals driven by several master regulatory genes. In this study, we investigated the differential expression of 84 stem cell-related genes in dental pulp cells (DPCs) and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) undergoing odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation. Our results showed that, although there was considerable overlap, certain genes had more differential expression in PDLCs than in DPCs. CCND2, DLL1, and MME were the major upregulated genes in both PDLCs and DPCs, whereas KRT15 was the only gene significantly downregulated in PDLCs and DPCs in both odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, a large number of regulatory genes in odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation interact or crosstalk via Notch, Wnt, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/bone morphogenic protein (BMP), and cadherin signaling pathways, such as the regulation of APC, DLL1, CCND2, BMP2, and CDH1. Using a rat dental pulp and periodontal defect model, the expression and distribution of both BMP2 and CDH1 have been verified for their spatial localization in dental pulp and periodontal tissue regeneration. This study has generated an overview of stem cell-related gene expression in DPCs and PDLCs during odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation and revealed that these genes may interact through the Notch, Wnt, TGF-beta/BMP, and cadherin signaling pathways to play a crucial role in determining the fate of dental derived cell and dental tissue regeneration. These findings provided a new insight into the molecular mechanisms of the dental tissue mineralization and regeneration.

  10. A saprophytic fungus ( Sepedonium) associated with fatal pneumonia in a patient undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Galindo, José; Eugenio, Vázquez-Meraz; Elva, Jiménez-Hernández; Jesús, Reséndiz-Sánchez; María de Los Ángeles, Martínez-Rivera; Rodolfo Norberto, Jiménez-Juárez; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Sara A, Ochoa; Ariadna, Cruz-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    Sepedonium sp . is a saprophytic fungus that inhabits soil and plant material. Few cases of infection with this fungus have been reported. We describe a case of a child who received haploidentical stem cell transplantation. The patient developed Sepedonium sp . infection after graft failure accompanied by cytomegalovirus infection. This was associated with two genotypes corresponding to a gB1 and gB3 mixture, which suggested involvement of two strains. Throughout the clinical course, immunosuppression and subsequent development of the fungal infection was observed. Our findings add to the available evidence regarding the potential for acquisition of fungal infection from the environment in patients at high risk because of immunosuppression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of Sepedonium sp . infection following graft failure accompanied by previous cytomegalovirus infection in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  11. Catheter-related bacteremia due to Kocuria rosea in a patient undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Altuntas, Fevzi; Yildiz, Orhan; Eser, Bülent; Gündogan, Kürsat; Sumerkan, Bulent; Çetin, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    Background Micrococcus species may cause intracranial abscesses, meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis in immunosuppressed or immunocompetent hosts. In addition, strains identified as Micrococcus spp. have been reported recently in infections associated with indwelling intravenous lines, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluids, ventricular shunts and prosthetic valves. Case presentation We report on the first case of a catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria rosea, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 39-year-old man undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to relapsed Hodgkin disease. This uncommon pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Conclusions This report presents a case of Kocuria rosea catheter related bacteremia after stem cell transplantation successfully treated with vancomycin and by catheter removal. PMID:15615593

  12. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Neslisah

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88) dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life. PMID:28116155

  13. Interventions for prophylaxis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease in people undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Daniel K L; Chiang, Alan K S; Ha, Shau Yin; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2015-05-27

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a severe complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Different drugs with different mechanisms of action have been tried in HSCT recipients to prevent hepatic VOD. However, it is uncertain whether high-quality evidence exists to support any prophylactic therapy. We aimed to determine the effects of various prophylactic therapies on the incidence of hepatic VOD, overall survival, mortality, quality of life (QOL), and the safety of these therapies in people undergoing HSCT. We searched the Cochrane Central Registe of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, conference proceedings of three international haematology-oncology societies and two trial registries in January 2015, together with reference checking, citation searching and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic therapies with placebo or no treatment, or comparing different therapies for hepatic VOD in people undergoing HSCT. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 14 RCTs. Four trials (612 participants) compared ursodeoxycholic acid with or without additional treatment versus placebo or no treatment or same additional treatment. Two trials (259 participants) compared heparin with no treatment. Two trials (106 participants) compared low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) with placebo or no treatment. One trial (360 participants) compared defibrotide with no treatment. One trial (34 participants) compared glutamine with placebo. Two trials (383 participants) compared fresh frozen plasma (FFP) with or without additional treatment versus no treatment or same additional treatment. One trial (30 participants) compared antithrombin III with heparin versus heparin. One trial compared heparin (47 participants) with LMWH (46 participants) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) (47 participants). No trial investigated the effects of

  14. Unusual Methylobacterium fujisawaense Infection in a Patient with Acute Leukaemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Corti, Giampaolo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Tortoli, Enrico; Mariottini, Alessandro; Pecile, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms of the genus Methylobacterium are facultative methylotrophic, gram-negative rods that are ubiquitous in nature and rarely cause human disease, mostly in subjects with preexisting causes of immune depression. Methylobacterium fujisawaense, first proposed as a new species in 1988, has never been reported as a bacterial agent of human infections so far. Here we describe a case of M. fujisawaense infection in a relapsed acute leukaemia undergoing unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Molecular identification of an M. fujisawaense strain was obtained from multiple mycobacterial blood cultures.

  15. Nephrotoxicity of high-dose ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide in adults undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agaliotis, D P; Ballester, O F; Mattox, T; Hiemenz, J W; Fields, K K; Zorsky, P E; Goldstein, S C; Perkins, J B; Rosen, R M; Elfenbein, G J

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate nephrotoxicity in adult patients treated with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinical and laboratory data from 131 patients with various malignancies who received treatment with escalating doses of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide followed by autologous stem cell transplantation as part of a phase I/II therapeutic trial. Abnormalities in glomerular filtration were evaluated by measuring peak creatinine levels and tubular dysfunction by the lowest recorded serum levels of potassium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, at different time periods after administration of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, and after autologous stem cell transplantation. For the entire group of 131 patients, peak creatinine levels were > 1.5 mg/dL but < 3.0 mg/dL in 37% and levels were > 3.0 mg/dL in 11% at some time during their hospital stay. At the time of discharge, creatinine levels were 1.6 mg/dL to 3.0 mg/dL in 25% of patients and were > 3 mg/dL in 5%. Immediately after high-dose therapy, peak creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients receiving higher doses of ifosfamide compared to those receiving lower doses (P < 0.00001) and those receiving intermediate doses (P < 0.005). There was a dramatic decrease in serum bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium levels immediately after chemotherapy, and they remained significantly decreased throughout the patient's hospital stay, despite massive replacement efforts (P ranging between < 0.008 and < 0.001). This is the largest adult population study documenting the incidence and severity of ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide-associated acute nephrotoxicity. Renal dysfunction was dose related and reversible in the majority of patients.

  16. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p < 0.001). The median oral mucositis severity, assessed using the WHO oral toxicity scale from grade 0-4, experienced in the no group was 2.5 vs. 2 in the cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  17. Prospective, comprehensive, and effective viral monitoring in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, S; Meisel, R; Adams, O; Pufal, Y; Laws, H J; Enczmann, J; Dilloo, D

    2010-10-01

    Major advances in the monitoring and treatment of viral infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have been achieved over the last decade. The appropriate extent of viral monitoring and antiviral therapy remains controversial, and reports in pediatric patients receiving allogeneic unmanipulated hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are sparse. A total of 40 pediatric patients who underwent HSCT with either peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs, n = 30) or bone marrow (BM; n = 10) were prospectively monitored every week for viral DNAemia (VDNA) by simultaneous detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6), human adenovirus (ADV), and polyoma BK virus (BKV) using real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All patients received prophylactic acyclovir and preemptive ganciclovir (GCV) when 500 copies/microg DNA (EBV/HHV6) or >1 copy/microg DNA (CMV) were detected on 2 consecutive measurements. VDNA occurred in 25 of 40 recipients (CMV, 11/40 patients [28%]; EBV, 19/40 [48%]; HHV6, 2/40 [5%]; ADV/BKV, 1/40) and was found exclusively after neutrophil engraftment and in most cases up to day +100. Recurrent VDNA (P = .028) and (readily treatable) viral disease (P = .003) were observed predominantly in patients suffering from nonmalignant diseases, a cohort characterized by delayed lymphocyte engraftment. VDNA occurred more frequently in HLA-mismatched HSCT and in the 24 of 40 patients receiving antithymocyte globulin (ATG). The incidence of EBV, but not that of CMV, was increased in the ATG group. Yet, in these patients, viral loads of both EBV and CMV were higher, but with prompt initiation of preemptive GCV, no posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder or other life-threatening morbidities occurred. HHV6 was typically detected at low viral loads (<10(2) copies/microg DNA), with only 5% of HSC recipients fulfilling our HHV6 criteria for triggering GCV treatment. In multivariate analysis, ATG treatment

  18. PRES in Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell or Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Masetti, Riccardo; Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Zama, Daniele; Vendemini, Francesca; Biagi, Carlotta; Franzoni, Emilio; Pession, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical neuroradiologic entity that is becoming increasingly well known and documented in pediatrics. It is characterized by a variable association of seizures, headache, vomiting, altered mental status, visual disturbances, and seizures, as well as imaging suggesting white-gray matter edema involving the posterior regions of the central nervous system in most cases. The pathophysiology of PRES remains unclear. Although PRES has been associated with a widespread range of clinical conditions, namely infections, adverse drug events, autoimmune diseases, and many others, its onset after hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation remains the most commonly reported. Historically, PRES has proved to be generally reversible and associated with good clinical outcomes; however, severe complications, sometimes life-threatening, can also occur. Most reported cases of childhood PRES after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation have been case reports or series across a broad spectrum of different transplant settings, and no clear consensus exists regarding how best to manage the syndrome. Thus, in this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the pathophysiological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of PRES in children, with a specific focus on the transplant scenario. Differential diagnoses with other neurologic complications after pediatric transplantation are reviewed, and crucial issues in the management of PRES and the development of future research are ultimately addressed.

  19. Productivity loss due to premature mortality caused by blood cancer: a study based on patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ortega, Marta; Oliva-Moreno, Juan; Jiménez-Aguilera, Juan de Dios; Romero-Aguilar, Antonio; Espigado-Tocino, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been used for many years to treat haematological malignancies that could not be cured by other treatments. Despite this medical breakthrough, mortality rates remain high. Our purpose was to evaluate labour productivity losses associated with premature mortality due to blood cancer in recipients of stem cell transplantations. We collected primary data from the clinical histories of blood cancer patients who had undergone stem cell transplantation between 2006 and 2011 in two Spanish hospitals. We carried out a descriptive analysis and calculated the years of potential life lost and years of potential productive life lost. Labour productivity losses due to premature mortality were estimated using the Human Capital method. An alternative approach, the Friction Cost method, was used as part of the sensitivity analysis. Our findings suggest that, in a population of 179 transplanted and deceased patients, males and people who die between the ages of 30 and 49 years generate higher labour productivity losses. The estimated loss amounts to over €31.4 million using the Human Capital method (€480,152 using the Friction Cost method), which means an average of €185,855 per death. The highest labour productivity losses are produced by leukaemia. However, lymphoma generates the highest loss per death. Further efforts are needed to reduce premature mortality in blood cancer patients undergoing transplantations and reduce economic losses. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhalation aromatherapy in children and adolescents undergoing stem cell infusion: results of a placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Ndao, Deborah H; Ladas, Elena J; Cheng, Bin; Sands, Stephen A; Snyder, Kathryn T; Garvin, James H; Kelly, Kara M

    2012-03-01

    Though often lifesaving, stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a period of great distress for both child and parent. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study evaluating the effect of the respiratory administration of bergamot essential oil on the anxiety, nausea, and pain of 37 pediatric patients with malignant and non-malignant disorders undergoing stem cell infusion and their parents. Patients were assessed at the time of recruitment, prior to infusion, upon infusion completion, and one hour post-infusion using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) for parents and the STAIC, Children's Behavioral Style Scale (CBSS), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and nausea, and the Emotionality Activity Sociability and Impulsivity instrument (EASI) for children. Children and adolescents in the treatment group experienced greater anxiety (p = 0.05) and nausea (p = 0.03) one hour post-infusion. Reported pain in both groups was no longer significant one hour post-infusion. Parental anxiety declined in both groups but did not reach statistical significance. Child's monitoring coping style was significantly predictive of transitory anxiety post-infusion (p = 0.01). Although this trial did not report a benefit of inhalation aromatherapy for reducing anxiety, nausea, or pain when added to standard supportive care, it provides the first experimental rather than descriptive report on testing a single therapeutic essential oil among children and adolescents undergoing stem cell infusion. Future research may consider exploring the cutaneous application of essential oil through massage or other psychoeducational counseling interventions among parents with elevated anxiety and patients with greater information seeking coping styles during SCT. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Microbiota Manipulation With Prebiotics and Probiotics in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Tessa M.; Rezvani, Andrew; Bhatt, Ami S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially life-saving therapy that often comes at the cost of complications such as graft-versus-host disease and post-transplant infections. With improved technology to under-stand the ecosystem of microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and microeukaryotes) that make up the gut microbiota, there is increasing evidence of the microbiota’s contribution to the development of post-transplant complications. Antibiotics have traditionally been the mainstay of microbiota-altering therapies available to physicians. Recently, interest is increasing in the use of prebiotics and probiotics to support the development and sustainability of a healthier microbiota. In this review, we will describe the evidence for the use of prebiotics and probiotics in combating microbiota dysbiosis and explore the ways in which they may be used in future research to potentially improve clinical outcomes and decrease rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and post-transplant infection. PMID:26780719

  2. Microbiota Manipulation With Prebiotics and Probiotics in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andermann, Tessa M; Rezvani, Andrew; Bhatt, Ami S

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially life-saving therapy that often comes at the cost of complications such as graft-versus-host disease and post-transplant infections. With improved technology to understand the ecosystem of microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and microeukaryotes) that make up the gut microbiota, there is increasing evidence of the microbiota's contribution to the development of post-transplant complications. Antibiotics have traditionally been the mainstay of microbiota-altering therapies available to physicians. Recently, interest is increasing in the use of prebiotics and probiotics to support the development and sustainability of a healthier microbiota. In this review, we will describe the evidence for the use of prebiotics and probiotics in combating microbiota dysbiosis and explore the ways in which they may be used in future research to potentially improve clinical outcomes and decrease rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and post-transplant infection.

  3. Synthesis and Organization of Hyaluronan and Versican by Embryonic Stem Cells Undergoing Embryoid Body Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shreya; Nair, Rekha; Rolle, Marsha W.; Braun, Kathleen R.; Chan, Christina K.; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Wight, Thomas N.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide a convenient model to probe the molecular and cellular dynamics of developmental cell morphogenesis. ESC differentiation in vitro via embryoid bodies (EBs) recapitulates many aspects of early stages of development, including the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of pluripotent cells into more differentiated progeny. Hyaluronan and versican are important extracellular mediators of EMT processes, yet the temporal expression and spatial distribution of these extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules during EB differentiation remains undefined. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the synthesis and organization of hyaluronan and versican by using murine ESCs during EB differentiation. Hyaluronan and versican (V0 and V1 isoforms), visualized by immunohistochemistry and evaluated biochemically, accumulated within EBs during the course of differentiation. Interestingly, increasing amounts of a 70-kDa proteolytic fragment of versican were also detected over time, along with ADAMTS-1 and -5 protein expression. ESCs expressed each of the hyaluronan synthases (HAS) -1, -2, and -3 and versican splice variants (V0, V1, V2, and V3) throughout EB differentiation, but HAS-2, V0, and V1 were expressed at significantly increased levels at each time point examined. Hyaluronan and versican exhibited overlapping expression patterns within EBs in regions of low cell density, and versican expression was excluded from clusters of epithelial (cytokeratin-positive) cells but was enriched within the vicinity of mesenchymal (N-cadherin-positive) cells. These results indicate that hyaluronan and versican synthesized by ESCs within EB microenvironments are associated with EMT processes and furthermore suggest that endogenously produced ECM molecules play a role in ESC differentiation. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 58

  4. Epigenome and chromatin structure in human embryonic stem cells undergoing differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Galiová, Gabriela; Krejcí, Jana; Harnicarová, Andrea; Strasák, Ludek; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-12-01

    Epigenetic histone (H3) modification patterns and the nuclear radial arrangement of select genetic elements were compared in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) before and after differentiation. H3K9 acetylation, H3K9 trimethylation, and H3K79 monomethylation were reduced at the nuclear periphery of differentiated hESCs. Differentiation coincided with centromere redistribution, as evidenced by perinucleolar accumulation of the centromeric markers CENP-A and H3K9me3, central repositioning of centromeres 1, 5, 19, and rearrangement of other centromeres at the nuclear periphery. The radial positions of PML, RARalpha genes, and human chromosomes 10, 12, 15, 17, and 19 remained relatively stable as hESCs differentiated. However, the female inactive H3K27-trimethylated X chromosome occupied a more peripheral nuclear position in differentiated cells. Thus, pluripotent and differentiated hESCs have distinct nuclear patterns of heterochromatic structures (centromeres and inactive X chromosome) and epigenetic marks (H3K9me3, and H3K27me3), while relatively conserved gene density-related radial chromatin distributions are already largely established in undifferentiated hES cells.

  5. Effectiveness of Etoposide Chemomobilization in Lymphoma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A; Whitley, Julia; Goyal, Ravi; Sharf, Andrew; Irons, Robert; Rao, Kamakshi V.; Essenmacher, Amber; Serody, Jonathan S.; Coghill, Jay M.; Armistead, Paul M.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Gabriel, Don A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Brown, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of stem cell mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in lymphoma patients is suboptimal. We reviewed our institutional experience using chemomobilization with etoposide (VP-16; 375mg/m2 on days +1 and +2) and G-CSF (5ug/kg twice daily from day +3 through the final day of collection) in 159 patients with lymphoma. This approach resulted in successful mobilization (> 2 × 106 CD34 cells collected) in 94% of patients (83% within 4 apheresis sessions). 57% of patients collected at least 5 × 106 cells in ≤ 2 days and were defined as good mobilizers. The regimen was safe with a low rate of rehospitalization. Average costs were $14,923 for good mobilizers and $27,044 for poor mobilizers (p<0.05). Using our data, we performed a ‘break-even’ analysis that demonstrated that adding two doses of Plerixafor to predicted poor mobilizers at the time of first CD34 count would achieve cost neutrality if the frequency of good mobilizers were to increase by 21%, while the frequency of good mobilizers would need to increase by 25% if three doses of Plerixafor were used. We conclude that chemomobilization with etoposide and G-CSF in patients with lymphoma is effective, with future opportunities for cost-neutral improvement using novel agents. PMID:23165501

  6. Views of Patients Undergo Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation on Their Basic Needs

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, Leila; Jafaraghaee, Fateme; Jeddian, Alireza; Atrian, Mahboobe Kafaei; Akbari, Azam; Tootoonchian, Farhood

    2013-01-01

    Background Today, hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT) has been accepted as a therapeutic approach and is widely applied in many patients with disorders of hematopoietic systems or patients with malignancies. Concomitant use of this therapeutic approach with long term chemotherapeutic procedures and hospitalization requires special care. This study was conducted to examine basic needs of patients after HSCT. Methods In this study, 171 hospitalized patients were selected after transplantation, using convenience sampling method. They completed a questionnaire formulated on the basis of Yura and Walsh Theory of Basic Needs. Results Most of the needs reported in the areas of vital functions, functional health status, and reaction to functional health status were chills (76.8%), insomnia (68.5%), and dissatisfaction with changes of lifestyle/habits (53.6%), respectively. Furthermore, 94.1% of the patients were aware of their disease. Conclusion This study identified a broad spectrum of the needs in HSCT patients. Given the importance of determining needs to reach thorough nursing care, paying attention to the provided list can facilitate the achievement of the goals of the care program for these patients. PMID:24505524

  7. Risk Factors for Delirium in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weckmann, Michelle T.; Gingrich, Roger; Mills, James A.; Hook, Larry; Beglinger, Leigh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is common following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment have been shown to improve long term outcomes. We sought to investigate the relationship between potential risk-factors and the development of delirium following HSCT. Methods Fifty-four inpatients admitted for HSCT were assessed prospectively for delirium every 2-3 days through their inpatient stay using standardized delirium and neuropsychological measures. Patient’s self-reports of medical history, medical records, and neurocognitive and psychiatric assessments were used to identify risk factors. Both pre- and post-HSCT risk factors were examined. Results Delirium incidence was 35% and occurred with highest frequency in the 2 weeks following transplant. The only pre-transplantation risk factors was lower oxygen saturation (p=0.003). Post-transplantation risk factors for delirium included higher creatinine (p<0.0001), higher blood urea nitrogen levels (p=0.005), lower creatinine clearance (p=0.0006), lower oxygen saturation (p=0.001), lower hemoglobin (p=0.04) and lower albumin (p=0.03). There was no observed association with level of cognitive performance, transplant type, disease severity, medical co-morbidity index, age or conditioning regimen. Conclusion Routine laboratory values can assist in the identification of high risk patients before delirium onset to improve early detection and treatment of delirium following HSCT. PMID:22860240

  8. Cognitive fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis undergoing immunoablative therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berard, Jason A; Bowman, Marjorie; Atkins, Harold L; Freedman, Mark S; Walker, Lisa A S

    2014-01-15

    Fatigue presents as a significant problem in multiple sclerosis (MS). Cognitive fatigue (CF) can be defined as a decrease in, or inability to maintain task performance throughout the duration of a continuous cognitive task. CF was evaluated using the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) both pre- and post-immunoablation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IA-HSCT) over a 3-year follow-up period. The magnitude of CF was examined and the impact of scoring methodology was evaluated. Twenty-three individuals with rapidly progressive MS and poor prognosis underwent high dose immunosuppression and subsequent HSCT. Individuals completed the 3″ and 2″ PASAT at baseline and every 6 months thereafter over a period of 36 months. As scoring methodology can impact its sensitivity to CF, the PASAT was scored according to three scoring methods. CF was noted across all three scoring methods at baseline and at the majority of time points post-IA-HSCT on both the 3″ and 2″ PASAT. The magnitude of CF remained consistent both pre-and post-IA-HSCT. While results suggest that the procedure itself does not ameliorate an individual's susceptibility to CF; neither does it seem to negatively impact levels of CF. As such, results support the notion that the IA-HSCT procedure, despite its aggressive nature, does not exacerbate CF in this particular sample. © 2013.

  9. [Cost of antibiotic therapy in neutropenic patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Palau, J; Picón, I; Aznar, E; Climent, M A; Máiquez, J

    2000-06-01

    The increase in pharmaceutical costs, especially for expensive procedures such as bone marrow transplants, has led to the study of the economic impact of febrile neutropenia in peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). We analyzed 89 consecutive patients with breast cancer who underwent PBSCT. All patients developed febrile neutropenia and were administered an empirical intravenous regimen based on the combination of piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin. We analyzed the direct costs of this treatment and grouped them into drug acquisition cost, administration costs (cost of the additional material), and preparation costs (time employed for the preparation and administration of the drug). We found that the overall cost was $1,110, 65% of which corresponded to the initial therapy and the rest (35%) to the use of additional antibiotics. This higher cost was especially related to the use of vancomycin or teicoplanin (50%). The acquisition costs accounted for 90% of the overall treatment costs. Thirty-six patients (40%) did not need additional antibiotics and the cost in this group was less ($663). We concluded that knowledge of the costs of pharmacological therapy for infection in PBSCT is indispensable for the appropriate development of treatment units, especially in terms of optimizing resources and comparing different therapeutic or prophylactic approaches.

  10. Lactobacillus brevis CD2 lozenges prevent oral mucositis in patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy followed by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Atul; Tilak, TVSVGK; Bakhshi, Sameer; Raina, Vinod; Kumar, Lalit; Chaudhary, Surendra Pal; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Gupta, Ritu; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is a common inflammatory complication in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Lactobacillus brevis CD2 has been proven efficacious in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Methods This phase II study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of L. brevis CD2 lozenges in preventing oral mucositis in patients undergoing HSCT. Eligible patients received four to six lozenges of L. brevis CD2 per day, beginning from 4 to 7 days before initiation of chemotherapy and continuing until resolution of mucositis or till day +24. Results Of 31 patients enrolled, 7 (22.6%) patients did not develop any mucositis, 6 (19.4%) patients developed grade 1, 12 (38.7%) patients developed grade 2, 4 (12.9%) and 2 (6.5%) patients developed grade 3 and grade 4 mucositis, respectively. Median time to onset and for resolution of mucositis were 6 days and 8 days, respectively. No adverse events were reported with usage of study drug. However, one patient died of Klebsiella sepsis. Conclusion Promising results from the study encourage the use of L. brevis CD2 lozenges as a supportive care treatment option; however, a randomised, double-blind, multicentric trial in a larger population is warranted. Trials registration number NCT01480011 at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ (Registered on Nov 04, 2011). PMID:28848667

  11. Acute kidney injury and the risk of mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kizilbash, Sarah J.; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Chavers, Blanche M.; Cao, Qing; Smith, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Dialysis after HSCT is associated with a lower overall survival (OS); however, the association between less severe AKI and OS is unclear. Method We retrospectively studied 205 consecutive pediatric HSCT patients to determine the incidence and impact of all stages of AKI on OS in pediatric HSCT recipients. We used the peak pRIFLE grade during the first 100 days to classify AKI (R=risk, I= injury, F= failure, L= loss of function, E= End-stage renal disease) and used the modified Schwartz formula to estimate glomerular filtration rate. Results AKI was observed in 173 of the 205 patients (84%). The 1-year OS decreased significantly with an increasing severity of pRIFLE grades (p < 0.01). There was no difference in the OS between patients without AKI and the R/I group. Regardless of the dialysis status, stages F/L/E had significantly lower OS compared with patients without AKI or R/I (p < 0.01). There was no difference in OS among patients with dialysis and F/L/E without dialysis (p 0.65). Stages F/L/E predicted mortality independent of acute graft versus host disease, gender, and malignancy. Conclusion The OS of children after HSCT decreases significantly with an increasing severity of AKI within the first 100 days posttransplant. While our data did not show an increased risk of mortality with stages R/I, stages F/L/E predicted mortality regardless of dialysis. Prevention and minimization of AKI may improve survival after pediatric HSCT. PMID:27034153

  12. Oral health risks associated with HLA-types of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dobr, Tereza; Passweg, Jakob; Weber, Catherine; Tichelli, André; Heim, Dominik; Meyer, Jürg; Gratwohl, Alois; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2007-06-01

    Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are frequent long-term complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Not all patients are affected equally. As HLA-genotypes are associated with many functions of the immune system we made use of our long-standing oral health program in HSCT recipients to compare oral health data with recipient HLA-antigens. This study includes 267 patients evaluated prior to a planned HSCT at our institution between March 1987 and March 2002. Standardized oral examinations were undertaken at fixed time points: pre-HSCT and at 6 and 12 months post-HSCT. Evaluation included loss of radiologic attachment level, decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) index, and salivary flow rate. For 241 patients (120 males, 121 females) baseline values of these parameters were compared with recipient HLA-A, -B, -C and -DR-antigens. Significant correlations were found between increased DMFT and HLA-A32 (P = 0.05), -B5 (0.04), and -DR2 (0.05) as well as decreased DMFT with HLA-B35 (0.02) and -C4 (0.04). Significant associations were also found between certain HLA-antigens and loss of radiologic periodontal attachment level [HLA-A1 (<0.01), -C7 (0.04), and -B60 (0.05)], and saliva flow rate [HLA-A30 (0.02)]. These data suggest that there may be associations between pretransplant caries, other oral parameters and HLA in patients at HSCT. Confirmatory studies concerning the associations of certain HLA-antigens with caries and periodontal diseases will be needed.

  13. Alternatives, and adjuncts, to prophylactic platelet transfusion for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Murphy, Michael F

    2016-08-22

    Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy since the mid-1970s, some areas continue to provoke debate especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. To determine whether agents that can be used as alternatives, or adjuncts, to platelet transfusions for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation are safe and effective at preventing bleeding. We searched 11 bibliographic databases and four ongoing trials databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE (OvidSP, 1946 to 19 May 2016), Embase (OvidSP, 1974 to 19 May 2016), PubMed (e-publications only: searched 19 May 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP and the ISRCTN Register (searched 19 May 2016). We included randomised controlled trials in people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, desmopressin (DDAVP), or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard care or platelet transfusion). We excluded studies of antifibrinolytic drugs, as they were the focus of another review. Two review authors screened all electronically derived citations and abstracts of papers identified by the review search strategy. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data independently. We identified 16 eligible trials. Four trials are ongoing and two have been completed but the results have not yet been published (trial completion dates: April 2012 to February 2017). Therefore, the

  14. Alternatives, and adjuncts, to prophylactic platelet transfusion for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Murphy, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy since the mid-1970s, some areas continue to provoke debate especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. Objectives To determine whether agents that can be used as alternatives, or adjuncts, to platelet transfusions for people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation are safe and effective at preventing bleeding. Search methods We searched 11 bibliographic databases and four ongoing trials databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE (OvidSP, 1946 to 19 May 2016), Embase (OvidSP, 1974 to 19 May 2016), PubMed (e-publications only: searched 19 May 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP and the ISRCTN Register (searched 19 May 2016). Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials in people with haematological malignancies undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, desmopressin (DDAVP), or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard care or platelet transfusion). We excluded studies of antifibrinolytic drugs, as they were the focus of another review. Data collection and analysis Two review authors screened all electronically derived citations and abstracts of papers identified by the review search strategy. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data independently. Main results We identified 16 eligible trials. Four trials are ongoing and two have been completed but the results have

  15. Long-term cultured mesenchymal stem cells frequently develop genomic mutations but do not undergo malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Zhang, Z; Chi, Y; Zhang, Q; Xu, F; Yang, Z; Meng, L; Yang, S; Yan, S; Mao, A; Zhang, J; Yang, Y; Wang, S; Cui, J; Liang, L; Ji, Y; Han, Z-B; Fang, X; Han, Z C

    2013-01-01

    Cultured human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are being tested in several clinical trials and encouraging outcomes have been observed. To determine whether in vitro expansion influences the genomic stability of hUC-MSCs, we maintained nine hUC-MSC clones in long-term culture and comparatively analyzed them at early and late passages. All of the clones senesced in culture, exhibiting decreased telomerase activity and shortened telomeres. Two clones showed no DNA copy number variations (CNVs) at passage 30 (P30). Seven clones had ≥1 CNVs at P30 compared with P3, and one of these clones appeared trisomic chromosome 10 at the late passage. No tumor developed in immunodeficient mice injected with hUC-MSCs, regardless of whether the cells had CNVs at the late passage. mRNA-Seq analysis indicated that pathways of cell cycle control and DNA damage response were downregulated during in vitro culture in hUC-MSC clones that showed genomic instability, but the same pathways were upregulated in the clones with good genomic stability. These results demonstrated that hUC-MSCs can be cultured for many passages and attain a large number of cells, but most of the cultured hUC-MSCs develop genomic alterations. Although hUC-MSCs with genomic alterations do not undergo malignant transformation, periodic genomic monitoring and donor management focusing on genomic stability are recommended before these cells are used for clinical applications. PMID:24309937

  16. Prognostic impact of viral reactivations in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first complete response

    PubMed Central

    Guenounou, Sarah; Borel, Cécile; Bérard, Emilie; Yon, Edwige; Fort, Marylise; Mengelle, Catherine; Bertoli, Sarah; Sarry, Audrey; Tavitian, Suzanne; Huguet, Françoise; Attal, Michel; Récher, Christian; Huynh, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) serological status of donor and recipient as well as CMV reactivation have been associated with a lower risk of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). Since immunosuppression following transplant allows resurgence of many other viruses, we retrospectively evaluated the impact of viral reactivations on relapse and survival in a cohort of 136 AML patients undergoing alloSCT in first remission from sibling (68%) or unrelated (32%) donors. Myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimen were given to 71 and 65 patients, respectively. Including CMV reactivations, at least 1 viral reactivation was recorded in 76 patients. Viral reactivations were associated with a lower risk of relapse (adjusted HR 0.14; 95% CI 0.07–0.30; P < 0.01), better disease-free survival (aHR 0.29; 95% CI 0.16–0.54; P < 0.01) but higher non relapse mortality. This translated into a better overall survival (aHR 0.44; 95%CI 0.25–0.77; P < 0.01) in patients who experienced viral reactivation. Thus, viral reactivations, including but not limited to CMV reactivation, are associated with a better outcome particularly with regard to the risk of relapse in AML patients undergoing alloSCT. New guidelines regarding the choice of donor according to the CMV serostatus are needed. PMID:27902595

  17. Utility of surveillance blood cultures in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveillance blood cultures are often obtained in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients for detection of bloodstream infection. The major aims of this retrospective cohort study were to determine the utility of the practice of obtaining surveillance blood cultures from asymptomatic patients during the first 100 post-transplant days and to determine if obtaining more than one positive blood culture helps in the diagnosis of bloodstream infection. Methods We conducted a 17-month retrospective analysis of all blood cultures obtained for patients admitted to the hospital for HSCT from January 2010 to June 2011. Each patient’s clinical course, vital signs, diagnostic testing, treatment, and response to treatment were reviewed. The association between number of positive blood cultures and the final diagnosis was analyzed. Results Blood culture results for 205 patients were reviewed. Cultures obtained when symptoms of infection were present (clinical cultures) accounted for 1,033 culture sets, whereas 2,474 culture sets were classified as surveillance cultures (no symptoms of infection were present). The total number of positive blood cultures was 185 sets (5.3% of cultures obtained) and accounted for 84 positive culture episodes. Incidence of infection in autologous, related allogeneic and unrelated allogeneic transplants was 8.3%, 20.0%, and 28.6% respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common organisms isolated. Based on our application of predefined criteria there were 29 infections and 55 episodes of positive blood cultures that were not infections. None of the patients who developed infection were diagnosed by surveillance blood cultures. None of the uninfected patients with positive blood cultures showed any clinical changes after receiving antibiotics. There was a significant difference between the incidence of BSI in the first and second 50-day periods post-HSCT. There was no association between the number of

  18. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  19. Stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behr, Björn; Ko, Sae Hee; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-10-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines and are classified according to their origin and their ability to differentiate. Enormous potential exists in use of stem cells for regenerative medicine. To produce effective stem cell-based treatments for a range of diseases, an improved understanding of stem cell biology and better control over stem cell fate are necessary. In addition, the barriers to clinical translation, such as potential oncologic properties of stem cells, need to be addressed. With renewed government support and continued refinement of current stem cell methodologies, the future of stem cell research is exciting and promises to provide novel reconstructive options for patients and surgeons limited by traditional paradigms.

  20. Ravuconazole in Preventing Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-07

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  1. Collecting and Storing Tissue and DNA Samples From Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-04

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  2. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients

  3. Mechanical Stimulation in Preventing Bone Density Loss in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved

  4. Ondansetron in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-26

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  5. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  6. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells undergo malignant transformation via indirect co-cultured with tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Yalan; Bai, Lu; Cui, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering as well as being potential carriers for tumour therapy. However, the safety of using MSCs in tumours is unknown. Herein, we analyse malignant transformation of MSCs in the tumour microenvironment. Rat bone marrow MSCs were cultured with malignant rat glioma C6 cells without direct cell-cell contact. After 7 days, the cells were assessed for transformation using flow cytometry, real-time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and chromosomal analysis. In addition, wild-type (WT) p53, mutant p53 and mdm2 was determined using Western blotting. Almost all MSCs became phenotypically malignant cells, with significantly decreased WT p53 expression and increased expression of mutant p53 and mdm2, along with an aneuploid karyotype. To evaluate tumorigenesis in vivo, the MSCs indirect co-cultured with C6 cells for 7 days were transplanted subcutaneously into immuno-deficient mice. The cells developed into a large tumour at the injection site within 8 weeks, with systemic symptoms including cachexia and scoliosis. Pathological and cytological analysis revealed poorly differentiated pleomorphic cells with a dense vascular network and aggressive invasion into the adjacent muscle. These data demonstrate that MSCs became malignant cancer cells when exposed to the tumour microenvironment and suggest that factors released from the cancer cells have a critical role in the malignant transformation of MSCs.

  7. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells produce concordant improvements in regional function, tissue perfusion, and fibrotic burden when administered to patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: The Prospective Randomized Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery (PROMETHEUS) trial.

    PubMed

    Karantalis, Vasileios; DiFede, Darcy L; Gerstenblith, Gary; Pham, Si; Symes, James; Zambrano, Juan Pablo; Fishman, Joel; Pattany, Pradip; McNiece, Ian; Conte, John; Schulman, Steven; Wu, Katherine; Shah, Ashish; Breton, Elayne; Davis-Sproul, Janice; Schwarz, Richard; Feigenbaum, Gary; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Suncion, Viky Y; Lardo, Albert C; Borrello, Ivan; Mendizabal, Adam; Karas, Tomer Z; Byrnes, John; Lowery, Maureen; Heldman, Alan W; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-04-11

    Although accumulating data support the efficacy of intramyocardial cell-based therapy to improve left ventricular (LV) function in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing CABG, the underlying mechanism and impact of cell injection site remain controversial. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) improve LV structure and function through several effects including reducing fibrosis, neoangiogenesis, and neomyogenesis. To test the hypothesis that the impact on cardiac structure and function after intramyocardial injections of autologous MSCs results from a concordance of prorecovery phenotypic effects. Six patients were injected with autologous MSCs into akinetic/hypokinetic myocardial territories not receiving bypass graft for clinical reasons. MRI was used to measure scar, perfusion, wall thickness, and contractility at baseline, at 3, 6, and 18 months and to compare structural and functional recovery in regions that received MSC injections alone, revascularization alone, or neither. A composite score of MRI variables was used to assess concordance of antifibrotic effects, perfusion, and contraction at different regions. After 18 months, subjects receiving MSCs exhibited increased LV ejection fraction (+9.4 ± 1.7%, P=0.0002) and decreased scar mass (-47.5 ± 8.1%; P<0.0001) compared with baseline. MSC-injected segments had concordant reduction in scar size, perfusion, and contractile improvement (concordant score: 2.93 ± 0.07), whereas revascularized (0.5 ± 0.21) and nontreated segments (-0.07 ± 0.34) demonstrated nonconcordant changes (P<0.0001 versus injected segments). Intramyocardial injection of autologous MSCs into akinetic yet nonrevascularized segments produces comprehensive regional functional restitution, which in turn drives improvement in global LV function. These findings, although inconclusive because of lack of placebo group, have important therapeutic and mechanistic hypothesis-generating implications. http

  8. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-17

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  9. Integrated meta-omic analyses of the gastrointestinal tract microbiome in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaysen, Anne; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Muller, Emilie E L; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Wampach, Linda; Laczny, Cédric C; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne; Franke, Katharina; Bittenbring, Jörg; Wilmes, Paul; Schneider, Jochen G

    2017-08-01

    In patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), treatment-induced changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiome have been linked to adverse outcomes, most notably graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). However, it is presently unknown whether this relationship is causal or consequential. Here, we performed an integrated meta-omic analysis to probe deeper into the GIT microbiome changes during allo-HSCT and its accompanying treatments. We used 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to resolve archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes within the GIT microbiomes of 16 patients undergoing allo-HSCT for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. These results revealed a major shift in the GIT microbiome after allo-HSCT including a marked reduction in bacterial diversity, accompanied by only limited changes in eukaryotes and archaea. An integrated analysis of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data was performed on samples collected from a patient before and after allo-HSCT for acute myeloid leukemia. This patient developed severe GvHD, leading to death 9 months after allo-HSCT. In addition to drastically decreased bacterial diversity, the post-treatment microbiome showed a higher overall number and higher expression levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). One specific Escherichia coli strain causing a paravertebral abscess was linked to GIT dysbiosis, suggesting loss of intestinal barrier integrity. The apparent selection for bacteria expressing ARGs suggests that prophylactic antibiotic administration may adversely affect the overall treatment outcome. We therefore assert that such analyses including information about the selection of pathogenic bacteria expressing ARGs may assist clinicians in "personalizing" regimens for individual patients to improve overall outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dendritic cell count in the graft predicts relapse in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing an HLA-matched related allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Reena; Lakshmi, Kavitha M; George, Biju; Viswabandya, Auro; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Abraham, Aby; Chandy, Mammen; Srivastava, Alok; Mathews, Vikram

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the impact of the number of infused and reconstituted immunocompetent cells including dendritic cells (DCs) on clinical outcome of patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Sixty-nine consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies were included in the analysis. The median age of the cohort was 32 years (range: 2-62 years) and there were 39 (57%) males. Twenty-one (30%) patients relapsed with a cumulative incidence of 44 % +/- 14% at a median follow up of 28 months. On a multivariate analysis, a high plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PC) content in the graft was associated with higher risk of relapse. The patients were further categorized based on the median PC counts in the graft as high (> or =2.3 x 10(6)/kg) and low (<2.3 x 10(6)/kg) groups. The baseline characteristics of these 2 groups were comparable. The group that had a high PC content in the graft had significantly higher risk of relapse and lower overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). Our data suggests that PC content in the graft predicts clinical outcomes such as relapse and survival in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing an allogeneic HLA matched related peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. There is potential for pretransplant manipulation of this cellular subset in the graft.

  11. Early Prognostic Value of Monitoring Serum Free Light Chain in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur; Sucak, Gülsan Türköz; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Yağcı, Münci; Haznedar, Rauf

    2017-03-16

    We hypothesized the levels of free light chains obtained before and after autologous stem cell transplantation can be useful in predicting transplantation outcome. We analyzed 70 multiple myeloma patients. Abnormal free light chain ratios before stem cell transplantation were found to be associated early progression, although without any impact on overall survival. At day +30, the normalization of levels of involved free light chain related with early progression. According to these results almost one-third reduction of free light chain levels can predict favorable prognosis after autologous stem cell transplantation.

  12. Comparison of the occurrence of mold infection among patients receiving chemotherapy for acute leukemia versus patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Anke; van der Bruggen, Tjomme; Haas, Pieter-Jan A; de Jong, Pim A; Minnema, Monique C

    2011-11-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMI) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Cumulative incidence numbers vary greatly, probably because local circumstances influence the incidence of IMI. Therefore, comparison of different patient groups at risk should be performed at one hospital. We performed a single-center retrospective analysis examining both adult patients treated with chemotherapy for acute leukemia or MDS and patients undergoing allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) between June 2007 and August 2009. IMI were classified according to the EORTC criteria. A total of 211 patients with 237 predefined risk episodes were analyzed. A total of 22 IMI were observed: three of them were classified as proven, 15 as probable, and four as possible. No IMI were observed in the autologous SCT group. The incidence of proven and probable IMI in the allogeneic SCT group was 7.2%, and in the chemotherapy group, 14.3%. Patients with IMI had a higher mortality risk. We demonstrate for the first time that patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukemia have the highest risk of developing IMI during their treatment compared to patients with allogeneic SCT. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Micafungin versus fluconazole for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections during neutropenia in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    van Burik, Jo-Anne H; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Stepan, Daniel E; Miller, Carole B; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Vesole, David H; Bunin, Nancy; Wall, Donna A; Hiemenz, John W; Satoi, Yoichi; Lee, Jeanette M; Walsh, Thomas J

    2004-11-15

    We hypothesized that chemoprophylaxis with the echinocandin micafungin would be an effective agent for antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We therefore conducted a randomized, double-blind, multi-institutional, comparative phase III trial, involving 882 adult and pediatric patients, of 50 mg of micafungin (1 mg/kg for patients weighing <50 kg) and 400 mg of fluconazole (8 mg/kg for patients weighing <50 kg) administered once per day. Success was defined as the absence of suspected, proven, or probable invasive fungal infection (IFI) through the end of therapy and as the absence of proven or probable IFI through the end of the 4-week period after treatment. The overall efficacy of micafungin was superior to that of fluconazole as antifungal prophylaxis during the neutropenic phase after HSCT (80.0% in the micafungin arm vs. 73.5% in the fluconazole arm [difference, 6.5%]; 95% confidence interval, 0.9%-12%; P=.03). This randomized trial demonstrates the efficacy of an echinocandin for antifungal prophylaxis in neutropenic patients.

  14. Effectiveness of preventive measures for hemato-oncologic patients undergoing stem cell transplantation during a period of hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Berger, Jutta; Willinger, Birgit; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda; Blacky, Alexander; Kalhs, Peter; Koller, Walter; Assadian, Ojan; Aichberger, Karl J

    2011-11-01

    Aspergillus spp are ubiquitous spore-forming fungi. Construction work, renovation, demolition, or excavation activities within a hospital or in surrounding areas increase the risk for aspergillus infection in susceptible patients and are the main cause of nosocomial aspergillus outbreaks. We investigated the efficacy of infection control measures on the frequency of fungal infection among hemato-oncologic patients undergoing stem cell transplantation during excavation and construction work of an adjacent hospital building. Clinical isolates from these patients obtained before and during the excavation and construction period were analyzed. Preventive measures consisted in the implementation of a multibarrier concept to protect these patients from fungal infection. There was no record of any clinical isolate of Aspergillus spp in the observation period before the beginning of the groundwork. However, 3 clinically significant isolates of Aspergillus spp were detected in respiratory tract specimen of 2 patients after the beginning of excavation and demolition work, which were found to be community acquired. Although our data cannot demonstrate the efficacy of infection control measures during construction work, it can be concluded that excavation work close to immunocompromised patients is safe if a bundle of preventive measures is implemented before groundwork. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic effects of massage therapy and handling touch on caregivers of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Rexilius, Stephanie J; Mundt, Carla; Erickson Megel, Mary; Agrawal, Sangeeta

    2002-04-01

    To examine the effect of massage therapy and Healing Touch on anxiety, depression, subjective caregiver burden, and fatigue experienced by caregivers of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Quasi-experimental repeated measures. Oncology/hematology outpatient clinic in a large midwestern city. 36 caregivers: 13 in the control group, 13 in the massage therapy group, and 10 in the Healing Touch group. Average age was 51.5 years; most participants were Caucasian. All caregivers completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Subjective Burden Scale, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20 before and after treatment consisting of two 30-minute massages or Healing Touch treatments per week for three weeks. Caregivers in the control group received usual nursing care and a 10-minute supportive visit from one of the researchers. Anxiety, depression, subjective burden, fatigue, Healing Touch, massage therapy. Results showed significant declines in anxiety scores, depression, general fatigue, reduced motivation fatigue, and emotional fatigue for individuals in the massage therapy group only. In the Healing Touch group, anxiety and depression scores decreased, and fatigue and subjective burden increased, but these changes did not achieve statistical significance. Caregivers can benefit from massage therapy in the clinic setting. Oncology nurses care for both patients and their caregivers. Although some transplant programs provide services to support lay caregivers, studies indicate that these individuals continue to feel stressed by their situation. Massage might be one intervention that can be used by nurses to decrease feelings of stress in patients' caregivers.

  16. The experiences of protective isolation in patients undergoing bone marrow or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: systematic review and metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Biagioli, V; Piredda, M; Alvaro, R; de Marinis, M G

    2017-09-01

    Protective isolation is aimed at preventing infection in neutropenic patients, but it is implemented inconsistently across centres and is supported by recommendations with poor evidence. This review and metasynthesis explored the experiences and the psychological implications of protective isolation in patients with haematological malignancies undergoing bone marrow (BMT) or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). A systematic search of multiple databases for qualitative studies exploring BMT or HSCT patients' experiences of protective isolation was completed. The metasynthesis followed the meta-aggregative method from the Joanna Briggs Institute, with four procedural steps: (1) comprehensive search, (2) quality appraisal, (3) extraction of relevant findings and (4) synthesis of the identified findings. Twenty-six findings were extracted from 11 articles included in the review. The synthesising process yielded seven categories, aggregated into three synthesised findings: (1) isolation is a source of suffering, (2) isolation can lead to relating with oneself and (3) the person does not close the door to the outside world. This metasynthesis sheds light on patients' suffering from being isolated, and the possibility of overcoming this suffering thanks to relationships that patients have with themselves and with the external world. Healthcare providers should reconsider this practise in order to avoid unnecessary patient suffering. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Breast Cancer Stem Cells Survive Periods of Farnesyl-Transferase Inhibitor-Induced Dormancy by Undergoing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chaterjee, Moumita; van Golen, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    A cancer stem cell has been defined as a cell within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. These tumor-forming cells could hypothetically originate from stem, progenitor, or differentiated cells. Previously, we have shown that breast cancer cells with low metastatic potential can be induced into a reversible state of dormancy by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs). Dormancy was induced by changes in RhoA and RhoC GTPases. Specifically, RhoA was found to be hypoactivated while RhoC was hyperactivated. In the current study we demonstrate that these dormant cells also express certain known stem cell markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase I (ALDHI) and cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44). We also show that autophagy markers Atg5, Atg12, and LC3-B are expressed in these dormant stem cell-like breast cancer cells. Inhibiting autophagy by inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) blocked the process of autophagy reversing the dormant phenotype. Further, we show that c-jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) is upregulated in these dormant stem cell-like breast cancer cells and is responsible for increasing autophagy. PMID:22046561

  18. Etanercept in Treating Young Patients With Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome After Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pulmonary Complications; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. High-dose weekly AmBisome antifungal prophylaxis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Parinda; Vinks, Alexander; Filipovich, Alexandra; Vaughn, Gretchen; Fearing, Deborah; Sper, Christine; Davies, Stella

    2006-02-01

    Disseminated fungal infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The widespread use of prophylactic oral triazoles has limitations of poor absorption, interindividual variability in metabolism, and hepatic toxicity. AmBisome (amphotericin B liposomal complex) has a better safety profile than the parent drug amphotericin B and produces higher plasma and tissue concentrations. We hypothesized that once-weekly high-dose AmBisome therapy could provide adequate fungal prophylaxis for immunocompromised children undergoing HSCT. We performed a pharmacokinetic pilot study to determine whether once-weekly high-dose AmBisome administration would result in effective concentrations throughout the dosing interval. A total of 14 children (median age, 3 years, 1 month; range, 4.5 months-9 years, 9 months) undergoing HSCT received once-weekly intravenous AmBisome prophylaxis (10 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion). Blood samples for pharmacokinetic measurements were drawn around the first and the fourth weekly doses. The concentration of non-lipid-complexed amphotericin in plasma was determined by a validated bioassay. Pharmacokinetic parameters after single doses and during steady state were calculated using standard noncompartmental methods. AmBisome was well tolerated at this dose. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles for weeks 1 and 4 were obtained in 12 patients. The half-life calculated in this pediatric population was shorter on average than reported in adults (45 hours vs 152 hours). The volume of distribution correlated best with body weight (R(2) = .55), and clearance was best predicted by initial serum creatinine level (R(2) = .19). Mean (+/- standard deviation) individual plasma trough concentrations were 0.23 (0.13) mg/L after single doses and 0.47 (0.41) mg/L after multiple doses. Mean steady-state area under the curve was higher at week 4 than after a single dose (P < .05). Single-dose and steady

  20. Prediction of area under the cyclosporine concentration versus time curve in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L Lee; Seto, Winnie; Teuffel, Oliver; Gibson, Paul; Schultz, Kirk R; Doyle, John D; Gassas, Adam; Egeler, R Maarten; Sung, Lillian; Schechter, Tal

    2013-03-01

    This prospective study aimed to validate a previously developed first-dose limited sampling strategy (LSS) to predict the area under the cyclosporine concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) and to develop and then validate an LSS to predict cyclosporine AUC at steady state. This two-center Canadian study included children (ages .4 to 17.2 years) undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receiving cyclosporine for acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. There were three cohorts, each incorporating 24 AUC determinations: first-dose LSS validation, steady-state LSS development, and steady-state LSS validation. Patients contributing data to either of the development cohorts were excluded from the corresponding validation group. Cyclosporine was given every 12 hours as a 2-hour infusion. Cyclosporine AUC was determined after administration of the first cyclosporine dose (8 samples) and then once weekly (9 samples) until engraftment. Steady-state LSSs were developed using stepwise multiple linear regression. An LSS was considered to provide an acceptable estimate of AUC if the lower limit of the 95% confidence limit (CL) of the intraclass coefficient was .8 or higher and both bias and precision were 15% or less. Fifty-three children age .4 to 18 years participated. Cyclosporine concentrations drawn up to 4 hours from the start of the infusion correlated most strongly with AUC. The previously developed first-dose LSSs and three steady-state LSSs met criteria for acceptability. The intraclass coefficients of the three-point first-dose LSS validation cohort, three-point steady-state LSS development cohort, and three-point steady-state LSS validation cohort were .974 (95% CL: .941 to .988), .984 (95% CL: .965 to .993), and .993 (95% CL: .984 to .997), respectively. The three-point first-dose (2, 6, and 8 hours) and steady-state (2, 2.5, and 8 hours) LSSs are valid measures of cyclosporine AUC after intravenous administration over 2 hours

  1. [Use of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as infection markers in febrile neutropenic patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yepes, Marina; Aznar-Oroval, Eduardo; Lorente-Alegre, Pablo; García-Lozano, Tomás; Picón-Roig, Isabel; Pérez-Ballestero, Pilar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia is a frequent sign in patients who are going to have a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Infection is an important complication in these patients, which is favoured by immunosuppression and the degree of neutropenia. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy and HSCT to determine the origin of the fever. PCT and CRP values were measured in 30 episodes of febrile neutropenia: before starting chemotherapy, appearance of neutropenia, onset of fever, days 1, 2, 3 and 6 after the onset of fever, and when the febrile episode ended. The episodes were classified as 5 bacteraemia, 3 microbiologically documented infections, 10 clinical infections, and 12 fevers of unknown origin. The highest PCT mean values corresponded to the group of patients with bacteraemia. Statistically significant differences (P=.04) were found on the second day after the onset of fever. The cut-off point of 0.5ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 75%. PCR results showed statistically significant differences on days 1, 2 and 3 after the onset of fever (P=.01, P=.003, and P=.002, respectively). The cut-off point of 7.5mg/L had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 58%. The combination of PCT and CRP is an insufficient method to detect bacterial infections and may not replace the proper clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Higher plasma bilirubin predicts veno-occlusive disease in early childhood undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Suk; Moon, Aree; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Young Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Kim, Sang Geon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between plasma bilirubin levels and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in non-adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during cyclosporine therapy. METHODS: A total of 123 patients taking cyclosporine were evaluated using an electronic medical system at the Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from the years 2004 through 2011. Patients were grouped by age and analyzed for incidence and type of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including VOD. RESULTS: The HSCT patients were divided into three age groups: G#1 ≥ 18; 9 ≤ G#2 ≤ 17; and G#3 ≤ 8 years of age). The majority of transplant donor types were cord blood transplantations. Most prevalent ADRs represented acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and VOD. Although the incidences of aGVHD did not vary among the groups, the higher frequency ratios of VOD in G#3 suggested that an age of 8 or younger is a risk factor for developing VOD in HSCT patients. After cyclosporine therapy, the trough plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were lower in G#3 than in G#1, indicative of its increased clearance. Moreover, in G#3 only, a maximal total bilirubin level (BILmax) of ≥ 1.4 mg/dL correlated with VOD incidence after cyclosporine therapy. CONCLUSION: HSCT patients 8 years of age or younger are more at risk for developing VOD, diagnosed as hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, and ascites/weight gain after cyclosporine therapy, which may be represented by a criterion of plasma BILmax being ≥ 1.4 mg/dL, suggestive of more sensitive VOD indication in this age group. PMID:27358786

  3. WT1-specific T-cell responses in high-risk multiple myeloma patients undergoing allogeneic T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and donor lymphocyte infusions

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Eleanor M.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; O'Reilly, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    While the emergence of WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (WT1-CTL) has been correlated with better relapse-free survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myeloid leukemias, little is known about the role of these cells in multiple myeloma (MM). We examined the significance of WT1-CTL responses in patients with relapsed MM and high-risk cytogenetics who were undergoing allogeneic T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloTCD-HSCT) followed by donor lymphocyte infusions. Of 24 patients evaluated, all exhibited WT1-CTL responses before allogeneic transplantation. These T-cell frequencies were universally correlated with pretransplantation disease load. Ten patients received low-dose donor lymphocyte infusions beginning 5 months after transplantation. All patients subsequently developed increments of WT1-CTL frequencies that were associated with reduction in specific myeloma markers, in the absence of graft-versus-host disease. Immunohistochemical analyses of WT1 and CD138 in bone marrow specimens demonstrated consistent coexpression within malignant plasma cells. WT1 expression in the bone marrow correlated with disease outcome. Our results suggest an association between the emergence of WT1-CTL and graft-versus-myeloma effect in patients treated for relapsed MM after alloTCD-HSCT and donor lymphocyte infusions, supporting the development of adoptive immunotherapeutic approaches using WT1-CTL in the treatment of MM (registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov, ID: NCT01131169). PMID:23160468

  4. Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease Predicts Survival in Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Stevenson, Philip A; Cassaday, Ryan D; Graf, Solomon A; Fromm, Jonathan R; Wu, David; Holmberg, Leona A; Till, Brian G; Chauncey, Thomas R; Smith, Stephen D; Philip, Mary; Orozco, Johnnie J; Shustov, Andrei R; Green, Damian J; Libby, Edward N; Bensinger, William I; Shadman, Mazyar; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2016-02-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is standard therapy for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in remission after induction chemotherapy, with the best results for patients in complete remission (CR). We hypothesized that evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) before ASCT could further stratify outcomes for these patients. Patients with MCL who underwent ASCT in clinical CR between 1996 and 2011 with pretransplantation MRD testing were eligible. Presence of a clonal IgH rearrangement, t(11; 14) by PCR or positive flow cytometry from blood or bone marrow, was considered positive. An adjusted proportional hazards model for associations with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was performed. Of 75 MCL patients in CR, 8 (11%) were MRD positive. MRD positivity was associated with shorter OS and PFS. The median OS for MRD-negative patients was not reached, with 82% survival at 5 years, whereas for the MRD-positive patients, median OS was 3.01 years (hazard ratio [HR], 4.04; P = .009), with a median follow-up of 5.1 years. The median PFS for MRD-negative patients was not reached with 75% PFS at 5 years, whereas for MRD-positive patients, it was 2.38 years (HR, 3.69; P = .002). MRD positivity is independently associated with poor outcomes after ASCT for MCL patients in CR. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4 undergo the stochastic cardiomyogenic fate and behave like transient amplifying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoji; Sakurada, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Yukiji; Gojo, Satoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro . E-mail: umezawa@1985.jukuin.keio.ac.jp

    2007-02-15

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells can give rise to cardiomyocytes as well as adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. The existence of mesenchymal stem cells has been proposed, but it remains unclear if a single-cell-derived stem cell stochastically commits toward a cardiac lineage. By single-cell marking, we performed a follow-up study of individual cells during the differentiation of 9-15c mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow cells. Three types of cells, i.e., cardiac myoblasts, cardiac progenitors and multipotent stem cells were differentiated from a single cell, implying that cardiomyocytes are generated stochastically from a single-cell-derived stem cell. We also demonstrated that overexpression of Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4, precardiac mesodermal transcription factors, enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of 9-15c cells, and the frequency of cardiomyogenic differentiation was increased by co-culturing with fetal cardiomyocytes. Single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4 behaved like cardiac transient amplifying cells, and still retained their plasticity in vivo.

  6. The Impact of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism on Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Methotrexate Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Yeop; Koh, Youngil; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Kim, Inho

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics can explain the inter-individual differences in response to drugs, including methotrexate (MTX) used for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) prophylaxis during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In real-world practice, preplanned MTX dose is arbitrarily modified according to observed toxicity which can lead to unexpected and severe aGVHD development. We aimed to validate the influence of MTHFR C677T polymorphism on the outcomes of allogenic HSCT in a relatively under-represented homogenous Asian population. A total of 177 patients were divided into 677TT group versus 677C-carriers (677CT+677CC), and clinical outcomes along with baseline characteristics were analyzed and compared. Although there was a tendency towards increased peak liver function test results and accordingly greater delta values between the highest and the baseline in 677TT group, we found no associations between genotypes and hepatotoxicity. However, the incidence of acute liver GVHD (≥ grade 2) was significantly higher in the 677TT group than in the 677CC + 677CT group (P = 0.016). A total of 25 patients (14.1%) expired due to transplantation related mortality (TRM) during the first 180 days after HSCT. Patients carrying 677TT genotype were more likely to experience early TRM than 677C-carriers. The same pattern was observed in the cumulative TRM rate, and 677TT genotype patients were more prone to cumulative TRM (P = 0.010). This translated into shorter OS for patients with 677TT compared to 677C-carriers (P = 0.010). The 3-year survival after HSCT was 29.9% for 677TT cases and 47.1% for 677C-carriers. The multivariate analysis identified 677TT genotype (HR = 1.775. 95% CI 1.122–2.808, P = 0.014) and non-CR state (HR = 2.841. 95% CI 1.627–4.960, P<0.001) as predictors for survival. In conclusion, the MTHFR 677TT genotype appears to be associated with acute liver GVHD, and represent a risk factor for TRM and survival in patients undergoing HSCT with MTX as

  7. Safety and efficacy of micafungin for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Results of a post-marketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Chie; Hanadate, Tomoko; Niwa, Toshiro; Hirano, Yasuno; Yoshiyasu, Takashi; So, Masahiro; Matsui, Keita

    2015-06-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A prospective multicenter post-marketing observational surveillance study was conducted from July 2007 to June 2010 to assess the safety and efficacy of micafungin, an echinocandin antifungal, for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Among 241 patients evaluated for safety, 143 adverse drug reactions were reported in 86 patients (35.7%), with hepatobiliary disorders the most frequently reported adverse drug reactions. The success rate for prophylaxis at the end of observation was 72.8% (131/180 patients), and the incidence of breakthrough infections was only 4.4% (8/180 patients). In conclusion, micafungin had sufficient safety and efficacy for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients with various backgrounds undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating the effects of lenalidomide induction therapy on peripheral stem cells collection in patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Divaya; Zonder, Jeffrey; Valent, Jason; Tageja, Nishant; Ayash, Lois; Deol, Abhinav; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Abrams, Judith; Lum, Lawrence; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Uberti, Joseph; Abidi, Muneer H

    2013-09-01

    Lenalidomide (LEN) is a relatively new and very effective therapy for multiple myeloma (MM). Prior LEN therapy is associated with an increased risk of peripheral blood stem cell collection (PBSC) failure, particularly with filgrastim (G-CSF) alone. We performed a retrospective chart review of 319 consecutive MM patients who underwent apheresis to collect PBSCs for the first autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). The median number of PBSCs collected in the LEN (+) group was significantly less than the LEN (-) group (6.34 vs. 7.52 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg; p = 0.0004). In addition, the median number of apheresis sessions required for adequate PBSCs collection were significantly more in the LEN (+) group as compared to LEN (-) group (2 vs. 1 sessions; p = 0.002). In the LEN (+) group, there was a negative correlation between PBSCs collected and prior number of cycles of LEN (p = 0.0001). Rate of PBSC collection failure was 9% in the LEN (+) group and 5% in the LEN (-) group (p = 0.16). Only six patients who failed PBSC collection with G-CSF were able to collect adequate PBSCs with G-CSF + plerixafor. LEN exposure had no effect on neutrophil or platelet recovery post-ASCT. Up to four cycles of LEN exposure have minimal negative impact on PBSC collection. Despite prolong exposure of LEN, PBSC collection was adequate for two ASCTs in the majority of patients and post-ASCT engraftment was not longer than expected; however, clinical relevance (complication rate, quality of life, cost) of prolonged LEN exposure on both PBSC and ASCT, should be evaluated in prospective clinical trials.

  9. Infectious complications associated with the use of central venous catheters in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Gláucia Helena; Romanelli, Roberta M C; Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Macedo, Antonio V; Chaia, Juliana M C; Nobre, Vandack

    2013-07-01

    In this prospective, observational study, we sought to investigate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of central venous catheter-associated infection in 56 patients admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In multivariate analysis, we found a 7-fold higher risk of central line-associated bloodstream infection with central venous catheter insertion in the internal jugular vein as compared with the subclavian access. Patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection had a higher incidence of acute renal failure.

  10. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-21

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. BCSH/BSBMT/UK clinical virology network guideline: diagnosis and management of common respiratory viral infections in patients undergoing treatment for haematological malignancies or stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dignan, Fiona L; Clark, Andrew; Aitken, Celia; Gilleece, Maria; Jayakar, Vishal; Krishnamurthy, Pramila; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Michael N; Shaw, Bronwen; Skinner, Roderick; Turner, Andrew; Wynn, Robert F; Coyle, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology, the British Society for Bone Marrow Transplantation and the UK Clinical Virology Network has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory viral infections in patients with haematological malignancies or those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This guideline includes recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of respiratory viral infections in adults and children. The suggestions and recommendations are primarily intended for physicians practising in the United Kingdom.

  12. T Cells in Predicting Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-26

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Caregiver burden among primary caregivers of patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Akgul, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to identify caregiver burden and influencing factors on the burden in primary caregivers of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients within 2-12 months following transplant, indicating early recovery period after discharge. This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outpatient units of three university hospitals in Turkey. A total of 55 patient and caregiver dyads were recruited and interviewed. The data were collected using questionnaires developed by the researchers and caregiver burden was measured with the Zarit Burden Interview. The mean score of Zarit Burden Interview was 28.41 (SD = 13.90). Patients' symptoms including nausea and self depreciation feeling were related to greater caregiver burden. Self-depreciation was referred to feeling undervalued. The mean score of the tool was significantly higher in caregivers who have not been educated beyond primary school and also caregivers who had lower income. Caregivers who supported their patients to fulfill physical needs and who did not receive help for meeting patients' psychological needs had statistically more elevated levels of burden. Moreover, the extent of care giving activities undertaken was positively correlated with caregiver burden scores. While positive impact of the care giving process on family relations decreased caregiver burden; negative effect increased the burden. This study suggests that caregiver burden of primary caregivers caring for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients varies by education, income status, and the extent of care giving activities undertaken. Changes in family ties and relations due to care giving effected caregiver burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA aneuploidy in porcine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenic and adipogenic in vitro differentiation.

    PubMed

    Opiela, Jolanta; Samiec, Marcin; Bochenek, Michał; Lipiński, Daniel; Romanek, Joanna; Wilczek, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we estimated the distribution of DNA diploidy and aneuploidy in porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) that were subjected to osteoblast/osteocyte and adipocyte differentiation to determine the impact of long-term in vitro culture and differentiation on the cell cycle distribution and nuclear DNA profile. This determination could be helpful to confirm or exclude the suitability of physico-chemical culture conditions for the purposes of both the maintenance of an undifferentiated state and to promote differentiation in pMSCs. Flow cytometry was applied to analyze the cell cycle and occurrence of aneuploidy/diploidy, and real-time PCR was used to quantify aP2 and osteocalcin, markers of adipocytes and osteocytes, respectively. The chi-squared test was used to compare the total rates of G0/G1-, S-, and G2/M-phase cell fractions with diploid and aneuploid DNA and the DNA index ratios between three experimental groups of pMSCs. Five weeks of in vitro culture under differentiating conditions resulted in a considerable reduction of DNA stability and a remarkable increase in the rate of cells exhibiting an aneuploid DNA stem line; however, a similar dependence was not found in the nondifferentiated MSCs. Furthermore, the cell fraction rates in each phase of the mitotic cycle and the DNA index (DI) were calculated. The results of real-time PCR for aP2 and osteocalcin proved positive MSC differentiation toward adipocytes and osteocytes. In terms of the possible use of differentiated MSC lines in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, we propose cytokinetic diagnostics using flow cytometry as an objective and useful method for screening the tumor-forming capacity and malignancy potential of both in vitro long-term cultured MSCs and MSCs subjected to ectopic differentiation.

  15. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  16. Prognostic value of pre-transplant PET/CT in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Allison; Rybicki, Lisa; Shah, Shetal N; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Gerds, Aaron T; Hamilton, Betty K; Liu, Hien; Dean, Robert; Sobecks, Ronald; Pohlman, Brad; Smith, Mitchell; Kalaycio, Matt; Bolwell, Brian J; Majhail, Navneet S; Hill, Brian T

    2017-08-30

    Pre-transplant PET/CT may be prognostic in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We reviewed relapsed and pre-transplant PET/CT scans of 32 patients with DLBCL treated with ASCT to determine the Deauville score and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Patients with a Deauville score of 4 had a significantly inferior prognosis. The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with Deauville 1-3 score was 64%, compared to 0% for Deauville 4, while the 3-year overall survival (OS) was 84% and 25%, respectively (p < .001, p = .002). The change in the SUVmax (>66 versus ≤66%) was not predictive of PFS or OS, but a high pre-transplant SUVmax (>6) demonstrated a trend towards an inferior PFS. Pre-transplant PET/CT is a tool for identifying DLBCL patients at high risk for treatment failure with ASCT and could be used to risk-stratify patients in prospective clinical trials of novel transplant strategies.

  17. [Prophylaxis against Toxoplasma gondii disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation].

    PubMed

    Payá, Ernesto; Noemí, Isabel; Tassara, Renzo; Catalán, Paula; Avilés, Carmen L

    2012-09-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely distributed zoonosis produced by the parasite T. gondii. In Chile the seroprevalence has been estimated between 20-37% in general population. Defined risk groups acquire or reactivate the infection by T. gondii in patients undergoing SOT and HSCT are: heart transplant or heart-lung with D (+) and R (-), allogeneic HSCT with R (+), HSCT with cord cells, GVHD, history of previous clinical toxoplasmosis and use of corticosteroids for prolonged periods or in high doses. Hand washing, hygiene in food handling and weekly post-transplant surveillance since day 15 post transplant for six months, are universally recommended. All patients with SOT and HSCT, regardless of risk, should receive prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole and require no another specific prophylaxis against T. gondii (A2). It is particularly important in high-risk patients who cannot receive cotrimoxazole prophylaxis establish specific alternative against T. gondii (B3).

  18. Flow cytometric minimal residual disease monitoring in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yuan, Constance; Heinerich, Jeremy; Braylan, Raul; Chang, Myron; Wingard, John; Moreb, Jan

    2008-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the flow cytometry (FCM) data from bone marrow aspirates of multiple myeloma (MM) patients before and after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Light scatter properties and CD38 expression were used to identify plasma cells, and CD19/CD45/CD56 further distinguished normal from abnormal plasma cells (NPC and APC, respectively), the latter defined as plasma cells with aberrant CD56, decreased or absent CD19 and/or CD45 expression. Forty-seven patients were screened. After ASCT, 66% (31/47) patients achieved complete remission (CR)/very good partial remission (VGPR), as compared to only 40% (19/47) prior to ASCT (P = 0.01). In 39 patients with data before and after ASCT, all 39 (100%) had a detectable APC population prior to ASCT. Twenty-six out of 39 patients (67%) also had detectable NPC. Following ASCT, the number of patients with detectable NPC increased to 35/39 (89%), while 3/39 (8%) had no detectable NPC and 1/39 (3%) had neither NPC nor APC. The proportion of APC decreased significantly after transplant from a median of 79% to 52% post-transplant (P < 0.001). The APC/total events ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) after transplant. Prior to transplant, patients with less than 1.8% APC had significantly longer progression free survival (PFS) than patients with greater than 1.8% (P = 0.017, by log rank test), while the difference in overall survival did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.081). Patients who achieved CR/VGPR after transplant had significantly longer PFS in comparison to all others (26 months vs. 11 months, P = 0.004). In conclusion, the detection of a significant population of APC by FCM prior to ASCT significantly correlates with poorer PFS in MM patients.

  19. Predictive value of risk assessment scores in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Wataru; Ogusa, Eriko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Maruta, Atsuo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Heiwa

    2014-09-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIC allo-SCT) is associated with less toxicity and is used for older patients. We retrospectively studied the predictive value of two risk assessment scores, which were the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and the pre-transplantation assessment of mortality (PAM) score, for assessing the outcome of RIC allo-SCT. Seventy-eight patients underwent transplantation between 2005 and 2013 at a single institution. RIC was performed with fludarabine and melphalan with/without total body irradiation. The 3-year overall survival of patients with an HCT-CI >3 was significantly worse than that of patients with an HCT-CI 0-3 (31.6% vs. 59.6%, P = 0.020). Also, the 3-year overall survival of patients with a PAM score >24 was significantly worse than that of those with a PAM score ≤24 (29.2% vs. 61.4%, P = 0.005). The present findings suggest that changing the cut-off values of these risk assessment scores can improve prediction of outcomes in patients receiving RIC allo-SCT with this conditioning regimen and we need validation by large-scale study with other regimens. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  1. Transfusion of ABO non-identical platelets does not influence the clinical outcome of patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Carpio, Nelly; Balaguer, Aitana; Romero, Samuel; Iacoboni, Gloria; Gómez, Inés; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Jaime; Lopez, Francisca; Martin, Guillermo; Jarque, Isidro; Montesinos, Pau; de la Rubia, Javier; Sanz, Guillermo; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are ABO antigens on the surface of platelets, but whether ABO compatible platelets are necessary for transfusions is a matter of ongoing debate. We retrospectively reviewed the ABO matching of platelet transfusions in a subset of patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation during a 14-year period. Our aim was to analyse the characteristics and outcomes of patients who received platelet transfusions that were or were not ABO identical. Material and methods We analysed 529 consecutive patients with various haematological and non-haematological diseases who underwent 553 autologous progenitor stem cell transplants at the University Hospital la Fe between January 2000 and December 2013. We retrospectively analysed and compared transfusion and clinical outcomes of patients according to the ABO match of the platelet transfusions received. The period analysed was the time from transplantation until discharge. Results The patients received a total of 2,772 platelet concentrates, of which 2,053 (74.0%) were ABO identical and 719 (26.0%) ABO non-identical; of these latter 309 were compatible and 410 incompatible with the patients’ plasma. Considering all transplants, 36 (6.5%) did not require any platelet transfusions, while in 246 (44.5%) cases, the patients were exclusively transfused with ABO identical platelets and in 47 (8.5%) cases they received only ABO non-identical platelet transfusions. The group of patients who received both ABO identical and ABO non-identical platelet transfusions had higher transfusion needs and worse clinical outcomes compared to patients who received only ABO identical or ABO non-identical platelets. Discussion In our hospital, patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation who received ABO identical or ABO non-identical platelet transfusions had similar transfusion and clinical outcomes. The isolated fact of receiving ABO non-identical platelets did not influence

  2. Group-Based Trajectory Modeling of Distress and Well-Being Among Caregivers of Children Undergoing Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Sands, Stephen A; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Manne, Sharon; Devine, Katie A; Savone, Mirko; Kashy, Deborah A

    2016-08-20

    OBJECTIVE : To examine the trajectories of caregiver psychological responses in the year following their child's hematopoetic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and whether cognitive and social processing strategies differentiated between trajectories.  METHOD : One hundred and eight caregivers randomized to the control condition of a cognitive-behavioral intervention study completed measures of distress, coping, and social support at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post HSCT of their child.  RESULTS : The majority reported moderate or low anxiety, depression, or distress that decreased over time, but a small group demonstrated high anxiety, depression, or distress that persisted or increased over time. Maladaptive coping was highest among caregivers in the high-persistent distress subgroup compared with the moderate-decreasing and low-stable groups. Adaptive coping was minimally associated with trajectory subgroups.  CONCLUSIONS : Screening HSCT caregivers for distress and maladaptive coping may be useful in identifying caregivers likely to experience persistently high distress who may benefit from psychological intervention.

  3. Multiparameter flow cytometric remission is the most relevant prognostic factor for multiple myeloma patients who undergo autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Bruno; Vidriales, Maria-Belén; Cerveró, Jorge; Mateo, Gema; Pérez, Jose J.; Montalbán, Maria A.; Sureda, Anna; Montejano, Laura; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; de Coca, Alfonso García; de las Heras, Natalia; Mateos, Maria V.; López-Berges, Maria C.; García-Boyero, Raimundo; Galende, Josefina; Hernández, Jose; Palomera, Luis; Carrera, Dolores; Martínez, Rafael; de la Rubia, Javier; Martín, Alejandro; Bladé, Joan; Lahuerta, Juan J.; Orfao, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment is standard in many hematologic malignancies but is considered investigational in multiple myeloma (MM). We report a prospective analysis of the prognostic importance of MRD detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) in 295 newly diagnosed MM patients uniformly treated in the GEM2000 protocol VBMCP/VBAD induction plus autologous stem cell transplantation [ASCT]). MRD status by MFC was determined at day 100 after ASCT. Progression-free survival (PFS; median 71 vs 37 months, P < .001) and overall survival (OS; median not reached vs 89 months, P = .002) were longer in patients who were MRD negative versus MRD positive at day 100 after ASCT. Similar prognostic differentiation was seen in 147 patients who achieved immunofixation-negative complete response after ASCT. Moreover, MRD− immunofixation-negative (IFx−) patients and MRD− IFx+ patients had significantly longer PFS than MRD+ IFx− patients. Multivariate analysis identified MRD status by MFC at day 100 after ASCT as the most important independent prognostic factor for PFS (HR = 3.64, P = .002) and OS (HR = 2.02, P = .02). Our findings demonstrate the clinical importance of MRD evaluation by MFC, and illustrate the need for further refinement of MM re-sponse criteria. This trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT00560053. PMID:18669875

  4. Nutritional support in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a multicentre survey of the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) transplant programmes.

    PubMed

    Botti, Stefano; Liptrott, Sarah Jayne; Gargiulo, Gianpaolo; Orlando, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A survey within Italian haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) programmes was performed, in order to obtain a snapshot of nutritional support (NS) in patients undergoing HSCT. The primary objective was to verify whether an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to NS was implemented in HSCT centres. A multicentre survey was performed by questionnaire, covering the main areas of NS (screening, treatment planning, monitoring, nutritional counselling, and methods of nutritional support). The results indicated a significant variation between clinical practice and evidence-based guidelines in terms of clinical pathways, decision-making, and care provision regarding NS. Further research is required to identify reasons for the limited application of EBP and measures that may be undertaken to address such issues. Development of a multidisciplinary educational programme in order to raise awareness of the issue should be undertaken.

  5. The Role of Social and Cognitive Processes in the Relationship between Fear Network and Psychological Distress among Parents of Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Gajda, Tina Marie

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether cognitive and social processing variables mediated the relationship between fear network and depression among parents of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Parents whose children were initiating HSCT (N = 179) completed survey measures including fear network, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), cognitive processing variables (positive reappraisal and self-blame) and social processing variables (emotional support and holding back from sharing concerns). Fear network was positively correlated with depression (p < .001). Self-blame and holding back emerged as individual partial mediators in the relationship between fear network and depression. Together they accounted for 34.3% of the variance in the relationship between fear network and depression. Positive reappraisal and emotional support did not have significant mediating effects. Social and cognitive processes, specifically self-blame and holding back from sharing concerns, play a negative role in parents’ psychological adaptation to fears surrounding a child’s HSCT. PMID:25081956

  6. Evaluation of thromboelastometry parameters as predictive markers for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Wojtasińska, Ewelina; Kanduła, Zuzanna; Nowicki, Adam; Matuszak, Magdalena; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (previously named veno-occlusive disease, SOS/VOD) is a serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Early identification of patients at risk of SOS/VOD may possibly improve the outcome and reduce mortality. Rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM) is global assay allowing for the precise assessment of both bleeding and thrombotic conditions, however, its usefulness in patients undergoing HSCT for acute leukaemia has not been studied. We evaluated the thromboelastometry parameters in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT for acute leukaemia to identify candidate biomarkers of SOS/VOD occurrence. ROTEM assays (INTEM, EXTEM, FIBTEM, APTEM) were performed on day -10, on the day of stem cell infusion (day 0) and on days +12 and +28 post-HSCT. The diagnosis of SOS/VOD was based on the Baltimore criteria. Seven patients (26%) developed SOS/VOD. On day +12, the patients with SOS/VOD had statistically significant longer INTEM-CT (clotting time, 199 ± 33.41vs166 ± 23.65s, p = 0.0033), EXTEM-CT (69.5 ± 6.39vs.52 ± 3.42s, p = 0.0139) and FIBTEM-CT (69.5 ± 22.75vs. 50.8 ± 14.31s, p = 0.0124) compared to SOS/VOD (-). ROC curve on day +12 indicated a cut-off value of 179s in INTEM-CT (AUC = 0.91), 69s in EXTEM-CT (AUC = 0.90) and 102s in FIBTEM-CT (AUC = 0.82) for the prediction of SOS/VOD. This is the first study evaluating the usefulness of ROTEM assays in the early detection of haemostasis abnormalities predictive of SOS/VOD development in patients undergoing HSCT for acute leukemia. Patients with SOS/VOD had a significant delay in the initiation of thrombin formation in the analysed ROTEM assays. The utility of ROTEM assays in the optimal management of patients undergoing HSCT should be clarified in further prospective studies. PMID:28938703

  7. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  8. Efficacy of oral cryotherapy on oral mucositis prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Gu, Zhenyang; Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT.

  9. Impact of Prophylactic Levofloxacin on Rates of Bloodstream Infection and Fever in Neutropenic Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Satlin, Michael J; Vardhana, Santosh; Soave, Rosemary; Shore, Tsiporah B; Mark, Tomer M; Jacobs, Samantha E; Walsh, Thomas J; Gergis, Usama

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the role of antibacterial prophylaxis during neutropenia in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At our center, levofloxacin prophylaxis was initiated in June 2006 in patients with myeloma who were undergoing autologous HSCT. We compared the incidence of bloodstream infection (BSI) and fever and neutropenia (FN) within 30 days of transplantation before (January 2003 to May 2006) and after (June 2006 to April 2010) the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients undergoing autologous HSCT for myeloma. We also compared rates of BSI and FN during the same time periods in autologous HSCT recipients with lymphoma who did not receive antibacterial prophylaxis during either time period. After the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, the BSI rate decreased from 41.2% (49 of 119) to 14.7% (23 of 156) and the rate of FN decreased from 91.6% to 60.9% in patients with myeloma (P < .001, for each). In contrast, rates of BSI (43.1% versus 47.3%; P = .50) and FN (98.8% versus 97.1%; P = .63) did not change in patients with lymphoma. Levofloxacin prophylaxis was independently associated with decreased odds of BSI (odds ratio, .27; 95% confidence interval, .14 to .51; P < .001) and FN (odds ratio, .18; 95% confidence interval, .09 to .36; P < .001) in multivariate analysis. Patients with myeloma had a nonsignificant increase in the risk of BSI due to levofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (5% versus 1%, P = .08) and Clostridium difficile infection (7% versus 3%, P = .12) after the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis but did not have higher rates of BSI due to other resistant bacteria. Levofloxacin prophylaxis is associated with decreased risk of BSI and FN in patients with myeloma undergoing autologous HSCT.

  10. [Altered gut bacterial flora and organic acids in feces of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Morotomi, Masami; Ishizuka, Naoki; Miwa, Akiyoshi; O Yoshida, Takato

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity and various infections are serious problems associated with high-dose chemotherapy. Antibacterial chemoprophylaxis reduces the incidence of gram-negative bacterial infection; however, it may affect the normal intestinal flora and induce drug resistance in organisms. We evaluated the chronological changes in fecal bacteria and organic acids in 6 patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based chemoprophylaxis. All patients developed grade 2-3 diarrhea. Four patients developed grade 3 febrile neutropenia. The total count of obligatory anaerobic bacteria was significantly decreased on Day 7, but total facultative anaerobic bacterial count did not change throughout transplantation. However, Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacillus were decreased on Day 7 and Staphylococcus was increased after transplantation. Total organic acid concentration and short-chain fatty acids were decreased on Day 7. The bacterial flora and organic acids in the gut were significantly altered in patients who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolonebased chemoprophylaxis. These changes may contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity and infections.

  11. Comparison of total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide with busulfan plus cyclophosphamide as conditioning regimens in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Celalettin; Pala, Cigdem; Kaynar, Leylagül; Yaray, Kadir; Aksozen, M Tarkan; Bankir, Mehmet; Zararsız, Gökmen; Orhan, Okan; Gündog, Mete; Yıldız, Oguz G; Eser, Bülent; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Conditioning regimens used during stem cell transplant provide prolonged control or cure of the disease in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we present a comparison of treatment results for 95 patients with ALL who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) with total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide (TBI + Cy) or busulfan plus cyclophosphamide (Bu + Cy) as conditioning regimen. Median age was 25 (range: 9-54) years. Median follow-up was 24 (range: 3-107) months. Median overall survival (OS) was found to be 29 months. Median event-free survival (EFS) was 9 months. Median OS was 37 months in the TBI + Cy arm, while it was 12 months in the Bu + Cy arm, suggesting a significant advantage favoring the TBI + Cy arm (p = 0.003). Median EFS was 13 months in the TBI + Cy arm, while it was 4 months in the Bu + Cy arm, indicating a significant difference (p = 0.006). In univariate and multivariate analysis, it was found that high OS and EFS were significantly correlated with TBI + Cy conditioning regimen and lack of transplant-related mortality (p < 0.05). The TBI + Cy conditioning regimen was found to be superior to the Bu + Cy regimen in patients with ALL undergoing AHSCT regarding both OS and EFS.

  12. Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non

  13. Prospective validation of a novel dosing scheme for intravenous busulfan in adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Heon; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Young; Choe, Sangmin; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to externally validate a new dosing scheme for busulfan. Thirty-seven adult patients who received busulfan as conditioning therapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) participated in this prospective study. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous busulfan, either as the conventional dosage (3.2 mg/kg daily) or according to the new dosing scheme based on their actual body weight (ABW) (23×ABW0.5 mg daily) targeting an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 5924 µM·min. Pharmacokinetic profiles were collected using a limited sampling strategy by randomly selecting 2 time points at 3.5, 5, 6, 7 or 22 hours after starting busulfan administration. Using an established population pharmacokinetic model with NONMEM software, busulfan concentrations at the available blood sampling times were predicted from dosage history and demographic data. The predicted and measured concentrations were compared by a visual predictive check (VPC). Maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimators were estimated to calculate the predicted AUC (AUCPRED). The accuracy and precision of the AUCPRED values were assessed by calculating the mean prediction error (MPE) and root mean squared prediction error (RMSE), and compared with the target AUC of 5924 µM·min. VPC showed that most data fell within the 95% prediction interval. MPE and RMSE of AUCPRED were -5.8% and 20.6%, respectively, in the conventional dosing group and −2.1% and 14.0%, respectively, in the new dosing scheme group. These fi ndings demonstrated the validity of a new dosing scheme for daily intravenous busulfan used as conditioning therapy for HCT. PMID:27162478

  14. Associations between gastrointestinal toxicity, micro RNA and cytokine production in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pontoppidan, Peter L; Jordan, Karina; Carlsen, Anting Liu; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Kielsen, Katrine; Christensen, Mette; Ifversen, Marianne; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Sangild, Per; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg; Heilmann, Carsten; Sengeløv, Henrik; Müller, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with a high risk of treatment related mortality. The primary aim of the present study was to examine associations between markers of gastrointestinal toxicity, markers of systemic inflammation, and plasma levels of microRNA (miRNA) -155 and -146a during the first month after HSCT. The secondary aim was to characterize the impact of the toxic-inflammatory response on the function of circulating leukocytes during immune recovery. Thirty HSCT patients were included. Gastrointestinal injury was monitored by toxicity scores, lactulose-mannitol test and plasma citrulline, as a measure of the enterocyte population. Nadir of citrulline and maximum of oral toxicity scores, intestinal permeability, CRP and plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-10 was seen at day +7 post-HSCT. miRNA-155 and mi-RNA-146a showed an inverse relation with significantly elevated miRNA-155 and decreased miRNA-146a levels, from day 0 to day +28 compared with pre-conditioning levels. Citrulline levels below the median at day +7 were associated with higher spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF-α as well as higher in vitro stimulated production of IL-17A at day +21. This study is the first to demonstrate that toxic responses to chemotherapy are accompanied by differential regulation of miRNAs with opposing effects on immune regulation. We find that a proinflammatory miRNA profile is sustained during the first three weeks after the transplantation, indicating that these miRNAs may play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory environment during immune reconstitution after HSCT.

  15. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-06-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11.5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8(+) TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Long term impact of hyperleukocytosis in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: an analysis from the acute leukemia working party of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Canaani, Jonathan; Labopin, Myriam; Socié, Gerard; Nihtinen, Anne; Huynh, Anne; Cornelissen, Jan; Deconinck, Eric; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Forcade, Edouard; Chevallier, Patrice; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Blaise, Didier; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-03-28

    Up to 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients present initially with hyperleukocytosis, placing them at increased risk for early mortality during induction. Yet, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis still retains prognostic value for AML patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Furthermore, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis holds prognostic significance when modern molecular markers such as FLT3-ITD and NPM1 are accounted for. To determine whether hyperleukocytosis is an independent prognostic factor influencing outcome in transplanted AML patients we performed a retrospective analysis using the registry of the acute leukemia working party of the EBMT. A cohort of 357 patients with hyperleukocytosis (159 patients with WBC 50K-100K, 198 patients with WBC≥100K) was compared to 918 patients without hyperleukocytosis. Patients with hyperleukocytosis were younger, had an increased rate of favorable risk cytogenetics, and more likely to be FLT3 and NPM1 mutated. In multivariate analysis, hyperleukocytosis was independently associated with increased relapse incidence (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 - 2.12; p=0.004), decreased leukemia-free survival (HR of 1.38, 95% CI, 1.07 - 1.78; p=0.013), and inferior overall survival (HR of 1.4, 95% CI, 1.07 - 1.84; p=0.013). Hyperleukocytosis retains a significant prognostic role for AML patients undergoing HSCT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. [Infection in patients with neutropenia that undergo an autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant due to breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Palau, J; Picón, I; Angel Climent, M; Martí, R; Aznar, E; Carmen Sanjuán, M; Máiquez, J

    2001-11-01

    The extent and duration of neutropenia and the characteristics of the underlying disease are determinant factors for the prognosis of febrile syndromes. Despite the fact that traditionally the peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) were considered to cause high risk neutropenia, in all probability the neutropenia observed in the PBSCT in some solid tumours could be considered moderate risk. Febrile episodes in patients with these characteristics were evaluated. We prospectively analysed 132 autologus PBSCT in patients with breast cancer (1994-1999). Conditioning regime: STAMP V. Antibacterial prophylaxis: ofloxacin (400 mg/12 hrs PO). Classification of the febrile syndrome: bacteremia, microbiologically documented infection withut bacteremia, clinical infection and a fever of unknown origin. 122 patients had a fever (92%), mean age: 45 years (range: 27-61). There were 32 (26%) bacteremias, 13 (11%) microbiologically documented infections without bacteremia and 54 (44%) clinical infections. The mean number of days with a neutrophil count of <1x109/1 was 14 (range: 11-20). In the 74 patients (61%) that had a granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), the mean number of days to reach a 0,5x109/I neutrophil count (7,6) and the average number of days in hospital (26) were significantly less. There was a main infectious point in 80 patients (65%): the most frequent being oropharynx in 33 cases (46%) and digestive in 29 cases (41%). 48 gram negative (GN) 29 gram positive (GP) bacteria were isolated (71% of the GN's were resistant to ofloxacin). Between 1997-1999 the GN/GP ratio was 2,3. There were no deaths related to the infection. Given the excellent evolution of our patients we can consider their neutropenia to be moderate or low risk, and they are a long way from the death rates caused by infections published by other types of hemopoietic transplants. The predominance of GN over the last few years and their limited sensitivity to quinolones means that

  18. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  19. Palifermin in Preventing Oral Mucositis Caused by Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy in Young Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-30

    Breast Cancer; Graft Versus Host Disease; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Mucositis; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  20. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  1. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Comparison of Three Distinct Prophylactic Agents Against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Haplo-identical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Vai, Andrea; Furst, Sabine; Bramanti, Stefania; Sarina, Barbara; Granata, Angela; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Vey, Norbert; Santoro, Armando; Chabannon, Christian; Castagna, Luca; Blaise, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT). The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to bedetermined. We conducted a retrospective analysis, comparing the safety and efficacy of micafungin 50mg/day vs. fluconazole 400mg/day vs. itraconazole 200mg/day as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) followed by high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy). Overall, 99 patients were identified: 30 patients received micafungin, 50 and 19 patients received itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range: 1–51), proven or probable IFIs were reported in 3 patients (10%) in the micafungin, 5 patients in the itraconazole (10%) and 2 patients (11%) in the fluconazole group (p=0.998). Fewer patients in the micafungin group had invasive aspergillosis (1 [3%] vs. 3 [6%] in the itraconazole vs. 2 [11%] in the fluconazole group, p=0.589). Four patients (13%) in the micafungin group vs 13 (26%) patients in the itraconazole group and 10 (53%) patients in the fluconazole received empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.19). No serious adverse events related to treatment were reported by patients, and there was no treatment discontinuation because of drug-related adverse events in both groups. The present analysis shows that micafungin did better than fluconazole in preventing invasive aspergillosis after transplant in these high-risk hematological diseases, as expected. In addition, micafungin was more effective than itraconazole in preventing all IFI episodes when also considering possible fungal infections. Future prospective studies would shed light on this issue, concerning this increasingly used transplant platform. PMID:26401237

  3. A single, double lumen high-flow catheter for patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Experience at the National Cancer Institute in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Volkow, P; Téllez, O; Vázquez, C; Aguilar, C; Valencia, M; Barrera, L; Alferián, A; Zinser, J; Sobrevilla, P; Acosta, A; Texcocano, J; Vilar-Compte, D; Reynoso, E

    1997-11-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) requires a high-flow catheter for adequate cell collection by apheresis and long i.v. support, this is usually achieved by multiple catheters. We analyzed our experience with Mahurkar or Permacath for apheresis and long-term i.v. support in PBSCT, cared for exclusively by an i.v. therapy team. Fifty-six catheters were used in 53 patients that completed PBSCT (28 Permacath and 28 Mahurkar). In 10 patients (19%) the same catheter was used for multiple PBSCT. The average stay was 58.4 days (7-219), Permacath 76.8 days (14-219) and Mahurkar 42 days (7-106). The incidence of infectious complications was 2.2 x 1000 catheter-days (1.7 Permacath and 3.0 Mahurkar); during neutropenia it was 3.7 x 1000 cathether-days. The incidence of thrombosis was 0.9 x 1000 catheter-days. There was a total of seven infectious episodes (12.7%). Five (9%) were local and two were (3.6%) bacteremias. The microorganism most commonly isolated was Staphylococcus sp. (57%). Four catheters (7.1%) were removed because of complications: one thrombosis and three infections. Both catheters have proven useful and safe for long-lasting vascular access in patients undergoing PBSCT. No statistical difference was found in infectious and non-infectious complications between either catheters.

  4. Rituximab in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III

  5. The Prospective Collection, Storage and Reporting of Data on Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Utilizing a Standard Preparative Regimen

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-25

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Germ Cell Neoplasms; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Immunodeficiency Diseases

  6. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  7. Stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cottler-Fox, Michele H; Lapidot, Tsvee; Petit, Isabelle; Kollet, Orit; DiPersio, John F; Link, Dan; Devine, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Successful blood and marrow transplant (BMT), both autologous and allogeneic, requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) capable of homing to the marrow cavity and regenerating a full array of hematopoietic cell lineages in a timely fashion. At present, the most commonly used surrogate marker for HPCs is the cell surface marker CD34, identified in the clinical laboratory by flow cytometry. Clinical studies have shown that infusion of at least 2 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg recipient body weight results in reliable engraftment as measured by recovery of adequate neutrophil and platelet counts approximately 14 days after transplant. Recruitment of HPCs from the marrow into the blood is termed mobilization, or, more commonly, stem cell mobilization. In Section I, Dr. Tsvee Lapidot and colleagues review the wide range of factors influencing stem cell mobilization. Our current understanding focuses on chemokines, proteolytic enzymes, adhesion molecules, cytokines and stromal cell-stem cell interactions. On the basis of this understanding, new approaches to mobilization have been designed and are now starting to undergo clinical testing. In Section II, Dr. Michele Cottler-Fox describes factors predicting the ability to mobilize the older patient with myeloma. In addition, clinical approaches to improving collection by individualizing the timing of apheresis and adjusting the volume of blood processed to achieve a desired product are discussed. Key to this process is the daily enumeration of blood CD34(+) cells. Newer methods of enumerating and mobilizing autologous blood HPCs are discussed. In Section III, Dr. John DiPersio and colleagues provide data on clinical results of mobilizing allogeneic donors with G-CSF, GM-CSF and the combination of both as relates to the number and type of cells collected by apheresis. Newer methods of stem cell mobilization as well as the relationship of graft composition on immune reconstitution

  8. Acupuncture for reduction of symptom burden in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a randomized sham-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Giralt, Sergio; Chung, David J; Landau, Heather; Siman, Jonathan; Search, Benjamin; Coleton, Marci; Vertosick, Emily; Shapiro, Nathan; Chien, Christine; Wang, Xin S; Cassileth, Barrie; Mao, Jun J

    2017-09-17

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is potentially curative for a number of hematologic malignancies, but is associated with high symptom burden. We conducted a randomized sham-controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate efficacy and safety of acupuncture as an integrative treatment for managing common symptoms during HCT. Adult patients with multiple myeloma undergoing high-dose melphalan followed by autologous HCT (AHCT) were randomized to receive either true or sham acupuncture once daily for 5 days starting the day after chemotherapy. Patients and clinical evaluators, but not acupuncturists, were blinded to group assignment. Symptom burden, the primary outcome was assessed with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) at baseline, during transplantation, and at 15 and 30 days post transplantation. Among 60 participants, true acupuncture produced nonsignificant reductions in overall MDASI core symptom scores and symptom interference scores during transplantation (P = .4 and .3, respectively), at 15 days (P = .10 and .3), and at 30 days posttransplantation (P = .2 and .4) relative to sham. However, true acupuncture was significantly more efficacious in reducing nausea, lack of appetite, and drowsiness at 15 days (P = .042, .025, and .010, respectively). Patients receiving sham acupuncture were more likely to increase pain medication use posttransplantation (odds ratio 5.31, P = .017). Acupuncture was well tolerated with few attributable adverse events. True acupuncture may prevent escalation of symptoms including nausea, lack of appetite, and drowsiness experienced by patients undergoing AHCT, and reduce the use of pain medications. These findings need to be confirmed in a future definitive study. NCT01811862.

  9. HIGH BODY MASS INDEX AMONG PATIENTS UNDERGOING HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION: RESULTS OF A CROSS-SECTIONAL EVALUATION OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN A PRIVATE HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Andrea Z; Victor, Elivane S; Vidal Campregher, Paulo; Piovacari, Silvia M F; Bernardo Barban, Juliana S; Pedreira, Wilson L; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2015-12-01

    nutritional status before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) affects prognosis: better nourished patients have shorter time to engraftment, while malnutrition is associated with increase of mortality rates, complications, medical costs, poor quality of life and hospitalization stay. Furthermore, underweight patients have increased risk of death in the early post- HSCT period, and non-relapse mortality is greater for those who are extremely underweight, overweight and obese. Obesity is associated with treatment-related toxicity, higher incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus- host disease (GVHD), infections and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of patients undergoing HSCT between 2007-2013 in a private hospital, by calculating the body mass index (BMI), to verify the prevalence of any nutritional imbalances, especially obesity. in this retrospective study, based on medical records, we analyzed data from all patients with malignant and nonmalignant diseases who underwent HSCT from January 2007 to February 2014 in the Hematology- Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Center at a large, tertiary referral center in Brazil. a total of 257 cases were treated in the period and analyzed, of which 79% were aged up to 65 years old. Among these, 56% were overweight or obese. We observed a higher prevalence of obesity in elderly patients (P < 0.001). The mean BMI of the total sample was 26.4 kg/m2. BMI was significantly different between genders, with higher prevalence of overweight among men (P < 0.001). differently from other studies, our investigation has shown low rates of underweight and more overweight and obesity rates in men and elderly patients undergoing HSCT. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinical trial, 29 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in Iran were selected by convenience sampling, and randomly allocated to control (n = 13) and intervention groups (n = 16). In the intervention group, cryotherapy was applied, while the control group received a normal saline mouthwash. The severity of the mucositis and neutrophil rate were investigated in five periods, based on the world health organization (WHO) scales. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. Results In both groups, the mucositis reached its peak intensity on the 7th day, and the least intensity was obtained on the 21st day. The neutrophil rate reached the minimum value on the 7th day, then increased up to the 21st day. The two groups showed no significant differences between the mucositis severity on the 14th and 21st days (P = 0.164), while the severity of the mucositis in the cryotherapy group was significantly less than that in the saline mouthwash group (1.81 < 2.54 and 0.13 < 0.92, respectively) on the 7th and 14th days (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the neutrophil rate between the groups. Conclusions The results showed that cryotherapy is more effective than the saline mouthwash in reducing the severity of mucositis. This method is recommended for the prevention of mucositis in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:27257512

  11. Vaccine Therapy in Reducing the Frequency of Cytomegalovirus Events in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Cytomegaloviral Infection; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

  12. Psychological distress and psychiatric diagnoses among primary caregivers of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant: an examination of prevalence, correlates, and racial/ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon L; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Gajda, Tina Marie; Darabos, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were to examine the prevalence of self-reported psychological distress, examine the prevalence of interview-rated psychiatric diagnoses, identify correlates of psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis and examine racial/ethnic group differences on measures of psychological distress among primary caregivers of children preparing to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Caregivers (N = 215) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Events Scale, and a psychiatric interview assessing major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Regression analyses examined correlates of distress and psychiatric diagnosis. Comparisons were made between racial/ethnic groups. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were reported by 54% of caregivers during the time preparing for the child's HSCT. Twenty-seven percent of caregivers met diagnostic criteria for at least one of the psychiatric diagnoses during this time. Few factors were associated with distress or psychiatric diagnosis, except the child scheduled for allogeneic transplant, being married and prior psychological/psychiatric care. Sociodemographic factors accounted for racial/ethnic group differences, except that Hispanic/Latino caregivers reported higher BDI scores than non-Hispanic white caregivers. Caregivers may be at greater risk of posttraumatic stress symptoms than anxiety or depression. Prior psychological/psychiatric treatment is a risk factor for greater psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis during this time. Racial differences are mostly due to sociodemographic factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Is Supplementation Efficacious in Maintaining Adequate Plasma Levels of Vitamin A and E for Thalassemic Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Hamidieh, Amir-Ali; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Kazempanah, Sahebeh; Sadeghi, Naficeh; Mansouri, Ava; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Thalassemia along with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can lead to major oxidative stress. Vitamins A and E are antioxidants which protect membrane from lipid peroxidation. We sought to determine for the first time, whether vitamins A and E supplementation is efficacious in maintaining or increasing plasma level of these vitamins in thalassemic children undergoing HSCT. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 50 children with β-thalassemia major hospitalized for HSCT. Patients took a daily multivitamin. Plasma vitamins A and E levels were measured at four different times: on admission, HSCT day (day 0), day 7 and day 14 after HSCT. Findings : Plasma vitamin A and E were abnormal on admission in most patients (62.0% and 60.0% respectively). Ratio of patient with normal to abnormal plasma level of the vitamins improved from baseline to a peak on day 7 then deteriorated afterward until day 14. There was an increasingly positive correlation between daily oral intake and plasma vitamin A at different times, but plasma vitamin E showed inverse correlation at first which tended towards no correlation subsequently. In multivariate analysis, supplementation significantly changed plasma level of vitamin A at different measurement time (P=0.001) within study subjects. But, plasma level of vitamin E showed no significant difference (P=0.2). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that oral supplementation could have beneficial effects due to increasing plasma vitamin A level and preventing plasma vitamin E depletion. PMID:25793043

  14. A Comprehensive Assessment of Toxicities in Patients with Central Nervous System Lymphoma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation Using Thiotepa, Busulfan, and Cyclophosphamide Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Scordo, Michael; Bhatt, Valkal; Hsu, Meier; Omuro, Antonio M; Matasar, Matthew J; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Dahi, Parastoo B; Moskowitz, Craig H; Giralt, Sergio A; Sauter, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) with thiotepa, busulfan, and cyclophosphamide (TBC) conditioning has emerged as an effective postinduction treatment strategy for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) or secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL), but it is associated with considerable toxicity and transplantation-related mortality (TRM) in the modern era. Forty-three adult patients with chemosensitive PCNSL or SCNSL underwent TBC-conditioned ASCT between 2006 and 2015. Twenty-eight of these patients received pharmacokinetically (PK)-targeted busulfan dosing. The median number of clinically relevant individual grade ≥3 nonhematologic toxicities per patient was 5. We found no association between pretransplantation patient characteristics and the presence of more than 5 grade ≥3 nonhematologic toxicities. Patients with elevated first-dose busulfan area under the curve values did not experience more toxicity. Paradoxically, patients treated with more than 2 regimens before undergoing ASCT had lower first-dose busulfan AUC values. With a median follow-up among survivors of 20 months, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) from the time of ASCT were 83% and 87%, respectively. Although this study reaffirms the favorable PFS and OS associated with TBC-conditioned ASCT for PCNSL or SCNSL, this treatment strategy carries a large toxicity burden.

  15. Psychological Distress and Psychiatric Diagnoses among Primary Caregivers of Children undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: An Examination of Prevalence, Correlates, and Racial/Ethnic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon L.; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Gajda, Tina Marie; Darabos, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine the prevalence of self-reported psychological distress, examine the prevalence of interview-rated psychiatric diagnoses, identify correlates of psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis, and examine racial/ethnic group differences on measures of psychological distress among primary caregivers of children preparing to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Methods Caregivers (N = 215) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Events Scale (IES), and a psychiatric interview assessing major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and panic disorder (PD). Regression analyses examined correlates of distress and psychiatric diagnosis. Comparisons were made between racial/ethnic groups. Results Posttraumatic stress symptoms were reported by 54% of caregivers during the time preparing for the child’s HSCT. Twenty-seven percent of caregivers met diagnostic criteria for at least one of the psychiatric diagnoses during this time. Few factors were associated with distress or psychiatric diagnosis, except the child scheduled for allogeneic transplant, being married, and prior psychological/psychiatric care. Socio-demographic factors accounted for racial/ethnic group differences, except Hispanic/Latino caregivers reported higher BDI scores than non-Hispanic White caregivers. Conclusion Caregivers may be at greater risk of posttraumatic stress symptoms than anxiety or depression. Prior psychological/psychiatric treatment is a risk factor for greater psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis during this time. Racial differences are mostly due to socio-demographic factors. PMID:25246347

  16. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Subhash C.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians. PMID:27057356

  17. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Subhash C; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians.

  18. Supersaturated Calcium Phosphate Rinse in Preventing Oral Mucositis in Young Patients Undergoing Autologous or Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mucositis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Stem Cells behind the Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B.; Darido, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells sustain the adult skin for a lifetime through self-renewal and the production of committed progenitors. These stem cells generate progeny that will undergo terminal differentiation leading to the development of a protective epidermal barrier. Whereas the molecular mechanisms that govern epidermal barrier repair and renewal have been extensively studied, pathways controlling stem cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Asymmetric cell divisions, small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), chromatin remodeling complexes, and multiple differentiation factors tightly control the balance of stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and disruption of this balance leads to skin diseases. In this review, we summarize and discuss current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating epidermal stem and progenitor cell differentiation, and explore new relationships for maintenance of skin barrier function. PMID:23812084

  20. Clinical outcomes of HLA-DPB1 mismatches in 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated donor-recipient pairs undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Ann M; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Kroning, Cynthia M; Kremers, Walter K; De Goey, Steven R; Patnaik, Mrinal; Litzow, Mark; Gastineau, Dennis A; Hogan, William J; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Wakefield, Laurie L; Gandhi, Manish J

    2017-09-01

    HLA-DPB1 matching may impact allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) outcomes; however, this locus is not in linkage disequilibrium with the remainder of the HLA genes. After classifying HLA-DPB1 mismatches based on T-cell epitope, avoiding non-permissive mismatches may impact survival. We tested this hypothesis at a single academic institution. Retrospective HLA-DPB1 genotyping was performed on 153 adult patients who underwent ASCT and unrelated donors matched for HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1 loci (10/10). Using the ImMunoGeneTics/HLA T-cell epitope matching algorithm, mismatch status was classified as permissive or non-permissive. Of 153 donor-recipient pairs, 22 (14.4%) were HLA-DPB1 matches, 64 (42.8%) permissive mismatches, and 67 (43.8%) non-permissive mismatches. DPB1 mismatch increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD; RR 2.89 [1.19-9.53], P=.016) compared with DPB1-matched transplants, but there were no differences in overall mortality, risk of relapse, or acute GVHD (aGVHD). Combining matches and permissive mismatches and comparing to non-permissive mismatches, there was no significant difference in overall survival or relapse; however, patients receiving non-permissive mismatched transplants experienced greater risk of aGVHD overall and severe aGVHD (RR 1.66 [1.13-2.44], P=.010 and RR 1.97 [1.10-3.59], P=.024, respectively). In this single-center study, HLA-DPB1 matching influenced outcomes of patients undergoing ASCT for hematologic malignancy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clofarabine Combined with Busulfan Provides Excellent Disease Control in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, P; Basset, Roland; Ledesma, C; Ciurea, S; Parmar, S; Shpall, EJ; Hosing, C; Khouri, Issa; Qazilbash, M; Popat, U; Alousi, A; Nieto, Y; Jones, RB; de Lima, M; Champlin, RE; Andersson, BS

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the safety and early disease-control data obtained with intravenous busulfan (Bu) combined with clofarabine (Clo) in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Fifty-one patients with median age 36 years (range 20–64) received a matched sibling (n=24), syngeneic (n=2) or matched unrelated donor transplant (n=25) for ALL in first complete remission (n=30), second complete remission (n=13), or with active disease (n=8). More than half of the patients had high-risk cytogenetic profiles as defined by the presence of t(9;22) (n=17), t(4;11) (n=3), or complex cytogenetics (n=7). Clo 40 mg/m2 was given once daily, each dose followed by pharmacokinetically-dosed Bu infused over three hours daily for 4 days followed by hematopoietic cell infusion 2 days later. The Bu dose was based upon the drug clearance determined by a test Bu dose, 32 mg/m2, given 48 hours prior to the high dose regimen. The target daily area under the curve (AUC) was 5,500 microMol-min for patients less than 60 years of age and 4000 microMol-min for patients ≥60 years of age. The regimen was well tolerated with 100 day non-relapse mortality (NRM) rate of 6%. With a median follow-up of 14 months among surviving patients (range, 6–28 months), the one-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and non-relapse mortality (NRM) rates were 67% (95%CI: 55%–83%), 54% (95%CI: 41%–71%), and 32% (95%CI: 16%–45%), respectively. For patients transplanted in first remission, the one-year OS, DFS, and NRM rates were 74%, 64%, and 25%, respectively. The combination of Clo-Bu provides effective disease control while maintaining a favorable safety profile. PMID:22750645

  2. Epidemiology, management, and outcome of invasive fungal disease in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: a multicenter prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqian; Meng, Fanyi; Han, Mingzhe; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Li; Huang, He; Wu, Depei; Ren, Hanyun; Wang, Chun; Shen, Zhixiang; Ji, Yu; Huang, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    The China Assessment of Antifungal Therapy in Hematological Disease study, the first large-scale observational study of invasive fungal disease (IFD) in China, enrolled 1401 patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (75.2% allogeneic and 24.8% autologous) at 31 hospitals across China. The overall incidence of proven or probable IFD was 7.7% (108 of 1401); another 266 cases (19.0%) were possible IFD. After allogeneic or autologous HSCT, the incidence of proven/probable IFD was 8.9% (94 of 1053) and 4.0% (14 of 348), respectively. Some cases (14 of 108) developed during conditioning before transplantation. The cumulative incidence of proven/probable IFD increased steeply in the first month after transplantation and after 6 months, the incidence was significantly higher in allogeneic than it was in autologous transplant recipients (9.2% versus 3.5%; P = .001) and when stem cells were derived from cord blood or bone marrow and peripheral blood (P = .02 versus other sources). Independent risk factors for proven/probable IFD in allogeneic HSCT were diabetes, HLA-matched unrelated donor, prolonged severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count > 500/mm(3) for >14 days), and immunosuppressants (odds ratio, 2.0 to 3.4 for all). Antifungal prophylaxis was independently protective (P = .01). Previous IFD and prolonged severe neutropenia were significant independent risk factors among autologous transplantation patients (P < .01, P = .04, respectively). In total, 1175 (83.9%) patients received antifungal prophylaxis (91.6% triazoles) and 514 (36.7%) were treated in the hospital with therapeutic antifungals (89.1% triazoles; median 27 days). Empirical, pre-emptive, and targeted antifungals were used in 82.3%, 13.6%, and 4.1% of cases, respectively. Overall mortality (13.4%; 188 deaths) was markedly higher in patients with proven (5 of 16; 31.3%), probable (20 of 92; 21.7%), or possible (61 of 266; 22.9%) IFD; allogeneic (171 of 1053; 16.2%) rather

  3. Preliminary study in a new protocol for the treatment of oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and chemotherapy (CT).

    PubMed

    Vitale, Marina Consuelo; Modaffari, Carola; Decembrino, Nunzia; Zhou, Feng Xiao; Zecca, Marco; Defabianis, Patrizia

    2017-08-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating and serious side effect in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and chemotherapy (CT). Laser therapy is becoming a promising treatment option in these patients, avoiding the necessity of enteral/parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser therapy in patients affected by oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and HSCT. Sixteen onco-hematological pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, affected by oral mucositis, were enrolled in this study. They were divided in two randomized groups: the laser group and the placebo-control group. Patients in the laser group were treated with HPLT (970 ± 15 nm, 3.2 W (50%), 35-6000 Hz, 240 s) for four consecutive days, once a day; and placebo group underwent sham treatment. The assessment of mucositis was recorded through WHO Oral Mucositis Grading Objective Scale, and pain was evaluated through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Patients were monitored and evaluated 3, 7, and 11 days after the first day of laser therapy. Once OM was diagnosed, the patients had mucositis grading assessments before laser or sham application at day 3, 7, and 11 after first application. All patients of laser group demonstrated improvement in pain sensation from day 3 after first application of laser (p < 0.05), ulcerations reduced their dimensions and erythema disappeared. The patients of placebo group had improvement from day 7. In laser group, all mucositis were fully resolved from day 7 (p < 0.05). Oral mucositis negatively impacts on nutritional intake, oral hygiene, and quality of life. Laser therapy appears to be a safe and innovative approach in the management of oral mucositis. In this preliminary study, HPLT encourages to consider laser therapy as a part of onco-hematological protocol, providing to decrease pain and duration of OM induced by CT and HSCT. Further researches will be needed

  4. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  5. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy cells replace damaged cells in adult organisms. Stem cell research is one of the most fascinating areas of ... as with many expanding fields of scientific inquiry, research on stem cells raises scientific questions as rapidly as it generates ...

  6. Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Reik, Wolf; Surani, M Azim

    2015-11-02

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in the germline and imprinting cycle. Germ cells show extensive epigenetic programming in preparation for the generation of the totipotent state, which in turn leads to the establishment of pluripotent cells in blastocysts. The latter are the cells from which pluripotent embryonic stem cells are derived and maintained in culture. Following blastocyst implantation, postimplantation epiblast cells develop, which give rise to all somatic cells as well as primordial germ cells, the precursors of sperm and eggs. Pluripotent stem cells in culture can be induced to undergo differentiation into somatic cells and germ cells in culture. Understanding the natural cycles of epigenetic reprogramming that occur in the germline will allow the generation of better and more versatile stem cells for both therapeutic and research purposes.

  7. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  8. A cost and resource utilization analysis of micafungin bridging for hemato-oncological high-risk patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Sebastian M; Vehreschild, Maria J G T; Cornely, Oliver A; Franke, Bernd; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Kron, Florian; Scheid, Christoph; Vehreschild, Jörg J

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous bridging strategies increase exposure of antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk hematological patients. The cost-effectiveness of such strategies has not been analyzed. A recent study compared the impact of oral posaconazole (POS) and oral posaconazole with intravenous micafungin bridging (POS-MIC) as prophylactic antifungal regimens in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT). Based on data from the Cologne Cohort of Neutropenic Patients (CoCoNut), a health economic evaluation of direct treatment costs was performed to analyze the economic impact of micafungin bridging. Analysis was undertaken based on current guidelines for the German societal perspective with an annual discount rate of 5%, whereby indirect costs were disregarded due to the severity of the underlying disease. Sensitivity analysis of cost calculation with different discount rates was performed to improve robustness of our health economic evaluation. A retrospective case-control analysis of patients undergoing aSCT between 05/2006 and 07/2011 was performed; 106 patients each in the POS and POS-MIC group were included. In the POS and POS-MIC group, mean costs per patient for the treatment on bone marrow transplant ward were €27,228 (95% CI: €24,932-€29,525) vs. €27,894 (95% CI: €26,414-€29,375; P = 0.629), for diagnostic measures €2124 (95% CI: €1823-€2425) vs. €1269 (95% CI: €1168-€1370; P ≤ 0.001), for laboratory findings €10,612 (95% CI: €9681-€11,544) vs. €8836 (95% CI: €8198-€9475; P = 0.002), and for overall antifungal treatment €6105 (95% CI: €4703-€7508) vs. €6943 (95% CI: €5393-€8493; P = 0.428), resulting in mean overall costs per patient of €60,304 (95% CI: €53,969-€66,639) vs. €58,089 (95% CI: €51,736-64,442; P = 0.625). Our health economic evaluation shows micafungin bridging in aSCT patients did not result in excess cost. Higher acquisition costs of antifungal prophylaxis were balanced by a

  9. Guideline for the prevention of oral and oropharyngeal mucositis in children receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Lillian; Robinson, Paula; Treister, Nathaniel; Baggott, Tina; Gibson, Paul; Tissing, Wim; Wiernikowski, John; Brinklow, Jennifer; Dupuis, L Lee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the prevention of oral mucositis in children (0–18 years) receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods The Mucositis Prevention Guideline Development Group was interdisciplinary and included internationally recognised experts in paediatric mucositis. For the evidence review, we included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in either children or adults evaluating the following interventions selected according to prespecified criteria: cryotherapy, low level light therapy (LLLT) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). We also examined RCTs of any intervention conducted in children. For all systematic reviews, we synthesised the occurrence of severe oral mucositis. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to describe quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Results We suggest cryotherapy or LLLT may be offered to cooperative children receiving chemotherapy or HSCT conditioning with regimens associated with a high rate of mucositis. We also suggest KGF may be offered to children receiving HSCT conditioning with regimens associated with a high rate of severe mucositis. However, KGF use merits caution as there is a lack of efficacy and toxicity data in children, and a lack of long-term follow-up data in paediatric cancers. No other interventions were recommended for oral mucositis prevention in children. Conclusions All three specific interventions evaluated in this clinical practice guideline were associated with a weak recommendation for use. There may be important organisational and cost barriers to the adoption of LLLT and KGF. Considerations for implementation and key research gaps are highlighted. PMID:25818385

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Sampling Strategy for Model-Based Precision Dosing of Melphalan in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kana; Dong, Min; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Chandra, Sharat; Mehta, Parinda A; McConnell, Scott; Anaissie, Elias J; Vinks, Alexander A

    2017-09-16

    High-dose melphalan is an important component of conditioning regimens for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The current dosing strategy based on body surface area results in a high incidence of oral mucositis and gastrointestinal and liver toxicity. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing will individualize exposure and help minimize overexposure-related toxicity. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and optimal sampling strategy. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM using 98 observations collected from 15 adult patients given the standard dose of 140 or 200 mg/m(2) by intravenous infusion. The determinant-optimal sampling strategy was explored with PopED software. Individual area under the curve estimates were generated by Bayesian estimation using full and the proposed sparse sampling data. The predictive performance of the optimal sampling strategy was evaluated based on bias and precision estimates. The feasibility of the optimal sampling strategy was tested using pharmacokinetic data from five pediatric patients. A two-compartment model best described the data. The final model included body weight and creatinine clearance as predictors of clearance. The determinant-optimal sampling strategies (and windows) were identified at 0.08 (0.08-0.19), 0.61 (0.33-0.90), 2.0 (1.3-2.7), and 4.0 (3.6-4.0) h post-infusion. An excellent correlation was observed between area under the curve estimates obtained with the full and the proposed four-sample strategy (R (2) = 0.98; p < 0.01) with a mean bias of -2.2% and precision of 9.4%. A similar relationship was observed in children (R (2) = 0.99; p < 0.01). The developed pharmacokinetic model-based sparse sampling strategy promises to achieve the target area under the curve as part of precision dosing.

  11. Non-comparative evaluation of the safety of aerosolized amphotericin B lipid complex in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B D; Dodds Ashley, E S; Addison, R M; Alspaugh, J A; Chao, N J; Perfect, J R

    2006-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at increased risk for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) over prolonged periods of time. Aerosolized amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC) has shown promise in lung transplant recipients as a convenient means of delivering protective drug to the upper airways avoiding systemic toxicities. The safety and tolerability of aerosolized ABLC in 40 subjects undergoing allogeneic HSCT was prospectively investigated in an open-labeled, non-comparative study. Subjects received aerosolized ABLC treatment once daily for 4 days, then once weekly for 13 weeks; fluconazole was administered daily as standard of care through post-transplant day 100. Pulmonary mechanics were measured before and after each dose of inhaled ABLC; adverse events (AEs) and the development of IFI were also monitored. Cough, nausea, taste disturbance, or vomiting followed 2.2% of 458 total inhaled ABLC administrations; 5.2% of inhaled ABLC administrations were associated with >or=20% decrease in pulmonary function measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second or forced vital capacity) and none required treatment with bronchodilators or withdrawal from study. Four mild AEs were considered possibly or probably related to study treatment; no deaths or withdrawals from treatment were attributed to study drug. Of 3 proven IFIs occurring during the study period, only 1, a catheter-related case of disseminated fusariosis, occurred while the subject was receiving study medication. Aerosolized ABLC was well tolerated in allogeneic HSCT recipients. With only 1 of 40 subjects developing IFI while receiving treatment, the combination of fluconazole and inhaled ABLC warrants further study as antifungal prophylaxis following allogeneic HSCT.

  12. Cytogenetic risk grouping by the monosomal karyotype classification is superior in predicting the outcome of acute myeloid leukemia undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Philipp G; Schulze-Luckow, Anthea; Terwey, Theis H; le Coutre, Philipp; Vuong, Lam G; Dörken, Bernd; Arnold, Renate

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the impact of cytogenetic abnormalities grouped according to the monosomal karyotype (MK) classification or the Southwest Oncology/Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (SWOG/ECOG) definition in 263 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) in complete remission (CR) at our center. Risk grouping using the MK criteria shows a highly significant difference in 5-yr overall survival (OS) ranging between 67%, for the most favorable, and 32%, for the poorest risk group (P = 0.001). Although similarly precise in predicting OS, the MK scheme better separates patients with respect to relapse incidence as compared to the SWOG/ECOG grouping (P = 0.0001 vs. P = 0.01). Notably, patients displaying non-MK abnormalities (MK-) had a 5-yr relapse incidence identical to those cytogenetically normal (CN), that is 24%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the MK classification is an independent prognosticator and superior in predicting OS (hazard ratios, HR 3.74, P = 0.01) and relapse incidence (HR 3.74, P = 0.005) as compared to the SWOG/ECOG criteria. Finally, subgroup analysis revealed that the prognostic capacity of the MK classification is highly significant in patients treated with standard myeloablative conditioning prior to alloSCT (P = 0.0011 for OS, P = 0.0007 for relapse). In contrast, the MK grouping failed to predict OS or relapse incidence in patients treated with reduced intensity conditioning. Taken together, these results indicate that the MK classification is superior in predicting the overall outcome of patients with AML undergoing alloSCT in CR. Furthermore, our data suggest that the genetic risk profile of MK- and CN patients is mostly overlapping in this setting.

  13. Baseline cytokine profiling identifies novel risk factors for invasive fungal disease among haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceesay, M Mansour; Kordasti, Shahram; Rufaie, Eamaan; Lea, Nicholas; Smith, Melvyn; Wade, Jim; Douiri, Abdel; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a disease of immunocompromised hosts. Cytokines are important mediators of innate and adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to identify cytokine profiles that correlate with increased risk of IFD. We prospectively enrolled 172 adult haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy, and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pro-inflammatory cytokine profiling using 30-plex Luminex assay was performed at baseline and during treatment. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4.1, TLR4.2, TLR6, CLEC7A, CARD9, and INFG) were investigated among transplant recipients and donors. The incidence of IFD in this cohort was 16.9% (29/172). Median baseline serum concentrations of IL-15, IL-2R, CCL2, and MIP-1α were significantly higher whilst IL-4 was lower in patients with proven/probable IFD compared to those with no evidence of IFD. Baseline high IL-2R and CCL2 were associated with increased risk of IFD in the multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1.1-5.1; P = 0.037], and hazard ratio 2.7 [95% CI 1.2-6.1; P = 0.016], respectively). However, these differences were not significant in follow up measurements. Similarly, no significant independent prognostic value was associated with baseline cytokine profile. High baseline IL-2R and CCL2 concentrations were independent indicators of the risk of developing IFD and could be used to identify patients for enhanced prophylaxis and early antifungal therapy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Age and Modified European LeukemiaNet Classification to Predict Transplant Outcomes: An Integrated Approach for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oran, Betül; Jimenez, Antonio M; De Lima, Marcos; Popat, Uday R; Bassett, Roland; Andersson, Borje S; Borthakur, Gautam; Bashir, Qaiser; Chen, Julianne; Ciurea, Stefan O; Jabbour, Elias; Cortes, Jorge; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa F; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Ravandi, Farhad; Rondon, Gabriela; Lu, Xinyan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of a modified European LeukemiaNet (ELN) classification for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) while in first complete remission (CR1). We analyzed 464 AML patients with matched related (n = 211, 45.5%), matched unrelated (n = 176, 37.9%), and mismatched donors (n = 77, 16.6%). Patients were classified into 4 modified ELN risk groups (favorable, intermediate-I, intermediate-II, and adverse) separately for 354 patients age < 60 years and 110 patients age ≥ 60 years. In this modified version of ELN classification, patients with normal cytogenetic were classified by FLT3-ITD mutational status: favorable risk if FLT3-ITDwild and intermediate-I if FLT3-ITDmut. The best outcomes occurred in the ELN favorable and intermediate-II groups in younger AML patients and in the favorable and intermediate-I groups in older AML patients. Older AML patients had worse transplant outcomes within each modified ELN risk group except intermediate-I when compared with younger patients; leukemia-free survival at 3 years was 67.8% versus 49.8% in favorable, 53.4% versus 50.7% in intermediate-I, 65.7% versus 20.2% in intermediate-II, and 44.6% versus 23.8% in adverse group younger and older patients, respectively. Among lesion-specific abnormalities, del5q/-5 and abnl(17p) had the worse transplant outcomes, with 3-year leukemia-free survival rates of 18.4% and 20% in younger CR1 patients. In conclusion, the modified ELN prognostic classification developed for chemotherapy outcomes also identifies prognostic groups for HSCT, which is useful for a selection of patients for post-transplant strategies to improve outcomes.

  15. [The role of pre-transplant debulking treatment in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jordan; Damaj, Gandhi; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains unsatisfactory. Variable success in the correction of blood cytopenias, reduction of the proportion of marrow myeloblasts, and normalization of cytogenetics has been achieved with a variety of treatment strategies, including the use of immunosuppressive drugs, differentiating agents, conventional chemotherapy, and hypomethylating agents (HMAs) However, in general, responses have not been complete and have been of limited duration; prolongation of survival, if achieved, on average has been in the range of months. Currently, allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains the only approach with curative potential for patients with higher risk/advanced MDS. Yet, despite the beneficial effects of allo-SCT, post-transplant relapse is a major cause of failure. Debulking prior to transplant treatment in patients with MDS is a matter of debate. The achievement of complete remission (CR) before allo-SCT improves post-transplantation outcome, although it is not clear whether this reflects the selection of patients with more responsive disease or is related to a reduction in disease burden. Higher CR rates in patients with MDS are obtained with induction chemotherapy (ICT) than with hypomethylating agents (HMAs), although HMAs may be active in patients with complex karyotypes in whom ICT almost invariably fails. Furthermore, HMAs have a good toxicity profile compared with ICT and may therefore be considered especially in older patients and in patients with comorbidities. However, all interventions aimed at reducing disease burden before allo-SCT expose patients to the risk of complications, which may prevent them from undergoing transplantation. Therefore, up-front allo-SCT is an option, particularly for patients with life-threatening cytopenias. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, the main therapeutic approaches are discussed in this review.

  16. The impact of early CD4+ lymphocyte recovery on the outcome of patients who undergo allogeneic bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Roberta; Martino, Massimo; Garreffa, Cristina; Messina, Giuseppe; Console, Giuseppe; Princi, Domenica; Dattola, Antonella; Moscato, Tiziana; Massara, Elisabetta; Spiniello, Elisa; Irrera, Giuseppe; Iacopino, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Background Different factors influence the clinical outcome of allogeneic transplants, the foremost being good immune recovery. Materials and methods The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different factors, such as stem cell source, type of donor, conditioning regimen and acute graft-versus-host disease, on early lymphocyte recovery after transplantation. We then analyzed the impact of early CD4+ cell count on overall survival, transplant-related mortality and disease-related mortality. Results Univariate analysis with Spearman’s rho showed a significant correlation between early CD4+ cell recovery and overall survival, transplant-related mortality, stem cell source and type of donor. In multivariate analysis CD4+ cell count was significantly associated with (i) stem cell source, being higher in patients whose haematopoietic progenitor cells were obtained by apheresis than in those whose source of grafted cells was bone marrow, and (ii) type of donor, being higher in patients transplanted from sibling donors than in those whose graft was from an alternative donor. The ROC curve of CD4+ cell count indicated that a cut-off of 115 CD4+ cells/mL could differentiate groups with different outcomes. At 2 years follow-up, patients achieving this CD4+ cell count had significantly lower cumulative transplant-related mortality compared to patients who did not have this count (10%±4% versus 40%±8%, p=0.0026). At the 5-year follow-up, the overall survival rates were 77.5%±0.6% and 36%±7% (p=0.000) in patients with a CD4+ cell count ≥115/mL and in patients with CD4+ cell count ≤ 115/mL, respectively. Conclusion Early CD4+ cell recovery after allogeneic transplantation has a relevant impact on overall survival and transplant-related mortality and is influenced by two factors: stem cell source and type of donor. PMID:22337266

  17. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  18. In-Hospital Mortality and Post-Transplant Complications in Elderly Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Larysa; Sylvester, Michael; Parrondo, Ricardo; Mariotti, Veronica; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Chang, Victor T

    2017-03-09

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) has improved survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and is increasingly used in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare in-hospital complications and mortality after auto-HSCT in younger (< age 65) vs. elderly (≥ age 65) MM patients utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Over a three-year period (2008-2010), 2209 patients with MM were admitted to U.S. Hospitals for auto-HSCT. The median age was 59 years, with 1650 patients (74.7%) younger than age 65 and 559 patients (25.3%) age 65 or older. Overall, in-hospital mortality in MM patients following auto-HSCT was rare (1.5%) and there was no significant difference in mortality between elderly and younger patients. Elderly patients did have a significantly increased mean length of stay (18.6 days + 10.8 days (standard deviation) vs. 16.8 days + 7.2 days, p<0.001) and mean total hospital charges ($161,117 + $105,008 vs. $151,192 + $78,342, p=0.018) compared to younger pts. Elderly patients were significantly more likely than younger patients to develop major in-hospital post-transplant complications such as severe sepsis (OR 2.70, 95% CI: 1.40-5.21, p=0.003), septic shock, (OR 3.10, 95% CI: 1.43-6.71, p=0.004), pneumonia (OR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.06-2.46, p=0.024), acute respiratory failure (OR 3.44, 95% CI: 1.70-6.96, p=0.001), endotracheal intubation requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (OR 2.19, 95% CI: 1.06-4.55, p=0.035), acute renal failure (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.38-3.33, p=0.001), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.52-2.79, <0.001). This data may help guide informed consent discussions and provide a focus for future studies to reduce treatment-related morbidity in elderly MM patients undergoing auto-HSCT.

  19. Changes in nutritional status, body composition, quality of life, and physical activity levels of cancer patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yun-Chi; Bauer, Judith; Horsley, Pamela; Waterhouse, Mary; Bashford, John; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2013-06-01

    This pilot exploratory study aimed to describe the changes in nutritional status, body composition, quality of life (QoL), and physical activity levels (PAL) of cancer patients undergoing high-dose conditioning and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) at pre-admission, hospital discharge, and at 100 days post-transplantation, and to examine if changes in these parameters are interrelated. Twenty-four patients (56.2 ± 12.9 years; 7 females, 17 males) were recruited from an Australian transplant center. Assessment was prospectively conducted at pre-admission, hospital discharge, and 100 days post-transplantation using the scored patient-generated subjective global assessment, air displacement plethysmography, EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3), and the international physical activity questionnaire. At discharge, nutritional status deteriorated (patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) median, +8.0; interquartile range, 6.0-13.0; p < 0.001) and the number of malnourished patients increased (n = 8/23; p = 0.023). Patients experienced significant loss of lean body mass (LBM; -2.2 kg, CI 95% -3.0, -1.4; p < 0.001), and decrease in QoL (-10.6, CI 95% -24.1, 2.9; p = 0.117); the proportion of patients with high PAL decreased (p = 0.012). By 100 days post-transplantation, all patients were well-nourished; however, LBM remained lower -1.0 kg (CI 95% -1.9, -0.1; p = 0.028). Change in nutritional status (PG-SGA score) was associated with weight (r = -0.46; p = 0.039) and fat mass (r = -0.57; p = 0.013). Change in QoL was associated with nutritional reservoir (i.e., fat; r = 0.54; p = 0.024); QoL was consistently higher for patients with high PAL. High-dose conditioning and autologous PBSCT is associated with deterioration in nutritional status, QoL and PAL, with LBM remaining below baseline levels at 100 days post-transplantation. A nutrition and exercise intervention program post

  20. Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  1. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells undergo enhanced chondrogenic differentiation when grown on nanofibrous scaffolds and in a sequential two-stage culture medium environment.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Subramanian, Arjunan; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Venugopal, Jayarama; Biswas, Arijit; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Bongso, Ariff

    2012-03-01

    The current treatments used for osteoarthritis from cartilage damage have their disadvantages of donor site morbidity, complicated surgical interventions and risks of infection and graft rejection. Recent advances in tissue engineering have offered much promise in cartilage repair but the best cell source and in vitro system have not as yet been optimised. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have thus far been the cell of choice. However, we derived a unique stem cell from the human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hWJSC) that has properties superior to hBMSCs in terms of ready availability, prolonged stemness characteristics in vitro, high proliferation rates, wide multipotency, non-tumorigenicity and tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. We observed enhanced cell attachment, cell proliferation and chondrogenesis of hWJSCs over hBMSCs when grown on PCL/Collagen nanoscaffolds in the presence of a two-stage sequential complex/chondrogenic medium for 21 days. Improvement of these three parameters were confirmed via inverted optics, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), MTT assay, pellet diameters, Alcian blue histology and staining, glycosaminglycans (GAG) and hyaluronic acid production and expression of key chondrogenic genes (SOX9, Collagen type II, COMP, FMOD) using immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In separate experiments we demonstrated that the 16 ng/ml of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) present in the complex medium may have contributed to driving chondrogenesis. We conclude that hWJSCs are an attractive stem cell source for inducing chondrogenesis in vitro when grown on nanoscaffolds and exposed sequentially first to complex medium and then followed by chondrogenic medium.

  2. Return to work for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and transformed indolent lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arboe, Bente; Olsen, Maja Halgren; Goerloev, Jette Soenderskov; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Johansen, Christoffer; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Brown, Peter de Nully

    2017-01-01

    Background Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard treatment for patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or transformed indolent lymphoma (TIL). The treatment is mainly considered for younger patients still available for the work market. In this study, social outcomes after ASCT in terms of return to work (RTW) are described. Patients and methods Information from national administrative registers was combined with clinical information on patients, who received ASCT for relapse of DLBCL or TIL between 2000 and 2012. A total of 164 patients were followed until RTW, disability or old-age pension, death, or December 31, 2015, whichever came first. A total of 205 patients were followed with disability pension as the event of interest. Cox models were used to determine cause-specific hazards. Results During follow-up, 82 (50%) patients returned to work. The rate of returning to work in the first year following ASCT was decreased for patients being on sick leave at the time of relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 0.3 [0.2;0.5]) and increased for patients aged ≥55 years (HR 1.9 [1.1;3.3]). In all, 56 (27%) patients were granted disability pension. Being on sick leave at the time of relapse was positively associated with receiving a disability pension in the first 2 years after ASCT (HR 3.7 [1.8;7.7]). Conclusion Patients on sick leave at the time of relapse have a poorer prognosis regarding RTW and have a higher rate of disability pension. Furthermore, patients >55 are more likely to RTW compared to younger patients. These results indicate an unmet need for focused social rehabilitation. PMID:28652814

  3. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  4. Can mesenchymal cells undergo collective cell migration?

    PubMed Central

    Theveneau, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration is critical for proper development of the embryo and is also used by many cell types to perform their physiological function. For instance, cell migration is essential for immune cells to monitor the body and for epithelial cells to heal a wound whereas, in cancer cells, acquisition of migratory capabilities is a critical step toward malignancy. Migratory cells are often categorized into two groups: (1) mesenchymal cells, produced by an epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition, that undergo solitary migration and (2) epithelial-like cells which migrate collectively. However, on some occasions, mesenchymal cells may travel in large, dense groups and exhibit key features of collectively migrating cells such as coordination and cooperation. Here, using data published on neural crest cells, a highly invasive mesenchymal cell population that extensively migrate throughout the embryo, we explore the idea that mesenchymal cells, including cancer cells, might be able to undergo collective cell migration under certain conditions and discuss how they could do so. PMID:22274714

  5. Nail stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sellheyer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Our knowledge on stem cells of the hair follicle has increased exponentially after the bulge was characterized as the stem cell niche two decades ago. In contrast, little is known about stem cells in the nail unit. Whereas hair follicles are plentiful and easy to access, the human body has only twenty nails and they are rarely biopsied. Therefore, examining fetal material offers unique advantages. In the following mini-review, our current knowledge on nail stem cells is summarized and analogies to the hair follicle stem cells are drawn.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-Based Mushroom Extract AndoSan in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing High Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized, Double Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021. PMID:25664323

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-based mushroom extract AndoSan in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized, double blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Jon-Magnus; Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021.

  8. [Prophylactic, preemptive and curative use of donor lymphocyte infusion in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: guidelines of the SFGM-TC].

    PubMed

    Guillaume, T; Porcheron, S; Audat, F; Bancillon, N; Berceanu, A; Charbonnier, A; Dulery, R; Edy, N; El Cheikh, J; Hermet, E; Maurer, N; Paul, F; Konopacki-Potet, J; Turlure, P; Wallart, A; Boulanger, F; Dhédin, N; Suarez, F; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-08-01

    In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the fourth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in September 2013 in Lille. Here, we report our recommendations regarding the use of donor lymphocyte injection (DLI) in the prophylactic, pre-emptive and curative settings. This work has been limited to allogeneic stem cell transplantations from an HLA-matched (10/10) or -one antigen-mismatched (9/10) donor.

  9. Stem cells remember their grade.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Scadden, David T

    2007-08-16

    The stem cell state is understood based on what cells do in performance assays, crude measures of a highly refined state. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Dykstra et al. (2007) reveal stem cell gradation and the extent to which that gradation is retained in stem cell daughters of hematopoietic stem cells.

  10. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  12. Ascitic fluid drainage using a peritoneal dialysis catheter to prevent and treat multi-organ dysfunction in veno-occlusive disease in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vijal; Lewis, Malcolm; Shenoy, Mohan; Bonney, Denise; Wynn, Robert

    2017-02-28

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD), or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, is a well-recognised, serious complication associated with the chemotherapy conditioning therapy used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fluid management is typically challenging in children with this condition. We describe effective early use of peritoneal dialysis catheters to drain extravascular, intra-abdominal fluid in children with VOD, allowing intravascular fluid administration to preserve renal perfusion and function, preventing multi-organ dysfunction. All but one of the children are long-term survivors, both of their significant VOD and their HSCT. The child that did not survive died from their underlying metabolic illness, not VOD.

  13. Stem Cells and Aging.

    PubMed

    Koliakos, George

    2017-02-01

    The article is a presentation at the 4th Conference of ESAAM, which took place on October 30-31, 2015, in Athens, Greece. Its purpose was not to cover all aspects of cellular aging but to share with the audience of the Conference, in a 15-minute presentation, current knowledge about the rejuvenating and repairing somatic stem cells that are distinct from other stem cell types (such as embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells), emphasize that our body in old age cannot take advantage of these rejuvenating cells, and provide some examples of novel experimental stem cell applications in the field of rejuvenation and antiaging biomedical research.

  14. Stress and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  15. Stress and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23799624

  16. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  17. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  18. Provision of cellular blood components to CMV-seronegative patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the UK: survey of UK transplant centres.

    PubMed

    Morton, S; Peniket, A; Malladi, R; Murphy, M F

    2017-09-15

    To identify current UK practice with regards to provision of blood components for cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seronegative, potential, allogeneic stem cell recipients of seronegative grafts. Infection with CMV remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT). CMV transmission has been a risk associated with the transfusion of blood components from previously exposed donors, but leucocyte reduction has been demonstrated to minimise this risk. In 2012, the UK Advisory Committee for the Safety of Tissues and Organs (SaBTO) recommended that CMV-unselected components could be safely transfused without increased risk of CMV transmission. We surveyed UK aSCT centres to establish current practice. Fifteen adult and seven paediatric centres (75%) responded; 22·7% continue to provide components from CMV-seronegative donors. Reasons cited include the continued perceived risk of CMV transmission by blood transfusion, its associated morbidity and concerns regarding potential for ambiguous CMV serostatus in seronegative potential transplant recipients due to passive antibody transfer from CMV-seropositive blood donors, leading to erroneous donor/recipient CMV matching at transplant. The survey demonstrated a surprisingly high rate (22.7%) of centres continuing to provide blood components from CMV-seronegative donors despite SaBTO guidance. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  19. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  20. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2, CALR, or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC.

  1. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer. PMID:21547056

  2. Long-term follow-up of patients undergoing adipose-derived adult stem cell administration to treat complex perianal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, Hector; Herreros, Dolores; De-La-Quintana, Paloma; Trebol, Jacobo; Garcia-Arranz, Mariano; Garcia-Olmo, Damian

    2012-05-01

    In patients with perianal fistulas, administration of adult stem cells (ASCs) derived from liposuction samples has proved a promising technique in a preceding phase II trial. We aimed to extend follow-up of these patients with this retrospective study. Patients who had received at least one dose of treatment (ASCs plus fibrin glue or fibrin glue alone) were included. Adverse events notified since the end of the phase II study were recorded. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria were used to determine whether recurrence of the healed fistula had occurred. Data were available for 21 out of 24 patients treated with ASCs plus fibrin glue and 13 out of 25 patients treated with fibrin glue in the phase II study. Follow-up lasted a mean of 38.0 and 42.6 months, respectively. Two adverse events unrelated to the original treatment were reported, one in each group. There were no reports of anal incontinence associated with the procedure. Of the 12 patients treated with ASCs plus fibrin glue who were included in the retrospective follow-up in the complete closure group, only 7 remained free of recurrence. MRI was done in 31 patients. No relationship was detected between MRI results and the clinical fistula status, independent of the treatment received. Long-term follow-up reaffirmed the very good safety profile of the treatment. Nevertheless, a low proportion of the stem cell-treated patients with closure after the procedure remained free of recurrence after more than 3 years of follow-up.

  3. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  4. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate ... virus infection. To search the complete list of stem cell research projects funded by NIH please go to NIH ...

  5. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants A ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  6. Developmental Exposure to 2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Attenuates Capacity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Undergo Lymphocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Wang, Xuexia; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life. PMID:24709672

  7. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates capacity of hematopoietic stem cells to undergo lymphocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Wang, Xuexia; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life.

  8. Evaluating the effect of Matricaria recutita and Mentha piperita herbal mouthwash on management of oral mucositis in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Ghassemi, Sara; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Mojab, Faraz; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Ghassemi, Samaneh; Hajifathali, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of Matricaria recutita and Mentha piperita on oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Randomized double blind placebo controlled clinical trial. Faculty of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, and Bone Marrow Transplantation Center at Taleghani Teaching Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Sixty patients undergoing HSCT were randomly assigned to two groups: placebo (n=33), and herbal mouthwash group (n=27). All patients received the mouthwash one week before HSCT and were instructed to use it three times daily for at least 30s. OM was graded using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) scale (grade 0-5). The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS: 0-10 scale) measured the severity of OM symptoms. The duration, maximum and average daily grade of OM were significantly reduced in the treatment group (P<0.05). The use of herbal mouthwash led to significant improvements in pain intensity (P=0.009), dryness (P=0.04) and dysphagia (P=0.009). Other significant results included: reduced need for complementary medications (P=0.03), narcotic analgesics (P=0.047), total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (P=0.02) and the duration of TPN (P=0.03). This study shows that patients receiving the herbal mouthwash experienced less complications and symptoms associated with OM. In summary, it seems that the use of our prepared herbal mouthwash is beneficial for patients undergoing HSCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Smart drugs for smarter stem cells: making SENSe (sphingolipid-enhanced neural stem cells) of ceramide.

    PubMed

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Ceramide and its derivative sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are important signaling sphingolipids for neural stem cell apoptosis and differentiation. Most recently, our group has shown that novel ceramide analogs can be used to eliminate teratoma (stem cell tumor)-forming cells from a neural stem cell graft. In new studies, we found that S1P promotes survival of specific neural precursor cells that undergo differentiation to cells expressing oligodendroglial markers. Our studies suggest that a combination of novel ceramide and S1P analogs eliminates tumor-forming stem cells and at the same time, triggers oligodendroglial differentiation. This review discusses recent studies on the function of ceramide and S1P for the regulation of apoptosis, differentiation, and polarity in stem cells. We will also discuss results from ongoing studies in our laboratory on the use of sphingolipids in stem cell therapy. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  11. Stem Cell Organoid Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E.; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies. PMID:26748754

  12. Engineering Stem Cell Organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-07

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies.

  13. Optimisation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based strategy for the detection and quantification of human herpesvirus 6 DNA in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miriam YH; Alvarenga, Paulo G; Real, Juliana M; Moreira, Eloisa de Sá; Watanabe, Aripuanã; Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Vescovi, Matheus; Novis, Yana; Rocha, Vanderson; Seber, Adriana; Oliveira, Jose SR; Rodrigues, Celso A; Granato, Celso FH

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may cause severe complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Monitoring this virus and providing precise, rapid and early diagnosis of related clinical diseases, constitute essential measures to improve outcomes. A prospective survey on the incidence and clinical features of HHV-6 infections after HSCT has not yet been conducted in Brazilian patients and the impact of this infection on HSCT outcome remains unclear. A rapid test based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been optimised to screen and quantify clinical samples for HHV-6. The detection step was based on reaction with TaqMan® hydrolysis probes. A set of previously described primers and probes have been tested to evaluate efficiency, sensitivity and reproducibility. The target efficiency range was 91.4% with linearity ranging from 10-106 copies/reaction and a limit of detection of five copies/reaction or 250 copies/mL of plasma. The qPCR assay developed in the present study was simple, rapid and sensitive, allowing the detection of a wide range of HHV-6 loads. In conclusion, this test may be useful as a practical tool to help elucidate the clinical relevance of HHV-6 infection and reactivation in different scenarios and to determine the need for surveillance. PMID:26038958

  14. A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Parent-Focused Social-Cognitive Processing Intervention for Caregivers of Children Undergoing Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Bartell, Abraham; Mee, Laura; Sands, Stephen; Kashy, Deborah A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Providing care to one’s child during and after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a universally stressful experience, but few psychological interventions have been developed to reduce caregiver distress. The goal of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief cognitive–behavioral intervention delivered to primary caregivers. Method Two hundred eighteen caregivers were assigned either best-practice psychosocial care (BPC) or a parent social-cognitive intervention program (P-SCIP). The 5 session P-SCIP was delivered during the HSCT hospitalization. Caregivers completed measures of distress, optimism, coping, and fear appraisals preintervention, 1, 6 months, and 1 year. Results P-SCIP reduced caregiver’s distress significantly more than BPC between the pretransplant assessment (Time 1) and 1-month follow-up assessment (Time 2). P-SCIP had a stronger effect than BPC among caregivers who began the hospitalization reporting higher depression and anxiety, and among caregivers whose children developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Long-term treatment effects of P-SCIP were seen in traumatic distress among caregivers who reported higher anxiety pretransplant as well as among caregivers whose children had GvHD at HSCT discharge. Conclusions Screening caregivers for elevations in pretransplant anxiety and targeting interventions specifically to these caregivers, as well as targeting caregivers to children who develop GvHD, may prove beneficial. PMID:26913620

  15. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Infections by Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patriarca, Francesca; Cigana, Chiara; Massimo, Dozzo; Lazzarotto, Davide; Geromin, Antonella; Isola, Miriam; Battista, Marta Lisa; Medeot, Marta; Cerno, Michela; Sperotto, Alessandra; Candoni, Anna; Crapis, Massimo; Sartor, Assunta; Scarparo, Claudio; Bassetti, Matteo; Fanin, Renato

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine risk factors and outcomes of infections by multidrug-resistant gram-negative (MDR GN) bacteria in 241 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The cumulative incidence of infections was 10.5% (95% CI, 12.0% to 25.8%), with 57% of infections occurring during the period of severe neutropenia (neutrophil count < .1 × 10(6)/L). In multivariate analysis, allogeneic transplant and colonization with MDR GN bacteria at admission to the transplant unit were significantly associated with an increased risk of infection. Although we observed neither transplant-related mortality (TRM) nor deaths due to infections by MDR GN bacteria after autologous transplant, in the allogeneic setting a significant difference was reported in terms of overall survival (OS) and TRM between patients who developed infections and those who did not (1-year OS, 39% versus 68%; 1-year TRM, 42% versus 19%). In multivariate analysis, refractory disease and development of grades III to IV graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were factors that affected both TRM and OS, whereas occurrence of infections by MDR GN pathogens significantly reduced OS. We conclude that eligibility to allogeneic HSCT in MDR GN bacteria carriers should be carefully evaluated together with all other factors that independently influence outcome (disease status, donor, and GVHD risk). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Unpredictability of intravenous busulfan pharmacokinetics in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for advanced beta thalassemia: limited toxicity with a dose-adjustment policy.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Robert; Cappelli, Barbara; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Frugnoli, Ilaria; Biral, Erika; Noè, Anna; Evangelio, Costanza; Fossati, Marco; Roccia, Tito; Biffi, Alessandra; Finizio, Valentina; Aiuti, Alessandro; Broglia, Monica; Bartoli, Antonella; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Marktel, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    beta-thalassemia is a major health problem worldwide, and stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only curative option. Oral Busulfan (Bu) based conditioning is widely used in this setting. Due to the variability of Bu systemic exposure, intravenous (i.v.) Bu has been proposed as a standard of care, with no need for drug monitoring and dose adjustment. Patients with beta-thalassemia from countries with limited resources might be at higher risk of erratic Bu metabolism because of liver dysfunction, severe iron overload, and specific ethnic/genetic features. We studied Bu pharmacokinetics in 53 children with advanced beta-thalassemia from Middle Eastern countries who underwent a total of 57 matched related donor SCTs. Forty-two percent of the children required dose adjustment because they did not achieve the therapeutic window after the first dose. With a Bu dose-adjustment policy, regimen-related toxicity was limited. At a median follow-up of 564 days, the probabilities of 2-year survival, current thalassemia-free survival, rejection, and treatment-related mortality were 96%, 88%, 21%, and 4%, respectively. Conditioning with i.v. Bu and dose adjustment is feasible and well tolerated, although recurrence of thalassemia remains an unsolved problem in children with advanced disease. Copyright 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael B.; Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    All multicellular organisms undergo a decline in tissue and organ function as they age. An attractive theory is that a loss in stem cell number and/or activity over time causes this decline. In accordance with this theory, aging phenotypes have been described for stem cells of multiple tissues, including those of the hematopoietic system, intestine, muscle, brain, skin and germline. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of why adult stem cells age and how this aging impacts diseases and lifespan. With this increased understanding, it is feasible to design and test interventions that delay stem cell aging and improve both health and lifespan. PMID:26732838

  18. [On plant stem cells and animal stem cells].

    PubMed

    You, Yun; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of plant and animal stem cells can highlight core aspects of stem-cell biology. In both kingdoms, stem cells are defined by their clonogenic properties and are maintained by intercellular signals. The signaling molecules are different in plants and animals stem cell niches, but the roles of argonaute and polycomb group proteins suggest that there are some molecular similarities.

  19. A multi-center analysis of adverse events among two thousand, three hundred and seventy two adult patients undergoing adult autologous stem cell therapy for orthopaedic conditions.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Christopher J; Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Freeman, Michael D; Smith, Jay; Murrell, William D; Bubnov, Rostyslav

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is to report on detailed complications among a much larger group of 2372 orthopaedic patients treated with stem cell injections who were followed in a treatment registry for up to nine years. All patients underwent an MSC-based, percutaneous injection treatment of an orthopaedic condition between December 2005 and September 2014 at one of 18 clinical facilities. Treated areas of the body included the knee, hip, ankle/foot, hand/wrist, elbow, shoulder, and spine. The patients were followed prospectively via enrollment in a treatment registry. Patients were followed prospectively at one, three, six and 12 months, and annually thereafter, using an electronic system, ClinCapture software. A total of 3012 procedures were performed on 2372 patients with follow-up period of 2.2 years. A total of 325 adverse events were reported. The majority were pain post-procedure (n = 93, 3.9 % of the study population) and pain due to progressive degenerative joint disease (n = 90, 3.8 % of the study population). Seven cases reported neoplasms, a lower rate than in the general population. The lowest rate of adverse events was observed among patients injected with BMC alone. Lowest rate of adverse events was among those patients receiving BMC injections alone, but the higher rate of AEs for BMC plus adipose and cultured cells was readily explained by the nature of the therapy or the longer follow-up. There was no clinical evidence to suggest that treatment with MSCs of any type in this study increased the risk of neoplasm.

  20. High incidence of severe cyclosporine neurotoxicity in children affected by haemoglobinopaties undergoing myeloablative haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: early diagnosis and prompt intervention ameliorates neurological outcome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurotoxicity is a recognized complication of cyclosporine A (CSA) treatment. The incidence of severe CSA-related neurological complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is 4-11%. Methods We describe 6 cases of CSA related neurotoxicity out of 67 matched related HSCT performed in paediatric Middle East patients affected by haemoglobinopaties (5 beta thalassemia major, 1 sickle cell disease-SCD). Conditioning regimen consisted of iv busulphan, cyclophosphamide and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) prophylaxis with CSA, methylprednisolone, methotrexate and ATG. Results All 6 patients presented prodromes such as arterial hypertension, headache, visual disturbances and vomiting, one to two days before overt CSA neurotoxicity. CSA neurotoxicity consisted of generalized seizures, signs of endocranial hypertension and visual disturbances at a median day of onset of 11 days after HSCT (range +1 to +40). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in all subjects showed reversible leukoencephalopathy predominantly in the posterior regions of the brain (PRES) in 5/6 patients. EEG performed in 5/6 patients was always abnormal. Neurotoxicity was not explainable by high CSA blood levels, as all patients had CSA in the therapeutic range with a median of 178 ng/ml (range 69-250). CSA was promptly stopped and switched to tacrolimus with disappearance of clinical and radiological findings. All patients are symptoms-free at a median follow up of 882 days (range 60-1065). Conclusions Our experience suggests that paediatric patients with haemoglobinopaties have a high incidence of CSA related neurological events with no correlation between serum CSA levels and neurotoxicity. Prognosis is good following CSA removal. Specific prodromes such as arterial hypertension, headache or visual disturbances occurring in the early post-transplant period should be carefully evaluated with electrophysiological and MRI-based imaging in order to intervene

  1. Evaluation of the risk factors associated with high-dose chemotherapy-induced dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: possible usefulness of cryotherapy in dysgeusia prevention.

    PubMed

    Okada, Naoto; Hanafusa, Takeshi; Abe, Shinji; Sato, Chiemi; Nakamura, Toshimi; Teraoka, Kazuhiko; Abe, Masahiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    Dysgeusia is one of the sporadic adverse effects induced by chemotherapy, but it remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to retrospectively identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Forty-eight patients with myeloma or lymphoma undergoing AHSCT were enrolled in this study. Data regarding dysgeusia and symptoms were collected by interviews conducted by medical workers. Patient characteristics and unfavorable effects induced by dysgeusia were obtained from medical records and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia. Of the 48 patients, 20 (42 %) had dysgeusia after AHSCT. The total period of parenteral nutrition (TPN) administration and period of decreased oral intake in the dysgeusia group were statistically longer than those in the non-dysgeusia group. Multivariate analyses revealed that oral mucositis (odds ratio: 30.3; p < 0.01) and the type of chemotherapy prior to AHSCT (odds ratio: 6.56; p < 0.05) were independent risk factors, while oral cryotherapy was the independent suppressive factor of dysgeusia (odds ratio: 0.14; p < 0.05). Our study showed that dysgeusia after AHSCT led to the decrease in oral intake and extended the TPN administration period. Moreover, MEAM or LEED chemotherapy and oral mucositis were independent risk factors for dysgeusia in patients undergoing AHSCT, while oral cryotherapy was an independent suppressive factor for dysgeusia. Therefore, oral cryotherapy should be implemented into the regimen of supportive care management in patients undergoing AHSCT.

  2. Tracking the rise of stem cell tourism.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kirsten A; Sanders, Amanda N; Wang, Dong D; Levine, Aaron D

    2010-01-01

    Driven by hype surrounding stem cell research, a number of clinics around the world currently offer 'stem cell therapies' to patients. These unproven interventions have attracted policy interest owing to the risks they may pose to patients and to the progress of legitimate translational stem cell research, yet remarkably little data exists about the patients who undergo these unproven therapies or their experiences. We sought to characterize this patient population. We developed a comprehensive data set of blogs written by patients (or their caretakers) about their experiences with unproven stem cell therapies. Analyzing these data suggests that unproven stem cell therapies are increasing rapidly in popularity and are attracting a wide range of patients--both young and old and with a diverse collection of medical conditions. These results should help clinicians advise individual patients and help policymakers devise strategies to mitigate the risks these treatments pose.

  3. Circulating miRNA panel for prediction of acute graft-versus-host disease in lymphoma patients undergoing matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gimondi, Silvia; Dugo, Matteo; Vendramin, Antonio; Bermema, Anisa; Biancon, Giulia; Cavané, Alessandra; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) results in significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tests for aGVHD are currently lacking, but would be beneficial in predicting aGVHD and improving the safety of allo-HSCT. Circulating microRNAs exhibit marked stability and may serve as biomarkers in several clinical settings. Here, we evaluated the use of circulating microRNAs as predictive biomarkers of aGVHD in lymphoma patients after allo-HSCT from matched unrelated donors (MUDs). After receiving informed consent, we prospectively collected plasma samples from 24 lymphoma patients before and after unmanipulated MUD allo-HSCT; microRNAs were then isolated. Fourteen patients developed aGVHD symptoms at a median of 48 days (range: 32-90) post-transplantation. Two patients developed intestinal GVHD, eight cutaneous GVHD, and four multiorgan GVHD. The microRNA expression profile was examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). MicroRNAs 194 and 518f were significantly upregulated in aGVHD samples compared with samples taken from non-aGVHD patients. Remarkably, these upregulated microRNAs could be detected before the onset of aGVHD. Pathway prediction analysis indicated that these microRNAs may regulate critical pathways involved in aGVHD pathogenesis. Considering the noninvasive characteristics of plasma sampling and the feasibility of detecting miRNAs after allo-HSCT using real-time polymerase chain reaction, our results indicate that circulating microRNAs have the potential to enable an earlier aGVHD diagnosis and might assist in individualizing therapeutic strategies after MUD allo-HSCT. Nevertheless, standardization of blood sampling and analysis protocols is mandatory for the introduction of miRNA profiling into routine clinical use. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Serum Stem Cell Factor Assay in Elderly Poor Responder Patients Undergoing IVF: A New Biomarker to Customize Follicle Aspiration Cycle by Cycle.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Quaranta, Michela; Andrisani, Alessandra; Bordin, Luciana; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Esposito, Federica; Venturella, Roberta; Zicchina, Cecilia; Gangemi, Michele; Noventa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In humans, stem cell factor (SCF), produced during follicular phase, may reflect a successful stimulation and oocyte maturation and so it may be a predictor of in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. An observational cohort study was conducted on 37 poor responders scheduled for fresh nondonor IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment with standard controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) using recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH; S-COS group). A total of 35 women received a second treatment using both rFSH and recombinant luteinizing hormone (rLH; LH-COS group). From 144 samples collected at pickup day, serum concentration of SCF (s-SCF) and follicular levels of SCF (f-SCF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. No differences were observed between the 2 protocols in terms of both f-SCF and s-SCF levels. The comparison between f-SCF and s-SCF levels showed a strong linear correlation. The comparison between s-SCF levels and clinical outcomes showed a statistically significant correlation between both the number of metaphase II (MII) oocytes retrieved and the embryos obtained after fertilization. Cases with at least 3 MII oocytes showed s-SCF values >800 pg/mL, 2 MII oocytes >600 pg/mL, and 1 MII oocytes >400 pg/mL. In 100% of cases with s-SCF <400 pg/mL, no MII oocytes were recovered. All 5 pregnancies occurred in patients with s-SCF values >1000 pg/mL. The introduction of s-SCF assay in the management of poor-responder patients may contribute to solving the dilemma of whether to cancel or proceed with the stimulation cycle.

  5. Outcome of Patients With IgD and IgM Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective CIBMTR Study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Donna E.; Vesole, David H.; Shrestha, Smriti; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Pérez, Waleska S.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Milone, Gustavo A.; Abidi, Muneer; Atkins, Harold; Bashey, Asad; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Boza, Willem Bujan; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gajewski, James L.; Gibson, John; Hale, Gregory A.; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Roy, Vivek; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined. Patients and Methods Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database, we identified 36 patients with IgD and 11 patients with IgM myeloma among 3578 myeloma patients who received intensive therapy and auto-HCT over a 10-year period. Results The progression-free and overall survival probabilities at 3 years were 38% (95% CI, 21%-56%) and 69% (95% CI, 51%-84%) for IgD myeloma, and 47% (95% CI, 17%-78%) and 68% (95% CI, 36%-93%), respectively, for IgM disease. Although formal statistical analysis was limited by the small sample size, these results were comparable to those for IgG and IgA patients autografted during the same time period. Transplantation-related mortality and disease relapse/progression of myeloma were also similar for all isotypes. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates comparable outcomes in all immunoglobulin isotypes. Therefore, auto-HCT should be offered to eligible patients with IgD and IgM myeloma. PMID:21156462

  6. Effect of Immunoglobulin Therapy on the Rate of Infections in Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation or Treated with Immunomodulatory Agents.

    PubMed Central

    Khalafallah, Alhossain; Maiwald, Matthias; Cox, Amanda; Burns, Denise; Bates, Gerald; Hannan, Terry; Seaton, David; Fernandopulle, Bernadene; Meagher, Damien; Brain, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with a significant risk of infection due to immune dysfunction. Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in MM patients. There are few data available regarding the prevalence of infection in MM patients, especially in conjunction with newer generations of immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, bortezomib, lenalidomide) or post autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used successfully to reduce infection rates in the stable phase of MM, with limited data in other stages. We retrospectively analyzed 47 patients with MM from March 2006 to June 2009 at our institution. All patients received thalidomide and steroid therapy for at least 6 months. Nine patients received bortezomib and 11 lenalidomide subsequent to thalidomide, because of disease progression, and 22 patients underwent ASCT. The median age was 64 years (range 37–86), with a female–to-male ratio of 18:29. The median residual-serum IgG-level at time of infection was 3.2 g/L, IgA 0.3 g/L and IgM 0.2 g/L. Most patients suffered from recurrent moderate to severe bacterial infections, including the ASCT group. Fifteen patients suffered from different degrees of viral infections. All patients except 3 received IVIG therapy with a significant decline of the rate of infection thereafter (p<001). Our analysis shows that patients with MM treated with the new immunomodulatory drugs in conjunction with steroids are at significant increased risk of infection. Employing IVIG therapy appears to be an effective strategy to prevent infection in this cohort of patients. Further studies to confirm these findings are warranted. PMID:21415947

  7. Screening with spirometry is a useful predictor of later development of noninfectious pulmonary syndromes in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Philip A; Lim, Andrew; Panek-Hudson, Yvonne; Tacey, Mark; Hijazi, Ramzi; Ng, Ashley P; Szer, Jeff; Ritchie, David; Bajel, Ashish

    2014-06-01

    Noninfectious pulmonary syndromes (NIPS) frequently complicate allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The most common and serious is the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, characterized by irreversible fixed airflow obstruction, impaired quality of life, and a high mortality. Treatment for established symptomatic disease is relatively ineffective. We therefore sought to identify potential predictive factors for development of NIPS, which may identify patients at risk in whom earlier intervention may be of benefit. Spirometry and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide were performed before allo-SCT, day 100, and 1 year after allo-SCT. We retrospectively analyzed spirometry in consecutive patients having allo-SCT from 2004 to 2010, along with computed tomography and bronchoalveolar lavage results to identify cases of NIPS. Cases of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were defined as per current National Institutes of Health consensus guidelines. Spirometry results and baseline variables were compared between patients with and without NIPS to identify early predictors and risk factors for NIPS. Of 235 assessable patients, 23 (9.8%) developed NIPS. Median time of onset was day 367 (interquartile range [IQR], 144 to 544 days). Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (ΔFEV1.0) was the best predictor of later NIPS development. Median ΔFEV1.0 from pretransplant to day 100 in patients later developing NIPS was -12% (IQR, -25% to -1%) versus -1% (IQR, -7% to +6%) in unaffected patients, P = .002. From pretransplant to 1 year, ΔFEV1.0 was -19% (IQR, -37% to -6%) versus -3% (IQR, -10% to +4%) in patients later developing NIPS and unaffected patients, respectively, P < .001. Busulfan-based, but not total body irradiation-based, conditioning increased the risk of NIPS (hazard ratio, 9.4 [3.4 to 23.9], P < .001). No cases of NIPS were seen in the 53 patients who received in vivo T cell depletion with antithymocyte globulin (ATG, Genzyme Transplant, Cambridge

  8. Melanoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The cancer stem cell concept significantly broadens our understanding of melanoma biology. However, this concept should be regarded as an integral part of a holistic cancer model that also includes the genetic evolution of tumor cells and the variability of cell phenotypes within a dynamic tumor microenvironment. The biologic complexity and methodological difficulties in identifying cancer stem cells and their biomarkers are currently impeding the direct translation of experimental findings into clinical practice. Nevertheless, it is these methodological shortcomings that provide a new perspective on the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of melanoma with important consequences for future therapies. The development of new combination treatment strategies, particularly with regard to overcoming treatment resistance, could significantly benefit from targeted elimination of cell subpopulations with cancer stem cell properties. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects.

  10. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  11. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  12. Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Hematologic Patients Undergoing Autologous or Allogeneic Transplantation of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells: a Prospective, Randomized Study with a Mouthwash Containing Camelia Sinensis Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Giovanni; Rocco, Melania; Panichi, Alessia; Chios, Chiara Feira; Ciurli, Ester; Mannucci, Chiara; Sordi, Elisabetta; Caracciolo, Francesco; Papineschi, Federico; Benedetti, Edoardo; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an important side effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCST), mainly due to toxicity of conditioning regimens. It produces significant pain and morbidity. The present study reports a prospective, randomized, non-blinded study testing the efficacy of a new mouthwash, called Baxidil Onco® (Sanitas Farmaceutici Srl, Tortona, Italy) in 60 hematologic patients undergoing HCST (28 autologous, 32 allogeneic). Baxidil Onco®, used three times a day from Day -1 to Day +30, in addition to standard prophylactic schedules, was administered to 14 patients undergoing autologous and 14 patients undergoing allogeneic HCST. The remaining 32 patients (14 autologous and 18 HCST) were treated only with standard prophylactic schedules and served as control. In our study, the overall incidence of oral mucositis, measured according to the World Health Organization 0-4 scale, was 50% in the Baxidl Onco® group versus 82% in the control group (P=0.022). In addition, a significant reduction in scale 2-4 oral mucositis was observed in the Baxidil Onco® group (25% vs 56.2%; P=0.0029). The results obtained indicate that incidence, severity and duration of oral mucositis induced by conditioning regimens for HCST can be significantly reduced by oral rinsing with Baxidil Onco®, in addition to the standard prophylaxis scheme. Since Camelia Sinensin extract, which is used to produce green tea, is the main agent in this mouthwash, we hypothesize that the anti-oxidative properties of polyphenolic compounds of tea might exert protective effects on oral mucosa. PMID:23888242

  13. Effect of photobiomodulation therapy on reducing the chemo-induced oral mucositis severity and on salivary levels of CXCL8/interleukin 8, nitrite, and myeloperoxidase in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Daniella Ribeiro Naves; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; de Castro, Eduardo Fernandes; Silva, Geisa Badauy Lauria; E Silva, Larissa Pereira; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Valadares, Marize Campos; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2017-06-29

    Oral mucositis (OM) is the most common debilitating complication among patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) has shown beneficial effects in the treatment of OM, but few studies have evaluated its biological effects. This study evaluated the effect of PBM on the reduction of OM severity in patients undergoing HSCT and its relation to the modulation of the inflammatory response. Fifty-one patients were randomly assigned to two groups: PBM [submitted to PBM from admission (AD) to D+7] (n = 27) and control (n = 24) [received oral hygiene]. OM severity was assessed daily using the WHO scale. Saliva samples were collected on AD, D+7, and hospital discharge (HD) to measure CXCL8/interleukin 8, using cytometric bead array analysis and nitrite (NO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) using colorimetric methods. PBM significantly reduced the severity of OM from D+7 to D+11 (p < 0.05). All non-interventional patients (controls) who developed grade 2 or higher OM induced an increase of CXCL8 in saliva (n = 14) on D+7. PBM led to a decrease in CXCL8 on D+7 in 85% of patients, while 70.8% of patients in the control group presented an increase in this chemokine (p = 0.007). NO decreased from AD to D+7 in the PBM group (p > 0.05). MPO significantly decreased on D+7 in both groups (p < 0.05). PBM brought about a reduction in the severity of OM in patients undergoing HSCT, and this reduction was associated with a decrease in CXCL8 salivary levels.

  14. Catalyzing stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Lisa; Lyall, Drew; Rudnicki, Michael

    2008-09-01

    In 2001, the Stem Cell Network was the first of its kind, a bold initiative to forge and nurture pan-Canadian collaborations involving researchers, engineers, clinicians and private and public sector partners. Canada's broad and deep pool of stem cell talent proved to be a fertile ground for such an initiative, giving rise to a strong, thriving network that, 7 years later, can list innovative cell expansion and screening technologies, early-phase clinical trials for stroke, pulmonary hypertension, muscular dystrophy and cornea replacement, and leading discourse on ethical, legal and social issues among its accomplishments. As it moves into its second and final phase of funding, the Stem Cell Network continues to push boundaries and has set its sights on overcoming the obstacles that impede the transfer of research findings to clinical applications, commercial products and public policy.

  15. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  16. Multipotent Stem Cell and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Khanlarkhani, Neda; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Najafi, Atefeh; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Sobhani, Aligholi

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing and undifferentiated cell types that can be differentiate into functional cells. Stem cells can be classified into two main types based on their source of origin: Embryonic and Adult stem cells. Stem cells also classified based on the range of differentiation potentials into Totipotent, Pluripotent, Multipotent, and Unipotent. Multipotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types within one particular lineage. There are plentiful advantages and usages for multipotent stem cells. Multipotent Stem cells act as a significant key in procedure of development, tissue repair, and protection. The accessibility and adaptability of these amazing cells create them a great therapeutic choice for different part of medical approaches, and it becomes interesting topic in the scientific researches to found obvious method for the most advantageous use of MSC-based therapies. Recent studies in the field of stem cell biology have provided new perspectives and opportunities for the treatment of infertility disorders.

  17. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  18. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell

  20. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  1. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  2. High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Graft Versus Host Disease; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    The Fifth Annual Stem Cell Summit, held in New York, included topics covering new commercial developments in the research field of stem cell-based therapies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on embryonic and adult stem cells, stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of orthopedic and cardiovascular indications and inflammatory diseases, as well as technologies for processing and storing stem cells. Investigational therapies discussed include placental expanded (PLX) cells (Pluristem Therapeutics Inc), StemEx (Gamida-Teva Joint Venture/Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd) and remestemcel-L (Osiris Therapeutics Inc/Genzyme Corp/JCR Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd/ Mochida Pharmaceutical Co Ltd).

  4. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; He, Yanli; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Jinghui; Huang, Tao

    2007-07-01

    Although all normal tissue cells, including stem cells, are genetically homologous, variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to the occurrence of epigenetic modification. This is of special importance for the existence of tissue stem cells because they are exclusively immortal within the body, capable of self-replicating and differentiating by which tissues renew and repair itself and the total tissue cell population maintains a steady-state. Impairment of tissue stem cells is usually accompanied by a reduction in cell number, slows down the repair process and causes hypofunction. For instance, chemotherapy usually leads to depression of bone marrow and hair loss. Cellular aging is closely associated with the continuous erosion of the telomere while activation of telomerase repairs and maintains telomeres, thus slowing the aging process and prolonging cell life. In normal adults, telomerase activation mainly presents in tissue stem cells and progenitor cells giving them unlimited growth potential. Despite the extensive demonstration of telomerase activation in malignancy (> 80%), scientists found that heterogeneity also exists among the tumor cells and only minorities of cells, designated as cancer stem cells, undergo processes analogous to the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells while the rest have limited lifespans. In this study, telomerase activity was measured and compared in breast cancer stem cells and non-stem cells that were phenotypically sorted by examining surface marker expression. The results indicated that cancer stem cells show a higher level of enzyme activity than non-stem cells. In addition, associated with the repair of cancer tissue (or relapse) after chemotherapy, telomerase activity in stem cells was markedly increased.

  5. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants A A A What's in this article? ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  6. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  7. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  8. Oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical outcomes in a context of specialized oral care using low-level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; Lopes, Roberta Marques da Graça; Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Brumatti, Melina; Vince, Carolina Sgaroni Camargo; de Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini; Vogel, Cristina; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    OM is a painful inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, derived from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High OM severity is frequently present in HSCT pediatric patients, who exhibit multiple painful ulcers that limit their mastication and swallowing, leading to poor nutritional status. Few studies have demonstrated OM clinical outcomes in young patients undergoing HSCT. Feasibility of oral care and LLLT on OM prophylaxis and treatment is also poorly discussed. The aim of this study was to describe a specialized oral care protocol that included LLLT for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes after OM prevention and treatment. Data from OM-related morbidity were collected from 51 HSCT pediatric patients treated daily with LLLT, followed by standard oral care protocols. All the patients, even infants and young children, accepted the daily oral care and LLLT well. The majority (80.0%) only exhibited erythema in the oral mucosa, and the maximum OM degree was WHO II. Patients who had undergone autologous and HLA-haploidentical transplants showed OM with the lowest severity. The frequency of total body irradiation and methotrexate prescriptions was higher in adolescents when compared with infants (p = 0.044), and adolescents also exhibited OM more severely than infants and young children. We found that good clinical outcomes were obtained using this therapy, mainly in regard to the control of OM severity and pain reduction in the oral cavity. Specialized oral care, including LLLT, is feasible and affordable for HSCT pediatric patients, although some adaptation in the patient's oral hygiene routine must be adopted with help from parents/companions and clinical staff.

  9. Neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kennea, Nigel L; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2002-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to self-renew, and are capable of differentiating into neurones, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Such cells have been isolated from the developing brain and more recently from the adult central nervous system. This review aims to provide an overview of the current research in this evolving area. There is now increasing knowledge of the factors controlling the division and differentiation of NSCs during normal brain development. In addition, the cues for differentiation in vitro, and the possibility of transdifferentiation are reviewed. The discovery of these cells in the adult brain has encouraged research into their role during neurogenesis in the normal mature brain and after injury. Lastly other sources of neural precursors are discussed, and the potential for stem cells to be used in cell replacement therapy for brain injury or degenerative brain diseases with a particular emphasis on cerebral ischaemia and Parkinson's disease. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Stem cell colloquy: conclusion].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, Maurice

    2002-10-01

    The stem cell data presented and discussed during the symposium raise the hope that important medical progress can be made in several fields: neuro-degenerative diseases, those linked to cellular deficit, some aspects of aging linked to cellular degeneration, and the treatment of cancers that may harm normal tissues at risk of being infiltrated by malignant cells. Three main types of stem cells are available. (i) Those present in normal adult tissue: contrary to what was believed, some data suggest that certain adult stem cells have a great plasticity (they can differentiate into cells different from those in tissues from which they were taken) and can proliferate in vitro without losing their properties. Nevertheless, their use faces several obstacles: in ill or elderly subjects, then these cells can be limited in number or not multiply well in vitro. In this case, auto-grafting of the cells cannot be used. They must be sought in another subject, and allo-grafting causes difficult and sometimes insoluble problems of immunological tolerance. (ii) Embryonic stem cells from surplus human embryos, obtained by in vitro fertilisation, which the parents decide not to use: these cells have a great potential for proliferation and differentiation, but can also encounter problems of immunological intolerance. (iii) Cells obtained from cell nuclear transfer in oocytes: these cells are well tolerated, since they are genetically and immunologically identical to those of the host. All types of stem cells can be obtained with them. However, they do present problems. For obtaining them, female oocytes are needed, which could lead to their commercialization. Moreover, the first steps for obtaining these cells are identical to those used in reproductive cloning. It therefore appears that each type of cell raises difficult scientific and practical problems. More research is needed to overcome these obstacles and to determine which type of stem cell constitutes the best solution for

  11. Beclomethasone Dipropionate in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small

  12. Neural stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parati, E A; Pozzi, S; Ottolina, A; Onofrj, M; Bez, A; Pagano, S F

    2004-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells are present in the majority of mammalian tissues where they are a renewable source of specialized cells. According to the several biological portions from which multipotent stem cells can be derived, they are characterized as a) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from the pluripotent inner-cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyste-stage embryo; b) multipotent fetal stem cells (FSCs) from aborted fetuses; and c) adult stem cells (ASCs) localized in small zones of several organs known as "niche" where a subset of tissue cells and extracellular substrates can indefinitely house one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny production in vivo. ECSs have an high self-renewing capacity, plasticity and pluripotency over the years. Pluripotency is a property that makes a stem cell able to give rise to all cell type found in the embryo and adult animals.

  13. Immunologic Diagnostic Blood Test in Predicting Side-Effects in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-03-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neuroblastoma; Therapy-related Toxicity

  14. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-04

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age.

  15. Stem Cells and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent findings in stem cell biology have resulted in new opportunities for the treatment of reproductive disease. Endometrial regeneration can be driven by bone marrow derived stem cells. This finding has potential implications for the treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the etiology of endometriosis. The ovaries have been shown to contain stem cells that form oocytes in adults and can be cultured in vitro to develop mature oocytes. Stem cells from the fetus have been demonstrated to lead to microchimerism in the mother and implicated in several maternal diseases. Additionally the placenta may be another source of hematopoietic stem cell. Finally endometrial derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into non-reproductive tissues. While we are just beginning to understand stem cells and many key questions remain, the potential advantages of stem cells in reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:19208782

  16. Wnt and the cancer niche: paracrine interactions with gastrointestinal cancer cells undergoing asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E; Jaiswal, Kshama R; Garfield, Susan H; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy.

  17. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage II Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma

  18. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  19. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemotherapy Dose Adjustment for Obese Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Survey on Behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Labopin, Myriam; Moukhtari, Leila; Ciceri, Fabio; Esteve, Jordi; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Schmid, Christopher; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Appropriate chemotherapy dosing for obese patients with malignant diseases is a significant challenge because limiting chemotherapy doses in these patients may negatively influence outcome. There is a paucity of information addressing high-dose chemotherapy in obese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods. The Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) designed an electronic survey to assess current practice of dose adjustment of chemotherapy in obese patients undergoing HSCT. Results. A total of 56 EBMT centers from 27 countries responded to the online survey. Overall, 45 centers declared that they routinely adjust chemotherapy doses for obese patients (80.5%), and only 11 (19.5%) declared they do not adjust dose. Among the former group, most used body mass index as the parameter for defining obesity (28 centers, 62%). The method for determining the weight for chemotherapy calculation was actual body weight (ABW) in 16 centers, ideal body weight (IBW) in 10 centers, IBW plus 25% of the difference between IBW and ABW in 16 centers, and other methods for the rest. Among centers that used dose adjustment, 44% also capped the dose at 2 m2 for a chemotherapy dose based on body surface area (BSA), whereas 56% did not cap. Interestingly, most of the centers (9 of 11) that did not adjust dose for weight also did not cap the BSA at 2 m2. Conclusion. This EBMT survey revealed large diversity among transplant centers regarding dose-adjustment practice for high-dose conditioning chemotherapy. Our next step is to analyze outcomes of transplantation according to dose-adjustment practice and, subsequently, to formulate a methodology for future prospective studies. PMID:25480827

  1. Chemotherapy dose adjustment for obese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a survey on behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shem-Tov, Noga; Labopin, Myriam; Moukhtari, Leila; Ciceri, Fabio; Esteve, Jordi; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Schmid, Christopher; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate chemotherapy dosing for obese patients with malignant diseases is a significant challenge because limiting chemotherapy doses in these patients may negatively influence outcome. There is a paucity of information addressing high-dose chemotherapy in obese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) designed an electronic survey to assess current practice of dose adjustment of chemotherapy in obese patients undergoing HSCT. A total of 56 EBMT centers from 27 countries responded to the online survey. Overall, 45 centers declared that they routinely adjust chemotherapy doses for obese patients (80.5%), and only 11 (19.5%) declared they do not adjust dose. Among the former group, most used body mass index as the parameter for defining obesity (28 centers, 62%). The method for determining the weight for chemotherapy calculation was actual body weight (ABW) in 16 centers, ideal body weight (IBW) in 10 centers, IBW plus 25% of the difference between IBW and ABW in 16 centers, and other methods for the rest. Among centers that used dose adjustment, 44% also capped the dose at 2 m(2) for a chemotherapy dose based on body surface area (BSA), whereas 56% did not cap. Interestingly, most of the centers (9 of 11) that did not adjust dose for weight also did not cap the BSA at 2 m(2). This EBMT survey revealed large diversity among transplant centers regarding dose-adjustment practice for high-dose conditioning chemotherapy. Our next step is to analyze outcomes of transplantation according to dose-adjustment practice and, subsequently, to formulate a methodology for future prospective studies. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Characterization of Amniotic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Chika; Zhou, Kaixuan; Takeda, Yuji; Fathy, Moustafa; Okabe, Motonori; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The amnion membrane is developed from embryo-derived cells, and amniotic cells have been shown to exhibit multidifferentiation potential. These cells represent a desirable source for stem cells for a variety of reasons. However, to date very few molecular analyses of amnion-derived cells have been reported, and efficient markers for isolating the stem cells remain unclear. This paper assesses the characterization of amnion-derived cells as stem cells by examining stemness marker expressions for amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry revealed that amnion epithelial cells expressed CD133, CD 271, and TRA-1-60, whereas mecenchymal cells expressed CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. Immunohistochemistry showed that both cells expressed the stemness markers Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and SSEA4. Stemness genes' expression in amnion epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, fibroblast, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than bone marrow–derived MSCs. The sorted TRA1-60–positive cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than unsorted cells or TRA1-60–negative cells. TRA1-60 can be a marker for isolating amnion epithelial stem cells. PMID:25068631

  3. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  4. Materials as stem cell regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  5. Materials as stem cell regulators

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  6. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, and Antithymocyte Globulin in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant For Hematological Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Precancerous Condition; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Small Intestine Cancer

  9. On the stem cell origin of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-06-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer-field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change-the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth.

  10. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth. PMID:20431026

  11. Impact of FAB classification on predicting outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, not otherwise specified, patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1: An analysis of 1690 patients from the acute leukemia working party of EBMT.

    PubMed

    Canaani, Jonathan; Beohou, Eric; Labopin, Myriam; Socié, Gerard; Huynh, Anne; Volin, Liisa; Cornelissen, Jan; Milpied, Noel; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Deconinck, Eric; Fegueux, Nathalie; Blaise, Didier; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-04-01

    The French, American, and British (FAB) classification system for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is extensively used and is incorporated into the AML, not otherwise specified (NOS) category in the 2016 WHO edition of myeloid neoplasm classification. While recent data proposes that FAB classification does not provide additional prognostic information for patients for whom NPM1 status is available, it is unknown whether FAB still retains a current prognostic role in predicting outcome of AML patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Using the European Society of Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation registry we analyzed outcome of 1690 patients transplanted in CR1 to determine if FAB classification provides additional prognostic value. Multivariate analysis revealed that M6/M7 patients had decreased leukemia free survival (hazard ratio (HR) of 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.99; P = .046) in addition to increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.06-3.01; P = .028) compared with other FAB types. In the NPM1(wt) AML, NOS cohort, FAB M6/M7 was also associated with increased NRM (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.14-4.16; P = .019). Finally, in FLT3-ITD(+) patients, multivariate analyses revealed that specific FAB types were tightly associated with adverse outcome. In conclusion, FAB classification may predict outcome following transplantation in AML, NOS patients.

  12. Melanocytes, melanocyte stem cells, and melanoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Deborah; Mascarenhas, Joseph B; Shea, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    Melanocyte stem cells differ greatly from melanoma stem cells; the former provide pigmented cells during normal tissue homeostasis and repair, and the latter play an active role in a lethal form of cancer. These 2 cell types share several features and can be studied by similar methods. Aspects held in common by both melanocyte stem cells and melanoma stem cells include their expression of shared biochemical markers, a system of similar molecular signals necessary for their maintenance, and a requirement for an ideal niche microenvironment for providing these factors. This review provides a perspective of both these cell types and discusses potential models of stem cell growth and propagation. Recent findings provide a strong foundation for the development of new therapeutics directed at isolating and manipulating melanocyte stem cells for tissue engineering or at targeting and eradicating melanoma specifically, while sparing nontumor cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrating physiological regulation with stem cell and tissue homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Daisuke; Levi, Boaz P.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells are uniquely able to self-renew, to undergo multilineage differentiation, and to persist throughout life in a number of tissues. Stem cells are regulated by a combination of shared and tissue-specific mechanisms and are distinguished from restricted progenitors by differences in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that other aspects of cellular physiology, including mitosis, signal transduction, and metabolic regulation also differ between stem cells and their progeny. These differences may allow stem cells to be regulated independently of differentiated cells in response to circadian rhythms, changes in metabolism, diet, exercise, mating, aging, infection, and disease. This allows stem cells to sustain homeostasis or to remodel relevant tissues in response to physiological change. Stem cells are therefore not only regulated by short-range signals that maintain homeostasis within their tissue of origin, but also by long-range signals that integrate stem cell function with systemic physiology. PMID:21609826

  14. Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Convergent mechanisms in pluripotent stem cells and cancer: implications for stem cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Bridget M; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Li, Yan; Xie, Yubing

    2013-04-01

    Stem cells and cancer cells share certain characteristics, including the capacity to self-renew, differentiatie, and undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis retain similarities with processes in normal stem cell development. Comprehensive analysis and comparison of cancer cell and stem cell development will advance the study of cancer progression, enabling development of effective strategies for cancer treatment. In this review article, we first examine the convergence of outcome, cellular communication, and signaling pathways active in pluripotent stem cells and cancer cells. Next, we detail how stem cell engineering is able to mimic in vivo microenvironments. These efforts can help better identify stem cell-cancer cell interactions, elucidated dysregulated pluripotent signaling pathways occurring in cancer, revealed new factors that restrict tumorigenesis and metastasis potential, and reprogrammed cancer cells to a less aggressive phenotype. The potential of stem cell engineering to enhance cancer research is tremendous and may lead to alternative therapeutic options for aggressive cancers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. In vitro assessment of bone marrow endothelial colonies (CFU-En) in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Campioni, D; Punturieri, M; Moretti, S; Dabusti, M; Spanedda, R; Castoldi, G

    2003-12-01

    The distribution and functional characteristics of in vitro bone marrow (BM) endothelial colonies (CFU-En) were studied in 70 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients in different phases of the disease to explore the association between CFU-En growth and angiogenesis, and between the number of CFU-En and the presence of hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. The mean number of CFU-En/10(6) BM mononuclear cells seen in remission patients was significantly higher than that seen in newly diagnosed patients (P=0.04), and in normal subjects (P=0.008). Patients with low-grade NHL in remission displayed a higher CFU-En value compared with high-grade NHL (P=0.04). In the autograft group (40 patients), a significant reduction of CFU-En number was detected in the first 4-6 months after transplantation. In remission patients, the CFU-En number positively correlated with the incidence of BM colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (P=0.013) and CFU-multilineage (CFU-GEMM) hematopoietic colonies (P=0.044). These in vitro data show that CFU-En numbers increase following standard-dose chemotherapy, thus providing a rationale for further investigating the effects of different cytostatic drugs on BM endothelial cells growth and function.

  17. [Melanocyte stem cells in adults].

    PubMed

    Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Djian-Zaouche, Johanna; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Melanocyte stem cells have been recently localized in mice, in the outer root sheath of the lower permanent portion of the hair follicle. Specific depletion of melanocyte stem cell population is responsible for natural hair greying in aging mice and humans. Melanocyte stem cells also seem to drive the growth of malignant melanomas. A few mutations, either spontaneous or genetically engineered, accelerate the natural process of hair greying with age. These mutations allowed the identification of genes and signalling pathways controlling emergence, maintenance and/or differentiation of melanocyte stem cells. This review summarizes recent studies on the melanocyte stem cells and defines a few major unanswered questions in the field.

  18. Measuring the Aging Process in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Van Zant, Gary; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells persist in replenishing functional mature cells throughout life by self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are among the best-characterized and understood stem cells, and they are responsible for the life-long production of all lineages of blood cells. HSCs are a heterogeneous population containing lymphoid-biased, myeloid-biased and balanced subsets. HSCs undergo age-associated phenotypic and functional changes, and the composition of the HSC pool alters with aging. HSCs and their lineage-biased subfractions can be identified and analyzed by flow cytometry based on cell surface makers. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) enables the isolation and purification of HSCs that greatly facilitates the mechanistic study of HSCs and their aging process at both cellular and molecular levels. The mouse model has been extensively used in HSC aging study. Bone marrow cells are isolated from young and old mice and stained with fluorescence-conjugated antibodies specific for differentiated and stem cells. HSCs are selected based on the negative expression of lineage markers and positive selection for several sets of stem cell markers. Lineage-biased HSCs can be further distinguished by the level of SLAM/CD150 expression and the extent of Hoechst efflux. PMID:25388383

  19. De Novo Prediction of Stem Cell Identity using Single-Cell Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; Muraro, Mauro J; Boisset, Jean-Charles; Wiebrands, Kay; Lyubimova, Anna; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan; Jansen, Erik; Clevers, Hans; de Koning, Eelco J P; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2016-08-04

    Adult mitotic tissues like the intestine, skin, and blood undergo constant turnover throughout the life of an organism. Knowing the identity of the stem cell is crucial to understanding tissue homeostasis and its aberrations upon disease. Here we present a computational method for the derivation of a lineage tree from single-cell transcriptome data. By exploiting the tree topology and the transcriptome composition, we establish StemID, an algorithm for identifying stem cells among all detectable cell types within a population. We demonstrate that StemID recovers two known adult stem cell populations, Lgr5+ cells in the small intestine and hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. We apply StemID to predict candidate multipotent cell populations in the human pancreas, a tissue with largely uncharacterized turnover dynamics. We hope that StemID will accelerate the search for novel stem cells by providing concrete markers for biological follow-up and validation.

  20. Building Epithelial Tissues from Skin Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, E.; Nowak, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The skin epidermis and its appendages provide a protective barrier that guards against loss of fluids, physical trauma, and invasion by harmful microbes. To perform these functions while confronting the harsh environs of the outside world, our body surface undergoes constant rejuvenation through homeostasis. In addition, it must be primed to repair wounds in response to injury. The adult skin maintains epidermal homeostasis, hair regeneration, and wound repair through the use of its stem cells. What are the properties of skin stem cells, when do they become established during embryogenesis, and how are they able to build tissues with such remarkably distinct architectures? How do stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis and repair wounds and how do they regulate the delicate balance between proliferation and differentiation? What is the relationship between skin cancer and mutations that perturbs the regulation of stem cells? In the past 5 years, the field of skin stem cells has bloomed as we and others have been able to purify and dissect the molecular properties of these tiny reservoirs of goliath potential. We report here progress on these fronts, with emphasis on our laboratory’s contributions to the fascinating world of skin stem cells. PMID:19022769

  1. New perspectives in stem cell research: beyond embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leeb, C; Jurga, M; McGuckin, C; Forraz, N; Thallinger, C; Moriggl, R; Kenner, L

    2011-04-01

    Although stem cell research is a rather new field in modern medicine, media soon popularized it. The reason for this hype lies in the potential of stem cells to drastically increase quality of life through repairing aging and diseased organs. Nevertheless, the essence of stem cell research is to understand how tissues are maintained during adult life. In this article, we summarize the various types of stem cells and their differentiation potential in vivo and in vitro. We review current clinical applications of stem cells and highlight problems encountered when going from animal studies to clinical practice. Furthermore, we describe the current state of induced pluripotent stem cell technology and applications for disease modelling and cell replacement therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties.

  3. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  4. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment.

  5. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  6. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  7. Autophagy in stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Miren; Matheu, Ander

    2017-10-01

    Aging is responsible for changes in mammalian tissues that result in an imbalance to tissue homeostasis and a decline in the regeneration capacity of organs due to stem cell exhaustion. Autophagy is a constitutive pathway necessary to degrade damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is one of the hallmarks of aging, which involves a decline in the number and functionality of stem cells. Recent studies show that stem cells require autophagy to get rid of cellular waste produced during the quiescent stage. In particular, two independent studies in muscle and hematopoietic stem cells demonstrate the relevance of the autophagy impairment for stem cell exhaustion and aging. In this review, we summarize the main results of these works, which helped to elucidate the impact of autophagy in stem cell activity as well as in age-associated diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Michael G; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R; Moore, Kateri A

    2016-03-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. (Re)defining stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Stanley

    2006-03-01

    Stem-cell nomenclature is in a muddle! So-called stem cells may be self-renewing or emergent, oligopotent (uni- and multipotent) or pluri- and totipotent, cells with perpetual embryonic features or cells that have changed irreversibly. Ambiguity probably seeped into stem cells from common usage, flukes in biology's history beginning with Weismann's divide between germ and soma and Haeckel's biogenic law and ending with contemporary issues over the therapeutic efficacy of adult versus embryonic cells. Confusion centers on tissue dynamics, whether stem cells are properly members of emerging or steady-state populations. Clarity might yet be achieved by codifying differences between cells in emergent populations, including embryonic stem and embryonic germ (ES and EG) cells in tissue culture as opposed to self-renewing (SR) cells in steady-state populations.

  10. Randomized Clinical Trial of Therapeutic Music Video Intervention for Resilience Outcomes in Adolescents/Young Adults Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Sheri L.; Burns, Debra S.; Stegenga, Kristin A.; Haut, Paul R.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Meza, Jane; Stump, Timothy E.; Cherven, Brooke O.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L.; Kintner, Eileen K.; Haight, Ann E.; Wall, Donna A.; Haase, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background To reduce the risk of adjustment problems associated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) for adolescents/young adults (AYA), we examined efficacy of a therapeutic music video (TMV) intervention delivered during the acute phase of HSCT to: (a) increase protective factors of spiritual perspective, social integration, family environment, courageous coping, and hope-derived meaning; (b) decrease risk factors of illness-related distress and defensive coping; and (c) increase outcomes of self-transcendence and resilience. Methods A multi-site, randomized controlled trial (COG-ANUR0631) conducted at 8 Children’s Oncology Group sites involving 113 AYA aged 11–24 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Participants, randomized to the TMV or low-dose control (audiobooks) group, completed 6 sessions over 3 weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Variables were based on Haase’s Resilience in Illness Model. Participants completed measures related to latent variables of illness-related distress, social integration, spiritual perspective, family environment, coping, hope-derived meaning and resilience at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 100-days post-transplant (T3). Results At T2, the TMV group reported significantly better courageous coping (ES=0.505; P=0.030). At T3, the TMV group reported significantly better social integration (ES=0.543; P=.028) and family environment (ES=0.663; P=0.008), as well as moderate non-significant effect sizes for spiritual perspective (E=0.450; P=0.071) and self-transcendence (ES=0.424; P=0.088). Conclusion The TMV intervention improves positive health outcomes of courageous coping, social integration, and family environment during a high risk cancer treatment. We recommend the TMV be examined in a broader population of AYA with high risk cancers. PMID:24469862

  11. Pharmacokinetic and Maximum Tolerated Dose Study of Micafungin in Combination with Fluconazole versus Fluconazole Alone for Prophylaxis of Fungal Infections in Adult Patients Undergoing a Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hiemenz, J.; Cagnoni, P.; Simpson, D.; Devine, S.; Chao, N.; Keirns, J.; Lau, W.; Facklam, D.; Buell, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this dose escalation study, 74 adult cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation received fluconazole (400 mg/day) and either normal saline (control) (12 subjects) or micafungin (12.5 to 200 mg/day) (62 subjects) for up to 4 weeks. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of micafungin was not reached, based on the development of Southwest Oncology Group criteria for grade 3 toxicity; drug-related toxicities were rare. Commonly occurring adverse events considered related to micafungin were headache (6.8%), arthralgia (6.8%), hypophosphatemia (4.1%), insomnia (4.1%), maculopapular rash (4.1%), and rash (4.1%). Pharmacokinetic profiles for micafungin on days 1 and 7 were similar. The mean half-life was approximately 13 h, with little variance after repeated or increasing doses. Mean maximum concentrations of the drug in serum and areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h were approximately proportional to dose. There was no clinical or kinetic evidence of interaction between micafungin and fluconazole. Five of 12 patients (42%) in the control group and 14 of 62 (23%) in the micafungin-plus-fluconazole groups had a suspected fungal infection during treatment which resulted in empirical treatment with amphotericin B. The combination of micafungin and fluconazole was found to be safe in this high-risk patient population. The MTD of micafungin was not reached even at doses up to 200 mg/day for 4 weeks. The pharmacokinetic profile of micafungin in adult cancer patients with blood or marrow transplants is consistent with the profile in healthy volunteers, and the area under the curve is proportional to dose. PMID:15793107

  12. Pharmacokinetic and maximum tolerated dose study of micafungin in combination with fluconazole versus fluconazole alone for prophylaxis of fungal infections in adult patients undergoing a bone marrow or peripheral stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, J; Cagnoni, P; Simpson, D; Devine, S; Chao, N; Keirns, J; Lau, W; Facklam, D; Buell, D

    2005-04-01

    In this dose escalation study, 74 adult cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation received fluconazole (400 mg/day) and either normal saline (control) (12 subjects) or micafungin (12.5 to 200 mg/day) (62 subjects) for up to 4 weeks. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of micafungin was not reached, based on the development of Southwest Oncology Group criteria for grade 3 toxicity; drug-related toxicities were rare. Commonly occurring adverse events considered related to micafungin were headache (6.8%), arthralgia (6.8%), hypophosphatemia (4.1%), insomnia (4.1%), maculopapular rash (4.1%), and rash (4.1%). Pharmacokinetic profiles for micafungin on days 1 and 7 were similar. The mean half-life was approximately 13 h, with little variance after repeated or increasing doses. Mean maximum concentrations of the drug in serum and areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h were approximately proportional to dose. There was no clinical or kinetic evidence of interaction between micafungin and fluconazole. Five of 12 patients (42%) in the control group and 14 of 62 (23%) in the micafungin-plus-fluconazole groups had a suspected fungal infection during treatment which resulted in empirical treatment with amphotericin B. The combination of micafungin and fluconazole was found to be safe in this high-risk patient population. The MTD of micafungin was not reached even at doses up to 200 mg/day for 4 weeks. The pharmacokinetic profile of micafungin in adult cancer patients with blood or marrow transplants is consistent with the profile in healthy volunteers, and the area under the curve is proportional to dose.

  13. Clinical and virological factors associated with hepatitis B virus reactivation in HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc antibodies-positive patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or autologous stem cell transplantation for cancer.

    PubMed

    Borentain, P; Colson, P; Coso, D; Bories, E; Charbonnier, A; Stoppa, A M; Auran, T; Loundou, A; Motte, A; Ressiot, E; Norguet, E; Chabannon, C; Bouabdallah, R; Tamalet, C; Gérolami, R

    2010-11-01

    We studied clinical outcome and clinico-virological factors associated with hepatitis B virus reactivation (HBV-R) following cancer treatment in hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative/anti-hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBcAb)-positive patients. Between 11/2003 and 12/2005, HBV-R occurred in 7/84 HBsAg-negative/anti-HBcAb-positive patients treated for haematological or solid cancer. Virological factors including HBV genotype, core promoter, precore, and HBsAg genotypic and amino acid (aa) patterns were studied. Patients presenting with reactivation were men, had an hepatitis B virus surface antibody (HBsAb) titre <100 IU/L and underwent >1 line of chemotherapy (CT) significantly more frequently than controls. All were treated for haematological cancer, 3/7 received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and 4/7 received rituximab. Using multivariate analysis, receiving >1 line of CT was an independent risk factor for HBV-R. Fatal outcome occurred in 3/7 patients (despite lamivudine therapy in two), whereas 2/4 survivors had an HBsAg seroconversion. HBV-R involved non-A HBV genotypes and core promoter and/or precore HBV mutants in all cases. Mutations known to impair HBsAg antigenicity were detected in HBV DNA from all seven patients. HBV DNA could be retrospectively detected in two patients prior cancer treatment and despite HBsAg negativity. HBV-R is a concern in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBcAb-positive patients undergoing cancer therapy, especially in males presenting with haematological cancer, a low anti-HBsAb titre and more than one chemotherapeutic agent. HBV DNA testing is mandatory to improve diagnosis and management of HBV-R in these patients. The role of specific therapies such as rituximab or HSCT as well as of HBV aa variability deserves further studies. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E.; Jensen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function. PMID:24961797

  15. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  16. Stem cell tracking by nanotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Fiori, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan; Belicchi, Marzia

    2010-03-12

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT). This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking.

  17. Stem Cell Tracking by Nanotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Fiori, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan; Belicchi, Marzia

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT). This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking. PMID:20480000

  18. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Michael B; Sinclair, David A

    2016-01-01

    All multicellular organisms undergo a decline in tissue and organ function as they age. An attractive theory is that a loss in stem cell number and/or activity over time causes this decline. In accordance with this theory, aging phenotypes have been described for stem cells of multiple tissues, including those of the hematopoietic system, intestine, muscle, brain, skin and germline. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of why adult stem cells age and how this aging impacts diseases and lifespan. With this increased understanding, it is feasible to design and test interventions that delay stem cell aging and improve both health and lifespan. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Germ line, stem cells, and epigenetic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Surani, M A; Durcova-Hills, G; Hajkova, P; Hayashi, K; Tee, W W

    2008-01-01

    The germ cell lineage has the unique attribute of generating the totipotent state. Development of blastocysts from the totipotent zygote results in the establishment of pluripotent primitive ectoderm cells in the inner cell mass of blastocysts, which subsequently develop into epiblast cells in postimplantation embryos. The germ cell lineage in mice originates from these pluripotent epiblast cells of postimplantation embryos in response to specific signals. Pluripotent stem cells and unipotent germ cells share some fundamental properties despite significant phenotypic differences between them. Additionally, early primordial germ cells can be induced to undergo dedifferentiation into pluripotent embryonic germ cells. Investigations on the relationship between germ cells and pluripotent stem cells may further elucidate the nature of the pluripotent state. Furthermore, comprehensive epigenetic reprogramming of the genome in early germ cells, including extensive erasure of epigenetic modifications, is a critical step toward establishment of totipotency. The mechanisms involved may be relevant for gaining insight into events that lead to reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  1. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  2. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  3. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  4. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  5. Pluripotent Stem Cells: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the ability to undergo self-renewal and to give rise to all cells of the tissues of the body. However, this definition has been recently complicated by the existence of distinct cellular states that display these features. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the family of pluripotent cell lines derived from early mouse and human embryos and compare them with induced pluripotent stem cells. Shared and distinct features of these cells are reported as additional hallmark of pluripotency, offering a comprehensive scenario of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26798367

  6. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  7. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  8. Epidermal stem cells: an update.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M; Lo Celso, Cristina; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2006-10-01

    The mammalian epidermis is a highly accessible tissue in which to study the properties of adult stem cells. Global gene expression profiling has revealed new markers and regulators of the stem cell compartment. Although stem cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple lineages, their progeny follow a more restricted number of lineages in undamaged epidermis as a result of local microenvironmental cues. The response of the epidermis to a particular signal depends on signal strength and duration. Recent advances in the field have led to elucidation of the mechanisms by which stem cells are maintained and the pathways that interact with Wnt signalling to specify lineage choice as cells leave the stem cell compartment. This work has also yielded new insights into skin tumour development.

  9. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  10. Stem cells for spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer’s disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  11. [Stem cell therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2009-03-01

    Medicine will be faced with a major challenge in coming years, namely how to treat for tissue dysfunction due to disease and aging There are two basic options: drug therapy and cell therapy. Stem cells have been the subject of intense speculation and controversy for several years, as they open up radically new therapeutic possibilities. Classical drugs can only smoothen consequences of tissue dysfunction, whereas cell therapy has the potential to restore tissue function by providing fresh cells. Cell therapy is totally different from organ transplantation, which can only benefit a limited number of patients. The use of the generic term "stem cells" to designate a whole variety of cell types that are present throughout life, is a source of confusion and ambiguity. It will take years of cognitive research to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern a stem cell's multi- or totipotent status before we can fully exploit this therapeutic tool to the full. The younger a stem cell the greater its potential and, probably, the more durable its benefits, but the use of embryonic stem cells raises ethical issues. The redundancy or equivalence of diferent categories of cells is another source of controversy, yet researchers must be able to study stem cells in all their diversity, as complementary rather than competitive alternatives, in an acceptable ethical and regulatory environment. We briefly describe the three types of stem cells: pluripotent embryonic stem cells, fetal and adult stem cells, and pluripotent reprogrammed adult somatic cells. Only the former two categories have physiological functions: the first gives rise to tissues and organs while the second maintains tissue function during adulthood

  12. Stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Józkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2011-11-01

    Multiple populations of stem cells have been indicated to potentially participate in regeneration of injured organs. Especially, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and recently inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS) receive a marked attention from scientists and clinicians for regenerative medicine because of their high proliferative and differentiation capacities. Despite that ESC and iPS cells are expected to give rise into multiple regenerative applications when their side effects are overcame during appropriate preparation procedures, in fact their most recent application of human ESC may, however, reside in their use as a tool in drug development and disease modeling. This review focuses on the applications of stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology. We discuss possible relevance of pluripotent cell stem populations in developing physiological models for any human tissue cell type useful for pharmacological, metabolic and toxicity evaluation necessary in the earliest steps of drug development. The present models applied for preclinical drug testing consist of primary cells or immortalized cell lines that show limitations in terms of accessibility or relevance to their in vivo counterparts. The availability of renewable human cells with functional similarities to their in vivo counterparts is the first landmark for a new generation of cell-based assays. We discuss the approaches for using stem cells as valuable physiological targets of drug activity which may increase the strength of target validation and efficacy potentially resulting in introducing new safer remedies into clinical trials and the marketplace. Moreover, we discuss the possible applications of stem cells for elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The knowledge about the mechanisms governing the development and progression of multitude disorders which would come from the cellular models established based on stem cells, may give rise to new therapeutical strategies for such diseases. All

  13. The advantages of hair follicle pluripotent stem cells over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Multipotent adult stem cells have many potential therapeutic applications. Our recent findings suggest that hair follicles are a promising source of easily accessible multipotent stem cells. Stem cells in the hair follicle area express the neural stem cell marker nestin, suggesting that hair-follicle stem cells and neural stem cells have common features. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can form neurons and other cell types, and thus adult hair follicle stem cells could have important therapeutic applications, particularly for neurologic diseases. Transplanted hair follicle stem cells promote the functional recovery of injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Recent findings suggest that direct transplantation of hair-follicle stem cells without culture can promote nerve repair, which makes them potentially clinically practical. Human hair follicle stem cells as well as mouse hair follicle stem cells promote nerve repair and can be applied to test the hypothesis that human hair follicle stem cells can provide a readily available source of neurologically therapeutic stem cells. The use of hair follicle stem cells for nerve regeneration overcomes critical problems of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells in that the hair follicle stem cells are multipotent, readily accessible, non-oncogenic, and are not associated with ethical issues.

  14. Stem cell therapies: California dreamin'?

    PubMed

    Novak, Kris

    2010-01-08

    Ready or not, stem cells are a step closer to the clinic, thanks to approximately $230 million awarded by CIRM to 14 California-based research groups to develop stem cell-based therapies within 4 years. But, as Kris Novak reports, some of these projects are closer to therapeutic reality than others.

  15. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future.

  16. [Stem cell properties of therapeutic potential].

    PubMed

    Seo, Geom Seog

    2011-09-25

    Stem cell research is a innovative technology that focuses on using undifferentiated cells able to self-renew through the asymmetrical or symmetrical divisions. Three types of stem cells have been studied in laboratory including embryonic stem cell, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass and it can give rise to any fetal or adult cell type. Adult stem cells are multipotent, have the ability to differentiate into a limited number of specialized cell types, and have been obtained from the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, placenta and adipose tissue. Stem cell therapy is the most promising therapy for several degenerative and devastating diseases including digestive tract disease such as liver failure, inflammatory bowel disease, Celiac sprue, and pancreatitis. Further understanding of biological properties of stem cells will lead to safe and successful stem cell therapies. (Korean J Gastroenterol 2011;58: 125-132).

  17. Culture of rodent spermatogonial stem cells, male germline stem cells of the postnatal animal.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Brinster, Ralph L

    2008-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), postnatal male germline stem cells, are the foundation of spermatogenesis, during which an enormous number of spermatozoa is produced daily by the testis throughout life of the male. SSCs are unique among stem cells in the adult body because they are the only cells that undergo self-renewal and transmit genes to subsequent generations. In addition, SSCs provide an excellent and powerful model to study stem cell biology because of the availability of a functional assay that unequivocally identifies the stem cell. Development of an in vitro culture system that allows an unlimited supply of SSCs is a crucial technique to manipulate genes of the SSC to generate valuable transgenic animals, to study the self-renewal mechanism, and to develop new therapeutic strategies for infertility. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol for the culture of mouse and rat SSCs. A key factor for successful development of the SSC culture system was identification of in vitro growth factor requirements for the stem cell using a defined serum-free medium. Because transplantation assays using immunodeficient mice demonstrated that extrinsic factors for self-renewal of SSCs appear to be conserved among many mammalian species, culture techniques for SSCs of other species, including farm animals and humans, are likely to be developed in the coming 5-10 years.

  18. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  19. What's It Like to Donate Stem Cells?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Cancer What’s It Like to Donate Stem Cells? People usually volunteer to donate stem cells for ... autologous transplant. If you want to donate stem cells for someone else People who want to donate ...

  20. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R; Ammirati, Mario; Brennum, Jannick; Mendez, Ivar; Ammar, Ahmed S; Balak, Naci; Bolles, Gene; Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Mathiesen, Tiit; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-01-17

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical clinic in an ethically sound manner, we present an ethical discussion of these major issues at stake in the field of stem cell clinical research for neurologic disease. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. [Plasticity of tissue stem cells].

    PubMed

    Uher, Ferenc; Vas, Virág

    2002-05-05

    In the early stages of embryonic development, cells have the capability of dividing indefinitely and then differentiating into any type of cell in the body. Recent studies have revealed that much of this remarkable developmental potential of stem cells is retained by small populations of cells within most tissues in the adult. Intercellular signals that control the proliferation, differentiation and survival of tissue stem cells in their niches are being identified and include a diverse array of morphogens, cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules. Adult tissue stem cells, moreover, can also differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve stem cells into blood cells. Currently, we can only speculate about the mechanisms involved in such dramatic changes in cell fate. For example, the emergence of, say, hematopoietic stem cells from brain neurospheres could involve either transdifferentiation (brain-->blood) or dedifferentiation (brain-->pluripotent cells), or by the actions of rare, but residual pluripotent stem cells. This issue is central to understanding the molecular basis of commitment and lies at the heart of debates about plasticity and the reversibility of developmental restriction.

  2. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The medical use of low level laser (LLL) irradiation has been occurring for decades, primarily in the area of tissue healing and inflammatory conditions. Despite little mechanistic knowledge, the concept of a non-invasive, non-thermal intervention that has the potential to modulate regenerative processes is worthy of attention when searching for novel methods of augmenting stem cell-based therapies. Here we discuss the use of LLL irradiation as a "photoceutical" for enhancing production of stem cell growth/chemoattractant factors, stimulation of angiogenesis, and directly augmenting proliferation of stem cells. The combination of LLL together with allogeneic and autologous stem cells, as well as post-mobilization directing of stem cells will be discussed. PMID:20158898

  3. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  4. The association of cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms with sulfolane formation and the efficacy of a busulfan-based conditioning regimen in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uppugunduri, C R S; Rezgui, M A; Diaz, P H; Tyagi, A K; Rousseau, J; Daali, Y; Duval, M; Bittencourt, H; Krajinovic, M; Ansari, M

    2014-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) likely have a role in the oxidation of intermediate metabolites of busulfan (Bu). In vitro studies to investigate the involvement of these enzymes are cumbersome because of the volatile nature of the intermediate metabolite tetrahydrothiophene (THT) and the lack of sensitive quantitation methods. This study explored the association between the CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2B6 and FMO3 genotypes and sulfolane (Su, a water soluble metabolite of Bu) plasma levels in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The relationship between these genotypes and the effectiveness of myeloablative conditioning was also analyzed. Sixty-six children receiving an intravenous Bu-based myeloablative conditioning regimen were genotyped for common functional variant alleles in CYP2C9 (*2 and *3), CYP2C19 (*2 and *17), FMO3 (rs2266780, rs2266782 and rs1736557) and CYP2B6 (*5 and *9). The plasma levels of Bu and its metabolite Su were measured after the ninth Bu dose in a subset of 44 patients for whom plasma samples were available. The ratio of Bu to Su was considered the metabolic ratio (MR) and was compared across the genotype groups. Higher MRs were observed in CYP2C9*2 and *3 allele carriers (mean±s.d.: 7.8±3.6 in carriers vs 4.4±2.2 in non-carriers; P=0.003). An increased incidence of graft failure was observed among patients with an MR>5 compared with those with MR values <5 (20% vs 0%; P=0.02). In contrast, a significantly higher incidence of relapse and graft failure (evaluated as event-free survival) was observed in patients with malignant disease who carried CYP2B6 alleles with reduced function on both chromosomes compared with carriers of at least one normal allele (100% vs 40%; P=0.0001). These results suggest that CYP2C9 has a role in the oxidation reactions of THT and indicate that it may be possible to predict the efficacy of Bu-based myeloablative conditioning before HSCT on the

  5. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  6. Stem cell mechanics: Auxetic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The nuclei of naive mouse embryonic stem cells that are transitioning towards differentiation expand when the cells are stretched and contract when they are compressed. What drives this auxetic phenotype is, however, unclear.

  7. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    PubMed

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  8. Treatment response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-NaF PET/CT in multiple myeloma patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, J; Goldschmidt, H; Wagner, B; Haberkorn, U; Kopka, K; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined use of the radiotracers (18)F-FDG and (18)F-NaF in treatment response evaluation of a group of multiple myeloma (MM) patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) by means of static (whole-body) and dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT). Thirty-four patients with primary, previously untreated MM scheduled for treatment with HDT followed by ASCT were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent PET/CT scanning with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-NaF before and after therapy. Treatment response by means of PET/CT was assessed according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 1999 criteria. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modelling and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). An analysis was possible in 29 patients: three with clinical complete response (CR) and 26 with non-CR (13 patients near complete response-nCR, four patients very good partial response-VGPR, nine patients partial response-PR). After treatment, (18)F-FDG PET/CT was negative in 14/29 patients and positive in 15/29 patients, showing a sensitivity of 57.5 % and a specificity of 100 %. According to the EORTC 1999 criteria, (18)F-FDG PET/CT-based treatment response revealed CR in 14 patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT CR), PR in 11 patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT PR) and progressive disease in four patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT PD). In terms of (18)F-NaF PET/CT, 4/29 patients (13.8 %) had a negative baseline scan, thus failed to depict MM. Regarding the patients for which a direct lesion-to-lesion comparison was feasible, (18)F-NaF PET/CT depicted 56 of the 129 (18)F-FDG positive lesions (43 %). Follow-up (18)F-NaF PET/CT showed persistence of 81.5 % of the baseline (18)F-NaF positive MM lesions after treatment, despite the

  9. Keratinocyte stem cells: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine

    2002-10-01

    For many years it has been widely accepted that stem cells play a crucial role in adult tissue maintenance. The concept that the renewing tissues of the body contain a small subcompartment of self-maintaining stem cells, upon which the entire tissue is dependent, is also now accepted as applicable to all renewing tissues. Gene therapy and tissue engineering are driving considerable interest in the clinical application of such hierarchically organized cellular compartments. Recent initial observations have provided a tantalizing insight into the large pluripotency of these cells. Indeed, scientists are now beginning to talk about the possible totipotency of some adult tissue stem cells. Such work is currently phenomenologic, but analysis of data derived from genomics and proteomics, identifying the crucial control signals involved, will soon provide a further impetus to stem cell biology with far reaching applications. The epidermis with its relatively simple structure, ease of accessibility, and the ability to grow its cells in vitro is one obvious target tissue for testing stem cell manipulation theories. It is crucial, however, that the normal keratinocyte stem cell is thoroughly characterized prior to attempting to manipulate its pluripotency. This commentary assesses the data generated to date and critically discusses the conclusions that have been drawn. Our current level of understanding, or lack of understanding, of the keratinocyte stem cell is reviewed.

  10. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  12. Stem cell biology and cell transplantation therapy in the retina.

    PubMed

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from the inner cell mass of mammalian blastocyst stage embryos, have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body and to grow indefinitely while maintaining pluripotency. During development, cells undergo progressive and irreversible differentiation into specialized adult cell types. Remarkably, in spite of this restriction in potential, adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed and returned to the naive state of pluripotency found in the early embryo simply by forcing expression of a defined set of transcription factors. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are molecularly and functionally equivalent to ES cells and provide powerful in vitro models for development, disease, and drug screening, as well as material for cell replacement therapy. Since functional impairment results from cell loss in most central nervous system (CNS) diseases, recovery of lost cells is an important treatment strategy. Although adult neurogenesis occurs in restricted regions, the CNS has poor potential for regeneration to compensate for cell loss. Thus, cell transplantation into damaged or diseased CNS tissues is a promising approach to treating various neurodegenerative disorders. Transplantation of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from human ES cells can restore some visual function. Patient-specific iPS cells may lead to customized cell therapy. However, regeneration of retinal function will require a detailed understanding of eye development, visual system circuitry, and retinal degeneration pathology. Here, we review the current progress in retinal regeneration, focusing on the therapeutic potential of pluripotent stem cells.

  13. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  14. Bone repair and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  15. Stem cells for tooth engineering.

    PubMed

    Bluteau, G; Luder, H U; De Bari, C; Mitsiadis, T A

    2008-07-31

    Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  16. GPCRs in Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    DOZE, VAN A.; PEREZ, DIANNE M.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues of the body cannot only repair themselves, but also self-renew, a property mainly due to stem cells and the various mechanisms that regulate their behavior. Stem cell biology is a relatively new field. While advances are slowly being realized, stem cells possess huge potential to ameliorate disease and counteract the aging process, causing its speculation as the next panacea. Amidst public pressure to advance rapidly to clinical trials, there is a need to understand the biology of stem cells and to support basic research programs. Without a proper comprehension of how cells and tissues are maintained during the adult life span, clinical trials are bound to fail. This review will cover the basic biology of stem cells, the various types of stem cells, their potential function, and the advantages and disadvantages to their use in medicine. We will next cover the role of G-protein coupled receptors in the regulation of stem cells and their potential in future clinical applications. PMID:23415095

  17. Discovery of HAP Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingna; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Cells expressing the stem cell marker, nestin, were selectively labeled in transgenic mice by placing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the nestin promoter in transgenic mice. In these transgenic mice, neural and other stem cells brightly expressed GFP. The mice were termed nestin-driven GFP (ND-GFP) mice. During early anagen or growth phase of the hair follicle, ND-GFP appeared in the permanent upper hair follicle immediately below the sebaceous glands in the follicle bulge. The relatively small, oval-shaped, nestin-expressing cells in the bulge area surrounded the hair shaft and were interconnected by short dendrites. The location of the nestin-expressing cells in the hair follicle varied with the hair cycle. During telogen or resting phase and in early anagen, the GFP-positive cells are mainly in the bulge area. However, in mid- and late-anagen, the GFP-expressing cells were located in the upper outer-root sheath as well as in the bulge area. The expression of the unique protein, nestin, in both neural stem cells and hair follicle stem cells, which suggested their relationship. The ND-GFP hair follicle stem cells were later termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells.

  18. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  19. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  20. DNA repair mechanisms in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xuemei; Cui, Ke; Yi, Qiuxiang; Yu, Lili; Xu, Yang

    2017-02-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can undergo unlimited self-renewal and retain the pluripotency to differentiate into all cell types in the body. Therefore, as a renewable source of various functional cells in the human body, ESCs hold great promise for human cell therapy. During the rapid proliferation of ESCs in culture, DNA damage, such as DNA double-stranded breaks, will occur in ESCs. Therefore, to realize the potential of ESCs in human cell therapy, it is critical to understand the mechanisms how ESCs activate DNA damage response and DNA repair to maintain genomic stability, which is a prerequisite for their use in human therapy. In this context, it has been shown that ESCs harbor much fewer spontaneous mutations than somatic cells. Consistent with the finding that ESCs are genetically more stable than somatic cells, recent studies have indicated that ESCs can mount more robust DNA damage responses and DNA repair than somatic cells to ensure their genomic integrity.

  1. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: stem cell transplantation methods that enhance stemness.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2015-11-05

    Because of their ease of isolation and relative abundance, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a particularly attractive autologous cell source for various therapeutic purposes. ASCs retain a high proliferation capacity in vitro and have the ability to undergo extensive differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, ASCs secrete a wide range of growth factors that can stimulate tissue regeneration. Therefore, the clinical use of ASCs is feasible. However, the potential of ASCs differs depending on the donor's medical condition, including diseases such as diabetes. Recent studies demonstrated that ASCs from diabetic donors exhibit reduced proliferative potential and a smaller proportion of stem cell marker-positive cells. Therefore, to ensure the success of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering methods must be improved by the incorporation of factors that increase the proliferation and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells when autologous cells are used. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which contains high levels of diverse growth factors that can stimulate stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation in the context of tissue regeneration, has recently been identified as a biological material that could be applied to tissue regeneration. Thus, co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP represents a promising novel approach for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. In this review, we describe the potential benefits of adding PRP to ASCs and preclinical and clinical studies of this approach in various medical fields. We also discuss the mechanisms of PRP action and future cell-based therapies using co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP.

  2. Stem cells and combinatorial science.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yue Qin; Wong, Wan Qing; Yap, Yan Wen; Orner, Brendan P

    2007-09-01

    Stem cell-based technologies have the potential to help cure a number of cell degenerative diseases. Combinatorial and high throughput screening techniques could provide tools to control and manipulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review chronicles historic and recent progress in the stem cell field involving both pluripotent and multipotent cells, and it highlights relevant cellular signal transduction pathways. This review further describes screens using libraries of soluble, small-molecule ligands, and arrays of molecules immobilized onto surfaces while proposing future trends in similar studies. It is hoped that by reviewing both the stem cell and the relevant high throughput screening literature, this paper can act as a resource to the combinatorial science community.

  3. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  4. Dental stem cells and their sources.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, Christine M; Botero, Tatiana M

    2012-07-01

    The search for more accessible mesenchymal stem cells than those found in bone marrow has propelled interest in dental tissues. Human dental stem/progenitor cells (collectively termed dental stem cells [DSCs]) that have been isolated and characterized include dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. Common characteristics of these cell populations are the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. In vitro and animal studies have shown that DSCs can differentiate into osseous, odontogenic, adipose, endothelial, and neural-like tissues.

  5. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  6. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  7. Stem cells, dot-com.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim K

    2012-09-12

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of suspect goods and services has burgeoned because of the Internet. Despite very limited approval for use, DTC stem cell-marketed "treatments" have emerged for an array of conditions, creating global public health and safety risks. However, it remains unclear whether such use of stem cells is subject to drugs or biologics regulations. To address this gap, regulatory agencies should be given clear authority, and the international community should create a framework for appropriate stem cell use. In addition, consumer protection laws should be used to scrutinize providers.

  8. Stem cells: research tools and clinical treatments.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Michael C; Wallace, Euan M

    2011-09-01

    The term 'stem cell' most commonly refers to embryonic stem cells, particularly in the lay media; however, it also describes other cell types. A stem cell represents a cell of multi-lineage potential with the ability for self-renewal. It is now clear that the plasticity and immortality of a given stem cell will depend on what type of stem cell it is, whether an embryonic stem cell, a fetal-placental stem cell or an adult stem cell. Stem cells offer great promise as cell-based therapies for the future. With evolving technology, much of the socio-political debate regarding stem cells can now be avoided. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Advances in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez López, Silvia; Otero Hernández, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginning of stem cell biology, considerable effort has been focused in the translation of scientific insights into new therapies. Cell-based assays represent a new strategy for organ and tissue repair in several pathologies. Moreover, alternative treatment strategies are urgently needed due to donor organ shortage that costs many lives every year and results in lifelong immunosuppression. At the moment, only the use of hematopoietic stem cells is considered as the standard for the treatment of malignant and genetic bone marrow disorders, being all other stem cell applications highly experimental. The present chapter tries to summarize some ongoing approaches of stem cell regenerative medicine and also introduces recent findings from published studies and trials conducted in various tissues such as skeletal muscle, liver and lung.

  10. Super pharmacological levels of calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2D3) inhibits mineral deposition and decreases cell proliferation in a strain dependent manner in chicken mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Chousalkar, Kapil C; Bhanugopan, Marie S; Quinn, Jane C

    2015-11-01

    The biologically active form of vitamin D₃, calcitriol (1,25-(OH)₂D₃), plays a key role in mineral homeostasis and bone formation and dietary vitamin D₃deficiency is a major cause of bone disorders in poultry. Supplementary dietary cholecalciferol (25-hydroxyvitamin D, 25-OH), the precursor of calcitriol, is commonly employed to combat this problem; however, dosage must be carefully determined as excess dietary vitamin D can cause toxicity resulting in a decrease in bone calcification, hypercalcinemia and renal failure. Despite much research on the therapeutic administration of dietary vitamin D in humans, the relative sensitivity of avian species to exogenous vitamin D has not been well defined. In order to determine the effects of exogenous 1,25-(OH)₂D₃during avian osteogenesis, chicken bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were exposed to varying doses of 1,25-(OH)₂D₃during in vitro osteogenic differentiation and examined for markers of early proliferation and osteogenic induction. Similar to humans and other mammals, poultry BM-MSCs were found to be highly sensitive to exogenous 1,25-(OH)₂D₃with super pharmacological levels exerting significant inhibition of mineralization and loss of cell proliferation in vitro. Strain related differences were apparent, with BM-MCSs derived from layers strains showing a higher level of sensitivity to 1,25-(OH)₂D₃than those from broilers. These data suggest that understanding species and strain specific sensitivities to 1,25-(OH)₂D₃is important for optimizing bone health in the poultry industry and that use of avian BM-MSCs are a useful tool for examining underlying effects of genetic variation in poultry.

  11. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neural stem cells or neurons for neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Lu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neurons or neural stem cells is one of the most important frontier fields in current neuroscience research. Without undergoing the pluripotency stage, induced neurons or induced neural stem cells are a safer and timelier manner resource in comparison to those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. In this prospective, we review the recent advances in generation of induced neurons and induced neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo and their potential treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:26981072

  12. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  13. Stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun

    2007-06-01

    The aim of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease is to reconstruct nigro-striatal neuronal pathways using endogenous neural stem/precursor cells or grafted dopaminergic neurons. As an alternative, transplantation of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons into the striatum has been attempted, with the aim of stimulating local synapse formation and/or release of dopamine and cytokines from grafted cells. Candidate stem cells include neural stem/precursor cells, embryonic stem cells and other stem/precursor cells. Among these, embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that proliferate extensively, making them a good potential donor source for transplantation. However, tumor formation and ethical issues present major problems for embryonic stem cell therapy. This review describes the current status of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease, as well as future research approaches from a clinical perspective.

  14. Live imaging of the Drosophila spermatogonial stem cell niche reveals novel mechanisms regulating germline stem cell output.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X Rebecca; Matunis, Erika

    2011-08-01

    Adult stem cells modulate their output by varying between symmetric and asymmetric divisions, but have rarely been observed in living intact tissues. Germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila testis are anchored to somatic hub cells and were thought to exclusively undergo oriented asymmetric divisions, producing one stem cell that remains hub-anchored and one daughter cell displaced out of the stem cell-maintaining micro-environment (niche). We developed extended live imaging of the Drosophila testis niche, allowing us to track individual germline cells. Surprisingly, new wild-type GSCs are generated in the niche during steady-state tissue maintenance by a previously undetected event we term 'symmetric renewal', where interconnected GSC-daughter cell pairs swivel such that both cells contact the hub. We also captured GSCs undergoing direct differentiation by detaching from the hub. Following starvation-induced GSC loss, GSC numbers are restored by symmetric renewals. Furthermore, upon more severe (genetically induced) GSC loss, both symmetric renewal and de-differentiation (where interconnected spermatogonia fragment into pairs while moving towards then establishing contact with the hub) occur simultaneously to replenish the GSC pool. Thus, stereotypically oriented stem cell divisions are not always correlated with an asymmetric outcome in cell fate, and changes in stem cell output are governed by altered signals in response to tissue requirements.

  15. Cancer stem cells in surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’ANDREA, V.; GUARINO, S.; DI MATTEO, F.M.; SACCÀ, M. MAUGERI; DE MARIA, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) hypothesis is based on three fundamental ideas: 1) the similarities in the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal of normal stem cells and cancer cells; 2) the possibility that tumour cells might arise from normal stem cells; 3) the notion that tumours might contain ‘cancer stem cells’ - rare cells with indefinite proliferative potential that drive the formation and growth of tumours. The roles for cancer stem cells have been demonstrated for some cancers, such as cancers of the hematopoietic system, breast, brain, prostate, pancreas and liver. The attractive idea about cancer stem cell hypothesis is that it could partially explain the concept of minimal residual disease. After surgical macroscopically zero residual (R0) resections, even the persistence of one single cell nestling in one of the so called “CSCs niches” could give rise to distant relapse. Furthermore the metastatic cells can remain in a “dormant status” and give rise to disease after long period of apparent disease free. These cells in many cases have acquired resistance traits to chemo and radiotherapy making adjuvant treatment vain. Clarifying the role of the cancer stem cells and their implications in the oncogenesis will play an important role in the management of cancer patient by identifying new prospective for drugs and specific markers to prevent and monitoring relapse and metastasis. The identification of the niche where the CSCs reside in a dormant status might represent a valid instrument to follow-up patients also after having obtained a R0 surgical resection. What we believe is that if new diagnostic instruments were developed specifically to identify the localization and status of activity of the CSCs during tumor dormancy, this would lead to impressive improvement in the early detection and management of relapse and metastasis. PMID:25644725

  16. [Management of graft failure and erythroblastopenia in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    PubMed

    Cornillon, Jérôme; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Chantepie, Sylvain; Coiteux, Valérie; Gauthier, Jordan; Masouridi-Levrat, Stavroula; Pochon, Cécile; Terriou, Louis; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Dalle, Jean-Hugues

    2016-11-01

    Success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation requires both the underlying disease eradication and satisfying reconstitution of hematopoiesis from donor cells. However, reconstitution delays, secondary development or persistence of cytopenia are regularly observed and are potential causes of failure after allogeneic transplantation. These graft dysfunctions should be distinguished from non-engraftment/engraftment failure. Although these situations are relatively common, there is no consensus in the literature for their management. During the workshop of the SFGM-TC, the working group proposed recommendations from an analysis of the literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  18. Framework bolsters stem cell progress.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2004-08-10

    With many of the leading science nations still stuck in debates on the use of embryonic stem cells, Britain, with a regulatory framework in place, is well-positioned to take the lead. Michael Gross reports.

  19. [Progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Zhu, He; Hao, Jie; Zhou, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all types of cells in the body and therefore have great application potential in regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. In recent years, stem cell technology has made great progress, and induced pluripotent stem cell technology revolutionizes the whole stem cell field. At the same time, stem cell research in our country has also achieved great progress and becomes an indispensable power in the worldwide stem cell research field. This review mainly focuses on the research progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine in our country since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, including induced pluripotent stem cells, transdifferentiation, haploid stem cells, and new gene editing tools.

  20. Stem cells, tissue engineering and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the clinical utility of stem cells in periodontal regeneration by reviewing relevant literature that assesses the periodontal-regenerative potential of stem cells. We consider and describe the main stem cell populations that have been utilized with regard to periodontal regeneration, including bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the main dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations: periodontal ligament stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle precursor cells. Research into the use of stem cells for tissue regeneration has the potential to significantly influence periodontal treatment strategies in the future.

  1. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Pedro M.

    2017-01-01

    Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs), which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions. PMID:28473858

  2. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Pedro M; Caicedo, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs), which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  3. Tracking stem cells in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chemaly, Elie R; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Frangioni, John V; Hajjar, Roger J

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells are a promising approach to cardiovascular therapeutics. Animal experiments have assessed the fate of injected stem cells through ex vivo methods on sacrificed animals. Approaches are needed for in vivo tracking of stem cells. Various imaging techniques and contrast agents for stem cell tracking will be reviewed.

  4. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  5. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression. PMID:23510696

  6. Pre-transplantation novel agent induction predicts progression-free survival for patients with immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis undergoing high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Klippel, Zandra K; Stevenson, Philip A; Hyun, Teresa S; Tuazon, Sherilyn; Becker, Pamela S; Green, Damian J; Holmberg, Leona A; Coffey, David G; Gopal, Ajay K; Libby, Edward N

    2016-12-01

    High-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM/SCT) is an effective treatment modality for immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis; however, its application remains restricted to patients with good performance status and limited organ involvement. In recent years, the paradigm for AL amyloidosis has changed with the introduction of novel agents such as immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors (PIs). We hypothesized that use of novel agent induction regimens has improved outcomes for patients with AL amyloidosis undergoing HDM/SCT at our center. All patients with AL amyloidosis, age ≥18 years who underwent HDM/SCT between 2001 and 2014 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington Medical Center were included in this study. Any regimen administered within 6 months prior to HDM/SCT including an IMiD or a PI was considered a novel induction regimen. Use of induction regimen was evaluated in a Cox proportional hazard model for association with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Forty-five patients with AL amyloidosis underwent HDM/SCT. The median age was 57.2 years (range 39-74.4), 15 (33.3%) were women. The median number of organs involved was 2 (range 1-5), with 20 patients having only 1 (44.4%), 10 patients having 2 (22.2%), and 15 patients (33.3%) having ≥ 3 organs involved. Novel agent induction regimens were used prior to HDM/SCT in 21 patients (46.7%); these comprised PI in 13/21 (57.1%), IMiD alone in 6/21 (28.6%), PI and cyclophosphamide (CyBorD) in 3/21 (14.3%), and IMiD and PI in 3/21 (14.3%). Use of a novel agent induction regimen was associated with improved, but not OS. The 3-year PFS for patients who received a novel agent induction was 79%, while for those who did not was 53% (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.317, p = 0.048). The 3-year OS for patients who received novel agent induction regimens was 95%, while for those who did not was 71% (HR = 0

  7. Stem cell potential of the mammalian gonad

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Feng; Barsoum, Ivraym; Gupta, Rupesh; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Yao, Humphrey Hung-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential for therapeutic application because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into different cell types. Gonads, which consist of somatic cells and germ cells, are the only organs capable of transmitting genetic materials to the offspring. Germ-line stem cells and somatic stem cells have been found in the testis; however, the presence of stem cells in the ovary remains controversial. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on whether stem cell properties are present in the different cell types of male and female gonads and their implications on stem cell research. PMID:19482665

  8. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  9. Stem Cells and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Fernanda M.P.; Santos, Anderson K.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Gomes, Katia N.; Ladeira, Luiz O.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in stem cell research is linked to the promise of developing treatments for many lifethreatening, debilitating diseases, and for cell replacement therapies. However, performing these therapeutic innovations with safety will only be possible when an accurate knowledge about the molecular signals that promote the desired cell fate is reached. Among these signals are transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Acting as an intracellular messenger, Ca2+ has a key role in cell signaling pathways in various differentiation stages of stem cells. The aim of this chapter is to present a broad overview of various moments in which Ca2+-mediated signaling is essential for the maintenance of stem cells and for promoting their development and differentiation, also focusing on their therapeutic potential. PMID:22453975

  10. Stem cell applications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) expects that the number of diabetic patients will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Patients with diabetes experience decreased insulin secretion that is linked to a significant reduction in the number of islet cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology that, in addition to β cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β cell de-differentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggests that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β cells. These observations are proof of the concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. An increasing body of evidence indicates that, in addition to embryonic stem cells, several potential adult stem/progenitor cells derived from the pancreas, liver, spleen, and bone marrow could differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro or in vivo. However, significant controversy currently exists in this field. Pharmacological approaches aimed at stimulating the in vivo/ex vivo regeneration of β cells have been proposed as a way of augmenting islet cell mass. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. A new technology, known as protein transduction, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of β cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  11. New Insights into Thyroid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells exhibit an extraordinary ability for self-renewal. They also give rise to many specialized cells. The potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery has been well documented. Although advances in stem cell science have raised broad ethical concerns, it is clear that stem cell technology has revolutionized our thinking in modern biology and medicine and provided the basis for understanding many of the mechanisms controlling basic biological processes and disease mechanisms. This review details the nascent field of thyroid stem cell research, exploring the current status of thyroid stem cell differentiation from the perspectives of both developmental biology and cell replacement therapy. It highlights successes to date in the generation of thyroid follicular cells from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory and the identification and characterization of adult stem cells from human thyroid glands and thyroid cancers. Finally, it outlines future challenges with a focus on potential stem cell therapy for thyroid patients. PMID:17727339

  12. Autophagy in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC. PMID:22110659

  13. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  14. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  15. Stem Cells in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hansraj, Kenneth K

    2016-10-26

    Spine surgeons are embracing advanced biologic technologies in an attempt to help millions of people achieve a better outcome in spine surgery. These new technologies may be complicated to understand, partly because the contribution of different types of cells has not been definitively identified. This paper describes the characteristics of the stem cells used in spine surgery, including their actions and possible complications. The description necessitates an overview of all studies to date on the use of stem cells in spine surgery, as well as other cells used in cellular therapy. The paper summarizes the results of major studies to date on the use of stem cells in spine surgery. Cells were harvested from the posterior superior iliac spine, vertebral bodies in surgery, fat tissue, or from the posterior spine of cadavers. This paper reports on three studies involving 37 patients treated with stem cells for regenerative spine surgery, 14 studies involving 533 patients treated with stem cells in spinal fusion surgery, and one study in which stem cells were used for the treatment of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Indications, techniques, and calibration of results were different in each study. Results are available for cellular augmentation of demineralized bone sponges, OsteoSponge® (Bacterin, Belgrade, Montana) and concentrated bone marrow (Terumo BCT®, Lakewood, CO); cancellous allograft bone and BMA; mineralized collagen and BMA; Osteocel® Plus (OC+) (Nuvasive®, San Diego, California); b-Tricalcium phosphate (b-TCP) (SYNTHES® Dento, West Chester, Pennsylvania; a silicate-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and HEALOS® graft carrier (DePuy Synthes, West Chester, Pennsylvania) with bone marrow aspirate. Stem cell augmentation of spinal fusion surgery is equivalent to the gold standard for iliac crest bone graft in posterolateral fusion models. There is evidence of safety and feasibility in the injectable treatment

  16. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells.

  17. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  18. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  19. Stem cells in pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranali; Mital, Seema

    2013-10-01

    The ability to reprogram virtually any cell of human origin to behave like embryonic or pluripotent stem cells is a major breakthrough in stem cell biology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provide a unique opportunity to study "disease in a dish" within a defined genetic and environmental background. Patient-derived iPSCs have been successfully used to model cardiomyopathies, rhythm disorders and vascular disorders. They also provide an exciting opportunity for drug discovery and drug repurposing for disorders with a known molecular basis including childhood onset heart disease, particularly cardiac genetic disorders. The review will discuss their use in drug discovery, efficacy and toxicity studies with emphasis on challenges in pediatric-focused drug discovery. Issues that will need to be addressed in the coming years include development of maturation protocols for iPSC-derived cardiac lineages, use of iPSCs to study not just cardiac but extra-cardiac phenotypes in the same patient, scaling up of stem cell platforms for high-throughput drug screens, translating drug testing results to clinical applications in the paradigm of personalized medicine, and improving both the efficiency and the safety of iPSC-derived lineages for future stem cell therapies.

  20. Embryonic stem cell lines of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2002-06-26

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines have opened great potential and expectation for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Monkey and human ES cell lines, which are very similar to each other, have been established from monkey blastocysts and surplus human blastocysts from fertility clinics. Nonhuman primate ES cell lines provide important research tools for basic and applicative research. Firstly, they provide wider aspects of investigation of the regulative mechanisms of stem cells and cell differentiation among primate species. Secondly, their usage does not need clearance or permission from the regulative rules in many countries that are associated with the ethical aspects of human ES cells, although human and nonhuman embryos and fetuses are very similar to each other. Lastly and most importantly, they are indispensable for animal models of cell therapy to test effectiveness, safety, and immunological reaction of the allogenic transplantation in a setting similar to the treatment of human diseases. So far, ES cell lines have been established from rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), using blastocysts produced naturally or by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These cell lines seem to have very similar characteristics. They express alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 and, in most cases, SSEA-3. Their pluripotency was confirmed by the formation of embryoid bodies and differentiation into various cell types in culture and also by the formation of teratomas that contained many types of differentiated tissues including derivatives of three germ layers after transplantation into the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The noneffectiveness of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signal makes culture of primate and human ES cell lines prone to undergo spontaneous differentiation and thus it is

  1. Pluripotent stem cells for Schwann cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitulating the various stages of in vivo neural crest formation and SC differentiation. In this review, we survey the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo processes. We then focus on the current in vitro strategies for generating SCs from two sources of pluripotent stem cells, namely embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Different methods for SC engineering from ESCs and iPSCs are reviewed and suggestions are proposed for optimizing the existing protocols. Potential safety issues regarding the clinical application of iPSC-derived SCs are discussed as well. Lastly, we will address future aspects of SC engineering.

  2. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... a fluid-filled cavity (the blastocoel ), and a cluster of cells on the interior (the inner cell ... the female body. Inner cell mass (ICM) —The cluster of cells inside the blastocyst . These cells give ...

  3. [Therapeutic use of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-15

    Stem cells display important capacities of self renewing, proliferation and differentiation. Because those present in the embryo have the more remarkable properties, their potential use in the therapy of until now incurable degenerative diseases have been envisioned. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are located in the inner mass of the balstocyst at early stages of the development. Even in long-term cultures they still retain their undifferentiated features. Under specific culture conditions, ES cells can be committed into a variety of differentiation pathways, giving rise to large amounts of cells corresponding to different tissues (neurones, cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, etc.). However, producing these tissues from already established ES cell lines would lead to immune rejection when transplanted to patients. To prevent this pitfall and using the expertise accumulated by animal cloning by nucleus transfer, it has been proposed to adapt this technique to human ES cells. The therapeutic cloning consists in transferring the nucleus of somatic stem cells isolated from the patient into an enucleated oocyte, to allow blastocyst development from which ES cells will be derived. From these stem cells, compatible tissues will be then produced. The problem is that it is in theoretically possible to reimplant the cloned blastocyst into a surrogate mother for obtaining a baby genetically identical to the donor. This is called reproductive cloning. This worrying risk raises important ethic and legal questions.

  4. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  5. Cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Hannah K; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Heymann, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and in some cases metastasis. Recent published work demonstrates evidence of cancer stem cell phenotypes in osteosarcoma with links to drug resistance and tumorigenesis. In this review we will discuss the commonly used isolation techniques for cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma as well as the identified biochemical and molecular markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal stem cell injury and protection during cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy remain the most effective and widely used cancer treatments. These treatments cause DNA damage and selectively target rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells, as well as inevitably cause damage to normal tissues, particularly those undergoing rapid self renewal. The side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapy are most pronounced in the hematopoietic (HP) system and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These tissues are fast renewing and have a well-defined stem cell compartment that plays an essential role in homeostasis, and in treatment-induced acute injury that is dose limiting. Using recently defined intestinal stem cell markers and mouse models, a great deal of insight has been gained in the biology of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), which will undoubtedly help further mechanistic understanding of their injury. This review will cover historic discoveries and recent advances in the identification and characterization of intestinal stem cells, their responses to genotoxic stress, and a new crypt and intestinal stem cell culture system. The discussion will include key pathways regulating intestinal crypt and stem cell injury and regeneration caused by cancer treatments, and strategies for their protection. The focus will be on the acute phase of cell killing in mouse radiation models, where our understanding of the mechanisms in relation to intestinal stem cells is most advanced and interventions appear most effective. PMID:24683536

  7. Regulation of apoptosis pathways in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-09-10

    Cancer stem cell are considered to represent a population within the bulk tumor that share many similarities to normal stem cells as far as their capacities to self-renew, differentiate, proliferate and to reconstitute the entire tumor upon serial transplantation are concerned. Since cancer stem cells have been shown to be critical for maintaining tumor growth and have been implicated in treatment resistance and tumor progression, they constitute relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, it has been postulated that eradication of cancer stem cells will be pivotal in order to achieve long-term relapse-free survival. However, one of the hallmarks of cancer stem cells is their high resistance to undergo cell death including apoptosis in response to environmental cues or cytotoxic stimuli. Since activation of apoptosis programs in tumor cells underlies the antitumor activity of most currently used cancer therapeutics, it will be critical to develop strategies to overcome the intrinsic resistance to apoptosis of cancer stem cells. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of cancer stem cells to evade apoptosis will likely open new avenues to target this critical pool of cells within the tumor in order to develop more efficient treatment options for patients suffering from cancer.

  8. Impact of the intensity of the pretransplantation conditioning regimen in patients with prior invasive aspergillosis undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective survey of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Rodrigo; Parody, Rocio; Fukuda, Takahiro; Maertens, Johan; Theunissen, Koen; Ho, Aloysius; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kroger, Nicolaus; Zander, Arnold R.; Heim, Dominik; Paluszewska, Monika; Selleslag, Dominik; Steinerova, Katerina; Ljungman, Per; Cesaro, Simone; Nihtinen, Anna; Cordonnier, Catherine; Vazquez, Lourdes; López-Duarte, Monica; Lopez, Javier; Cabrera, Rafael; Rovira, Montserrat; Neuburger, Stefan; Cornely, Oliver; Hunter, Ann E.; Marr, Kieren A.; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Einsele, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we analyzed the outcomes of 129 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and had a history of probable or proven invasive aspergillosis (IA), of whom 57 (44%) received a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Overall, 27 patients with IA progressed after the allo-HSCT (cumulative incidence [CumInc] at 2 years, 22%). The variables that increased the 2-year CumInc of IA progression were (1) longer duration of neutropenia after transplantation; (2) advanced status of the underlying disease; and (3) less than 6 weeks from start of systemic anti-Aspergillus therapy and the allo-HSCT. In addition, (4) conventional myeloablative conditioning increased the risk of progression early after transplantation (before day 30) only, while 3 variables increased the risk beyond day 30 were (5) cytomegalovirus disease; (6) bone marrow or cord blood as source of stem cells; and (7) grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). A risk model for progression was generated, defined as low (0-1 risk factors, 6% incidence), intermediate (2-3 risk factors, 27% incidence), or high risk (≥ 3 risk factors, 72% incidence [P < .001]). These findings may help in the interpretation and design of future studies on secondary prophylaxis of IA after an allo-HSCT. PMID:16720833

  9. Impact of the intensity of the pretransplantation conditioning regimen in patients with prior invasive aspergillosis undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective survey of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martino, Rodrigo; Parody, Rocio; Fukuda, Takahiro; Maertens, Johan; Theunissen, Koen; Ho, Aloysius; Mufti, Ghulam J; Kroger, Nicolaus; Zander, Arnold R; Heim, Dominik; Paluszewska, Monika; Selleslag, Dominik; Steinerova, Katerina; Ljungman, Per; Cesaro, Simone; Nihtinen, Anna; Cordonnier, Catherine; Vazquez, Lourdes; López-Duarte, Monica; Lopez, Javier; Cabrera, Rafael; Rovira, Montserrat; Neuburger, Stefan; Cornely, Oliver; Hunter, Ann E; Marr, Kieren A; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Einsele, Hermann

    2006-11-01

    In this retrospective study, we analyzed the outcomes of 129 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and had a history of probable or proven invasive aspergillosis (IA), of whom 57 (44%) received a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Overall, 27 patients with IA progressed after the allo-HSCT (cumulative incidence [CumInc] at 2 years, 22%). The variables that increased the 2-year CumInc of IA progression were (1) longer duration of neutropenia after transplantation; (2) advanced status of the underlying disease; and (3) less than 6 weeks from start of systemic anti-Aspergillus therapy and the allo-HSCT. In addition, (4) conventional myeloablative conditioning increased the risk of progression early after transplantation (before day 30) only, while 3 variables increased the risk beyond day 30 were (5) cytomegalovirus disease; (6) bone marrow or cord blood as source of stem cells; and (7) grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). A risk model for progression was generated, defined as low (0-1 risk factors, 6% incidence), intermediate (2-3 risk factors, 27% incidence), or high risk (> or = 3 risk factors, 72% incidence [P < .001]). These findings may help in the interpretation and design of future studies on secondary prophylaxis of IA after an allo-HSCT.

  10. Reconstructing the stem cell debate.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Bradley J

    2002-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have been a major topic in science, medicine, and religion since their discovery in 1998. However, due to the complex discourse and rhetoric of scientific language, debate has remained within the professional realm via "expert bioethics." Using the tenets of pragmatism, the author examines the need to move the debate to society as a whole and disentangle the stem cell debate from the ideologies of the human cloning and abortion debates. Opening this issue to a societal debate will advance societal growth, resulting in informed decisions on moral issues, funding, or regulation associated with hES cell research.

  11. Stem cells' exodus: a journey to immortality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-28

    Stem cell niches provide a regulatory microenvironment that retains stem cells and promotes self-renewal. Recently in Developmental Cell, Rinkevich et al. (2013) showed that cell islands (CIs) of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial chordate, provide niches for maintaining cycling stem cells that migrate from degenerated CIs to newly formed buds.

  12. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  13. Targeting Ovarian Carcinoma Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    expertise with expertise in gynecologic oncology /ovarian carcinoma and in animal models of cancer this proposal will: 1) Identify, isolate, and...more numerous differentiated progeny characterizing the malignancy . Although the clinical significance of these cancer stem cells (CSC) has been...the dramatic initial response rates in ovarian carcinoma represent therapeutic effectiveness against the differentiated cancer cells making up the

  14. Stem-cell ecology and stem cells in motion

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, David T.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights major scientific developments over the past 50 years or so in concepts related to stem-cell ecology and to stem cells in motion. Many thorough and eloquent reviews have been presented in the last 5 years updating progress in these issues. Some paradigms have been challenged, others validated, or new ones brought to light. In the present review, we will confine our remarks to the historical development of progress. In doing so, we will refrain from a detailed analysis of controversial data, emphasizing instead widely accepted views and some challenging novel ones. PMID:18398055

  15. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  16. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. PMID:26516408

  17. Introduction to stem cells and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kolios, George; Moodley, Yuben

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are a population of undifferentiated cells characterized by the ability to extensively proliferate (self-renewal), usually arise from a single cell (clonal), and differentiate into different types of cells and tissue (potent). There are several sources of stem cells with varying potencies. Pluripotent cells are embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of the embryo and induced pluripotent cells are formed following reprogramming of somatic cells. Pluripotent cells can differentiate into tissue from all 3 germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). Multipotent stem cells may differentiate into tissue derived from a single germ layer such as mesenchymal stem cells which form adipose tissue, bone, and cartilage. Tissue-resident stem cells are oligopotent since they can form terminally differentiated cells of a specific tissue. Stem cells can be used in cellular therapy to replace damaged cells or to regenerate organs. In addition, stem cells have expanded our understanding of development as well as the pathogenesis of disease. Disease-specific cell lines can also be propagated and used in drug development. Despite the significant advances in stem cell biology, issues such as ethical controversies with embryonic stem cells, tumor formation, and rejection limit their utility. However, many of these limitations are being bypassed and this could lead to major advances in the management of disease. This review is an introduction to the world of stem cells and discusses their definition, origin, and classification, as well as applications of these cells in regenerative medicine.

  18. Influence of molecular subgroups on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype in 141 patients undergoing salvage allogeneic stem cell transplantation in primary induction failure or beyond first relapse

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Tim; Schleuning, Michael; Mayer, Jiri; Haude, Karl-Heinz; Tischer, Johanna; Buchholz, Stefanie; Bunjes, Donald; Bug, Gesine; Holler, Ernst; Meyer, Ralf G.; Greinix, Hildegard; Scheid, Christof; Christopeit, Maximilian; Schnittger, Susanne; Braess, Jan; Schlimok, Günter; Spiekermann, Karsten; Ganser, Arnold; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Schmid, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Based on molecular aberrations, in particular the NPM1 mutation (NPM1mut) and the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3-ITD), prognostic subgroups have been defined among patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype. Whereas these subgroups are known to play an important role in outcome in first complete remission, and also in the indication for allogeneic stem cell transplantation, data are limited on their role after transplantation in advanced disease. To evaluate the role of molecular subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype after allogeneic stem cell transplantation beyond first complete remission, we analyzed the data from 141 consecutive adults (median age: 51.0 years, range 18.4-69.3 years) who had received an allogeneic transplant either in primary induction failure or beyond first complete remission. A sequential regimen of cytoreductive chemotherapy (fludarabine, high-dose AraC, amsacrine) followed by reduced intensity conditioning (FLAMSA-RIC), was uniformly used for conditioning. After a median follow up of three years, overall survival from transplantation was 64±4%, 53±4% and 44±5% at one, two and four years, respectively. Forty patients transplanted in primary induction failure achieved an encouraging 2-year survival of 69%. Among 101 patients transplanted beyond first complete remission, 2-year survival was 81% among patients with the NPM1mut/FLT3wt genotype in contrast to 43% in other genotypes. Higher numbers of transfused CD34+ cells (hazard ratio 2.155, 95% confidence interval 0.263-0.964, P=0.039) and favorable genotype (hazard ratio 0.142, 95% confidence interval: 0.19-0.898, P=0.048) were associated with superior overall survival in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype can frequently be rescued after primary induction failure by allogeneic transplantation following FLAMSA-RIC. The prognostic role of NPM1mut/FLT3-ITD based subgroups was carried

  19. Multipotent Stem Cell and Current Application.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Aligholi; Khanlarkhani, Neda; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Najafi, Atefeh; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Sargolzaei Aval, Fereydoon

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing and undifferentiated cell types that can be differentiate into functional cells. Stem cells can be classified into two main types based on their source of origin: Embryonic and Adult stem cells. Stem cells also classified based on the range of differentiation potentials into Totipotent, Pluripotent, Multipotent, and Unipotent. Multipotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types within one particular lineage. There are plentiful advantages and usages for multipotent stem cells. Multipotent Stem cells act as a significant key in procedure of development, tissue repair, and protection. Multipotent Stem cells have been applying in treatment of different disorders such as spinal cord injury, bone fracture, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, hematopoietic defects, and fertility preservation.

  20. Preconditioning and stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Haider, Husnain Kh; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-04-01

    The harsh ischemic and cytokine-rich microenvironment in the infarcted myocardium, infiltrated by the inflammatory and immune cells, offers a significant challenge to the transplanted donor stem cells. Massive cell death occurs during transplantation as well as following engraftment which significantly lowers the effectiveness of the heart cell therapy. Various approaches have been adopted to overcome this problem nevertheless with multiple limitations with each of these current approaches. Cellular preconditioning and reprogramming by physical, chemical, genetic, and pharmacological manipulation of the cells has shown promise and "prime" the cells to the "state of readiness" to withstand the rigors of lethal ischemia in vitro as well as posttransplantation. This review summarizes the past and present novel approaches of ischemic preconditioning, pharmacological and genetic manipulation using preconditioning mimetics, recombinant growth factor protein treatment, and reprogramming of stem cells to overexpress survival signaling molecules, microRNAs, and trophic factors for intracrine, autocrine, and paracrine effects on cytoprotection.

  1. Stem cells in orthopaedics and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alwattar, Basil J; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell application is a burgeoning field of medicine that is likely to influence the future of orthopaedic surgery. Stem cells are associated with great promise and great controversy. For the orthopaedic surgeon, stem cells may change the way that orthopaedic surgery is practiced and the overall approach of the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Stem cells may change the field of orthopaedics from a field dominated by surgical replacements and reconstructions to a field of regeneration and prevention. This review will introduce the basic concepts of stem cells pertinent to the orthopaedic surgeon and proceed with a more in depth discussion of current developments in the study of stem cells in fracture healing.

  2. Un(MaSC)ing Stem Cell Dynamics in Mammary Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Erin; Wrenn, Emma D; Cheung, Kevin J

    2017-02-27

    The properties of stem cells that participate in mammary gland branching morphogenesis remain contested. Reporting in Nature, Scheele et al. (2017) establish a model for post-pubertal mammary branching morphogenesis in which position-dependent, lineage-restricted stem cells undergo cell mixing in order to contribute to long-term growth.

  3. Lgr5 intestinal stem cells have high telomerase activity and randomly segregate their chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schepers, Arnout G; Vries, Robert; van den Born, Maaike; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells have been proposed to be limited in the number of cell divisions they can undergo. This is thought to be a mechanism by which stem cells retain their integrity preventing disease. However, we have recently discovered intestinal crypt stem cells that persist for the lifetime of a mouse, yet divide every day. We now demonstrate biochemically that primary isolated Lgr5+ve stem cells contain significant telomerase activity. Telomerase activity rapidly decreases in the undifferentiated progeny of these stem cells and is entirely lost in differentiated villus cells. Conversely, asymmetric segregation of chromosomes has been proposed as a mechanism for stem cells to protect their genomes against damage. We determined the average cell cycle length of Lgr5+ve stem cells at 21.5 h and find that Lgr5+ve intestinal stem cells randomly segregate newly synthesized DNA strands, opposing the ‘immortal strand' hypothesis. PMID:21297579

  4. Busulfan and fludarabine conditioning regimen given at hematological nadir of cytoreduction fludarabine, cytarabine, and idarubicin chemotherapy in patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a single arm pilot consort study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Fan, Xing; Wang, Ling; Hu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    To improve the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we conducted a single-arm phase II clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of conditioning regimen following cytoreduction chemotherapy with 7-day interval. Adult patients with refractory AML were enrolled in the study and received fludarabine, cytarabine, and idarubicin (FLAG-IDA) as cytoreductive chemotherapy followed by busulfan and fludarabine (Flu-BU) conditioning regimen and transfusion of mobilized peripheral stem cells from human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or unrelated donor. The primary endpoint of the study was 2-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) and secondary endpoints included complete-remission rate, 2-year overall survival (OS), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), and relapse rate. A total of 16 patients were enrolled with median age of 36 (16-60), which included 9 primary induction failure, 2 early relapse, and 5 with relapse/refractory disease. The median cycles of previous chemotherapy were 4 (3-10) with a median of 55% (1%-90%) blasts in bone marrow. Six patients received transplantation from matched sibling and 10 from matched unrelated donors. After transplantation, 15 patients achieved bone marrow remission (11 complete remissions [CRs] and 4 bone marrow remissions without platelet recovery) at day +28. A total of 8 patients remained alive in CR with median LFS of 29.5 months (9.5-40.5 months). Four patients relapsed and 3 of them died of disease and another 4 patients died because of transplantation-related toxicity. The 2-year NRM and relapse rates were 25.0% ± 10.8% and 33.4% ± 13.8%, respectively with 2-year OS at 53.5% ± 13.1% and LFS at 50.0% ± 12.5%. Based on the Simon 2-stage design, 5 out of first eligible 14 patients remained leukemia-free for more than 2 years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, the null hypothesis of the study will be rejected and the study protocol

  5. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  6. Proliferative control in Drosophila stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlmaier, Alexander; Edgar, Bruce A

    2008-12-01

    The relationship between cell growth (cell mass increase over time) and cell division is poorly understood in animal stem cells. Recent studies in several Drosophila stem cell types have provided the tools to interrogate this relationship. In several cases (brat, mei-P26, pros, bam, lethal giant larvae, polo), mutations have been defined that trigger tumorous overproliferation of progenitor cells and reveal how unrestricted self-renewing capacity is controlled. Moreover, microRNAs have been discovered as essential regulators of stem cell division rate and identity, suggesting that stem cell self-renewal depends on protein translational control. Biosynthetic capacity has also been found to be limiting for stem cell division rates. Finally, asymmetric cell division can impose dominant differentiation signals in a stem cell's daughter, and this can inhibit the stem cell-specific proliferation signature and lock in cell cycle exit.

  7. Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate ofNerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD  NUMBER:      W81XWH-­13-­1-­0298   TITLE:    “Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate of Nerve Regeneration...a cell type we have identified that show stem -- cell like qualities after undergoing physical and chemical stresses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nothing...rat model, comparing implantation of decellularized nerve grafts alone, to the same grafts after being seeded with recently described stem cells

  8. [Cell cycle regulation in cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Shoichiro

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the properties of self-renewal and multipotency, cancer stem cells share the characteristics of their distinct cell cycle status with somatic stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained in a quiescent state with this characteristic conferring resistance to anticancer therapies that target dividing cells. Elucidation of the mechanisms of CSC quiescence might therefore be expected to provide further insight into CSC behaviors and lead to the elimination of cancer. This review summarizes several key regulators of the cell cycle in CSCs as well as attempts to define future challenges in this field, especially from the point of view of the application of our current understandings to the clinical medicine.

  9. [Cancer stem cells as the therapeutic target of tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Hatina, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The concept of hierarchical organization of tumour cell population, with cancer stem cells positioned at the apex of the cell hierarchy, can explain at least some crucial aspects of biological and clinical behaviour of cancer, like its propensity to relapse as well as the development of therapeutic resistance. The underlying biological properties of cancer stem cells are crucially dependent on various signals, inhibition of which provides an attractive opportunity to attack pharmacologically cancer stem cells. Currently, a lot of such stemness-inhibitors undergo various phases of clinical testing. Interestingly, numerous old drugs that are in routine use in human and veterinary medicine for non-oncological indications appear to be able to specifically target cancer stem cells as well. As cancer stem cells, at least for most tumours, represent usually only a minor tumour cell fraction, it is quite probable that the main focus of the clinical use of the stemness inhibitors would consist in their rational combinations with traditional anticancer treatment modalities. A highly important goal for the future research is to identify reliable and clinically applicable predictive markers that would allow to apply these novel anticancer drugs on the individual basis within the context of personalized medicine.

  10. Adult stem cell therapy: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Moraleda, Jose M; Blanquer, Miguel; Bleda, Patricia; Iniesta, Paqui; Ruiz, Francisco; Bonilla, Sonia; Cabanes, Carmen; Tabares, Lucía; Martinez, Salvador

    2006-12-01

    Adult stem cells may be an invaluable source of plastic cells for tissue regeneration. The bone marrow contains different subpopulations of adult stem cells easily accessible for transplantation. However the therapeutic value of adult stem cell is a question of debate in the scientific community. We have investigated the potential benefits of adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of demyelinating and motor neuron diseases. Our results suggest that transplantation of HSC have direct and indirect neuroregenerative and neuroprotective effects.

  11. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  12. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Parekkadan, Biju; Milwid, Jack M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are being clinically explored as a new therapeutic for treating a variety of immune-mediated diseases. First heralded as a regenerative therapy for skeletal tissue repair, MSCs have recently been shown to modulate endogenous tissue and immune cells. Preclinical studies of the mechanism of action suggest that the therapeutic effects afforded by MSC transplantation are short-lived and related to dynamic, paracrine interactions between MSCs and host cells. Therefore, representations of MSCs as drug-loaded particles may allow for pharmacokinetic models to predict the therapeutic activity of MSC transplants as a function of drug delivery mode. By integrating principles of MSC biology, therapy, and engineering, the field is armed to usher in the next generation of stem cell therapeutics. PMID:20415588

  14. Drosophila dyskerin is required for somatic stem cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vicidomini, Rosario; Petrizzo, Arianna; di Giovanni, Annamaria; Cassese, Laura; Lombardi, Antonella Anna; Pragliola, Caterina; Furia, Maria

    2017-03-23

    Drosophila represents an excellent model to dissect the roles played by the evolutionary conserved family of eukaryotic dyskerins. These multifunctional proteins are involved in the formation of H/ACA snoRNP and telomerase complexes, both involved in essential cellular tasks. Since fly telomere integrity is guaranteed by a different mechanism, we used this organism to investigate the specific role played by dyskerin in somatic stem cell maintenance. To this aim, we focussed on Drosophila midgut, a hierarchically organized and well characterized model for stemness analysis. Surprisingly, the ubiquitous loss of the protein uniquely affects the formation of the larval stem cell niches, without altering other midgut cell types. The number of adult midgut precursor stem cells is dramatically reduced, and this effect is not caused by premature differentiation and is cell-autonomous. Moreover, a few dispersed precursors found in the depleted midguts can maintain stem identity and the ability to divide asymmetrically, nor show cell-growth defects or undergo apoptosis. Instead, their loss is mainly specifically dependent on defective amplification. These studies establish a strict link between dyskerin and somatic stem cell maintenance in a telomerase-lacking organism, indicating that loss of stemness can be regarded as a conserved, telomerase-independent effect of dyskerin dysfunction.

  15. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  17. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  18. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sessions Workshop on Clinical Translation Clinical Advances in Stem Cell Research Speakers & Session Topics Networking Experiences Job Match ... Industry Committee Session RUCDR Humanity in a Dish Stem Cell Engineering Junior Investigator Events Career Panel Meet the ...

  19. Ethics and Governance of Stem Cell Banks.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Donald; Rathjen, Peter; Rathjen, Joy; Nicol, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines the ethical principles and governance frameworks for stem cell banks. Good governance of stem cell banks should balance facilitation of the clinical use of stem cells with the proper respect and protection of stem cell sample providers and stem cell recipients and ensure compliance with national regulatory requirements to foster public trust in the use of stem cell technology. Stem cell banks must develop with regard to the science, the needs of scientists, and the requirements of the public, which will benefit from this science. Given the international reach of this promising research and its clinical application, it is necessary for stem cell bank governance frameworks to be harmonized across jurisdictions.

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  1. Perspectives on human stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu Won

    2009-09-01

    Human stem cell research draws not only scientists' but the public's attention. Human stem cell research is considered to be able to identify the mechanism of human development and change the paradigm of medical practices. However, there are heated ethical and legal debates about human stem cell research. The core issue is that of human dignity and human life. Some prefer human adult stem cell research or iPS cell research, others hES cell research. We do not need to exclude any type of stem cell research because each has its own merits and issues, and they can facilitate the scientific revolution when working together.

  2. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative for limbal deficiency were analyzed. Risk factors, clinical findings and sequelae were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight eyes of six patients with stem cell deficiency not secondary to a known diagnosis were described. All eyes had prior ocular surgery involving the corneoscleral limbus. Six eyes had been on chronic topical medications and all eyes had concurrent external disease such as pterygium, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, rosacea or herpes simplex virus keratitis. All eyes had superior quadrants affected corresponding to areas of prior limbal surgery. Sequelae of disease included corneal scarring and neo-vascularization, and five eyes had with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. CONCLUSIONS: Because the epitheliopathy started peripherally and extended centrally in all patients, we feel it represents a stem cell deficiency. The fact that all patients were affected superiorly, at sites of a prior limbal surgical incision, points to surgical trauma to the SC as the likely major etiologic factor for the deficiency. The surgical trauma to the limbal SC probably made these cells more susceptible to damage from other external disease influences and toxicity from chronic topical medications. Because the stem cell deficiency is secondary to prior ocular surgery and chronic topical medications, we propose the term "iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency". Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B PMID:9440165

  3. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... to survive, including the umbilical cord and the placenta that nourishes the developing fetus. Basic cell biology ... types but cannot generate support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord. Other cells are multipotent, meaning ...

  4. Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes

    PubMed Central

    Grácio, Filipe; Cabral, Joaquim; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient and may be dominated by stochastic effects. In this work we build mass-action models of the core regulatory elements controlling stem cell induction and maintenance. The models include not only the network of transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, but also important epigenetic regulatory features of DNA methylation and histone modification. We show that the network topology reported in the literature is consistent with the observed experimental behavior of bistability and inducibility. Based on simulations of stem cell generation protocols, and in particular focusing on changes in epigenetic cellular states, we show that cooperative and independent reaction mechanisms have experimentally identifiable differences in the dynamics of reprogramming, and we analyze such differences and their biological basis. It had been argued that stochastic and elite models of stem cell generation represent distinct fundamental mechanisms. Work presented here suggests an alternative possibility that they represent differences in the amount of information we have about the distribution of cellular states before and during reprogramming protocols. We show further that unpredictability and variation in reprogramming decreases as the cell progresses along the induction process, and that identifiable groups of cells with elite-seeming behavior can come about by a stochastic process. Finally we show how different mechanisms and kinetic properties impact the prospects of improving the efficiency of iPS cell generation protocols. PMID:23667423

  5. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    PubMed

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  6. Stem cells in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soler, María José; José Tomas, Ortiz-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Circulating bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seem to play a crucial role in both vasculogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Chronic kidney disease is a state of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated progression of atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular risk. As a consequence, cardiovascular disorders are the main cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It has been shown that patients with advanced renal failure have decreased number of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and impaired EPCs function. Moreover, in kidney transplant patients, renal graft function significantly correlated with EPC number. The reduced number of EPCs in patients with ESRD has been ascribed to the uremia. Therefore, therapies that improve the uremic status in dialysis patients such as nocturnal hemodialysis are associated with restoration of impaired EPCs number and migratory function. In fact, some of the common treatments for patients with chronic kidney disease such as erythropoietin, statins and angiotensin II receptor antagonist increase the number of EPCs. Nowadays, there is growing evidence indicating that, under pathophysiological conditions, stem cells (SCs) derived from bone marrow are able to migrate in the injured kidney, and they seem to play a role in glomerular and tubular regeneration. After acute tubular renal injury, surviving tubular epithelial cells and putative renal stem cells proliferate and differentiate into tubular epithelial cells to promote structural and functional repair. Moreover, bone marrow stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells can also participate in the repair process by proliferation and differentiation into renal lineages. For instance, mesenchymal SCs have been shown to decrease inflammation and enhance renal regeneration. The administration of ex vivo expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SCs have been proved to be beneficial in various experimental models of acute

  7. Salivary Gland Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the existence of a tumorigenic population of cancer cells that demonstrate stem cell-like properties such as self-renewal and multipotency. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), are able to both initiate and maintain tumor formation and progression. Studies have shown that CSC are resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments preventing complete eradication of the tumor cell population. Following treatment, CSC are able to re-initiate tumor growth leading to patient relapse. Salivary gland cancers are relatively rare but constitute a highly significant public health issue due to the lack of effective treatments. In particular, patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two most common salivary malignancies, have low long-term survival rates due to the lack of response to current therapies. Considering the role of CSC in resistance to therapy in other tumor types, it is possible that this unique sub-population of cells is involved in resistance of salivary gland tumors to treatment. Characterization of CSC can lead to better understanding of the pathobiology of salivary gland malignancies as well as to the development of more effective therapies. Here, we make a brief overview of the state-of-the-science in salivary gland cancer, and discuss possible implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the treatment of salivary gland malignancies. PMID:23810400

  8. An introduction to stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Hemmat, Shirin; Lieberman, David M; Most, Sam P

    2010-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology has undergone tremendous expansion over the past two decades. Scientific investigation has continued to expand our understanding of these complex cells at a rapidly increasing rate. This understanding has produced a vast array of potential clinical applications. This article will serve as an overview of the current state of stem cell research as it applies to scientific and medical applications. Included in the discussion is a review of the many different types of stem cells, including but not limited to adult, embryonic, and perinatal stem cells. Also, this article describes somatic cell nuclear transfer, an exciting technology that allows the production of totipotent stem cells from fully differentiated cells, thereby eliminating the use of embryonic sources. This discussion should serve as a review of the field of stem cell biology and provide a foundation for the reader to better understand the interface of stem cell technology and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  9. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  10. Epidermal stem cells and their epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Jin, Hongchuan; Wang, Xian

    2013-08-30

    Stem cells play an essential role in embryonic development, cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. Tissue homeostasis in adults is maintained by adult stem cells resident in the niches of different tissues. As one kind of adult stem cell, epidermal stem cells have the potential to generate diversified types of progeny cells in the skin. Although its biology is still largely unclarified, epidermal stem cells are widely used in stem cell research and regenerative medicine given its easy accessibility and pluripotency. Despite the same genome, cells within an organism have different fates due to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we will briefly discuss the current understanding of epigenetic modulation in epidermal stem cells.

  11. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  12. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  13. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:27713769

  14. [Cell transplant and regenerative stem cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Prosper, F

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of the first human embryonic stem cell lines as well as the notion of the unexpected plasticity and potential of the adult stem cells has significantly impacted the biomedical research. Many of the tissues long believe to lack any regenerative capacity has demonstrated otherwise. Patients alike physicians expectations for treatment of incurable diseases have also fuelled this field and in occasions have led to unrealistic expectations. In the next pages I review some of the tissue specific stem cells that have been used either in preclinical models or even in clinical research. Despite the effort of numerous investigators, more questions that answers remain in the field of cell therapy and only careful and independent -not biased- research will allow us to translate some of this findings into clinical application.

  15. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    PubMed

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  16. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  17. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  18. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  19. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  20. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  1. ADULT STEM CELLS AND THEIR NICHES

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Francesca; Celso, Cristina Lo; Scadden, David

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells participate in dynamic physiologic systems that dictate the outcome of developmental events and organismal stress, Since these cells are fundamental to tissue maintenance and repair, the signals they receive play a critical role in the integrity of the organism. Much work has focused on stem cell identification and the molecular pathways involved in their regulation. Yet, we understand little about how these pathways achieve physiologically responsive stem cell functions. This chapter will review the state of our understanding of stem cells in the context of their microenvironment regarding the relation between stem cell niche dysfunction, carcinogenesis and aging. PMID:21222205

  2. Somatic stem cell biology and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Yihan; Li, Dehua; Jin, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Somatic stem cells have been acknowledged for their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types and their capacity for self-renewal. Some mesenchymal stem cells play a dominant role in the repair and reconstruction of periodontal tissues. Both dental-derived and some non-dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells possess the capacity for periodontal regeneration under certain conditions with induced differentiation, proliferation, cellular secretion, and their interactions. Stem cell-based tissue engineering technology promises to bring improvements to periodontal regeneration, biologic tooth repair, and bioengineered implants. The present review discusses the roles and values of various somatic stem cells in periodontal regeneration.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  4. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  5. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  6. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells.

  7. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  8. Dormancy in the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Sottocornola, Roberta; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2012-03-19

    Tissues characterized by constant turnover contain post-mitotic, terminally differentiated cells originating from highly proliferative progenitors, which in turn derive from a relatively small population of stem cells. At the population level, self-renewal and differentiation are the possible outcomes of stem cell proliferation; overall, however, stem cells are quiescent if compared with their direct progeny. The recent discovery of a particularly quiescent, or dormant, subpopulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) raises a number of fundamental questions. As stem cell fate is influenced by the signals integrated by the stem cell niche, will dormant HSCs reside in specific dormant niches? Is the mechanism of dormancy common to multiple regenerating tissues or specific to the hematopoietic system? If cancer is maintained by a few cancer stem cells, do they also contain a subpopulation of dormant cells, and could this be exploited for therapeutic purposes?

  9. Dormancy in the stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tissues characterized by constant turnover contain post-mitotic, terminally differentiated cells originating from highly proliferative progenitors, which in turn derive from a relatively small population of stem cells. At the population level, self-renewal and differentiation are the possible outcomes of stem cell proliferation; overall, however, stem cells are quiescent if compared with their direct progeny. The recent discovery of a particularly quiescent, or dormant, subpopulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) raises a number of fundamental questions. As stem cell fate is influenced by the signals integrated by the stem cell niche, will dormant HSCs reside in specific dormant niches? Is the mechanism of dormancy common to multiple regenerating tissues or specific to the hematopoietic system? If cancer is maintained by a few cancer stem cells, do they also contain a subpopulation of dormant cells, and could this be exploited for therapeutic purposes? PMID:22429750

  10. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gschweng, Eric; De Oliveira, Satiro; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) provide an attractive target for immunotherapy of cancer and leukemia by the introduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) directed against tumor-associated antigens. HSCs engraft for long-term blood cell production and could provide a continuous source of targeted anti-cancer effector cells to sustain remissions. T cells produced de novo from HSCs may continuously replenish anti-tumor T cells that have become anergic or exhausted from ex vivo expansion or exposure to the intratumoral microenvironment. In addition, transgenic T cells produced in vivo undergo allelic exclusion, preventing co-expression of an endogenous TCR that could mis-pair with the introduced TCR chains and blunt activity or even cause off-target reactivity. CAR-engineered HSCs may produce myeloid and natural killer cells in addition to T cells expressing the CAR, providing broader anti-tumor activity that arises quickly after transplant and does not solely require de novo thymopoiesis. Use of TCR- or CAR-engineered HSCs would likely require cytoreductive conditioning to achieve long-term engraftment, and this approach may be used in clinical settings where autologous HSC transplant is being performed to add a graft-versus-tumor effect. Results of experimental and preclinical studies performed to date are reviewed.

  12. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C.; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  13. Stem cells: science, policy, and ethics

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Gerald D.; Fischbach, Ruth L.

    2004-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells offer the promise of a new regenerative medicine in which damaged adult cells can be replaced with new cells. Research is needed to determine the most viable stem cell lines and reliable ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types (neurons, muscle cells, etc.). To create new cell lines, it is necessary to destroy preimplantation blastocysts. This has led to an intense debate that threatens to limit embryonic stem cell research. The profound ethical issues raised call for informed, dispassionate debate. PMID:15545983

  14. Stem cells: science, policy, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Gerald D; Fischbach, Ruth L

    2004-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells offer the promise of a new regenerative medicine in which damaged adult cells can be replaced with new cells. Research is needed to determine the most viable stem cell lines and reliable ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types (neurons, muscle cells, etc). To create new cell lines, it is necessary to destroy preimplantation blastocysts. This has led to an intense debate that threatens to limit embryonic stem cell research. The profound ethical issues raised call for informed, dispassionate debate.

  15. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  16. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  17. Cell cycle regulation in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Eric M; Warr, Matthew R; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2011-11-28

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all lineages of blood cells. Because HSCs must persist for a lifetime, the balance between their proliferation and quiescence is carefully regulated to ensure blood homeostasis while limiting cellular damage. Cell cycle regulation therefore plays a critical role in controlling HSC function during both fetal life and in the adult. The cell cycle activity of HSCs is carefully modulated by a complex interplay between cell-intrinsic mechanisms and cell-extrinsic factors produced by the microenvironment. This fine-tuned regulatory network may become altered with age, leading to aberrant HSC cell cycle regulation, degraded HSC function, and hematological malignancy.

  18. Polymer microarray technology for stem cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Robert; Jia, Jia; Mei, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in developing soluble factors (e.g., small molecules and growth factors) to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activity has limited the realization of the enormous potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to a large number of materials properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties of materials) that can affect stem cell fate. This makes it challenging to design biomaterials to direct stem cell behavior. To address this, polymer microarray technology has been developed to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. In this article, we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing chemically defined media to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of the suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activities has been limiting the realization of the potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to the number of variables in material properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties) that can affect stem cells. Polymer microarray technology has shown to be a powerful tool to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. Here we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endometrial stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Javad; Tan, Aaron; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    First described in 2004, endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) are adult stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue. EnSCs comprise of a population of epithelial stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population stem cells. When secreted in the menstrual blood, they are termed menstrual stem cells or endometrial regenerative cells. Mounting evidence suggests that EnSCs can be utilized in regenerative medicine. EnSCs can be used as immuno-modulatory agents to attenuate inflammation, are implicated in angiogenesis and vascularization during tissue regeneration, and can also be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, EnSCs can be used in tissue engineering applications and there are several clinical trials currently in place to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCs. This review highlights the progress made in EnSC research, describing their mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal potentials both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Endometrial stem cells in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    First described in 2004, endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) are adult stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue. EnSCs comprise of a population of epithelial stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population stem cells. When secreted in the menstrual blood, they are termed menstrual stem cells or endometrial regenerative cells. Mounting evidence suggests that EnSCs can be utilized in regenerative medicine. EnSCs can be used as immuno-modulatory agents to attenuate inflammation, are implicated in angiogenesis and vascularization during tissue regeneration, and can also be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, EnSCs can be used in tissue engineering applications and there are several clinical trials currently in place to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCs. This review highlights the progress made in EnSC research, describing their mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal potentials both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25097665

  1. Stem cell strategies, future and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2003-01-01

    The use of stem cells for neuroreplacement therapy is no longer science fiction--it is science fact. We have succeeded in the development of neural and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to produce neural cells in the brain. We have seen the improvement of cognitive function in a memory-impaired aged animal model following stem cell transplantation. These results may promise a bright future for stem cell strategies. Before we begin to think about clinical applications beyond the present preclinical studies or even consider the pathophysiological environments of individual diseases, we must address and weigh the factors that may affect stem cell biology. Here, we not only show the potential for therapeutic applications for stem cell strategies in neuropathological conditions, but we also discuss the effects on the biology of stem cells of those factors that are altered under disease conditions.

  2. Stem cells: are we ready for therapy?

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy as a replacement for diseased or destroyed endogenous cells is a major component of regenerative medicine. Various types of stem cells are or will be used in clinical settings as autologous or allogeneic products. In this chapter, the progress that has been made to translate basic stem cell research into pharmaceutical manufacturing processes will be reviewed. Even if in public perception, embryonic stem (ES) cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells dominate the field of regenerative medicine and will be discussed in great detail, it is the adult stem cells that are used for decades as therapeutics. Hence, these cells will be compared to ES and iPS cells. Finally, special emphasis will be placed on the scientific, technical, and economic challenges of developing stem cell-based in vitro model systems and cell therapies that can be commercialized.

  3. History and perspective of stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Bongso, Ariff; Richards, Mark

    2004-12-01

    Several types of stem cell have been discovered from germ cells, the embryo, fetus and adult. Each of these has promised to revolutionize the future of regenerative medicine through the provision of cell-replacement therapies to treat a variety of debilitating diseases. Stem cell research is politically charged, receives considerable media coverage, raises many ethical and religious debates and generates a great deal of public interest. The tremendous versatility of embryonic stem cells versus the unprecedented reports describing adult stem cell plasticity have ignited debates as to the choice of one cell type over another for future application. However, the biology of these mysterious cells have yet to be understood and a lot more basic research is needed before new therapies using stem-cell-differentiated derivatives can be applied. Stem cell research opens-up the new field of 'cell-based therapies' and, as such, several safety measures have also to be evaluated.

  4. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Gong, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1) improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2) identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3) development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress. PMID:22399855

  5. Stem cells in the Drosophila digestive system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Chauhan, Chhavi; Hou, Steven X

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by continuously replenishing damaged, aged and dead cells in any organism. Five types of region and organ-specific multipotent adult stem cells have been identified in the Drosophila digestive system: intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the posterior midgut; hindgut intestinal stem cells (HISCs) at the midgut/hindgut junction; renal and nephric stem cells (RNSCs) in the Malpighian Tubules; type I gastric stem cells (GaSCs) at foregut/midgut junction; and type II gastric stem cells (GSSCs) at the middle of the midgut. Despite the fact that each type of stem cell is unique to a particular organ, they share common molecular markers and some regulatory signaling pathways. Due to the simpler tissue structure, ease of performing genetic analysis, and availability of abundant mutants, Drosophila serves as an elegant and powerful model system to study complex stem cell biology. The recent discoveries, particularly in the Drosophila ISC system, have greatly advanced our understanding of stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and the role of stem cells play in tissue homeostasis/regeneration and adaptive tissue growth.

  6. Embryonic stem cell patents and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2007-09-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells.

  7. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  8. Stem cell maintenance in a different niche

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the difficulty of controlling stem cell fate and function in applications to regenerative medicine, a number of alternative approaches have been made. Recent reports demonstrate that a non-cellular niche modulating the biophysical microenvironment with chemical factors can support stem cell self-renewal. In our previous studies, early establishment was executed to optimize biophysical factors and it was subsequently found that the microgeometry of the extracellular matrix made huge differences in stem cell behavior and phenotype. We review here a three-dimensional, non-cellular niche designed to support stem cell self-renewal. The characteristics of stem cells under the designed system are further discussed. PMID:23875159

  9. Serum stem cell growth factor for monitoring hematopoietic recovery following stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ito, C; Sato, H; Ando, K; Watanabe, S; Yoshiba, F; Kishi, K; Furuya, A; Shitara, K; Sugimoto, S; Kohno, H; Hiraoka, A; Hotta, T

    2003-08-01

    Stem cell growth factor (SCGF) is a novel cytokine for primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Although it has burst-promoting activity and granulocyte/macrophage colony-promoting activity in vitro, its significance in hematopoiesis in vivo has not been elucidated. In this study, we have established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to quantify human SCGF and measured serum cytokines in normal volunteers and 27 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT), including six autologous and 21 allogeneic transplants. SCGF levels gradually increased after SCT regardless of graft-versus-host disease or type of transplant. The maximum level of SCGF was observed during the rapid granulocyte recovery phase in patients subjected to an autologous transplantation, and during the granulocyte stabilization phase in allogeneic patients. SCGF levels in PBSCT patients began to rise earlier than in BMT patients. Two patients with no increment of SCGF after SCT showed delayed engraftment. The source of SCGF was further analyzed by RT-PCR and we found that SCGF was highly expressed in bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) and CD34(-)CD33(+) cells, but not in BM CD34(-)CD33(-) cells, BM stromal cells and peripheral blood cells. The cell population expressing SCGF in BM possess the colony-forming cell activity. Therefore, serum SCGF can be an indicator of hematopoietic recovery following SCT.

  10. Effect of melphalan 140 mg/m(2) vs 200 mg/m(2) on toxicities and outcomes in multiple myeloma patients undergoing single autologous stem cell transplantation-a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Lakshmikanth; McCullough, Lindsay M; Dai, Yunfeng; Hsu, Jack; Byrne, Michael; Hiemenz, John; May, Stratford; Cogle, Christopher R; Norkin, Maxim; Brown, Randy A; Wingard, John R; Chang, Myron; Moreb, Jan S

    2016-08-01

    Although melphalan at a dose of 140 mg/m(2) (MEL140) is an acceptable conditioning regimen for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, very few studies compared it to the most commonly used dose of 200 mg/m(2) (MEL200). A retrospective review of records of MM patients (2001-2010) identified 33 patients who received MEL140 and 96 patients who received MEL200. As expected, significantly higher percentage of patients in the MEL140 arm were >65 years or had cardiac ejection fraction <50%, had Karnofsky score <80, or had creatinine >2 at the time of ASCT (P≤.01). There were no significant differences in incidence of treatment related mortality and morbidity. At a median follow-up of 74 months from ASCT, there were no significant differences in relapse free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Similar proportion had myeloma status improve to ≥VGPR at 3 months post-ASCT. Usage of post-ASCT maintenance was similar. In multivariate cox proportional hazards model, only disease status of ≥VGPR at the time of ASCT significantly improved RFS (P=.024), but not OS (P=.104). In conclusion, MM patients who received MEL140 had similar long-term outcomes to MEL200 patients despite their older age and co-morbidities.

  11. High incidence of post-transplant cytomegalovirus reactivations in myeloma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation after treatment with bortezomib-based regimens: a survey from the Rome transplant network.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, F; Mengarelli, A; Giannotti, F; Tendas, A; Anaclerico, B; Porrini, R; Picardi, A; Cerchiara, E; Dentamaro, T; Chierichini, A; Romeo, A; Cudillo, L; Montefusco, E; Tirindelli, M C; De Fabritiis, P; Annino, L; Petti, M C; Monarca, B; Arcese, W; Avvisati, G

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivations in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is relatively low. However, the recent increased use of novel agents, such as bortezomib and/or immunomodulators, before transplant, has led to an increasing incidence of Herpesviridae family virus infections. The aim of the study was to establish the incidence of post-engraftment symptomatic CMV reactivations in MM patients receiving ASCT, and to compare this incidence with that of patients treated with novel agents or with conventional chemotherapy before transplant. The study was a survey of 80 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT after treatment with novel agents (Group A). These patients were compared with a cohort of 89 patients treated with VAD regimen (vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone) before ASCT (Group B). Overall, 7 patients (4.1%) received an antiviral treatment for a symptomatic CMV reactivation and 1 died. The incidence of CMV reactivations was significantly higher in Group A than in Group B (7.5% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.048). When compared with Group B, the CMV reactivations observed in Group A were significantly more frequent in patients who received bortezomib, whether or not associated with immunomodulators (9.4% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.019), but not in those treated with immunomodulators only (3.7% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.396). These results suggest that MM patients treated with bortezomib-based regimens are at higher risk of developing a symptomatic CMV reactivation after ASCT.

  12. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular e