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Sample records for stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy

  1. Stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsies on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system.

    PubMed

    Viala, Juliette; Gignier, Pierre; Perret, Baudouin; Hovasse, Claudie; Hovasse, Denis; Chancelier-Galan, Marie-Dominique; Bornet, Gregoire; Hamrouni, Adel; Lasry, Jean-Louis; Convard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our operating process and to report results of 118 stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsies performed on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system. From October 2009 to December 2010, 118 stereotactic vacuum assisted biopsies have been performed on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system. Informed consent was obtained for all patients. A total of 106 patients had a lesion, six had two lesions. Sixty-one lesions were clusters of micro-calcifications, 54 were masses and three were architectural distortions. Patients were in lateral decubitus position to allow shortest skin-target approach (or sitting). Specific compression paddle, adapted on the system, performed, and graduated, allowing localization in X-Y. Tomosynthesis views define the depth of lesion. Graduated Coaxial localization kit determines the beginning of the biopsy window. Biopsies were performed with an ATEC-Suros, 9 Gauge handpiece. All biopsies, except one, have reached the lesions. Five hemorrhages were incurred in the process, but no interruption was needed. Eight breast hematomas, were all spontaneously resolved. One was an infection. About 40% of patients had a skin ecchymosis. Processing is fast, easy, and requires lower irradiation dose than with classical stereotactic biopsies. Histology analysis reported 45 benign clusters of micro-calcifications, 16 malignant clusters of micro-calcifications, 24 benign masses, and 33 malignant masses. Of 13 malignant lesions, digital 2D-mammography failed to detect eight lesions and underestimated the classification of five lesions. Digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis depicts malignant lesions not visualized on digital 2D-mammography. Development of tomosynthesis biopsy unit integrated to stereotactic system will permit histology analysis for suspicious lesions.

  2. Vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy in the diagnosis and management of suspicious microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Gül; Tutar, Burçin; Uras, Cihan; Calay, Zerrin; İnce, Ümit; Tutar, Onur

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to present our biopsy method and retrospectively evaluate the results, upgrade rate, and follow-up findings of stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) procedures performed in our clinic. METHODS Two hundred thirty-four patients with mammographically detected nonpalpable breast lesions underwent VABB using a 9 gauge biopsy probe and prone biopsy table. A total of 195 patients (median age 53 years, range 32–80 years) with 198 microcalcification-only lesions with a follow-up of at least one year were included in the study. The location of the lesion relative to the needle was determined from the postfire images, and unlike the conventional technique, tissue retrieval was predominantly performed from that location, followed by a complete 360° rotation, if needed. RESULTS The median core number was 8.5. Biopsy results revealed 135 benign, 24 atypical, and 39 malignant lesions. The total upgrade rate at surgery was 7.7% (6.1% for ductal carcinomas in situ and 10.5% for atypical lesions). Patients with benign lesions were followed up for a median period of 27.5 months, with no interval change. At the follow-up, scar formation was seen in 23 patients (17%); three of the scars were remarkable for resembling a malignancy. CONCLUSION Our biposy method is fast and practical, and it is easily tolerated by patients without compromising accuracy. Patients with a diagnosis of atypia still need to undergo a diagnostic surgical procedure and those with a malignancy need to undergo curative surgery, even if the lesion is totally excised at biopsy. VABB may leave a scar in the breast tissue, which may resemble a malignancy, albeit rarely. PMID:27306660

  3. Non-stereotactic method involving combination of ultrasound-guided wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for microcalcification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Park, Ho Yong; Jung, Jin Hyang; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Kwon, Taek Ju; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic breast biopsy is a standard intervention for evaluation of “microcalcification-only” lesions. However, an expensive stereotactic device and radiologic expertise are necessary for this procedure. We herein report a non-stereotactic technique involving the combination of wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) under ultrasound (US) guidance. Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients with category 3 or 4a microcalcification only as shown by mammography underwent the above-mentioned non-stereotactic combination method involving US-guided wire localization and VABB. The location of the microcalcification was measured by manual stereotaxis, and the microcalcification was confirmed by specimen mammography after the procedure. Results The mean number ± standard deviation of removed cores and calcified cores was 28.4±13.4 and 2.2±0.9, respectively. In one case, the procedure was repeated 3 times. The histologic diagnoses were fibrocystic change (n=14), fibroadenoma (n=4), sclerosing adenosis (n=1), usual ductal hyperplasia (n=2), and atypical ductal hyperplasia (n=1). Conclusions “Microcalcification-only” breast lesions can be easily evaluated with the combination of non-stereotactic US-guided wire localization and VABB. This would be an effective diagnostic technique for breast lesion which reveals only microcalcification. PMID:27294037

  4. Absence of Residual Microcalcifications in Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia Diagnosed via Stereotactic Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy: Is Surgical Excision Obviated?

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Inyoung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to evaluate the underestimation rate of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) on vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB), and to examine the correlation between residual microcalcifications and the underestimation rate of ADH. Methods A retrospective study was performed on 27 women (mean age, 49.2±9.2 years) who underwent additional excision for ADH via VABB for microcalcifications observed by using mammography. The mammographic findings, histopathologic diagnosis of all VABB and surgical specimens, and association of malignancy with residual microcalcifications were evaluated. The underestimation rate of ADH was also calculated. Results Of the 27 women with microcalcifications, nine were upgraded to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS); thus, the underestimation rate was 33.3% (9/27). There was no difference in age (p=0.40) and extent of microcalcifications (p=0.10) when comparing benign and malignant cases. Six of 17 patients (35.3%) with remaining calcifications after VABB were upgraded to DCIS, and three of 10 patients (30%) with no residual calcifications after VABB were upgraded (p=1.00). Conclusion The underestimation rate of ADH on VABB was 33.3%. Furthermore, 30% of patients with no remaining calcifications were upgraded to DCIS. Therefore, we conclude that all ADH cases diagnosed via VABB should be excised regardless of the presence of residual microcalcifications. PMID:25320625

  5. Screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of suspicious microcalcifications without mass: radiological-histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Halon, Agnieszka; Matkowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Commonly identified on screening mammography breast microcalcifications are the predominant manifestation of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between clinico-radiological features and histological findings in patients with screen-detected DCIS. Patients and methods Consecutive 127 patients with pure DCIS found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of screen-detected suspicious microcalcifications without mass entered the study. Patient age, type and distribution of microcalcifications, DCIS nuclear grade (NG) and the presence of comedonecrosis were investigated. Association between parameters was statistically analysed with P < 0.05 as a significance level. Results. Powdery microcalcifications were most often clustered while regional were most common of casting-type (P < 0.001). High, intermediate and low NG of DCIS was significantly related to casting-type, crushed stone-like and powdery microcalcifications, respectively (P < 0.01). Low and intermediate NG DCIS were the most common in clustered and grouped microcalcifications while high NG DCIS was the most often when regional distribution was observed (P < 0.05). Comedonecrosis was significantly more common in high NG DCIS (P < 0.01). The association between comedonecrosis and type of microcalcifications was not significant, but with their distribution was close to the significance level (P = 0.07). Patient age was not significantly related to imaging or histological findings. Conclusions The association between pattern of mammographic microcalcifications and histological findings related to more aggressive disease can be helpful in optimal surgery planning in patients with screen-detected DCIS, regarding the extent of breast intervention and consideration of synchronous sentinel node biopsy. PMID:27247546

  6. Vacuum-assisted stereotactic biopsy for isolated BI-RADS 4 microcalcifications: evaluation with histopathology and midterm follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    Atasoy, Mehmet Mahir; Tasali, Nuri; Çubuk, Rahmi; Narin, Burcu; Deveci, Uğur; Yener, Neşe; Çelik, Levent

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the 10-gauge vacuum-assisted stereotactic biopsy (VASB) of isolated Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 microcalcifications, using histology and follow-up results. METHODS From January 2011 to June 2013, VASB was performed on 132 lesions, and 66 microcalcification-only lesions of BI-RADS 4 were included into our study. VASB was performed using lateral decubitis stereotaxy for all patients. Pathologic results of VASB and further surgical biopsies were reviewed retrospectively. Patients who were diagnosed to have benign lesions by VASB were referred for follow-up. VASB and surgical histopathology results were compared to determine the underestimation ratios. RESULTS Fifteen out of 66 lesions from 63 patients (median age, 47 years; range, 34–88 years) were identified as malignant by VASB. Pathological results after surgery revealed three cases of invasive ductal carcinoma among the 12 VASB-diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions, for a DCIS underestimation rate of 25%. The atypical ductal hyperplasia underestimation rate was 0% for the three lesions. The follow-up period was at least 10 months, with an average of 22.7 months for all patients and 21.2 months for patients with VASB-diagnosed benign lesions. None of the patients had malignancy during the follow-ups. The false-negative rate was 0% in the follow-up of 48 patients. CONCLUSION VASB should be the standard method of choice for BI-RADS 4 microcalcifications. This method obviates the need for a surgical procedure in 73% of BI-RADS 4 microcalcification-only patients. PMID:25323837

  7. Predictive factors for invasive cancer in surgical specimens following an initial diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ after stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in microcalcification-only lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gümüş, Hatice; Mills, Philippa; Fish, David; Gümüş, Metehan; Cox, Karina; Devalia, Haresh; Jones, Sue; Jones, Peter; Sever, Ali R.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of invasive breast carcinoma in patients with preoperative diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy (SVAB) performed for microcalcification-only lesions, and to identify the predictive factors of invasion. METHODS From 2000 to 2010, the records of 353 DCIS patients presenting with microcalcification-only lesions who underwent SVAB were retrospectively reviewed. The mammographic size of microcalcification cluster, presence of microinvasion within the cores, the total number of calcium specks, and the number of calcium specks within the retrieved core biopsy specimen were recorded. Patients were grouped as those with or without invasion in the final pathologic report, and variables were compared between the two groups. RESULTS The median age was 58 years (range, 34–88 years). At histopathologic examination of the surgical specimen, 63 of 353 patients (17.8%) were found to have an invasive component, although SVAB cores had only shown DCIS preoperatively. The rate of underestimation was significantly higher in patients with microcalcification covering an area of 40 mm or more, in the presence of microinvasion at biopsy, and in cases where less than 40% of the calcium specks were removed from the lesion. CONCLUSION Invasion might be underestimated in DCIS cases diagnosed with SVAB performed for microcalcification-only lesions, especially when the mammographic size of calcification is equal to or more than 40 mm or if microinvasion is found within the biopsy specimen and less than 40% of the calcifications are removed. At least 40% of microcalcification specks should be removed from the lesion to decrease the rate of underestimation with SVAB. PMID:26509833

  8. US-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Biopsy of Microcalcifications in Breast Lesions and Long-Term Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hua Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Son, Eun Ju; Oh, Ki Keun

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the use of an ultrasonography (US)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy for microcalcifications of breast lesions and to evaluate the efficacy of the use of US-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy with long-term follow-up results. Materials and Methods US-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy cases of breast lesions that were performed between 2002 and 2006 for microcalcifications were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 62 breast lesions were identified where further pathological confirmation was obtained or where at least two years of mammography follow-up was obtained. These lesions were divided into the benign and malignant lesions (benign and malignant group) and were divided into underestimated group and not-underestimated lesions (underestimated and not-underestimated group) according to the diagnosis after a vacuum-assisted biopsy. The total number of specimens that contained microcalcifications was analyzed and the total number of microcalcification flecks as depicted on specimen mammography was analyzed to determine if there was any statistical difference between the groups. Results There were no false negative cases after more than two years of follow-up. Twenty-nine lesions were diagnosed as malignant (two invasive carcinomas and 27 carcinoma in situ lesions). Two of the 27 carcinoma in situ lesions were upgraded to invasive cancers after surgery. Among three patients diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia, the diagnosis was upgraded to a ductal carcinoma in situ after surgery in one patient. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of specimens with microcalcifications and the total number of microcalcification flecks between the benign group and malignant group of patients and between the underestimated group and not-underestimated group of patients. Conclusion US-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy can be an effective alternative to stereotactic-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy in cases where

  9. Emergent Embolization of Arterial Bleeding after Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, Aaron M.; Epelboym, Yan; Siegelbaum, Robert H. Weintraub, Joshua L. Kim, Edward Nowakowski, Francis S. Lookstein, Robert A.

    2012-02-15

    Vacuum-assisted core breast biopsy has become important in evaluating patients with suspicious breast lesions. It has proven to be a relatively safe procedure that in rare cases can result in vascular complications. These are the first reported cases of transcatheter embolization of uncontrolled breast hemorrhage after vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. With increased use of biopsy and larger-gauge devices, breast imaging groups may consider embolotherapy as a safe alternative for treatment of hemorrhage in a select group of patients.

  10. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  11. Methodology of stereotactic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Carapella, C M; Mastrostefano, R; Raus, L; Riccio, A

    1989-01-01

    The great technological improvement in the neurosurgical tools and in the neuroradiological imaging has brought about the diffusion of the stereotactic techniques. They are crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial expanding lesions of small dimensions or located in sites inaccessible to conventional techniques. The Authors describe the most common systems and methodologies for the stereotactic biopsy. They stress the importance of performing serial explorations which can provide evidence of the heterogeneity of the neoplastic lesion and of the infiltration of the brain adjacent to the tumor.

  12. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in Korean women: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is the technique of choice for lesions that are visible only with breast MRI. The purpose of this study was to report our clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy in Korean women. Methods A total of 13 patients with 15 lesions for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were prospectively entered into this study between September 2009 and November 2011. Biopsy samples were obtained in a 3-T magnet using a 9-guage MRI-compatible vacuum-assisted biopsy device. We evaluated clinical indications for biopsy, lesion characteristics on prebiopsy MRI, pathologic results, and postbiopsy complication status. Results The clinical indications for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were as follows: abnormalities in patients with interstitial mammoplasty on screening MRI (n = 10); preoperative evaluation of patients with a recently diagnosed cancer (n = 3); and suspicious recurrence on follow-up MRI after cancer surgery (n = 1) or chemotherapy (n = 1). All lesions have morphologic features suspicious or highly suggestive of malignancy by the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category of MRI (C4a = 12, C4b = 2, C5 = 1). In two of the 15 lesions (13.3%, <6 mm), MRI-guided 9-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy was deferred due to nonvisualization of the MRI findings that led to biopsy and the lesions were stable or disappeared on follow up so were considered benign. Of 13 biopsied lesions, pathology revealed four malignancies (4/13, 30.8%; mean size 15.5 mm) and nine benign lesions (9/13, 69.2%; size 14.2 mm). Immediate postprocedural hematoma (mean size 23.5 mm) was observed in eight out of 13 patients (61.5%) and was controlled conservatively. Conclusions Our initial experience of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy showed a success rate of 86.7% and a cancer diagnosis rate of 30.8%, which was quite satisfactory. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a

  13. Outcome of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy – initial experience at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Hertl, Kristijana; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Cavlek, Mihael; Podobnik, Gasper; Snoj, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Background Like all breast imaging modalities MRI has limited specificity and the positive predictive value for lesions detected by MRI alone ranges between 15 and 50%. MRI guided procedures (needle biopsy, presurgical localisation) are mandatory for suspicious findings visible only at MRI, with potential influence on therapeutic decision. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our initial clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy as an alternative to surgical excision and to investigate the outcome of MRI-guided breast biopsy as a function of the MRI features of the lesions. Patients and methods. In 14 women (median age 51 years) with 14 MRI-detected lesions, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy was performed. We evaluated the MRI findings that led to biopsy and we investigated the core and postoperative histology results and follow-up data. Results The biopsy was technically successful in 14 (93%) of 15 women. Of 14 biopsies in 14 women, core histology revealed 6 malignant (6/14, 43%), 6 benign (6/14, 43%) and 2 high-risk (2/14, 14%) lesions. Among the 6 cancer 3 were invasive and 3 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The probability of malignancy in our experience was higher for non-mass lesion type and for washout and plateau kinetics. Conclusions Our initial experience confirms that MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is fast, safe and accurate alternative to surgical biopsy for breast lesions detected at MRI only. PMID:23077445

  14. [Development and design of a new sonography rigid bronchoscopy and corollary vacuum-assisted biopsy device system].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xiangdong; Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Ruixiang; Dong, Fuwen

    2014-02-01

    The present study was to develop and design a new sonography rigid bronchoscopy and corollary vacuum-assisted biopsy device system with less injury and complication. The system combined ultrasonic-probe with ultrasound catheter, a new medical ultrasound technique, and rigid bronchoscopy (RB) which is improved with an auxiliary vacuum-assisted biopsy device. The principle of the device is vacuum suction and rotary knife. The reduced outer diameter of the RB led to less pain and lower complications for the patient. With the help of ultrasonic-probe (30 MHz), lesions and blood vessels can be identified clearly and unintentional puncture and damage to blood vessels can be avoided. Plenty of lesions can be obtained quickly through the vacuum-assisted biopsy device without getting puncture needle in and out repeatedly. The novel endobronchial sonography rigid bronchoscopy and matched vacuum-assisted biopsy device has many remarkable advantages. It can enlarge the applied range of the RB from endobronchial to mediastinal lesions, avoiding unintentional puncture of vessels. Obtaining multiple samples with a higher accuracy rate than that by other sampling techniques, minimizing operation time, alleviating pain and decreasing the complication rate, the system makes up the technical deficiency for the diagnosis and treatment of the mediastinal lesions, to a certain degree.

  15. Fluorescence guidance during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Brucker, David; Ehrhardt, Andre; Fischer, Stefan; Goebel, Werner; Goetz, Marcus; Guenther, Bettina; Hennig, Georg; Herms, Jochen; Irion, Klaus-Martin; Johansson, Ann; Kienast, Yvonne; Kniebuehler, Gesa; Li, Pan; Ruehm, Adrian; Sandner, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Objective: When a stereotactic biopsy is taken to enable histopathological diagnosis of a suspected brain tumor, it is essential to i) do this safely, that is not injure a major blood vessel and ii) to obtain relevant vital material from the tumor. We are investigating the suitability of Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence for blood vessel recognition and 5- Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence for identification of proliferative brain tumor tissue. Methods: A fiber-optic endoscopic approach was studied to generate and detect both fluorescence signals. PpIX concentrations in brain tumors have been measured by chemical extraction. Preliminary equipment was studied in a mouse model. Results: PpIX-concentrations in glioblastoma tissue showed high inner- and inter-patient variability, but each patient out of 15 with interpretable data showed at least one sample with a PpIX-concentration exceeding 2.4 μmol/l, which is easily detectable by state-of-the-art fiberoptic fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging fluoroscope with 30,000 pixels resolution could be introduced through a position controlled stereotactic needle. ICG-fluorescence from vessels with diameters >= 0.1 mm can be detected with a contrast of 2-2.5 against surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Fluorescence detection during stereotactic biopsy might increase safety and precision of the procedure significantly.

  16. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  17. Imprint cytology on microcalcifications excised by Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy: A rapid preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Fotou, Maria; Oikonomou, Vassiliki; Zagouri, Flora; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Nonni, Afroditi; Athanassiadou, Pauline; Drouveli, Theodora; atsouris, Efstratios; Kotzia, Evagelia; Zografos, George C

    2007-01-01

    Background To evaluate imprint cytology in the context of specimens with microcalcifications derived from Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy (VABB). Patients and methods A total of 93 women with microcalcifications BI-RADS 3 and 4 underwent VABB and imprint samples were examined. VABB was performed on Fischer's table using 11-gauge Mammotome vacuum probes. A mammogram of the cores after the procedure confirmed the excision of microcalcifications. For the application of imprint cytology, the cores with microcalcifications confirmed by mammogram were gently rolled against glass microscope slides and thus imprint smears were made. For rapid preliminary diagnosis Diff-Quick stain, modified Papanicolaou stain and May Grunwald Giemsa were used. Afterwards, the core was dipped into a CytoRich Red Collection fluid for a few seconds in order to obtain samples with the use of the specimen wash. After the completion of cytological procedures, the core was prepared for routine histological study. The pathologist was blind to the preliminary cytological results. The cytological and pathological diagnoses were comparatively evaluated. Results According to the pathological examination, 73 lesions were benign, 15 lesions were carcinomas (12 ductal carcinomas in situ, 3 invasive ductal carcinomas), and 5 lesions were precursor: 3 cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and 2 cases of lobular neoplasia (LN). The observed sensitivity and specificity of the cytological imprints for cancer were 100% (one-sided, 97.5% CI: 78.2%–100%). Only one case of ADH could be detected by imprint cytology. Neither of the two LN cases was detected by the imprints. The imprints were uninformative in 11 out of 93 cases (11.8%). There was no uninformative case among women with malignancy. Conclusion Imprint cytology provides a rapid, accurate preliminary diagnosis in a few minutes. This method might contribute to the diagnosis of early breast cancer and possibly attenuates patients' anxiety. PMID

  18. Effectiveness of hemostasis with Foley catheter after vacuum-assisted breast biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shao-Mei; Wang, Xue-Mei; Yin, Chu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventional bleeding and post-interventional hematoma are the most common complications following vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Foley catheter-induced hemostasis in VABB. Methods A randomized prospective controlled trial was conducted using a total of 437 consecutive 8-gauge ultrasound-guided VABB procedures that were performed in 282 patients from June 2012 to October 2013. In each procedure, hemostasis was induced with either a Foley catheter or with external compression. Bleeding during intervention, hematoma post-intervention and the time of procedure were recorded. Statistical analysis included a Chi-Square test and an independent-samples t-test, and P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results Significantly less bleeding and post-interventional hematoma resulted when hemostasis was induced using a Foley catheter vs. compression (7.6% vs. 17.4%, P=0.002; 8.9% vs. 27.9%, P<0.001). The mean time of breast biopsy was significantly less when using a Foley catheter vs. compression (33.6 vs. 45.5 min, P<0.001). No post-procedural infectious was encountered. In stratification analysis, there were no significantly different bleeding rates between the Foley catheter and compression methods in cases of single lesions (6.7% vs. 14.1%, P=0.346). In cases of multiple lesions, the Foley catheter method produced less bleeding/hematoma than compression (10.4% vs. 47.4%, P=0.018; 16.7% vs. 52.6%, P=0.020). Whether using a Foley catheter or compression to induce hemostasis, no significant difference was found in the rate of bleeding or hematoma when lesions <15 mm were removed (3.8% vs. 6.1%, P=0.531; 6.1% vs. 11.4%, P=0.340). When lesions ≥15 mm were excised, the rates of interventional bleeding and post-interventional hematoma were significantly lower in the Foley catheter study group than the compression control group (12.5% vs. 32.2%, P=0.034; 12.5% vs. 49.4%, P<0

  19. Underestimation of cancer in case of diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) by vacuum assisted core needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Polom, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Kurzawa, Paweł; Michalak, Michał; Murawa, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Background With the introduction of mammography screening, we are more often dealing with the diagnosis of precancerous and preinvasive breast lesions. An increasing number of patients are observed to show a premalignant change of ADH (atypical ductal hyperplasia). It also involves a wider use of the vacuum assisted core biopsy as a tool for verifying nonpalpable changes identified by mammography. Aim This paper describes our experience of 134 cases of ADH diagnosed at Mammotome® vacuum core needle biopsy. Material and methods Of 4326 mammotomic biopsies performed at our institution in 2000–2006, ADH was diagnosed in 134 patients (3.1%). Patients underwent surgery to remove the suspected lesion. All histopathological blocks were again reviewed by one pathologist. Clinical, radiological and pathological data were collected for statistical evaluation. Results Underestimation of invasive changes occurred in 12 patients (9%). The only clinicopathologic feature of statistical significance radiologically and pathologically was the presence of radial scar in the mammography. Conclusions More frequent diagnosis of precancerous changes in the mammotomic breast biopsy forces us to establish a clear clinical practice. The problem is the underestimation of invasive changes. The occurrence of radial scar on mammography for diagnosis of the presence of ADH increases the risk of invasive changes. PMID:24377013

  20. Initial Experience with Magnetic Resonance-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Biopsy in Korean Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hye Na; Ko, Eun Young; Shin, Jung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to describe our initial experience with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsy and to determine the malignancy rate of additional lesions identified by MR only in Korean women with breast cancer. Methods A retrospective review identified 22 consecutive patients with breast cancer who had undergone MR-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (VAB) of MR-only identified lesions from May 2009 to October 2011.We evaluated the rate of compliance, the technical success for MR-guided VAB and the MR imaging findings of the target lesions. VAB histology was compared with surgical histology and follow-up imaging findings. Results The biopsy recommendations for MR-only identified lesions were accepted in 46.8% (22/47) of patients. One of 22 procedures failed due to the target's posterior location. Among 21 MR-guided VAB procedures, the target lesions were considered as a mass in 12 cases and a nonmass enhancement in nine cases. VAB histology revealed malignancies in 14% (3/21) of cases, high-risk lesions in 24% (5/21) and benign lesions in 62% (13/21). Eleven cases (52%, 11/21) had a positive surgical correlation, and one of them was upgraded from atypical ductal hyperplasia to invasive ductal carcinoma. In the remaining 10 lesions, follow-up breast ultrasound and mammography were available (range, 15-44 months; mean, 32.1 months) and did not show suspicious lesions. The final malignancy rate was 19% (4/21). Conclusion MR-guided VAB for MR-only identified lesions yielded a 19% malignancy rate in Korean women with breast cancer. MR-guided VAB helps surgeons avoid an unnecessary wide excision or additional excisional biopsy. PMID:25320626

  1. Outcome Analysis of 9-Gauge Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Core Needle Breast Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Gaiane M.; Dogan, Basak E.; Smith, Taletha B.; Liu, Ping; Yang, Wei T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To correlate 9-gauge Magnetic Resonance imaging-guided Vacuum-Assisted breast Biopsy (MRVAB) with surgical histology to determine the upgrade rate and to correlate the frequency of MRVAB cancer diagnosis with breast MRI indications and enhancement characteristics of targeted lesions. Materials and Methods The HIPAA compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A database search was performed of all MRVABs performed from January 1, 2005 to September 31, 2010. The breast MRI indications, history, age, risk factors, lesion size, enhancement characteristics, pathology at MRVAB and at surgery were documented. Fisher's exact test and Analysis of Variance were used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 218 lesions underwent MRVAB in 197 women (mean age 52 years, range 28 - 76 years), of which 85 (39%) had surgical correlation. (R1, #3) There were 48/218 (22%) malignant, 133/218 (61%) benign, and 37/218 (17%) high-risk lesions at MRVAB. Ten (12%) of 85 lesions were upgraded to malignancy at surgery, with a final malignancy rate of 25%. The frequency of malignancy was significantly higher in patients presenting for diagnostic (50/177, 28%) versus screening (4/41, 10%, P<0.05) evaluation, patients with ipsilateral cancer (22/49, 45%, P<0.001), lesions with washout kinetics (34/103, 33%, P < 0.05); and relatively higher in lesions with non-mass-like enhancement (26/76, 34%, P=0.07), which represented ductal carcinoma in situ in the majority (17/26, 65%, P<0.005). Conclusion Patients with ipsilateral cancer who have additional suspicious lesions identified on MRI require careful evaluation and biopsy to exclude additional sites of cancer that may impact surgical management. PMID:22268171

  2. Limitations of stereotactic biopsy in the initial management of gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R. J.; Fuller, G. N.; Abi-Said, D.; Lang, F. F.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Shi, W. M.; Wildrick, D. M.; Sawaya, R.

    2001-01-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is often performed for diagnostic purposes before treating patients whose imaging studies highly suggest glioma. Indications cited for biopsy include diagnosis and/or the "inoperability" of the tumor. This study questions the routine use of stereotactic biopsy in the initial management of gliomas. At The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, we retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 81 patients whose imaging studies suggested glioma and who underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by craniotomy/resection (within 60 days) between 1993 and 1998. All relevant clinical and imaging information was reviewed, including computerized volumetric analysis of the tumors based on pre- and postoperative MRI. Stereotactic biopsy was performed at institutions other than M. D. Anderson in 78 (96%) of 81 patients. The majority of tumors were located either in eloquent brain (36 of 81 = 44%) or near-eloquent brain (41 of 81 = 51%), and this frequently was the rationale cited for performing stereotactic biopsy. Gross total resection (>95%) was achieved in 46 (57%) of 81 patients, with a median extent of resection of 96% for this series. Diagnoses based on biopsy or resection in the same patient differed in 40 (49%) of 82 cases. This discrepancy was reduced to 30 (38%) of 80 cases when the biopsy slides were reviewed preoperatively by each of three neuropathologists at M. D. Anderson. Major neurologic complications occurred in 10 (12.3%) of 81 surgical patients and 3 (3.7%) of 81 patients undergoing biopsy. Surgical morbidity was probably higher in our series than it would be for glioma patients in general because our patients represent a highly selected subset of glioma patients whose tumors present a technical challenge to remove. Stereotactic biopsy is frequently inaccurate in providing a correct diagnosis and is associated with additional risk and cost. If stereotactic biopsy is performed, expert neuropathology consultation should be sought

  3. Optical spectroscopy for stereotactic biopsy of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; von Berg, Anna; Fiedler, Sebastian; Goetz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Polzer, Christoph; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic biopsy procedure is performed to obtain a tissue sample for diagnosis purposes. Currently, a fiber-based mechano-optical device for stereotactic biopsies of brain tumors is developed. Two different fluorophores are employed to improve the safety and reliability of this procedure: The fluorescence of intravenously applied indocyanine green (ICG) facilitates the recognition of blood vessels and thus helps minimize the risk of cerebral hemorrhages. 5- aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence is used to localize vital tumor tissue. ICG fluorescence detection using a 2-fiber probe turned out to be an applicable method to recognize blood vessels about 1.5 mm ahead of the fiber tip during a brain tumor biopsy. Moreover, the suitability of two different PpIX excitation wavelengths regarding practical aspects was investigated: While PpIX excitation in the violet region (at 405 nm) allows for higher sensitivity, red excitation (at 633 nm) is noticeably superior with regard to blood layers obscuring the fluorescence signal. Contact measurements on brain simulating agar phantoms demonstrated that a typical blood coverage of the tumor reduces the PpIX signal to about 75% and nearly 0% for 633 nm and 405 nm excitation, respectively. As a result, 633 nm seems to be the wavelength of choice for PpIX-assisted detection of high-grade gliomas in stereotactic biopsy.

  4. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebral lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, M A; Pell, M F; Brew, B J

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy, mortality and morbidity of CT directed stereotactic biopsy of a cerebral lesion in 32 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients between July 1991 and June 1994 who had an atypical presentation for toxoplasmosis or who were failing or intolerant of empirical antitoxoplasmosis treatment was evaluated. An histological diagnosis was able to be made in 85%: progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in 13, primary cerebral lymphoma in 10, toxoplasmosis in 3 and HIV encephalitis in one. Non-specific reactive changes or gliosis were seen in 5 patients. There was no mortality, and morbidity occurred in 2 patients: one intraventricular haemorrhage and one transient third nerve palsy. Correct diagnosis made by image-directed stereotactic biopsy of central nervous system (CNS) disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients may improve outcome, particularly in those diseases where effective treatment strategies already exist and become increasingly available in the future.

  5. Combination of needle aspiration and core needle biopsy: A new technique of stereotactic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abrar Ahad; Wani, M. Afzal; Ramzan, Altaf U.; Nizami, Furqan A.; Malik, Nayil K.; Shafiq, S.; Ahmad, Rais; Kumar, Ashish; Lone, Iqbal; Makhdoomi, Rumana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aims at describing the results of using a new technique to acquire the tissue sample in stereotactic biopsy of brain lesions. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in 19 patients over a period of 5 years in which we used the new technique, i.e., Abrar and Afzal technique (AT) of obtaining tissue biopsy. It is a combination of core tissue biopsy and needle aspiration techniques. The technique was devised to acquire greater amount of tissue for pathologic study. Results: While we could give pathologic diagnosis in 18 patients out of 19 (94.7%), in one patient, the tissue sample revealed only inflammatory cells and definitive diagnosis could not be reached. There was no significant morbidity or any mortality in the series. Conclusion: Abrar and Afzal technique is a reasonably accurate technique of acquiring larger tissue sample in stereotactic brain biopsy without any additional risks. It can be done with little modification of the conventional equipment available with the stereotactic system. PMID:27057212

  6. The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, R M; Russell, E; Yungbluth, M; Hidvegi, D F; Brody, B A; Dal Canto, M C

    1992-02-01

    A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

  7. Raman spectroscopy: a real-time tool for identifying microcalcifications during stereotactic breast core needle biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Saha, A.; Barman, I.; Dingari, N. C.; McGee, S.; Volynskaya, Z.; Galindo, L. H.; Liu, W.; Plecha, D.; Klein, N.; Dasari, R. R.; Fitzmaurice, M.

    2011-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. We present here a Raman spectroscopic tool for detecting microcalcifications in breast tissue based on their chemical composition. We collected ex vivo Raman spectra from 159 tissue sites in fresh stereotactic breast needle biopsies from 33 patients, including 54 normal sites, 75 lesions with microcalcifications and 30 lesions without microcalcifications. Application of our Raman technique resulted in a positive predictive value of 97% for detecting microcalcifications. This study shows that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to detect microcalcifications during stereotactic breast core biopsies and provide real-time feedback to radiologists, thus reducing non-diagnostic and false negative biopsies. PMID:22025985

  8. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  9. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T; Cecere, Thomas E; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm(3). No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions. PMID:26664949

  10. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T.; Cecere, Thomas E.; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L.; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm3. No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions. PMID:26664949

  11. Application of Raman spectroscopy to identify microcalcifications and underlying breast lesions at stereotactic core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-06-01

    Microcalcifications are a feature of diagnostic significance on a mammogram and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we report development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to simultaneously identify microcalcification status and diagnose the underlying breast lesion, in real-time, during stereotactic core needle biopsy procedures. Raman spectra were obtained ex vivo from 146 tissue sites from fresh stereotactic breast needle biopsy tissue cores from 33 patients, including 50 normal tissue sites, 77 lesions with microcalcifications, and 19 lesions without microcalcifications, using a compact clinical system. The Raman spectra were modeled on the basis of the breast tissue components, and a support vector machine framework was used to develop a single-step diagnostic algorithm to distinguish normal tissue, fibrocystic change (FCC), fibroadenoma, and breast cancer, in the absence and presence of microcalcifications. This algorithm was subjected to leave-one-site-out cross-validation, yielding a positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of 100%, 95.6%, 62.5%, and 100% for diagnosis of breast cancer (with or without microcalcifications) and an overall accuracy of 82.2% for classification into specific categories of normal tissue, FCC, fibroadenoma, or breast cancer (with and without microcalcifications). Notably, the majority of breast cancers diagnosed are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common lesion associated with microcalcifications, which could not be diagnosed using previous Raman algorithm(s). Our study shows the potential of Raman spectroscopy to concomitantly detect microcalcifications and diagnose associated lesions, including DCIS, and thus provide real-time feedback to radiologists during such biopsy procedures, reducing nondiagnostic and false-negative biopsies. PMID:23729641

  12. Application of Raman spectroscopy to identify microcalcifications and underlying breast lesions at stereotactic core needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H.; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-01-01

    Microcalcifications are a feature of diagnostic significance on a mammogram and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we report development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to simultaneously identify microcalcification status and diagnose the underlying breast lesion, in real-time, during stereotactic core needle biopsy procedures. Raman spectra were obtained ex vivo from 146 tissue sites from fresh stereotactic breast needle biopsy tissue cores from 33 patients, including 50 normal tissue sites, 77 lesions with microcalcifications, and 19 lesions without microcalcifications, using a compact clinical system. The Raman spectra were modeled based on the breast tissue components and a support vector machine framework was used to develop a single-step diagnostic algorithm to distinguish normal tissue, fibrocystic change (FCC), fibroadenoma (FA) and breast cancer, in the absence and presence of microcalcifications. This algorithm was subjected to leave-one-site-out cross-validation, yielding a positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity and specificity of 100%, 95.6%, 62.5% and 100% for diagnosis of breast cancer (with or without microcalcifications) and an overall accuracy of 82.2% for classification into specific categories of normal tissue, FCC, FA or breast cancer (with and without microcalcifications). Notably, the majority of breast cancers diagnosed are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common lesion associated with microcalcifications, which could not be diagnosed using previous Raman algorithm(s). Our study demonstrates the potential of Raman spectroscopy to concomitantly detect microcalcifications and diagnose associated lesions, including DCIS, and thus provide real-time feedback to radiologists during such biopsy procedures, reducing non-diagnostic and false negative biopsies. PMID:23729641

  13. A new system for neuronavigation and stereotactic biopsy pantograph stereotactic localization and guidance system.

    PubMed

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Moin, Houshang; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Hajibabaie, Mahmood; Haghighi, Elham K; Abbasifard, Salman

    2011-07-01

    Everyday, neurosurgeons face the problem of orientation within the brain but the advent of stereotactic surgery and neuronavigation have solved this problem. Frame-based stereotactic systems (FBSS) and neuronavigation systems have their own strengths and priority and pitfalls, which were the main driving force for us to design a new system. This hybrid system comprises three main parts: main frame, monitoring system, and pantograph, which are connected to each other and to the operating table by particular attachments. For using this system, after performing CT SCAN or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) the axial view will be transferred to Liquid Cristal Display (LCD). In the operating room, the head of the patient fixes to the operating table and registration is completed by two arms of pantograph. We made a simulation operation with our system on an occipital cavernous angioma and a frontal oligodendroglioma. The software, which have been used for simulation were as follows; Poser (version-7), Catia (version 5- R18), and 3 Dimension Max (version 2008). The accuracy of this system is approximately two millimeter. The advantages of this system are: easy to use, much less expensive, and compatible with different devices, which may be needed during neurosurgical operation. For countries that do not have the opportunity to have sophisticated technology and neuronavigation system, we believe that our system is a one-stop solution.

  14. CT-assisted stereotactic brain biopsy: value of intraoperative frozen section diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colbassani, H J; Nishio, S; Sweeney, K M; Bakay, R A; Takei, Y

    1988-01-01

    In 100 recent CT-guided brain biopsies, the value of intraoperative histologic examination using frozen section technique was evaluated. In 87 of these cases, the biopsy was performed stereotactically. In the remaining 13 cases, a CT-guided free hand technique was used. Of the 100 biopsies performed, adequate tissue for histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 97, and in three the biopsy was nondiagnostic. In 61 procedures the initial biopsy specimen was adequate for diagnosis. Two specimens were required in 25 and in the remaining cases it was necessary to obtain three to four biopsy specimens before a definitive diagnosis could be made. Ultimately, the histologic diagnosis was made on frozen section examination in 93 of the cases. The lesions identified were neoplastic disease in 83 cases, vascular disease in seven, infectious disease in five, demyelinating disease in one, and radiation necrosis in one. Comparison between the frozen section diagnosis and the final diagnosis based on the permanent sections revealed that they matched in 89 cases (92%). Of the 83 cases of neoplasms the exact grade of malignancy was determined by frozen section to make a final diagnosis revealed that even if the specimen volume was less than 2 mm3, the biopsy was generally successful. The disadvantages of the small sample size obtained through needle biopsy are best overcome by careful targeting and assessment of sample quality by intraoperative frozen section examinations, which will give the definitive diagnosis in most of the cases without paraffin-embedded sections. Images PMID:3283295

  15. Raman spectroscopic sensing of carbonate intercalation in breast microcalcifications at stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyavathi, R.; Saha, Anushree; Soares, Jaqueline S.; Spegazzini, Nicolas; McGee, Sasha; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Barman, Ishan

    2015-04-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and frequent target for stereotactic biopsy. Despite their indisputable value, microcalcifications, particularly of the type II variety that are comprised of calcium hydroxyapatite deposits, remain one of the least understood disease markers. Here we employed Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the relationship between pathogenicity of breast lesions in fresh biopsy cores and composition of type II microcalcifications. Using a chemometric model of chemical-morphological constituents, acquired Raman spectra were translated to characterize chemical makeup of the lesions. We find that increase in carbonate intercalation in the hydroxyapatite lattice can be reliably employed to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, with algorithms based only on carbonate and cytoplasmic protein content exhibiting excellent negative predictive value (93-98%). Our findings highlight the importance of calcium carbonate, an underrated constituent of microcalcifications, as a spectroscopic marker in breast pathology evaluation and pave the way for improved biopsy guidance.

  16. Raman spectroscopic sensing of carbonate intercalation in breast microcalcifications at stereotactic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sathyavathi, R; Saha, Anushree; Soares, Jaqueline S; Spegazzini, Nicolas; McGee, Sasha; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Barman, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and frequent target for stereotactic biopsy. Despite their indisputable value, microcalcifications, particularly of the type II variety that are comprised of calcium hydroxyapatite deposits, remain one of the least understood disease markers. Here we employed Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the relationship between pathogenicity of breast lesions in fresh biopsy cores and composition of type II microcalcifications. Using a chemometric model of chemical-morphological constituents, acquired Raman spectra were translated to characterize chemical makeup of the lesions. We find that increase in carbonate intercalation in the hydroxyapatite lattice can be reliably employed to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, with algorithms based only on carbonate and cytoplasmic protein content exhibiting excellent negative predictive value (93-98%). Our findings highlight the importance of calcium carbonate, an underrated constituent of microcalcifications, as a spectroscopic marker in breast pathology evaluation and pave the way for improved biopsy guidance. PMID:25927331

  17. Raman spectroscopic sensing of carbonate intercalation in breast microcalcifications at stereotactic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sathyavathi, R.; Saha, Anushree; Soares, Jaqueline S.; Spegazzini, Nicolas; McGee, Sasha; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Barman, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and frequent target for stereotactic biopsy. Despite their indisputable value, microcalcifications, particularly of the type II variety that are comprised of calcium hydroxyapatite deposits, remain one of the least understood disease markers. Here we employed Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the relationship between pathogenicity of breast lesions in fresh biopsy cores and composition of type II microcalcifications. Using a chemometric model of chemical-morphological constituents, acquired Raman spectra were translated to characterize chemical makeup of the lesions. We find that increase in carbonate intercalation in the hydroxyapatite lattice can be reliably employed to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, with algorithms based only on carbonate and cytoplasmic protein content exhibiting excellent negative predictive value (93–98%). Our findings highlight the importance of calcium carbonate, an underrated constituent of microcalcifications, as a spectroscopic marker in breast pathology evaluation and pave the way for improved biopsy guidance. PMID:25927331

  18. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.; Downey, D. B.; Fenster, A.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM and US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target localization

  19. Development and validation of a new guidance device for lateral approach stereotactic breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Kornecki, A; Bax, J; Mundt, Y; Fenster, A

    2009-06-01

    Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is the gold standard for minimally invasive breast cancer diagnosis. Current systems rely on one of two methods for needle insertion: A vertical approach (perpendicular to the breast compression plate) or a lateral approach (parallel to the compression plate), While the vertical approach is more frequently used, it is not feasible in patients with thin breasts (<3 cm thick after compression) or with superficial lesions. Further, existing SBB guidance hardware provides at most one degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, and as such requires a separate skin incision for each biopsy target. The authors present a new design of lateral guidance device for SBB, which addresses the limitations of the vertical approach and provides improvements over the existing lateral guidance hardware. Specifically, the new device provides (1) an adjustable rigid needle support to minimize needle deflection within the breast and (2) an additional degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, allowing the radiologist to sample multiple targets through a single skin incision. This device was compared to a commercial lateral guidance device in a series of phantom experiments. Needle placement error using each device was measured in agar phantoms for needle insertions at lateral depths of 2 and 5 cm. The biopsy success rate for each device was then estimated by performing biopsy procedures in commercial SBB phantoms. SBB performed with the new lateral guidance device provided reduced needle placement error relative to the commercial lateral guidance device (0.89 +/- 0.22 vs 1.75 +/- 0.35 mm for targets at 2 cm depth; 1.94 +/- 0.20 vs 3.21 +/- 0.31 mm for targets at 5 cm depth). The new lateral guidance device also provided improved biopsy accuracy in SBB procedures compared to the commercial lateral guidance device (100% vs 58% success rate). Finally, experiments were performed to demonstrate that the new device can accurately sample

  20. Development and validation of a new guidance device for lateral approach stereotactic breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K.; Kornecki, A.; Bax, J.; Mundt, Y.; Fenster, A.

    2009-06-15

    Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is the gold standard for minimally invasive breast cancer diagnosis. Current systems rely on one of two methods for needle insertion: A vertical approach (perpendicular to the breast compression plate) or a lateral approach (parallel to the compression plate). While the vertical approach is more frequently used, it is not feasible in patients with thin breasts (<3 cm thick after compression) or with superficial lesions. Further, existing SBB guidance hardware provides at most one degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, and as such requires a separate skin incision for each biopsy target. The authors present a new design of lateral guidance device for SBB, which addresses the limitations of the vertical approach and provides improvements over the existing lateral guidance hardware. Specifically, the new device provides (1) an adjustable rigid needle support to minimize needle deflection within the breast and (2) an additional degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, allowing the radiologist to sample multiple targets through a single skin incision. This device was compared to a commercial lateral guidance device in a series of phantom experiments. Needle placement error using each device was measured in agar phantoms for needle insertions at lateral depths of 2 and 5 cm. The biopsy success rate for each device was then estimated by performing biopsy procedures in commercial SBB phantoms. SBB performed with the new lateral guidance device provided reduced needle placement error relative to the commercial lateral guidance device (0.89{+-}0.22 vs 1.75{+-}0.35 mm for targets at 2 cm depth; 1.94{+-}0.20 vs 3.21{+-}0.31 mm for targets at 5 cm depth). The new lateral guidance device also provided improved biopsy accuracy in SBB procedures compared to the commercial lateral guidance device (100% vs 58% success rate). Finally, experiments were performed to demonstrate that the new device can accurately sample

  1. Development and validation of a new guidance device for lateral approach stereotactic breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Kornecki, A; Bax, J; Mundt, Y; Fenster, A

    2009-06-01

    Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is the gold standard for minimally invasive breast cancer diagnosis. Current systems rely on one of two methods for needle insertion: A vertical approach (perpendicular to the breast compression plate) or a lateral approach (parallel to the compression plate), While the vertical approach is more frequently used, it is not feasible in patients with thin breasts (<3 cm thick after compression) or with superficial lesions. Further, existing SBB guidance hardware provides at most one degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, and as such requires a separate skin incision for each biopsy target. The authors present a new design of lateral guidance device for SBB, which addresses the limitations of the vertical approach and provides improvements over the existing lateral guidance hardware. Specifically, the new device provides (1) an adjustable rigid needle support to minimize needle deflection within the breast and (2) an additional degree of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory, allowing the radiologist to sample multiple targets through a single skin incision. This device was compared to a commercial lateral guidance device in a series of phantom experiments. Needle placement error using each device was measured in agar phantoms for needle insertions at lateral depths of 2 and 5 cm. The biopsy success rate for each device was then estimated by performing biopsy procedures in commercial SBB phantoms. SBB performed with the new lateral guidance device provided reduced needle placement error relative to the commercial lateral guidance device (0.89 +/- 0.22 vs 1.75 +/- 0.35 mm for targets at 2 cm depth; 1.94 +/- 0.20 vs 3.21 +/- 0.31 mm for targets at 5 cm depth). The new lateral guidance device also provided improved biopsy accuracy in SBB procedures compared to the commercial lateral guidance device (100% vs 58% success rate). Finally, experiments were performed to demonstrate that the new device can accurately sample

  2. Development and comparative assessment of Raman spectroscopic classification algorithms for lesion discrimination in stereotactic breast biopsies with microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Saha, Anushree; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis H.; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. Here, we develop and compare different approaches for developing Raman classification algorithms to diagnose invasive and in situ breast cancer, fibrocystic change and fibroadenoma that can be associated with microcalcifications. In this study, Raman spectra were acquired from tissue cores obtained from fresh breast biopsies and analyzed using a constituent-based breast model. Diagnostic algorithms based on the breast model fit coefficients were devised using logistic regression, C4.5 decision tree classification, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and support vector machine (SVM) analysis, and subjected to leave-one-out cross validation. The best performing algorithm was based on SVM analysis (with radial basis function), which yielded a positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 96% for cancer diagnosis. Importantly, these results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy provides adequate diagnostic information for lesion discrimination even in the presence of microcalcifications, which to the best of our knowledge has not been previously reported. Raman spectroscopy and multivariate classification provide accurate discrimination among lesions in stereotactic breast biopsies, irrespective of microcalcification status. PMID:22815240

  3. A new lateral guidance device for stereotactic breast biopsy using an add-on unit to an upright mammography system.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Fenster, A; Kornecki, A; Mundt, Y; Bax, J

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is the gold standard for noninvasive breast cancer diagnosis. Current systems rely on one of two methods for needle insertion: a vertical-approach (from above the breast compression plate) or a lateral-approach (parallel to the compression plate). While the vertical-approach is more commonly used, it is not feasible in patients with thin breasts (less than 3 cm thickness after compression) or with superficial lesions. We present a novel design of lateral guidance device for SBB which addresses these limitations of the vertical-approach, and provides improvements over existing lateral guidance hardware. This device incorporates spherical linkages to allow two degrees of rotational freedom in the needle trajectory for increased targeting flexibility, as well as an adjustable rigid needle support to minimize needle deflection within the tissue. Needle placement error in SBB experiments is compared using both the new lateral guidance device and a commercial lateral guidance device in agar phantoms. The effect of elevation angle on needle placement accuracy using the new lateral guidance device is also assessed. Finally, a biopsy accuracy experiment is presented using a certified SBB phantom to compare the new design and the commercial lateral guidance device. In these experiments, SBB performed using the new lateral guidance device resulted in improved needle placement error and biopsy accuracy, while increasing targeting flexibility and maintaining procedural workflow.

  4. Breast Microcalcifications: Diagnostic Outcomes According to Image-Guided Biopsy Method

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sohi; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic outcomes of ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB), US-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (US-VAB), and stereotactic-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (S-VAB) for diagnosing suspicious breast microcalcification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 336 cases of suspicious breast microcalcification in patients who subsequently underwent image-guided biopsy. US-CNB was performed for US-visible microcalcifications associated with a mass (n = 28), US-VAB for US-visible microcalcifications without an associated mass (n = 59), and S-VAB for mammogram-only visible lesions (n = 249). Mammographic findings, biopsy failure rate, false-negative rate, and underestimation rate were analyzed. Histological diagnoses and the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories were reported. Results Biopsy failure rates for US-CNB, US-VAB, and S-VAB were 7.1% (2/28), 0% (0/59), and 2.8% (7/249), respectively. Three false-negative cases were detected for US-CNB and two for S-VAB. The rates of biopsy-diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ that were upgraded to invasive cancer at surgery were 41.7% (5/12), 12.9% (4/31), and 8.6% (3/35) for US-CNB, US-VAB, and S-VAB, respectively. Sonographically visible lesions were more likely to be malignant (66.2% [51/77] vs. 23.2% [46/198]; p < 0.001) or of higher BI-RADS category (61.0% [47/77] vs. 22.2% [44/198]; p < 0.001) than sonographically invisible lesions. Conclusion Ultrasonography-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is more accurate than US-CNB when suspicious microcalcifications are detected on US. Calcifications with malignant pathology are significantly more visible on US than benign lesions. PMID:26357494

  5. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  6. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Prediction Model for Underestimated Invasive Breast Cancer in Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ at Stereotactic Large Core Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Diepstraten, Suzanne C. E.; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Elias, Sjoerd G.

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. Methods From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, drawn from the prospective COBRA (Core Biopsy after RAdiological localization) and COBRA2000 cohort studies, were used to fit the multivariable model and assess its overall performance, discrimination, and calibration. Results 348 women with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ were available for analysis. In 100 (28.7%) patients invasive carcinoma was found at subsequent surgery. Nine predictors were included in the model. In the multivariable analysis, the predictors with the strongest association were lesion size (OR 1.12 per cm, 95% CI 0.98-1.28), number of cores retrieved at biopsy (OR per core 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01), presence of lobular cancerization (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.25-26.77), and microinvasion (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.42-9.87). The overall performance of the multivariable model was poor with an explained variation of 9% (Nagelkerke’s R2), mediocre discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73), and fairly good calibration. Conclusion The evaluation of our multivariable prediction model in a large, clinically representative study population proves that routine clinical and pathological variables are not suitable to select patients with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ for sentinel node biopsy during primary surgery. PMID:24147085

  8. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Tissue sampling ... biopsy is called a percutaneous biopsy. It removes tissue using a needle attached to a hollow tube ... The needle is passed several times through the tissue being examined. The doctor uses the needle to ...

  9. 19. Engine identified as a single cylinder vacuum assist engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Engine identified as a single cylinder vacuum assist engine for the Filer and Stowell 15-inch continuous mill. - Carnegie Steel-Ohio Works, Steam Engines, 912 Salt Springs Road, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  10. 21. Engine identified as a 'single cylinder vacuum assist engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Engine identified as a 'single cylinder vacuum assist engine for Tod tandem compound engine' showing compressor. - Carnegie Steel-Ohio Works, Steam Engines, 912 Salt Springs Road, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  11. 20. Engine identified as a 'single cylinder vacuum assist engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Engine identified as a 'single cylinder vacuum assist engine for the Tod tandem compound engine' showing crank end. - Carnegie Steel-Ohio Works, Steam Engines, 912 Salt Springs Road, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  12. Single fiber beta detector for stereotactic biopsy and intraoperative lumpectomy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Nalcioglu, O.; Roeck, W.W.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed an intraoperative probe for use in early detection of breast cancer and aiding lumpectomy. The probe consists of a small plastic scintillator, 0.8mm dia and 3mm long, coupled to a single clear optical-fiber strand, and solid state photomultiplier. Due to the small size of the probe, it can be placed inside of a small gauge biopsy needle. The scintillator is very efficient in detecting betas and positrons while being very in efficient to energetic gammas due to small size and low density. High quantum efficiency, 80%, and high gain obtainable, solid state photomultiplier makes the probe very low noise device in detecting beta particles. Intrinsic resolution of the probe is expected to be around 1 mm. Preliminary results using beta sources and a rat bearing R320 adenocarcinoma tumor were very successful.

  13. A Combined Scintimammography/Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger; F. Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; C. Keppel; B. Kross; S. Majewski; V. Popov; R. Wojcik; D. C. Wymer

    2000-10-20

    Jefferson Lab, Hampton University and the Riverside Regional Medical Center are collaborating in a clinical study employing a dual modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography. The purpose of the study is to obtain clinical data on the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions with the ultimate goal to reduce the number of false positives associated with conventional x-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm x 5.3 cm based on a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is <4 mm FWHM and the sensitivity is 4000 cps/mCi. Preliminary results are that of the six cases that indicated a lesion with high uptake of MiraLuma ({sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi) five were positive for cancer. Out of a total of 25 patients in the study, all cases negative for MiraLuma uptake were confirmed negative via the biopsy pathology. The scintimammography results indicate that the lesions become visible with the mini gamma camera within 3 minutes post injection of MiraLuma.

  14. Pleomorphic adenoma of the breast initially misdiagnosed as metaplastic carcinoma in preoperative stereotactic biopsy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Djakovic, A; Engel, J B; Geisinger, E; Honig, A; Tschammler, A; Dietl, J

    2011-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is a benign mixed tumor found commonly in the salivary glands but rarely in the breast. PA might be misinterpreted clinically and pathologically as a malignant tumor. The differential diagnoses include fibroadenoma, phyllodes tumor and metaplastic carcinoma. Metaplastic carcinoma is the most important entitiy with respect to differential diagnoses, as surgical overtreatment, i.e., mastectomy may be the result. We describe one of the first cases of PA initially misdiagnosed as metaplastic carcinoma (osteoid-chondroid type) in a preoperative stereotactic biopsy and review the literature regarding this entity.

  15. Changing attitudes toward needle biopsies of breast cancer in Shanghai: experience and current status over the past 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuang; Liu, Zhe-Bin; Ling, Hong; Chen, Jia-Jian; Shen, Ju-Ping; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic patterns in breast cancer have greatly changed over the past few decades, and core needle biopsy (CNB) has become a reliable procedure for detecting breast cancer without invasive surgery. To estimate the changing diagnostic patterns of breast cancer in urban Shanghai, 11,947 women with breast lesions detected by preoperative needle biopsy between January 1995 and December 2012 were selected from the Shanghai Cancer Data base, which integrates information from approximately 50% of breast cancer patients in Shanghai. The CNB procedure uses an automated prone unit, biopsy gun, and 14-gauge needles under freehand or ultrasound guidance and was performed by experienced radiologists and surgeons specializing in needle biopsies. Diagnosis and classification for each patient were independently evaluated by pathologists. Over the indicated 8-year period, biopsy type consisted of 11,947 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies (UCNBs), 2,015 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (UVABs), and 654 stereotactic X-ray-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (XVABs). For all the 11,947 women included in this study, image-guided needle biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure. Approximately 81.0% of biopsied samples were histopathologically determined to be malignant lesions, 5.5% were determined to be high-risk lesions, and 13.5% were determined to be benign lesions. The number of patients choosing UCNB increased at the greatest rate, and UCNB has become a standard procedure for histodiagnosis because it is inexpensive, convenient, and accurate. The overall false-negative rate of CNB was 1.7%, and the specific false-negative rates for UCNB, UVAB, and XVAB, were 1.7%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. This study suggests that the use of preoperative needle biopsy as the initial breast cancer diagnostic procedure is acceptable in urban Shanghai. Preoperative needle biopsy is now a standard procedure in the Shanghai Cancer Center because it may reduce the number of surgeries

  16. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have breast cancer . Two main types of breast cancer may be found: Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, ...

  17. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum...

  18. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum...

  19. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum...

  20. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum...

  2. Combined positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the planning of stereotactic brain biopsies in children: experience in 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Pirotte, Benoit; Goldman, Serge; Salzberg, Sacha; Wikler, David; David, Philippe; Vandesteene, Arlette; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Salmon, Isabelle; Brotchi, Jacques; Levivier, Marc

    2003-03-01

    Because brain tumors can be histologically heterogeneous, stereotactic brain biopsies (SBB) may lead to inaccurate diagnosis or grading. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in pediatric neuro-oncology to help in the understanding and management of brain neoplasms. We combined PET and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the planning of SBB in 9 children (5 males and 4 females, aged 2-14 years) with infiltrative, ill-defined brain lesions. Tracers used for PET were (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in 4 cases, (11)C-methionine in 2 cases and both tracers in 3 cases. Biopsy targets were selected in hypermetabolic areas. PET-guided SBB provided accurate histological diagnosis in all patients and allowed a reduction of the number of trajectories in lesions located in functional areas. It also helped in better understanding and management of complex cases. This preliminary series suggests that combining PET and MR imaging in the planning of SBB in children (1) improves the diagnostic yield of SBB in infiltrative, ill-defined brain lesions, (2) makes it possible to reduce the sampling in high-risk/functional areas and (3) improves the quality of therapeutic management of pediatric brain tumors.

  3. Versatile use of vacuum-assisted healing in fifty patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Fadhli, Ahmad; Alexander, George; Kanjoor, James Roy

    2009-01-01

    Context: Wound management can often be a challenging experience, especially in the presence of diabetes mellitus, vascular or immunological compromise. While no single technique can be considered by itself to be ideal, vacuum-assisted healing, which is a recent innovation, is fast becoming a necessary addition as adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To determine the efficacy of vacuum-assisted healing. Settings and Design: Plastic surgery centre. Ministry of Health Hospital, Kuwait. Materials and Methods: Patients from Kuwait in a wide variety of clinical situations were chosen for study: Patients (n=50) were classified by diagnosis: Group 1: pressure sore- sacral (n= 3), trochanteric (n=6), ischial (n= 2); Group 2: ulcers (n= 11); Group 3: traumatic soft tissue wounds (n =15); Group 4: extensive tissue loss from the abdominal wall perineum, thigh and axilla (n =5); Group 5: sternal dehiscence wounds (n =4) and Group 6: wounds from flap necrosis (n =4). All wounds were subjected to vacuum by wall unit or portable unit, using pressure of 100-125 mm - continuous or intermittent. Closure of wounds, significant reduction in size and refusal by patient for continuation of vacuum-assisted closure therapy were end points of vacuum application. Results: Sixteen per cent of patients showed complete healing of the wound. Seventy per cent of patients showed 20-78% reduction in wound size. In 14% of patients treatment had to be discontinued. All patients showed improvement in granulation tissue and reduction in bacterial isolates and tissue oedema. Conclusions: The application of subatmospheric pressure or negative pressure promotes healing in a wide range of clinical settings and is an advanced wound healing therapy that can optimize patient care, promote rapid wound healing and help manage costs. It may be used in most instances in both hospital and community settings. PMID:20368850

  4. Breast Cancer Detection with Short-Interval Follow-up Compared with Return to Annual Screening in Patients with Benign Stereotactic or US-guided Breast Biopsy Results

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alisa K.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Geller, Berta M.; Hotaling, Elise N.; Herschorn, Sally D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cancer detection rate and stage after benign stereotactic or ultrasonography (US)–guided core breast biopsy between patients with short-interval follow-up (SIFU) and those who return to annual screening. Materials and Methods The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registry and the BCSC Statistical Coordinating Center received institutional review board approval for active and passive consent processes and a waiver of consent. All procedures were HIPAA compliant. BCSC data for 1994–2010 were used to compare ipsilateral breast cancer detection rates and tumor characteristics for diagnoses within 3 months after SIFU (3–8 months) versus return to annual screening (RTAS) mammography (9–18 months) after receiving a benign pathology result from image-guided breast biopsy. Results In total, 17 631 biopsies with benign findings were identified with SIFU or RTAS imaging. In the SIFU group, 27 ipsilateral breast cancers were diagnosed in 10 715 mammographic examinations (2.5 cancers per 1000 examinations) compared with 16 cancers in 6916 mammographic examinations in the RTAS group (2.3 cancers per 1000 examinations) (P = .88). Sixteen cancers after SIFU (59%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39%, 78%) were invasive versus 12 after RTAS (75%; 95% CI: 48%, 93%). The invasive cancer rate was 1.5 per 1000 examinations after SIFU (95% CI: 0.9, 2.4) and 1.7 per 1000 examinations (95% CI: 0.9, 3.0) after RTAS (P = .70). Among invasive cancers, 25% were late stage (stage 2B, 3, or 4) in the SIFU group (95% CI: 7%, 52%) versus 27% in the RTAS group (95% CI: 6%, 61%). Positive lymph nodes were found in seven (44%; 95% CI: 20%, 70%) invasive cancers after SIFU and in three (25%; 95% CI: 5%, 57%) invasive cancers after RTAS. Conclusion Similar rates of cancer detection were found between SIFU and RTAS after benign breast biopsy with no significant differences in stage, tumor size, or nodal status, although the present study was limited by sample size

  5. Correlation of 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron-emission tomography uptake values and histomorphological findings by stereotactic serial biopsy in newly diagnosed brain tumors using a refined software tool

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Cordeiro, Joacir Graciolli; Albicker, Ulrich; Doostkam, Soroush; Nikkhah, Guido; Kirch, Robert D; Trippel, Michael; Reithmeier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard neuroimaging method to diagnose neoplastic brain lesions, as well as to perform stereotactic biopsy surgical planning. MRI has the advantage of providing structural anatomical details with high sensitivity, though histological specificity is limited. Although combining MRI with other imaging modalities, such as positron-emission tomography (PET), has proven to increment specificity, exact correlation between PET threshold uptake ratios (URs) and histological diagnosis and grading has not yet been described. Objectives The aim of this study was to correlate exactly the histopathological criteria of the biopsy site to its PET uptake value with high spatial resolution (mm3), and to analyze the diagnostic value of PET using the amino acid O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (18F-FET) PET in patients with newly diagnosed brain lesions in comparison to histological findings obtained from stereotactic serial biopsy. Patients and methods A total of 23 adult patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors on MRI were enrolled in this study. Subsequently to diagnoses, all patients underwent a 18F-FET PET-guided stereotactic biopsy, using an original newly developed software module, which is presented here. Conventional MRI, stereotactic computed tomography series, and 18F-FET PET images were semiautomatically fused, and hot-spot detection was performed for target planning. UR was determined using the uptake value from the biopsy sites in relation to the contralateral frontal white matter. UR values ≥1.6 were considered positive for glioma. High-grade glioma (HGG) was suspected with URs ≥3.0, while low-grade glioma (LGG) was suspected with URs between 1.6 and 3.0. Stereotactic serial biopsies along the trajectory at multiple sites were performed in millimeter steps, and the FET URs for each site were correlated exactly with a panel of 27 different histopathological markers. Comparisons between FET URs along the biopsy

  6. Variability Analysis in Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubert, Pascal; Pipes, R. Byron; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2002-01-01

    The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process is a low-cost, innovative method that is being considered for manufacture of large aircraft-quality components where high mechanical properties and dimensional tolerance are essential. In the present work a rigorous science-based approach is used to study the VARTM processing of high performance complex shape components. A process model, COMPRO, is used to simulate the cure of panels produced by VARTM. It was found that the presence of the distribution media significantly affects the magnitude of the exotherm particularly for thick panels. For C-shaped laminates, the part distortion was a function of fiber volume fraction distribution and was affected by the presence of the distribution media.

  7. Lesions with unclear malignant potential (B3) after minimally invasive breast biopsy: evaluation of vacuum biopsies performed in Switzerland and recommended further management

    PubMed Central

    Haueisen, Harald; Kampmann, Gert; Oehlschlegel, Christian; Seifert, B; Rageth, Luzi; Rageth, Christoph; Stadlmann, S; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Histopathological B3 lesions after minimal invasive breast biopsy (VABB) are a particular challenge for the clinician, as there are currently no binding recommendations regarding the subsequent procedure. Purpose To analyze all B3 lesions, diagnosed at VABB and captured in the national central Swiss MIBB database and to provide a data basis for further management in this subgroup of patients. Material and Methods All 9,153 stereotactically, sonographically, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies, performed in Switzerland between 2009 and 2011, captured in a central database, were evaluated. The rate of B3 lesions and the definitive pathological findings in patients who underwent surgical resection were analyzed. Results The B3 rate was 17.0% (1532 of 9000 biopsies with B classification). Among the 521 lesions with a definitive postoperative diagnosis, the malignancy rate (invasive carcinoma or DCIS) was 21.5%. In patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, papillary lesions, flat epithelial atypia, lobular neoplasia, and radial scar diagnosed by VABB, the malignancy rates were 25.9%, 3.1%, 18.3%, 26.4%, and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion B3 lesions, comprising 17%, of all analyzed biopsies, were common and the proportion of malignancies in those lesions undergoing subsequent surgical excision was high (21.5%). PMID:26552694

  8. How to apply vacuum-assisted closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Georgina

    2016-03-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to provide an overview of the technique for applying vacuum-assisted closure therapy (V.A.C. therapy), using the example of one of the most basic dressing types: V.A.C. GranuFoam, a black polyurethane foam. Practitioners should refer to the manufacturer's instructions for application of other dressing types. ▶ V.A.C. therapy is used to apply negative pressure to the wound bed to promote wound healing. ▶ V.A.C therapy promotes perfusion, reduces oedema, draws the wound edges together and stimulates the formation of granulation tissue. ▶ The correct technique for applying V.A.C. therapy is essential to ensure patient safety and optimum wound healing outcomes. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will change your practice. 2. How the use of V.A.C. therapy might affect the patient's experience. PMID:26932648

  9. Vacuum-Assisted, Constant-Force Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P.; Jensen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum-assisted, constant-force exercise device (VAC-FED) has been proposed to fill a need for a safe, reliable exercise machine that would provide constant loads that could range from 20 to 250 lb (0.09 to 1.12 kN) with strokes that could range from 6 to 36 in. (0.15 to 0.91 m). The VAC-FED was originally intended to enable astronauts in microgravity to simulate the lifting of free weights, but it could just as well be used on Earth for simulated weight lifting and other constant-force exercises. Because the VAC-FED would utilize atmospheric/vacuum differential pressure instead of weights to generate force, it could weigh considerably less than either a set of free weights or a typical conventional exercise machine based on weights. Also, the use of atmospheric/ vacuum differential pressure to generate force would render the VAC-FED inherently safer, relative to free weights and to conventional exercise machines that utilize springs to generate forces. The overall function of the VAC-FED would be to generate a constant tensile force in an output cable, which would be attached to a bar, handle, or other exercise interface. The primary force generator in the VAC-FED would be a piston in a cylinder. The piston would separate a volume vented to atmosphere at one end of the cylinder from an evacuated volume at the other end of the cylinder (see figure). Hence, neglecting friction at the piston seals, the force generated would be nearly constant equal to the area of the piston multiplied by the atmospheric/vacuum differential pressure. In the vented volume in the cylinder, a direct-force cable would be looped around a pulley on the piston, doubling the stroke and halving the tension. One end of the direct-force cable would be anchored to a cylinder cap; the other end of the direct-force cable would be wrapped around a variable-ratio pulley that would couple tension to the output cable. As its name suggests, the variable-ratio pulley would contain a mechanism that

  10. Vacuum-Assisted Venous Drainage: A 2014 Safety Survey.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Rachel; Searles, Bruce; Darling, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD) and case reports describing catastrophic incidents related to VAVD, there is a lack of data cataloging specific safety measures that individuals and institutions have incorporated into their VAVD practices for the prevention of these incidents. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to survey the perfusion community to gather data on VAVD practices, and to compare these current practices with literature recommendations and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology (AmSECT) Standards and Guidelines. In September 2014, a survey was distributed via PerfList and PerfMail, and by direct e-mail to members of the New York State Society of Perfusionists, targeting certified clinical perfusionists in New York State. Survey topics pertaining to VAVD practice included 1) equipment, 2) pressure monitoring and alarms, 3) protocols, checklists, and documentation, and 4) VAVD-related incidents. Of ∼200 certified clinical perfusionists who live and/or work in New York State (NYS), 88 responded (42%). Most respondents (90.1%) report they use VAVD. Of these, 87.3% report that they monitor VAVD pressure, with 51.6% having audible and visual alarms for both positive and excessive negative pressures. At the institutional level, 61.2% of respondents reported that there is a protocol in place at for their team limiting negative pressure in the reservoir, 28.4% document VAVD pressure in the pump record, and AmSECT's three recommended VAVD checklist items are met with 53.7%, 55.1%, and 33.8% compliance. In conclusion, the results of this study reveal that the use of VAVD has increased and has become nearly universal in 2014. There is high compliance to some of the literature recommendations and AmSECT Standards and Guidelines, however, there are still some gaps between current practices and these recommendations. Continued improvement, both at the individual and institutional levels, will help to improve

  11. Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM): Model development and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaolan

    2003-06-01

    In this investigation, a comprehensive Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process simulation model was developed and verified. The model incorporates resin flow through the preform, compaction and relaxation of the preform, and viscosity and cure kinetics of the resin. The computer model can be used to analyze the resin flow details, track the thickness change of the preform, predict the total infiltration time and final fiber volume fraction of the parts, and determine whether the resin could completely infiltrate and uniformly wet out the preform. Flow of resin through the preform is modeled as flow through porous media. Darcy's law combined with the continuity equation for an incompressible Newtonian fluid forms the basis of the flow model. During the infiltration process, it is well accepted that the total pressure is shared by the resin pressure and the pressure supported by the fiber network. With the progression of the resin, the net pressure applied to the preform decreases as a result of increasing local resin pressure. This leads to the springback of the preform, and is called the springback mechanism. On the other side, the lubrication effect of the resin causes the rearrangement of the fiber network and an increase in the preform compaction. This is called the wetting compaction mechanism. The thickness change of the preform is determined by the relative magnitude of the springback and wetting deformation mechanisms. In the compaction model, the transverse equilibrium equation is used to calculate the net compaction pressure applied to the preform, and the compaction test results are fitted to give the compressive constitutive law of the preform. The Finite Element/Control Volume (FE/CV) method is adopted to find the flow front location and the fluid pressure. The code features the ability of simultaneous integration of 1-D, 2-D and 3-D element types in a single simulation, and thus enables efficient modeling of the flow in complex mold

  12. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans.

    PubMed

    Aljehani, Yasser; Al-Matar, Zahra; Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space. PMID:27660730

  13. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space.

  14. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space. PMID:27660730

  15. Successful recovery after amniotic fluid embolism in a patient undergoing vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Wise, Eric M; Harika, Ricky; Zahir, Fatima

    2016-11-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare, catastrophic emergency that requires prompt recognition and treatment. Despite early recognition and supportive therapy, the morbidity and mortality remain high. We report a case of AFE after vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery resulting in hemodynamic collapse and subsequent multiorgan failure. Management included mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. The patient was able to make a full recovery with minimal sequelae. In AFE with multiorgan failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis can be valuable therapies. Proper management requires effective communication and the combined efforts of physicians of several disciplines. PMID:27687451

  16. Matrix Characterization and Development for the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, B. W.; Hubert, P.; Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Loos, A. C.; Pipes, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    The curing kinetics and viscosity of an epoxy resin system, SI-ZG-5A, have been characterized for application in the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. Impregnation of a typical carbon fiber perform provided the test bed for the characterization. Process simulations were carried out using the process model, COMPRO, to examine heat transfer and curing kinetics for a fully impregnated panel, neglecting resin flow. The predicted viscosity profile and final degree of cure were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  17. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure system (E-VAC): case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Bobkiewicz, Adam; Malinger, Stanisław; Świrkowicz, Józef; Hermann, Jacek; Drews, Michał; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a standard in the treatment of chronic and difficult healing wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy is applied to the wound via a special vacuum-sealed sponge. Nowadays, the endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system (E-VAC) has been proven to be an important alternative in patients with upper and lower intestinal leakage not responding to standard endoscopic and/or surgical treatment procedures. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system provides perfect wound drainage and closure of various kinds of defect and promotes tissue granulation. Our experience has shown that E-VAC may significantly improve the morbidity and mortality rate. Moreover, E-VAC may be useful in a multidisciplinary approach – from upper gastrointestinal to rectal surgery complications. On the other hand, major limitations of the E-VAC system are the necessity of repeated endoscopic interventions and constant presence of well-trained staff. Further, large-cohort studies need to be performed to establish the applicability and effectiveness of E-VAC before routine widespread use can be recommended. PMID:26240633

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Gamma knife - discharge; Cyberknife - discharge; Stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy- discharge; Cyclotrons- discharge; Linear accelerator- discharge; Lineacs - discharge; Proton beam radiosurgery - discharge

  19. Composite Properties of RTM370 Polyimide Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, James M.; Mintz, Eric A.; Shonkwiler, Brian; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3?,4?-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianinline (3,4'-ODA) with the 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has been shown to exhibit a high cured T(sub g) (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been successfully fabricated into composites reinforced with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM). RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327?C (620?F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288?C (550?F) for 1000 h. In this work, RTM370 composites were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags on a steel plate. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM are compared to those prepared by RTM.

  20. Polyimide Composites Properties of RTM370 Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resins Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3 ,4 -biphenyl dianhydride ( a-BPDA), 3,4 -oxydianinline (3,4 -ODA) with 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has shown to exhibit high Tg (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been fabricated into composites with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM) successfully. RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327 C (620 F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288 C (550 F) for 1000 hrs. In this presentation, RTM 370 composites will be fabricated by vacuum assisted resins transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags without mold. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM will be compared to those of RTM370 made by RTM.

  1. Flow and Compaction During the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Song, Xiao-Lan; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.; Pipes, R. Byron

    2001-01-01

    The flow of an epoxy resin and compaction behavior of carbon fiber preform during vacuum- assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) infiltration was measured using an instrumented tool. Composite panels were fabricated by the VARTM process using SAERTEX(R)2 multi-axial non- crimp carbon fiber fabric and the A.T.A.R.D. SI-ZG-5A epoxy resin. Resin pressure and preform thickness variation was measured during infiltration. The effects of the resin on the compaction behavior of the preform were measured. The local preform compaction during the infiltration is a combination of wetting and spring-back deformations. Flow front position computed by the 3DINFIL model was compared with the experimental data.

  2. Stereotactic radiation therapy and radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, C B

    1994-01-01

    with surgical resection. Apart from the possibility to define the borders of the treatment volume with serial stereotactic biopsies, there are dosimetric advantages of interstitial radiosurgery. Local single high-dose treatment remains controversial for highly malignant infiltrative tumors, and significant treatment benefit remains to be documented. Radiosurgery can be used to effectively treat solitary brain metastases with less invasiveness and dissection of normal tissue, and with lower morbidity and less expense than open surgery. PMID:7624637

  3. Vacuum-assisted wound closure for cheaper and more comfortable healing of pressure sores: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Marcus B; Schwarzl, Franz; Strub, Beni; Zaech, Guido A; Pierer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Pressure sores are a common complication of patients with spinal injuries. The vacuum-assisted closure technique is widely used to induce and promote wound healing. We tested our clinical impression that pressure sores healed faster with vacuum-assisted closure, and compared it with the traditional wet-to-dry/wet-to-wet technique with gauze soaked in Ringer's solution changed three times a day. Consecutive patients with pressure sores were entered into the study. Two randomised groups of 11 patients each with pressure sores of the pelvic region were included. We found no difference in time to reach 50% of the initial wound volume between the two methods. The vacuum-assisted group took a mean (SD) of 27 (10) days and the traditional group 28 (7) days. The two methods were equally effective in forming granulation tissue, so one can profit from the other advantages of the vacuum-assisted treatment (reduced costs and improved comfort) knowing that the effect on the formation of granulation tissue is as good as with the traditional treatment. PMID:12625392

  4. Breast Biopsy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are high technology silicon chips that connect light directly into electronic or digital images, which can be manipulated or enhanced by computers. When Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) scientists realized that existing CCD technology could not meet scientific requirements for the Hubble Space Telescope Imagining Spectrograph, GSFC contracted with Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (SITe) to develop an advanced CCD. SITe then applied many of the NASA-driven enhancements to the manufacture of CCDs for digital mammography. The resulting device images breast tissue more clearly and efficiently. The LORAD Stereo Guide Breast Biopsy system incorporates SITe's CCD as part of a digital camera system that is replacing surgical biopsy in many cases. Known as stereotactic needle biopsy, it is performed under local anesthesia with a needle and saves women time, pain, scarring, radiation exposure and money.

  5. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Renal biopsy; Biopsy - kidney ... Barisoni L, Arend LJ, Thomas DB. Introduction to renal biopsy. In: Zhou M, Mari-Galluzzi C, eds. ... Saunders; 2015:chap 7. Topham PS, Chen Y. Renal biopsy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, ...

  6. Gum biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... used to close the opening created for the biopsy. ... to eat for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Risks for this procedure include: Bleeding from the biopsy site Infection of the gums Soreness

  7. The effect of regional block over pain levels during vacuum-assisted wound closure.

    PubMed

    Findikcioglu, Kemal; Sezgin, Billur; Kaya, Basar; Ozkose, Zerrin; Ayhan, Suhan

    2014-02-01

    Despite being a wound treatment method with a broad spectrum of indications, vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAWC) can be a painful treatment modality which may even result with patient unwillingness for the continuation of treatment. A prospective study was undertaken to determine the effect of regional pain blocks (RPB) for patients who wanted to abandon treatment due to pain after the first application. Patients were asked to score their pain using a visual analogue scale for two different time frames (i) during dressing changes and (ii) while daytime treatment. This evaluation was carried out for conventional wound dressings, VAWC before RPB and finally for VAWC after RPB. The pain experienced with blocks was significantly lesser than conventional and VAWC dressing changes that were applied without pain blocks. Also, the pain was significantly lesser under pain blocks for daytime treatment. For patients with refractory pain where VAWC would prove to be of most benefit, RPB can be discussed with the patient and used. This study has shown that effective pain control can be obtained through regional blocks for patients with excruciating pain undergoing VAWC treatment.

  8. Vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery (VAVD)-basics for the risk manager.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) manager calls you about a baby delivered last night now with brain trauma. She understands that it was a difficult delivery with a vacuum. There were "multiple pop-offs" and, after the baby was delivered, the NICU resuscitation team was called. The Apgar scores were 3 and 5. They are requesting risk management to lead a debriefing today. What to ask? How many pop-offs are allowed? What was the interaction between the nurses and physician? Why wasn't the resuscitation team in attendance before the delivery? Was the vacuum placed properly? How many pulls? How long was the vacuum in place? What should be documented, and was the documentation adequate? All of these are appropriate questions for an adequate analysis of an adverse outcome resulting from a vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery (VAVD). This article focuses on the risk management issues of VAVD in order to give the risk manager a better understanding of appropriate use, data-gathering tools, educational opportunities, and assistance in establishing a culture of safety for the entire perinatal team regarding the use of the vacuum device.

  9. Processing and Properties of Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molded Phenylethynyl Terminated Imide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Jensen, Brian J.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Polyimide composites are very attractive for applications that require a high strength to weight ratio and thermal stability. Recent work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has concentrated on developing new polyimide resin systems that can be processed without the use of an autoclave for advanced aerospace applications. Due to their low melt viscosities and long melt stability, certain phenylethynyl terminated imides (PETI) can be processed into composites using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (HT-VARTM). VARTM has shown the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of composite structures. In the current study, two PETI resins, LARC(Trademark) PETI-330 and LARC(Trademark) PETI-9, were infused into carbon fiber preforms at 260 C and cured at temperatures up to 371 C. Photomicrographs of polished cross sections were taken and void contents, determined by acid digestion, were below 4.5%. Mechanical properties including short block compression (SBC), compression after impact (CAI), and open hole compression (OHC) were determined at room temperature, 177 C, and 288 C. Both PETI-9 and PETI-330 composites demonstrated very good retention of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. SBC and OHC properties after aging for 1000 hours at temperatures up to 288 C were also determined.

  10. Vacuum-assisted Fluid Flow in Microchannels to Pattern Substrates and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Anil B.; Kung, Frank H.; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Substrate and cell patterning are widely used techniques in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This paper describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. Our method builds upon a previous vacuum-assisted method used for micromolding (Jeon, Choi et al. 1999) and successfully patterned collagen-I, fibronectin and Sal-1 substrates on glass and polystyrene surfaces, filling microchannels with lengths up to 120 mm and covering areas up to 13 × 10 mm2. Vacuum-patterned substrates were subsequently used to culture mammalian PC12 and fibroblast cells and amphibian neurons. Cells were also patterned directly by injecting cell suspensions into microchannels using vacuum. Fibroblast and neuronal cells patterned using vacuum showed normal growth and minimal cell death indicating no adverse effects of vacuum on cells. Our method fills reversibly sealed PDMS microchannels. This enables the user to remove the PDMS microchannel cast and access the patterned biomaterial or cells for further experimental purposes. Overall, this is a straightforward technique that has broad applicability for cell biology. PMID:24989641

  11. Vacuum-assisted closure increases ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I expression in wound therapy

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEIYANG; PAN, ZHENYU; HU, XIANG; LI, ZONGHUAN; ZHAO, YONG; YU, AI-XI

    2014-01-01

    Severe traumatic wounds are challenging to manage during surgery. The introduction of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is a breakthrough in wound management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of VAC on cytokines in wounds during the management of severe traumatic wounds following initial debridement. VAC and conventional wound care (CWC) were independently applied to severe traumatic wounds on pigs. The expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, collagen I and human fibroblast collagenase 1 were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. VAC significantly increased the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I compared with that induced by CWC at the protein and mRNA levels. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that VAC therapy is an effective method for treating severe traumatic wounds, as it increases the expression of cytokines in wounds. VAC significantly increases the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I to manage severe traumatic wounds. PMID:24940415

  12. Simulation based flow distribution network optimization for vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Ting; Devillard, Mathieu; Advani, Suresh G.

    2004-05-01

    In the vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process, using a flow distribution network such as flow channels and high permeability fabrics can accelerate the resin infiltration of the fibre reinforcement during the manufacture of composite parts. The flow distribution network significantly influences the fill time and fill pattern and is essential for the process design. The current practice has been to cover the top surface of the fibre preform with the distribution media with the hope that the resin will flood the top surface immediately and penetrate through the thickness. However, this approach has some drawbacks. One is when the resin finds its way to the vent before it has penetrated the preform entirely, which results in a defective part or resin wastage. Also, if the composite structure contains ribs or inserts, this approach invariably results in dry spots. Instead of this intuitive approach, we propose a science-based approach to design the layout of the distribution network. Our approach uses flow simulation of the resin into the network and the preform and a genetic algorithm to optimize the flow distribution network. An experimental case study of a co-cured rib structure is conducted to demonstrate the design procedure and validate the optimized flow distribution network design. Good agreement between the flow simulations and the experimental results was observed. It was found that the proposed design algorithm effectively optimized the flow distribution network of the part considered in our case study and hence should prove to be a useful tool to extend the VARTM process to manufacture of complex structures with effective use of the distribution network layup.

  13. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  14. Biopsy - polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Polyp biopsy ... are treated is the colon. How a polyp biopsy is done depends on the location: Colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy explores the large bowel Colposcopy-directed biopsy examines the vagina and cervix Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or ...

  15. Impact of Tumor Localization and Method of Preoperative Biopsy on Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping After Periareolar Nuclide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Julia; Dutschke, Anja; Kaiser, Clemens G.; Schnitzer, Andreas; Gerhardt, Axel; Radosa, Julia C.; Brade, Joachim; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Wasser, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether tumor localization and method of preoperative biopsy affect sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection after periareolar nuclide injection in breast cancer patients. Methods and Findings 767 breast cancer patients were retrospectively included. For lymphscintigraphy periareolar nuclide injection was performed and the SLN was located by gamma camera. Patient and tumor characteristics were correlated to the success rate of SLN mapping. SLN marking failed in 9/61 (14.7%) patients with prior vacuum-assisted biopsy and 80/706 (11.3%) patients with prior core needle biopsy. Individually evaluated, biopsy method (p = 0.4) and tumor localization (p = 0.9) did not significantly affect the SLN detection rate. Patients with a vacuum-assisted biopsy of a tumor in the upper outer quadrant had a higher odds ratio of failing in SLN mapping (OR 3.8, p = 0.09) compared to core needle biopsy in the same localization (OR 0.9, p = 0.5). Conclusions Tumor localization and preoperative biopsy method do not significantly impact SLN mapping with periareolar nuclide injection. However, the failure risk tends to rise if vacuum-assisted biopsy of a tumor in the upper outer quadrant is performed. PMID:26867137

  16. Photoacoustic Imaging of Breast Microcalcifications: A Preliminary Study with 8-Gauge Core-Biopsied Breast Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga Ram; Kang, Jeeun; Kwak, Jin Young; Chang, Jin Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Youk, Ji Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background We presented the photoacoustic imaging (PAI) tool and to evaluate whether microcalcifications in breast tissue can be detected on photoacoustic (PA) images. Methods We collected 21 cores containing microcalcifications (n = 11, microcalcification group) and none (n = 10, control group) in stereotactic or ultrasound (US) guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Photoacoustic (PA) images were acquired through ex vivo experiments by transmitting laser pulses with two different wavelengths (700 nm and 800 nm). The presence of microcalcifications in PA images were blindly assessed by two radiologists and compared with specimen mammography. A ratio of the signal amplitude occurring at 700 nm to that occurring at 800 nm was calculated for each PA focus and was called the PAI ratio. Results Based on the change of PA signal amplitude between 700 nm and 800 nm, 10 out of 11 specimens containing microcalcifications and 8 out of 10 specimens without calcifications were correctly identified on blind review; the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values of our blind review were 90.91%, 80.0%, 85.71%, 83.33% and 88.89%. The PAI ratio in the microcalcification group was significantly higher than that in the control group (the median PAI ratio, 2.46 versus 1.11, respectively, P = .001). On subgroup analysis in the microcalcification group, neither malignant diagnosis nor the number or size of calcification-foci was proven to contribute to PAI ratios. Conclusion Breast microcalcifications generated distinguishable PA signals unlike breast tissue without calcifications. So, PAI, a non-ionizing and non-invasive hybrid imaging technique, can be an alternative in overcoming the limitations of conventional US imaging. PMID:25153128

  17. Vacuum-assisted headspace solid phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solid samples.

    PubMed

    Yiantzi, Evangelia; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2015-08-26

    For the first time, Vacuum Assisted Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) is used for the recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from solid matrices. The procedure was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. According to the theory, reducing the total pressure increases the vapor flux of chemicals at the soil surface, and hence improves HSSPME extraction kinetics. Vac-HSSPME sampling could be further enhanced by adding water as a modifier and creating a slurry mixture. For these soil-water mixtures, reduced pressure conditions may increase the volatilization rates of compounds with a low K(H) present in the aqueous phase of the slurry mixture and result in a faster HSSPME extraction process. Nevertheless, analyte desorption from soil to water may become a rate-limiting step when significant depletion of the aqueous analyte concentration takes place during Vac-HSSPME. Sand samples spiked with PAHs were used as simple solid matrices and the effect of different experimental parameters was investigated (extraction temperature, modifiers and extraction time). Vac-HSSPME sampling of dry spiked sand samples provided the first experimental evidence of the positive combined effect of reduced pressure and temperature on HSSPME. Although adding 2 mL of water as a modifier improved Vac-HSSPME, humidity decreased the amount of naphthalene extracted at equilibrium as well as impaired extraction of all analytes at elevated sampling temperatures. Within short HSSPME sampling times and under mild sampling temperatures, Vac-HSSPME yielded linear calibration curves in the range of 1-400 ng g(-1) and, with the exception of fluorene, regression coefficients were found higher than 0.99. The limits of detection for spiked sand samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.233 ng g(-1) and repeatability from 4.3 to 10 %. Finally, the amount of PAHs extracted from spiked soil samples was smaller compared to spiked sand samples, confirming that soil could bind target

  18. Vacuum-assisted headspace solid phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solid samples.

    PubMed

    Yiantzi, Evangelia; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2015-08-26

    For the first time, Vacuum Assisted Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) is used for the recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from solid matrices. The procedure was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. According to the theory, reducing the total pressure increases the vapor flux of chemicals at the soil surface, and hence improves HSSPME extraction kinetics. Vac-HSSPME sampling could be further enhanced by adding water as a modifier and creating a slurry mixture. For these soil-water mixtures, reduced pressure conditions may increase the volatilization rates of compounds with a low K(H) present in the aqueous phase of the slurry mixture and result in a faster HSSPME extraction process. Nevertheless, analyte desorption from soil to water may become a rate-limiting step when significant depletion of the aqueous analyte concentration takes place during Vac-HSSPME. Sand samples spiked with PAHs were used as simple solid matrices and the effect of different experimental parameters was investigated (extraction temperature, modifiers and extraction time). Vac-HSSPME sampling of dry spiked sand samples provided the first experimental evidence of the positive combined effect of reduced pressure and temperature on HSSPME. Although adding 2 mL of water as a modifier improved Vac-HSSPME, humidity decreased the amount of naphthalene extracted at equilibrium as well as impaired extraction of all analytes at elevated sampling temperatures. Within short HSSPME sampling times and under mild sampling temperatures, Vac-HSSPME yielded linear calibration curves in the range of 1-400 ng g(-1) and, with the exception of fluorene, regression coefficients were found higher than 0.99. The limits of detection for spiked sand samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.233 ng g(-1) and repeatability from 4.3 to 10 %. Finally, the amount of PAHs extracted from spiked soil samples was smaller compared to spiked sand samples, confirming that soil could bind target

  19. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction.

    PubMed

    Lord, A C; Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene(®) mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence. PMID:25519257

  20. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction.

    PubMed

    Lord, A C; Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene(®) mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence.

  1. [Stereotaxic brain biopsy in AIDS patients with neurological manifestations].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    Prospective series showing the importance of computerized stereotactic brain biopsy in the management of AIDS patients neurologically symptomatic and confirmed by images. Patients undergone an algorithm step by step done by their own doctors and referred to us for stereotactic biopsy. Our protocol was opened in August 1995 and closed in December 1996. Twenty patients were biopsied. This protocol is similar to the Levy's one (Chicago IL, USA). We have got diagnosis in all cases. Lymphoma was predominant and followed by toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and HIV encephalopathy. We included one patient with diploic giant cells lymphoma. Our mortality and morbidity was zero. By these results we conclude that stereotactic biopsy in AIDS patients is safe and effective.

  2. [Stereotaxic brain biopsy in AIDS patients with neurological manifestations].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    Prospective series showing the importance of computerized stereotactic brain biopsy in the management of AIDS patients neurologically symptomatic and confirmed by images. Patients undergone an algorithm step by step done by their own doctors and referred to us for stereotactic biopsy. Our protocol was opened in August 1995 and closed in December 1996. Twenty patients were biopsied. This protocol is similar to the Levy's one (Chicago IL, USA). We have got diagnosis in all cases. Lymphoma was predominant and followed by toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and HIV encephalopathy. We included one patient with diploic giant cells lymphoma. Our mortality and morbidity was zero. By these results we conclude that stereotactic biopsy in AIDS patients is safe and effective. PMID:9698730

  3. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  4. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... right diagnosis. [ Top ] What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... Top ] What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  5. Tongue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - tongue ... A tongue biopsy can be done using a needle. You will get numbing medicine at the place where the ... provider will gently stick the needle into the tongue and remove a tiny piece of tissue. Some ...

  6. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 341 KB)​​​​. Alternate Language URL Español Liver Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is a ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is a liver biopsy? A liver biopsy is a procedure that involves ...

  7. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Farnsworth, Paul B.; Weber, Arthur L.; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions.

  8. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Keelor, Joel D; Farnsworth, Paul B; L Weber, Arthur; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions. PMID:26883531

  9. Multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: the NASA smart probe project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Aghevli, A.; Freitas, K.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papsin, R.; Reed, C.; Stassinopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Real-time tissue identification can benefit procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy, functional neurosurgery and brain tumor excision. Optical scattering spectroscopy has been shown to be effective at discriminating cancer from noncancerous conditions in the colon, bladder and breast. The NASA Smart Probe extends the concept of 'optical biopsy' by using neural network techniques to combine the output from 3 microsensors contained within a cannula 2. 7 mm in diameter (i.e. the diameter of a stereotactic brain biopsy needle). Experimental data from 5 rats show the clear differentiation between tissues such as brain, nerve, fat, artery and muscle that can be achieved with optical scattering spectroscopy alone. These data and previous findings with other modalities such as (1) analysis of the image from a fiberoptic neuroendoscope and (2) the output from a microstrain gauge suggest the Smart Probe multiple microsensor technique shows promise for real-time tissue identification in neurosurgical procedures. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Synovial biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... small incision. After anesthesia, an instrument called a trocar is inserted into the joint space. This tool ... area. A biopsy grasper is inserted through the trocar and turned to cut out a tissue segment. ...

  11. Positron Emission Mammography Imaging with Low Activity Fluorodeoxyglucose and Novel Utilization in Core-needle Biopsy Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Choudhery, Sadia; Seiler, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM), a relatively novel breast imaging modality, provides certain advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including the ability to image biopsy samples. However, the radiation activity associated with PEM has remained a concern in clinical practice. We present a case of an invasive ductal carcinoma that was adequately imaged with a much lower than the standard 185 to 370 MBq activity of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. In addition, we demonstrate ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy sample imaging with PEM to assess adequacy of sampling, a strategy that has previously only been documented with vacuum-assisted biopsy samples. PMID:25709550

  12. Vacuum-assisted therapy accelerates wound healing in necrotizing soft tissue infections: our experience in two intravenous drug abuse patients.

    PubMed

    Marinis, Athanasios; Voultsos, Mavroudis; Grivas, Paraskevas; Dikeakos, Panagiotis; Liarmakopoulos, Emmanouil; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Rizos, Spyros

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) devices is currently a well established technique for managing complicated wounds. Such wounds occur after aggressive surgical debridement for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). In this report we present our experience in two intravenous drug abusers managed with VAC for NSTIs. The patients were 25 and 34 years old, HCV positive and presented with oedema of the upper femoral compartments and concomitant severe sepsis. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed severe cellulitis, fluid collection and necrosis of the affected fasciae and muscles. After emergent and subsequent aggressive surgical debridement during the first 48h, the VAC device was applied. Both patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a fast recovery from their multiorgan dysfunction. Suture closure of the wounds was achieved at the 25th and 38th postoperative days respectively and patients were discharged without any motor deficit. Negative pressure wound therapy is a modern therapeutic modality for treating complicated infected wounds. Moreover, it accelerates wound healing and primary closure, facilitating patient ambulation and recovery. A dedicated medical and nursing team is an important prerequisite for a successful outcome.

  13. Recurrence Rates of Benign Phyllodes Tumors After Surgical Excision and Ultrasonography-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Excision.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga Ram; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2016-06-01

    The recurrence rates of benign phyllodes tumors diagnosed through surgery and ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted excision (US-VAE) were evaluated. A total of 146 benign phyllodes tumors diagnosed by surgery (n = 126) or US-VAE (n = 20) in 144 patients who had further follow-up after surgery or US-VAE were included (median follow-up period, 32.3 months; range, 6.7-142.5 months). Comparisons of recurrence rate, interval to recurrence, patient age, initial tumor size, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category, or follow-up interval were performed between the surgery and VAE groups and between groups with and without recurrence. Three cases (2.1%, 3/146) had recurrence and all were in the surgery group (2.4%, 3/126). The surgery group demonstrated larger size than the VAE group (median, 25 vs 16 mm; P < 0.001). The median age of women in the surgery group was older than those in the VAE group (39 vs 33 years, P = 0.509). The median age of women with recurrence (n = 3) was older than those without recurrence (n = 143, 49 vs 38 years, P = 0.023). In conclusion, when benign phyllodes tumor is unexpectedly diagnosed at US-VAE, if there is no residual lesion at US, clinical follow-up rather than further surgery might be recommended. PMID:27233071

  14. Phyllodes tumor diagnosed after ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted excision: should it be followed by surgical excision?

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the results of ultrasound (US)-guided vacuum-assisted excision (US-VAE) of phyllodes tumors (PTs). A total of 41 PTs diagnosed at US-VAE followed by surgery (n = 27) or at least 2 y of US monitoring (n = 14) were included. By comparison of US-VAE pathology with surgical histology or follow-up US results, cases were divided into upgraded (malignant) and non-upgraded (benign) groups. These two groups were compared with respect to clinical, procedural and US features. Among 27 surgical cases, 2 (8.7%) of 23 benign PTs were upgraded to malignant PTs. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category was retrospectively assigned as 4a (50%) or 4b (50%) in the upgraded group (n = 2) and 3 (64%) or 4a (36%) in the non-upgraded group (n = 39) (p = 0.018). Residual tumor was observed at the site of US-VAE in 15 of 27 surgical cases and 0 of 14 US follow-up cases (36.6%, 15/41). Given the rates of upgrade to malignancy (8.7%) and residual tumor (36.6%), PTs diagnosed after US-VAE should be surgically excised. PMID:25619780

  15. Outer-selective pressure-retarded osmosis hollow fiber membranes from vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization for osmotic power generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-11-19

    In this paper, we report the technical breakthroughs to synthesize outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes, which is in an urgent need for osmotic power generation with the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In the first step, a defect-free thin-film composite membrane module is achieved by vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization. The PRO performance is further enhanced by optimizing the support in terms of pore size and mechanical strength and the TFC layer with polydopamine coating and molecular engineering of the interfacial polymerization solution. The newly developed membranes can stand over 20 bar with a peak power density of 7.63 W/m(2), which is equivalent to 13.72 W/m(2) of its inner-selective hollow fiber counterpart with the same module size, packing density, and fiber dimensions. The study may provide insightful guidelines for optimizing the interfacial polymerization procedures and scaling up of the outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membrane modules for PRO power generation.

  16. Dual mode stereotactic localization method and application

    DOEpatents

    Keppel, Cynthia E.; Barbosa, Fernando Jorge; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The invention described herein combines the structural digital X-ray image provided by conventional stereotactic core biopsy instruments with the additional functional metabolic gamma imaging obtained with a dedicated compact gamma imaging mini-camera. Before the procedure, the patient is injected with an appropriate radiopharmaceutical. The radiopharmaceutical uptake distribution within the breast under compression in a conventional examination table expressed by the intensity of gamma emissions is obtained for comparison (co-registration) with the digital mammography (X-ray) image. This dual modality mode of operation greatly increases the functionality of existing stereotactic biopsy devices by yielding a much smaller number of false positives than would be produced using X-ray images alone. The ability to obtain both the X-ray mammographic image and the nuclear-based medicine gamma image using a single device is made possible largely through the use of a novel, small and movable gamma imaging camera that permits its incorporation into the same table or system as that currently utilized to obtain X-ray based mammographic images for localization of lesions.

  17. Management of pleural empyema with a vacuum-assisted closure device and reconstruction of open thoracic window in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Munguía-Canales, Daniel Alejandro; Vargas-Mendoza, Gary Kosai; Alvarez-Bestoff, Gustavo; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2013-10-01

    The patient is a 21-year-old female, diagnosed with cryptogenic cirrhosis at the age of 9. She presented with left post-pneumonic empyema that did not remit with conventional medical management and evolved with fistulization to the skin in the 7th intercostal space in the left subscapular region. We performed an open thoracic window procedure, and on the 6th day the patient was sent home with a portable vacuum-assisted closure device, with changes of the material every 4 days until the cavity was completed obliterated (92 days). Imaging tests showed full expansion of the lung, and chest wall reconstruction was performed with titanium rods. The high mortality of empyema in patients with liver disease requires both implementing and searching for new adjuvant therapies, like the use of vacuum-assisted closure systems and reconstruction with titanium rods. Controlled studies with a wide range of cases are needed for proper evaluation.

  18. Lymph node biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - lymph nodes; Open lymph node biopsy; Fine needle aspiration biopsy; Sentinel lymph node biopsy ... then sent to the laboratory for examination. A needle biopsy involves inserting a needle into a lymph ...

  19. Effect of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Combined with Open Bone Grafting to Promote Rabbit Bone Graft Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Zhang, Taogen; Ren, Bin; Deng, Zhouming; Cai, Lin; Lei, Jun; Ping, Ansong

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with composite bone non-union and soft tissue defects are difficult to treat. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) combined with open bone grafting is one of the most effective treatments at present. The aim of the present study was to preliminarily investigate the effect and mechanism of VAC combined with open bone grafting to promote rabbit bone graft vascularization, and to propose a theoretical basis for clinical work. Material/Methods Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group. Allogeneic bones were grafted and banded with the proximal femur with a suture. The experimental group had VAC whereas the control group had normal wound closure. The bone vascularization rate was compared based on X-ray imaging, fluorescent bone labeling (labeled tetracycline hydrochloride and calcein), calcium content in the callus, and expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in bone allografts by Western blot analysis at the 4th, 8th, and 12th week after surgery. Results At the 4th, 8th, and 12th week after surgery, the results of the tests demonstrated that the callus was larger, contained more calcium (p<0.05), and expressed FGF-2 at higher levels (p<0.05) in the experimental group than in the control group. Fluorescent bone labeling showed the distance between the two fluorescent ribbons was significantly shorter in the control group than in the experimental group at the 8th and 12th week after surgery. Conclusions VAC combined with open bone grafting promoted rabbit bone graft vascularization. PMID:25913359

  20. Design and testing of a new sampler for simplified vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yiantzi, Evangelia; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2016-07-13

    The design and testing of a new and low-cost experimental setup used for vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) is reported here. The device consists of a specially designed O-ring seal screw cap offering gas-tight seal to commercially available headspace vials. The new polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cap was molded by a local manufacturer and had a hole that could tightly accommodate a septum. All operations were performed through the septum: air evacuation of the sampler, sample introduction and HSSPME sampling. The analytical performance of the new sampler was evaluated using 22 mL headspace vials with 9 mL water samples spiked with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimized conditions were: 1000 rpm agitation speed; 30 min extraction time; 40 °C sampling temperature; polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber. The lack of accurate Henry's law constant (KH) values and information regarding how they change with temperature was a major limitation in predicting the phase location of evaporation resistance during Vac-HSSPME. Nevertheless, the combined effects of system conditions indicated the increasing importance of gas phase resistance with increasing degree of PCBs chlorination. Stirring enhancements were not recorded for the higher chlorinated PCBs suggesting that the hyperhydrophobic gas/water interface was the preferred location for these compounds. Analytically, the developed method was found to yield linear calibration curves with limits of detection in the sub ng L(-1) level and relative standard deviations ranging between 5.8 and 14%. To compensate for the low recoveries of the higher chlorinated PCB congeners in spiked river water the standard addition methodology was applied. Overall, the compact design of the new and reusable sample container allows efficient HSSPME sampling of organic analytes in water within short extraction times and at low sampling

  1. Design and testing of a new sampler for simplified vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yiantzi, Evangelia; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2016-07-13

    The design and testing of a new and low-cost experimental setup used for vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) is reported here. The device consists of a specially designed O-ring seal screw cap offering gas-tight seal to commercially available headspace vials. The new polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cap was molded by a local manufacturer and had a hole that could tightly accommodate a septum. All operations were performed through the septum: air evacuation of the sampler, sample introduction and HSSPME sampling. The analytical performance of the new sampler was evaluated using 22 mL headspace vials with 9 mL water samples spiked with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimized conditions were: 1000 rpm agitation speed; 30 min extraction time; 40 °C sampling temperature; polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber. The lack of accurate Henry's law constant (KH) values and information regarding how they change with temperature was a major limitation in predicting the phase location of evaporation resistance during Vac-HSSPME. Nevertheless, the combined effects of system conditions indicated the increasing importance of gas phase resistance with increasing degree of PCBs chlorination. Stirring enhancements were not recorded for the higher chlorinated PCBs suggesting that the hyperhydrophobic gas/water interface was the preferred location for these compounds. Analytically, the developed method was found to yield linear calibration curves with limits of detection in the sub ng L(-1) level and relative standard deviations ranging between 5.8 and 14%. To compensate for the low recoveries of the higher chlorinated PCB congeners in spiked river water the standard addition methodology was applied. Overall, the compact design of the new and reusable sample container allows efficient HSSPME sampling of organic analytes in water within short extraction times and at low sampling

  2. Testicular biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... egg in the lab. This process is called in vitro fertilization. Testicular biopsy may also be done if you have found a lump during testicular self-examination . If tests ... the lump may be in the testicle, surgery may be needed to look ...

  3. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  4. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  5. Stereotactic Neurosurgery Planning On A PC Based Workstation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.; Clark, John A.; Pike, Gordon; Henri, Christopher J.; Collins, D. L.; Leksell, Dan; Jeppsson, Ola

    1989-05-01

    Stereotactic surgery requires knowledge of cerebral structures derived from more than one image source. We have developed a PC-AT based workstation which accepts patient images, made with the stereotactic frame in place, from CT, MRI and DSA modalities. Reference markers on the frame are identified in the images to establish the coordinate geometry for each modality. Target points may be identified on each image type and trajectories of probe paths to these points defined. Targets identified on one set of images may be transferred automatically to other images of the same patient, in order, for example, to guarantee a vascular free path of approach to a target point deep within the brain. To date several hundred patients have had stereotactic surgery performed on the basis of plans using this system. Procedures included biopsy and aspiration of lesions, implantation of electrodes for the recording of deep EEG signals, and radiosurgical techniques based on the use of a high energy linear accelerator. We present clinical examples of the use of this system in typical stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, address stereoscopic applications, and discuss the results of inter-modality tests to establish the accuracy of the technique.

  6. Transnasal stereotactic surgery of pituitary adenomas concomitant with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Metyolkina, L; Peresedov, V

    1995-01-01

    Since 1960 we have performed stereotactic transsphenoidal cryohypophysectomy in 70 patients with pituitary adenomas, 42 women and 28 men, aged 11-59 years. The dominant clinical syndrome was acromegaly in 50 patients, galactorrhea in 9, amenorrhea in 5, adiposogenital dystrophy in 4 and gigantism with mild endocrine symptomatology in 2 patients. In 67 patients the histological structure of the tumor was established by biopsy (50 patients with eosinophil adenoma, 10 with mixed-type adenoma, 4 with chromophobe adenoma and 3 with basophil adenoma). Somatotropic hormone, human growth hormone, prolactin, ACTH and 17-ketosteroid levels indicated active/inactive adenomas. In 42 cases the adenoma was only intrasellar, which was confirmed by contrast X-ray investigations, CT scanning, angiography and ophthalmological investigation. Transnasal stereotactic cryohypophysectomy was performed in all 70 cases using a stereotactic apparatus especially designed for operations on the pituitary. All patients (except 2) tolerated the operation well. No complications occurred. Vision deteriorated after operation in 1 patient. Thrombosis of the left middle cerebral artery developed in another patient. All the other patients noted improvement directly after operation - rapid diminution of signs of acromegaly and rapid restoration of normal values in hormonal tests. Six patients with continuing growth of the tumor underwent a second operation 1.5-6 years after the first operation. We conclude from our own clinical experience and information from the literature that transnasal stereotactic cryodestruction is highly effective and relatively safe in the management of pituitary adenoma. PMID:8916351

  7. Integrated cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm erbium:glass laser is effective in treating mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Politi, Y; Levi, A; Enk, C D; Lapidoth, M

    2015-12-01

    Acne treatment by a mid-infrared laser may be unsatisfactory due to deeply situated acne-affected sebaceous glands which serve as its target. Skin manipulation by vacuum and contact cooling may improve laser-skin interaction, reduce pain sensation, and increase overall safety and efficacy. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of acne treatment using an integrated cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm erbium:glass laser, a prospective interventional study was conducted. It included 12 patients (seven men and five women) suffering from mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris. The device utilizes a mid-infrared 1540-nm laser (Alma Lasers Ltd. Caesarea, Israel), which is integrated with combined cooling-vacuum-assisted technology. An acne lesion is initially manipulated upon contact by a vacuum-cooling-assisted tip, followed by three to four stacked laser pulses (500-600 mJ, 4 mm spot size, and frequency of 2 Hz). Patients underwent four to six treatment sessions with a 2-week interval and were followed-up 1 and 3 months after the last treatment. Clinical photographs were taken by high-resolution digital camera before and after treatment. Clinical evaluation was performed by two independent dermatologists, and results were graded on a scale of 0 (exacerbation) to 4 (76-100 % improvement). Patients' and physicians' satisfaction was also recorded. Pain perception and adverse effects were evaluated as well. All patients demonstrated a moderate to significant improvement (average score of 3.6 and 2.0 within 1 and 3 months, respectively, following last treatment session). No side effects, besides a transient erythema, were observed. Cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm laser is safe and effective for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  8. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a group of severely impaired eating behaviors, which include three subgroups: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  9. Brain astrocytomas: biopsy, then irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L D; Somaza, S; Kondziolka, D; Flickinger, J C

    1995-01-01

    We believe that every patient who has clinical symptoms and neurodiagnostic imaging signs suggesting a low-grade glial neoplasm should undergo early diagnosis and treatment. Observation is not warranted for a tumor that has a median survival of 5 years. The value of cytoreductive surgery for many patients has yet to be proven. It is incumbent on neurosurgeons who advocate this approach to show that this more aggressive treatment strategy is preferable to minimally invasive techniques, such as stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy. Clearly, some patients who have a glial tumor require early cytoreductive surgery: those with mass effect and significant neurologic deficits. Otherwise, they will not be able to tolerate fractionated radiation therapy. Because the long-term survival rate is very poor, observation is not warranted in patients with suspected glial neoplasm. Early stereotactic biopsy immediately identifies those patients who, in fact, have more anaplastic tumors and a much worse prognosis. Such patients may benefit from early, aggressive treatments such as cytoreductive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Applying this philosophy, we have achieved a median survival of more than 10 years in patients with astrocytoma. Most patients maintain a high KPS rating, and most do not require delayed cytoreductive surgery. Although we believe that the outcomes of future patients with astrocytomas will improve, we must establish whether such improvement is related to better therapeutic options, earlier recognition enabled by advanced neuroimaging, or the availability of corticosteroids (28, 30). We also believe that neurosurgeons and neuro-oncologists should stop arguing over whether cytoreductive surgery is warranted. For some patients it is, and for others it is not. This prolonged controversy indicates the basic impotence with which neurosurgeons approach glial tumors. Our energy and efforts should be devoted toward more concrete and positive goals in

  10. Open lung biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - open lung ... An open lung biopsy is done in the hospital using general anesthesia , which means you are asleep and pain- ... The open lung biopsy is done to evaluate lung problems seen on x-ray or CT scan .

  11. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  12. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  13. Chronic pelvic abscedation after completion proctectomy in a rectal stump insufficiency; treatment with gracilis muscle flap following vacuum assisted closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Tayfun, Sait; Babuccu, Orhan; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-08-01

    Presacral abscess formation due to rectal stump insufficiency following Hartmann procedure is very rare complication. If the abscess cavity is large, it might delay the reversal of the stoma and will probably result in a devastating future functioning of the neorectum. Moreover, very invasive treatments will be required in order to prevent severe septic complications. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with a past history of Hartmann procedure for a low rectal carcinoma who presented with rectal stump insufficiency and a large presacral abscess. Following extensive debridement and rectal stump resection, a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system was applied to the large abscess cavity to facilitate gracilis muscle flap reconstruction and to optimize wound healing. The satisfactory results showed in the present report led us to favor a combination of VAC therapy and a gracilis muscle flap in intrapelvic and perineal reconstruction in the case of large defects associated with high risks of septic complications. PMID:24032119

  14. Chronic Pelvic Abscedation After Completion Proctectomy in a Rectal Stump Insufficiency; Treatment With Gracilis Muscle Flap Following Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Tayfun, Sait; Babuccu, Orhan; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Presacral abscess formation due to rectal stump insufficiency following Hartmann procedure is very rare complication. If the abscess cavity is large, it might delay the reversal of the stoma and will probably result in a devastating future functioning of the neorectum. Moreover, very invasive treatments will be required in order to prevent severe septic complications. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with a past history of Hartmann procedure for a low rectal carcinoma who presented with rectal stump insufficiency and a large presacral abscess. Following extensive debridement and rectal stump resection, a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system was applied to the large abscess cavity to facilitate gracilis muscle flap reconstruction and to optimize wound healing. The satisfactory results showed in the present report led us to favor a combination of VAC therapy and a gracilis muscle flap in intrapelvic and perineal reconstruction in the case of large defects associated with high risks of septic complications. PMID:24032119

  15. Improving planning procedure in brain biopsy: coupling frame-based stereotaxy with navigational device STP 4.0.

    PubMed

    Winkler, D; Trantakis, C; Lindner, D; Richter, A; Schober, J; Meixensberger, J

    2003-02-01

    37 consecutive patients with space-occupying intracerebral lesions were operated via frame-based stereotaxy. After CT-localizing of suspect lesions and computer-supported definition of entry and target coordinates a serial stereotactic biopsy was performed. Biopsy specimens allowed a satisfactory neuropathological examination and diagnostic result in 36 cases (97 %). Only three patients (8.1 %) showed an intraoperative bleeding, which was not associated with any postoperative CT-detectable hematoma, neurosurgical intervention nor with any neurological deficits. In summary we described the method of a computerized planning technique for stereotactic biopsy with the use of a special stereotactic planning program. High percentage of satisfactory neuropathological diagnoses and comfortable and accurate definition of target and entry coordinates justify computer support as a routine method. PMID:12640582

  16. Robotic multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papasin, R.; Wallace, M.; Winters, J.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time identification of tissue would improve procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy (SBX), functional and implantation neurosurgery, and brain tumor excision. To standard SBX equipment has been added: (1) computer-controlled stepper motors to drive the biopsy needle/probe precisely; (2) multiple microprobes to track tissue density, detect blood vessels and changes in blood flow, and distinguish the various tissues being penetrated; (3) neural net learning programs to allow real-time comparisons of current data with a normative data bank; (4) three-dimensional graphic displays to follow the probe as it traverses brain tissue. The probe can differentiate substances such as pig brain, differing consistencies of the 'brain-like' foodstuff tofu, and gels made to simulate brain, as well as detect blood vessels imbedded in these substances. Multimodality probes should improve the safety, efficacy, and diagnostic accuracy of SBX and other neurosurgical procedures.

  17. Skin biopsy: Biopsy issues in specific diseases.

    PubMed

    Elston, Dirk M; Stratman, Erik J; Miller, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis may result from biopsy site selection, technique, or choice of transport media. Important potential sources of error include false-negative direct immunofluorescence results based on poor site selection, uninformative biopsy specimens based on both site selection and technique, and spurious interpretations of pigmented lesions and nonmelanoma skin cancer based on biopsy technique. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article addresses common pitfalls involving site selection and biopsy technique in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, vasculitis, panniculitis, connective tissue diseases, drug eruptions, graft-versus-host disease, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, hair disorders, and neoplastic disorders. Understanding these potential pitfalls can result in improved diagnostic yield and patient outcomes.

  18. Stereotactic atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Laherty, R W; Kahler, R J; Walker, D G; Tomlinson, F H

    2005-01-01

    Atlantoaxial stabilisation can be performed using a variety of surgical techniques. Developments in spinal instrumentation and stereotactic technology have been incorporated into these procedures. We have recently adopted frameless stereotaxy to assist in such operations. A retrospective study of patients treated by the authors and using frameless stereotaxy from 2001 to 2002 was performed. Each patient underwent pre-operative fine-cut CT in the position of fixation. Using these images, screw trajectory was planned. Stereotaxis and fluoroscopy was utilised during fixation. A post-operative CT was performed. There were nine patients. Bilateral screw placement was achieved in eight. In the remaining case stereotactic planning predicted the single screw fixation. There were no post-operative complications. Post-operative CT showed screw placement corresponding to the planned trajectory in all 17 screws. Stabilisation was achieved in all. Stereotactic atlantoaxial screw fixation is an accessible, safe and accurate method for the management of C1-2 instability. PMID:15639416

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  20. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  1. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Smriti; Kumari, Swati; Srivastava, Anurag; Thulkar, Sanjay; Mathur, Sandeep; Veedu, Prasad Thotton

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biopsy of palpable breast masses can be performed manually by palpation guidance or under imaging guidance. Based on retrospective studies, image guided biopsy is considered more accurate than palpation guided breast biopsy; however, these techniques have not been compared prospectively. We conducted this prospective study to verify the superiority and determine the size of beneficial effect of image guided biopsy over palpation guided biopsy. Methods: Over a period of 18 months, 36 patients each with palpable breast masses were randomized into palpation guided and image guided breast biopsy arms. Ultrasound was used for image guidance in 33 patients and mammographic (stereotactic) guidance in three patients. All biopsies were performed using 14 gauge automated core biopsy needles. Inconclusive, suspicious or imaging-histologic discordant biopsies were repeated. Results: Malignancy was found in 30 of 36 women in palpation guided biopsy arm and 27 of 36 women in image guided biopsy arm. Palpation guided biopsy had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.7, 100, 100, 27.3 per cent, respectively, for diagnosing breast cancer. Nineteen of 36 women (52.8%) required repeat biopsy because of inadequate samples (7 of 19), suspicious findings (2 of 19) or imaging-histologic discordance (10 of 19). On repeat biopsy, malignancy was found in all cases of imaging-histologic discordance. Image guided biopsy had 96.3 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity. There was no case of inadequate sample or imaging-histologic discordance with image guided biopsy. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates. PMID:27488003

  2. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  3. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  4. Percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Newton, Eric; Kar, Premashish

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy has been performed for more than 120 years, and remains an important diagnostic procedure for the management of hepatobiliary disorders. Modern biochemical, immunologic, and radiographic techniques have facilitated the diagnosis and management of liver diseases but have not made liver biopsy obsolete. This comprehensive review article will discuss the history of development of percutaneous liver biopsy, its indications, contraindications, complications and the various aspects of the biopsy procedure in detail.

  5. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Lang, Julie E; Sener, Stephen F; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E; Kirk Shung, K

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  6. Optimization of Resin Infusion Processing for Composite Pipe Key-Part and K/T Type Joints Using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changchun; Bai, Guanghui; Yue, Guangquan; Wang, Zhuxi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Boming

    2016-10-01

    In present study, the optimization injection processes for manufacturing the composite pipe key-part and K/T type joints in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) were determined by estimating the filling time and flow front shape of four kinds of injection methods. Validity of the determined process was proved with the results of a scaling-down composite pipe key-part containing of the carbon fiber four axial fabrics and a steel core with a complex surface. In addition, an expanded-size composite pipe part was also produced to further estimate the effective of the determined injection process. Moreover, the resin injection method for producing the K/T type joints via VARTM was also optimized with the simulation method, and then manufactured on a special integrated mould by the determined injection process. The flow front pattern and filling time of the experiments show good agreement with that from simulation. Cross-section images of the cured composite pipe and K/T type joints parts prove the validity of the optimized injection process, which verify the efficiency of simulation method in obtaining a suitable injection process of VARTM.

  7. Comparative analysis of global gene expression profiles between diabetic rat wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure therapy, moist wound healing or gauze under suction.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Kathleen L; Norbury, Kenneth; Kieswetter, Kris; Skaf, Jihad; McNulty, Amy K

    2008-12-01

    How differential gene expression affects wound healing is not well understood. In this study, Zucker diabetic fatty (fa/fa) male inbred rats were used to investigate gene expression during wound healing in an impaired wound-healing model. Whole genome microarray surveys were used to gain insight into the biological pathways and healing processes in acute excisional wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.). Therapy, moist wound healing (MWH) or gauze under suction (GUS). Global gene expression analyses after 2 days of healing indicated major differences with respect to both number of genes showing fold changes and pathway regulation between the three different wound treatments. Statistical analysis of expression profiles indicated that 5072 genes showed a >1.6-fold change with V.A.C. Therapy compared with 3601 genes with MWH and 3952 genes with GUS. Pathways and related genes associated with the early phases of wound healing diverged between treatment groups. For example, pathways involving angiogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation and inflammation were associated with elevated gene expression following V.A.C. Therapy. This study is the first to assess wound healing by whole genome interrogation in a diabetic rat model treated with different healing modalities.

  8. A multi-stage curing technique toward improved dimensional infidelity of curve-shaped composites manufactured with vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Kai Jin

    The occurrence of dimensional infidelity during the curing process is detected as curved composites are being released from the mold after full consolidation. On the other hand, the lengthy cure cycle, thermal spiking and non-uniform consolidation in thick composite manufacturing are often strong deterrents to widespread industrial implementation. Therefore, a multi-stage curing technique is implemented and its outcome toward the spring-in phenomenon is investigated in this research. The composite processing technique of stage curing is useful for assessing the effects of thermal spiking, non-uniform consolidation and fiber wrinkling on mechanical integrity for thick composite structures. However, the prediction of spring-in behavior for a multi-stage curing process is still a relatively unexplored area in engineering research. As a result, a compatibility model based on the residual stress that builds up at each curing stage is performed in our study. Since the resin provides a lubricant effect between each curing stage, a partial slipping interface factor w is introduced to our numerical simulation model. The newly developed multi-stage curing model shows good agreement with the experimental results under Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process.

  9. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure - results of 58 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Das optimale Behandlungskonzept eines temporären Bauchdeckenverschlusses (temporary abdominal closure, TAC) bei kritisch kranken viszeralchirurgischen Patienten mit offenem Abdomen („open abdomen“, OA) ist weiterhin unklar. Durch eine VACM-Therapie (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) scheinen sich gegenüber anderen Verfahren des TAC höhere Faszienverschlussraten (delayed primary fascial closure rate, FCR) realisieren zu lassen. Material und Methoden: Patienten unserer Klinik (n=58), welche in den Jahren 2005 bis 2008 mittels eines VAC/VACM-Behandlungsmanuals behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die FCR aller Patienten betrug insgesamt 48,3% (95%-Konfidenzintervall: 34,95–61,78). Bei Patienten, bei denen im Verlauf ein Vicryl-Netz auf Faszienebene implantiert wurde (VACM-Therapie), konnte eine FCR von 61,3% realisiert werden. Die Letalität der mittels VACM therapierten Patienten betrug 45,2% (95%-KI: 27,32–63,97).Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse der eigenen Untersuchung bestätigen bisherige Studienergebnisse, die eine akzeptable FCR bei non-trauma-Patienten durch Anwendung der VACM-Therapie zeigen konnten. Die VACM-Therapie scheint aktuell Therapiekonzept der ersten Wahl bei Patienten mit OA und Indikation zum TAC zu sein.

  10. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure – results of 58 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The optimal treatment concept for temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in critically ill visceral surgery patients with open abdomen (OA) continues to be unclear. The VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) therapy seems to permit higher delayed primary fascial closure rates (FCR) than other TAC procedures. Material and methods: Patients of our clinic (n=58) who were treated by application of a VAC/VACM treatment manual in the period from 2005 to 2008 were retrospectively analysed. Results: The overall FCR of all patients was 48.3% (95% confidence interval: 34.95–61.78). An FCR of 61.3% was achieved in patients who had a vicryl mesh implanted at the fascial level (VACM therapy) in the course of treatment. Mortality among patients treated with VACM therapy was 45.2% (95% CI: 27.32–63.97). Conclusions: The results of our own study confirm the results of previous studies which showed an acceptable FCR among non-trauma patients who were treated with VACM therapy. VACM therapy currently appears to be the treatment regime of choice for patients with OA requiring TAC. PMID:27547691

  11. Optimization of Resin Infusion Processing for Composite Pipe Key-Part and K/T Type Joints Using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changchun; Bai, Guanghui; Yue, Guangquan; Wang, Zhuxi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Boming

    2016-05-01

    In present study, the optimization injection processes for manufacturing the composite pipe key-part and K/T type joints in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) were determined by estimating the filling time and flow front shape of four kinds of injection methods. Validity of the determined process was proved with the results of a scaling-down composite pipe key-part containing of the carbon fiber four axial fabrics and a steel core with a complex surface. In addition, an expanded-size composite pipe part was also produced to further estimate the effective of the determined injection process. Moreover, the resin injection method for producing the K/T type joints via VARTM was also optimized with the simulation method, and then manufactured on a special integrated mould by the determined injection process. The flow front pattern and filling time of the experiments show good agreement with that from simulation. Cross-section images of the cured composite pipe and K/T type joints parts prove the validity of the optimized injection process, which verify the efficiency of simulation method in obtaining a suitable injection process of VARTM.

  12. Transfemoral sockets with vacuum-assisted suspension comparison of hip kinematics, socket position, contact pressure, and preference: ischial containment versus brimless.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Jason T; Highsmith, M Jason

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of brimless compared with ischial ramus containment (IRC) prosthetic sockets when using vacuum-assisted suspension (VAS) on persons with a unilateral transfemoral amputation (TFA). A randomized crossover design with a 2 d accommodation was used. People with unilateral TFA (n = 9 analyzed) were enrolled. Interventions were IRC VAS and brimless VAS sockets. Main outcome measures included coronal hip angle and vertical and lateral socket movement as measured by X-ray, skin pressure measured by Tekscan, and preference measured subjectively. The brimless design was statistically equivalent to IRC in all measured coronal hip angles and vertical and lateral socket displacement. The peak/stance mean pressure in the medial proximal aspect of the socket was 322 mmHg in the IRC compared with 190 mmHg in the brimless condition. Except for medial proximal pressure, no other measures reached statistical significance. All subjects reported the brimless design to be more comfortable than the IRC in short-term preference. Brimless VAS socket design may be a clinically viable choice for people with TFA.

  13. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Altındas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  14. Precision of Raman Spectroscopy Measurements in Detection of Microcalcifications in Breast Needle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Anushree; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Galindo, Luis H.; Sattar, Abdus; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2012-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. We developed Raman spectroscopy decision algorithms to detect breast microcalcifications, based on fit coefficients (FC) derived by modeling tissue Raman spectra as a linear combination of the Raman spectra of 9 chemical and morphologic components of breast tissue. However, little or no information is available on the precision of such measurements and its effect on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to make predictions for breast microcalcification detection. Here we report the precision, that is, the closeness of agreement between replicate Raman spectral measurements - and the model FC derived from them - obtained ex vivo from fresh breast biopsies from patients undergoing stereotactic breast needle biopsy, using a compact clinical Raman system. The coefficients of variation of the model FC averaged 0.03 for normal breast tissue sites, 0.12 for breast lesions without and 0.22 for breast lesions with microcalcifications. Imprecision in the FC resulted in diagnostic discordance among replicates only for line-sitters, that is, tissue sites with FC values near the decision line or plane. The source of this imprecision and their implications for the use of Raman spectroscopy for guidance of stereotactic breast biopsies for microcalcifications are also discussed. In summary, we conclude that the precision of Raman spectroscopy measurements in breast tissue obtained using our compact clinical system is more than adequate to make accurate and repeatable predictions of microcalcifications in breast tissue using decision algorithms based on model FC. This provides strong evidence of the potential of Raman spectroscopy guidance of stereotactic breast needle biopsies for microcalcifications. PMID:22746329

  15. [Image-guided stereotaxic biopsy of central nervous system lesions].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    In a series of 44 image guided stereotactic biopsy from August 1995 until March 1997, findings were as follows (frequency order). Tumors, glioblastoma was the most frequent. Primary lymphoma and other conditions associated to AIDS. Metastasis, three cases, Vasculites, two cases, Arachnoid cyst, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, cortical degeneration, inespecific calcification (one case each). The age varied from 1 to 83 years. Forty one lesions were supratentorial, two infratentorial, and one was outside the brain (dura and skull) and we used stereotaxy to localize it. There was no mortality and morbidity was 2.3%. The literature is reviewed. We conclude that this procedure is safe and highly diagnostic.

  16. [Image-guided stereotaxic biopsy of central nervous system lesions].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    In a series of 44 image guided stereotactic biopsy from August 1995 until March 1997, findings were as follows (frequency order). Tumors, glioblastoma was the most frequent. Primary lymphoma and other conditions associated to AIDS. Metastasis, three cases, Vasculites, two cases, Arachnoid cyst, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, cortical degeneration, inespecific calcification (one case each). The age varied from 1 to 83 years. Forty one lesions were supratentorial, two infratentorial, and one was outside the brain (dura and skull) and we used stereotaxy to localize it. There was no mortality and morbidity was 2.3%. The literature is reviewed. We conclude that this procedure is safe and highly diagnostic. PMID:9698729

  17. Mammographically Occult Asymptomatic Radial Scars/Complex Sclerosing Lesions at Ultrasonography-Guided Core Needle Biopsy: Follow-Up Can Be Recommended.

    PubMed

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of radial scars are detected by ultrasound (US), but their management is controversial. This study investigated the upgrade rate in mammographically occult radial scars/complex sclerosing lesions without epithelial atypia at US-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy in asymptomatic patients. Nineteen mammographically occult benign radial scars/complex sclerosing lesions (median size, 7 mm; range, 3-23 mm) were included. Patients underwent surgical excision (n = 10) or vacuum-assisted excision, with follow-up US at least 6 mo after benign vacuum-assisted excision results (n = 8), or underwent US follow-up for 2 y after core needle biopsy (n = 1). Any cases with change in diagnosis to high-risk lesions or malignancy at excision were considered upgrades. The upgrade rate was 0.0%. Based on US findings, 15.8% (3/19) were Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, 68.4% (13/19) were BI-RADS category 4a and 15.8% (3/19) were BI-RADS category 4b. Follow-up with US can be considered for mammographically occult benign radial scar/complex sclerosing lesions diagnosed by US core needle biopsy in asymptomatic patients. PMID:27444865

  18. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  19. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - salivary gland ... You have several pairs of salivary glands that drain into your mouth: A major pair in front of the ears (parotid glands) Another major pair beneath your jaw (submandibular ...

  20. Colposcopy - directed biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... squamous cells - colposcopy; Pap smear - colposcopy; HPV - colposcopy; Human papilloma virus - colposcopy; Cervix - colposcopy; Colposcopy ... also called cervical dysplasia) Cervical warts (infection with human papilloma virus , or HPV) If the biopsy does not determine ...

  1. Mediastinoscopy with biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure is also done for certain infections (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and autoimmune disorders . Normal Results Biopsies of lymph ... findings may indicate: Hodgkin disease Lung cancer Lymphoma Sarcoidosis The spread of disease from one body part ...

  2. Biopsy catheter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... examination, a heart biopsy can be performed. A catheter is carefully threaded into an artery or vein to gain access into the heart. A bioptome (catheter with jaws in its tip) is then introduced. ...

  3. Effect of changing patient position from supine to prone on the accuracy of a Cosman-Roberts-Wells (CRW) stereotactic head frame system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Maurer, Calvin R., Jr.; Dean, David; Maciunas, Robert J.

    2002-05-01

    Despite the growing popularity of frameless image-guided surgery systems, stereotactic head frame systems are widely accepted by neurosurgeons and are still commonly used to perform stereotactic biopsy, functional procedures, and stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, we investigate the accuracy of the Cosman-Roberts-Wells (CRW) stereotactic frame system when the mechanical load on the frame changes between pre-operative imaging and the intervention due to different patient position - supine during imaging, prone during intervention. We analyze CT images acquired from 12 patients who underwent stereotactic biopsy or stereotactic radiosurgery. Two CT images were acquired for each patient, one with the patient in the supine position and one in the prone position. The prone images were registered to the respective supine images using an intensity-based registration algorithm, once using only the frame and once using only the head. The difference between the transformations produced by these two registrations describes the movement of the patient's head with respect to the frame due to mechanical distortion of the latter. The maximum frame-based registration error between supine and prone positions was 2.8 mm, greater than 2 mm in two patients, and greater than 1.5 mm in five patients. Anterior-posterior translation is the dominant component of the difference transformation for most of these patients. In general, the magnitude of the movement increased with brain volume, which is an index of head weight. We conclude that in order to minimize frame-based registration error due to a change in the mechanical load on the frame, frame-based stereotactic procedures should be performed with the patient in the identical position during imaging and intervention.

  4. Stereotactic Neurosurgical Treatment Options for Craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Trippel, Michael; Nikkhah, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma are the most common non-glial tumors in childhood. The results of different studies indicate that radical excision surgery is not an appropriate treatment strategy for childhood craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic involvement. Stereotactic neurosurgery provides save, minimal invasive and cost-efficient options in the treatment of childhood craniopharyngioma. In this review a summary of the contribution of the stereotactic neurosurgery in the interdisciplinary treatment regime of childhood craniopharyngioma will be given and discussed in detail. PMID:22654877

  5. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces. PMID:25955851

  6. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces.

  7. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  8. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT): a novel treatment for brain lesions regrowing after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Juan; Tomasiewicz, Hilarie C; Shetty, Anil; Amankulor, Nduka M; Chiang, Veronica L

    2013-07-01

    Since the inception of radiosurgery, the management of brain metastases has become a common problem for neurosurgeons. Although the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiation therapy serves to control the majority of disease burden, patients who survive longer than 6-8 months sometimes face the problem of symptomatic radiographically regrowing lesions with few treatment options. Here we investigate the feasibility of use of MRI-guided stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) as a novel treatment option for these lesions. Six patients who had previously undergone gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases were selected. All patients had an initial favorable response to radiosurgery but subsequently developed regrowth of at least one lesion associated with recurrent edema and progressive neurological symptoms requiring ongoing steroids for symptom control. All lesions were evaluated for craniotomy, but were deemed unresectable due to deep location or patient's comorbidities. Stereotactic biopsies were performed prior to the thermotherapy procedure in all cases. LITT was performed using the Visualase system and follow-up MRI imaging was used to determine treatment response. In all six patients biopsy results were negative for tumor and consistent with adverse radiation effects also known as radiation necrosis. Patients tolerated the procedure well and were discharged from the hospital within 48 h of the procedure. In 4/6 cases there was durable improvement of neurological symptoms until death. In all cases steroids were weaned off within 2 months. One patient died from systemic causes related to his cancer a month after the procedure. One patient had regrowth of the lesion 3 months after the procedure and required re-initiation of steroids and standard craniotomy for surgical resection. There were no complications directly related to the thermocoagulation procedure. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy is a feasible

  9. Use of Core Needle Biopsy rather than Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology in the Diagnostic Approach of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, Paola; Spunticchia, Flaminia; Barberi, Simona; Caprio, Giuliana; Paglicci, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims In the following study case, we reviewed breast ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB), using Mammotome (vacuum-assisted breast biopsy) and Tru-cut, carried out on palpable and nonpalpable uncertain breast lumps or malignant large lesions to be submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Material and Methods Examinations were conducted during a 4-year period of clinical activity in a highly specialized center, from December 2009 to December 2013, in 712 patients previously subjected to fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Results The results demonstrated that among the 712 breast biopsies, in many cases FNAC was not conclusive, and therefore we proceeded with the echo-guided biopsy, through which we were able to collect sufficient material for the histological examination in order to direct patients to surgery or follow-up. Conclusions CNB is far superior to FNAC, especially in cases of uncertainty, where it is preferable to proceed directly with CNB, which may also determine additional prognostic and predictive markers. Initially FNAC is less expensive, but the actual costs involved tend to be higher for FNAC as it is less accurate and a CNB is often required. In accordance with recent publications, we can confirm the full validity of CNB in the diagnostic approach of breast lesions. PMID:25120471

  10. Techniques for the Application of Stereotactic Head Frames Based on a 25-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Burke, John; McDermott, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    The use of skull fixed stereotactic head frames remains an integral part of neurosurgical practice. Methods for the positioning, anesthesia, and fixation have been described in various publications. The authors describe the steps used currently that reflect a 25-year experience with stereotactic frame application. Photographs were obtained throughout the set-up and frame application process. The step-by-step methods were described with accompanying figures. Consent was obtained from that patient to allow for photographs throughout the frame application process. Consent was also obtained from a separate patient for videotaping the entire application process. Descriptive tags are embedded in the video to assist with the instruction of the senior author's (MWM) methods. The senior author has used the described method in over 1,000 cases. A recent analysis of the patient pain experience has been reported and is well tolerated. Supplemental devices beyond the manufacturers' standard equipment have been employed or developed: ethyl chloride spray, angled front posts, frame positioner, and torque wrenches. There have been no shunt perforations, no cranial vault penetrations, one titanium mesh cranioplasty deformation, three pin site infections (3 patients; 4,000 pin sites; 0.075%), and one thermal injury (0.025%). Stereotactic head frame application remains an important part of neurosurgical practice. The steps in application employed here after a 25-year experience appear to make the procedure well tolerated by patients. The authors hope this instructional article will be of value to new users who practice stereotactic radiosurgery, frame-based biopsy, depth electrode placement, or deep brain stimulator implantation. PMID:27158573

  11. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  12. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  13. Efficiency of Core Biopsy for BI-RADS-5 Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronald; Quan, Glenda; Calhoun, Kris; Soot, Laurel; Skokan, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic biopsy has proven more cost effective for biopsy of lesions associated with moderately suspicious mammograms. Data regarding selection of stereotactic biopsy (CORE) instead of excisional biopsy (EB) as the first diagnostic procedure in patients with nonpalpable breast lesions and highest suspicion breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS)-5 mammograms are sparse. Records from a regional health system radiology database were screened for mammograms associated with image-guided biopsy. A total of 182 nonpalpable BI-RADS-5 lesions were sampled in 178 patients over 5 years, using CORE or EB. Initial surgical margins, number of surgeries, time from initial procedure to last related surgical procedure, and hospital and professional charges for related admissions were compared using chi-squared, t-test, and Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests. A total of 108 CORE and 74 EB were performed as the first diagnostic procedure. Invasive or in situ carcinoma was diagnosed in 156 (86%) of all biopsies, 95 in CORE and 61 in EB groups. Negative margins of the first surgical procedure were more frequent in CORE (n = 70, 74%) versus EB (n = 17, 28%), p < 0.05. Use of CORE was associated with fewer total surgical procedures per lesion (1.29 +/- 0.05 versus 1.8 +/- 0.05, p < 0.05). Time of initial diagnostic procedure to final treatment did not vary significantly according to group (27 +/- 2 days versus 22 +/- 2 days, CORE versus EB). Mean charges including the diagnostic procedure and all subsequent surgeries were not different between CORE and EB groups ($10,500 +/- 300 versus $11,500 +/- 500, p = 0.08). Use of CORE as the first procedure in patients with highly suspicious mammograms is associated with improved pathologic margins and need for fewer surgical procedures than EB, and should be considered the preferred initial diagnostic approach. PMID:18821933

  14. Preliminary experience with interactive guided brain biopsies using a vertically opened 0.5-T MR system.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J P; Dietrich, J; Lieberenz, S; Schmidt, F; Sorge, O; Trantakis, C; Seifert, V; Kellermann, S; Schober, R; Franke, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of brain biopsies performed within a vertically opened MR system. We worked with the interventional 0.5-T MR "SIGNA SP" (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.) with an integrated tracking device "Flashpoint Position Encoder" (Image Guided Technologies, USA). As a holding device for this instrument we constructed a special frame. The whole system allows an exact adjustment of an optimum biopsy direction and guidance of the biopsy in a non-stereotactic, interactive mode in near real-time. As biopsy tools we used MR-compatible aspiration and specially made side-cut needles (Daum, Germany; E-Z-EM, USA). We performed a prospective diagnostic brain biopsy study in 18 patients. Guidance of the needle was carried out using gradient-echo single-slice technique. The sample was taken after controlling the exact position of the needle tip on spin-echo images. In 12 cases an exact neuropathological diagnosis was possible. In 6 cases of negative biopsy (4 aspiration biopsies) the samples were not representative. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of interactive MR-guided minimally invasive brain biopsies in an open MR system. The best results were achieved using cut needles for biopsies of contrast-enhancing lesions visible on T1-weighted gradient-echo guidance sequence. PMID:10101643

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Garcia, L.; Alexander, K.; Schreiner, L. J.; Joshi, C.

    2013-06-01

    This work describes the use of a motion phantom and 1D, 2D, and 3D ion chamber, EBT3 film, electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and FXG gel measurements for dosimetric validation of a stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SBRT) technique in our clinic. Results show good agreement between the measurements and calculated treatment plan dose.

  16. Imaging for Stereotactic Spine Radiotherapy: Clinical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Zindler, Jaap D.; Sanchez, Esther; Verbakel, Wilko F.; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. With the need for accurate target definition and conformal avoidance of critical normal structures, high-quality multimodal imaging has emerged as a key component at each stage of the treatment process. Multidisciplinary collaboration is necessary to optimize imaging protocols and implement imaging advances into routine patient care.

  17. The endomyocardial biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, H; Hager, W D; Gondos, B

    1986-01-01

    Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) provides a safe, simple method of gathering unique information. Although the role of EMB continues to evolve rapidly, present consensus includes the following indications, based on the ability of EMB to provide diagnoses unobtainable by other means: assessment of early rejection following cardiac transplantation; determination of myocarditis as etiology of clinically obscure cardiac dysfunction; quantification of chemotherapeutic (especially anthracycline) cardiotoxicity; and distinction between constrictive and restrictive heart disease. Each of these indications carries major therapeutic as well as prognostic implications. Methods of processing EMB are presented, complications listed, artifacts described, findings and uses illustrated, and suggestions for future development addressed briefly.

  18. Telepathology and Optical Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Roca, Olga

    2009-01-01

    The ability to obtain information about the structure of tissue without taking a sample for pathology has opened the way for new diagnostic techniques. The present paper reviews all currently available techniques capable of producing an optical biopsy, with or without morphological images. Most of these techniques are carried out by physicians who are not specialized in pathology and therefore not trained to interpret the results as a pathologist would. In these cases, the use of telepathology or distant consultation techniques is essential. PMID:20339507

  19. Upfront Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pineal Parenchymal Tumors in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Khang, Shin Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) in adults are rare, and knowledge regarding their optimal management and treatment outcome is limited. Herein, we present the clinical results of our series of PPTs other than pineoblastomas managed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at upfront setting. Methods Between 1997 and 2014, nine consecutive adult patients with the diagnosis of PPTs, either pineocytoma or pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, were treated with SRS. There were 6 men and 3 women. The median age was 39 years (range, 31-53 years). All of the patients presented with symptoms of hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy was done for initial management. After histologic diagnosis, patients were treated with Gamma Knife with the mean dose of 13.3 Gy (n=3) or fractionated Cyberknife with 32 Gy (n=6). Results After a mean follow-up of 78.6 months (range, 14-223 months), all patients were alive and all of their tumors were locally controlled except for one instance of cerebrospinal fluid seeding metastasis. On magnetic resonance images, tumor size decreased in all patients, resulting in complete response in 3 patients and partial response in 6. One patient had experienced temporary memory impairment after SRS, which improved spontaneously. Conclusion SRS is effective and safe for PPTs in adults and can be considered as a useful alternative to surgical resection at upfront setting. PMID:26587186

  20. Mammotome breast cancer biopsy: combined guided with X-ray stereotaxis and imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Scafè, R.; Falcini, F.; Sala, R.; Burgio, N.; Fiorentini, G.; Giorgetti, G.; Stella, S.; Chiarini, S.; Scopinaro, F.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1999 our group started with practical experience on diagnostic use of small, transportable prototypes of high-resolution gamma cameras (patented) for radioguided surgery: the Imaging Probe (IP). First experiences allowed us to develop dedicated prototypes for specific applications. At the moment the most intriguing field is guiding biopsy. Dedicated detectors, characterized by low cost and weight, allow to transfer imaging where the biopsy has to be done. In this paper, a new combined application for breast cancer detection is described. In present system IP is put inside a Fisher digital stereotactic device prepared for Mammotome biopsy: so biopsy can contemporaneously be driven by X-ray stereotaxis and 99mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI) images from IP. The Field Of View (FOV) is about 2×2 cm 2 and 0.8 kg weight. This novel scintillation camera is based upon the compact Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (PSPMT), coupled to scintillating arrays. The PSPMT can be arranged as array when larger FOV is needed. Present application was provided with off line software for image fusion running on the IP dedicated PC. It was matched with the Fisher digital stereotactic X-ray device dedicated to address Mammotome (Ethicon Endo-surgery by Johnson and Johnson) towards breast opacities. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) at laboratory tests. A preliminary IP-X-ray digital system inter-calibration was performed using a Perspex-lead phantom. 99mTc MIBI was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before biopsy to three patients with breast opacities of respectively 0.6, 0.8 and 1.5 cm, scheduled for Mammotome biopsy. Sixty-four pixel scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to slightly correct the direction of the Mammotome needle taking into account stereotactic X-ray, scintigraphic and fused images. Bioptic samples were also counted with IP before sending them to

  1. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M.; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow 'pencil beam' treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.1-3 Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,4 patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,5 respiration-correlated computed tomography,6 or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.7-9 The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.10 Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.11-13 Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality comes at the

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow 'pencil beam' treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.(1-3) Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,(4) patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,(5) respiration-correlated computed tomography,(6) or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.(7-9) The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.(10) Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.(11-13) Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality

  3. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part II: nonspinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part II) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for nonspinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for spinal tumors (part I) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980677

  4. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part I: spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, the co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part I) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for spinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for nonspinal tumors (part II) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980676

  5. Renal biopsy: methods and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2004-07-01

    Renal biopsy most often is indicated in the management of dogs and cats with glomerular disease or acute renal failure. Renal biopsy can readily be performed in dogs and cats via either percutaneous or surgical methods. Care should be taken to ensure that proper technique is used. When proper technique is employed and patient factors are properly addressed, renal biopsy is a relatively safe procedure that minimally affects renal function. Patients should be monitored during the post biopsy period for severe hemorrhage, the most common complication. Accurate diagnosis of glomerular disease, and therefore, accurate treatment planning,requires that the biopsy specimens not only be evaluated by light microscopy using special stains but by electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. PMID:15223207

  6. Surgical amputation of a digit and vacuum-assisted-closure (V.A.C.) management in a case of osteomyelitis and wound care in an eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Stanley, Bryden J; Sikarskie, James G; Bohart, George; Ames, N Kent; Tomlian, Janice; Marquardt, Mark; Marcum, Annabel; Kiupel, Matti; Sledge, Dodd; Agnew, Dalen

    2011-06-01

    A 14-yr-old female eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) presented with progressive suppurative osteomyelitis in her left hind lateral toe. beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus sp. was isolated. The animal was treated with multiple systemic antibiotics, and topical wound cleansing. Repeated debridements and nail trimmings were performed for 5 mo prior to electing amputation. The toe was surgically amputated under general anesthesia between the first and second phalanges. Analgesia was diffused into the wound topically via a catheter and elastomeric pump. The open amputation site was covered with adherent drapes and a negative-pressure wound therapy device provided vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) for 72 hr. Three months later this animal developed a deep dermal ulcer on the lateral aspect of the right hind limb, at the level of the stifle. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The wound was managed by initial daily lavage, followed by 1 mo of V.A.C. therapy, with 72 hr between dressing changes. Clinically, this therapy expedited the formation of healthy granulation tissue and overall healing was accelerated. The animal tolerated the machine and bandage changes well via operant conditioning. The use of negative-pressure wound therapy appeared to shorten time to resolution of slow-healing wounds in black rhinoceros. PMID:22946413

  7. Extrapulmonary Soft-Tissue Fibrosis Resulting From Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Nodular Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Kokubo, Masaki; Kamikubo, Yoshifumi; Ishibashi, Ryouchi; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To clarify the incidence, symptoms, and timing of extrapulmonary fibrosis developing after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 379 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors at four institutions between February 2001 and March 2007. The median follow-up time was 29 months (range, 1-72). We investigated the subjective and objective characteristics of the extrapulmonary masses, redelineated the origin tissue of each on the treatment planning computed tomography scan, and generated dose-volume histograms. Results: In 9 patients (2.4%), extrapulmonary masses were found 3-36 months (median, 14) after irradiation. Coexisting swelling occurred in 3 patients, chest pain in 2, thumb numbness in 1, and arm edema in 1 patient. Extrapulmonary masses occurred in 5 (5.4%) of 92 and 4 (1.4%) of 287 patients irradiated with a 62.5-Gy and 48.0-Gy isocenter dose, respectively. The mean and maximal dose to the origin tissue was 25.8-53.9 Gy (median, 43.7) and 47.5-62.5 Gy (median, 50.2), respectively. In 5 of 9 patients, the standardized uptake values on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography was 1.8-2.8 (median, 2.2). Percutaneous needle biopsy was performed in 3 patients, and all the specimens showed benign fibrotic changes without malignant cells. Conclusion: All patients should be carefully followed after stereotactic body radiotherapy. The findings of any new lesion should prompt an assessment for radiation-induced extrapulmonary fibrosis before an immediate diagnosis of recurrence is made. Careful beam-shape modification and dose prescription near the thoracic outlet are required to prevent forearm neuropathy and lymphedema.

  8. Stereotactic Interstitial Radiosurgery With the Photon Radiosurgery System (PRS) for Metastatic Brain Tumors: A Prospective Single-Center Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazis, Georgios; Trippel, Michael; Birg, Walter; Ostertag, Christoph B.; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and the treatment outcome of tumor patients being treated stereotactically with a miniature X-ray generator (Photon Radiosurgery System, PRS). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with histologically diagnosed cerebral metastases were treated with a single fraction of stereotactic interstitial irradiation (median, 18 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging evaluation were assessed at 2-, 6-, and 12-week intervals postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Survival, local control, and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival was 7.37 months and the actuarial survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 60.0% and 34.3%, respectively. Acute complications on six patients were associated with shorter survival. Local tumor control at the initial stage and at the last follow-up were 82% and 50%. Eighteen patients (53%) developed distant brain metastases after treatment. At 1 year, the local control rate and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were 33.0%, 43.3%, and 14.7%, respectively. A shorter local tumor control was observed by PRS treatment of a recurrent tumor and by irregular tumor configuration. Conclusions: Interstitial radiosurgery with the PRS requires continued investigation. It allows for an immediate and potentially cost-efficient treatment for patients with singular, small (<= 6.36 cm{sup 3}; or <= 2.3 cm) spherical brain metastasis subsequent to a stereotactic biopsy.

  9. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, Esengül Koçak; Abacıoğlu, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients. PMID:25759766

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Link, Michael J.; Brown, Paul D.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

  11. Experience with the advanced breast biopsy instrumentation system

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Vsevolod S.; Colapinto, Nicholas D.; Lee, Stephen; Down, Nancy K.; Cook, Dodie M.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To report early experience with the advanced breast biopsy instrumentation (ABBI) system and to compare the results with those of other published studies. Design A nonrandomized case series. Setting An outpatient breast diagnostic centre at a large urban community hospital. Patients Thirty-four women; 27 had suspicious calcifications, 2 had a nonpalpable mass and 5 had both. Intervention The ABBI procedure to excise a breast lesion or obtain a representative sample for histologic examination. Main outcome measures Success of the procedure with respect to diagnosis, sample quality, technical problems, margins of tumour free tissue and patient satisfaction. Results Malignant tissue was diagnosed in 7 women (21%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia in 2 (6%). In all cancers, the obtained samples had malignant cells present at the margins or less than 1 mm away. Technical problems were encountered in 32% of cases. Manual extraction of the specimen was required in 21% of cases. Conclusions The preliminary data correlate well with those of other published results. Although it is possible that a small number of cases and a relatively high proportion of technical difficulties may represent a normal learning curve, there is a definite need for improvement of some ABBI components. ABBI does not appear to provide adequate margins of uninvolved tissue in patients with cancer and thus should not be used with curative intent. ABBI provides excellent quality samples for pathological study and good patient satisfaction. There are not yet enough data for meaningful comparison of ABBI with stereotactic core biopsy and excisional biopsy with needle localization. PMID:11129832

  12. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  13. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal violet stain to test a sample of tissue taken ... microscope slide. The specimen is stained with crystal violet stain and goes through more processing before it ...

  14. Experience with transjugular liver biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, H J; Gilmore, I T; Bradley, R D; Marigold, J H; Thompson, R P

    1983-01-01

    The results of 193 transjugular liver biopsies performed with a modified needle are described. An adequate specimen was obtained in 97%, and complications were rare, although puncture of the liver capsule does occur and caused bleeding in two patients. Fever after the procedure was reduced by ultrasonic cleaning of the needle. Although not easy, this technique is safe and preferable in the management of selected patients, but in most patients percutaneous biopsy is to be preferred. PMID:6629116

  15. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  16. A needle guidance system for biopsy and therapy using two-dimensional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bluvol, Nathan; Sheikh, Allison; Kornecki, Anat; Del Rey Fernandez, David; Downey, Donal; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-02-15

    Image-guided needle biopsies are currently used to provide a definitive diagnosis of breast cancer; however, difficulties in tumor targeting exist as the ultrasound (United States) scan plane and biopsy needle must remain coplanar throughout the procedure to display the actual needle tip position. The additional time associated with aligning and maintaining this coplanar relationship results in increased patient discomfort. Biopsy procedural efficiency is further hindered since needle pathway interpretation is often difficult, especially for needle insertions at large depths that usually require multiple reinsertions. The authors developed a system that would increase the speed and accuracy of current breast biopsy procedures using readily available two-dimensional (2D) US technology. This system is composed of a passive articulated mechanical arm that attaches to a 2D US transducer. The arm is connected to a computer through custom electronics and software, which were developed as an interface for tracking the positioning of the mechanical components in real time. The arm couples to the biopsy needle and provides visual guidance for the physician performing the procedure in the form of a real-time projected needle pathway overlay on an US image of the breast. An agar test phantom, with stainless steel targets interspersed randomly throughout, was used to validate needle trajectory positioning accuracy. The biopsy needle was guided by both the software and hardware components to the targets. The phantom, with the needle inserted and device decoupled, was placed in an x-ray stereotactic mammography (SM) machine. The needle trajectory and bead target locations were determined in three dimensions from the SM images. Results indicated a mean needle trajectory accuracy error of 0.75{+-}0.42 mm. This is adequate to sample lesions that are <2 mm in diameter. Chicken tissue test phantoms were used to compare core needle biopsy procedure times between experienced

  17. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bazioglou, M; Theodorou, K; Kappas, C

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is one of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding high costs of computer-based training systems and database development). PMID:10394345

  18. [Flexible bronchoscopy techniques: bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsy and transbronchial biopsy].

    PubMed

    Escribano Montaner, A; Moreno Galdó, A

    2005-04-01

    This article completes previous recommendations of the Techniques Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonologists on the practice of flexible bronchoscopy in children. We review the most frequently performed diagnostic and therapeutic procedures applied through the flexible bronchoscope: bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsy and transbronchial biopsy. Recommendations are also provided on the practice of nonbronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage. We review the indications and contraindications of these techniques, the equipment required, and the preparation and monitoring of the patient before, during and after the procedure. The complications of these techniques are also discussed. These recommendations may be adopted, modified or rejected according to clinical needs and constraints.

  19. Freehand Two-Step CT-Guided Brain Tumor Biopsy: A Fast and Effective Interventional Procedure in Selected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas Mylona, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided needle biopsy of brain lesions without a stereotactic device, and to determine the best possible indications for this technique. Methods. From February 2001 to February 2004, 20 patients (12 men, 8 women; age 61-82 years) underwent CT-guided brain lesion biopsy. The procedure started with a brain CT scan for lesion localization and for selection of the inlet for needle insertion. The patient was then transported to the operating room where cranioanatrisis was performed. Subsequently, the biopsy was performed under CT guidance using a 14G brain biopsy needle with a blind smooth end and lateral holes. At the end of the biopsy, the field was checked for possible complications with a CT scan. Results. Histopathologic results were: brain tumor in 16 patients (80%), inflammatory process in 3 (15%), and no conclusive diagnosis in 1 (5%). A repeat of the process was required in 2 patients. A minor complication of local hematoma was found in 1 patient (5%). There were no deaths or other serious complications.Conclusion. CT-guided biopsy is a reliable method for histopathologic diagnosis of brain lesions in selected cases. It is a simple, fast, effective, low-cost procedure with minimal complications, indicated especially for superficial and large tumors.

  20. Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  1. An approach to duodenal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Serra, S; Jani, P A

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of endoscopy of the upper digestive tract as a routine diagnostic procedure has increased the number of duodenal biopsy specimens. Consequently, the pathologist is often asked to evaluate them. In this review, a practical approach to the evaluation of a duodenal biopsy specimen is discussed. An overview of the handling of specimens is given and the normal histology and commonly encountered diseases are discussed. Finally, a description of commonly seen infections is provided, together with an algorithmic approach for diagnosis. PMID:16679353

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27261915

  3. Accuracy of Marketing Claims by Providers of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Amol K.; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. Methods: We reviewed the Web sites of all US hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Results: Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Conclusion: Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed. PMID:23633973

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation.

  5. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for

  6. Multi-contaminant analysis of organophosphate and halogenated flame retardants in food matrices using ultrasonication and vacuum assisted extraction, multi-stage cleanup and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuchao; García-Bermejo, Ángel; Malarvannan, Govindan; Gómara, Belén; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    A multi-residue analytical method was developed for the determination of a range of flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), emerging halogenated FRs (EFRs) and organophosphate FRs (PFRs), in food matrices. An ultrasonication and vacuum assisted extraction (UVAE), followed by a multi-stage clean-up procedure, enabled the removal of up to 1g of lipid from 2.5 g of freeze-dried food samples and significantly reduce matrix effects. UVAE achieves a waste factor (WF) of about 10%, while the WFs of classical QuEChERS methods range usually between 50 and 90%. The low WF of UVAE leads to a dramatic improvement in the sensitivity along with saving up to 90% of spiking (internal) standards. Moreover, a two-stage clean-up on Florisil and aminopropyl silica was introduced after UVAE, for an efficient removal of pigments and residual lipids, which led to cleaner extracts than normally achieved by dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE). In this way, the extracts could be concentrated to low volumes, e.g. <100 μL and the equivalent matrix concentrations were up to 100g ww/mL. The final analysis of PFRs was performed on GC-EI-MS, while PBDEs and EFRs were measured by GC-ECNI-MS. Validation tests were performed with three food matrices (lean beef, whole chicken egg and salmon filet), obtaining acceptable recoveries (66-135%) with good repeatability (RSD 1-24%, mean 7%). Method LOQs ranged between 0.008 and 0.04 ng/g dw for PBDEs, between 0.08 and 0.20 ng/g dw for EFRs, and between 1.4 and 3.6 ng/g dw for PFRs. The method was further applied to eight types of food samples (including meat, eggs, fish, and seafood) with lipid contents ranging from 0.1 to 22%. Various FRs were detected above MLOQ levels, demonstrating the wide-range applicability of our method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method reported for simultaneous analysis of brominated and organophosphate FRs in food matrices. PMID:25997844

  7. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  8. Biopsy techniques for intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Dhami, Abhinav; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2016-01-01

    Biopsy involves the surgical removal of a tissue specimen for histopathologic evaluation. Most intraocular tumors are reliably diagnosed based on the clinical evaluation or with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. However, accurately diagnosing a small percentage of tumors can be challenging. A tissue biopsy is thus needed to establish a definitive diagnosis and plan the requisite treatment. From fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to surgical excision, all tissue collection techniques have been studied in the literature. Each technique has its indications and limitations. FNAB has been reported to provide for 88–95% reliable and safe ophthalmic tumor diagnosis and has gained popularity for prognostic purposes and providing eye conserving treatment surgeries. The technique and instrumentation for biopsy vary depending upon the tissue involved (retina, choroid, subretinal space, vitreous, and aqueous), suspected diagnosis, size, location, associated retinal detachment, and clarity of the media. The cytopathologist confers a very important role in diagnosis and their assistance plays a key role in managing and planning the treatment for malignancies. PMID:27488148

  9. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  10. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  12. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. PMID:27614511

  13. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy: uncertainties and margins].

    PubMed

    Lacornerie, T; Marchesi, V; Reynaert, N

    2014-01-01

    The principles governing stereotactic body radiation therapy are tight margins and large dose gradients around targets. Every step of treatment preparation and delivery must be evaluated before applying this technique in the clinic. Uncertainties remain in each of these steps: delineation, prescription with the biological equivalent dose, treatment planning, patient set-up taking into account movements, the machine accuracy. The calculation of margins to take into account uncertainties differs from conventional radiotherapy because of the delivery of few fractions and large dose gradients around the target. The quest of high accuracy is complicated by the difficulty to reach it and the lack of consensus regarding the prescription. Many schemes dose/number of fractions are described in clinical studies and there are differences in the way describing the delivered doses. While waiting for the ICRU report dedicated to this technique, it seems desirable to use the quantities proposed in ICRU Report 83 (IMRT) to report the dose distribution. PMID:25023588

  14. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee shall retain a record of each spot-check for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units required...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee shall retain a record of each spot-check for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units required...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  18. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  19. Biopsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... computed tomography (CT) , fluoroscopy , ultrasound , or MRI . A mammography unit is a rectangular box that houses the ... seen. Some lesions, such as clustered calcifications on mammography are not as clearly shown with ultrasound as ...

  20. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  1. Liquid biopsy in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Labgaa, Ismail; Villanueva, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Liver cancer has become the second cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Most patients are still diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stage, where potentially curative treatment options are not recommended. Unlike other solid tumors, there are no validated oncogenic addiction loops and the only systemic agent to improve survival in advanced disease is sorafenib. All phase 3 clinical trials testing molecular therapies after sorafenib have been negative, none of which selected patients based on predictive biomarkers of response. Theoretically, analysis of circulating cancer byproducts (e.g., circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acids), namely "liquid biopsy," could provide easy access to molecular tumor information, improve patients' stratification and allow to assess tumor dynamics over time. Recent technical developments and preliminary data from other malignancies indicate that liquid biopsy might have a role in the future management of cancer patients. PMID:25977189

  2. 20 CFR 718.106 - Autopsy; biopsy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.106 Autopsy; biopsy. (a... does not have pneumoconiosis. However, where positive findings are obtained on biopsy, the results will constitute evidence of the presence of pneumoconiosis....

  3. 20 CFR 718.106 - Autopsy; biopsy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.106 Autopsy; biopsy. (a... does not have pneumoconiosis. However, where positive findings are obtained on biopsy, the results will constitute evidence of the presence of pneumoconiosis....

  4. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [ ... on the topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer ...

  5. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Takayama, Kenji

    2010-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a new treatment modality where narrow beams from several directions focus on the target while sparing the adjacent normal tissues with high accuracy. This technique basically derived from that of radiosurgery for intracranial lesions allows us to deliver high dose to the target leading to high control of the tumor without causing significant cytotoxicities associated with the treatment. Early-stage non-small cell lung cancers are regarded as most appropriate malignancies for this modality and accordingly have most intensively been investigated. With many encouraging outcomes in retrospective studies, several prospective clinical trials have been started world-wide. Japan Clinical Oncology Group protocol 0403 is a phase II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer including both inoperable and operable patients. The results for operable patients are to be disclosed this year after 3 years of follow-up. It is highly probable that stereotactic body radiation therapy can be a standard treatment modality for inoperable patients for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy for operable patients is expected to be clarified by the outcomes of coming clinical trials. Tremendous advance in stereotactic body radiation therapy is expected when four-dimensional radiation therapy coping with tumor movement is realized. Among several approaches, tumor tracking appears most ideal. The new image-guided radiotherapy system which has the capability of tumor tracking has been developed in Japan.

  6. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eunjin; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Lawrence Chinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS. PMID:26756026

  7. The Confluence of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy and Tumor Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Timmerman, Robert; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Dörthe; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Mantz, Constantine A.; Wilson, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Stereotactic radiation approaches are gaining more popularity for the treatment of intracranial as well as extracranial tumors in organs such as the liver and lung. Technology, rather than biology, is driving the rapid adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), in the clinic due to advances in precise positioning and targeting. Dramatic improvements in tumor control have been demonstrated; however, our knowledge of normal tissue biology response mechanisms to large fraction sizes is lacking. Herein, we will discuss how SABR can induce cellular expression of MHC I, adhesion molecules, costimulatory molecules, heat shock proteins, inflammatory mediators, immunomodulatory cytokines, and death receptors to enhance antitumor immune responses. PMID:22162711

  8. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  9. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  10. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  11. DNA adducts in bronchial biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B P; Vedal, S; San, R H; Kwan, W F; Nelems, B; Enarson, D A; Stich, H F

    1991-06-19

    To investigate the feasibility of measuring DNA-carcinogen adducts in the lungs of non-surgical patients, endobronchial biopsies were obtained from 78 patients undergoing routine diagnostic bronchoscopy. Lung cancer was present in 37 (47%) of the patients. DNA was isolated from the tissues and analyzed by HPLC- or nuclease-PI-enriched 32P-postlabelling, using procedures selective for aromatic adducts. Chromatograms from all 28 current smokers showed a distinctive diagonal adduct zone which was present in only 24 of 40 ex-smokers and 4 of 10 lifetime non-smokers. Adduct levels and chromatographic patterns were similar in bronchial tissue from different lobes of the lung, in bronchial and alveolar tissue, and in tumor and non-tumor bronchial tissue taken from the same subject. Bronchial DNA adduct levels were strongly associated with cigarette smoking status and dropped rapidly after smoking ceased. Higher levels of DNA adducts seen in the lung-cancer patients were mainly due to cigarette smoking. Frequent alcohol intake was the only dietary factor associated with higher levels of bronchial DNA adducts. We conclude that the level of bronchial DNA adducts is strongly associated with cigarette-smoking history and with alcohol intake, but is not associated with lung cancer independently from its relation to smoking. The results indicate the feasibility of using 32P-postlabelling to detect and quantitate genetic damage in bronchial biopsy specimens.

  12. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  13. Benign Papillomas Without Atypia Diagnosed on Core Needle Biopsy: Experience From a Single Institution and Proposed Criteria for Excision

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Anupma; Carkaci, Selin; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Liu, Ping; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Bassett, Roland L.; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Hong; Coyne, Robin L.; Bevers, Therese B.; Sneige, Nour; Huo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. We describe the clinicopathologic features of 80 patients with such lesions in our institution, with an upgrade rate to malignancy of 3.8%. A multidisciplinary approach to select patients for surgical excision is recommended. Background The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. In this study, we determined the upgrade rate to malignancy for BPs without atypia diagnosed on CNB and whether there are factors associated with upgrade. Methods Through our pathology database search, we studied 80 BPs without atypia identified on CNB from 80 patients from 1997 to 2010, including 30 lesions that had undergone excision and 50 lesions that had undergone ≥ 2 years of radiologic follow-up. Associations between surgery or upgrade to malignancy and clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features were analyzed. Results Mass lesions, lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB, and palpable lesions were associated with surgical excision. All 3 upgraded cases were mass lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB. None of the lesions with radiologic follow-up only were upgraded to malignancy. The overall upgrade rate was 3.8%. None of the clinical, radiologic, or histologic features were predictive of upgrade. Conclusion Because the majority of patients can be safely managed with radiologic surveillance, a selective approach for surgical excision is recommended. Our proposed criteria for excision include pathologic/radiologic discordance or sampling by ultrasound-guided CNB without vacuum assistance when the patient is symptomatic or lesion size is ≥ 1.5 cm. PMID:24119786

  14. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  15. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, T.-W.; Wong, Victy Y.W.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To study the treatment outcome in patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with non-metastatic, locally recurrent NPC who were treated with curative intent between 1998 and 2002 were retrospectively analyzed. The International Union Against Cancer T-stage distribution at recurrence (rT) was as follows: rT1-14, rT2-7, rT3-3, and rT4-6. All patients were treated with SRT with a daily fractional dose of 2.5-4.5 Gy (median, 3 Gy) in 8-22 fractions (median, 18 fractions). Total equivalent dose (TED) was calculated by the linear-quadratic formula without a time factor correction. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local failure-free survival (LFFS) rate for the whole group were 40%, 41.4%, and 56.8%, respectively. The 3-year LFFS rates of rT1-2 and rT3-4 diseases were 65% and 66.7%, respectively. Seven of nine patients who received a TED <55 Gy recurred locally compared with 4 of 21 patients who received >=55 Gy. Their corresponding 5-year LFFS rates were 22.2% and 75.8% (p = 0.005). The TED was the only factor significant in affecting the local control on univariate analyses. Conclusion: SRT is an effective treatment for locally recurrent NPC. TED >=55 Gy should be given to secure a higher local control rate. The late complication rates were acceptable for patients with rT1-2 disease. For patients with rT3-4 disease, more works need to be done to further decrease the late complications.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Maluccio, Mary; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A. Joseph; Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  18. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma - A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm(3). Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  19. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma – A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm3. Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  20. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  1. Parotid gland biopsy for investigation of xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J W; Edwards, J L; Christmas, P I; Ferguson, M M

    1990-08-01

    A technique is described for biopsy of the parotid salivary gland under local anaesthesia, which has been undertaken for a series of 59 patients who presented with suspected inflammatory exocrinopathy. The procedure is reliable and is associated with negligible postoperative discomfort. The advantages of the technique suggest that parotid gland biopsy is an acceptable alternative to conventional lower lip biopsy of minor salivary glands in the investigation of xerostomia.

  2. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  3. Preliminary Results of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy After Cyst Drainage for Craniopharyngioma in Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesaka, Naoto; Mikami, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Nogi, Sachika; Tajima, Yu; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Wada, Jun; Miki, Tamotsu; Haraoka, Jou; Okubo, Mitsuru; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for craniopharyngioma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2005, 16 patients with craniopharyngioma were referred to Tokyo Medical University Hospital. They received FSRT alone after histologic confirmation by needle biopsy and underwent cyst drainage via endoscopy. The median prescription dose fraction was 30 Gy in six fractions. All patients except 1 were followed up until December 2009 or death. Results: The median follow-up period was 52 months (range, 4-117 months). Of the 17 patients, 3 experienced recurrence 4 to 71 months after FSRT. The 3-year local control rate was 82.4%. One patient died of thyroid cancer, and the 3-year survival rate was 94.1%. Eight patients had improved visual fields at a median of 2.5 months after FSRT, but hormonal functions did not improve in any patient. Conclusions: FSRT after cyst drainage seems to be safe and effective for patients with craniopharyngiomas, and it may be a safe alternative to surgery.

  4. Adequate histologic sectioning of prostate needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Kahane, Hillel

    2013-08-01

    No standard method exists for sampling prostate needle biopsies, although most reports claim to embed 3 cores per block and obtain 3 slices from each block. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of histologic sectioning necessary for optimal examination of prostate biopsies. We prospectively compared the impact on cancer yield of submitting 1 biopsy core per cassette (biopsies from January 2010) with 3 cores per cassette (biopsies from August 2010) from a large national reference laboratory. Between 6 and 12 slices were obtained with the former 1-core method, resulting in 3 to 6 slices being placed on each of 2 slides; for the latter 3-core method, a limit of 6 slices was obtained, resulting in 3 slices being place on each of 2 slides. A total of 6708 sets of 12 to 18 core biopsies were studied, including 3509 biopsy sets from the 1-biopsy-core-per-cassette group (January 2010) and 3199 biopsy sets from the 3-biopsy-cores-percassette group (August 2010). The yield of diagnoses was classified as benign, atypical small acinar proliferation, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and cancer and was similar with the 2 methods: 46.2%, 8.2%, 4.5%, and 41.1% and 46.7%, 6.3%, 4.4%, and 42.6%, respectively (P = .02). Submission of 1 core or 3 cores per cassette had no effect on the yield of atypical small acinar proliferation, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or cancer in prostate needle biopsies. Consequently, we recommend submission of 3 cores per cassette to minimize labor and cost of processing. PMID:23764163

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  6. 20 CFR 718.106 - Autopsy; biopsy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Autopsy; biopsy. 718.106 Section 718.106 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND... pneumoconiosis. However, where positive findings are obtained on biopsy, the results will constitute evidence...

  7. Transjugular liver biopsy: indications, technique and results.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Guerrache, Y; Boudiaf, M; Gavini, J-P; Kaci, R; Soyer, P

    2014-01-01

    Transjugular liver biopsy is a safe, effective and well-tolerated technique to obtain liver tissue specimens in patients with diffuse liver disease associated with severe coagulopathies or massive ascites. Transjugular liver biopsy is almost always feasible. The use of ultrasonographic guidance for percutaneous puncture of the right internal jugular vein is recommended to decrease the incidence of local cervical minor complications. Semiautomated biopsy devices are very effective in obtaining optimal tissue samples for a precise and definite histological diagnosis with a very low rate of complication. The relative limitations of transjugular liver biopsy are the cost, the radiation dose given to the patient, the increased procedure time by comparison with the more common percutaneous liver biopsy, and the need of a well-trained interventional radiologist. PMID:24007769

  8. Biopsy needle detection in transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ayvaci, Alper; Yan, Pingkun; Xu, Sheng; Soatto, Stefano; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Using the fusion of pre-operative MRI and real time intra-procedural transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to guide prostate biopsy has been shown as a very promising approach to yield better clinical outcome than the routinely performed TRUS only guided biopsy. In several situations of the MRI/TRUS fusion guided biopsy, it is important to know the exact location of the deployed biopsy needle, which is imaged in the TRUS video. In this paper, we present a method to automatically detect and segment the biopsy needle in TRUS. To achieve this goal, we propose to combine information from multiple resources, including ultrasound probe stability, TRUS video background model, and the prior knowledge of needle orientation and position. The proposed algorithm was tested on TRUS video sequences which have in total more than 25,000 frames. The needle deployments were successfully detected and segmented in the sequences with high accuracy and low false-positive detection rate.

  9. Open lung biopsy in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    McKenna, R J; Mountain, C F; McMurtrey, M J

    1984-11-01

    Increased use of open lung biopsy in the search for a treatable etiology of acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) in immunocompromised patients is based on the assumption that examination and cultures from biopsy specimens will yield significant information leading to beneficial treatment of the condition. To assess the true impact of the results of open lung biopsy on the subsequent treatment and outcome in such patients, a retrospective study was done of 64 consecutive patients undergoing the procedure in a recent five-year period. When open lung biopsy was performed for the diagnosis of AIP in immunocompromised patients after empiric broad spectrum treatment failed, it rarely missed a specific, treatable etiology, if present. However, the results from open lung biopsy infrequently lead to a change in the treatment that improves the patient's clinical course.

  10. Delayed culture of Leishmania in skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dedet, J P; Pratlong, F; Pradinaud, R; Moreau, B

    1999-01-01

    Between January 1997 and October 1998, 16 skin biopsies collected from 13 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in French Guiana were inoculated in culture medium after travel for 3-17 days from the place of biopsy to the culture laboratory in France. Each biopsy fragment was introduced near the flame of a Bunsen burner into the transport medium (RPMI medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum) which was maintained at ambient temperature during postal delivery to France. In France the biopsies were ground in sterile saline before being inoculated into NNN culture tubes. The cultures were incubated at 25 degrees C and subcultured every week until the 5th week. The cultures were positive in 9 cases, remained negative in 4, and were contaminated in 3 cases. Positive results were obtained at all seasons and for 3 different Leishmania species. The study indicates that delayed culture can yield useful results from biopsies taken in field conditions.

  11. Transplant biopsy beyond light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adam, Benjamin; Mengel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Despite its long-standing status as the diagnostic "gold standard", the renal transplant biopsy is limited by a fundamental dependence on descriptive, empirically-derived consensus classification. The recent shift towards personalized medicine has resulted in an increased demand for precise, mechanism-based diagnoses, which is not fully met by the contemporary transplantation pathology standard of care. The expectation is that molecular techniques will provide novel pathogenetic insights that will allow for the identification of more accurate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. Here we review the current state of molecular renal transplantation pathology. Despite significant research activity and progress within the field, routine adoption of clinical molecular testing has not yet been achieved. The recent development of novel molecular platforms suitable for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue will offer potential solution for the major barriers to implementation. The recent incorporation of molecular diagnostic criteria into the 2013 Banff classification is a reflection of progress made and future directions in the area of molecular transplantation pathology. Transcripts related to endothelial injury and NK cell activation have consistently been shown to be associated with antibody-mediated rejection. Prospective multicenter validation and implementation of molecular diagnostics for major entities remains an unmet clinical need in transplantation. It is expected that an integrated system of transplantation pathology diagnosis comprising molecular, morphological, serological, and clinical variables will ultimately provide the greatest diagnostic precision. PMID:26249165

  12. Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

  13. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units... facility; (3) Viewing and intercom systems; (4) Timer termination; (5) Radiation monitors used to...

  14. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  15. Utilization trends and positive biopsy rates for prostate biopsies in the United States: 2005 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Deepak A; Bostwick, David G; Mendrinos, Savvas E; Anderson, Ann E; Olsson, Carl A

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the positive biopsy rate and core sampling pattern in patients undergoing needle biopsy of the prostate in the United States at a national reference laboratory (NRL) and anatomic pathology laboratories integrated into urology group practices, and analyzes the relationship between positive biopsy rates and the number of specimen vials per biopsy. For the years 2005 to 2011 we collected pathology data from an NRL, including number of urologists and urology practices referring samples, total specimen vials submitted for prostate biopsies, and final pathologic diagnosis for each case. The diagnoses were categorized as benign, malignant, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or atypical small acinar proliferation. Over the same period, similar data were gathered from urology practices with in-house laboratories performing global pathology services (urology practice laboratories; UPLs) as identified by a survey of members of the Large Urology Group Practice Association. For each year studied, positive biopsy rate and number of specimen vials per biopsy were calculated in aggregate and separately for each site of service. From 2005 to 2011, 437,937 biopsies were submitted in > 4.23 million vials (9.4 specimen vials/biopsy); overall positive biopsy rate was 40.3%-this was identical at both the NRL and UPL (P = .97). Nationally, the number of specimen vials per biopsy increased sharply from a mean of 8.8 during 2005 to 2008 to a mean of 10.3 from 2009 to 2011 (difference, 1.5 specimen vials/biopsy; P = .03). For the most recent 3-year period (2009-2011), the difference of 0.6 specimen vials per biopsy between the NRL (10.0) and UPL (10.6) was not significant (P = 0.08). Positive biopsy rate correlated strongly (P < .01) with number of specimen vials per biopsy. The positive prostate biopsy rate is 40.3% and is identical across sites of service. Although there was a national trend toward increased specimen vials per biopsy from 2005 to 2011, from 2009 to

  16. Utilization Trends and Positive Biopsy Rates for Prostate Biopsies in the United States: 2005 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Deepak A; Bostwick, David G; Mendrinos, Savvas E; Anderson, Ann E; Olsson, Carl A

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the positive biopsy rate and core sampling pattern in patients undergoing needle biopsy of the prostate in the United States at a national reference laboratory (NRL) and anatomic pathology laboratories integrated into urology group practices, and analyzes the relationship between positive biopsy rates and the number of specimen vials per biopsy. For the years 2005 to 2011 we collected pathology data from an NRL, including number of urologists and urology practices referring samples, total specimen vials submitted for prostate biopsies, and final pathologic diagnosis for each case. The diagnoses were categorized as benign, malignant, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or atypical small acinar proliferation. Over the same period, similar data were gathered from urology practices with in-house laboratories performing global pathology services (urology practice laboratories; UPLs) as identified by a survey of members of the Large Urology Group Practice Association. For each year studied, positive biopsy rate and number of specimen vials per biopsy were calculated in aggregate and separately for each site of service. From 2005 to 2011, 437,937 biopsies were submitted in > 4.23 million vials (9.4 specimen vials/biopsy); overall positive biopsy rate was 40.3%-this was identical at both the NRL and UPL (P = .97). Nationally, the number of specimen vials per biopsy increased sharply from a mean of 8.8 during 2005 to 2008 to a mean of 10.3 from 2009 to 2011 (difference, 1.5 specimen vials/biopsy; P = .03). For the most recent 3-year period (2009–2011), the difference of 0.6 specimen vials per biopsy between the NRL (10.0) and UPL (10.6) was not significant (P = 0.08). Positive biopsy rate correlated strongly (P < .01) with number of specimen vials per biopsy. The positive prostate biopsy rate is 40.3% and is identical across sites of service. Although there was a national trend toward increased specimen vials per biopsy from 2005 to 2011, from 2009

  17. A systematic pipeline for the objective comparison of whole-brain spectroscopic MRI with histology in biopsy specimens from grade III glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Zhongxing; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Neill, Stewart G.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and management of patients with gliomas are largely dictated by the pathological analysis of tissue biopsied from a selected region within the lesion. However, due to the heterogeneous and infiltrative nature of gliomas, identifying the optimal region for biopsy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quite difficult. This is especially true for low grade gliomas, which often are non-enhancing tumors. To improve the management of patients with these tumors, the field of neuro-oncology requires an imaging modality that can specifically identify a tumor’s most anaplastic/aggressive region(s) for biopsy targeting. The addition of metabolic mapping using spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) to supplement conventional MRI could improve biopsy targeting and, ultimately, diagnostic accuracy. Here, we describe a pipeline for the integration of state-of-the-art, high-resolution whole-brain 3D sMRI maps into a stereotactic neuronavigation system for guiding biopsies in gliomas with nonenhancing components. We also outline a machine-learning method for automated histology analysis that generates normalized, quantitative metrics describing tumor infiltration in immunohistochemically-stained tissue specimens. As a proof of concept, we describe the combination of these two techniques in a small cohort of grade III glioma patients. In this work, we aim to set forth a systematic pipeline to stimulate histopathology-image validation of advanced MRI techniques, such as sMRI. PMID:27489883

  18. Prevention of sepsis prior to prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Urosepsis is the most feared complication of transrectal prostate biopsy. The incidence may be increasing from <1% to 2%–3% in contemporary series. Historically, fluoroquinolones have been effective antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective complications but antibiotic resistance is increasing. The increase in antibiotic resistance may contribute to reported increases in urosepsis and hospitalization after transrectal biopsy. This article will review other methods clinicians may employ to reduce the incidence of infective complications after prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using literature databases PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE in August 2015 in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) criteria. Results Effective strategies to reduce infective complications after transrectal prostate biopsy include augmented prophylaxis with other antibiotics, rectal swab culture directed antibiotic prophylaxis or a transperineal biopsy approach. Needle disinfection, minimizing the number of biopsy needles and rectal disinfectants may also be of use. These methods may be of particular utility in patients with risk factors for developing urosepsis such as recent antibiotic use and overseas travel. Conclusions The scientific literature describes various techniques designed to reduce infective complications caused by prostate biopsy. Clinicians should consider incorporating these novel techniques into their contemporary practice. PMID:26981590

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers a promising opportunity for cure and/or palliation to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer whose comorbidities, performance status, and history of prior treatment may preclude many other salvage options. Stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to have a favorable response and toxicity profile compared with other nonoperative salvage options for recurrent head and neck cancer. However, the risk of severe toxicity remains, with carotid blowout syndrome a unique concern, although the incidence of this complication may be minimized with alternating-day fractionation. The short overall treatment time and low rates of acute toxicity make SBRT an optimal vehicle to integrate with novel systemic therapies, and several phase II studies have used concurrent cetuximab as a radiosensitizer with SBRT with promising results. Ongoing studies aim to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of SBRT with immune checkpoint inhibitors in recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:27441751

  20. An Improved Stereotactic System For CT Aided Neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Glenn, William V., Jr.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Howland, Robert S.

    1982-11-01

    Several computed tomography (CT) aided stereotactic systems have been introduced during the last five years for precise placement of neurosurgical instruments. Using digital CT image data that is transformed to a patient-frame coordinate system surgery can be simulated, planned and executed with sub-millimeter precision. This paper introduces a second generation stereotactic system that improves on speed, image resolution, accuracy and patient comfort of past and current systems. The system described here is designed for surgical procedures conducted entirely in the CT suite. Geometric resolution of this system is presented, test procedures are described and phantom results are discussed. An application to percutaneous knee surgery is briefly mentioned. At this writing patient data is not yet available.

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  2. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  3. Delivery validation of VMAT stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy at commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Alexander, K. M.; Jechel, C.; Nasr, A. T.; Joshi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric validation of two volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plans was completed as part of the commissioning process of this technique in our clinic. Static and dynamic ion chamber, EBT3 film and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gel measurements were acquired using a motion phantom with appropriate inserts for each dosimeter. The results show good agreement between measured and calculated plan dose.

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  5. Monte Carlo verification of gel dosimetry measurements for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Crowe, S. B.; Dunn, L.; Franich, R. D.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-06-01

    The quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments requires the use of small-field dose measurements that can be experimentally challenging. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to establish that PAGAT dosimetry gel can be used to provide accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional dose measurements of stereotactic radiotherapy fields. A small cylindrical container (4 cm height, 4.2 cm diameter) was filled with PAGAT gel, placed in the parietal region inside a CIRS head phantom and irradiated with a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy plan. The resulting three-dimensional dose measurement was read out using an optical CT scanner and compared with the treatment planning prediction of the dose delivered to the gel during the treatment. A BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulation of this treatment was completed, to provide a standard against which the accuracy of the gel measurement could be gauged. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained from Monte Carlo and from the gel measurement were found to be in better agreement with each other than with the dose distribution provided by the treatment planning system's pencil beam calculation. Both sets of data showed close agreement with the treatment planning system's dose distribution through the centre of the irradiated volume and substantial disagreement with the treatment planning system at the penumbrae. The Monte Carlo calculations and gel measurements both indicated that the treated volume was up to 3 mm narrower, with steeper penumbrae and more variable out-of-field dose, than predicted by the treatment planning system. The Monte Carlo simulations allowed the accuracy of the PAGAT gel dosimeter to be verified in this case, allowing PAGAT gel to be utilized in the measurement of dose from stereotactic and other radiotherapy treatments, with greater confidence in the future. Experimental aspects of this work were originally presented at the Engineering and Physical Sciences in Medicine

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  7. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  8. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  9. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, Franco; Livi, Lorenzo; Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura; Meattini, Icro; Bonucci, Ivano; Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Doro, Raffaela

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43-77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3-63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  10. Cushing's disease: a single centre's experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P J; Williams, J R; Smee, R I

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is hypercortisolaemia secondary to an adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. Primary management is almost always surgical, with limited effective medical interventions available. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiation is gaining popularity, with the bulk of the literature related to the Gamma Knife. We present the results from our own institution using the linear accelerator (LINAC) since 1990. Thirty-six patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), one patient who underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and for the purposes of comparison, 13 patients who had undergone conventional radiotherapy prior to 1990, were included in the analysis. Serum cortisol levels improved in nine of 36 (25%) SRS patients and 24 hour urinary free cortisol levels improved in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%). Tumour volume control was excellent in the SRS group with deterioration in only one patient (3%). The patient who underwent FSRT had a highly aggressive tumour refractory to radiation.

  11. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series.

  12. Magnetic Resonance (MR)-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ... considered if the lesion can be seen on mammography or on ultrasound , where the biopsy can be ...

  13. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Other Stereotactic Techniques for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Shiris Wai Sum; Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung; Kam, Michael Koon Ming; Leung, Sing Fai; Yu, Brian Kwok Hung; Ngai, Dennis Yuen Kan; Wong, Simon Chun Fai; Chan, Anthony Tak Cheung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients can be salvaged by reirradiation with a substantial degree of radiation-related complications. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is widely used in this regard because of its rapid dose falloff and high geometric precision. The aim of this study was to examine whether the newly developed intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has any dosimetric advantages over three other stereotactic techniques, including circular arc (CARC), static conformal beam (SmMLC), and dynamic conformal arc (mARC), in treating locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images of 32 patients with locally recurrent NPC, previously treated with SRT, were retrieved from the stereotactic planning system for contouring and computing treatment plans. Treatment planning of each patient was performed for the four treatment techniques: CARC, SmMLC, mARC, and IMSRT. The conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) and doses to the organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. Results: All four techniques delivered adequate doses to the PTV. IMSRT, SmMLC, and mARC delivered reasonably conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV (CI <1.47, HI <0.53), but not for CARC (p < 0.05). IMSRT presented with the smallest CI (1.37) and HI (0.40). Among the four techniques, IMSRT spared the greatest number of OARs, namely brainstem, temporal lobes, optic chiasm, and optic nerve, and had the smallest normal tissue volume in the low-dose region. Conclusion: Based on the dosimetric comparison, IMSRT was optimal for locally recurrent NPC by delivering a conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV while sparing OARs.

  14. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  15. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery...

  16. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery...

  17. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  18. [Prostate biopsy: Procedure in the clinical routine].

    PubMed

    Enzmann, T; Tokas, T; Korte, K; Ritter, M; Hammerer, P; Franzaring, L; Heynemann, H; Gottfried, H-W; Bertermann, H; Meyer-Schwickerath, M; Wirth, B; Pelzer, A; Loch, T

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade there has been a 25% decrease in the mortality rates for prostate cancer. The reasons for this significant decrease are most likely associated with the application of urological screening tests. The main tools for early detection are currently increased public awareness of the disease, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided topographically assignable biopsy sampling. Together with the histopathological results these features provide essential information for risk stratification, diagnostics and therapy decisions. The evolution of prostate biopsy techniques as well as the use of PSA testing has led to an increased identification of asymptomatic men, where further clarification is necessary. Significant efforts and increased clinical research focus on determining the appropriate indications for a prostate biopsy and the optimal technique to achieve better detection rates. The most widely used imaging modality for the prostate is TRUS; however, there are no clearly defined standards for the clinical approach for each individual biopsy procedure, dealing with continuous technical optimization and in particular the developments in imaging. In this review the current principles, techniques, new approaches and instrumentation of prostate biopsy imaging control are presented within the framework of the structured educational approach. PMID:26704284

  19. Common Data Elements for Muscle Biopsy Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Dastgir, Jahannaz; Rutkowski, Anne; Alvarez, Rachel; Cossette, Stacy A.; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Sewry, Caroline; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Bonnemann, Carsten; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Context There is no current standard among myopathologists for reporting muscle biopsy findings. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has recently launched a common data element (CDE) project to standardize neuromuscular data collected in clinical reports and to facilitate their use in research. Objective To develop a more-uniform, prospective reporting tool for muscle biopsies, incorporating the elements identified by the CDE project, in an effort to improve reporting and educational resources. Design The variation in current biopsy reporting practice was evaluated through a study of 51 muscle biopsy reports from self-reported diagnoses of genetically confirmed or undiagnosed muscle disease from the Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry. Two reviewers independently extracted data from deidentified reports and entered them into the revised CDE format to identify what was missing and whether or not information provided on the revised CDE report (complete/incomplete) could be successfully interpreted by a neuropathologist. Results Analysis of the data highlighted showed (1) inconsistent reporting of key clinical features from referring physicians, and (2) considerable variability in the reporting of pertinent positive and negative histologic findings by pathologists. Conclusions We propose a format for muscle-biopsy reporting that includes the elements in the CDE checklist and a brief narrative comment that interprets the data in support of a final interpretation. Such a format standardizes cataloging of pathologic findings across the spectrum of muscle diseases and serves emerging clinical care and research needs with the expansion of genetic-testing therapeutic trials. PMID:26132600

  20. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect

    Laredo, Jean-Denis Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  1. The treatment of recurrent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Kooy, H.M.; Wen, P.Y.; Fine, H.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Mannarino, E.G.; Tsai, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1986 and August 1989, we treated 18 patients with 21 recurrent or persistent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator. To be eligible for radiosurgery, patients had to have a performance status of greater than or equal to 70% and have no evidence of systemic disease. All but one patient had received prior radiotherapy, and were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the time of recurrence. Polar lesions were treated only if the patient had undergone and failed previous complete surgical resection (10 patients). Single doses of radiation (900 to 2,500 cGy) were delivered to limited volumes (less than 27 cm3) using a modified 6MV linear accelerator. The most common histology of the metastatic lesion was carcinoma of the lung (seven patients), followed by carcinoma of the breast (four patients), and melanoma (four patients). With median follow-up of 9 months (range, 1 to 39), all tumors have been controlled in the radiosurgery field. Two patients failed in the immediate margin of the treated volume and were subsequently treated with surgery and implantation of 125I to control the disease. Radiographic response was dramatic and rapid in the patients with adenocarcinoma, while slight reduction and stabilization occurred in those patients with melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. The majority of patients improved neurologically following treatment, and were able to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Complications were limited and transient in nature and no cases of symptomatic radiation necrosis occurred in any patient despite previous exposure to radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and relatively safe treatment for recurrent solitary metastases and is an appealing technique for the initial management of deep-seated lesions as a boost to whole brain radiotherapy.

  2. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  4. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  5. Simulation of punch biopsies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sessanna, Dennis; Stredney, Don; Hittle, Brad; Lambert, David

    2008-01-01

    As the incidence of skin cancer continues to rise, there is an increasing need for skilled practitioners that are proficient in identifying suspicious lesions and competent in acquiring biopsies that provide for optimal determination of malignancy and staging. We report on the development of a prototype simulation that emulates the basic procedures necessary to acquire a punch biopsy. The objective of this effort is to produce a low-cost, effective method to teach non-specialists, i.e., nurse practitioners, internists, etc., the optimal placement of the punch to obtain a biopsy for pathological analysis. The simulation can be utilized for synchronous sessions with remote experts, as well as asynchronous sessions for deliberate practice. The simulation is designed to allow for easy import of digital images of various lesions to promote use and present the wide pathological variance experienced in the clinic.

  6. Muscle biopsy findings in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-11-01

    The inflammatory myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of acquired muscle diseases characterized clinically, by muscle weakness, and histologically, by inflammatory infiltrates within the skeletal muscles. The group of these myopathies comprise three major and discrete subsets: polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Each subset retains its characteristic clinical, immunopathologic, and morphologic features regardless of whether it occurs separately or in connection with other systemic diseases. Although the diagnosis of these disorders is based on the combination of clinical examination, electromyographic data, serum muscle enzyme levels, various autoantibodies, and the muscle biopsy findings, the muscle biopsy offers the most definitive diagnostic information in the majority of the cases. This article summarizes the main histologic features that characterize PM, DM, or IBM and emphasizes the main pitfalls associated with interpretation of the biopsies.

  7. Vertebral compression fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, Arjun; Whyne, Cari M; Ma, Lijun; Larson, David A; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-07-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic spinal tumours is increasing. Serious adverse events for this treatment include vertebral compression fracture (VCF) and radiation myelopathy. Although VCF is a fairly low-risk adverse event (approximately 5% risk) after conventional radiotherapy, crude risk estimates for VCF after spinal SBRT range from 11% to 39%. In this Review, we summarise the evidence and predictive factors for VCF induced by spinal SBRT, review the pathophysiology of VCF in the metastatic spine, and discuss strategies used to prevent and manage this potentially disabling complication. PMID:23816297

  8. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  9. Technique for Robotic Stereotactic Irradiation of Choroidal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Callejo, Sonia; Roberge, David

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a long history in the organ-sparing management of choroidal melanoma. Joining plaque radiotherapy and proton irradiation, stereotactic robotic photon irradiation is a new tool in the radiation oncologist's armamentarium for ocular tumors. The non-coplanar fields with steep dose gradients are well suited to spare uninvolved retina, anterior chamber, and the optic nerve. In our practice, it is the preferred treatment for melanomas that are non-amenable to standard plaque brachytherapy. Since late 2010, we have treated more than 40 patients with our robotic linear accelerator. This case-based technical note outlines the technique used at the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. PMID:27226942

  10. Technique for Robotic Stereotactic Irradiation of Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Callejo, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a long history in the organ-sparing management of choroidal melanoma. Joining plaque radiotherapy and proton irradiation, stereotactic robotic photon irradiation is a new tool in the radiation oncologist’s armamentarium for ocular tumors. The non-coplanar fields with steep dose gradients are well suited to spare uninvolved retina, anterior chamber, and the optic nerve. In our practice, it is the preferred treatment for melanomas that are non-amenable to standard plaque brachytherapy. Since late 2010, we have treated more than 40 patients with our robotic linear accelerator. This case-based technical note outlines the technique used at the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. PMID:27226942

  11. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  12. Is there an Upgrading to Malignancy at Surgery of Mucocele-Like Lesions Diagnosed on Percutaneous Breast Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Provencher, Louise; Morin, Josée; Desbiens, Christine; Poirier, Brigitte; Poirier, Éric; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Jacob, Simon; Côté, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Management of pure mucocele-like lesion (MLL) diagnosed on percutaneous breast biopsy (PBB) is controversial. To assess surgical upgrade rate and clinical outcome of pure MLL obtained as sole diagnosis on PBB. Patients diagnosed with a MLL as the most advanced lesion on PBB from April 1997 to December 2010 were reviewed for radiologic presentation, biopsy technique, and pathologic and clinical outcomes. Of the 21,340 image-guided PBB performed during the study period, 50 women with 51 MLL (0.24%) were identified. Mean age was 53.1 ± 7.7 years. Radiologic findings were mostly microcalcifications (n = 47, 92.2%). Stereotactic PBB was performed for 49 lesions (96.1%). Surgery was performed shortly after biopsy in 35 women, with benign final pathology in 33, and upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in two patients (2/35, 5.7%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.5 years (3.7 ± 2.1 years for surgical patients; 5.9 ± 2.9 years for follow-up only patients); three women were lost to follow-up (3/50). Three invasive cancers (3/47, 6.4%) were diagnosed 1.2, 1.2, and 2.8 years after biopsy: two in surgical patients, and one in a follow-up only patient. No cancer occurred at the same site as the original MLL. Pure MLL lesion of the breast is a rare entity and is mostly associated with a benign outcome. We observed an upgrade to DCIS slightly superior to 5%, but no invasive cancer. It is therefore unclear if these lesions should be excised or clinically and radiologically followed up when such lesions are found at PBB. PMID:26662058

  13. Best way to perform a punch biopsy.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cherit, Judith; Gutiérrez Mendoza, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Nail punch biopsy is used to obtain a tissue sample for the diagnosis and treatment of nail diseases. The best results will be possible if the surgeon is familiar with the anatomy and physiology of the nail apparatus. A punch biopsy can be used in all regions of the nail apparatus in the presence or absence of nail plate. When the procedure is performed with a careful handling of the anatomic site and specimen, in most cases a successful diagnosis can be achieved. PMID:25828717

  14. Retroperitoneoscopic renal biopsy: still a good indication!

    PubMed

    Micali, Salvatore; Dandrea, Matteo; De Carne, Cosimo; Martorana, Eugenio; De Stefani, Stefano; Cappelli, Gianni; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    The histological evaluation of the renal parenchyma is often essential in cases of several renal diseases and provides useful information in determining the prognosis and guiding treatment. In patients with contraindications to percutaneous kidney biopsy, retroperitoneal laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) is to be preferred as a minimally invasive technique. However, there are cases in which the LESS technique is difficult to perform, especially given that the learning curve is not optimal. We present a case of a Jehovah's Witness patient with severe obesity, in whom conventional retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal biopsy was preferred to the LESS technique. PMID:25198939

  15. Aspiration biopsy cytology of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Kline, T S; Merriam, J M; Shapshay, S M

    1981-09-01

    Aspiration biopsy by fine needle from the major salivary glands has been an under-utilized technic in the United States. To evaluate this form of biopsy, 69 patients with salivary gland enlargement were examined by this technic; 47 had confirmative histology. Characteristic ABC patterns were seen in the benign mixed tumor, the papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum, the mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and malignancy metastatic to the salivary gland. These findings are described. The method proved complication-free and accurate and is recommended for all tumors of the salivary gland.

  16. Case Report: Ischaemic appendicitis post mesenteric biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Zukiwskyj, Marianna; Tun, June; Desai, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    A common indication for laparoscopic mesenteric lymph node biopsy is to provide a tissue diagnosis in the absence of palpable peripheral nodes via a minimally invasive approach.  There are no reports to date of ischaemia to the appendix as a complication of this procedure.   We report the case of a 34-year-old lady who underwent a mesenteric biopsy for a lesion found incidentally on CT to investigate longstanding abdominal pain, and 2 days later required an appendicectomy for ischaemic appendicitis. PMID:26937277

  17. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  18. Effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Karin; Nowak, Peter; Pan, Connie de; Marijnissen, Johannes P.; Paridaens, Dion A.; Levendag, Peter; Luyten, Gre P.M. . E-mail: g.p.m.luyten@erasmusmc.nl

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness and acute side effects of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (fSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 38 patients (21 male, 17 female) were included in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (mean follow-up of 25 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given in 5 consecutive days. A blinking light and a camera (to monitor the position of the diseased eye) were fixed to a noninvasive relocatable stereotactic frame. Primary end points were local control, best corrected visual acuity, and toxicity at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Results: After 3 months (38 patients), the local control was 100%; after 12 months (32 patients) and 24 months (15 patients), no recurrences were seen. The best corrected visual acuity declined from a mean of 0.21 at diagnosis to 0.06 2 years after therapy. The acute side effects after 3 months were as follows: conjunctival symptoms (10), loss of lashes or hair (6), visual symptoms (5), fatigue (5), dry eye (1), cataract (1), and pain (4). One eye was enucleated at 2 months after fSRT. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate that fSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality for uveal melanoma with an excellent local control and mild acute side effects. The follow-up should be prolonged to study both long-term local control and late toxicity.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Intrahepatic and Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Anand; Dagoglu, Nergiz; Mancias, Joseph; Raven, Kristin; Khwaja, Khalid; Tseng, Jennifer F; Ng, Kimmie; Enzinger, Peter; Miksad, Rebecca; Bullock, Andrea; Evenson, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unresectable intrahepatic and hilar cholangiocarcinomas carry a dismal prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy and conventional external beam radiation and brachytherapy have been used with limited success. We explored the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for these patients. Methods: Patients with unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma or those with positive margins were included in this study. Systemic therapy was used at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The CyberknifeTM stereotactic body radiotherapy system used to treat these patients. Patients were treated with three daily fractions. Clinical and radiological follow-up were performed every three months. Results: 34 patients (16 male and 18 female) with 42 lesions were included in this study. There were 32 unresectable tumors and two patients with resected tumors with positive margins. The median SBRT dose was 30Gy in three fractions. The median follow-up was 38 months (range 8-71 months). The actuarial local control rate was 79%. The median overall survival was 17 months and the median progression free survival was ten months. There were four Grade III toxicities (12%), including duodenal ulceration, cholangitis and liver abscess. Conclusions: SBRT is an effective and reasonably safe local therapy option for unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26516357

  20. Temporal compartmental dosing effects for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Sahgal, Arjun; Hu, Weigang; Jabbari, Siavash; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Hsu, I.-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack, III; Ma, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    The rate of dose accumulation within a given area of a target volume tends to vary significantly for non-isocentric delivery systems such as Cyberknife stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether intra-target temporal dose distributions produce significant variations in the biological equivalent dose. For the study, time courses of ten patients were reconstructed and calculation of a biologically equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was performed using a formula derived from the linear quadratic model (α/β = 3 for prostate cancer cells). The calculated EUD values obtained for the actual patient treatments were then compared with theoretical EUD values for delivering the same physical dose distribution except that the whole target being irradiated continuously (e.g. large-field ‘dose-bathing’ type of delivery). For all the case, the EUDs for the actual treatment delivery were found to correlate strongly with the EUDs for the large-field delivery: a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.98 was obtained and the average EUD for the actual Cyberknife delivery was somewhat higher (5.0 ± 4.7%) than that for the large-field delivery. However, no statistical significance was detected between the two types of delivery (p = 0.21). We concluded that non-isocentric small-field Cyberknife delivery produced consistent biological dosing that tracked well with the constant-dose-rate, large-field-type delivery for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  1. Stereotactic multibeam radiation therapy system in a PACS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresne, Francoise; Le Gall, G.; Barillot, Christian; Gibaud, Bernard; Manens, Jean-Pierre; Toumoulin, Christine; Lemoine, Didier; Chenal, C.; Scarabin, Jean-Marie

    1991-05-01

    A Multibeam radiation therapy treatment is a non-invasive technique devoted to treat a lesion within the cerebral medium by focusing photon-beams on the same target from a high number of entrance points. We present here a computer assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: (1) an analysis module to define the target volume by using 2D and 3D displays, (2) a planing module to issue a treatment strategy including the dosimetric simulations and (3) a treatment module setting up the parameters to order the robotized treatment system (i.e. chair- framework, radiation unit machine). Another important feature of this system is its connection to the PACS system SIRENE settled in the University hospital of Rennes which makes possible the archiving and the communication of the multimodal images (CT, MRI, Angiography) used by this application. The corporate use of stereotactic methods and the multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes the target definition and the cognition of the structures environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (i.e. the stereotactic frame) guarantees an optimal distribution of the dose computed by an original 3D volumetric algorithm. The robotic approach of the treatment stage has consisted to design a computer driven chair-framework cluster to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter.

  2. Clinical commissioning of Laitinen Stereoadapter for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, G A; Gebert, J A; Fuery, J J

    1998-01-01

    The Laitinen Stereoadapter 5000 from Sandstroem Trade and Technology was acceptance tested and commissioned for clinical use in a Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Program at our facility. The frame was implemented to function as a localization device for target delineation rather than as an immobilization device. The frame is of non-invasive nature utilizing ear plugs and a nasion bridge adapter as the connecting points with the patient's head. The reproducibility of the head frame position with respect to external skull reference points was tested. CT and MRI imaging studies were performed on a patient phantom with the stereoadapter in place. The target was delineated and target coordinates were calculated for two implanted targets. The phantom was positioned according to the target coordinates on a Siemens MXE Linear Accelerator by aid of the target positioning lasers. Radiographic port film images were taken with the circular fields typically used in stereotactic radiosurgery. A complete treatment isodose plan was performed and dosimetric accuracy was tested by positioning a small volume ionization chamber at the center of the target volume in the head phantom. The results of these tests were found to be clinically acceptable. PMID:9863732

  3. The renal biopsy in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Helen; Gaut, Joseph P

    2013-08-01

    Renal biopsy was introduced in the 1950s. By 1980 the pathologic diagnostic criteria for the majority of medical kidney diseases known today, including pediatric diseases, were established using light, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. However, it has become clear that there are limitations in the morphologic evaluation, mainly because a given pattern of injury can be caused by different aetiologies and, conversely, a single aetiology may present with more than one histological pattern. An explosion in kidney disease research in the last 20-30 years has brought new knowledge from bench to bedside rapidly and resulted in new molecular and genetic tools that enhance the diagnostic and prognostic power of the renal biopsy. Genomic technologies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays, collectively known as genomics, detect single or multiple genes underscoring the pathologic changes and revealing specific causes of injury that may require different treatment. The aims of this review are to (1) summarize current recommendations for diagnostic renal biopsies encompassing light microscopy, immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy; (2) address the limitations of morphology; (3) show current contributions of genomic technologies adjunct to the renal biopsy, and provide examples of how these may transform pathologic interpretation into molecular disease phenotypes.

  4. Clinical role of the renal transplant biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Winfred W.; Taheri, Diana; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Colvin, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous needle core biopsy is the definitive procedure by which essential diagnostic and prognostic information on acute and chronic renal allograft dysfunction is obtained. The diagnostic value of the information so obtained has endured for over three decades and has proven crucially important in shaping strategies for therapeutic intervention. This Review provides a broad outline of the utility of performing kidney graft biopsies after transplantation, highlighting the relevance of biopsy findings in the immediate and early post-transplant period (from days to weeks after implantation), the first post-transplant year, and the late period (beyond the first year). We focus on how biopsy findings change over time, and the wide variety of pathological features that characterize the major clinical diagnoses facing the clinician. This article also includes a discussion of acute cellular and humoral rejection, the toxic effects of calcineurin inhibitors, and the widely varying etiologies and characteristics of chronic lesions. Emerging technologies based on gene expression analyses and proteomics, the in situ detection of functionally relevant molecules, and new bioinformatic approaches that hold the promise of improving diagnostic precision and developing new, refined molecular pathways for therapeutic intervention are also presented. PMID:22231130

  5. Frictional insertion kinetics of bone biopsy needles.

    PubMed

    Heiner, A D; Brown, T D; Rossin, V; Buckwalter, J A

    2001-12-01

    Patients undergoing a percutaneous bone biopsy often complain of pain during needle insertion, despite local anesthesia. Bone biopsy needles are typically inserted with combined axial and twisting motions. These motions could cause pain through frictional heating or direct mechanical irritation. The hypothesis of this study is that the insertion energy of bone biopsy needles can be reduced by modifying the insertion kinetics or by adding a friction-lowering coating to the needles. Jamshidi bone biopsy needles were driven into a bone analog model by an MTS materials testing machine operating under axial and rotational displacement control. The load/torque recordings showed that, to significantly decrease insertion energy and peak resistance to needle insertion, axial velocity and angular frequency had to be decreased to one quarter of the baseline, typical-usage parameters. However the increased insertion time may not be acceptable clinically. The majority of the insertion energy was associated with the needle axial thrust rather than with needle twisting. Overcoming friction against the side of the needle consumed much more of the insertion energy than did the process of cutting per se. None of five needle coatings tested succeeded in appreciably lowering the insertion energy, and none achieved a substantial decrease in peak resisting force.

  6. A case of severe hemoptysis after stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kana; Tomita, Natsuo; Shimizu, Arisa; Sato, Yozo; Makita, Chiyoko; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), severe hemoptysis has been reported in several studies. We report here a rare case of hemoptysis after SBRT even though the lung tumor was peripherally located. A lung nodule of a 79-year-old man was accidentally found at the periphery of the left upper lobe. A computed tomography-guided biopsy of this nodule provided confirmation of the diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The clinical diagnosis was T1bN0M0, stage I primary lung cancer. The patient was treated with SBRT using helical tomotherapy at a dose of 60 Gy in 6 fractions (i.e., BED10 = 120). He obtained a complete response and did not experience recurrence. However, the patient suffered massive hemoptysis 4.5 years after SBRT. As hypervascularity of a left bronchial artery was observed at the left lung in accordance with SBRT field on bronchial arteriography, a bronchial artery embolization (BAE) procedure was performed. The patient has had no episodes of hemoptysis after BAE. Although SBRT for early stage NSCLC is usually safe and efficient, it is necessary to be careful for late-onset bronchial hemorrhage in SBRT, even for a peripheral tumor.

  7. MO-B-18C-01: Proton Therapy II: Proton Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, B; Daartz, J

    2014-06-15

    Proton stereotactic radiotherapy shares fundamental principles with general proton therapy physics, specifically range uncertainties and broad beam measurement techniques. Significant differences emerge when treating with smaller field sizes that suffer lateral disequilibrium and when fractions are reduced. This session will explore the history and scope of proton stereotactic radiotherapy in clinical practice. Uncertainties and treatment planning methods specific to stereotactic treatments will be discussed. The session will include an overview of the physical properties of small proton fields and resulting needs for accurate measurements and modeling of dose distributions for radiosurgery treatment planning. Learning Objectives: Understand the clinical rationale for proton radiosurgery. Understand the similarities and differences from general proton therapy. Understand the similarities and differences from photon stereotactic radiosurgery. Understand the basic physics and clinical physics methods for measuring and commissioning a radiosurgery program.

  8. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  9. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Stephanie A.; Tuite, Michael J.; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [18F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  10. Performance and Cost of Disposable Biopsy Forceps in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Comparison with Reusable Biopsy Forceps

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Won Chul; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong; Chung, In-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims It is believed that disposable biopsy forceps are more costly than reusable biopsy forceps. In this study, we evaluated performance and cost of disposable forceps versus reusable forceps in esophagogastroduodenoscopic biopsy. Methods Between October 2009 and July 2010, we enrolled 200 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopic biopsy at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Biopsies were performed with 100 disposable or 5 reusable forceps by random assignment. Seventy-five additional patients were studied to estimate durability of reusable forceps. The assisting nurses estimated the performance of the forceps. The evaluation of costs included purchase prices and reprocessing costs. The adequacy of the sample was estimated according to the diameter of the obtained tissue. Results Performance of disposable forceps was estimated as excellent in 97.0%, good in 2.0% and adequate in 1.0%. Reusable forceps were estimated as excellent in 36.0%, good in 36.0%, adequate in 25.1% and inadequate in 2.9%. The performance of reusable forceps declined with the number of uses. The reprocessing cost of reusable forceps for one biopsy session was calculated as ₩8,021. The adequacy of the sample was excellent for both forceps. Conclusions Disposable forceps showed excellent performance. Considering the reprocessing costs of reusable forceps, usage of disposable forceps with a low price should be considered. PMID:22741133

  11. Multiple Biopsies and Detection of Cervical Cancer Precursors at Colposcopy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Walker, Joan L.; Gold, Michael A.; Smith, Katie M.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Mathews, Cara; Dunn, S. Terence; Zhang, Roy; Moxley, Katherine; Bishop, Erin; Tenney, Meaghan; Nugent, Elizabeth; Graubard, Barry I.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results are referred to colposcopy and biopsy for diagnosis of cervical cancer precursors (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [HSILs]). Colposcopy with a single biopsy can miss identification of HSILs. No systematic study has quantified the improved detection of HSIL by taking multiple lesion-directed biopsies. Methods The Biopsy Study was an observational study of 690 women referred to colposcopy after abnormal cervical cancer screening results. Up to four directed biopsies were taken from distinct acetowhite lesions and ranked by colposcopic impression. A nondirected biopsy of a normal-appearing area was added if fewer than four directed biopsies were taken. HSIL identified by any biopsy was the reference standard of disease used to evaluate the incremental yield and sensitivity of multiple biopsies. Results In the overall population, sensitivities for detecting HSIL increased from 60.6% (95% CI, 54.8% to 66.6%) from a single biopsy to 85.6% (95% CI, 80.3% to 90.2%) after two biopsies and to 95.6% (95% CI, 91.3% to 99.2%) after three biopsies. A significant increase in sensitivity of multiple biopsies was observed in all subgroups. The highest increase in yield of HSIL was observed for women with a high-grade colposcopic impression, HSIL cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 positivity. Only 2% of all HSILs diagnosed in the participants were detected by biopsies of normal-appearing transformation zone. Conclusion Collection of additional lesion-directed biopsies during colposcopy increased detection of histologic HSIL, regardless of patient characteristics. Taking additional biopsies when multiple lesions are present should become the standard practice of colposcopic biopsy. PMID:25422481

  12. Stereotactic radiation therapy in arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors using the Fixster system.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V

    1986-01-01

    In brain tumours, stereotactic radiation therapy, performed in a single high dose (SHD) or fractionated (FSR), gives better results than conventional methods. In arteriovenous malformations (AVM), radiosurgery is a well-defined alternative to neurosurgery and embolization, if the malformation is not wider than 3 cm. In large AVMs, a successful combined technique of radiosurgery and FSR has been developed. In a series of 110 patients the experience proved that the atraumatic Greitz-Bergström stereotactic system is appropriate.

  13. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  14. Achromatized endomicroscope objective for optical biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kyrish, Matthew; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, researchers and clinicians lack achromatized endomicroscope objectives that are as narrow as biopsy needles. We present a proof-of-concept prototype that validates the optical design of an NA0.4 objective. The objective, built with plastic lenses, has a 0.9 mm clear aperture and is achromatized from 452 nm to 623 nm. The objective’s measured Strehl ratio is 0.74 ± 0.05 across a 250 μm FOV. We perform optical sectioning via structured illumination through the objective while capturing fluorescence images of breast carcinoma cells stained with proflavine and cresyl violet. This technology has the potential to improve optical biopsies and provide the next step forward in cancer diagnostics. PMID:23412009

  15. Cerebral Whipple's disease. Diagnosis by brain biopsy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Diamond, I

    1980-10-01

    Whipple's disease, a multisystem chronic granulomatous disease treatable by antibiotics, usually presents clinically with gastrointestinal or joint symptoms. Usually, the diagnosis is substantiated by small intestinal biopsy. This shows diastase-resistant periodic-acid-Schiff-(PAS)-positive inclusions in the cytoplasm of macrophages within the lamina propria. By electron microscopy, this PAS-positive material consists of 1.5 X 0.2-mum bacilli and fine fibrillar material within macrophage phagolysosomes. Rarely, Whipple's disease presents clinically as a primary neurologic disease without gastrointestinal symptoms. Because untreated cerebral Whipple's disease usually progresses rapidly to death, it is imperative to establish the diagnosis promptly. This report describes a case of cerebral Whipple's disease without gastrointestinal symptoms that was diagnosed early by light-and electron-microscopic study of brain biopsy material. PMID:6158859

  16. Computer assisted biopsy of breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Arambula Cosio, Fernando; Lira Berra, Eric; Hevia Montiel, Nidiyare; Garcia Segundo, Cresencio; Garduno, Edgar; Alvarado Gonzalez, Montserrat; Quispe Siccha, Rosa Ma; Reyes Ramirez, Bartolome; Hazan Lasri, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report our preliminary results of the development of a computer assisted system for breast biopsy. The system is based on tracked ultrasound images of the breast. A three dimensional ultrasound volume is constructed from a set of tracked B-scan images acquired with a calibrated probe. The system has been designed to assist a radiologist during breast biopsy, and also as a training system for radiology residents. A semiautomatic classification algorithm was implemented to assist the user with the annotation of the tumor on an ultrasound volume. We report the development of the system prototype, tested on a physical phantom of a breast with a tumor, made of polivinil alcohol. PMID:21097108

  17. Accessing Genetic Information with Liquid Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuyu; Janku, Filip; Zhan, Qimin; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific advances in understanding circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA/RNA, and exosomes in blood have laid a solid foundation for the development of routine molecular 'liquid biopsies'. This approach provides non-invasive access to genetic information--somatic mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential expression--about the physiological conditions of our body and diseases. It opens a valuable avenue for future genetic studies and human disease diagnosis, including prenatal and neurodegenerative disease diagnosis, as well as for cancer screening and monitoring. With the rapid development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies such as next-generation sequencing, molecular 'liquid biopsies' will quickly become a central piece in the future of precision medicine.

  18. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M S; Chen, J Z; Xu, A P

    2014-10-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding diatheses, amyloidosis, advanced age, gender and so on. Our primary purpose of this review is to summarize current measures in recent years literature aiming at minimizing the bleeding complication after the renal biopsy, including the drug application before and after renal biopsy, operation details in percutaneous renal biopsies, nursing and close monitoring after the biopsy and other kinds of biopsy methods.

  19. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  20. Preliminary study of tendon biopsy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Webbon, P M

    1986-09-01

    A series of experimental tendon biopsies is described. Three biopsies were taken from the lateral digital extensor tendon (LDET) and three from the superficial flexor tendon (SFT). The LDET biopsies resulted in little discomfort whereas the SFT biopsies led to temporary lameness. The tendons were examined histologically up to 99 days after the biopsies were removed. In all of the tendons the defect filled with granulation tissue which subsequently became organised as a longitudinally orientated collagenous scar tissue. In this small series of biopsies the histological effects of the biopsy persisted longer in the SFT than in the LDET. It is concluded that tendon biopsy cannot be advocated for safe routine use in the horse.

  1. Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Science News Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson’s - Mar ... team performed a procedure called a needle core biopsy of the submandibular glands in 15 people who ...

  2. Conjunctival biopsy in adult form galactosialidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Usui, T; Sawaguchi, S; Abe, H; Iwata, K; Oyanagi, K

    1993-01-01

    Conjunctival biopsy was performed in two siblings with adult-form galactosialidosis. Electron microscopically, several types of intracytoplasmic inclusion were observed in the fibroblasts in conjunctival stroma, lymphatic capillary endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and epithelial cells. Membrane-bound vesicles with fibrillogranular content were frequently observed, and occasional lamellar structures were noted in these inclusions. Dense granular inclusions and oil droplets were also seen. Dense granular inclusions have not been reported in this disease previously. Images PMID:8384473

  3. [Is undirected liver biopsy a safe procedure?].

    PubMed

    Oliva, L; Hirt, M

    1993-09-01

    In the authors' group of 976 umaimed liver biopsies (ULB) 10 complications were recorded. The authors described them and compared them with reports from the world literature. Two patients from the group died after ULB. One as a result of biopsy from haemoperitoneum, the other patient died with delirium tremens after surgery called for by persisting peritoneal syndrome. In eight patients mild complications were involved. In five patients complications receded spontaneously, in three after administration of an analgetic. From the submitted paper ensues that ULB is not quite safe, even when used by an experienced physician and when all contraindications are respected. A smooth course is not ensured by a risk-free diagnosis, previous uncomplicated biopsies normal prebioptic haemocoagulation tests. It is essential to realize this with regard to every patient where we indicate ULB. It is better to omit it unless we are unequivocally convinced of its asset. The question thus is: What will be the benefit of ULB for the patient?

  4. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  5. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  6. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  7. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  8. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon.

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Maverick W K

    2016-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  12. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kylie H.; Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B.; Siva, Shankar; Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications. PMID:26083933

  13. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei; Pai, Reetesh K.; Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  14. Interactive sonar-operated device for stereotactic and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, H F; Zweifel, H J

    1990-01-01

    An accuracy of +/- 1 mm in surgical localization of brain targets was reliably attained with a new sonar-operated system, provided that air turbulence was minimized. Since a conventional frame construction with coordinate settings has been disposed of, apart from a halo ring head holder, free access to the operating site is guaranteed. Using offset probes, measurements in depth can be realized with a relatively simple hardware arrangement. A small, 'floating' locator probe can be attached to all kinds of surgical instruments; its spatial position is computed in real time and immediately referred to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Although this work is still in progress, promising applications both in stereotactic and in open surgery are envisaged.

  15. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  16. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  17. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z. Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  18. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  19. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  20. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy plug. (a) Identification. A preformed (polymerized) absorbable lung biopsy plug is intended to...

  1. A new apparatus for standardized rat kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P M

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney.

  2. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1075 Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is...

  3. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1075 Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is...

  4. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1075 Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is...

  5. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1075 Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is...

  6. A New Apparatus for Standardized Rat Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney. PMID:25506931

  7. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1075 Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is...

  8. Minimizing MRI Geometric Distortions for Improved Stereotactic Surgical Planning Accuracy: a Theoretical and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolina, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate localization of internal structures is essential for successful stereotactic surgical planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive modality for stereotactic imaging because it is highly sensitive to soft-tissue differences. Unfortunately, it has been shown to be susceptible to geometric distortions. These distortions contribute to object shifting and also to object -shape deformations. Research analyzing these distortions has found them to be complex and attributable to a variety of different sources. Furthermore, a wide range of stereotactic errors has been reported in numerous clinical studies, intimating that these errors are site specific. Because of the complexity of these distortions and the uncertainty of their effects from one imaging site to the next, most clinical sites choose either to ignore the likelihood that distortions exist, or image concurrently with MRI (for tissue specificity) and x-ray computed tomography (for geometric accuracy). Both of these strategies are unsatisfactory, however, as they either compromise patient care or induce unnecessary cost and inconvenience. This uncertainty in the accuracy of MRI was the impetus that prompted a comprehensive study of geometric distortion contributors and their subsequent effects on both imaged objects and stereotactic accuracy. This dissertation is a report of that study. As far as is known, it is the first comprehensive analysis (theoretical and experimental) of all of the individual distortion contributors that affect MRI geometric accuracy. Additionally, it is the first work that individually analyzes distortion effects on the stereotactic referencing system as well as on imaged objects. The dissertation begins with a brief history of the role of medical imaging in stereotactic surgical planning. Individual contributors to MRI geometric distortions are then analyzed theoretically and experimentally. How they affect both object distortions and stereotactic accuracy is

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma: a Leksell Gamma Knife Society 2000 debate.

    PubMed

    Linskey, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    By definition, the term "radiosurgery" refers to the delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose in a single fraction, not simply the use of stereotaxy. Multiple-fraction delivery is better termed "stereotactic radiotherapy." There are compelling radiobiological principles supporting the biological superiority of single-fraction radiation for achieving an optimal therapeutic response for the slowly proliferating, late-responding, tissue of a schwannoma. It is axiomatic that complication avoidance requires precise three-dimensional conformality between treatment and tumor volumes. This degree of conformality can only be achieved through complex multiisocenter planning. Alternative radiosurgery devices are generally limited to delivering one to four isocenters in a single treatment session. Although they can reproduce dose plans similar in conformality to early gamma knife dose plans by using a similar number of isocenters, they cannot reproduce the conformality of modern gamma knife plans based on magnetic resonance image--targeted localization and five to 30 isocenters. A disturbing trend is developing in which institutions without nongamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) centers are championing and/or shifting to hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannomas. This trend appears to be driven by a desire to reduce complication rates to compete with modern GKS results by using complex multiisocenter planning. Aggressive advertising and marketing from some of these centers even paradoxically suggests biological superiority of hypofractionation approaches over single-dose radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas. At the same time these centers continue to use the term radiosurgery to describe their hypofractionated radiotherapy approach in an apparent effort to benefit from a GKS "halo effect." It must be reemphasized that as neurosurgeons our primary duty is to achieve permanent tumor control for our patients and not to eliminate complications at the

  10. Fatal haemorrhage following liver biopsy in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, D R; Mann, D; Coker, R J; Miller, R F; Glazer, G; Goldin, R D; Lucas, S B; Weber, J N; De Cock, K M

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective review of all 248 liver biopsies performed in patients with HIV infection at two referral centres in London over a 12 year period revealed five cases of major bleeding following biopsy, with four deaths. The risk of major bleeding was 2.0%, and mortality was 1.6% following liver biopsy. The risk of bleeding as much higher than in published series of biopsies done in patients without HIV infection, owing in part to the high prevalence of thrombocytopaenia and clotting abnormalities in patients with HIV infection. HIV infection per se may also increase the risk of bleeding following liver biopsy. PMID:8655172

  11. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, Sicco J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24-85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose-area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0-93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1-7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104-551) s, room time was 34 (range 15-79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9-80.5) Gy{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and interventional time was 18 (range 5-65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86-96), 100% (95% CI 82-100), 100% (95% CI 96-100), 66.7% (95% CI 55-83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86-96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  12. Value of repeat biopsy in lupus nephritis flares

    PubMed Central

    Greloni, G; Scolnik, M; Marin, J; Lancioni, E; Quiroz, C; Zacariaz, J; De la Iglesia Niveyro, P; Christiansen, S; Pierangelo, M A; Varela, C F; Rosa-Diez, G J; Catoggio, L J; Soriano, E R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Renal flares are common in lupus nephritis (LN), and class switch is thought to be characteristic. There is no agreement on indications for performing a repeat renal biopsy. Our objective was to retrospectively review patients who had more than one renal biopsy performed on clinical indications, and analyse clinical, pathological and treatment changes after successive biopsies. Methods Forty-five patients with LN and one or more repeat renal biopsies were included, with a total of 116 biopsies. Results Of the 71 repeat biopsies, pathological transition occurred in 39 (54.9%). When having a previous biopsy with a proliferative lesion, class switch occurred in 55.6%, with 24.4% evolving into non-proliferative classes. When previous biopsy was class V, transition to other classes occurred in 58.3% and changes were all into proliferative classes. Conversion from one pure proliferative form to another (class III to class IV or vice versa) happened in 11.3% of the rebiopsies, with 62 rebiopsies (87.3%) leading to a change in the treatment regimen. Conclusions Histological transformations were common, and they occurred when the previous biopsy had non-proliferative lesions as well as when lesions were proliferative. Treatments were modified after repeat renal biopsy in the majority of patients. In this experience, kidney repeat biopsies were useful in guiding treatment of LN flares. PMID:25396056

  13. Transthoracic needle biopsy of the lung

    PubMed Central

    DiBardino, David M.; Yarmus, Lonny B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Image guided transthoracic needle aspiration (TTNA) is a valuable tool used for the diagnosis of countless thoracic diseases. Computed tomography (CT) is the most common imaging modality used for guidance followed by ultrasound (US) for lesions abutting the pleural surface. Novel approaches using virtual CT guidance have recently been introduced. The objective of this review is to examine the current literature for TTNA biopsy of the lung focusing on diagnostic accuracy and safety. Methods MEDLINE was searched from inception to October 2015 for all case series examining image guided TTNA. Articles focusing on fluoroscopic guidance as well as influence of rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) on yield were excluded. The diagnostic accuracy, defined as the number of true positives divided by the number of biopsies done, as well as the complication rate [pneumothorax (PTX), bleeding] was examined for CT guided TTNA, US guided TTNA as well as CT guided electromagnetic navigational-TTNA (E-TTNA). Of the 490 articles recovered 75 were included in our analysis. Results The overall pooled diagnostic accuracy for CT guided TTNA using 48 articles that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria was 92.1% (9,567/10,383). A similar yield was obtained examining ten articles using US guided TTNA of 88.7% (446/503). E-TTNA, being a new modality, only had one pilot study citing a diagnostic accuracy of 83% (19/23). Pooled PTX and hemorrhage rates were 20.5% and 2.8% respectively for CT guided TTNA. The PTX rate was lower in US guided TTNA at a pooled rate of 4.4%. E-TTNA showed a similar rate of PTX at 20% with no incidence of bleeding in a single pilot study available. Conclusions Image guided TTNA is a safe and accurate modality for the biopsy of lung pathology. This study found similar yield and safety profiles with the three imaging modalities examined. PMID:26807279

  14. Critical assessment of diagnostic value of endomyocardial biopsy. Assessment of cardiac biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, E H; Littler, W A; Sleight, P

    1978-01-01

    Right or left ventricular endomyocardial biopsy with the Konno or the Olympus bioptome was attempted in 73 patients aged 5 months to 61 years, with 82 per cent success. Light and electron microscopy showed non-specific features in over half the biopsies with new or diagnostically useful information in only 10 per cent of cases, usually as a result of electron microscopy. The method is safe but is of strictly limited diagnostic value and is likely to be of most help as a research tool in the biochemical study of cardiomyopathies. Images PMID:626666

  15. Dermal vacuoles in two biopsies of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Ayva, Sebnem; Erkek, Emel; Atasoy, Pinar

    2008-11-01

    Two patients presented with cutaneous lesions clinically typical of psoriasis. The first case was a 38-year-old man and the second was a 51-year-old woman. To confirm the diagnosis, 4-mm punch biopsy samples were obtained from both patients from the lesions on the knees. Histology in both cases was in favour of psoriasis and also revealed empty vacuoles in the papillary dermis, concentrated at sites of intense lymphocyte infiltration. The empty vacuoles resembled true fat cells or fat globules. They did not reveal positive immunostaining with CD34 antigen, suggesting that they were not lined by endothelial cells. Final histological diagnosis was psoriasis associated with dermal vacuolization.

  16. Endobronchial biopsies on aspirin and prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Kebbe, Jad

    2015-06-01

    Patients are generally required to stop antiplatelet therapy prior to elective invasive procedures. Some patients receive dual antiplatelet therapy for recent vascular procedures such as drug-eluting coronary stenting, and early discontinuation of antiplatelet agents could lead to a significant risk of stent thrombosis. Most bronchoscopic procedures are performed on patients using Aspirin but not on those using Clopidogrel or Prasugrel. In this report, we describe a unique case of a patient with a recent placement of drug-eluting stents, who required endobronchial biopsies for evaluation of lung cancer recurrence. The procedure was performed successfully and safely with no complications. PMID:25697386

  17. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation. PMID:27236576

  18. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation.

  19. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alsaif, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report our experience in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in early breast cancer. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2005 and December 2014. There were 120 patients who underwent SLNB with frozen section examination. Data collected included the characteristics of patients, index tumor, and sentinel node (SN), SLNB results, axillary recurrence rate and SLNB morbidity. Results: There were 120 patients who had 123 cancers. Sentinel node was identified in 117 patients having 120 tumors (97.6% success rate). No SN was found intraoperatively in 3 patients. Frozen section results showed that 95 patients were SN negative, those patients had no immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), whereas 25 patients were SN positive and subsequently had immediate ALND. Upon further examination of the 95 negative SN’s by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining for doubtful H&E cases, 10 turned out to have micrometastases (6 had delayed ALND and 4 had no further axillary surgery). Median follow up of patients was 35.5 months and the mean was 38.8 months. There was one axillary recurrence observed in the SN negative group. The morbidity of SLNB was minimal. Conclusion: The obtainable results from our local experience in SLNB in breast cancer, concur with that seen in published similar literature in particular the axillary failure rate. Sentinel lymph node biopsy resulted in minimal morbidity. PMID:26318461

  20. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Benign Meningioma: Long-Term Outcome in 318 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term outcome of stereotactic-based radiation therapy in a large cohort of patients with benign intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2010, 318 patients with histologically confirmed (44.7%; previous surgery) or imaging-defined (55.3%) benign meningiomas were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (79.6%), hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (15.4%), or stereotactic radiosurgery (5.0%), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), prognostic factors, and toxicity were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 50 months (range, 12-167 months). Local control, OS, and CSS at 5 years were 92.9%, 88.7%, and 97.2%, and at 10 years they were 87.5%, 74.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, tumor location (P=.029) and age >66 years (P=.031) were predictors of LC and OS, respectively. Worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms immediately after radiation therapy occurred in up to 2%. Clinically significant acute toxicity (grade 3°) occurred in 3%. Only grade 1-2 late toxicity was observed in 12%, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusions: Patients with benign meningiomas predominantly treated with standard fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with narrow margins enjoy excellent LC and CSS, with minimal long-term morbidity.

  1. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  2. Temporal artery biopsy: is there any value in examining biopsies at multiple levels?

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, A; Franks, A

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To analyse the cost-effectiveness of three strategies for examining temporal artery biopsies based on data from cases examined over the past 10 years. Methods—Of a total of 172 temporal artery biopsies, five were unsuitable for further analysis, 47 had already had levels cut, and 120 had levels cut as part of the study. All the biopsies were examined blind before and after levels. A tree with eventual diagnostic outcomes for different strategies was constructed and economic and sensitivity analyses performed. Welcan units were used to assess technical workload. Results—Only one of the 132 initially normal cases and two of 14 diagnosed with periarterial lymphocytic infiltration (PALI) revealed giant cell arteritis after examining the tissue at multiple levels. Fifteen cases (8.9%) showed PALI not previously observed. The marginal cost for each extra case of giant cell arteritis detected was 83.5 Welcan units for a strategy of routine levels on all sections, and 21 Welcan units for a strategy of only cutting levels if PALI was present on the initial section. These costs were sensitive to the frequency of giant cell arteritis in cases with PALI and to the relative extra cost of moving from cutting single section to routine levels. Conclusions—Routinely examining a temporal artery biopsy at multiple levels does not increase the diagnostic yield of the test, although selective further examination may be indicated in some cases. The significance of PALI is uncertain. The cost-benefit of the different strategies in terms of clinical decision making revolve around the perceived risk inherent in not making a diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. Key Words: temporal artery biopsy • economic analysis • decision analysis PMID:10767829

  3. Direct MRI-guided biopsy of the prostate: use of post-biopsy needle track imaging to confirm targeting

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Alexander J.; Pettersson, David R.; Korngold, Elena K.; Foster, Bryan R.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Amling, Christopher L.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the observation that in-plane post-biopsy T2-weighted MRI often demonstrates the needle track as a transient visible linear tissue distortion during direct MRI-guided biopsy. Materials and methods We retrospectively identified 11 prostatic lesions in 9 men that underwent direct MRI-guided biopsy and in which post-biopsy images were obtained in the plane of the biopsy needle. Results In 9 of 11 targets, a post-biopsy needle track was visible as a linear tissue distortion on in-plane T2-weighted images obtained at a mean interval of 6 min (range 3–15). In these nine cases, the needle track traversed the intended target, and the biopsy was positive for malignancy in six. Biopsy was positive in one of two cases where the needle track was not visible. In five targets, one or more delayed series were obtained after a mean interval of 21 min (range 8–33), showing the track was no longer visible (n = 3) or was of progressively decreased conspicuity (n = 2). Conclusion Accurate targeting during direct MRI-guided biopsy of the prostate can be confirmed by obtaining post-biopsy in-plane images, since the needle track is usually visible as a transient linear tissue distortion. PMID:25687631

  4. Accuracy validation for MRI-guided robotic prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Helen; Lasso, Andras; Vikal, Siddharth; Guion, Peter; Krieger, Axel; Kaushal, Aradhana; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-02-01

    We report a quantitative evaluation of the clinical accuracy of a MRI-guided robotic prostate biopsy system that has been in use for over five years at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. A two-step rigid volume registration using mutual information between the pre and post needle insertion images was performed. Contour overlays of the prostate before and after registration were used to validate the registration. A total of 20 biopsies from 5 patients were evaluated. The maximum registration error was 2 mm. The mean biopsy target displacement, needle placement error, and biopsy error was 5.4 mm, 2.2 mm, and 5.1 mm respectively. The results show that the pre-planned biopsy target did dislocate during the procedure and therefore causing biopsy errors.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Neffendorf, James E; Jackson, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID) showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR) is underway. PMID:26491243

  6. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Brophy, Brian P.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  7. A structural group-connectome in standard stereotactic (MNI) space

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A group connectome of 20 subjects has been normalized into standard stereotactic (MNI) space. Data has been processed using the Gibbs' Tracking approach (Reisert et al., 2011) [11] and normalized into standard space using DARTEL (Ashburner, 2007) [1]. All data has been acquired within the scope of the study A. Horn, D. Ostwald, M. Reisert, F. Blankenburg, The structural–functional connectome and the default mode network of the human brain, NeuroImage 102 (2013) 142–151. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.09.069. The utility of this dataset can be described by the following points: In medical studies in which subject-specific dMRI is not available, a standardized connectome may help to gain some canonical insight into white-matter connectivity. The dataset enables scientists who use different modalities (like EEG, MEG etc.) without access to MRI, to combine studies obtained using other methodology with insights from the brain's inner structural formation. The dataset could also extend possible claims made by meta-analyzes/literature-based studies. PMID:26543893

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices.

  9. Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery: current status of the initial paradigm shifter.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-09-10

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  10. Automated fiducial marker planning for thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Jason D.; Rai, Lav; Wibowo, Henky; Tsalyuk, Serge; Anderson, Eric D.

    2012-02-01

    Stereotactic body-radiation therapy (SBRT) has gained acceptance in treating lung cancer. Localization of a thoracic lesion is challenging as tumors can move significantly with breathing. Some SBRT systems compensate for tumor motion with the intrafraction tracking of targets by two stereo fluoroscopy cameras. However, many lung tumors lack a fluoroscopic signature and cannot be directly tracked. Small radiopaque fiducial markers, acting as fluoroscopically visible surrogates, are instead implanted nearby. The spacing and configuration of the fiducial markers is important to the success of the therapy as SBRT systems impose constraints on the geometry of a fiducial-marker constellation. It is difficult even for experienced physicians mentally assess the validity of a constellation a priori. To address this challenge, we present the first automated planning system for bronchoscopic fiducial-marker placement. Fiducial-marker planning is posed as a constrained combinatoric optimization problem. Constraints include requiring access from a navigable airway, having sufficient separation in the fluoroscopic imaging planes to resolve each individual marker, and avoidance of major blood vessels. Automated fiducial-marker planning takes approximately fifteen seconds, fitting within the clinical workflow. The resulting locations are integrated into a virtual bronchoscopic planning system, which provides guidance to each location during the implantation procedure. To date, we have retrospectively planned over 50 targets for treatment, and have implanted markers according to the automated plan in one patient who then underwent SBRT treatment. To our knowledge, this approach is the first to address automated bronchoscopic fiducialmarker planning for SBRT.

  11. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  12. Cranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Current Status of the Initial Paradigm Shifter

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Jason P.; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  13. Role of stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    The integration of new technologies has raised an interest in liver tumor radiotherapy, with literature evolving to support its efficacy. These advances, particularly stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have been critical in improving local control or potential cure in liver lesions not amenable to first-line surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation. Active investigation of SBRT, particularly for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has recently started, yielding promising local control rates. In addition, data suggest a possibility that SBRT can be an alternative option for HCC unfit for other local therapies. However, information on optimal treatment indications, doses, and methods remains limited. In HCC, significant differences in patient characteristics and treatment availability exist by country. In addition, the prognosis of HCC is greatly influenced by underlying liver dysfunction and treatment itself in addition to tumor stage. Since they are closely linked to treatment approach, it is important to understand these differences in interpreting outcomes from various reports. Further studies are required to validate and maximize the efficacy of SBRT by a large, multi-institutional setting. PMID:24696597

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  15. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  16. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  17. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost.

  18. Patient Outcomes in Canceled MRI-Guided Breast Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Niell, Bethany L.; Lee, Janie M.; Johansen, Christopher; Halpern, Elkan F.; Rafferty, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The reported frequency of aborted MRI-guided breast biopsies ranges from 8% to 17%, usually secondary to nonvisualization at attempted biopsy. Our study examines the frequency of MRI-guided breast biopsies aborted because of lesion nonvisualization and the subsequent risk of malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We identified 350 patients and 445 lesions scheduled for MRI-guided biopsy between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed to ascertain patient demographics, lesion and imaging characteristics, and subsequent pathology results. Chi-square statistics were calculated for patient level analyses. RESULTS. MRI-guided biopsies were aborted in 13% (56/445) of lesions and 15% (53/350; 95% CI, 11.6–19.3%) of patients because of nonvisualization of the biopsy target at the time of attempted biopsy. Of these 53 patients, 50 patients had follow-up data available. Malignancy was subsequently diagnosed in five of those 50 patients (10%; 95% CI, 3.3–21.8%) patients, three with invasive ductal carcinomas and two with ductal carcinoma in situ. The mean time to malignant diagnosis from the date of aborted biopsy was 2.6 months (range, 1.1–6.9 months). CONCLUSION. Informed consent for MRI-guided breast biopsies should include discussion of biopsy cancellation because of nonvisualization of the target lesion. The low yet significant risk of malignancy in patients subsequent to an aborted MRI-guided breast biopsy warrants short-term follow-up MRI after a canceled biopsy. PMID:24370148

  19. Diagnostic yield of brain biopsies in children presenting to neurology.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Sunita; Hawkins, Cynthia; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2008-03-01

    The role of brain biopsy is well established in patients with neoplastic lesions, with a diagnostic yield approaching 95%. The diagnostic yield of brain biopsy in adults with neurological decline varies from 20% to 43%. Only a few studies have examined the diagnostic yield of brain biopsy in children with idiopathic neurological decline. A retrospective analysis was conducted on all open and closed pediatric brain biopsies performed between January 1988 and May 2003. Biopsies were performed for diagnostic purposes in patients showing a progressively deteriorating neurologic course in whom less-invasive modalities such as neuroimaging, electroencephalography (EEG), and molecular genetic studies were either negative or inconclusive. Immunocompromised patients were included. Patients were excluded if the preoperative diagnosis was a neoplasm or if the patient was undergoing a resection as part of a work-up for intractable epilepsy. Each patient underwent numerous investigations before brain biopsy. The utility of each biopsy was analyzed. Sixty-six children had brain biopsies performed for diagnostic purposes during the study period. Patient ages ranged from 2 months to 16 years and 9 months at the time of biopsy. The diagnostic yield was 48.5% overall, with a yield of 68.8% between 1996 and 2003. Of the total, 26 (39.4%) biopsies were both diagnostic and useful. Patients most frequently presented with seizures (56.1%) and encephalopathy (33%). The most frequently diagnosed disease was vasculitis (18.2%). A total of 71.9% of patients with diagnostic biopsies improved with appropriate treatment. Brain biopsy in children had a diagnostic yield of 48.5% in our series. A specific diagnosis may help in management and outcome, especially with a diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:18192645

  20. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  1. Intrinsic Frequency and the Single Wave Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Petrasek, Danny; Pahlevan, Niema M.; Tavallali, Peyman; Rinderknecht, Derek G.; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the hallmark of classical type II diabetes. In addition, insulin resistance plays a central role in metabolic syndrome, which astonishingly affects 1 out of 3 adults in North America. The insulin resistance state can precede the manifestation of diabetes and hypertension by years. Insulin resistance is correlated with a low-grade inflammatory condition, thought to be induced by obesity as well as other conditions. Currently, the methods to measure and monitor insulin resistance, such as the homeostatic model assessment and the euglycemic insulin clamp, can be impractical, expensive, and invasive. Abundant evidence exists that relates increased pulse pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and vascular dysfunction with insulin resistance. We introduce a potential method of assessing insulin resistance that relies on a novel signal-processing algorithm, the intrinsic frequency method (IFM). The method requires a single pulse pressure wave, thus the term “ wave biopsy.” PMID:26183600

  2. Automated quantitative muscle biopsy analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An automated system to aid the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases by producing fiber size histograms utilizing histochemically stained muscle biopsy tissue. Televised images of the microscopic fibers are processed electronically by a multi-microprocessor computer, which isolates, measures, and classifies the fibers and displays the fiber size distribution. The architecture of the multi-microprocessor computer, which is iterated to any required degree of complexity, features a series of individual microprocessors P.sub.n each receiving data from a shared memory M.sub.n-1 and outputing processed data to a separate shared memory M.sub.n+1 under control of a program stored in dedicated memory M.sub.n.

  3. [Conjunctival rhinosporidiois diagnosed in a biopsy specimen].

    PubMed

    Zoroquiain, Pablo; Moreno, Alberto; Oddó, David

    2014-04-01

    11 years old girl, from south region of Chile, without history of travels outside Chile nor the province, complaints of red eye with blepharitis and blood-tingued epiphora. Eye exam revealed a pseudomembrane. Clinical diagnosis was folicular conjunctivitis. A surgical removal was performed and the lesion sent to biopsy analysis. On microscopic examination numerous 50-150 microm cysts with keratinous wall and numerous endospores were found. Rinosporidiosis is an infection caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi that frecuently affects nasal cavity but could infect eye, urogenital tract and airways. This infections is considered endemic in Asia and Africa, but it is very important to have the suspicious among polyps in these areas because travel to endemic areas is become more frecuently. PMID:24878912

  4. Percutaneous renal biopsy as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, Christopher O.; Kadiri, Solomon

    2004-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a safe and effective tool in the diagnosis and management of renal disease. It is the gold standard for evaluating renal parenchymal disease. It is both useful for diagnosis and monitoring progress of renal diseases. Where facilities and personnel are available to carry out the procedure in developing countries, it has become increasingly difficult for patients to pay for hospital admission fees, the procedure, and processing of the samples obtained. Information on the success rate and safety of the procedure is of interest to nephrologists for cost-benefit considerations and medicolegal purposes. This paper reports the outcome of outpatient PRB done among patients of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. With the use of ultrasound guidance, PRB remains a safe procedure and can be done on an outpatient basis. PMID:15481751

  5. Needle aspiration biopsy in salivary gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R; Webber, C; DiMaio, T; Jaffe, B M

    1990-10-01

    The value of needle aspiration biopsy in the evaluation and management of salivary gland pathology is controversial. The major reasons for this controversy are the difficulty in cytologic evaluation and the fact that the extent of surgery can be easily defined based on clinical judgement. However, a preoperative diagnosis is helpful in discussions with patients regarding the extent and type of surgery. Apart from the fact that needle biopsy can distinguish benign from malignant conditions, it is also very useful in distinguishing between salivary and other nonsalivary pathology. Over the past 7 1/2 years, we have performed 160 needle aspirations of parotid, submandibular, and submucosal lesions. Adequate specimens for cytologic evaluation were obtained in 155 patients (97%). A total of 84 parotid lesions, 70 submandibular lumps, and 6 submucosal abnormalities were detected. A cytologic diagnosis of benign pathology was made in 120 patients. Twelve patients had lymphoma and the diagnosis was suspected based on needle aspiration. There were 10 patients with tuberculosis and 30 patients with hyperplastic lymph nodes or benign lymphoepithelial disease of the parotid. There were three false-positive and two false-negative reports. No complications such as hematoma, nerve injury, or infection developed. The major difficulty was in distinguishing between malignancy and obstructive sialadenitis in the submandibular region. Needle aspiration was helpful in evaluating lesions in the tail of the parotid and submandibular area. The cytologic distinction between salivary and nonsalivary pathology was useful in planning the appropriate surgery and the extent of surgical resection. From a clinical standpoint, the distinction between benign and malignant salivary and nonsalivary pathology was very helpful. Preoperative diagnosis of Warthin's tumor, lymphoma, or benign lymphoepithelial disease was essential to the correct management of these patients.

  6. Preservative solution for skeletal muscle biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Yasemin Gulcan; Kurt, Bulent; Ozcan, Omer; Topal, Turgut; Kilic, Abdullah; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Acikel, Cengizhan; Sener, Kenan; Sahiner, Fatih; Yigit, Nuri; Aydin, Ibrahim; Alay, Semih; Ekinci, Safak

    2015-01-01

    Context: Muscle biopsy samples must be frozen with liquid nitrogen immediately after excision and maintained at -80°C until analysis. Because of this requirement for tissue processing, patients with neuromuscular diseases often have to travel to centers with on-site muscle pathology laboratories for muscle biopsy sample excision to ensure that samples are properly preserved. Aim: Here, we developed a preservative solution and examined its protectiveness on striated muscle tissues for a minimum of the length of time that would be required to reach a specific muscle pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A preservative solution called Kurt-Ozcan (KO) solution was prepared. Eight healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed; striated muscle tissue samples were collected and divided into six different groups. Muscle tissue samples were separated into groups for morphological, enzyme histochemical, molecular, and biochemical analysis. Statistical method used: Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Samples kept in the KO and University of Wisconsin (UW) solutions exhibited very good morphological scores at 3, 6, and 18 hours, but artificial changes were observed at 24 hours. Similar findings were observed for the evaluated enzyme activities. There were no differences between the control group and the samples kept in the KO or UW solution at 3, 6, and 18 hours for morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of β-actin gene was protected up to 6 hours in the KO and UW solutions. Conclusion: The KO solution protects the morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features of striated muscle tissue of healthy rats for 18 hours and preserves the mRNA for 6 hours. PMID:26019417

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma: Long-term experience and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel, Angelika; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze our long-term experience and prognostic factors after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma. Methods and materials: Between January 1985 and December 2001, 317 patients with a median age of 55.7 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. The tumor distribution was World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 in 48.3%, WHO Grade 2 in 8.2%, and unknown in 43.5%. Of the 317 patients, 97 underwent RT as their primary treatment, 79 underwent postoperative RT (subtotal resection in 38 and biopsy only in 41), and 141 were treated for recurrent disease. The median target volume was 33.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.0-412.6 cm{sup 3}). The median total dose was 57.6 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction five times weekly. Results: The median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 1.2-14.3 years). The overall local tumor control rate was 93.1% (295 of 317). Of the 317 patients, 72 had a partial response on CT/MRI and 223 (70.4%) remained stable. At a median of 4.5 years after FSRT, 22 patients (6.9%) had local tumor progression on MRI. Local tumor failure was significantly greater in patients with WHO Grade 2 meningioma (p < 0.002) than in patients with WHO Grade 1 or unknown histologic features. Patients treated for recurrent meningioma showed a trend toward decreased progression-free survival compared with patients treated with primary therapy, after biopsy, or after subtotal resection (p < 0.06). Patients with a tumor volume >60 cm{sup 3} had a recurrence rate of 15.5% vs. 4.3% for those with a tumor volume of {<=}60 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In 42.9% of the patients, preexisting neurologic deficits improved. Worsening of preexisting neurologic symptoms occurred in 8.2%. Eight patients developed new clinical symptoms, such as reduced vision, trigeminal neuralgia, and intermittent tinnitus located at the side of the irradiated meningioma after FSRT. Conclusion: These data have demonstrated that FSRT is an

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery of the foramen magnum region and upper neck lesions: technique modification.

    PubMed

    Samblas, J M; Bustos, J C; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J A; Donckaster, G; Santos, M; Ortiz de Urbina, D I

    1994-04-01

    A modification of the stereotactic radiosurgical procedure to permit treatment of lesions in the foramen magnum and upper cervical regions is described. The modification consists of placing the frontal pins of the stereotactic head ring in the zigoma bone, with no changes in the position of the occipital pins, so the final BRW head ring is oblique to the orbito-meatal plane. In this new position there is room enough in the posterior part of the guide for the support scrubs. This is unhampered by the patient's shoulders and the lesion is far enough to permit setting the axial coordinate sufficiently above the head ring plane.

  9. Comparison of MR/Ultrasound Fusion–Guided Biopsy With Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy for the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; George, Arvin K.; Rothwax, Jason; Shakir, Nabeel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Parnes, Howard L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Simon, Richard M.; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Targeted magnetic resonance (MR)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy has been shown to detect prostate cancer. The implications of targeted biopsy alone vs standard extended-sextant biopsy or the 2 modalities combined are not well understood. Objective To assess targeted vs standard biopsy and the 2 approaches combined for the diagnosis of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Design, Setting, And Participants Prospective cohort study of 1003 men undergoing both targeted and standard biopsy concurrently from 2007 through 2014 at the National Cancer Institute in the United States. Patients were referred for elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or abnormal digital rectal examination results, often with prior negative biopsy results. Risk categorization was compared among targeted and standard biopsy and, when available, whole-gland pathology after prostatectomy as the “gold standard.” Interventions Patients underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging to identify regions of prostate cancer suspicion followed by targeted MR/ultrasound fusion biopsy and concurrent standard biopsy. Main Outcomes And Measures The primary objective was to compare targeted and standard biopsy approaches for detection of high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥4 + 3); secondary end points focused on detection of low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score 3 + 3 or low-volume 3 + 4) and the biopsy ability to predict whole-gland pathology at prostatectomy. Results Targeted MR/ultrasound fusion biopsy diagnosed 461 prostate cancer cases, and standard biopsy diagnosed 469 cases. There was exact agreement between targeted and standard biopsy in 690 men (69%) undergoing biopsy. Targeted biopsy diagnosed 30% more high-risk cancers vs standard biopsy (173 vs 122 cases, P < .001) and 17% fewer low-risk cancers (213 vs 258 cases, P < .001). When standard biopsy cores were combined with the targeted approach, an additional 103 cases (22%) of mostly low

  10. Real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with needle guide by nephrologists decreases post-biopsy complications

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Shashi; Manjunath, Revanasiddappa; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama; Sharma, Raj K; Gupta, Amit; Lal, Hira; Jain, Manoj; Agrawal, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Background Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) can result in serious complications. The study is aimed to compare the biopsy yield and complications rate of the real-time ultrasonagram (USG)-guided PRB and needle tracking with and without needle guide in two different study periods. Methods We compared the yield and complications of 2138 kidney biopsies performed in two different periods, 1510 biopsies during the first period from April 2004–December 2010 and 628 biopsies during second period from January 2011–March 2013. All biopsies in both periods were performed by nephrologists. Radiologists provided the real-time image without needle guide during the first period while nephrologists performed both imaging and biopsy with needle guide during the second period. Results Of all the 2138 patients, 226 (10.5%) patients developed 118 minor and 108 major complications. Only 13 (2.1%) major complications occurred in the second period and 95 (6.7%) in the first period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing a major complication without guide was 3.04 times greater than that of the biopsies performed with use of the guide. The mean number of glomeruli per biopsy obtained during the second period (17.98 ± 6.75) was significantly greater than that of the first period (14.14 ± 6.01) (P = 0.004). The number of passes to acquire adequate tissue (P = 0.001) and percentage of cortex on biopsy (P = 0.001) were also significantly better in the second period. The optimal observation period post biopsy is 24 h. Conclusions Real-time USG imaging supported by needle guide device is associated with better biopsy yield and fewer complications. PMID:25815170

  11. Automatic biopsy instruments used through a coaxial bone biopsy system with an eccentric drill tip.

    PubMed

    Aström, K G; Sundström, J C; Lindgren, P G; Ahlström, K H

    1995-05-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive CT (n = 23) or ultrasonographically (n = 5) guided biopsy procedures were performed on musculoskeletal lytic lesions covered (n = 13) or not covered (n = 15) with intact bone. Specimens were obtained by means of Biopty techniques (n = 27), i.e. Biopty and Monopty instruments, through different cannulas with normal or shortened needle-throws. Four out of 5 bone penetrations were successful with an Ostycut needle, and all 8 bone penetrations by a coaxial bone biopsy system with an eccentric drill. The eccentric drill makes a hole in the cortical bone larger than the diameter of the outer cannula of this system, making it easy to anchor the cannula and then coaxially insert a Biopty-Gun needle for example. The overall histopathological diagnostic accuracy of the Biopty techniques was 25/27 (92.6%).

  12. Is magnetic resonance/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy better than systematic prostate biopsy? an updated meta- and trial sequential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Junyuan; Yu, Yasai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Liu, Ben; Xie, Liping

    2015-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the literature to determine whether Magnetic Resonance/Ultrasound (MR/US) fusion prostate biopsy is better than systematic biopsy for making a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. The two strategies were also compared for their ability to detect lesions with different degrees of suspicion on MRI and clinically significant prostate cancer, and the number of cores needed for diagnosis. The Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Medline were searched from inception until May 1, 2015. Meta-analysis was conducted via RevMan 5.2 software. Data was expressed as risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval. Trial sequential analysis was used to assess risk of random errors. Fourteen trials were included, encompassing a total of 3105 participants. We found that MR/US fusion biopsy detected more prostate cancers than systematic biopsy (46.9% vs. 44.2%, p=0.03). In men with moderate/high MRI suspicion, MR/US fusion biopsy did better than systematic biopsy (RR = 1.46; p < 0.05) for making a diagnosis. Moreover, MR/US fusion biopsy detected more clinically significant cancers than systematic biopsy (RR = 1.19; p < 0.05). We recommend that MR/US fusion prostate biopsy be used to better detect prostate cancer, particularly in patients with moderate/high suspicion lesions on MRI. PMID:26498362

  13. Renal biopsy in the management of lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T K; Gelber, A C; Witter, F R; Petri, M; Fine, D M

    2015-02-01

    The differential diagnosis of proteinuria and hematuria in pregnancy is broad and includes active lupus nephritis. Identification of the correct diagnosis often has a profound therapeutic impact on not only the mother but also the fetus. To date, relatively few reports exist on the role of renal biopsy during pregnancy among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present a case series of 11 pregnant women with SLE who underwent a renal biopsy to evaluate a presumptive flare of lupus nephritis. The electronic medical record was retrospectively analyzed for pre-biopsy serum creatinine, proteinuria, hematuria, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA); histologic findings on renal biopsy; and the clinical course of each mother and fetus. From 2001 to 2012, 11 pregnant women with SLE flares during pregnancy underwent a renal biopsy at an academic tertiary medical center. At the time of biopsy, median gestational age was 16 weeks (range 9 to 27), median serum creatinine was 0.6 mg/dl (interquartile range 0.5 to 0.9), six (55%) had hematuria, and all had proteinuria >500 mg/24 hours. Proliferative lupus nephritis was found in 10 (91%) of 11 biopsies (five with ISN/RPS Class III; five with ISN/RPS Class IV). All but one individual underwent a change in management guided by information gleaned from renal biopsy. No apparent biopsy-related complications occurred to mother or fetus. Three women elected to terminate their pregnancy; although many factors were involved, the findings on renal biopsy informed the decision-making process. Among the remaining cases, there were three pre-term deliveries, one fetus with complete heart block, one in utero demise, and one maternal death. Renal biopsy is helpful at informing the management of patients with lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

  14. Radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takahashi, Wataru; Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has a local control rate of 95% at 2 years for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and should improve the prognosis of inoperable patients, elderly patients, and patients with significant comorbidities who have early-stage NSCLC. The safety of SBRT is being confirmed in international, multi-institutional Phase II trials for peripheral lung cancer in both inoperable and operable patients, but reports so far have found that SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for early-stage NSCLC and early metastatic lung cancer. Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is one of the most common toxicities of SBRT. Although most post-treatment RP is Grade 1 or 2 and either asymptomatic or manageable, a few cases are severe, symptomatic, and there is a risk for mortality. The reported rates of symptomatic RP after SBRT range from 9% to 28%. Being able to predict the risk of RP after SBRT is extremely useful in treatment planning. A dose-effect relationship has been demonstrated, but suggested dose-volume factors like mean lung dose, lung V20, and/or lung V2.5 differed among the reports. We found that patients who present with an interstitial pneumonitis shadow on computed tomography scan and high levels of serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein D have a high rate of severe radiation pneumonitis after SBRT. At our institution, lung cancer patients with these risk factors have not received SBRT since 2006, and our rate of severe RP after SBRT has decreased significantly since then. PMID:25276313

  15. Conformality Study for Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Marvene M.; DesRosiers, Colleen; Fakiris, Achilles J.; DeBliek, Carolyn R.; Kiszka, Daniel N.; Stinson, Eric R.; Young, Lanice E.; Bartlett, Gregory K.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two techniques of developing highly conformal plans for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) that target a high ablative dose to the center of the tumor while dropping off rapidly in normal tissues to determine which technique produced a more desirable treatment plan. The techniques used for comparison are 'field in field' (FIF) and 'non field in field' (NFIF). Twelve case studies were used, all of which had been treated using the FIF technique. Each FIF plan was edited, maintaining the same geometry for each field but reducing the total number of fields to one half by deleting all of the fields that were inside another field; this edited plan was the NFIF plan. Normalization was made to the isodose line (NFIF-I) and to the target volume (NFIF-V) and both plans were compared with the standard FIF plan independently. Dose-ratio comparisons were made of the 80% and 50% isodose volumes, as well as maximum doses outside of the planning target volume, mean dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV), minimum dose coverage on the GTV, maximum dose to the spinal cord, and the dose to the volume of noninvolved lung receiving 2000 cGy (V20). The FIF plans resulted in the best sparing of normal tissue. The NFIF-I had the best target coverage but also resulted in the highest doses to normal tissues. The NFIF-V was not significantly different from the FIF in doses to normal tissue but had the lowest coverage to targets of any of the techniques. Overall, in our department, we have chosen to use the FIF technique for SBRT conformality to obtain optimal coverage while minimizing the dose to normal tissue.

  16. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, Evan R; Mackie, Thomas R

    2011-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc.

  17. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Kondziolka, D.; Flickinger, J.C.; Bissonette, D.J.; Jungreis, C.A.; Maitz, A.H.; Horton, J.A.; Coffey, R.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery successfully obliterates carefully selected arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) of the brain. In an initial 3-year experience using the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 227 patients with AVM's were treated. Symptoms at presentation included prior hemorrhage in 143 patients (63%), headache in 104 (46%), and seizures in 70 (31%). Neurological deficits were present in 102 patients (45%). Prior surgical resection (resulting in subtotal removal) had been performed in 36 patients (16%). In 47 selected patients (21%), embolization procedures were performed in an attempt to reduce the AVM size prior to radiosurgery. The lesions were classified according to the Spetzler grading system: 64 (28%) were Grade VI (inoperable), 22 (10%) were Grade IV, 90 (40%) were Grade III, 43 (19%) were Grade II, and eight (4%) were Grade I. With the aid of computer imaging-integrated isodose plans for single-treatment irradiation, total coverage of the AVM nidus was possible in 216 patients (95%). The location and volume of the AVM were the most important factors for the selection of radiation dose. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at 6-month intervals in 161 patients. Seventeen patients who had MR evidence of complete obliteration underwent angiography within 3 months of imaging: in 14 (82%) complete obliteration was confirmation being 4 months (mean 17 months) after radiosurgery. The 2-year obliteration rates according to volume were: all eight (100%) AVM's less than 1 cu cm; 22 (85%) of 26 AVM's of 1 to 4 cu cm; and seven (58%) of 12 AVM's greater than 4 cu cm. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed postirradiation changes in 38 (24%) of 161 patients at a mean interval of 10.2 months after radiosurgery; only 10 (26%) of those 38 patients were symptomatic.

  19. Technical and anatomical aspects of novalis stereotactic radiosurgery sphenopalatine ganglionectomy

    SciTech Connect

    De Salles, Antonio A.F. . E-mail: adesalles@mednet.ucla.edu; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Golish, S. Raymond Ph.D.; Medin, Paul M.; Malkasian, Dennis; Solberg, Timothy D.; Selch, Michael T.

    2006-11-15

    Background: Several techniques have been applied for destruction of the sphenopalatine ganglion to control cluster headache and ocular pain with sympathetic component. Cluster headache has responded to radiofrequency ablation or phenol destruction. Radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion is promising due to the excellent visualization of the target on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and skull X-rays. Material and Methods: Six patients and one cadaver head were analyzed in this study. The cadaver-head dissection confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion on X-rays and CT imaging. One patient undergoing radiofrequency sphenopalatine ablation participated for confirmation of the location of the ganglion on plain X-rays. Five patients received radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion. One patient had classic unilateral cluster headache. Two patients had neuropathic pain and 1 had bilateral migrainous neuralgia. The fifth patient had bilateral atypical facial pain. All received a single maximal dose of 90 Gy with a 5- or 7.5-mm circular collimator. MRI, CT, and skull X-rays identified and confirmed the target. Results: The sphenopalatine fossa is seen in the skull X-ray as an inverse tear drop just caudal to the sphenoid sinus. This location is readily correlated to the CT target by the stereotactic coordinates and confirmed with the presence of the ganglion visualized in the MRI scan. Only the patient with cluster headache experienced lasting pain relief. Conclusion: Multiple imaging modalities confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion for radiosurgery. The procedure was performed safely with CT and MRI fusion. Radiosurgery was significantly beneficial only on classic cluster headache.

  20. Prediction of AVM obliteration after stereotactic radiotherapy using radiobiological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Nataf, François; Schlienger, Michel; Karlsson, Bengt; Lax, Ingmar; Kappas, Constantin; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders

    2002-07-01

    This study was carried out in order to derive the radiobiological parameters of the dose-response relation for the obliteration of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) following single fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Furthermore, the accuracy by which the linear Poisson model predicts the probability of obliteration and how the haemorrhage history, location and volume of the AVM influence its radiosensitivity are investigated. The study patient material consists of 85 patients who received radiation for AVM therapy. Radiation-induced AVM obliterations were assessed on the basis of post-irradiation angiographies and other radiological findings. For each patient the dose delivered to the clinical target volume and the clinical treatment outcome were available. These data were used in a maximum likelihood analysis to calculate the best estimates of the parameters of the linear Poisson model. The uncertainties of these parameters were also calculated and their individual influence on the dose-response curve was studied. AVM radiosensitivity was assumed to be the same for all the patients. The radiobiological model used was proved suitable for predicting the treatment outcome pattern of the studied patient material. The radiobiological parameters of the model were calculated for different AVM locations, bleeding histories and AVM sizes. The range of parameter variability had considerable effect on the dose-response curve of AVM. The correlation between the dosimetric data and their corresponding clinical effect could be accurately modelled using the linear Poisson model. The derived response parameters can be introduced into the clinical routine with the calculated accuracy assuming the same methodology in target definition and delineation. The known volume dependence of AVM radiosensitivity was confirmed. Moreover, a trend relating AVM location with its radiosensitivity was observed.

  1. Monitor Unit Checking in Heterogeneous Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Patrick D.; Adolfson, Troy; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Saxena, Rishik

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of lung cancer using very-high-dose fractionation in small fields requires well-tested dose modeling, a method for density-averaging compound targets constructed from different parts of the breathing cycle, and monitor unit verification of the heterogeneity-corrected treatment plans. The quality and safety of each procedure are dependent on these factors. We have evaluated the dosimetry of our first 26 stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, including 260 treatment fields, planned with the Pinnacle treatment planning system. All targets were combined from full expiration and inspiration computed tomography scans and planned on the normal respiration scan with 6-MV photons. Combined GTVs (cGTVs) have been density-averaged in different ways for comparison of the effect on total monitor units. In addition, we have compared planned monitor units against hand calculations using 2 classic 1D correction methods: (1) effective attenuation and (2) ratio of Tissue-Maximum Ratios (TMRs) to determine the range of efficacy of simple verification methods over difficult-to-perform measurements. Different methods of density averaging for combined targets have been found to have minimal impact on total dose as evidenced by the range of total monitor units generated for each method. Nondensity-corrected treatment plans for the same fields were found to require about 8% more monitor units on average. Hand calculations, using the effective attenuation method were found to agree with Pinnacle calculations for nonproblematic fields to within {+-}10% for >95% of the fields tested. The ratio of TMRs method was found to be unacceptable. Reasonable choices for density-averaging of cGTVs using full inspiration/expiration scans should not strongly affect the planning dose. Verification of planned monitor units, as a check for problematic fields, can be done for 6-MV fields with simple 1D effective attenuation-corrected hand calculations.

  2. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, Evan R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc. PMID:21844866

  3. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  5. A preplanning method for stereotactic radiosurgery to improve treatment workflow.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Ozturk, Naim; Smith, Brett; Slavin, Konstantin V; Koshy, Matthew; Aydogan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Frame-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires fixation of an invasive head ring to ensure accurate targeting. Minimizing waiting time with a fixed head ring is important for patient comfort and satisfaction. We report a practical preplanning solution for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system that reduces waiting time by expediting the planning process on treatment day. A water-filled anthropomorphic head phantom was used to acquire a surrogate CT image set for preplanning and fused with patient's MRI, which was obtained before the day of treatment. Once an acceptable preplan was obtained, it was saved as a plan template and the phantom image set was removed from the Brainlab database to prevent any confusion and mix-up of image sets. On the treatment day, the patient's CT and MRI were fused, and the customized beam settings of the preplan template were then applied and optimized. Up to 10-fold of reduction in treatment plan time was demonstrated by bench testing with multiple planners and a variety of cases. Loading the plan template and fine-tuning the preconfigured beam settings took only a small fraction of the preplan time to restore the conformity and dose falloff comparable to those of the preplan. For instance, preplan time was 2 hr for a two-isocenter case, whereas, it took less than 20 min for a less experienced planner to plan it on the day of treat-ment using the preplan method. The SRS preplanning technique implemented in this study for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system offers an opportunity to explore possible beam configurations thoroughly, optimize planning parameters, resolve gantry angle clearance issues, and communicate and address challenges with physicians before the treatment day. Preplanning has been proven to improve plan quality and to improve efficiency in our clinic, especially for multiple-isocenter and dosimetrically challenging cases. PMID:27167274

  6. Frameless stereotactic body radiation therapy for multiple lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mu, Jinming; Gu, Wendong; Chen, Yuan; Ning, Zhonghua; Jin, Jianxue; Pei, Honglei

    2014-07-08

    Two patients with multiple lung metastases (≥ 5) were treated using frameless stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator equipped with an interdigitation-capable multileaf collimator and four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D CBCT). The technique and the early clinical outcomes were evaluated. Patient A with five lung metastases and Patient B with seven lung metastases underwent SBRT (48 Gy/8 fractions for Patient A, 42 Gy/7 fractions for Patient B). The treatments were administered using a 6 MV photon beam. The nominal dose rate was 660 MUs/min. Patients were positioned and immobilized using thermoplastic masks and image guidance was done using 4D CBCT. The targets were delineated on the images of the 4D CT, and the positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) images were taken as references. A two-step, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan was designed for each patient. Step 1: the lesions in one lung were irradiated by a 210° arc field; Step 2: the rest of the lesions in the other lung were irradiated by a 120° arc field. Plans were evaluated using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Patients were followed up and adverse events were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 (CTCAE v4.0). The beam-on time of each treatment was less than 10 min. The CI and HI for the two plans were 0.562, 0.0709 and 0.513, 0.0794, respectively. Pulmonary function deteriorated slightly in both patients, and the patient with seven lung lesions was confirmed to have Grade 1 radiation pneumonitis. The technique was fast, accurate, and well tolerated by patients, and the two-step plan is a helpful design in reducing the dose to the lungs.

  7. Stereotactic breast irradiation with kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine, using Monte Carlo simulation and a realistic patient model, the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions when breast tumors are irradiated using small-field stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with kilovoltage x-ray beams instead of the standard megavoltage energies currently in use. The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) female phantom was used to model a pair of small-field SBRT breast treatments: in one treatment the tumor at depth and another one with the tumor located close to the breast surface. Each treatment consisted of 300 circular beams aimed at the tumor from a plurality of positions. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose distribution for each beam and subsequently an optimization algorithm determined each beam weight according to a set of prescription goals. Both kilo- and megavoltage beam treatments were modeled, the latter to be used as a reference. Cumulative dose-volume histograms for eleven structures were used to compare the kilovoltage and reference treatments. Integral dose values are also reported. Absorbed dose distributions for the target volumes as well as the organs at risk were within the parameters reported in a clinical trial for both treatments. While for the ipsilateral healthy breast tissue the megavoltage treatment does offer an advantage in terms of less volume irradiated to intermediate doses, for the contralateral structures, breast and lung, the low penetration ability of the kilovoltage treatment results in a lower maximum dose. Skin dose is higher for the kilovoltage treatment but still well within the tolerance limits reported in the clinical trial.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  9. The use of spine stereotactic radiosurgery for oligometastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer C; Tang, Chad; Deegan, Brian J; Allen, Pamela K; Jonasch, Eric; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors investigated the outcomes following spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) for patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine. METHODS The study was a secondary analysis of 38 of 209 patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional Phase I/II prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011. Of these 38 patients, 33 (87%) were treated for a solitary spine metastasis, with no other history of metastatic disease. SSRS was prescribed to 24 Gy in 1 fraction (8%), 18 Gy in 1 fraction (18%), 16 Gy in 1 fraction (11%), 27 Gy in 3 fractions (53%), 30 Gy in 5 fractions (8%), or 20 Gy in 5 fractions (3%). Seventeen patients (45%) received prior conventional external beam radiation therapy. RESULTS The median overall survival (OS) was 75.7 months, and the 2- and 5-year OS rates were 84% and 60%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients who had prior spine surgery and a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score had an improved OS (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.52, p < 0.01, and HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13%-0.84%, p = 0.02, respectively), and those who had undergone prior radiation therapy had a worse OS (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2%-10%, p = 0.02). The 1-, 2-, and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 85%, 82%, and 78%, respectively. The median time to systemic therapy modification was 41 months. Two patients (5%) experienced late Grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS Patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine treated with SSRS can experience long-term survival and a long time before needing a modification in systemic therapy. In addition, SSRS leads to excellent local control and minimal late toxicity. PMID:27035507

  10. Interobserver delineation variation in lung tumour stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Persson, G F; Nygaard, D E; Hollensen, C; Munck af Rosenschöld, P; Mouritsen, L S; Due, A K; Berthelsen, A K; Nyman, J; Markova, E; Roed, A P; Roed, H; Korreman, S; Specht, L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In radiotherapy, delineation uncertainties are important as they contribute to systematic errors and can lead to geographical miss of the target. For margin computation, standard deviations (SDs) of all uncertainties must be included as SDs. The aim of this study was to quantify the interobserver delineation variation for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung tumours using a cross-sectional study design. Methods 22 consecutive patients with 26 tumours were included. Positron emission tomography/CT scans were acquired for planning of SBRT. Three oncologists and three radiologists independently delineated the gross tumour volume. The interobserver variation was calculated as a mean of multiple SDs of distances to a reference contour, and calculated for the transversal plane (SDtrans) and craniocaudal (CC) direction (SDcc) separately. Concordance indexes and volume deviations were also calculated. Results Median tumour volume was 13.0 cm3, ranging from 0.3 to 60.4 cm3. The mean SDtrans was 0.15 cm (SD 0.08 cm) and the overall mean SDcc was 0.26 cm (SD 0.15 cm). Tumours with pleural contact had a significantly larger SDtrans than tumours surrounded by lung tissue. Conclusions The interobserver delineation variation was very small in this systematic cross-sectional analysis, although significantly larger in the CC direction than in the transversal plane, stressing that anisotropic margins should be applied. This study is the first to make a systematic cross-sectional analysis of delineation variation for peripheral lung tumours referred for SBRT, establishing the evidence that interobserver variation is very small for these tumours. PMID:22919015

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Treatment of Adrenal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Sheema; Chen, Yuhchyau; Katz, Alan W.; Muhs, Ann G.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and outcomes of patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases to the adrenal glands. Methods and Materials: At University of Rochester, patients have been undergoing SBRT for limited metastases since 2001. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients who had undergone SBRT for adrenal metastases from various primary sites, including lung (n = 20), liver (n = 3), breast (n = 3), melanoma (n = 1), pancreas (n = 1), head and neck (n = 1), and unknown primary (n = 1). Results: Of the 30 patients, 14 with five or fewer metastatic lesions (including adrenal) underwent SBRT, with the intent of controlling all known sites of metastatic disease, and 16 underwent SBRT for palliation or prophylactic palliation of bulky adrenal metastases. The prescribed dose ranged from 16 Gy in 4 fractions to 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The median dose was 40 Gy. Of the 30 patients, 24 had >3 months of follow-up with serial computed tomography. Of these 24 patients, 1 achieved a complete response, 15 achieved a partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 4 developed progressive disease. No patient developed symptomatic progression of their adrenal metastases. The 1-year survival, local control, and distant control rate was 44%, 55%, and 13%, respectively. No patient developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: SBRT for adrenal metastases is well tolerated. Most patients developed widespread metastases shortly after treatment. Local control was poor, although this was a patient population selected for adverse risk factors, such as bulky disease. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of SBRT for oligometastatic adrenal metastases, given the propensity of these patients to develop further disease progression.

  12. [FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY: A GAME CHANGER FOR NEUROSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nissim, Ouzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The article by Dr. Cohen-Inbar published in this issue of Harefuah is a timely review that brings to the general medical community the recent important developments in the field of radiosurgery--the evolution of multi-session radiosurgery [or "FSR", standing for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation]. Radiosurgery and FSR continue to have a tremendous impact on modern neurosurgery. Sharing sub-millimetric accuracy in radiation delivery made possible by real-time-imaging positioning, frameless single and multisession radiosurgery have become two faces of a therapeutic technique with wide application in the field of intracranial pathology. Blending dose fractionation with delivery precision, FSR is a hybrid tool that can be implemented safely and effectively for practically any intra-cranial pathology without restrictions of volume or location. Dr. Cohen Inbar reviews the available data regarding doses, fractionation schemes, and results for the different pathologies in which FSR is being increasingly applied. FSR, as single-dose radiosurgery since the late 1980s, has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Radical microsorgical tumor removal at any cost in demanding intracranial locations has been replaced by upfront conservative volume-reduction surgery, leaving the more complicated part of those tumors to safer elimination by precise irradiation in single or multiple sessions. In Israel, further to the first unit operative since 1993 at the Sheba Medical Center, 3 new active LINAC based treatment sites have been added in recent years, with facilities either planned or under construction in the remaining major medical centers with neurosurgical and radiotherapy resources. They are evidence of the central role this modality has captured in the management of intracranial pathology. PMID:27526561

  13. Organizing pneumonia after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of the lung

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Organizing pneumonia (OP), so called bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer has been often reported. There is little information about OP after other radiation modalities. This cohort study investigated the clinical features and risk factors of OP after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of the lung (SABR). Methods Patients undergoing SABR between 2004 and 2010 in two institutions were investigated. Blood test and chest computed tomography were performed at intervals of 1 to 3 months after SABR. The criteria for diagnosing OP were: 1) mixture of patchy and ground-glass opacity, 2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for at least 2 weeks, 3) radiographic lesion in the lung volume receiving < 0.5 Gy, and 4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results Among 189 patients (164 with stage I lung cancer and 25 with single lung metastasis) analyzed, nine developed OP. The incidence at 2 years was 5.2% (95% confidence interval; 2.6-9.3%). Dyspnea were observed in all patients. Four had fever. These symptoms and pulmonary infiltration rapidly improved after corticosteroid therapy. Eight patients had presented with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) around the tumor 2 to 7 months before OP. The prior RP history was strongly associated with OP (hazard ratio 61.7; p = 0.0028) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions This is the first report on OP after SABR. The incidence appeared to be relatively high. The symptoms were sometimes severe, but corticosteroid therapy was effective. When patients after SABR present with unusual pneumonia, OP should be considered as a differential diagnosis, especially in patients with prior symptomatic RP. PMID:22853821

  14. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  15. MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for 100 hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Shigeki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Sonoda, Masaki; Akazawa, Kohei

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to elucidate the invasiveness, effectiveness, and feasibility of MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (SRT) for hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). METHODS The authors examined the clinical records of 100 consecutive patients (66 male and 34 female) with intractable gelastic seizures (GS) caused by HH, who underwent SRT as a sole surgical treatment between 1997 and 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 3 years (range 1-17 years). Seventy cases involved pediatric patients. Ninety percent of patients also had other types of seizures (non-GS). The maximum diameter of the HHs ranged from 5 to 80 mm (median 15 mm), and 15 of the tumors were giant HHs with a diameter of 30 mm or more. Comorbidities included precocious puberty (33.0%), behavioral disorder (49.0%), and mental retardation (50.0%). RESULTS A total of 140 SRT procedures were performed. There was no adaptive restriction for the giant or the subtype of HH, regardless of any prior history of surgical treatment or comorbidities. Patients in this case series exhibited delayed precocious puberty (9.0%), pituitary dysfunction (2.0%), and weight gain (7.0%), besides the transient hypothalamic symptoms after SRT. Freedom from GS was achieved in 86.0% of patients, freedom from other types of seizures in 78.9%, and freedom from all seizures in 71.0%. Repeat surgeries were not effective for non-GS. Seizure freedom led to disappearance of behavioral disorders and to intellectual improvement. CONCLUSIONS The present SRT procedure is a minimally invasive and highly effective surgical procedure without adaptive limitations. SRT involves only a single surgical procedure appropriate for all forms of epileptogenic HH and should be considered in patients with an early history of GS. PMID:26587652

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  17. PET-directed, 3D Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Nieh, Peter T; Schuster, David M; Master, Viraj A

    2013-01-01

    Multimodatity imaging is a promising approach for improving prostate cancer detection and diagnosis. This article describes various concepts in PET-directed, ultrasound-guided biopsies and highlights a new PET/ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy system for prostate cancer detection. PMID:25392702

  18. Diagnosis of sarcoidosis by lip biopsy of minor salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Hyman; Anderson, Larry G.; Rosenberg, Earle H.; Sheffer, Albert L.

    1974-01-01

    In two patients with bilateral parotid gland swelling of unknown etiology the diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established by lip biopsy of the minor salivary glands. This simple, innocuous biopsy procedure may prove useful in tissue documentation of sarcoidosis. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4442017

  19. Diffuse reflectance imaging: a tool for guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Subhash, Narayanan; Manju, Stephen; Nisha, Unni G.; Beena, Valappil T.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of premalignant or malignant oral lesions depends on the quality of the biopsy, adequate clinical information and correct interpretation of the biopsy results. The major clinical challenge is to precisely locate the biopsy site in a clinically suspicious lesion. Dips due to oxygenated hemoglobin absorption have been noticed at 545 and 575 nm in the diffusely reflected white light spectra of oral mucosa and the intensity ratio R545/R575 has been found suited for early detection of oral pre-cancers. A multi-spectral diffuse reflectance (DR) imaging system has been developed consisting of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera and a liquid crystal tunable filter for guiding the clinician to an optimal biopsy site. Towards this DR images were recorded from 27 patients with potentially malignant lesions on their tongue (dorsal, lateral and ventral sides) and from 44 healthy controls at 545 and 575 nm with the DR imaging system. False colored ratio image R545/R575 of the lesion provides a visual discerning capability that helps in locating the most malignant site for biopsy. Histopathological report of guided biopsy showed that out of the 27 patients 16 were cancers, 9 pre-cancers and 2 lichen planus. In this clinical trial DR imaging has correctly guided 25 biopsy sites, yielding a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 98%, thereby establishing the potential of DR imaging as a tool for guided biopsy.

  20. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  1. My approach to the interpretation of endometrial biopsies and curettings

    PubMed Central

    McCluggage, W G

    2006-01-01

    A major proportion of the workload in many histopathology laboratories is accounted for by endometrial biopsies, either curettage specimens or outpatient biopsy specimens. The increasing use of pipelle and other methods of biopsy not necessitating general anaesthesia has resulted in greater numbers of specimens with scant tissue, resulting in problems in assessing adequacy and in interpreting artefactual changes, some of which appear more common with outpatient biopsies. In this review, the criteria for adequacy and common artefacts in endometrial biopsies, as well as the interpretation of endometrial biopsies in general, are discussed, concentrating on areas that cause problems for pathologists. An adequate clinical history, including knowledge of the age, menstrual history and menopausal status, and information on the use of exogenous hormones and tamoxifen, is necessary for the pathologist to critically evaluate endometrial biopsies. Topics such as endometritis, endometrial polyps, changes that are induced by hormones and tamoxifen within the endometrium, endometrial metaplasias and hyperplasias, atypical polypoid adenomyoma, adenofibroma, adenosarcoma, histological types of endometrial carcinoma and grading of endometrial carcinomas are discussed with regard to endometrial biopsy specimens rather than hysterectomy specimens. The value of ancillary techniques, especially immunohistochemistry, is discussed where appropriate. PMID:16873562

  2. Percutaneous lung biopsy in the horse: comparison of two instruments and repeated biopsy in horses with induced acute interstitial pneumopathy.

    PubMed

    Venner, M; Schmidbauer, S; Drommer, W; Deegen, E

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study reported here was to compare complications of lung biopsy in horses and the quality of the lung specimens after biopsy using the manual Tru-Cut biopsy needle (TC) and an automated biopsy needle (ABN). For experiment 1, lung biopsy was performed in 50 horses with one instrument on one side of the thorax, and then with the other instrument on the other side. Postmortem examination was performed in 20 of the 50 horses. Coughing was detected in 10 of 50 horses and epistaxis was observed in 6 of the 50 horses. Endoscopy revealed bleeding into the airways in 16 of 49 horses and in 5 of 49 horses after biopsy with the TC or the ABN, respectively. Use of the ABN induced a significantly smaller amount of bleeding. Pneumothorax was detected by radiography in 1 of 50 horses. Hematoma diameter determined in 7 of 20 horses at postmortem examination, was significantly larger after biopsy with the TC than with the ABN. The quality of the lung specimen was good. In experiment 2, complications after repeated and multiple lung biopsies in 6 horses were evaluated. Moderate epistaxis was observed on 13 of 104 occasions. Bleeding into the airways was detected at endoscopy on 41 of 104 occasions, and pneumothorax was detected during 4 of 104 occasions. Complications such as hematoma at the biopsy site and bleeding into the airways were greater after biopsy with the TC than after use of the ABN. Lung biopsy specimens obtained with the ABN were fairly safe for the animal.

  3. Recent advances in image-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna M; Elbuluk, Osama; Mertan, Francesca; Sankineni, Sandeep; Margolis, Daniel J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in the United States that results in over 30,000 deaths per year. The current state of prostate cancer diagnosis, based on PSA screening and sextant biopsy, has been criticized for both overdiagnosis of low-grade tumors and underdiagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers (Gleason score ≥7). Recently, image guidance has been added to perform targeted biopsies of lesions detected on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scans. These methods have improved the ability to detect clinically significant cancer, while reducing the diagnosis of low-grade tumors. Several approaches have been explored to improve the accuracy of image-guided targeted prostate biopsy, including in-bore MRI-guided, cognitive fusion, and MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. This review will examine recent advances in these image-guided targeted prostate biopsy techniques. PMID:25596716

  4. The global burden of major infectious complications following prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H Y; Roberts, M J; Doi, S A R; Gardiner, R A

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic review providing estimates of the overall and regional burden of infectious complications following prostate biopsy. A directly standardized prevalence estimate was used because it reflects the burden of disease more explicitly. Complications included sepsis, hospitalization, bacteraemia, bacteriuria, and acute urinary retention after biopsy. There were 165 articles, comprising 162 577 patients, included in the final analysis. Our findings demonstrate that transrectal biopsy was associated with a higher burden of hospitalization (1·1% vs. 0·9%) and sepsis (0·8% vs. 0·1%) compared to transperineal biopsy, while acute urinary retention was more prevalent after transperineal than transrectal biopsy (4·2% vs. 0·9%). The differences were statistically non-significant because of large heterogeneity across countries. We also demonstrate and discuss regional variations in complication rates, with Asian studies reporting higher rates of sepsis and hospitalization.

  5. Aspiration biopsy of testis: another method for histologic examination

    SciTech Connect

    Nseyo, U.O.; Englander, L.S.; Huben, R.P.; Pontes, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The most important method for evaluating the pathogenesis of male infertility is open testicular biopsy. Herein the authors describe a method of aspiration biopsy of testis for histologic examination. Sexually mature dogs and rats treated with chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation were followed with periodic testicular aspiration biopsy during and after treatment. The histologic findings from the aspiration biopsy compare with the results of routine histologic examination in assessing spermatogenetic activity and delineating pathologic changes. The puncture in the experimental animals was performed under general anesthesia. In human patients testicular biopsy could be done under local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic. The procedure would be less painful, minimally invasive, and more cost-effective.

  6. CT-directed robotic biopsy testbed: motivation and concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Stoianovici, Dan S.; Glossop, Neil D.; Gary, Kevin A.; Onda, Sumiyo; Cody, Richard; Lindisch, David; Stanimir, Alexandru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Patriciu, Alexandru; Watson, Vance; Levy, Elliot

    2001-05-01

    As a demonstration platform, we are developing a robotic biopsy testbed incorporating a mobile CT scanner, a small needle driver robot, and an optical localizer. This testbed will be used to compare robotically assisted biopsy to the current manual technique, and allow us to investigate software architectures for integrating multiple medical devices. This is a collaboration between engineers and physicians from three universities and a commercial vendor. In this paper we describe the CT-directed biopsy technique, review some other biopsy systems including passive and semi- autonomous devices, describe our testbed components, and present our software architecture. This testbed is a first step in developing the image-guided, robotically assisted, physician directed, biopsy systems of the future.

  7. Patient information preferences and behaviour in relation to oral biopsies.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, P; Camacho-Alonso, F; Sanchez-Siles, M

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to study the impact of information on the behaviour of patients who were to have an oral biopsy specimen taken. Patients were randomly assigned either to be given the basic information about oral biopsy or a more extensive amount of information. The Krantz Health Opinion Survey was used as a measure of preferences in decisions made about oral biopsy, and we used a questionnaire to assess anxiety. A total of 260 patients were studied. The participants were satisfied with the information provided (both form and content), but significantly more of those given basic information would have liked to know more (p=0.02). We conclude that information exerts a clear effect on patients' attitude to oral biopsy. Provision of preoperative information leads to significantly less anxiety in all patients having a procedure under local anaesthesia. The results emphasise that patients need to be adequately informed about oral biopsy.

  8. The global burden of major infectious complications following prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H Y; Roberts, M J; Doi, S A R; Gardiner, R A

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic review providing estimates of the overall and regional burden of infectious complications following prostate biopsy. A directly standardized prevalence estimate was used because it reflects the burden of disease more explicitly. Complications included sepsis, hospitalization, bacteraemia, bacteriuria, and acute urinary retention after biopsy. There were 165 articles, comprising 162 577 patients, included in the final analysis. Our findings demonstrate that transrectal biopsy was associated with a higher burden of hospitalization (1·1% vs. 0·9%) and sepsis (0·8% vs. 0·1%) compared to transperineal biopsy, while acute urinary retention was more prevalent after transperineal than transrectal biopsy (4·2% vs. 0·9%). The differences were statistically non-significant because of large heterogeneity across countries. We also demonstrate and discuss regional variations in complication rates, with Asian studies reporting higher rates of sepsis and hospitalization. PMID:26645476

  9. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-11-16

    This invention relates to a microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures. The advantages include: minimal specimen handling; smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 {mu}m or greater); micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens; low cost; disposable; fabrication process which renders sterile parts; and ease of use. The cutter is a cheese-grater style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  10. Uncompacted myelin lamellae in peripheral nerve biopsy.

    PubMed

    Vital, Claude; Vital, Anne; Bouillot, Sandrine; Favereaux, Alexandre; Lagueny, Alain; Ferrer, Xavier; Brechenmacher, Christiane; Petry, Klaus G

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the authors have studied 49 peripheral nerve biopsies presenting uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML). Based on the ultrastructural pattern of UML they propose a 3-category classification. The first category includes cases displaying regular UML, which was observed in 43 cases; it was more frequent in 9 cases with polyneuropathy organomegaly endocrinopathy m-protein skin changes (POEMS) syndrome as well as in 1 case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B with a novel point mutation in the P0 gene. The second category consists of cases showing irregular UML, observed in 4 cases with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity. This group included 1 benign case and 3 B-cell malignant lymphomas. The third category is complex UML, which was present in 2 unrelated patients with an Arg 98 His missense mutation in the P0 protein gene. Irregular and complex UML are respectively related to MAG and P0, which play a crucial role in myelin lamellae compaction and adhesion.

  11. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Arda, I; Yildirim, S; Demirhan, B; Firat, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) is a routine diagnostic technique for evaluating thyroid nodules. Many reports in adults consider that FNA is superior to thyroid ultrasonography (USG) and radionuclide scanning (RS). Only five studies have been published on FNA of childhood thyroid nodules.
AIMS—To investigate the reliability of FNA in the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules, and compare the results of FNA, USG, and RS with regard to final histopathological diagnosis.
METHODS—FNA was performed in 46 children with thyroid nodules after USG and RS examination. We investigated the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of USG, RS, and FNA in their management.
RESULTS—Six patients who had malignant or suspicious cells on FNA examination underwent immediate surgery. The other 40 patients received medical treatment according to their hormonal status. Fifteen of these nodules either disappeared or decreased in number and/or size. Surgery was performed in 25 patients who did not respond to therapy. Statistical analysis revealed sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values respectively as follows: 60%, 59%, 59%, 15%, and 92% for USG; 30%, 42%, 39%, 12%, and 68% for SC; 100%, 95%, 95%, 67%, and 100% for FNAB.
CONCLUSION—FNAB is as reliable in children as in adults for definitive diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Using this technique avoids unnecessary thyroid surgery in children.

 PMID:11567941

  12. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  13. The role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours☆

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Historically, the biopsy of renal masses was not advocated, and to date there remains some controversy on the role of biopsy for renal masses in making treatment decisions. With the widespread use of imaging methods, the incidental diagnosis of renal masses has increased, necessitating renal biopsies to better plan the management of these tumours. Here I review previous reports to define the role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours. Methods Data were obtained from English-language studies listed in PubMed on the use of renal biopsy for evaluating incidental solid small renal tumours. Results The biopsy of small renal tumours is increasingly accepted due to: the increase in the incidence of small renal tumours; the finding that a significant number of these tumours are benign; the availability of new management options, such as ablative therapy and surveillance strategies; that imaging alone is unable to predict the biological behaviour of these tumours; and advances in the pathological evaluation of the biopsies. The biopsy procedure has an acceptable complication rate but is not free of limitations. The current recommendations for the use of renal biopsy in small renal tumours are: to help in differentiating benign from malignant renal tumours; before or during ablative therapies and during the follow-up after ablative therapies, for defining treatment success or failure; and to exclude nonrenal cell primary tumours (metastasis and lymphoma) or benign conditions (abscess), which may not require surgery. Conclusions The biopsy of small renal tumours is a safe and accurate procedure, and can help in the planning of definitive patient management. PMID:26579260

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery for non-functioning and secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is frequently employed in patients with residual or recurrent pituitary adenoma with excellent rates of tumor control and remission of hormonal hypersecretion. Advances in RT have improved with the use of stereotactic techniques either as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), all aiming to improve the dose distribution to the tumor while reducing the amount of normal brain receiving significant doses of radiation. We provide an overview of the recent published literature on the long-term efficacy and adverse effects of stereotactic irradiation in nonfunctioning and secreting pituitary adenomas. Both techniques are associated with excellent clinical outcomes; however, advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques in terms of local control, hormonal excess normalization, and radiation-induced toxicity remain a matter of debate. In clinical practice, single-fraction SRS may represent a convenient approach to patients with small and medium-sized pituitary adenoma away at least 2 mm from the optic chiasm, whereas FSRT is preferred over SRS for lesions >2.5-3 cm in size and/or involving the anterior optic pathway. PMID:27330422

  15. Lung stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastases: comparison of oligo-recurrence and sync-oligometastases†

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Katsui, Kuniaki; Jingu, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Terahara, Atsuro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Oligometastases can be divided into sync-oligometastases and oligo-recurrence. The difference is whether the primary site is uncontrolled or controlled. The goal of this multicenter study was to evaluate treatment outcomes and factors affecting survival after stereotactic body radiotherapy for pulmonary oligometastases. Methods The information after stereotactic body radiotherapy from January 2004 to April 2014 was retrospectively collected. Ninety-six patients (65 males, 31 females) were enrolled. Ten cases (10%) were sync-oligometastases, 79 cases (82%) were oligo-recurrences and 7 (7%) were unclassified oligometastases with <6 months of disease-free interval. The median disease-free interval between initial therapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy was 24 months. The median calculated biological effective dose was 105.6 Gy. Results The median follow-up period was 32 months for survivors. The 3-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were 53% and 32%, respectively. No Grade 5 toxicity occurred. The median overall survival was 23.9 months for sync-oligometastases and 66.6 months for oligo-recurrence (P = 0.0029). On multivariate analysis, sync-oligometastases and multiple oligometastatic tumors were significant unfavorable factors for both overall survival and relapse-free survival. Conclusions In stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic lung tumors, the state of oligo-recurrence has the potential of a significant prognostic factor for survival. PMID:27162324

  16. First clinical implementation of audiovisual biofeedback in liver cancer stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Regina; Martin, Darren; McLean, Lisa; Cho, Gwi; Hill, Robin; Pickard, Sheila; Aston, Paul; Huang, Chen‐Yu; Makhija, Kuldeep; O'Brien, Ricky; Keall, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary This case report details a clinical trial's first recruited liver cancer patient who underwent a course of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment utilising audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance. Breathing motion results for both abdominal wall motion and tumour motion are included. Patient 1 demonstrated improved breathing motion regularity with audiovisual biofeedback. A training effect was also observed. PMID:26247520

  17. Robot Assisted Stereotactic Laser Ablation for a Radiosurgery Resistant Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Vinita; Sather, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are benign tumors that can cause significant morbidity in adults as a cause of epilepsy, particularly gelastic seizures. Open and endoscopic resections of HH offer good seizure control but have high rates of morbidity and are technically challenging. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been an alternative treatment; however, it results in comparably poor seizure control. Recently, in children, stereotactic laser ablation has shown promise as a surgical technique that can combine the best features of both of these approaches for the treatment of HH. Here we present the first reported use of a frameless robot-assisted stereotactic system to treat an HH. The patient had failed two previous Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatments. Post-procedure he had a stable, but unintentional weight loss of 20 kg and a transient episode of hemiparesis the night of the operation. At six months postoperatively the patient remained seizure free. Stereotactic laser ablation may represent a new standard in the treatment of HH in adults, especially in those who have failed radiosurgery. Further study is warranted in this population to determine efficacy and safety profiles. PMID:27217984

  18. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  19. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  20. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  1. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  2. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  3. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  4. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  5. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  6. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  7. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  8. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  9. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... power or hydraulic backups with the unit off; (ii) Helmet microswitches; (iii) Emergency timing circuits... units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery...

  10. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; (7) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup battery power or hydraulic backups with the... radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic...

  11. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; (7) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup battery power or hydraulic backups with the... radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic...

  12. The Mathematics of Three N-Localizers Used Together for Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-localizer enjoys widespread use in image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery and radiosurgery. This article derives the mathematical equations that are used with three N-localizers and provides analogies, explanations, and appendices in order to promote a deeper understanding of the mathematical principles that govern the N-localizer. PMID:26594605

  13. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.615 Safety precautions for remote afterloader...

  14. Internal movement, set-up accuracy and margins for stereotactic body radiotherapy using a stereotactic body frame.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders T; Petersen, Jørgen B; Høyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the uncertainty of patient immobilization within the Elekta body frame (SBF) used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to suggest margins sufficient to ensure dose coverage to the gross target volume (GTV). The study was based on the evaluation of repeated CT-scans of 30 patients treated by SBRT. The overall uncertainty was divided between uncertainty related to internal movement of the tumor and uncertainty in the patient set-up. Standard deviations of the overall tumor displacement were 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm in medial-lateral (m-l), anterior-posterior (a-p), and cranio-caudal (c-c) directions, respectively. In a model based on the data, an ellipsoid planned target volume (PTV) corresponding to the standard deviations in the orthogonal directions and a scaling factor, K defined a 3-dimentional (3-D) probability density. According to the model, a 90% probability of full dose coverage of the GTV was secured using margins of 9 mm (m-l), 9 mm (a-p) and 13 mm (c-c), respectively. The overall uncertainty was dominated by internal tumor movements whereas the set-up uncertainty of the patient in the SBF was less pronounced. It was concluded that the Elekta SBF is useful for immobilisation of patients for SBRT. However, due to internal movement conventional margins of 5 mm in m-l and a-p and 10 mm in the c-c directions may be insufficient for full dose coverage. PMID:16982562

  15. INTER- AND INTRAFRACTION MOTION FOR STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY IN DOGS AND CATS USING A MODIFIED BRAINLAB FRAMELESS STEREOTACTIC MASK SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Sonja; Zwingenberger, Allison; Hansen, Katherine; Pfeiffer, Isabella; Théon, Alain; Kent, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate patient positioning is necessary when doing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to ensure adequate dosing to the tumor and sparing of normal tissues. This prospective cross-sectional study aimed to assess feasibility of a commercially available modified frameless SRS positioning system for use in veterinary radiotherapy patients with brain tumors. Fifty-one dogs and 12 cats were enrolled. Baseline and verification CT images were acquired. The verification CT images from 32 dogs and five cats had sufficient images for fusion to baseline CT images. A rigid box-based fusion was performed to determine interfraction motion. Forty-eight dogs and 11 cats were assessed for intrafraction motion by cine CT. Seventy percent of dogs and 60% of cats had interfraction 3D vector translational shifts >1 mm, with mean values of 1.9 mm in dogs, and 1.8 mm in cats. In dogs muscle wasting was weakly correlated with translational shifts. The maximum angular interfraction motion observed was 6.3° (roll), 3.5° (pitch), and 3.3° (yaw). There was no correlation between angular interfraction motion and weight, brachycephaly, or muscle wasting. Fifty-seven percent of dogs and 50% of cats had respiration-related intrafraction motion. Of these, 4.5% of dogs and 10% of cats had intrafraction motion >1 mm. This study demonstrates the modified Brainlab system is feasible for SRS in dogs and cats. The smaller cranial size and difference in anatomy increases setup uncertainty in some animals beyond limits usually accepted in SRS. Image-guided positioning is recommended to achieve clinically acceptable setup accuracy (<1 mm) for SRS. PMID:26118737

  16. [The repeated biopsy in patients with lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Subils, Gisella; Alba, Paula; Gobbi, Carla; Astesana, Pablo; Babini, Alejandra; Albiero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively studied patients with SLE according to ACR criteria, with NL who underwent a repeat renal biopsy from 2005 to 2012. We analyzed the main indications of renal biopsies, the histopathological Class and activity and chronicity changes. RESULTS The total number of patients with NL was 120, of which 18 (15%) patients underwent repeat renal biopsy, 18 had 2 renal biopsies and 6 had 3 biopsies. 3 (16.7%) patients were smokers; 1 (5.6%) had a history of previous DBT, 2 (11.1%) had a history of hypertension; and 3 (16.7%) patients had previous obesity. The duration of SLE was 15 ± 96 months; the time between the 1st and the 2nd biopsy was 45 ± 11 months and the time between the 2nd and 3rd biopsy was 56 ± 12 months. Indications for repeat biopsy were proteinuria in 10 biopsies (41.6%); proteinuria with impaired renal function in 2 biopsies (8.3%); proteinuria with pathological urine sediment in 8 (33.3%); . and pathological proteinuria with pathological urine sediment and impaired renal function in 4 biopsies (16.6%) The most frequent histological changes found between first and repeat biopsies were class IV to class III: 2 (8.2%) ; Class IV to Class IV: 8 (33.3%), class IV to class III + V: 2 (8.2%); class IV to class IV + V 3 (12.5%); class IV to class V: 2 (8.2%). Changes in NL biopsies with proliferative activity and chronicity indices (A / C) were: A to A / C: 7 (29.1%), A / C to A / C: 7 (29.1%). The immunosuppressive therapy was increased in 79.1% and 16.6% remained without changes. 20% patients received cyclophosphamide 1 g every 30 days, 26% Cyclophosphamide 500 mg every 15 days, 23% induction therapy with mycophenolate mofetil; 23% with Rituximab; 8% Cyclosporin A. Maintenance therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was performed in 87.5%; azathioprine in 1 case. Hydroxychloroquine was used in all cases.

  17. Outcomes of treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery or proton beam therapy for choroidal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sikuade, M J; Salvi, S; Rundle, P A; Errington, D G; Kacperek, A; Rennie, I G

    2015-01-01

    Aim To present our experience of the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and proton beam therapy to treat posterior uveal melanoma over a 10 year period. Methods and materials Case notes of patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or Proton beam therapy (PBT) for posterior uveal melanoma were reviewed. Data collected included visual acuity at presentation and final review, local control rates, globe retention and complications. We analysed post-operative visual outcomes and if visual outcomes varied with proximity to the optic nerve or fovea. Results 191 patients were included in the study; 85 and 106 patients received Stereotactic radiosurgery and Proton beam therapy, respectively. Mean follow up period was 39 months in the SRS group and 34 months in the PBT group. Both treatments achieved excellent local control rates with eye retention in 98% of the SRS group and 95% in the PBT group. The stereotactic radiosurgery group showed a poorer visual prognosis with 65% losing more than 3 lines of Snellen acuity compared to 45% in the PBT group. 33% of the SRS group and 54% of proton beam patients had a visual acuity of 6/60 or better. Conclusions Stereotactic radiosurgery and proton beam therapy are effective treatments for larger choroidal melanomas or tumours unsuitable for plaque radiotherapy. Our results suggest that patients treated with proton beam therapy retain better vision post-operatively; however, possible confounding factors include age, tumour location and systemic co-morbidities. These factors as well as the patient's preference should be considered when deciding between these two therapies. PMID:26160531

  18. The Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Burr Hole Technique for Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Urasaki, Eiichirou; Umeno, Tetsuya; Sakai, Waka; Nagaishi, Akiko; Nakane, Shunya; Fukudome, Takayasu; Yamakawa, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is performed by burr hole surgery. In microelectrode recording by multi-channel parallel probe, because all microelectrodes do not always fit in the burr hole, additional drilling to enlarge the hole is occasionally required, which is time consuming and more invasive. We report a stereotactic burr hole technique to avoid additional drilling, and the efficacy of this novel technique compared with the conventional procedure. Ten patients (20 burr holes) that received DBS were retrospectively analyzed (5 in the conventional burr hole group and 5 in the stereotactic burr hole group). In the stereotactic burr hole technique, the combination of the instrument stop slide of a Leksell frame and the Midas Rex perforator with a 14-mm perforator bit was attached to the instrument carrier slide of the arc in order to trephine under stereoguidance. The efficacy of this technique was assessed by the number of additional drillings. Factors associated with additional drilling were investigated including the angle and skull thickness around the entry points. Four of the 10 burr holes required additional drilling in the conventional burr hole group, whereas no additional drilling was required in the stereotactic burr hole group (p = 0.043). The thicknesses in the additional drilling group were 10.9 ± 0.9 mm compared to 9.1 ± 1.2 mm (p = 0.029) in the non-additional drilling group. There were no differences in the angles between the two groups. The stereotactic burr hole technique contributes to safe and exact DBS, particularly in patients with thick skulls. PMID:26345669

  19. The Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Burr Hole Technique for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    TOYODA, Keisuke; URASAKI, Eiichirou; UMENO, Tetsuya; SAKAI, Waka; NAGAISHI, Akiko; NAKANE, Shunya; FUKUDOME, Takayasu; YAMAKAWA, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is performed by burr hole surgery. In microelectrode recording by multi-channel parallel probe, because all microelectrodes do not always fit in the burr hole, additional drilling to enlarge the hole is occasionally required, which is time consuming and more invasive. We report a stereotactic burr hole technique to avoid additional drilling, and the efficacy of this novel technique compared with the conventional procedure. Ten patients (20 burr holes) that received DBS were retrospectively analyzed (5 in the conventional burr hole group and 5 in the stereotactic burr hole group). In the stereotactic burr hole technique, the combination of the instrument stop slide of a Leksell frame and the Midas Rex perforator with a 14-mm perforator bit was attached to the instrument carrier slide of the arc in order to trephine under stereoguidance. The efficacy of this technique was assessed by the number of additional drillings. Factors associated with additional drilling were investigated including the angle and skull thickness around the entry points. Four of the 10 burr holes required additional drilling in the conventional burr hole group, whereas no additional drilling was required in the stereotactic burr hole group (p = 0.043). The thicknesses in the additional drilling group were 10.9 ± 0.9 mm compared to 9.1 ± 1.2 mm (p = 0.029) in the non-additional drilling group. There were no differences in the angles between the two groups. The stereotactic burr hole technique contributes to safe and exact DBS, particularly in patients with thick skulls. PMID:26345669

  20. Microbiological diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis: relevance of second percutaneous biopsy following initial negative biopsy and limited yield of post-biopsy blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Gras, G; Buzele, R; Parienti, J J; Debiais, F; Dinh, A; Dupon, M; Roblot, F; Mulleman, D; Marcelli, C; Michon, J; Bernard, L

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiological diagnosis yield of post-biopsy blood cultures (PBBCs) and second percutaneous needle biopsy (PNB) following an initial negative biopsy in vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) without bacteremia. A retrospective multicenter study was performed. Patients with VO, pre-biopsy negative blood culture(s), ≥1 PNB, and ≥1 PBBC (0-4 h) were included. One hundred and sixty-nine PNBs (136 first and 33 following initial negative biopsy) were performed for 136 patients (median age = 58 years, sex ratio M/F = 1.9). First and second PNBs had a similar yield: 43.4 % (59/136) versus 39.4 % (13/33), respectively. Only two PBBCs (1.1 %) led to a microbiological diagnosis. The strategy with positive first PNB and second PNB following an initial negative result led to microbiological diagnosis in 79.6 % (74/93) of cases versus 44.1 % (60/136) for the strategy with only one biopsy. In the multivariate analysis, young age (odds ratio, OR [95 % confidence interval (CI)] = 0.98 [0.97; 0.99] per 1 year increase, p = 0.02) and >1 sample (OR = 2.4 ([1.3; 4.4], p = 0.007)) were independently associated with positive PNB. To optimize microbiological diagnosis in vertebral osteomyelitis, performing a second PNB (after an initial negative biopsy) could lead to a microbiological diagnosis in nearly 80 % of patients. PBBC appears to be limited in microbiological diagnosis.

  1. Renal biopsy practice: What is the gold standard?

    PubMed

    Brachemi, Soumeya; Bollée, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Renal biopsy (RB) is useful for diagnosis and therapy guidance of renal diseases but incurs a risk of bleeding complications of variable severity, from transitory haematuria or asymptomatic hematoma to life-threatening hemorrhage. Several risk factors for complications after RB have been identified, including high blood pressure, age, decreased renal function, obesity, anemia, low platelet count and hemostasis disorders. These should be carefully assessed and, whenever possible, corrected before the procedure. The incidence of serious complications has become low with the use of automated biopsy devices and ultrasound guidance, which is currently the "gold standard" procedure for percutaneous RB. An outpatient biopsy may be considered in a carefully selected population with no risk factor for bleeding. However, controversies persist on the duration of observation after biopsy, especially for native kidney biopsy. Transjugular RB and laparoscopic RB represent reliable alternatives to conventional percutaneous biopsy in patients at high risk of bleeding, although some factors limit their use. This aim of this review is to summarize the issues of complications after RB, assessment of hemorrhagic risk factors, optimal biopsy procedure and strategies aimed to minimize the risk of bleeding.

  2. Brain biopsy in neurologic decline of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Gardner, Tracie; Khanlou, Negar; Yong, William H; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V

    2015-04-01

    Brain biopsies have an uncertain role in the diagnosis of patients with dementia or neurologic decline of unknown etiology. They are often performed only after an exhaustive panel of less invasive tests and procedures have failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of brain biopsies in this patient group through the retrospective analysis of 53 brain biopsies performed for neurologic disease of unknown etiology at a single tertiary care institution between December 2001 and December 2011. Patients with known nonlymphomatous neoplasms thought to be associated with the neurologic symptoms or with immunodeficiency were excluded from the study. Furthermore, the clinical presentation, imaging and laboratory tests were compared between diagnostic groups to identify factors more likely to yield a diagnosis. Sixty percent of the biopsies were diagnostic (32 of 53), with the most common histologic diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma in 14 of 53 patients (26% of total) followed by infarct in four subjects (7.5%). A few patients were found to have rare and unsuspected diseases such as lymphomatosis cerebri, neurosarcoidosis and neuroaxonal leukodystrophy. Complications from biopsy were uncommon and included hemorrhage and infection with abscess formation at the biopsy site. These results suggest that brain biopsies may be useful in difficult cases in which less invasive measures have been unable to yield a definitive diagnosis.

  3. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  4. Neuropathological alterations in diabetic truncal neuropathy: evaluation by skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, G.; McArthur, J.; Hauer, P.; Griffin, J.; Cornblath, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features in skin biopsies from patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy.
METHODS—Three patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy underwent skin biopsies from both symptomatic and asymptomatic regions of the chest and trunk. After local anaesthesia, biopsies were performed using a 3 mm diameter punch device (Acupunch). Intraepidermal nerve fibres (IENFs), the most distal processes of small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, were identified after staining with PGP 9.5 as previously described.
RESULTS—Diabetes was diagnosed at the time of the neurological presentation in two, and one was a known diabetic patient. All three had associated sensory-motor polyneuropathy. In all, skin biopsies showed a marked reduction of both epidermal and dermal nerve fibres in the symptomatic dermatomes, compared with skin from asymptomatic truncal areas. In one patient, a follow up skin biopsy when symptoms had improved showed a return of IENFs.
CONCLUSIONS—In diabetic truncal neuropathy, skin biopsies from symptomatic regions show a loss of IENFs. After clinical recovery, there is a return of the IENF population, suggesting that improvement occurs by nerve regeneration. These findings suggest that sensory nerve fibre injury in diabetic truncal neuropathy is distal to or within the sensory ganglia. Skin biopsy provides a possible tool for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease.

 PMID:9810952

  5. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Andreas E.; Rosenberg, Robert; Wagler, Elke; Gretschel, Stephan; Sendler, Andreas; Siewert, Joerg-Ruediger; Nährig, Jörg; Witzigmann, Helmut; Hauss, Johann; Knorr, Christian; Dimmler, Arno; Gröne, Jörn; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Haier, Jörg; Herbst, Hermann; Tepel, Juergen; Siphos, Bence; Kleespies, Axel; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Horstmann, Olaf; Grützmann, Robert; Imdahl, Andreas; Svoboda, Daniel; Wittekind, Christian; Schneider, Wolfgang; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Schlag, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical impact of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in colon cancer is still controversial. The purpose of this prospective multicenter trial was to evaluate its clinical value to predict the nodal status and identify factors that influence these results. Methods: Colon cancer patients without prior colorectal surgery or irradiation were eligible. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) was identified intraoperatively by subserosal blue dye injection around the tumor. The SLN underwent step sections and immunohistochemistry (IHC), if classified free of metastases after routine hematoxylin and eosin examination. Results: At least one SLN (median, n = 2) was identified in 268 of 315 enrolled patients (detection rate, 85%). Center experience, lymphovascular invasion, body mass index (BMI), and learning curve were positively associated with the detection rate. The false-negative rate to identify pN+ patients by SLNB was 46% (38 of 82). BMI showed a significant association to the false-negative rate (P < 0.0001), the number of tumor-involved lymph nodes was inversely associated. If only slim patients (BMI ≤24) were investigated in experienced centers (>22 patients enrolled), the sensitivity increased to 88% (14 of 16). Moreover, 21% (30 of 141) of the patients, classified as pN0 by routine histopathology, revealed micrometastases or isolated tumor cells (MM/ITC) in the SLN. Conclusions: The contribution of SLNB to conventional nodal staging of colon cancer patients is still unspecified. Technical problems have to be resolved before a definite conclusion can be drawn in this regard. However, SLNB identifies about one fourth of stage II patients to reveal MM/ITC in lymph nodes. Further studies must clarify the clinical impact of these findings in terms of prognosis and the indication of adjuvant therapy. PMID:17522509

  6. Towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, Angela B.; Benson, Trevor M.; Sujecki, Slawomir; Abdel-Moneim, Nabil; Tang, Zhuoqi; Furniss, David; Sojka, Lukasz; Stone, Nick; Jayakrupakar, Nallala; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Lindsay, Ian; Ward, Jon; Farries, Mark; Moselund, Peter M.; Napier, Bruce; Lamrini, Samir; Møller, Uffe; Kubat, Irnis; Petersen, Christian R.; Bang, Ole

    2016-03-01

    We are establishing a new paradigm in mid-infrared molecular sensing, mapping and imaging to open up the midinfrared spectral region for in vivo (i.e. in person) medical diagnostics and surgery. Thus, we are working towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy (`opsy' look at, bio the biology) in situ in the body for real-time diagnosis. This new paradigm will be enabled through focused development of devices and systems which are robust, functionally designed, safe, compact and cost effective and are based on active and passive mid-infrared optical fibers. In particular, this will enable early diagnosis of external cancers, mid-infrared detection of cancer-margins during external surgery for precise removal of diseased tissue, in one go during the surgery, and mid-infrared endoscopy for early diagnosis of internal cancers and their precision removal. The mid-infrared spectral region has previously lacked portable, bright sources. We set a record in demonstrating extreme broad-band supercontinuum generated light 1.4 to 13.3 microns in a specially engineered, high numerical aperture mid-infrared optical fiber. The active mid-infrared fiber broadband supercontinuum for the first time offers the possibility of a bright mid-infrared wideband source in a portable package as a first step for medical fiber-based systems operating in the mid-infrared. Moreover, mid-infrared molecular mapping and imaging is potentially a disruptive technology to give improved monitoring of the environment, energy efficiency, security, agriculture and in manufacturing and chemical processing. This work is in part supported by the European Commission: Framework Seven (FP7) Large-Scale Integrated Project MINERVA: MId-to-NEaR- infrared spectroscopy for improVed medical diAgnostics (317803; www.minerva-project.eu).

  7. Does Prebiopsy, Nonsterile Ultrasonography Gel Affect Biopsy-Site Asepsis?

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, Kamil Karabay, Oguz; Gurel, Safiye; Hildebolt, Charles

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of nonsterile gel, prior to antiseptic procedures in ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous biopsies, results in contamination of the biopsy site. Materials and Methods. Patients referred for US-guided percutaneous biopsies were included in this study. Transmission material used for US evaluation before biopsy-site antiseptic procedures were performed was either nonsterile gel or sterile saline. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: nonsterile gel (n = 30) and sterile saline (n = 30). Before the transmission material was used and after antiseptic procedures were performed, microbial swabs of a 10-cm{sup 2}-diameter area were obtained at the biopsy site. Swabs were also obtained from the gel, saline, and povidine-iodine. Inoculated specimen plates were incubated at 37{sup o}C under aerobic conditions, and the numbers of colony-forming units recorded. Nominal logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds of postantisepsis bacterial growth (after antiseptic procedures were performed) based on group, gender, coincidental disease (diabetes, chronic renal failure, and malignancy), biopsy-site location (head and neck or breast and abdomen), and local factors (skin fold, skin tag, and hair). Results. The following odds ratios (adjusted for the other variables) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated: (1) group (2.9 [0.8-11.1]; p = 0.10); (2) gender (1.2 [0.3-5.2]; p = 0.78); (3) coincidental disease (7.6 [0.9-166.7]; p = 0.09); (4) biopsy site location (6.2 [1.4-31.3]; p = 0.02); and (5) local factors (7.0 [1.6-36.0]; p = 0.01). No bacterial growth occurred with swabs obtained from gel, povidine-iodine, or saline. Conclusion. We conclude that nonsterile gel used prior to percutaneous biopsy does not affect biopsy-site asepsis.

  8. Current indications for renal biopsy: a questionnaire-based survey.

    PubMed

    Fuiano, G; Mazza, G; Comi, N; Caglioti, A; De Nicola, L; Iodice, C; Andreucci, M; Andreucci, V E

    2000-03-01

    Indications for renal biopsy are still ill defined. We recently sent a detailed questionnaire to 360 nephrologists in different areas of the world with the aim of providing information on this critical issue by evaluating the replies. The questionnaire was organized in four sections that included questions on renal biopsy indications in patients with normal renal function, renal insufficiency, and a transplanted kidney. In addition, the questions included methods applied to each renal biopsy procedure and to specimen processing. We received 166 replies; North Europe (50 replies), South Europe (47 replies), North America (31 replies), Australia and New Zealand (24 replies), and other countries (14 replies). In patients with normal renal function, primary indications for renal biopsy were microhematuria associated with proteinuria, particularly greater than 1 g/d of protein. In chronic renal insufficiency, kidney dimension was the major parameter considered before renal biopsy, whereas the presence of diabetes or serological abnormalities was not considered critical. In the course of acute renal failure (ARF) of unknown origin, 20% of the respondents would perform renal biopsy in the early stages, 26% after 1 week of nonrecovery, and 40% after 4 weeks. In a transplanted kidney, the majority of nephrologists would perform a renal biopsy in the case of graft failure after surgery, ARF after initial good function, slow progressive deterioration of renal function, and onset of nephrotic proteinuria. The last section provided comprehensive information on the technical aspects of renal biopsy. This survey represents the first attempt to provide a reliable consensus that can be used in developing guidelines on the use of kidney biopsy. PMID:10692270

  9. Comparison of a new aspiration needle device and the Quick-Core biopsy needle for transjugular liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Togashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Kouji; Seki, Kei-ichi; Ohta, Hironobu; Yoshida, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Noriko; Kamimura, Tomoteru

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate sample adequacy, safety, and needle passes of a new biopsy needle device compared to the Quick-Core biopsy needle for transjugular liver biopsy in patients affected by liver disease. METHODS: Thirty consecutive liver-disease patients who had major coagulation abnormalities and/or relevant ascites underwent transjugular liver biopsy using either a new needle device (18 patients) or the Quick-Core biopsy needle (12 patients). The length of the specimens was measured before fixation. A pathologist reviewed the histological slides for sample adequacy and pathologic diagnoses. The two methods’ specimen adequacy and complication rates were assessed. RESULTS: Liver biopsies were technically successful in all 30 (100%) patients, with diagnostic histological core specimens obtained in 30 of 30 (100%) patients, for an overall success rate of 100%. With the new device, 18 specimens were obtained, with an average of 1.1 passes per patient. Using the Quick-Core biopsy needle, 12 specimens were obtained, with an average of 1.8 passes per patient. Specimen length was significantly longer with the new needle device than with the Quick-Core biopsy needle (P < 0.05). The biopsy tissue was not fragmented in any of the specimens with the new aspiration needle device, but tissue was fragmented in 3 of 12 (25.0%) specimens obtained using the Quick-Core biopsy needle. Complications included cardiac arrhythmia in 3 (10.0%) patients, and transient abdominal pain in 4 (13.3%) patients. There were no cases of subcapsular hematoma, hemoperitoneum, or sepsis, and there was no death secondary to the procedure. In particular, no early or delayed major procedure-related complications were observed in any patient. CONCLUSION: Transjugular liver biopsy is a safe and effective procedure, and there was significant difference in the adequacy of the specimens obtained using the new needle device compared to the Quick-Core biopsy needle. Using the new biopsy needle device, the

  10. Dosimetric measurements of Onyx embolization material for stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Donald A.; Balter, James M.; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J.; Pandey, Aditya S.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Arteriovenous malformations are often treated with a combination of embolization and stereotactic radiosurgery. Concern has been expressed in the past regarding the dosimetric properties of materials used in embolization and the effects that the introduction of these materials into the brain may have on the quality of the radiosurgery plan. To quantify these effects, the authors have taken large volumes of Onyx 34 and Onyx 18 (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer doped with tantalum) and measured the attenuation and interface effects of these embolization materials. Methods: The manufacturer provided large cured volumes ({approx}28 cc) of both Onyx materials. These samples were 8.5 cm in diameter with a nominal thickness of 5 mm. The samples were placed on a block tray above a stack of solid water with an Attix chamber at a depth of 5 cm within the stack. The Attix chamber was used to measure the attenuation. These measurements were made for both 6 and 16 MV beams. Placing the sample directly on the solid water stack and varying the thickness of solid water between the sample and the Attix chamber measured the interface effects. The computed tomography (CT) numbers for bulk material were measured in a phantom using a wide bore CT scanner. Results: The transmission through the Onyx materials relative to solid water was approximately 98% and 97% for 16 and 6 MV beams, respectively. The interface effect shows an enhancement of approximately 2% and 1% downstream for 16 and 6 MV beams. CT numbers of approximately 2600-3000 were measured for both materials, which corresponded to an apparent relative electron density (RED) {rho}{sub e}{sup w} to water of approximately 2.7-2.9 if calculated from the commissioning data of the CT scanner. Conclusions: We performed direct measurements of attenuation and interface effects of Onyx 34 and Onyx 18 embolization materials with large samples. The introduction of embolization materials affects the dose distribution of a MV

  11. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  12. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  13. Knowledge Modeling for the Outcome of Brain Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Jillian E.

    Purpose: To build a model that will predict the survival time for patients that were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases using support vector machine (SVM) regression. Methods and Materials: This study utilized data from 481 patients, which were equally divided into training and validation datasets randomly. The SVM model used a Gaussian RBF function, along with various parameters, such as the size of the epsilon insensitive region and the cost parameter (C) that are used to control the amount of error tolerated by the model. The predictor variables for the SVM model consisted of the actual survival time of the patient, the number of brain metastases, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores, prescription dose, and the largest planning target volume (PTV). The response of the model is the survival time of the patient. The resulting survival time predictions were analyzed against the actual survival times by single parameter classification and two-parameter classification. The predicted mean survival times within each classification were compared with the actual values to obtain the confidence interval associated with the model's predictions. In addition to visualizing the data on plots using the means and error bars, the correlation coefficients between the actual and predicted means of the survival times were calculated during each step of the classification. Results: The number of metastases and KPS scores, were consistently shown to be the strongest predictors in the single parameter classification, and were subsequently used as first classifiers in the two-parameter classification. When the survival times were analyzed with the number of metastases as the first classifier, the best correlation was obtained for patients with 3 metastases, while patients with 4 or 5 metastases had significantly worse results. When the KPS score was used as the first classifier, patients with a KPS score of 60 and

  14. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  15. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery to intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B A; Wazer, D E; Engler, M J; Tsai, J S; Ling, M N

    1998-01-01

    To compare the dosimetry achievable with an intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMR) system to that of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for an irregularly shaped moderate size target. A treatment plan was selected from 109 single fraction SRS cases having had multiple non-coplanar arc therapy using a 6 MV linear accelerator fitted with circular tertiary collimators 1.00 to 4.00 cm in diameter at isocenter. The CT scan with delineated regions of interest was then entered into an IMR treatment planning system and optimized dose distributions, using a back projection technique for dynamic multileaf collimator delivery, were generated with a stimulated annealing algorithm. Dose volume histograms (DVH), homogeneity indices (HI), conformity indices (CI), minimum and maximum doses to surrounding highly sensitive intracranial structures, as well as the volume of tissue treated to > 80, 50, and 20% of the prescription dose from the IMR plan were then compared to those from the single isocenter SRS plan used and a hypothetical three isocenter SRS plan. For an irregularly shaped target, the IMR plan produced a HI of 1.08 and CI of 1.50 compared to 1.75 and 4.41, respectively, for the single isocenter SRS plan (SRS1) and 3.33 and 3.43 for the triple isocenter SRS plan (SRS3). The maximum and minimum doses to surrounding critical structures were less with the IMR plan in comparison to both SRS plans. However, the volume of non-target tissue treated to > 80, 50, and 20% of the prescription dose with the IMR plan was 137, 170, and 163%, respectively, of that treated with the SRS1 plan and 85, 100, and 123% of the volume when compared to SRS3 plan. The IMR system provided more conformal target doses than were provided by the single isocenter or three isocenter SRS plans. IMR delivered less dose to critical normal tissues and provided increased homogeneity within the target volume for a moderate size irregularly shaped target, at the cost of a larger penumbra. PMID:9503486

  16. Reirradiation Human Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma, Lijun; Weinberg, Vivian; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chao, Sam; Chang, Ung-Kyu; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Angelov, Liliyanna; Chang, Eric L.; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Soltys, Scott G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Ryu, Sam; Gerszten, Peter C.; Fowler, Jack; Wong, C. Shun; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed the treatment for patients with spine metastases who initially received conventional external beam radiation (EBRT) and were reirradiated with 1-5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) who did or did not subsequently develop radiation myelopathy (RM). Methods and Materials: Spinal cord dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for 5 RM patients (5 spinal segments) and 14 no-RM patients (16 spine segments) were based on thecal sac contours at retreatment. Dose to a point within the thecal sac that receives the maximum dose (P{sub max}), and doses to 0.1-, 1.0-, and 2.0-cc volumes within the thecal sac were reviewed. The biologically effective doses (BED) using {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy for late spinal cord toxicity were calculated and normalized to a 2-Gy equivalent dose (nBED = Gy{sub 2/2}). Results: The initial conventional radiotherapy nBED ranged from {approx}30 to 50 Gy{sub 2/2} (median {approx}40 Gy{sub 2/2}). The SBRT reirradiation thecal sac mean P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 20.0 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8-29.2), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 67.4 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 51.0-83.9) in the RM group. The mean total P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 62.3 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 50.3-74.3), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 105.8 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 84.3-127.4) in the RM group. The fraction of the total P{sub max} nBED accounted for by the SBRT P{sub max} nBED for the RM patients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 and that for the no-RM patients ranged from 0.04 to 0.53. Conclusions: SBRT given at least 5 months after conventional palliative radiotherapy with a reirradiation thecal sac P{sub max} nBED of 20-25 Gy{sub 2/2} appears to be safe provided the total P{sub max} nBED does not exceed approximately 70 Gy{sub 2/2}, and the SBRT thecal sac P{sub max} nBED comprises no more than approximately 50% of the total nBED.

  17. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  18. ALK positivity on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Kate, Arvind H; Mehta, Deval; Dhabar, Boman N; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and around 75% to 80% of lung cancers are detected in advanced stage. Multiple genetic mutations are identified and reported in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Various pulmonary samples can be tested for molecular mutations in lung cancer. However, feasibility of molecular profiling of pleuroscopic pleural biopsies in lung adenocarcinoma is not reported. We describe a case of advanced adenocarcinoma of lung with positive anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase mutation on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy and improved with oral crizotinib. The current case highlights the feasibility of pleuroscopy.-guided pleural biopsies in molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27461706

  19. [A case of multiple intracranial tuberculoma diagnosed by open brain biopsy].

    PubMed

    Sakuma, R; Jin, K; Nagai, M; Kinpara, T; Shiga, Y; Fujihara, K; Itoyama, Y

    1997-10-01

    To provide histological diagnoses of brain diseases, CT-guided stereotactic brain biopsy (CT-SBB) has been widely used because of its less invasive technique compared with open brain biopsy (OBB). However, CT-SBB is not always diagnostic. We report a case of multiple intracranial tuberculoma whose diagnosis was not made by CT-SBB but by OBB. The patient is a 46-year-old man with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who had been receiving immunosuppressive agents (azathioprine, cyclosporin, and prednisolone) after renal transplantation for diabetic renal failure for 9 years. He gradually developed febrile, headache and unsteady gait. Brain MRI demonstrated multiple intracranial lesions involving left fronto-temporal and right parietal lobes, left cerebellar hemisphere, and the fourth ventricle. Although the MRI findings were consistent with those of previously reported cases of intracranial tuberculoma, other conditions, such as malignant lymphoma and toxoplasmosis, were not ruled out. Therefore, CT-SBB targeting the left temporal lobe lesion was done for definitive diagnosis, but it revealed only mild perivascular infiltration of mononuclear cells and hemorrhage. He was transferred to our clinic for further evaluation. On examination, mild truncal and limb ataxia on the left were noted in addition to the neurological findings corresponding to diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy. Despite vigorous laboratory examinations, including repeated bacterial cultures and PCR of cerebrospinal fluid, no evidence of tuberculous infection was obtained. A tentative diagnosis of multiple intracranial tuberculoma was made, and anti-tuberculous drugs (isoniazid 400 mg, ethambutol 750 mg, and pyrazinamide 1.5 g) were administered. Since his symptoms deteriorated because of ventricular dilatation resulting from the enlarged lesion in the fourth ventricle after a temporary clinical improvement, VP-shunting and OBB from the left temporal lobe lesion were done. The excised lesion was

  20. The diagnosis of cancer in thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy. Surgery, repeat biopsy or specimen consultation?

    PubMed

    Stanek-Widera, A; Biskup-Frużyńska, M; Zembala-Nożyńska, E; Śnietura, M; Lange, D

    2016-03-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) is the only diagnostic method that allows a preoperative diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma. An unequivocal diagnosis of a malignant change is achievable only in cases in which all cytological criteria of carcinoma are met. The aim of the study was to evaluate the necessity of repeat thyroid FNA in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma verified on consultative examination (CE). We analyzed cytology reports of thyroid FNA and CE that resulted in the diagnosis of papillary carcinoma. Evaluation of the correlation of the cytological diagnosis with the histopathology report was based on data obtained after the surgery. Between 2010 and 2015 in the Institute of Oncology (IO) there were 184 cancers diagnosed on CE or in thyroid FNA performed primarily in IO. Additionally, 74 patients were subjected to repeat biopsy after confirmation of cancer in CE. Histopathological diagnosis of cancer was obtained in 62 (100%) cases that were doubly confirmed with cytological examination. The remaining 12 patients were operated on outside the institute. From 110 FNA primarily performed in the IO, histopathological verification was achievable in 92 cases, from which 92 (100%) provided a confirmation of cancer, and the remaining 18 patients were operated on outside the institute. High (100%) specificity of cancer diagnosis in FNA established primarily and verified on CE (second independent assessment) indicates that repeat FNA in order to confirm the diagnosis is unnecessary. PMID:27179270

  1. Transfemoral liver biopsy using a Quick-Core biopsy needle system in living donor liver transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Fen Qiang; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yu, Eunsil

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle in select living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) recipients. Eight LDLT recipients underwent 9 transfemoral liver biopsy sessions. Six patients had undergone modified right lobe (mRL) LDLT, and 2 patients had undergone dual-left lobe LDLT. The indications for transfemoral liver biopsy were a hepatic vein (HV) at an acute angle to the inferior vena cava (IVC) on the coronal plane and a thin (<10-mm) liver parenchyma surrounding the HV to be biopsied on enhanced computed tomography. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the right inferior HV in the mRL or the left HV in the right-sided left lobe with a cranial orientation was negotiated with a 5-Fr catheter via the common femoral vein. Then, a stiffening cannula was introduced into the HV over a stiff guide wire. Needle passage was then performed with an 18- or 19-gauge Quick-Core biopsy needle. Technical success was achieved in all sessions without major complications. The median number of needle passages was 4 (range = 2-6). The median total length of obtained liver specimens in each session was 44 mm (range = 24-75 mm). The median number of portal tracts was 18 (range = 10-29), and the obtained liver specimens were adequate for histological diagnosis in all sessions. In conclusion, transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle is an effective and safe alternative for obtaining a liver specimen when standard transjugular liver biopsy is not feasible because of an unfavorable HV angle with respect to the IVC and/or a thin liver parenchyma surrounding the HV. PMID:24916429

  2. Stereotactic localization and removal of a bullet in the third ventricle causing obstructive hydrocephalus after a cerebral gunshot wound: case report.

    PubMed

    Linskey, M E; Kondziolka, D; Marion, D W

    1994-06-01

    A bullet, lodged in the pineal-posterior region of the third ventricle and causing obstructive hydrocephalus, was removed without damage to critical adjacent vascular structures using stereotactic localization followed by laser-guided stereotactic craniotomy. Stereotactic techniques provided precise target localization and allowed dissection to be restricted to the previously injured missile track, thus avoiding any additional morbidity from the surgical procedure. PMID:8015013

  3. Breast Biopsy: The Effects of Hypnosis and Music.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Arnoldo; Sánchez-Jáuregui, Teresa; Juárez-García, Dehisy M; García-Solís, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The authors evaluated the efficacies of audio-recorded hypnosis with background music and music without hypnosis in the reduction of emotional and physical disturbances in patients scheduled for breast biopsy in comparison with a control group. A total of 75 patients were randomly assigned to 3 different groups and evaluated at baseline and before and after breast biopsy using visual analog scales of stress, pain, depression, anxiety, fatigue, optimism, and general well-being. The results showed that, before breast biopsy, the music group presented less stress and anxiety, whereas the hypnosis with music group presented reduced stress, anxiety, and depression and increased optimism and general well-being. After the biopsy, the music group presented less anxiety and pain, whereas the hypnosis group showed less anxiety and increased optimism. PMID:27585728

  4. Drill biopsy in the diagnosis of lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Shatapathy, P; Sahoo, R C; Rao, K M; Krishnan, K V; Rau, P V; Padhee, A

    1987-11-01

    A high speed pneumatic drill was used to perform 190 percutaneous transthoracic biopsies in 161 patients. The resultant cores of tissue provided a definite diagnosis in 146 patients, giving a success rate of 90.7%. Complications occurred in 58 patients, subcutaneous emphysema being the most common, though only seven patients required active treatment, giving a rate of 3.7% for important complications. One patient died within 24 hours of the biopsy procedure owing to asphyxia resulting from aspiration of the contents of an acutely dilated stomach. Our experience clearly establishes that the drill biopsy as used by us is simple and safe and can be carried out in an outpatient department, yielding better overall results than any other procedure for closed biopsy of the lung currently practised.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systemic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUSBx) is the standard procedure for diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa), but reveals a limited accuracy for the detection of cancer. Currently, multiparametric MR imaging (mp-MRI) is increasingly regarded as a promising method to detect PCa with an excellent positive predictive value. The use of mp-MRI during a MRI-guided biopsy (MRGB) procedure improves the quality of a targeted biopsy. The aim of this article is to provide an overview about the MRGB technique for PCa detection, to review the accuracy and clinical indications of MRGB and discuss its current issues and further directions. A MRGB seems accurate and efficient for the detection of clinically significant PCa in men with previous negative TRUSBx. Moreover, it may decrease the detection of clinically insignificant cancers with fewer biopsy cores. PMID:25598677

  6. The disappearing clip: an unusual complication in MRI biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Peter, Prasant; Jose, Chaitra Lesli

    2014-01-01

    MRI-guided biopsies are being increasingly used for otherwise occult breast lesions. Clip migration has been reported however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no documented cases of entire disappearance of a marker clip. Absence of the postbiopsy marker clip was noted when our patient returned for preoperative hook-wire localisation even though accurate clip placement had been confirmed on the post-MRI biopsy mammogram. PMID:25139917

  7. Pericardial Tamponade Following CT-Guided Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Montgomery, Mark; Reiter, Charles G.; Culp, William C.

    2008-07-15

    While not free from hazards, CT-guided biopsy of the lung is a safe procedure, with few major complications. Despite its safety record, however, potentially fatal complications do rarely occur. We report a case of pericardial tamponade following CT-guided lung biopsy. Rapid diagnosis and therapy allowed for complete patient recovery. Physicians who perform this procedure should be aware of the known complications and be prepared to treat them appropriately.

  8. Low coherence interferometry approach for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Gardecki, Joseph; Pitman, Martha; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Patel, Ankit; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-11-01

    We present portable preclinical low-coherence interference (LCI) instrumentation for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies featuring the second-generation LCI-based biopsy probe and an improved scoring algorithm for tissue differentiation. Our instrument and algorithm were tested on 38 mice with cultured tumor mass and we show the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of tumor detection of over 0.89, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively.

  9. Advanced Imaging for Biopsy Guidance in Primary Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Ramakrishna, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate glioma sampling is required for diagnosis and establishing eligibility for relevant clinical trials. MR-based perfusion and spectroscopy sequences supplement conventional MR in noninvasively predicting the areas of highest tumor grade for biopsy. We report the case of a patient with gliomatosis cerebri and multifocal patchy enhancement in whom the combination of advanced and conventional imaging attributes successfully guided a diagnostic biopsy. PMID:27014538

  10. Emergency right hepatectomy after laparoscopic tru-cut liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Nicolás; León, Felipe; Martínez, Jorge; Jarufe, Nicolás; Guerra, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Background Liver biopsy is a common procedure usually required for final pathologic diagnosis of different liver diseases. Morbidity following tru-cut biopsy is uncommon, with bleeding complications generally self-limited. Few cases of major hemorrhage after liver biopsies have been reported, but to our knowledge, no cases of emergency hepatectomy following a tru-cut liver biopsy have been reported previously. Presentation of case We report the case of a 38 years-old woman who presented with an intrahepatic arterial bleeding after a tru-cut liver biopsy under direct laparoscopic visualization, initially controlled by ligation of the right hepatic artery and temporary liver packing. On tenth postoperative day, she developed a pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior branch of the right hepatic artery, evolving with massive bleeding that was not amenable to control by endovascular therapy. Therefore, an emergency right hepatectomy had to be performed in order to stop the bleeding. The patient achieved hemodynamic stabilization, but developed a biliary fistula from the liver surface, refractory to non-operative treatment. In consequence, a Roux-Y hepatico-jejunostomy was performed at third month, with no further complications. Discussion Bleeding following tru-cut biopsy is a rare event. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an emergency hepatectomy due to hemorrhage following liver biopsy. Risks and complications of liver biopsy are revised. Conclusion Care must be taken when performing this kind of procedures and a high level of suspicion regarding this complication should be taken in count when clinical/hemodynamic deterioration occurs after these procedures. PMID:25618399

  11. Low coherence interferometry approach for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ernest W.; Gardecki, Joseph; Pitman, Martha; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Patel, Ankit; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We present portable preclinical low-coherence interference (LCI) instrumentation for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies featuring the second-generation LCI-based biopsy probe and an improved scoring algorithm for tissue differentiation. Our instrument and algorithm were tested on 38 mice with cultured tumor mass and we show the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of tumor detection of over 0.89, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. PMID:25375634

  12. Evaluation of electronic biopsy for clinical diagnosis in virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Joseph; Du, Wei; Barish, Matthew; Li, Ellen; Zhu, Wei; Kaufman, Arie

    2011-03-01

    Virtual colonoscopy provides techniques not available in optical colonoscopy, an exciting one being the ability to perform an electronic biopsy. An electronic biopsy image is created using ray-casting volume rendering of the CT data with a translucent transfer function mapping higher densities to red and lower densities to blue. The resulting image allows the physician to gain insight into the internal structure of polyps. Benign tissue and adenomas can be differentiated; the former will appear as homogeneously blue and the latter as irregular red structures. Although this technique is now common, is included with clinical systems, and has been used successfully for computer aided detection, there has so far been no study to evaluate the effectiveness of a physician using electronic biopsy in determining the pathological state of a polyp. We present here such a study, wherein an experienced radiologist ranked polyps based on electronic biopsy alone per scan (supine and prone), as well as both combined. Our results show a correct identification 77% of the time using prone or supine images alone, and 80% accuracy using both. Using ROC analysis based on this study with one reader and a modest sample size, the combined score is not significantly higher than using a single electronic biopsy image alone. However, our analysis indicates a trend of superiority for the combined ranking that deserves a follow-up confirmatory study with a larger sample and more readers. This study yields hope that an improved electronic biopsy technique could become a primary clinical diagnosis method.

  13. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma): Predicting the Risk of Hydrocephalus;Vestibular schwannoma; Hydrocephalus; Fractionated; Stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Ceri; Micallef, Caroline; Gonsalves, Adam; Wharram, Bev; Ashley, Sue; Brada, Michael

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and predictive factors for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with acoustic neuromas (AN) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seventy-two patients with AN were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 (45-50 Gy in 25-30 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks). The pretreatment MRI scan was assessed for tumor characteristics and anatomic distortion independently of subsequent outcome and correlated with the risk of hydrocephalus. Results: At a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 1-120 months), 5-year event-free survival was 95%. Eight patients (11%) developed hydrocephalus within 19 months of radiotherapy, which was successfully treated. On univariate analysis, pretreatment factors predictive of hydrocephalus were maximum diameter (p = 0.005), proximity to midline (p = 0.009), displacement of the fourth ventricle (p = 0.02), partial effacement of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.001), contact with the medulla (p = 0.005), and more brainstem structures (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for fourth ventricular effacement, no other variables remained independently associated with hydrocephalus formation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in excellent tumor control of AN, albeit with a risk of developing hydrocephalus. Patients at high risk, identified as those with larger tumors with partial effacement of the fourth ventricle before treatment, should be monitored more closely during follow-up. It would also be preferable to offer treatment to patients with progressive AN while the risk of hydrocephalus is low, before the development of marked distortion of fourth ventricle before tumor diameter significantly exceeds 2 cm.

  14. Feasibility study of real-time planning for stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qinghui; Song Yulin; Chan, Maria; Burman, Chandra; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: 3D rotational setup errors in radiotherapy are often ignored by most clinics due to inability to correct or simulate them accurately and efficiently. There are two types of rotation-related problems in a clinical setting. One is to assess the affected dose distribution in real-time if correction is not applied and the other one is to correct the rotational setup errors prior to the initiation of the treatment. Here, the authors present the analytical solutions to both problems. Methods: (1) To assess the real-time dose distribution, eight stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) cases were used as examples. For each plan, two new sets of beams with different table, gantry, and collimator angles were given in analytical forms as a function of patient rotational errors. The new beams simulate the rotational effects of the patient during the treatment setup. By using one arbitrary set of beams, SRS plans were recomputed with a series of different combinations of patient rotational errors, ranging from (-5 Degree-Sign , -5 Degree-Sign , -5 Degree-Sign ) to (5 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign ) (roll, pitch, and yaw) with an increment of 1 Degree-Sign and compared with those without rotational errors. For each set of rotational errors, its corresponding equivalent beams were computed using the analytical solutions and then used for dose calculation. (2) To correct for the rotational errors, two new sets of table, gantry, and collimator angles were derived analytically to validate the previously published derivation. However, in the derivation, a novel methodology was developed and two sets of table, gantry, and collimator angles were obtained in analytical forms. The solutions provide an alternative approach to rotational error correction by rotating the couch, gantry, and collimator rather than the patient. Results: For demonstration purpose, the above-derived new beams were implemented in a treatment planning system (TPS) to study the rotational effects on

  15. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  16. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  17. Optimizing prostate needle biopsy through 3D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianchao; Kaplan, Charles; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Lynch, John H.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    Prostate needle biopsy is used for the detection of prostate cancer. The protocol of needle biopsy that is currently routinely used in the clinical environment is the systematic sextant technique, which defines six symmetric locations on the prostate surface for needle insertion. However, this protocol has been developed based on the long-term observation and experience of urologists. Little quantitative or scientific evidence supports the use of this biopsy technique. In this research, we aim at developing a statistically optimized new prostate needle biopsy protocol to improve the quality of diagnosis of prostate cancer. This new protocol will be developed by using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer- based probability map of prostate cancer. For this purpose, we have developed a computer-based 3-D visualization and simulation system with prostate models constructed from the digitized prostate specimens, in which the process of prostate needle biopsy can be simulated automatically by the computer. In this paper, we first develop an interactive biopsy simulation mode in the system, and evaluate the performance of the automatic biopsy simulation with the sextant biopsy protocol by comparing the results by the urologist using the interactive simulation mode with respect to 53 prostate models. This is required to confirm that the automatic simulation is accurate and reliable enough for the simulation with respect to a large number of prostate models. Then we compare the performance of the existing protocols using the automatic biopsy simulation system with respect to 107 prostate models, which will statistically identify if one protocol is better than another. Since the estimation of tumor volume is extremely important in determining the significance of a tumor and in deciding appropriate treatment methods, we further investigate correlation between the tumor volume and the positive core volume with 89 prostate models. This is done in order to develop a method to

  18. Wall or machine suction rectal biopsy for Hirschsprung's disease: a simple modified technique can improve the adequacy of biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ali, A E; Morecroft, J A; Bowen, J C; Bruce, J; Morabito, A

    2006-08-01

    Suction rectal biopsy (SRB) may not include sufficient submucosa for histological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and a repeat biopsy is required. Substitution of the conventional syringe for sustained suction from a machine or wall suction unit could provide a more consistently adequate tissue biopsy. This study was conducted to compare the adequacy of SRB specimens using a conventional method of syringe suction (SSRB) with those taken by wall or machine suction (WSRB). Hospital records of patients who had a SRB between 2002 and 2004 were studied retrospectively. The biopsy was considered inadequate if there was insufficient submucosa and a repeat specimen was requested. SSRB were taken using the conventional SSRB technique. WSRB were taken with the same Noblett forceps but with suction from wall suction or from a portable suction machine. Ninety-five infants had 103 SRB, 24 had WSRB and all (100%) were adequate for histopathological diagnosis or exclusion of HD. Seventy nine conventional SSRB were undertaken in 71 infants of which 64 (81.02%) were adequate. The difference in adequacy between WSRB and SSRB was statistically significant (P = 0.02). There were no instances of haemorrhage or bowel perforation in either subgroup. WSRB with the Noblett biopsy forceps is more likely to produce an adequate specimen and to reduce the incidence of repeat biopsies.

  19. The emerging role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Barbarisi, Manlio; Romanelli, Pantaleo

    2012-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an emerging treatment option offered to patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Radiosurgery is performed as an outpatient procedure and provides a safe and effective non invasive treatment for focal GBM. High energy beams originating from cobalt sources placed into an helmet (Gamma-Knife) or generated by a linear accelerator (LINAC) rotating on a gantry (X-Knife, Novalis) or maneuvered by a robotic arm (CyberKnife) are delivered with submillimetric accuracy to a selected intracranial target. Treatment accuracy is provided by image-guided volumetric CT and MR studies complemented with advanced metabolic neuroimaging techniques such as CT-PET. Radiosurgery is typically used as a salvage treatment in patients with recurrent GBM to avoid further surgical procedures or as a complement to conventional fractionated radiotherapy. This paper reviews the emerging role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of GBM. PMID:22642423

  20. Early manifestation of communicating hydrocephalus after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for aggressive giant atypical prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Ohe, Naoyuki; Iwama, Toru; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Aggressive giant invasive pituitary adenomas refractory to standard surgical or medical treatment remain a genuine challenge. In addition, communicating hydrocephalus (CH) attributed to malabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) developing after radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas has not been previously reported. Herein, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male presenting with a giant atypical prolactinoma refractory to previous therapies, including pharmacotherapy and repetitive surgery. He underwent image-guided fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in 28 fractions, resulting in early manifestation of CH associated with undisputed, both radiological and hormonal response. He recovered well after a shunt placement, with otherwise favorable consequences such as sustained tumor regression, decreasing prolactin level, and retained visual function for a 22-month follow-up. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy would provide a viable treatment alternative for these refractory cases, while caution should be exercised regarding the possibility of iatrogenic CH.