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Sample records for sterol synthesis insights

  1. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jeremy H.; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  2. Insights into the mechanisms of sterol transport between organelles.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno; Drin, Guillaume

    2013-09-01

    In cells, the levels of sterol vary greatly among organelles. This uneven distribution depends largely on non-vesicular routes of transfer, which are mediated by soluble carriers called lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). These proteins have a domain with a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates one sterol molecule. However, a demonstration of their role in sterol transport in cells remains difficult. Numerous LTPs also contain membrane-binding elements, but it is not clear how these LTPs couple their ability to target organelles with lipid transport activity. This issue appears critical, since many sterol transporters are thought to act at contact sites between two membrane-bound compartments. Here, we emphasize that biochemical and structural studies provide precious insights into the mode of action of sterol-binding proteins. Recent studies on START, Osh/ORP and NPC proteins suggest models on how these proteins could transport sterol between organelles and, thereby, influence cellular functions.

  3. Dynamics of sterol synthesis during development of Leishmania spp. parasites to their virulent form.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chaoqun; Wilson, Mary E

    2016-04-12

    The Leishmania spp. protozoa, the causative agents of the "neglected" tropical disease leishmaniasis, are transmitted to mammals by sand fly vectors. Within the sand fly, parasites transform from amastigotes to procyclic promastigotes, followed by development of virulent (metacyclic) promastigote forms. The latter are infectious to mammalian hosts. Biochemical components localized in the parasite plasma membrane such as proteins and sterols play a pivotal role in Leishmania pathogenesis. Leishmania spp. lack the enzymes for cholesterol synthesis, and the dynamics of sterol acquisition and biosynthesis in parasite developmental stages are not understood. We hypothesized that dynamic changes in sterol composition during metacyclogenesis contribute to the virulence of metacyclic promastigotes. Sterols were extracted from logarithmic phase or metacyclic promastigotes grown in liquid culture with or without cholesterol, and analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TriTrypDB was searched for identification of genes involved in Leishmania sterol biosynthetic pathways. In total nine sterols were identified. There were dynamic changes in sterols during promastigote metacyclogenesis. Cholesterol in the culture medium affected sterol composition in different parasite stages. There were qualitative and relative quantitative differences between the sterol content of virulent versus avirulent parasite strains. A tentative sterol biosynthetic pathway in Leishmania spp. promastigotes was identified. Significant differences in sterol composition were observed between promastigote stages, and between parasites exposed to different extracellular cholesterol in the environment. These data lay the foundation for further investigating the role of sterols in the pathogenesis of Leishmania spp. infections.

  4. Genome profiling of sterol synthesis shows convergent evolution in parasites and guides chemotherapeutic attack.

    PubMed

    Fügi, Matthias A; Gunasekera, Kapila; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Guan, Xueli; Wenk, Markus R; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Sterols are an essential class of lipids in eukaryotes, where they serve as structural components of membranes and play important roles as signaling molecules. Sterols are also of high pharmacological significance: cholesterol-lowering drugs are blockbusters in human health, and inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis are widely used as antifungals. Inhibitors of ergosterol synthesis are also being developed for Chagas's disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we develop an in silico pipeline to globally evaluate sterol metabolism and perform comparative genomics. We generate a library of hidden Markov model-based profiles for 42 sterol biosynthetic enzymes, which allows expressing the genomic makeup of a given species as a numerical vector. Hierarchical clustering of these vectors functionally groups eukaryote proteomes and reveals convergent evolution, in particular metabolic reduction in obligate endoparasites. We experimentally explore sterol metabolism by testing a set of sterol biosynthesis inhibitors against trypanosomatids, Plasmodium falciparum, Giardia, and mammalian cells, and by quantifying the expression levels of sterol biosynthetic genes during the different life stages of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The phenotypic data correlate with genomic makeup for simvastatin, which showed activity against trypanosomatids. Other findings, such as the activity of terbinafine against Giardia, are not in agreement with the genotypic profile.

  5. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications.

  6. Plant sterol ester diet supplementation increases serum plant sterols and markers of cholesterol synthesis, but has no effect on total cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Weingärtner, Oliver; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Schirmer, Stephan H; Husche, Constanze; Vanmierlo, Tim; Wagenpfeil, Gudrun; Hoth, Markus; Böhm, Michael; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over intervention-study was conducted in healthy volunteers to evaluate the effects of plant sterol ester supplemented margarine on cholesterol, non-cholesterol sterols and oxidative stress in serum and monocytes. Sixteen volunteers, average age 34 years, with no or mild hypercholesterolemia were subjected to a 4 week period of daily intake of 3g plant sterols per day supplied via a supplemented margarine on top of regular eating habits. After a wash-out period of one week, volunteers switched groups. Compared to placebo, a diet supplementation with plant sterols increased serum levels of plant sterols such as campesterol (+0.16±0.19mg/dL, p=0.005) and sitosterol (+0.27±0.18mg/dL, p<0.001) and increased markers of cholesterol synthesis such as desmosterol (+0.05±0.07mg/dL, p=0.006) as well as lathosterol (+0.11±0.16mg/dL, p=0.012). Cholesterol serum levels, however, were not changed significantly (+18.68±32.6mg/dL, p=0.052). These findings could not be verified in isolated circulating monocytes. Moreover, there was no effect on monocyte activation and no differences with regard to redox state after plant sterol supplemented diet. Therefore, in a population of healthy volunteers with no or mild hypercholesterolemia, consumption of plant sterol ester supplemented margarine results in increased concentrations of plant sterols and cholesterol synthesis markers without affecting total cholesterol in the serum, activation of circulating monocytes or redox state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of frequency of dosing of plant sterols on plasma cholesterol levels and synthesis rate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to compare the effects of plant sterols (PS) consumed as a single dose (single) at breakfast or as three doses consumed with breakfast, lunch and dinner (divided) on plasma lipoprotien levels and cholesterol endogenous fractional synthesis rate (FSR). A randomized, placebo-controll...

  8. Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein ACBP1 Modulates Sterol Synthesis during Embryogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Xue, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and sterols are primary metabolites that exert interrelated functions as structural and signaling lipids. Despite their common syntheses from acetyl-coenzyme A, homeostatic cross talk remains enigmatic. Six Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) are involved in FA metabolism. ACBP1 interacts with PHOSPHOLIPASE Dα1 and regulates phospholipid composition. Here, its specific role in the negative modulation of sterol synthesis during embryogenesis is reported. ACBP1, likely in a liganded state, interacts with STEROL C4-METHYL OXIDASE1-1 (SMO1-1), a rate-limiting enzyme in the sterol pathway. Proembryo abortion in the double mutant indicated that the ACBP1-SMO1-1 interaction is synthetic lethal, corroborating with their strong promoter activities in developing ovules. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed quantitative and compositional changes in FAs and sterols upon overexpression or mutation of ACBP1 and/or SMO1-1. Aberrant levels of these metabolites may account for the downstream defect in lipid signaling. GLABRA2 (GL2), encoding a phospholipid/sterol-binding homeodomain transcription factor, was up-regulated in developing seeds of acbp1, smo1-1, and ACBP1+/−smo1-1 in comparison with the wild type. Consistent with the corresponding transcriptional alteration of GL2 targets, high-oil, low-mucilage phenotypes of gl2 were phenocopied in ACBP1+/−smo1-1. Thus, ACBP1 appears to modulate the metabolism of two important lipid classes (FAs and sterols) influencing cellular signaling. PMID:28500265

  9. Sterols regulate 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) via dual sterol regulatory elements: cooperative induction of key enzymes in lipid synthesis by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzes a final step in cholesterol synthesis, and has been ascribed diverse functions, such as being anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. How this enzyme is regulated transcriptionally by sterols is currently unclear. Some studies have suggested that its expression is regulated by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs) while another suggests it is through the Liver X Receptor (LXR). However, these transcription factors have opposing effects on cellular sterol levels, so it is likely that one predominates. Here we establish that sterol regulation of DHCR24 occurs predominantly through SREBP-2, and identify the particular region of the DHCR24 promoter to which SREBP-2 binds. We demonstrate that sterol regulation is mediated by two sterol regulatory elements (SREs) in the promoter of the gene, assisted by two nearby NF-Y binding sites. Moreover, we present evidence that the dual SREs work cooperatively to regulate DHCR24 expression by comparison to two known SREBP target genes, the LDL receptor with one SRE, and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1, with two SREs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Current and new insights on phytosterol oxides in plant sterol-enriched food.

    PubMed

    García-Llatas, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Estrada, María Teresa

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, plant sterol-enriched foods have faced a great increase in the market, due to the asserted cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols. However, owing to their chemical structures, plant sterols can oxidize and produce a wide variety of oxidation products with controversial biological effects. Although oxyphytosterols can derive from dietary sources and endogenous formation, their single contribution should be better defined. The following review provides an overall and critical picture on the current knowledge and future perspectives of plant sterols-enriched food, particularly focused on occurrence of plant sterol oxidation products and their biological effects. The final objective of this overview is to evince the different aspects of plant sterols-enriched food that require further research, for a better understanding of the influence of plant sterols and their oxides on consumers' health.

  11. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  12. Primary hyperlipidemias in children: effect of plant sterol supplementation on plasma lipids and markers of cholesterol synthesis and absorption.

    PubMed

    Guardamagna, O; Abello, F; Baracco, V; Federici, G; Bertucci, P; Mozzi, A; Mannucci, L; Gnasso, A; Cortese, C

    2011-06-01

    Plant sterols lower serum cholesterol concentration. Available data have confirmed the lipid-lowering efficacy in adults, while there is a relative dearth of data in children and almost exclusively restricted to subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of plant sterol supplementation in children with different forms of primary hyperlipidemias. The effect of plant sterol consumption on plasma lipids was evaluated in 32 children with heterozygous FH, 13 children with Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCH) and 13 children with Undefined Hypercholesterolemia (UH) in a 12-week open-label intervention study using plant sterol-enriched yoghurt. Plasma lipids and apolipoproteins were measured by routine methods. Markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and absorption (campesterol and sitosterol) were measured by GC-MS. Tolerability and adherence to recommended regimen was very high. A significant reduction was observed in LDL-cholesterol in the three groups (10.7, 14.2 and 16.0% in FH, FCH and UH, respectively). Lathosterol concentrations were unchanged, reflecting a lack of increased synthesis of cholesterol. Of the two absorption markers, only sitosterol showed a slight but significant increase. Daily consumption of plant sterol dairy products favorably changes lipid profile by reducing LDL-cholesterol. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of plant sterols-enriched foods in treating children with primary hyperlipidemia such as FCH and UH, likely to be the most frequent form also in the young age in the western populations.

  13. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, A K; Nègre-Aminou, P; van Thiel, G C; Bolhuis, P A; Cohen, L H

    1996-11-08

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 +/- 6 nM and 4.0 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 +/- 38 nM). Through inhibition of mevalonate production, these compounds have a distinct inhibiting effect on cell proliferation. Because proliferation of myoblasts is important in the repair of damaged skeletal muscle, experiments were performed to investigate the effect of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on cell proliferation and cell viability. The more potent inhibitors of sterol synthesis, lovastatin, and simvastatin, were able to inhibit the proliferation of these cells during 3 days of incubation with drug concentrations of 1 microM for lovastatin and 0.1 microM or 1 microM for simvastatin. DNA synthesis was decreased by more than 80% in the presence of 1 microM of lovastatin or simvastatin. In contrast, under these conditions, pravastatin had no influence on cell proliferation or DNA synthesis, which is probably related to the lack of inhibition of sterol synthesis by pravastatin on extended incubation. The three 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors did not disturb cell viability because mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and ATP content remained proportional to the number of cells in the culture at any concentration used.

  14. Towards New Insights in the Sterol/Amphotericin Nanochannels Formation: A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Boukari, Khaoula; Balme, Sébastien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene which self-organizes into membrane cell in order to cause the cell death. Its specific action towards fungal cell is not fully understood but was proved to become from sterol composition. The mechanism was shown experimentally to require the formation of stable sterol/polyene couples which could then organize in a nanochannel. This would allow the leakage of ions responsible for the death of fungal cells, only. In this present study, we investigate the arrangement of AmB/sterols in biological membrane using molecular dynamic simulations in order to understand the role of the sterol structure on the antifungal action of the polyene. We show in particular that the nanochannels tend to close up when cell was composed with cholesterol (animal cell) due to strong interaction between amphotericin and sterol. On the other side, with ergosterol (fungal cell) the largest interactions between amphotericin and lipid membrane lead to the appearance of large hole that could favor the important leakage of ions and thus, the fungal cell death. This work appears as a good complement in the extensive studies linked to the understanding of the antifungal molecules in membrane cells.

  15. Sterol balance in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Reduction in whole body cholesterol synthesis and normal bile acid production.

    PubMed

    Steiner, R D; Linck, L M; Flavell, D P; Lin, D S; Connor, W E

    2000-09-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple malformation/mental retardation syndrome caused by a deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol Delta(7)-reductase. This enzyme converts 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to cholesterol in the last step in cholesterol biosynthesis. The pathology of this condition may result from two different factors: the deficiency of cholesterol itself and/or the accumulation of precursor sterols such as 7-DHC. Although cholesterol synthesis is defective in cultured SLOS cells, to date there has been no evidence of decreased whole body cholesterol synthesis in SLOS and only incomplete information on the synthesis of 7-DHC and bile acids. In this first report of the sterol balance in SLOS, we measured the synthesis of cholesterol, other sterols, and bile acids in eight SLOS subjects and six normal children. The diets were very low in cholesterol content and precisely controlled. Cholesterol synthesis in SLOS subjects was significantly reduced when compared with control subjects (8.6 vs. 19.6 mg/kg per day, respectively, P < 0.002). Cholesterol precursors 7-DHC, 8-DHC, and 19-nor-cholestatrienol were synthesized in SLOS subjects (7-DHC synthesis was 1.66 +/- 1.15 mg/kg per day), but not in control subjects. Total sterol synthesis was also reduced in SLOS subjects (12 vs. 20 mg/kg per day, P < 0.022). Bile acid synthesis in SLOS subjects (3.5 mg/kg per day) did not differ significantly from control subjects (4.6 mg/kg per day) and was within the range reported previously in normals. Normal primary and secondary bile acids were identified. This study provides direct evidence that whole body cholesterol synthesis is reduced in patients with SLOS and that the synthesis of 7-DHC and other cholesterol precursors is profoundly increased. It is also the first reported measure of daily bile acid synthesis in SLOS and provides evidence that bile acid supplementation is not likely to be necessary for treatment. These sterol balance studies

  16. Cholesterol-induced conformational changes in the sterol-sensing domain of the Scap protein suggest feedback mechanism to control cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yansong; Zhou, Yulian; Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2017-05-26

    Scap is a polytopic protein of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes that transports sterol regulatory element-binding proteins to the Golgi complex for proteolytic activation. Cholesterol accumulation in ER membranes prevents Scap transport and decreases cholesterol synthesis. Previously, we provided evidence that cholesterol inhibition is initiated when cholesterol binds to loop 1 of Scap, which projects into the ER lumen. Within cells, this binding causes loop 1 to dissociate from loop 7, another luminal Scap loop. However, we have been unable to demonstrate this dissociation when we added cholesterol to isolated complexes of loops 1 and 7. We therefore speculated that the dissociation requires a conformational change in the intervening polytopic sequence separating loops 1 and 7. Here we demonstrate such a change using a protease protection assay in sealed membrane vesicles. In the absence of cholesterol, trypsin or proteinase K cleaved cytosolic loop 4, generating a protected fragment that we visualized with a monoclonal antibody against loop 1. When cholesterol was added to these membranes, cleavage in loop 4 was abolished. Because loop 4 is part of the so-called sterol-sensing domain separating loops 1 and 7, these results support the hypothesis that cholesterol binding to loop 1 alters the conformation of the sterol-sensing domain. They also suggest that this conformational change helps transmit the cholesterol signal from loop 1 to loop 7, thereby allowing separation of the loops and facilitating the feedback inhibition of cholesterol synthesis. These insights suggest a new structural model for cholesterol-mediated regulation of Scap activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Selective inhibition of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterol synthesis in Candida albicans by terconazole, a new triazole antimycotic.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, D M; Tolman, E L; Tobia, A J; Rosenthale, M E; McGuire, J L; Vanden Bossche, H; Janssen, P A

    1988-03-01

    Terconazole, a new broad spectrum antimycotic triazole derivative, has been shown to have potent activity against Candida albicans in vitro and to be effective in animal models of yeast infections. The present study explored a possible mechanism of anticandidal activity of terconazole. The compound inhibited production of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterols (e.g. ergosterol) in C. albicans at concentrations (IC50 = 3-6 x 10(-9) M) lower than those inhibiting the in-vitro growth of the yeast. There was concomitant accumulation of methylated sterols, (e.g. lanosterol), which are considered detrimental to normal yeast cell membrane function. Terconazole stimulated incorporation of 14C-acetate into triglycerides, but had no other effect on C. albicans lipid metabolism. At concentrations greater than or equal to 10(-6)M terconazole inhibited the oxidation of 14C-acetate into 14CO2 in C. albicans although the mechanism for this effect remains unclear. These data indicate that terconazole is a specific inhibitor of yeast C-14 desmethyl sterol production in C. albicans. Furthermore, terconazole reduced cytochrome P-450 levels in yeast microsomes at concentrations 10,000-fold below those at which it showed effects on rabbit liver microsomes. These data indicate a species specificity for the biochemical actions of terconazole. The C-14 alpha-desmethylase system in yeast cell membranes is cytochrome P-450 associated. Thus, terconazole, was a potent inhibitor of C-14 desmethyl sterol synthesis. This effect could contribute to the anticandidal activity of the drug.

  18. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  19. Brain Cholesterol Synthesis and Metabolism is Progressively Disturbed in the R6/1 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease: A Targeted GC-MS/MS Sterol Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kreilaus, Fabian; Spiro, Adena S; Hannan, Anthony J; Garner, Brett; Jenner, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has essential functions in neurological processes that require tight regulation of synthesis and metabolism. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis has been demonstrated in Huntington's disease, however the exact role of these changes in disease pathogenesis is not fully understood. This study aimed to comprehensively examine changes in cholesterol biosynthetic precursors, metabolites and oxidation products in the striatum and cortex of the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease. We also aimed to characterise the progression of the physical phenotype in these mice. GC-MS/MS was used to quantify a broad range of sterols in the striatum and cortex of R6/1 and wild type mice at 6, 12, 20, 24 and 28 weeks of age. Motor dysfunction was assessed over 28 weeks using the RotaRod and the hind-paw clasping tests. 24(S)-Hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol were the major cholesterol metabolites that significantly changed in R6/1 mice. These changes were specifically localised to the striatum and were detected at the end stages of the disease. Cholesterol synthetic precursors (lathosterol and lanosterol) were significantly reduced in the cortex and striatum by 6 weeks of age, prior to the onset of motor dysfunction, as well as the cognitive and affective abnormalities previously reported. Elevated levels of desmosterol, a substrate of delta(24)-sterol reductase (DHCR24), were also detected in R6/1 mice at the end time-point. Female R6/1 mice exhibited a milder weight loss and hind paw clasping phenotype compared to male R6/1 mice, however, no difference in the brain sterol profile was detected between sexes. Several steps in cholesterol biosynthetic and metabolic pathways are differentially altered in the R6/1 mouse brain as the disease progresses and this is most severe in the striatum. This provides further insights into early molecular mediators of HD onset and disease progression and identifies candidate molecular targets for novel therapeutic

  20. New insights on the neuroprotective role of sterols and sex steroids: the seladin-1/DHCR24 paradigm.

    PubMed

    Peri, Alessandro; Danza, Giovanna; Benvenuti, Susanna; Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Rosati, Fabiana; Cellai, Ilaria; Serio, Mario

    2009-07-01

    In 2000 a new gene, i.e. seladin-1 (for selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1) was identified and found to be down regulated in vulnerable brain regions in Alzheimer's disease. Seladin-1 was considered a novel neuroprotective factor, because of its anti-apoptotic properties. Subsequently, it has been demonstrated that seladin-1 corresponds to the gene that encodes 3-beta-hydroxysterol delta-24-reductase (DHCR24), that catalyzes the synthesis of cholesterol from desmosterol. There is evidence that cholesterol plays a fundamental role in maintaining brain homeostasis. Because of its enzymatic activity, seladin-1/DHCR24 has been considered the human homolog of the plant protein DIMINUTO/DWARF1, that is involved in the synthesis of sterol plant hormones. We have recently demonstrated that seladin-1/DHCR24 is a fundamental mediator of the protective effects of estrogens in the brain. This review describes how this protein interacts with cholesterol and estrogens, thus generating a neuroprotective network, that might open new possibilities in the prevention/treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Synthesis of steryl ferulates with various sterol structures and comparison of their antioxidant activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Steryl ferulates extracted from corn and rice differ in the structures of the phytosterol head groups, which had a significant impact on their activity as antioxidants in soybean oil used for frying. An improved method was used to synthesize steryl ferulates from commercial sterols to better underst...

  2. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  3. The hypoxic regulator of sterol synthesis Nro1 is a nuclear import adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Lee, Chih-Yung S.; Amzel, L. Mario; Espenshade, Peter J.; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 Å resolution shows an all-α-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response. PMID:21481773

  4. "Dinoflagellate Sterols" in marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Wikfors, Gary H

    2011-10-01

    Sterol compositions for three diatom species, recently shown to contain sterols with side chains typically found in dinoflagellates, were determined by HPLC and ¹H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The centric diatom Triceratium dubium (=Biddulphia sp., CCMP 147) contained the highest percentage of 23-methylated sterols (37.2% (24R)-23-methylergosta-5,22-dienol), whereas the pennate diatom Delphineis sp. (CCMP 1095) contained the cyclopropyl sterol gorgosterol, as well as the 27-norsterol occelasterol. The sterol composition of Ditylum brightwellii (CCMP 358) was the most complex, containing Δ⁰- and Δ⁷-sterols, in addition to the predominant Δ⁵-sterols. A pair of previously unknown sterols, stigmasta-5,24,28-trienol and stigmasta-24,28-dienol, were detected in D. brightwellii and their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic analysis and by synthesis of the former sterol from saringosterol. Also detected in D. brightwellii was the previously unknown 23-methylcholesta-7,22-dienol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of hepatic sterol synthesis in the Mongolian gerbil in vivo using (/sup 3/H)water: diurnal variation and effect of type of dietary fat

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, N.J.; Holub, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The hepatic synthesis of sterol was measured in the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) in vivo following the administration of (/sup 3/H)water by monitoring the incorporation of radioactivity into digitonin-precipitable sterol. A diurnal rhythm in cholesterol synthesis was exhibited under conditions of ad libitum feeding with alternating 12-hour periods of light (0200 to 1400 hr) and dark (1400 to 0200 hr). The zenith was reached between 1500 and 2100 hr and the nadir approximately 10-12 hours later between 0200 and 0400 hr, which provided a zenith/nadir ratio of 9.6 to 1.0. The in vivo rates of hepatic sterol synthesis and plasma cholesterol levels were measured in gerbils fed semi-purified diets containing either 19.5% beef tallow + 0.5% safflower, 20% lard, or 20% safflower oil and widely differing ratios of polyunsaturated: saturated fatty acids. All diets were equalized to contain 0.01% cholesterol and 0.05% plant sterol. After 3 days on the experimental diets, the mean rates of cholesterol synthesis (nmol/g liver per hr) were 41.5, 26.6, and 13.8 for animals fed the diets containing beef tallow, lard, and safflower oil, respectively. After 7 and 14 days, synthetic rates were lowest in the gerbils fed safflower oil as were also the plasma cholesterol levels. These results indicate that the type of dietary lipid can significantly influence the in vivo rate of sterol biosynthesis in gerbil liver. This response may contribute, at least in part, to the observed differences in plasma cholesterol levels.

  6. Distribution and functions of sterols and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Hannich, J Thomas; Umebayashi, Kyohei; Riezman, Howard

    2011-05-01

    Sterols and sphingolipids are considered mainly eukaryotic lipids even though both are present in some prokaryotes, with sphingolipids being more widespread than sterols. Both sterols and sphingolipids differ in their structural features in vertebrates, plants, and fungi. Interestingly, some invertebrates cannot synthesize sterols de novo and seem to have a reduced dependence on sterols. Sphingolipids and sterols are found in the plasma membrane, but we do not have a clear picture of their precise intracellular localization. Advances in lipidomics and subcellular fractionation should help to improve this situation. Genetic approaches have provided insights into the diversity of sterol and sphingolipid functions in eukaryotes providing evidence that these two lipid classes function together. Intermediates in sphingolipid biosynthesis and degradation are involved in signaling pathways, whereas sterol structures are converted to hormones. Both lipids have been implicated in regulating membrane trafficking.

  7. Distribution and Functions of Sterols and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Hannich, J. Thomas; Umebayashi, Kyohei; Riezman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Sterols and sphingolipids are considered mainly eukaryotic lipids even though both are present in some prokaryotes, with sphingolipids being more widespread than sterols. Both sterols and sphingolipids differ in their structural features in vertebrates, plants, and fungi. Interestingly, some invertebrates cannot synthesize sterols de novo and seem to have a reduced dependence on sterols. Sphingolipids and sterols are found in the plasma membrane, but we do not have a clear picture of their precise intracellular localization. Advances in lipidomics and subcellular fractionation should help to improve this situation. Genetic approaches have provided insights into the diversity of sterol and sphingolipid functions in eukaryotes providing evidence that these two lipid classes function together. Intermediates in sphingolipid biosynthesis and degradation are involved in signaling pathways, whereas sterol structures are converted to hormones. Both lipids have been implicated in regulating membrane trafficking. PMID:21454248

  8. The synthesis, regulation, and functions of sterols in Candida albicans: Well-known but still lots to learn.

    PubMed

    Lv, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2016-08-17

    Sterols are the basal components of the membranes of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these membranes determine the susceptibility of C. albicans cells to a variety of stresses, such as ionic, osmotic and oxidative pressures, and treatment with antifungal drugs. The common antifungal azoles in clinical use are targeted to the biosynthesis of ergosterol. In the past years, the synthesis, storage and metabolism of ergosterol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been characterized in some detail; however, these processes has not been as well investigated in the human opportunistic pathogen C. albicans. In this review, we summarize the genes involved in ergosterol synthesis and regulation in C. albicans. As well, genes in S. cerevisiae implicated in ergosterol storage and conversions with other lipids are noted, as these provide us clues and directions for the study of the homologous genes in C. albicans. In this report we have particularly focused on the essential roles of ergosterol in the dynamic process of cell biology and its fundamental status in the biological membrane system that includes lipid rafts, lipid droplets, vacuoles and mitochondria. We believe that a thorough understanding of this classic and essential pathway will give us new ideas about drug resistance and morphological switching in C. albicans.

  9. Hepatic and nonhepatic sterol synthesis and tissue distribution following administration of a liver selective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, CI-981: comparison with selected HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bocan, T M; Ferguson, E; McNally, W; Uhlendorf, P D; Bak Mueller, S; Dehart, P; Sliskovic, D R; Roth, B D; Krause, B R; Newton, R S

    1992-01-24

    Since cholesterol biosynthesis is an integral part of cellular metabolism, several HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors were systematically analyzed in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo sterol synthesis assays using [14C]acetate incorporation into digitonin precipitable sterols as a marker of cholesterol synthesis. Tissue distribution of radiolabeled CI-981 and lovastatin was also performed. In vitro, CI-981 and PD134967-15 were equipotent in liver, spleen, testis and adrenal, lovastatin was more potent in extrahepatic tissues than liver and BMY21950, pravastatin and PD135023-15 were more potent in liver than peripheral tissues. In ex vivo assays, all inhibitors except lovastatin preferentially inhibited liver sterol synthesis; however, pravastatin and BMY22089 were strikingly less potent in the liver. CI-981 inhibited sterol synthesis in vivo in the liver, spleen and adrenal while not affecting the testis, kidney, muscle and brain. Lovastatin inhibited sterol synthesis to a greater extent than CI-981 in the spleen, adrenal and kidney while pravastatin and BMY22089 primarily affected liver and kidney. The tissue distribution of radiolabeled CI-981 and lovastatin support the changes observed in tissue sterol synthesis. Thus, we conclude that a spectrum of liver selective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors exist and that categorizing agents as liver selective is highly dependent upon method of analysis.

  10. Phylogenetic Distribution of Fungal Sterols

    PubMed Central

    Weete, John D.; Abril, Maritza; Blackwell, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Background Ergosterol has been considered the “fungal sterol” for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. Methodology/Principal Findings The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Δ5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -Δ5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade), and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28)-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. Conclusions/Significance Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol), and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles) target reactions in the synthesis of

  11. Green synthesis of β-sitostanol esters catalyzed by the versatile lipase/sterol esterase from Ophiostoma piceae.

    PubMed

    Molina-Gutiérrez, María; Hakalin, Neumara L S; Rodríguez-Sanchez, Leonor; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María Jesús

    2017-04-15

    β-sitostanol esters, used as dietary complement for decreasing cholesterol absorption, have been synthesized at 28°C via direct esterification or transesterification catalyzed by the versatile lipase/sterol esterase from the ascomycete fungus O. piceae. Direct esterification was conducted in biphasic isooctane: water systems containing 10mM β-sitostanol and lauric or oleic acid as acyl donors, reaching 90% esterification in 3h with the recombinant enzyme. The use of molar excesses of the free fatty acids did not improve direct esterification rate, and the enzyme did not convert one of the two fatty acids preferentially when both were simultaneously available. On the other hand, solvent-free transesterification was an extremely efficient mechanism to synthesize β-sitostanyl oleate, yielding virtually full conversion of up to 80mM β-sitostanol in 2h. This process may represent a promising green alternative to the current chemical synthesis of these esters of unquestionable nutraceutical value.

  12. Synthesis of Hydroxylated Sterols in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Alters Growth and Steroid Metabolism1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Lisa; Nahar, Nurun; Dalman, Kerstin; Fujioka, Shozo; Jonsson, Lisbeth; Dutta, Paresh C.; Sitbon, Folke

    2011-01-01

    To explore mechanisms in plant sterol homeostasis, we have here increased the turnover of sterols in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants by overexpressing four mouse cDNA encoding cholesterol hydroxylases (CHs), hydroxylating cholesterol at the C-7, C-24, C-25, or C-27 positions. Compared to the wild type, the four types of Arabidopsis transformant showed varying degrees of phenotypic alteration, the strongest one being in CH25 lines, which were dark-green dwarfs resembling brassinosteroid-related mutants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants revealed trace levels of α and β forms of 7-hydroxycholesterol, 7-hydroxycampesterol, and 7-hydroxysitosterol. The expected hydroxycholesterol metabolites in CH7-, CH24-, and CH25 transformants were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additional hydroxysterol forms were also observed, particularly in CH25 plants. In CH24 and CH25 lines, but not in CH7 ones, the presence of hydroxysterols was correlated with a considerable alteration of the sterol profile and an increased sterol methyltransferase activity in microsomes. Moreover, CH25 lines contained clearly reduced levels of brassinosteroids, and displayed an enhanced drought tolerance. Equivalent transformations of potato plants with the CH25 construct increased hydroxysterol levels, but without the concomitant alteration of growth and sterol profiles observed in Arabidopsis. The results suggest that an increased hydroxylation of cholesterol and/or other sterols in Arabidopsis triggers compensatory processes, acting to maintain sterols at adequate levels. PMID:21746809

  13. Sterol patterns of cultured zooxanthellae isolated from marine invertebrates: Synthesis of gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol by aposymbiotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Nancy W.; Kokke, W. C. M. C.; Fenical, William; Djerassi, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative sterol compositions of cultured zooxanthellae isolated from various Pacific and Atlantic invertebrate hosts: Zoanthus sociatus (a zoanthid), Oculina diffusa (a scleractian coral), Tridacna gigas (a giant clam), Melibe pilosa (a nudibranch), and Aiptasia pulchella (a sea anemone) are reported. The results clearly demonstrate large differences in sterol patterns of zooxanthellae and that there is no obvious relationship between the taxonomic affiliation of the host and the sterol pattern of its isolated symbiont. The sterols of the zooxanthellae of O. diffusa (Cnidaria) and T. gigas (Mollusca) are qualitatively equivalent. Based on the structures of the two major free sterols synthesized by each alga, the zooxanthellae from different hosts were separated into three distinct groups. It was also found that an aposymbiotic alga can synthesize the unique marine sterols gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol. Most of the sterols were identified by using mass spectroscopy and 360-MHz proton magnetic resonance. Spectroscopic data are reported for four novel sterols—(23,24R)-dimethyl-5α-cholest-(22E)-en-3β-o l, 23-methyl-5α-cholest-22E-en-3β-ol, cholesta-5,14-dien-3β-ol, and 4α-methyl-5α-cholesta-8(14)-24-dien-3β-ol. PMID:16593195

  14. Sterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein clearance in vivo in the pregnant rat, placenta, and fetus. Sources for tissue cholesterol during fetal development.

    PubMed Central

    Belknap, W M; Dietschy, J M

    1988-01-01

    Whereas the greatest relative increase in body mass occurs during the third trimester of fetal life, the source of the cholesterol that supports this growth is uncertain. These studies used [3H]water and 125I-cellobiose-labeled low density lipoproteins to quantitate absolute rates of cholesterol acquisition in vivo by the fetus of the rat. Preliminary studies demonstrated that [3H]water administered intravenously to the mother rapidly equilibrated with the body pool of water in the fetus and that 22-microgram atoms of H from the water pool were incorporated into each micromole of newly synthesized cholesterol. After administration of [3H]water to pregnant rats, the rates of sterol synthesis per 100 g of whole body weight were severalfold higher in the fetus than in the dams. Individual organs of the dam such as the liver, however, had much higher synthetic rates than those in the fetus. When maternal hepatic cholesterol synthesis was suppressed by cholesterol feeding, newly synthesized cholesterol disappeared from the maternal blood yet there was essentially no change in the rate of appearance of newly synthesized sterol in the fetus, placenta, and fetal membranes. The placenta did take up low density lipoproteins at rates equal to about one-third of that seen in the maternal liver, but none of the apolipoprotein or cholesterol was transferred to the fetus. These studies indicate that the rat fetus receives little or no cholesterol from the mother but, rather, satisfies its need for cholesterol during fetal development through local synthesis. Furthermore, the fetal membranes appear to be an important site for sterol synthesis in the fetal compartment. Images PMID:3198766

  15. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  16. Special relationship between sterols and oxygen: were sterols an adaptation to aerobic life?

    PubMed

    Galea, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    A fascinating link between sterols and molecular oxygen (O(2)) has been a common thread running through the fundamental work of Konrad Bloch, who elucidated the biosynthetic pathway for cholesterol, to recent work supporting a role of sterols in the sensing of O(2). Synthesis of sterols by eukaryotes is an O(2)-intensive process. In this review, we argue that increased levels of O(2) in the atmosphere not only made the evolution of sterols possible, but that these sterols may in turn have provided the eukaryote with an early defence mechanism against O(2). The idea that nature crafted sterols as a feedback loop to adapt to, or help protect against, the hazards of O(2) is novel and enticing. We marshal several lines of evidence to support this thesis: (1) coincidence of atmospheric O(2) and sterol evolution; (2) sterols regulate O(2) entry into eukaryotic cells and organelles; (3) sterols act as O(2) sensors across eukaryotic life; (4) sterols serve as a primitive cellular defence against O(2) (including reactive oxygen species). Therefore, sterols may have evolved in eukaryotes partially as an adaptive response to the rise of terrestrial O(2), rather than merely as a consequence of it.

  17. Allyl isothiocyanate suppresses the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and de novo fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are a family of transcription factors that regulate lipid homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we used a stable cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter gene driven by an SRE-containing fatty acid synthase promoter to identify allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), one of the major isothiocyanates in cruciferous vegetables, as a novel SREBP inactivator. We found that AITC downregulated the proteolytic processing of SREBPs and the expression of their target genes in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells. Furthermore, AITC reduced the de novo synthesis of both fatty acids and cholesterol. Our results indicate a novel physiological function of AITC in lipid metabolism regulation.

  18. Peroxisomal cholesterol synthesis in vivo: accumulation of 4-methyl intermediate sterols after aminotriazole inhibition of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, F; Hayashi, H

    1994-08-25

    To clarify the importance and pathway of peroxisomal cholesterol synthesis in vivo, we have examined whether or not 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8-en-3 beta-ol and 4 alpha-methyl-5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol are accumulated in hepatic peroxisomes of aminotriazole-treated rats (we have shown that these intermediate steroids accumulate in rat liver when cholesterol synthesis is inhibited by aminotriazole: Hashimoto, F. and Hayashi, H. (1991) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1086, 115). Differential centrifugation and Nycodenz gradient centrifugation showed that these intermediate steroids were localized in peroxisomes and microsomes. Cholestyramine (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activator) pretreatment of aminotriazole-treated rats increased the contents of the intermediate steroids in both peroxisomes and microsomes. In peroxisomes, both 4 alpha-methyl-5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol and 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8-en-3 beta-ol were increased to about 3 times the control (aminotriazole-treated rat), and they were predominantly (about 70%) recovered in the membrane fraction after treatment with 0.05% deoxycholate or 100 mM Na2CO3. Gemfibrozil (peroxisomal proliferator) pretreatment enhanced the contents of 4 alpha-methyl-5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol and 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8-en-3 beta-ol of peroxisomes to 4.5 times and 37 times the control, respectively. The effects of aminotriazole, cholestyramine and gemfibrozil on the intermediate contents were different between peroxisomes and microsomes. We suggest that peroxisomes in addition to microsomes participate in cholesterol synthesis in vivo, and the biosynthetic pathway includes 4 alpha-methyl-5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol and 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8-en-3 beta-ol.

  19. SOME FACTORS AFFECTING STEROL FORMATION IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE1

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Patricia R.; Parks, L. W.

    1962-01-01

    Starr, Patricia R. (Oregon State University, Corvallis) and L. W. Parks. Some factors affecting sterol formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Bacteriol. 83:1042–1046. 1962.—A wild-type diploid strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in a study of factors that influence sterol synthesis. Maltose, glucose, sodium acetate, and ethanol were shown to be readily available for sterol synthesis in growing cultures of yeast. In cells grown anaerobically and then exposed to various substrates in aerobic resting-cell suspension, only glucose and ethanol stimulated ergosterol formation. Under these conditions, sterol synthesis was directly proportional to the amount of glucose provided. Sulfanilamide decreased the yield of sterol in growing cells, but had no effect on sterol synthesis by resting cultures. PMID:13916377

  20. Sterol methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M T; Hartmann, M A; Bottema, C D; Parks, L W

    1984-01-01

    Various nystatin-resistant mutants defective in S-adenosylmethionine: delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.41) were shown to possess alleles of the same gene, erg6. The genetic map location of erg6 was shown to be close to trp1 on chromosome 4. Despite the single locus for erg6, S-adenosylmethionine: delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase enzyme activity was found in three separate fractions: mitochondria, microsomes, and the "floating lipid layer." The amount of activity in each fraction could be manipulated by assay conditions. The lipids and lipid synthesis of mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in the delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase were compared with a C5(6) desaturase mutant and parental wild types. No ergosterol (C28 sterol) could be detected in whole-cell sterol extracts of the erg6 mutants, the limits of detection being less than 10(-11) mol of ergosterol per 10(8) cells. The distribution of accumulated sterols by these mutants varied with growth phase and between free and esterified fractions. The steryl ester concentrations of the mutants were eight times higher than those of the wild type from exponential growth samples. However, the concentration of the ester accumulated by the mutants was not as great in stationary-phase cells. Whereas the head group phospholipid composition was the same between parental and mutant strains, strain-dependent changes in fatty acids were observed, most notably a 40% increase in the oleic acid content of phosphatidylethanolamine of one erg6 mutant, JR5. PMID:6363386

  1. Sterol Regulation of Metabolism, Homeostasis and Development

    PubMed Central

    Wollam, Joshua; Antebi, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Sterol metabolites are critical signaling molecules that regulate metabolism, development, and homeostasis. Oxysterols, bile acids, and steroids work primarily through cognate sterol-responsive nuclear hormone receptors to control these processes through feed-forward and feedback mechanisms. These signaling pathways are conserved from simple invertebrates to mammals. Indeed, results from various model organisms have yielded fundamental insights into cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis, lipid and glucose metabolism, protective mechanisms, tissue differentiation, development, reproduction, and even aging. Here, we review how sterols act through evolutionarily ancient mechanisms to control these processes. PMID:21495846

  2. Optimization and modeling for the synthesis of sterol esters from deodorizer distillate by lipase-catalyzed esterification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Jiang; Zeng, Aiwu

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, cotton seed oil deodorizer distillate (CSODD), was recovered to obtain fatty acid sterol ester (FASE), which is one of the biological activated substances added as human therapeutic to lower cholesterol. Esterification reactions were carried out using Candida rugosa lipase as a catalyst, and the conversion of phytosterol was optimized using response surface methodology. The highest conversion (90.8 ± 0.4%) was reached at 0.84 wt% enzyme load, 1:25 solvent/CSODD mass ratio, and 44.2 °C after 12 H reaction. A kinetic model based on the reaction rate equation was developed to describe the reaction process. The activation energy of the reaction was calculated to be 56.9 kJ/mol and the derived kinetic parameters provided indispensable basics for further study. The optimization and kinetic research of synthesizing FASE from deodorizer distillate provided necessary information for the industrial applications in the near future. Experimental results showed that the proposed process is a promising alternative to recycle sterol esters from vegetable oil deodorizer distillates in a mild, efficient, and environmental friendly method. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis.

  4. A review of tobacco BY-2 cells as an excellent system to study the synthesis and function of sterols and other isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Gerber, Esther; Feldtrauer, Jean-François; Wentzinger, Laurent; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Tritsch, Denis; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2004-08-01

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this paper we review findings and observations made primarily with tobacco BY-2 cells (TBY-2), which have proven to be an excellent system in which to study the two biosynthetic pathways. A major advantage of these cells as an experimental system is their ability to readily take up specific inhibitors and stably- and/or radiolabeled precursors. This permits the functional elucidation of the role of isoprenoid end products and intermediates. Because TBY-2 cells undergo rapid cell division and can be synchronized within the cell cycle, they constitute a highly suitable test system for determination of those isoprenoids and intermediates that act as cell cycle inhibitors, thus giving an indication of which branches of the isoprenoid pathway are essential. Through chemical complementation; and use of precursors, intracellular compartmentation can be elucidated, as well as the extent to which the plastidial and cytosolic pathways contribute to the syntheses of specific groups of isoprenoids (e.g., sterols) via exchange of intermediates across membranes. These topics are discussed in the context of the pertinent literature.

  5. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor α regulates diurnal rhythm and fasting induction of sterol 12α-hydroxylase in bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Preeti; Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2013-12-27

    Sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) is required for cholic acid synthesis and plays a critical role in intestinal cholesterol absorption and pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism of fasting induction and circadian rhythm of CYP8B1 by a cholesterol-activated nuclear receptor and core clock gene retinoic acid-related orphan receptor α (RORα). Fasting stimulated, whereas restricted-feeding reduced expression of CYP8B1 mRNA and protein. However, fasting and feeding had little effect on the diurnal rhythm of RORα mRNA expression, but fasting increased RORα protein levels by cAMP-activated protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of the protein. Adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of RORα to mice strongly induced CYP8B1 expression, and increased liver cholesterol and 12α-hydroxylated bile acids in the bile acid pool and serum. A reporter assay identified a functional RORα response element in the CYP8B1 promoter. RORα recruited cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) to stimulate histone acetylation on the CYP8B1 gene promoter. In conclusion, RORα is a key regulator of diurnal rhythm and fasting induction of CYP8B1, which regulates bile acid composition and serum and liver cholesterol levels. Antagonizing RORα activity may be a therapeutic strategy for treating inflammatory diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes.

  6. Enhancement of sterol synthesis by the monoterpene perillyl alcohol is unaffected by competitive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Branch, S K; Broitman, S A

    1999-06-01

    Monoterpenes such as limonene and perillyl alcohol (PA) are currently under investigation for their chemotherapeutic properties which have been tied to their ability to affect protein isoprenylation. Because PA affects the synthesis of isoprenoids, such as ubiquinone, and cholesterol is the end product of the synthetic pathway from which this isoprenoid pathway branches, we investigated the effects of this compound upon cholesterol metabolism in the colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW480. PA (1 mM) inhibited incorporation of 14C-mevalonate into 21-26 kDa proteins by 25% in SW480 cells. Cholesterol (CH) biosynthesis was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate into 27-carbon-sterols. Cells treated with PA (1 mM) exhibited a fourfold increase in the incorporation of 14C-acetate but not 14C-mevalonate into cholesterol. Mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA(HMG-CoA) reductase, at 2 microM concentration, inhibited CH synthesis from 14C-acetate by 80%. Surprisingly, concurrent addition of mevinolin and PA did not significantly alter the stimulatory effects of PA. As observed differences in 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate precursor labeling could indicate PA affects early pathway events, the effects of this monoterpene on HMG-CoA reductase activity were evaluated. Unexpectedly, 1 mM PA did not stimulate activity of this enzyme. Consistent with its action as a reversibly bound inhibitor, in washed microsomes, 2 microM mevinolin pretreatment increased reductase protein expression causing a 12.7 (+/- 2.4)-fold compensatory HMG-CoA reductase activity increase; concurrent treatment with 1 mM PA attenuated this to a 5.3 (+/- 0.03)-fold increase. Gas chromatographic analysis confirmed CH was the major lipid present in the measured thin-layer chromatography spot. Since 14C-acetate incorporation into free fatty acid and phospholipid pools was not significantly affected by PA treatment, nonspecific changes in whole

  7. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  8. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  9. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix. PMID:26168008

  10. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Dikiy, Igor; Kiburu, Irene; Eliezer, David; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-08-04

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix.

  11. 4-Methyl Sterols Regulate Fission Yeast SREBP-Scap under Low Oxygen and Cell Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adam L.; Lee, Chih-Yung S.; Bien, Clara M.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    In fission yeast, orthologs of mammalian SREBP and Scap, called Sre1 and Scp1, monitor oxygen-dependent sterol synthesis as a measure of cellular oxygen supply. Under low oxygen conditions, sterol synthesis is inhibited and Sre1 cleavage is activated. However, the sterol signal for Sre1 activation is unknown. In this study, we characterize the sterol signal for Sre1 activation using a combination of Sre1 cleavage assays and gas chromatography sterol analysis. We find that Sre1 activation is regulated by levels of the 4-methyl sterols 24-methylene lanosterol and 4,4-dimethylfecosterol under conditions of low oxygen and cell stress. Both increases and decreases in the level of these ergosterol pathway intermediates induce Sre1 proteolysis in a Scp1-dependent manner. The SREBP ortholog in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is also activated by high levels of 4-methyl sterols, suggesting that this signal for SREBP activation is conserved among unicellular eukaryotes. Finally, we provide evidence that the sterol sensing domain of Scp1 is important for regulating Sre1 proteolysis. The conserved mutations Y247C, L264F, and D392N in Scp1 that render Scap insensitive to sterols cause constitutive Sre1 activation. These findings indicate that unlike Scap, fission yeast Scp1 responds to 4-methyl sterols and thus shares properties with mammalian HMG-CoA reductase, a sterol sensing domain protein whose degradation is regulated by the 4-methyl sterol lanosterol. PMID:17595166

  12. Enzyme mechanisms for sterol C-methylations.

    PubMed

    Nes, W David

    2003-09-01

    The mechanisms by which sterol methyl transferases (SMT) transform olefins into structurally different C-methylated products are complex, prompting over 50 years of intense research. Recent enzymological studies, together with the latest discoveries in the fossil record, functional analyses and gene cloning, establish new insights into the enzymatic mechanisms of sterol C-methylation and form a basis for understanding regulation and evolution of the sterol pathway. These studies suggest that SMTs, originated shortly after life appeared on planet earth. SMTs, including those which ultimately give rise to 24 alpha- and 24 beta-alkyl sterols, align the si(beta)-face pi-electrons of the Delta(24)-double bond with the S-methyl group of AdoMet relative to a set of deprotonation bases in the active site. From the orientation of the conformationally flexible side chain in the SMT Michaelis complex, it has been found that either a single product is formed or cationic intermediates are partitioned into multiple olefins. The product structure and stereochemistry of SMT action is phylogenetically distinct and physiologically significant. SMTs control phytosterol homeostasis and their activity is subject to feedback regulation by specific sterol inserts in the membrane. A unified conceptual framework has been formulated in the steric-electric plug model that posits SMT substrate acceptability on the generation of single or double 24-alkylated side chains, which is the basis for binding order, stereospecificity and product diversity in this class of AdoMet-dependent methyl transferase enzymes. The focus of this review is the mechanism of the C-methylation process which, as discussed, can be altered by point mutations in the enzyme to direct the shape of sterol structure to optimize function.

  13. Sterol Biosynthesis Is Required for Heat Resistance but Not Extracellular Survival in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm −) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm − mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm − causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance. PMID:25340392

  14. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S.; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heterotrophic Phytophthora infestans. We first present a comprehensive reconstruction of a likely sterol synthesis pathway for S. parasitica, causative agent of the disease saprolegniasis in fish. This pathway shows multiple potential routes of sterol synthesis, and draws on several avenues of new evidence: bioinformatic mining for genes with sterol-related functions, expression analysis of these genes, and analysis of the sterol profiles in mycelium grown in different media. Additionally, we explore the extent to which P. infestans, which causes the late blight in potato, can modify exogenously provided sterols. We consider whether the two very different approaches to sterol acquisition taken by these pathogens represent any specific survival advantages or potential drug targets. PMID:28152045

  15. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heterotrophic Phytophthora infestans. We first present a comprehensive reconstruction of a likely sterol synthesis pathway for S. parasitica, causative agent of the disease saprolegniasis in fish. This pathway shows multiple potential routes of sterol synthesis, and draws on several avenues of new evidence: bioinformatic mining for genes with sterol-related functions, expression analysis of these genes, and analysis of the sterol profiles in mycelium grown in different media. Additionally, we explore the extent to which P. infestans, which causes the late blight in potato, can modify exogenously provided sterols. We consider whether the two very different approaches to sterol acquisition taken by these pathogens represent any specific survival advantages or potential drug targets.

  16. Pneumocysterol [(24Z)-ethylidenelanost-8-en-3beta-ol], a rare sterol detected in the opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii hominis: structural identity and chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, E S; Amit, Z; Swonger, M M; Kreishman, G P; Brooks, E E; Kreishman, M; Jayasimhulu, K; Parish, E J; Sun, H; Kizito, S A; Beach, D H

    1999-01-05

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PcP) remains among the most prevalent opportunistic infections among AIDS patients. Currently, drugs used clinically for deep mycosis act by binding ergosterol or disrupting its biosynthesis. Although classified as a fungus, P. carinii lacks ergosterol. Instead, the pathogen synthesizes a number of distinct Delta7, 24-alkylsterols, despite the abundance of cholesterol, which it can scavenge from the lung alveolus. Thus, the pathogen-specific sterols appear vital for organism survival and proliferation. In the present study, high concentrations of a C32 sterol were found in human-derived P. carinii hominis. The definitive structural identities of two C-24 alkylated lanosterol compounds, previously not reported for rat-derived P. carinii carinii, were determined by using GLC, MS, and NMR spectroscopy together with the chemical syntheses of authentic standards. The C31 and C32 sterols were identified as euphorbol (24-methylenelanost-8-en-3beta-ol) and pneumocysterol [(24Z)-ethylidenelanost-8-en-3beta-ol], respectively. The identification of these and other 24-alkylsterols in P. carinii hominis suggests that (i) sterol C-24 methyltransferase activities are extraordinarily high in this organism, (ii) 24-alkylsterols are important components of the pathogen's membranes, because the addition of these side groups onto the sterol side chain requires substantial ATP equivalents, and (iii) the inefficacy of azole drugs against P. carinii can be explained by the ability of this organism to form 24-alkysterols before demethylation of the lanosterol nucleus. Because mammals cannot form 24-alkylsterols, their biosyntheses in P. carinii are attractive targets for the development of chemotherapeutic strategies against this opportunistic infection.

  17. Molecular insights into protein synthesis with proline residues.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey; Mailliot, Justine; Rigger, Lukas; Neuner, Sandro; Shin, Byung-Sik; Yusupova, Gulnara; Dever, Thomas E; Micura, Ronald; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-12-01

    Proline is an amino acid with a unique cyclic structure that facilitates the folding of many proteins, but also impedes the rate of peptide bond formation by the ribosome. As a ribosome substrate, proline reacts markedly slower when compared with other amino acids both as a donor and as an acceptor of the nascent peptide. Furthermore, synthesis of peptides with consecutive proline residues triggers ribosome stalling. Here, we report crystal structures of the eukaryotic ribosome bound to analogs of mono- and diprolyl-tRNAs. These structures provide a high-resolution insight into unique properties of proline as a ribosome substrate. They show that the cyclic structure of proline residue prevents proline positioning in the amino acid binding pocket and affects the nascent peptide chain position in the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel. These observations extend current knowledge of the protein synthesis mechanism. They also revise an old dogma that amino acids bind the ribosomal active site in a uniform way by showing that proline has a binding mode distinct from other amino acids.

  18. Steroid and sterol 7-hydroxylation: ancient pathways.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard

    2002-11-01

    B-ring hydroxylation is a major metabolic pathway for cholesterols and some steroids. In liver, 7 alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterols, mediated by CYP7A and CYP39A1, is the rate-limiting step of bile acid synthesis and metabolic elimination. In brain and other tissues, both sterols and some steroids including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are prominently 7 alpha-hydroxylated by CYP7B. The function of extra-hepatic steroid and sterol 7-hydroxylation is unknown. Nevertheless, 7-oxygenated cholesterols are potent regulators of cell proliferation and apoptosis; 7-oxygenated derivatives of DHEA, pregnenolone, and androstenediol can have major effects in the brain and in the immune system. The receptor targets involved remain obscure. It is argued that B-ring modification predated steroid evolution: non-enzymatic oxidation of membrane sterols primarily results in 7-oxygenation. Such molecules may have provided early growth and stress signals; a relic may be found in hydroxylation at the symmetrical 11-position of glucocorticoids. Early receptor targets probably included intracellular sterol sites, some modern steroids may continue to act at these targets. 7-Hydroxylation of DHEA may reflect conservation of an early signaling pathway.

  19. The Evolution of Sterol Biosynthesis in Bacteria: In Situ Fluorescence Localization of Sterols in the Nucleoid Bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budin, M.; Jorgenson, T. L.; Pearson, A.

    2004-12-01

    The biosynthesis of sterols is generally regarded as a eukaryotic process. The first enzymatic step in the production of sterols requires molecular oxygen. Therefore, both the origin of eukaryotes and the evolution of sterol biosynthesis were thought to postdate the rise of oxygen in earth's atmosphere, until Brocks et al. discovered steranes in rocks aged 2.7 Ga (1). Many prokaryotes produce hopanoids, sterol-like compounds that are synthesized from the common precursor squalene without the use of molecular oxygen. However, a few bacterial taxa are also known to produce sterols, suggesting this pathway could precede the rise of oxygen (2, 3). Recently, we discovered the shortest sterol-producing biosynthetic pathway known to date in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus (4). Using genomic searches, we found that Gemmata has the enzymes necessary for synthesis of sterols, and lipid analyses showed that the sterols produced are lanosterol and its isomer parkeol. Gemmata is a member of the Planctomycetes, an unusual group of bacteria, all of the known species of which contain intracellular compartmentalization. Among the Planctomycetes, Gemmata uniquely is the only prokaryote known to contain a double-membrane-bounded nuclear body (5). Since sterols usually are found in eukaryotes, and Gemmata has a eukaryote-like nuclear organelle, we investigated the location of the sterols within Gemmata to postulate whether they play a role in stabilization of the nuclear membrane and control of genomic organization. We used the sterol-specific fluorescent dye Filipin III in conjunction with fluorescent dyes for internal and external cellular membranes in order to determine whether the sterols are located in the nuclear body membrane, external membrane, or both. We found that sterols in Gemmata are concentrated in the internal membrane, implying that they function in maintaining this unusual cellular component. It is notable that Gemmata also produce hopanoids, suggesting that they

  20. Sterol Uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Heme Auxotrophic Mutants Is Affected by Ergosterol and Oleate but Not by Palmitoleate or by Sterol Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Frédérique; Achstetter, Tilman; Duport, Catherine; Karst, Francis; Spagnoli, Roberto; Degryse, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between sterol uptake and heme competence in two yeast strains impaired in heme synthesis, namely, G204 and H12-6A, was analyzed. To evaluate heme availability, a heterologous 17α-hydroxylase cytochrome P-450 cDNA (P-450c17) was expressed in these strains, and its activity was measured in vivo. Heme deficiency in G204 led to accumulation of squalene and lethality. The heterologous cytochrome P-450 was inactive in this strain. The leaky H12-6A strain presented a slightly modified sterol content compared to that for the wild type, and the P-450c17 recovered partial activity. By analyzing sterol transfer on nongrowing cells, it was shown that the cells were permeable toward exogenous cholesterol when they were depleted of endogenous sterols, which was the case for G204 but not for H12-6A. It was concluded that the fully blocked heme mutant (G204) replenishes its diminishing endogenous sterol levels during growth by replacement with sterol from the outside medium. Endogenous sterol biosynthesis appears to be the primary factor capable of excluding exogenous sterol. Oleate but not palmitoleate was identified as a component that reduced but did not prevent sterol transfer. Sterol transfer was only slightly affected by a lack of esterification. It is described herein how avoidance of the potential cytotoxicity of the early intermediates of the mevalonate pathway could be achieved by a secondary heme mutation in erg auxotrophs. PMID:9537392

  1. The effects of sterol structure upon sterol esterification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Don S; Steiner, Robert D; Merkens, Louise S; Pappu, Anuradha S; Connor, William E

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is esterified in mammals by two enzymes: LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase) in plasma and ACAT(1) and ACAT(2) (acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferases) in the tissues. We hypothesized that the sterol structure may have significant effects on the outcome of esterification by these enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sterol esters in plasma and tissues in patients having non-cholesterol sterols (sitosterolemia and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). The esterification of a given sterol was defined as the sterol ester percentage of total sterols. The esterification of cholesterol in plasma by LCAT was 67% and in tissues by ACAT was 64%. Esterification of nine sterols (cholesterol, cholestanol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, campestanol, sitostanol, 7-dehydrocholesterol and 8-dehydrocholesterol) was examined. The relative esterification (cholesterol being 1.0) of these sterols by the plasma LCAT was 1.00, 0.95, 0.89, 0.40, 0.85, 0.82 and 0.80, 0.69 and 0.82, respectively. The esterification by the tissue ACAT was 1.00, 1.29, 0.75, 0.49, 0.45, 1.21 and 0.74, respectively. The predominant fatty acid of the sterol esters was linoleic acid for LCAT and oleic acid for ACAT. We compared the esterification of two sterols differing by only one functional group (a chemical group attached to sterol nucleus) and were able to quantify the effects of individual functional groups on sterol esterification. The saturation of the A ring of cholesterol increased ester formation by ACAT by 29% and decreased the esterification by LCAT by 5.9%. Esterification by ACAT and LCAT was reduced, respectively, by 25 and 11% by the presence of an additional methyl group on the side chain of cholesterol at the C-24 position. This data supports our hypothesis that the structure of the sterol substrate has a significant effect on its esterification by ACAT or LCAT.

  2. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by oxygenated sterol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.I.; Bass, J.; Yachnin, S.

    1980-07-01

    When preincubated with certain oxygenated sterol compounds in lipoprotein-depleted serum (20% (vol/vol)), human polymorphonuclear leukocytes show inhibition of chemotaxis toward the synthetic dipeptide N-formylmethionylphenylalinine without alteration of random movement or loss of cell viability. These effects can occur at sterol concentrations as low as 6.25 ..mu..M and after as little as 5 min of preincubation, but they are increased at higher concentrations and longer preincubation times. The inhibition can be almost completely reversed by preincubation in lipoprotein-replete serum (human AB serum, 20% (vol/vol)) and may be partially corrected by addition of free cholesterol (0.125 mM) to the medium. These effects are unlikely to be due to inhibition of cellular sterol synthesis, competition for chemotaxin membrane binding sites, or deactivation of the leukocytes but they may be a consequence of insertion of the sterol molecule into the leukocyte plasma membranes.

  3. Paleoproterozoic sterol biosynthesis and the rise of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, David A.; Caron, Abigail; Fournier, Gregory P.; Summons, Roger E.

    2017-03-01

    Natural products preserved in the geological record can function as ‘molecular fossils’, providing insight into organisms and physiologies that existed in the deep past. One important group of molecular fossils is the steroidal hydrocarbons (steranes), which are the diagenetic remains of sterol lipids. Complex sterols with modified side chains are unique to eukaryotes, although simpler sterols can also be synthesized by a few bacteria. Sterol biosynthesis is an oxygen-intensive process; thus, the presence of complex steranes in ancient rocks not only signals the presence of eukaryotes, but also aerobic metabolic processes. In 1999, steranes were reported in 2.7 billion year (Gyr)-old rocks from the Pilbara Craton in Australia, suggesting a long delay between photosynthetic oxygen production and its accumulation in the atmosphere (also known as the Great Oxidation Event) 2.45-2.32 Gyr ago. However, the recent reappraisal and rejection of these steranes as contaminants pushes the oldest reported steranes forward to around 1.64 Gyr ago (ref. 6). Here we use a molecular clock approach to improve constraints on the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. We infer that stem eukaryotes shared functionally modern sterol biosynthesis genes with bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Comparing multiple molecular clock analyses, we find that the maximum marginal probability for the divergence time of bacterial and eukaryal sterol biosynthesis genes is around 2.31 Gyr ago, concurrent with the most recent geochemical evidence for the Great Oxidation Event. Our results therefore indicate that simple sterol biosynthesis existed well before the diversification of living eukaryotes, substantially predating the oldest detected sterane biomarkers (approximately 1.64 Gyr ago), and furthermore, that the evolutionary history of sterol biosynthesis is tied to the first widespread availability of molecular oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system.

  4. Paleoproterozoic sterol biosynthesis and the rise of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Caron, Abigail; Fournier, Gregory P; Summons, Roger E

    2017-03-16

    Natural products preserved in the geological record can function as 'molecular fossils', providing insight into organisms and physiologies that existed in the deep past. One important group of molecular fossils is the steroidal hydrocarbons (steranes), which are the diagenetic remains of sterol lipids. Complex sterols with modified side chains are unique to eukaryotes, although simpler sterols can also be synthesized by a few bacteria. Sterol biosynthesis is an oxygen-intensive process; thus, the presence of complex steranes in ancient rocks not only signals the presence of eukaryotes, but also aerobic metabolic processes. In 1999, steranes were reported in 2.7 billion year (Gyr)-old rocks from the Pilbara Craton in Australia, suggesting a long delay between photosynthetic oxygen production and its accumulation in the atmosphere (also known as the Great Oxidation Event) 2.45-2.32 Gyr ago. However, the recent reappraisal and rejection of these steranes as contaminants pushes the oldest reported steranes forward to around 1.64 Gyr ago (ref. 6). Here we use a molecular clock approach to improve constraints on the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. We infer that stem eukaryotes shared functionally modern sterol biosynthesis genes with bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Comparing multiple molecular clock analyses, we find that the maximum marginal probability for the divergence time of bacterial and eukaryal sterol biosynthesis genes is around 2.31 Gyr ago, concurrent with the most recent geochemical evidence for the Great Oxidation Event. Our results therefore indicate that simple sterol biosynthesis existed well before the diversification of living eukaryotes, substantially predating the oldest detected sterane biomarkers (approximately 1.64 Gyr ago), and furthermore, that the evolutionary history of sterol biosynthesis is tied to the first widespread availability of molecular oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system.

  5. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  6. Plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols: Minute concentrations-Major physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Vesa M; Gylling, Helena; Ikonen, Elina

    2017-05-01

    Non-cholesterol sterols are present in our body at very low concentrations as compared to cholesterol. Small changes in the structure of sterol molecules confer them highly distinct biological activities. The best-known example are steroid hormones derived from cholesterol. During the past decade, our knowledge of also other biomolecules related to or derived from cholesterol, particularly plant sterols, biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, and oxysterols, has expanded rapidly. In this review article we recapitulate the latest insights into the properties and physiological activities of these non-cholesterol sterols, as well as their importance in disease processes and potential as diagnostic biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant sterols: Friend or foe in CNS disorders?

    PubMed

    Vanmierlo, Tim; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmol, Jasmine; Lütjohann, Dieter; Mulder, Monique; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system (CNS) is the most cholesterol rich organ by weight. Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated in the CNS and all cholesterol available is synthesized in situ. Deficits in cholesterol homeostasis at the level of synthesis, transport, or catabolism result in severe disorders featured by neurological disability. Recent studies indicate that a disturbed cholesterol metabolism is involved in CNS disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast to circulating cholesterol, dietary plant sterols, can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the membranes of CNS cells. Plant sterols are well-known for their ability to lower circulating cholesterol levels. The finding that they gain access to the CNS has fueled research focusing on the physiological roles of plant sterols in the healthy and diseased CNS. To date, both beneficial and detrimental effects of plant sterols on CNS disorders are defined. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the impact of plant sterols on homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the CNS, and elaborate on the therapeutic potential of plant sterols in CNS disorders.

  8. High confidence proteomic analysis of yeast LDs identifies additional droplet proteins and reveals connections to dolichol synthesis and sterol acetylation[S

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Erin; Guo, Xiuling; Christiano, Romain; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kory, Nora; Harrison, Kenneth; Haas, Joel; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate protein inventories are essential for understanding an organelle’s functions. The lipid droplet (LD) is a ubiquitous intracellular organelle with major functions in lipid storage and metabolism. LDs differ from other organelles because they are bounded by a surface monolayer, presenting unique features for protein targeting to LDs. Many proteins of varied functions have been found in purified LD fractions by proteomics. While these studies have become increasingly sensitive, it is often unclear which of the identified proteins are specific to LDs. Here we used protein correlation profiling to identify 35 proteins that specifically enrich with LD fractions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of these candidates, 30 fluorophore-tagged proteins localize to LDs by microscopy, including six proteins, several with human orthologs linked to diseases, which we newly identify as LD proteins (Cab5, Rer2, Say1, Tsc10, YKL047W, and YPR147C). Two of these proteins, Say1, a sterol deacetylase, and Rer2, a cis-isoprenyl transferase, are enzymes involved in sterol and polyprenol metabolism, respectively, and we show their activities are present in LD fractions. Our results provide a highly specific list of yeast LD proteins and reveal that the vast majority of these proteins are involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:24868093

  9. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  10. Survival strategies of a sterol auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Maria; Schwudke, Dominik; Sampaio, Julio L.; Palm, Wilhelm; Riezman, Isabelle; Dey, Gautam; Gupta, Gagan D.; Mayor, Satyajit; Riezman, Howard; Shevchenko, Andrej; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.; Eaton, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The high sterol concentration in eukaryotic cell membranes is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila cannot synthesize sterols, but do require them for development. Does this simply reflect a requirement for sterols in steroid hormone biosynthesis, or is bulk membrane sterol also essential in Drosophila? If the latter is true, how do they survive fluctuations in sterol availability and maintain membrane homeostasis? Here, we show that Drosophila require both bulk membrane sterol and steroid hormones in order to complete adult development. When sterol availability is restricted, Drosophila larvae modulate their growth to maintain membrane sterol levels within tight limits. When dietary sterol drops below a minimal threshold, larvae arrest growth and development in a reversible manner. Strikingly, membrane sterol levels in arrested larvae are dramatically reduced (dropping sixfold on average) in most tissues except the nervous system. Thus, sterols are dispensable for maintaining the basic membrane biophysical properties required for cell viability; these functions can be performed by non-sterol lipids when sterols are unavailable. However, bulk membrane sterol is likely to have essential functions in specific tissues during development. In tissues in which sterol levels drop, the overall level of sphingolipids increases and the proportion of different sphingolipid variants is altered. These changes allow survival, but not growth, when membrane sterol levels are low. This relationship between sterols and sphingolipids could be an ancient and conserved principle of membrane homeostasis. PMID:20940226

  11. A Nano-MgO and Ionic Liquid-Catalyzed ‘Green’ Synthesis Protocol for the Development of Adamantyl-Imidazolo-Thiadiazoles as Anti-Tuberculosis Agents Targeting Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51)

    PubMed Central

    Anusha, Sebastian; CP, Baburajeev; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Mathai, Jessin; Rangappa, Shobith; Mohan, Surender; Chandra; Paricharak, Shardul; Mervin, Lewis; Fuchs, Julian E.; M, Mahedra; Bender, Andreas; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the ‘green’ synthesis of novel 6-(adamantan-1-yl)-2-substituted-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles (AITs) by ring formation reactions using 1-(adamantan-1-yl)-2-bromoethanone and 5-alkyl/aryl-2-amino1,3,4-thiadiazoles on a nano material base in ionic liquid media. Given the established activity of imidazothiadiazoles against M. tuberculosis, we next examined the anti-TB activity of AITs against the H37Rv strain using Alamar blue assay. Among the tested compounds 6-(adamantan-1-yl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole (3f) showed potent inhibitory activity towards M. tuberculosis with an MIC value of 8.5 μM. The inhibitory effect of this molecule against M. tuberculosis was comparable to the standard drugs such as Pyrazinamide, Streptomycin, and Ciprofloxacin drugs. Mechanistically, an in silico analysis predicted sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) as the likely target and experimental activity of 3f in this system corroborated the in silico target prediction. In summary, we herein report the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel AITs against M. tuberculosis that likely target CYP51 to induce their antimycobacterial activity. PMID:26470029

  12. Sterols of the cultured dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula.

    PubMed

    Kokke, W C; Fenical, W; Djerassi, C

    1982-09-01

    Eighteen components of the sterol fraction of Pyrocystis lunula have been identified. In addition to 4 alpha-methyl sterols (typical dinoflagellate sterols), regular sterols, both with a saturated and delta 5-unsaturated skeleton, were isolated, together with delta 4-3-keto steroids including the hitherto unknown 23,24R-dimethyl-4,22E-cholestadien-3-one.

  13. Study of Behavior of Sterols at Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, P. D.; Knight, J. C.; Szczepanik, P. A.

    1968-01-01

    Behavior of sterols and sterol acetates on various types of interfaces indicates that the function of a sterol depends upon a surface orientation and surface energy of the interface. Column-chromatographic techniques determine the retention volume of various sterols under standard conditions.

  14. The use of the Dhcr7 knockout mouse to accurately determine the origin of fetal sterols

    PubMed Central

    Tint, G. S.; Yu, Hongwei; Shang, Quan; Xu, Guorong; Patel, Shailendra B.

    2006-01-01

    Mice with a targeted mutation of 3β-hydroxysterol Δ7-reductase (Dhcr7) that cannot convert 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol were used to identify the origin of fetal sterols. Because their heterozygous mothers synthesize cholesterol normally, virtually all sterols found in a Dhcr7 knockout fetus having a Δ7 or a Δ8 double bond must have been synthesized by the fetus itself but any cholesterol had to have come from the mother. Early in gestation, most fetal sterols were of maternal origin, but at approximately E13–14, in situ synthesis became increasingly important, and by birth, 55–60% of liver and lung sterols had been made by the fetus. In contrast, at E10–11, upon formation of the blood-brain barrier, the brain rapidly became the source of almost all of its own sterols (90% at birth). New, rapid, de novo sterol synthesis in brain was confirmed by the observation that concentrations of C24,25-unsaturated sterols were low in the brains of all very young fetuses but increased rapidly beginning at approximately E11–12. Reduced activity of sterol C24,25-reductase (Dhcr24) in brain, suggested by the abundance of C24,25-unsaturated compounds, seems to be the result of suppressed Dhcr24 expression. The early fetal brain also appears to conserve cholesterol by keeping cholesterol 24-hydroxylase expression low until approximately E18. PMID:16651660

  15. A parameterized model of amylopectin synthesis provides key insights into the synthesis of granular starch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alex Chi; Morell, Matthew K; Gilbert, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    A core set of genes involved in starch synthesis has been defined by genetic studies, but the complexity of starch biosynthesis has frustrated attempts to elucidate the precise functional roles of the enzymes encoded. The chain-length distribution (CLD) of amylopectin in cereal endosperm is modeled here on the basis that the CLD is produced by concerted actions of three enzyme types: starch synthases, branching and debranching enzymes, including their respective isoforms. The model, together with fitting to experiment, provides four key insights. (1) To generate crystalline starch, defined restrictions on particular ratios of enzymatic activities apply. (2) An independent confirmation of the conclusion, previously reached solely from genetic studies, of the absolute requirement for debranching enzyme in crystalline amylopectin synthesis. (3) The model provides a mechanistic basis for understanding how successive arrays of crystalline lamellae are formed, based on the identification of two independent types of long amylopectin chains, one type remaining in the amorphous lamella, while the other propagates into, and is integral to the formation of, an adjacent crystalline lamella. (4) The model provides a means by which a small number of key parameters defining the core enzymatic activities can be derived from the amylopectin CLD, providing the basis for focusing studies on the enzymatic requirements for generating starches of a particular structure. The modeling approach provides both a new tool to accelerate efforts to understand granular starch biosynthesis and a basis for focusing efforts to manipulate starch structure and functionality using a series of testable predictions based on a robust mechanistic framework.

  16. Sterols and sphingolipids: Dynamic duo or partners in crime?

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sonia; Liu, Ying; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Wilcox, Lisa; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    One manner in which eukaryotic cells respond to their environments is by optimizing the composition and proportions of sterols and sphingolipids in membranes. The physical association of the planar ring of sterols with the acyl chains of phospholipids, particularly sphingolipids, produces membrane micro-heterogeneity that is exploited to coordinate several crucial pathways. We hypothesize that these lipid molecules play an integrated role in human disease; when one of the partners is mis-regulated, pathology frequently ensues. Sterols and sphingolipid levels are not coordinated by the action of a single master regulator, however the cross talk between their metabolic pathways is considerable. We describe our perspectives on the key components of synthesis, catabolism and transport of these lipid partners with an emphasis on evolutionarily conserved reactions that produce disease states when defective. PMID:20362613

  17. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans.

    PubMed

    Ikekawa, Nobuo; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970-1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids.

  18. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    IKEKAWA, Nobuo; FUJIMOTO, Yoshinori; ISHIGURO, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970–1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids. PMID:24126284

  19. Tracking the sterol biosynthesis pathway of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Michele; Matthijs, Michiel; Carbonelle, Sophie; Moses, Tessa; Pollier, Jacob; Dasseville, Renaat; Baart, Gino J E; Vyverman, Wim; Goossens, Alain

    2014-11-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic microalgae that play a major role in global primary production and aquatic biogeochemical cycling. Endosymbiotic events and recurrent gene transfers uniquely shaped the genome of diatoms, which contains features from several domains of life. The biosynthesis pathways of sterols, essential compounds in all eukaryotic cells, and many of the enzymes involved are evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes. Although well characterized in most eukaryotes, the pathway leading to sterol biosynthesis in diatoms has remained hitherto unidentified. Through the DiatomCyc database we reconstructed the mevalonate and sterol biosynthetic pathways of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in silico. We experimentally verified the predicted pathways using enzyme inhibitor, gene silencing and heterologous gene expression approaches. Our analysis revealed a peculiar, chimeric organization of the diatom sterol biosynthesis pathway, which possesses features of both plant and fungal pathways. Strikingly, it lacks a conventional squalene epoxidase and utilizes an extended oxidosqualene cyclase and a multifunctional isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase/squalene synthase enzyme. The reconstruction of the P. tricornutum sterol pathway underscores the metabolic plasticity of diatoms and offers important insights for the engineering of diatoms for sustainable production of biofuels and high-value chemicals.

  20. Cholesterol metabolism and serum non-cholesterol sterols: summary of 13 plant stanol ester interventions.

    PubMed

    Hallikainen, Maarit; Simonen, Piia; Gylling, Helena

    2014-04-27

    The efficacy and safety of plant stanols added to food products as serum cholesterol lowering agents have been demonstrated convincingly, but their effects on cholesterol metabolism and on serum non-cholesterol sterols is less evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of serum non-cholesterol sterols and squalene as bioindices of cholesterol synthesis and absorption, and to examine how the individual serum non-cholesterol sterols respond to consumption of plant stanols. We collected all randomized, controlled plant stanol ester (STAEST) interventions in which serum cholestanol, plant sterols campesterol and sitosterol, and at least two serum cholesterol precursors had been analysed. According to these criteria, there was a total of 13 studies (total 868 subjects without lipid-lowering medication; plant stanol doses varied from 0.8 to 8.8 g/d added in esterified form; the duration of the studies varied from 4 to 52 weeks). Serum non-cholesterol sterols were assayed with gas-liquid chromatography, cholesterol synthesis with the sterol balance technique, and fractional cholesterol absorption with the dual continuous isotope feeding method. The results demonstrated that during the control and the STAEST periods, the serum plant sterol/cholesterol- and the cholestanol/cholesterol-ratios reflected fractional cholesterol absorption, and the precursor sterol/cholesterol-ratios reflected cholesterol synthesis. Plant sterol levels were dose-dependently reduced by STAEST so that 2 g of plant stanols reduced serum campesterol/cholesterol-ratio on average by 32%. Serum cholestanol/cholesterol-ratio was reduced less frequently than those of the plant sterols by STAEST, and the cholesterol precursor sterol ratios did not change consistently in the individual studies emphasizing the importance of monitoring more than one surrogate serum marker. Serum non-cholesterol sterols are valid markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis even during cholesterol

  1. Cholesterol metabolism and serum non-cholesterol sterols: summary of 13 plant stanol ester interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of plant stanols added to food products as serum cholesterol lowering agents have been demonstrated convincingly, but their effects on cholesterol metabolism and on serum non-cholesterol sterols is less evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of serum non-cholesterol sterols and squalene as bioindices of cholesterol synthesis and absorption, and to examine how the individual serum non-cholesterol sterols respond to consumption of plant stanols. Methods We collected all randomized, controlled plant stanol ester (STAEST) interventions in which serum cholestanol, plant sterols campesterol and sitosterol, and at least two serum cholesterol precursors had been analysed. According to these criteria, there was a total of 13 studies (total 868 subjects without lipid-lowering medication; plant stanol doses varied from 0.8 to 8.8 g/d added in esterified form; the duration of the studies varied from 4 to 52 weeks). Serum non-cholesterol sterols were assayed with gas–liquid chromatography, cholesterol synthesis with the sterol balance technique, and fractional cholesterol absorption with the dual continuous isotope feeding method. Results The results demonstrated that during the control and the STAEST periods, the serum plant sterol/cholesterol- and the cholestanol/cholesterol-ratios reflected fractional cholesterol absorption, and the precursor sterol/cholesterol-ratios reflected cholesterol synthesis. Plant sterol levels were dose-dependently reduced by STAEST so that 2 g of plant stanols reduced serum campesterol/cholesterol-ratio on average by 32%. Serum cholestanol/cholesterol-ratio was reduced less frequently than those of the plant sterols by STAEST, and the cholesterol precursor sterol ratios did not change consistently in the individual studies emphasizing the importance of monitoring more than one surrogate serum marker. Conclusions Serum non-cholesterol sterols are valid markers of cholesterol absorption

  2. Recent insights in enzymatic synthesis of fructooligosaccharides from inulin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Singh, Rupinder Pal; Kennedy, John F

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, people are paying more attention to their dietary habits, and functional foods are playing a key role in maintaining the health of man. Prebiotics are considered as a main component of the functional foods which are usually composed of short chains of carbohydrates. Fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) are considered as one of the main group of prebiotics which have recognisable bifidogenic properties. FOSs are obtained either by extraction from various plant materials or by enzymatic synthesis from different substrates. Enzymatically, these can be obtained either from sucrose using fructosyltransferase or from inulin by endoinulinase. Inulin is a potent substrate for the enzymatic production of FOSs. This review article will provide an overview on the inulin as potent substrate, microbial sources of endoinulinases, enzymatic synthesis of FOSs from inulin, commercial status of FOSs, and their future perspectives.

  3. Sterols as Complex-forming Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, D. V.

    1986-02-01

    The formation of complexes of sterols with different compounds determines the biological properties of both sterols and various natural substances such as saponins and polyene antibiotics. Complex formation by sterols with phospholipids, steroid saponins, and polyene antibiotics is determined by the same characteristic features of the structure of the sterol molecule. The principal role in complex formation is played by the hydrophobic reaction of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring. The formation of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of the sterol and a proton acceptor, which is assumed in most complexes, has been proved only in the complexes of sterols with water and acids. The bibliography contains 122 references.

  4. Cloning and functional expression of UGT genes encoding sterol glucosyltransferases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris, and Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, D; Erdmann, R; Fahl, A; Hube, B; Müller, F; Zank, T; Zähringer, U; Heinz, E

    1999-05-07

    Sterol glucosides, typical membrane-bound lipids of many eukaryotes, are biosynthesized by a UDP-glucose:sterol glucosyltransferase (EC 2. 4.1.173). We cloned genes from three different yeasts and from Dictyostelium discoideum, the deduced amino acid sequences of which all showed similarities with plant sterol glucosyltransferases (Ugt80A1, Ugt80A2). These genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (UGT51 = YLR189C), Pichia pastoris (UGT51B1), Candida albicans (UGT51C1), and Dictyostelium discoideum (ugt52) were expressed in Escherichia coli. In vitro enzyme assays with cell-free extracts of the transgenic E. coli strains showed that the genes encode UDP-glucose:sterol glucosyltransferases which can use different sterols such as cholesterol, sitosterol, and ergosterol as sugar acceptors. An S. cerevisiae null mutant of UGT51 had lost its ability to synthesize sterol glucoside but exhibited normal growth under various culture conditions. Expression of either UGT51 or UGT51B1 in this null mutant under the control of a galactose-induced promoter restored sterol glucoside synthesis in vitro. Lipid extracts of these cells contained a novel glycolipid. This lipid was purified and identified as ergosterol-beta-D-glucopyranoside by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These data prove that the cloned genes encode sterol-beta-D-glucosyltransferases and that sterol glucoside synthesis is an inherent feature of eukaryotic microorganisms.

  5. Sterol biosynthesis in oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gaulin, Elodie; Bottin, Arnaud; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of filamentous eukaryotic microbes comprising devastating animal and plant pathogens. They share many characteristics with fungi, including polarized hyphal extension and production of spores, but phylogenetics studies have clearly placed oomycetes outside the fungal kingdom, in the kingdom Stramenopila which also includes marine organisms such as diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes display various specific biochemical features, including sterol metabolism. Sterols are essential isoprenoid compounds involved in membrane function and hormone signaling. Oomycetes belonging to Peronosporales, such as Phytophthora sp., are unable to synthesize their own sterols and must acquire them from their plant or animal hosts. In contrast, a combination of biochemical and molecular approaches allowed us to decipher a nearly complete sterol biosynthetic pathway leading to fucosterol in the legume pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, an oomycete belonging to Saprolegniales. Importantly, sterol demethylase, a key enzyme from this pathway, is susceptible to chemicals widely used in agriculture and medicine as antifungal drugs, suggesting that similar products could be used against plant and animal diseases caused by Saprolegniales.

  6. Sterol biosynthesis in oomycete pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gaulin, Elodie; Bottin, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of filamentous eukaryotic microbes comprising devastating animal and plant pathogens. They share many characteristics with fungi, including polarized hyphal extension and production of spores, but phylogenetics studies have clearly placed oomycetes outside the fungal kingdom, in the kingdom Stramenopila which also includes marine organisms such as diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes display various specific biochemical features, including sterol metabolism. Sterols are essential isoprenoid compounds involved in membrane function and hormone signaling. Oomycetes belonging to Peronosporales, such as Phytophthora sp., are unable to synthesize their own sterols and must acquire them from their plant or animal hosts. In contrast, a combination of biochemical and molecular approaches allowed us to decipher a nearly complete sterol biosynthetic pathway leading to fucosterol in the legume pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, an oomycete belonging to Saprolegniales. Importantly, sterol demethylase, a key enzyme from this pathway, is susceptible to chemicals widely used in agriculture and medicine as antifungal drugs, suggesting that similar products could be used against plant and animal diseases caused by Saprolegniales. PMID:20023385

  7. Non-cholesterol Sterols in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dyslipidemias: A Review.

    PubMed

    Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Non-cholesterol sterols have been used as markers of cholesterol intestinal absorption and hepatic synthesis, leading to a better understanding of cholesterol homeostasis in humans. This review discusses the main noncholesterol sterols that are clinically useful, different methods to quantify the factors associated with blood concentration, and the potential role of non-cholesterol sterols in the diagnosis and treatment of different types of dyslipidemia. The main indication is the use of non-cholesterol sterols for the diagnosis of rare diseases associated with defects in cholesterol synthesis or anomalies in the absorption and/or elimination of phytosterols. However, other potential uses, including the diagnosis of certain hypercholesterolemias and the individualization of lipid-lowering therapies, are promising as they could help treat a wider population.

  8. Properties, structure, and applications of microbial sterol esterases.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Maria Eugenia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Prieto, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    According to their substrate preferences, carboxylic ester hydrolases are organized in smaller clusters. Among them, sterol esterases (EC 3.1.1.13), also known as cholesterol esterases, act on fatty acid esters of cholesterol and other sterols in aqueous media, and are also able to catalyze synthesis by esterification or transesterification in the presence of organic solvents. Mammalian cholesterol esterases are intracellular enzymes that have been extensively studied since they are essential in lipid metabolism and cholesterol absorption, and the natural role of some microbial sterol esterases is supposed to be similar. However, besides these intracellular enzymes, a number of microbes produce extracellular sterol esterases, which show broad stability, selectivity, or wide substrate specificity, making them interesting for the industry. In spite of this, there is little information about microbial sterol esterases, and only a small amount of them have been characterized. Some of the most commercially exploited cholesterol esterases are produced by Pseudomonas species and by Candida rugosa, although in the last case they are usually described and named as "high substrate versatility lipases." From a structural point of view, most of them belong to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily and have a conserved "catalytic triad" formed by His, an acidic amino acid and a Ser residue that is located in a highly conserved GXSXG sequence. In this review, the information available on microbial sterol esterases has been gathered, taking into account their origin, production and purification, heterologous expression, structure, stability, or substrate specificity, which are the main properties that make them attractive for different applications. Moreover, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis on available sequences of cholesterol esterases has been done, including putative sequences deduced from public genomes.

  9. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent.

  10. Cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols.

    PubMed

    AbuMweis, Suhad S; Jones, Peter J H

    2008-12-01

    Plant sterols are plant components that have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol except for the addition of an extra methyl or ethyl group; however, plant sterol absorption in humans is considerably less than that of cholesterol. In fact, plant sterols reduce cholesterol absorption and thus reduce circulating levels of cholesterol. Earlier studies that have tested the efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol-lowering agents incorporated plant sterols into fat spreads. Later on, plant sterols were added to other food matrices, including juices, nonfat beverages, milk and yogurt, cheese, meat, croissants and muffins, and cereal and chocolate bars. The beneficial physiologic effects of plant sterols could be further enhanced by combining them with other beneficial substances, such as olive and fish oils, fibers, and soy proteins, or with exercise. The addition of plant sterols to the diet is suggested by health experts as a safe and effective way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

  11. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  12. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  13. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  14. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  15. Effect of chlorpromazine on lipid metabolism in aortas from cholesterol-fed rabbits and normal rats, in vitro: inhibition of sterol esterification and modification of phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, F.P.

    1983-06-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a major tranquilizer, was found to be a potent inhibitor of acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, EC 2.3.1.26) in isolated arterial microsomes and in intact arterial tissue from the rat and cholesterol-fed rabbit in vitro. In isolated rabbit arterial microsomes, CPZ resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of ACAT with 50% inhibition of (1-14C)oleoylCoA incorporation into (14C)cholesteryl esters occurring at 0.1 mM CPZ. CPZ also effectively inhibited the incorporation of (14C)oleate into triglycerides without affecting incorporation into diglycerides. Additionally, CPZ altered the pattern of arterial phospholipids synthesized from (1-14C)oleate. Incorporation into phosphatidylcholine was depressed while incorporation into phosphatidylinositol was increased. Since diglyceride synthesis appeared to be unaffected by CPZ, a redirection of phosphatidic acid into the CDP-diglyceride pathway of glycerolipid synthesis does not adequately account for the effect of CPZ on arterial phospholipid and triglyceride synthesis in these experiments.

  16. Plant Sterol Diversity in Pollen from Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Villette, Claire; Berna, Anne; Compagnon, Vincent; Schaller, Hubert

    2015-08-01

    Here we have examined the composition of free sterols and steryl esters of pollen from selected angiosperm species, as a first step towards a comprehensive analysis of sterol biogenesis in the male gametophyte. We detected four major sterol structural groups: cycloartenol derivatives bearing a 9β,19-cyclopropyl group, sterols with a double bond at C-7(8), sterols with a double bond at C-5(6), and stanols. All these groups were unequally distributed among species. However, the distribution of sterols as free sterols or as steryl esters in pollen grains indicated that free sterols were mostly Δ(5)-sterols and that steryl esters were predominantly 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols. In order to link the sterol composition of a pollen grain at anthesis with the requirement for membrane lipid constituents of the pollen tube, we germinated pollen grains from Nicotiana tabacum, a model plant in reproductive biology. In the presence of radiolabelled mevalonic acid and in a time course series of measurements, we showed that cycloeucalenol was identified as the major neosynthesized sterol. Furthermore, the inhibition of cycloeucalenol neosynthesis by squalestatin was in full agreement with a de novo biogenesis and an apparent truncated pathway in the pollen tube.

  17. Scaling up complex interventions: insights from a realist synthesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Stockton, Lisa; Abramowicz, Aneta; Zummach, Dana; Wong, Geoff; Robinson, Kerry L; Best, Allan

    2016-12-19

    Preventing chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, requires complex interventions, involving multi-component and multi-level efforts that are tailored to the contexts in which they are delivered. Despite an increasing number of complex interventions in public health, many fail to be 'scaled up'. This study aimed to increase understanding of how and under what conditions complex public health interventions may be scaled up to benefit more people and populations.A realist synthesis was conducted and discussed at an in-person workshop involving practitioners responsible for scaling up activities. Realist approaches view causality through the linkages between changes in contexts (C) that activate mechanisms (M), leading to specific outcomes (O) (CMO configurations). To focus this review, three cases of complex interventions that had been successfully scaled up were included: Vibrant Communities, Youth Build USA and Pathways to Education. A search strategy of published and grey literature related to each case was developed, involving searches of relevant databases and nominations from experts. Data extracted from included documents were classified according to CMO configurations within strategic themes. Findings were compared and contrasted with guidance from diffusion theory, and interpreted with knowledge users to identify practical implications and potential directions for future research.Four core mechanisms were identified, namely awareness, commitment, confidence and trust. These mechanisms were activated within two broad scaling up strategies, those of renewing and regenerating, and documenting success. Within each strategy, specific actions to change contexts included building partnerships, conducting evaluations, engaging political support and adapting funding models. These modified contexts triggered the identified mechanisms, leading to a range of scaling up outcomes, such as commitment of new communities, changes in relevant

  18. The counterflow transport of sterols and PI4P.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol levels in intracellular membranes are constantly adjusted to match with specific organelle functions. Cholesterol is kept high in the plasma membrane (PM) because it is essential for its barrier function, while low levels are found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where cholesterol mediates feedback control of its own synthesis by sterol-sensor proteins. The ER→Golgi→PM concentration gradient of cholesterol in mammalian cells, and ergosterol in yeast, appears to be sustained by specific intracellular transport processes, which are mostly mediated by lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Here we review a recently described function of two LTPs, OSBP and its yeast homolog Osh4p, which consists in creating a sterol gradient between membranes by vectorial transport. OSBP also contributes to the formation of ER/Golgi membrane contact sites, which are important hubs for the transfer of several lipid species. OSBP and Osh4p organize a counterflow transport of lipids whereby sterols are exchanged for the phosphoinositide PI4P, which is used as a fuel to drive sterol transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  19. On the sterols of some ascidians.

    PubMed

    Voogt, P A; van Rheenen, J W

    1975-08-01

    The lipid content of sea squirts is low, namely less than a half percent of the fresh weight. Lipids consist of about seventy percent of saponifiable lipids and of about twenty percent of non-saponifiable lipids. Both types of these lipids, including sterols, can be synthesized from acetate by these animals. Small amounts of C30 sterols were observed only in Microcosmus sulcatus and Halocynthia papillosa, the species with a low content of C27 sterols and a high content of C28 sterols. In addition these species contained considerable higher amounts of sterols with a double bond at the C22 position than Ciona intestinalis and Styela plicata did.

  20. Dietary plant sterols and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Lars H; Andersson, Susan W; Normén, A Lena; Andersson, Henrik A

    2007-01-01

    Plant sterols, naturally occurring in foods of plant origin, reduce cholesterol absorption. Experimental studies show plant sterols to be an important part of the serum-cholesterol lowering effect of certain diets and dietary components. Epidemiological data show that individuals with higher intakes of plant sterols from their habitual diets have lower serum-cholesterol levels. To date, the role of naturally occurring plant sterols for lowering serum cholesterol has probably been underestimated. The consumption of dietary plant sterols should be a part of dietary advice to patients with hypercholesterolemia and the general public for the prevention and management of coronary heart disease.

  1. Multiple Functions of Sterols in Yeast Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Heese-Peck, Antje; Pichler, Harald; Zanolari, Bettina; Watanabe, Reika; Daum, Günther; Riezman, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Sterols are essential factors for endocytosis in animals and yeast. To investigate the sterol structural requirements for yeast endocytosis, we created a variety of ergΔ mutants, each accumulating a distinct set of sterols different from ergosterol. Mutant erg2Δerg6Δ and erg3Δerg6Δ cells exhibit a strong internalization defect of the α-factor receptor (Ste2p). Specific sterol structures are necessary for pheromone-dependent receptor hyperphosphorylation, a prerequisite for internalization. The lack of phosphorylation is not due to a defect in Ste2p localization or in ligand–receptor interaction. Contrary to most known endocytic factors, sterols seem to function in internalization independently of actin. Furthermore, sterol structures are required at a postinternalization step of endocytosis. ergΔ cells were able to take up the membrane marker FM4-64, but exhibited defects in FM4-64 movement through endosomal compartments to the vacuole. Therefore, there are at least two roles for sterols in endocytosis. Based on sterol analysis, the sterol structural requirements for these two processes were different, suggesting that sterols may have distinct functions at different places in the endocytic pathway. Interestingly, sterol structures unable to support endocytosis allowed transport of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein Gas1p from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi compartment. PMID:12181337

  2. A Mutation in a Purported Regulatory Gene Affects Control of Sterol Uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James H.; Leak, Frank W.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Tove, Shirley; Parks, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Aerobically growing wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are unable to take exogenously supplied sterols from media. This aerobic sterol exclusion is vitiated under anaerobic conditions, in heme-deficient strains, and under some conditions of impaired sterol synthesis. Mutants which can take up sterols aerobically in heme-competent cells have been selected. One of these mutations, designated upc2-1, gives a pleiotropic phenotype in characteristics as diverse as aerobic accumulation of sterols, total lipid storage, sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors, response to altered sterol structures, and cation requirements. During experiments designed to ascertain the effects of various cations on yeast with sterol alterations, it was observed that upc2-1 was hypersensitive to Ca2+. Using resistance to Ca2+ as a screening vehicle, we cloned UPC2 and showed that it is YDR213W, an open reading frame on chromosome IV. This belongs to a fungal regulatory family containing the Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA binding domain. The single guanine-to-adenine transition in upc2-1 gives a predicted amino acid change from glycine to aspartic acid. The regulatory defect explains the semidominance and pleiotropic effects of upc2-1. PMID:9696767

  3. Correction: Synergism between genome sequencing, tandem mass spectrometry and bio-inspired synthesis reveals insights into nocardioazine B biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Norah; Porwal, Suheel K; James, Elle D; Bis, Dana M; Karty, Jonathan A; Lane, Amy L; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2015-09-21

    Correction for 'Synergism between genome sequencing, tandem mass spectrometry and bio-inspired synthesis reveals insights into nocardioazine B biogenesis' by Norah Alqahtani et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 7177-7192.

  4. Fluorescent Sterols and Cholesteryl Esters as Probes for Intracellular Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Solanko, Katarzyna A.; Modzel, Maciej; Solanko, Lukasz M.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol transport between cellular organelles comprised vesicular trafficking and nonvesicular exchange; these processes are often studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. A major challenge for using this approach is producing analogs of cholesterol with suitable brightness and structural and chemical properties comparable with those of cholesterol. This review surveys currently used fluorescent sterols with respect to their behavior in model membranes, their photophysical properties, as well as their transport and metabolism in cells. In the first part, several intrinsically fluorescent sterols, such as dehydroergosterol or cholestatrienol, are discussed. These polyene sterols (P-sterols) contain three conjugated double bonds in the steroid ring system, giving them slight fluorescence in ultraviolet light. We discuss the properties of P-sterols relative to cholesterol, outline their chemical synthesis, and explain how to image them in living cells and organisms. In particular, we show that P-sterol esters inserted into low-density lipoprotein can be tracked in the fibroblasts of Niemann–Pick disease using high-resolution deconvolution microscopy. We also describe fluorophore-tagged cholesterol probes, such as BODIPY-, NBD-, Dansyl-, or Pyrene-tagged cholesterol, and eventual esters of these analogs. Finally, we survey the latest developments in the synthesis and use of alkyne cholesterol analogs to be labeled with fluorophores by click chemistry and discuss the potential of all approaches for future applications. PMID:27330304

  5. Effect of dietary cholesterol and plant sterol consumption on plasma lipid responsiveness and cholesterol trafficking in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Peter A S; Ramprasath, Vanu; Jones, Peter J H

    2017-01-01

    Dietary cholesterol and plant sterols differentially modulate cholesterol kinetics and circulating cholesterol. Understanding how healthy individuals with their inherent variabilities in cholesterol trafficking respond to such dietary sterols will aid in improving strategies for effective cholesterol lowering and alleviation of CVD risk. The objectives of this study were to assess plasma lipid responsiveness to dietary cholesterol v. plant sterol consumption, and to determine the response in rates of cholesterol absorption and synthesis to each sterol using stable isotope approaches in healthy individuals. A randomised, double-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial (n 49) with three treatment phases of 4-week duration were conducted in a Manitoba Hutterite population. During each phase, participants consumed one of the three treatments as a milkshake containing 600 mg/d dietary cholesterol, 2 g/d plant sterols or a control after breakfast meal. Plasma lipid profile was determined and cholesterol absorption and synthesis were measured by oral administration of [3, 4-13C] cholesterol and 2H-labelled water, respectively. Dietary cholesterol consumption increased total (0·16 (sem 0·06) mmol/l, P=0·0179) and HDL-cholesterol (0·08 (sem 0·03) mmol/l, P=0·0216) concentrations with no changes in cholesterol absorption or synthesis. Plant sterol consumption failed to reduce LDL-cholesterol concentrations despite showing a reduction (6 %, P=0·0004) in cholesterol absorption. An over-compensatory reciprocal increase in cholesterol synthesis (36 %, P=0·0026) corresponding to a small reduction in absorption was observed with plant sterol consumption, possibly resulting in reduced LDL-cholesterol lowering efficacy of plant sterols. These data suggest that inter-individual variability in cholesterol trafficking mechanisms may profoundly impact plasma lipid responses to dietary sterols in healthy individuals.

  6. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  7. Analysis of molluscan sterols: Colorimetric methods.

    PubMed

    Swift, M L

    1984-08-01

    The wide variety of sterols normally found in extracts of bivalve molluscs leads to high variability in analytical data obtained with colorimetric (chole)sterol methods. Total sterol levels in oyster (Crassostrea virginica) extracts were determined using the Liebermann-Burchard reagent, an acid-FeCl3 reagent and a cholesterol oxidase procedure. The data from the latter two agreed to within 5.4% and yielded about 30% higher estimates of sterol content than the Liebermann-Burchard test. Gas-liquid chromatographic data also are compared.Several pure sterols, selected because of their presence in oyster sterol fractions or because of their structural similarities to such sterols, were examined using each of the three procedures. Sterols, differing from cholesterol only with regard to the side chain, reacted 80-102% as well as cholesterol with the acid-FeCl3 reagent and cholesterol oxidase. The Liebermann-Burchard reaction was more specific for cholesterol. The colorimetric cholesterol oxidase method is recommended for the estimation of total molluscan sterol content.

  8. The sterols of calcareous sponges (Calcarea, Porifera).

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Andrea; Voigt, Oliver; Wörheide, Gert; Thiel, Volker

    2008-11-01

    Sponges are sessile suspension-feeding organisms whose internal phylogenetic relationships are still the subject of intense debate. Sterols may have the potential to be used as independent markers to test phylogenetic hypotheses. Twenty representative specimens of calcareous sponges (class Calcarea, phylum Porifera) with a broad coverage within both subclasses Calcinea and Calcaronea were analysed for their sterol content. Two major pseudohomologous series were found, accompanied by some additional sterols. The first series encompassing conventional C(27) to C(29)Delta(5,7,22) sterols represented the major sterols, with ergosterol (ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3beta-ol, C(28)Delta(5,7,22)) being most prominent in many species. The second series consisted of unusual C(27) to C(29)Delta(5,7,9(11),22) sterols. Cholesterol occurred sporadically, mostly in trace amounts. The sterol patterns did not resolve intraclass phylogenetic relationships, namely the distinction between the subclasses, Calcinea and Calcaronea. This pointed towards major calcarean lipid traits being established prior to the separation of subclasses. Furthermore, calcarean sterol patterns clearly differ from those found in Hexactinellida, whereas partial overlap occurred with some Demospongiae. Hence, sterols only partly reflect the phylogenetic separation of Calcarea from both of the other poriferan classes that was proposed by recent molecular work and fatty acid analyses.

  9. C26 sterol in a human urine.

    PubMed

    Ikekawa, N; Fujimoto, Y; Isiguro, M; Suwa, S; Hirayama, Y; Mizunuma, H

    1979-06-15

    A new C26 sterol, 22-trans-27-norcholesta-5,22-dien-3 beta-ol, was found in the urine of a 6-year-old girl, with a clinical diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia of the salt losing type, accompanied by symptoms of mixed sex anatomy and skin pigmentation. The structure of the sterol was determined by comparison with the synthetic compound. The sterol was also detected in ther serum. This appears to be the first case in which a C26 sterol has occurred in mammalia.

  10. Glucal-conjugated sterols as novel vascular leakage blocker: structure-activity relationship focusing on the C17-side chain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeojin; Maharjan, Sony; Lim, Changjin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Agrawal, Vijayendra; Han, Young Taek; Lee, Sujin; An, Hongchan; Yun, Hwayoung; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Young-Guen; Suh, Young-Ger

    2014-03-21

    A series of glucal-conjugated sterols as novel vascular leakage blocker were identified through design, synthesis and biologically evaluation. In addition, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the glucal-conjugated sterols focusing on the C17-side chain was also established. The sterol analogs linked with the rigid C17-side chain side chains exhibited potent cell survival activities. In particular, analog 21l, which possesses a cyclopentyl oxime moiety, was shown to have excellent pharmacological effects on retinal vascular leakage in a diabetic mouse model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. New Insight into the Synthesis of Large-Pore Ordered Mesoporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Sun, Zhenkun; Luo, Wei; Li, Yuhui; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2017-02-08

    Ordered mesoporous materials (OMMs) have received increasing interest due to their uniform pore size, high surface area, various compositions and wide applications in energy conversion and storage, biomedicine and environmental remediation, etc. The soft templating synthesis using surfactants or amphiphilic block copolymers is the most efficient method to produce OMMs with tailorable pore structure and surface property. However, due to the limited choice of commercially available soft templates, the common OMMs usually show small pore size and amorphous (or semicrystalline) frameworks. Tailor-made amphiphilic block copolymers with controllable molecular weights and compositions have recently emerged as alternative soft templates for synthesis of new OMMs with many unique features including adjustable mesostructures and framework compositions, ultralarge pores, thick pore walls, high thermal stability and crystalline frameworks. In this Perspective, recent progresses and some new insights into the coassembly process about the synthesis of OMMs based on these tailor-made copolymers as templates are summarized, and typical newly developed synthesis methods and strategies are discussed in depth, including solvent evaporation induced aggregation, ligand-assisted coassembly, solvent evaporation induced micelle fusion-aggregation assembly, homopolymer assisted pore expanding and carbon-supported crystallization strategy. Then, the applications of the obtained large-pore OMMs in catalysis, sensor, energy conversion and storage, and biomedicine by loading large-size guest molecules (e.g., protein and RNA), precious metal nanoparticles and quantum dots, are discussed. At last, the outlook on the prospects and challenges of future research about the synthesis of large-pore OMMs by using tailor-made amphiphilic block copolymers are included.

  12. ABCA1-dependent sterol release: sterol molecule specificity and potential membrane domain for HDL biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shinji; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells synthesize various sterol molecules, including the C30 sterol, lanosterol, as cholesterol precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum. The build-up of precursor sterols, including lanosterol, displays cellular toxicity. Precursor sterols are found in plasma HDL. How these structurally different sterols are released from cells is poorly understood. Here, we show that newly synthesized precursor sterols arriving at the plasma membrane (PM) are removed by extracellular apoA-I in a manner dependent on ABCA1, a key macromolecule for HDL biogenesis. Analysis of sterol molecules by GC-MS and tracing the fate of radiolabeled acetate-derived sterols in normal and mutant Niemann-Pick type C cells reveal that ABCA1 prefers newly synthesized sterols, especially lanosterol, as the substrates before they are internalized from the PM. We also show that ABCA1 resides in a cholesterol-rich membrane domain resistant to the mild detergent, Brij 98. Blocking ACAT activity increases the cholesterol contents of this domain. Newly synthesized C29/C30 sterols are transiently enriched within this domain, but rapidly disappear from this domain with a half-life of less than 1 h. Our work shows that substantial amounts of precursor sterols are transported to a certain PM domain and are removed by the ABCA1-dependent pathway. PMID:26497474

  13. Building Synthetic Sterols Computationally – Unlocking the Secrets of Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Róg, Tomasz; Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital in regulating the physical properties of animal cell membranes. While it remains unclear what renders cholesterol so unique, it is known that other sterols are less capable in modulating membrane properties, and there are membrane proteins whose function is dependent on cholesterol. Practical applications of cholesterol include its use in liposomes in drug delivery and cosmetics, cholesterol-based detergents in membrane protein crystallography, its fluorescent analogs in studies of cholesterol transport in cells and tissues, etc. Clearly, in spite of their difficult synthesis, producing the synthetic analogs of cholesterol is of great commercial and scientific interest. In this article, we discuss how synthetic sterols non-existent in nature can be used to elucidate the roles of cholesterol’s structural elements. To this end, we discuss recent atomistic molecular dynamics simulation studies that have predicted new synthetic sterols with properties comparable to those of cholesterol. We also discuss more recent experimental studies that have vindicated these predictions. The paper highlights the strength of computational simulations in making predictions for synthetic biology, thereby guiding experiments. PMID:26347865

  14. Bioorthogonal probes for imaging sterols in cells.

    PubMed

    Jao, Cindy Y; Nedelcu, Daniel; Lopez, Lyle V; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Welti, Ruth; Salic, Adrian

    2015-03-02

    Cholesterol is a fundamental lipid component of eukaryotic membranes and a precursor of potent signaling molecules, such as oxysterols and steroid hormones. Cholesterol and oxysterols are also essential for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Despite their importance, the use of imaging sterols in cells is currently very limited. We introduce a robust and versatile method for sterol microscopy based on C19 alkyne cholesterol and oxysterol analogues. These sterol analogues are fully functional; they rescue growth of cholesterol auxotrophic cells and faithfully recapitulate the multiple roles that sterols play in Hedgehog signal transduction. Alkyne sterol analogues incorporate efficiently into cellular membranes and can be imaged with high resolution after copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction with fluorescent azides. We demonstrate the use of alkyne sterol probes for visualizing the subcellular distribution of cholesterol and for two-color imaging of sterols and choline phospholipids. Our imaging strategy should be broadly applicable to studying the role of sterols in normal physiology and disease. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  16. Determination of plant sterol oxidation products in plant sterol enriched spreads, fat blends, and plant sterol concentrates.

    PubMed

    Louter, Arjan J H

    2004-01-01

    Plant sterols (PS) are very stable molecules but may undergo oxidation due to the presence of a double bond in the ring structure. In order to assess whether this occurs during heating and storage, an analytical procedure was developed for the determination of concentration levels and identity of PS oxidation products in functional food ingredients and products. The method is based on cold saponification, solvent extraction of unsaponifiables, isolation of sterol oxidation products by means of liquid chromatography, and final analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection. Identification of the key PS oxidation products was performed by means of GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotope dilution MS was used to verify the absence of the formation of potential artifacts by the method. The method described is applicable to spreads (containing 20-65% water), oils, sterol esters, pure sterols, and fat extracts from food. The between-day reproducibility of the total content of sterol oxidation products in control samples sample was 8%, and of individual sterol oxidation products, 6-15%. The recovery of sterol oxidation products was 91%. The limit of detection was 0.1 mg/kg.

  17. Thresholds for sterol-limited growth of Daphnia magna: a comparative approach using 10 different sterols.

    PubMed

    Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Oexle, Sarah; Wacker, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Arthropods are incapable of synthesizing sterols de novo and thus require a dietary source to cover their physiological demands. The most prominent sterol in animal tissues is cholesterol, which is an indispensable structural component of cell membranes and serves as precursor for steroid hormones. Instead of cholesterol, plants and algae contain a variety of different phytosterols. Consequently, herbivorous arthropods have to metabolize dietary phytosterols to cholesterol to meet their requirements for growth and reproduction. Here, we investigated sterol-limited growth responses of the freshwater herbivore Daphnia magna by supplementing a sterol-free diet with increasing amounts of 10 different phytosterols and comparing thresholds for sterol-limited growth. In addition, we analyzed the sterol composition of D. magna to explore sterol metabolic constraints and bioconversion capacities. We show that dietary phytosterols strongly differ in their potential to support somatic growth of D. magna. The dietary threshold concentrations obtained by supplementing the different sterols cover a wide range (3.5-34.4 μg mg C(-1)) and encompass the one for cholesterol (8.9 μg mg C(-1)), indicating that certain phytosterols are more efficient in supporting somatic growth than cholesterol (e.g., fucosterol, brassicasterol) while others are less efficient (e.g., dihydrocholesterol, lathosterol). The dietary sterol concentration gradients revealed that the poor quality of particular sterols can be alleviated partially by increasing dietary concentrations, and that qualitative differences among sterols are most pronounced at low to moderate dietary concentrations. We infer that the dietary sterol composition has to be considered in zooplankton nutritional ecology to accurately assess potential sterol limitations under field conditions.

  18. Sterols in spermatogenesis and sperm maturation

    PubMed Central

    Keber, Rok; Rozman, Damjana; Horvat, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex developmental program in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. One intriguing aspect of sperm production is the dynamic change in membrane lipid composition that occurs throughout spermatogenesis. Cholesterol content, as well as its intermediates, differs vastly between the male reproductive system and nongonadal tissues. Accumulation of cholesterol precursors such as testis meiosis-activating sterol and desmosterol is observed in testes and spermatozoa from several mammalian species. Moreover, cholesterogenic genes, especially meiosis-activating sterol-producing enzyme cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase, display stage-specific expression patterns during spermatogenesis. Discrepancies in gene expression patterns suggest a complex temporal and cell-type specific regulation of sterol compounds during spermatogenesis, which also involves dynamic interactions between germ and Sertoli cells. The functional importance of sterol compounds in sperm production is further supported by the modulation of sterol composition in spermatozoal membranes during epididymal transit and in the female reproductive tract, which is a prerequisite for successful fertilization. However, the exact role of sterols in male reproduction is unknown. This review discusses sterol dynamics in sperm maturation and describes recent methodological advances that will help to illuminate the complexity of sperm formation and function. PMID:23093550

  19. Sterol chemotaxonomy of marine pelagophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Zhao, Hui; Boyer, Gregory L; Satchwell, Michael F; Andersen, Robert A

    2009-07-01

    Several marine algae of the class Pelagophyceae produce the unusual marine sterol 24-propylidenecholesterol, mainly as the (24E)-isomer. The (24Z)-isomer had previously been considered as a specific biomarker for Aureococcus anophagefferens, the 'brown tide' alga of the Northeast coast of the USA. To test this hypothesis and to generate chemotaxonomic information, the sterol compositions of 42 strains of pelagophyte algae including 17 strains of Aureococcus anophagefferens were determined by GC analysis. A more comprehensive sterol analysis by HPLC and (1)H-NMR was obtained for 17 selected pelagophyte strains. All strains analyzed contained 24-propylidenecholesterol. In all strains belonging to the order Sarcinochrysidales, this sterol was found only as the (E)-isomer, while all strains in the order Pelagomonadales contained the (Z)-isomer, either alone or together with the (E)-isomer. The occurrence of Delta(22) and 24alpha-sterols was limited to the Sarcinochrysidales. The first occurrence of Delta(22)-24-propylcholesterol in an alga, CCMP 1410, was reported. Traces of the rare sterol 26,26-dimethyl-24-methylenecholesterol were detected in Aureococcus anophagefferens, and the (25R)-configuration was proposed, based on biosynthetic considerations. Traces of a novel sterol, 24-propylidenecholesta-5,25-dien-3beta-ol, were detected in several species.

  20. Dissecting the sterol C-4 demethylation process in higher plants. From structures and genes to catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rahier, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Sterols become functional only after removal of the two methyl groups at C-4. This review focuses on the sterol C-4 demethylation process in higher plants. An intriguing aspect in the removal of the two C-4 methyl groups of sterol precursors in plants is that it does not occur consecutively as it does in yeast and animals, but is interrupted by several enzymatic steps. Each C-4 demethylation step involves the sequential participation of three individual enzymatic reactions including a sterol methyl oxidase (SMO), a 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase/C4-decarboxylase (3βHSD/D) and a 3-ketosteroid reductase (SR). The distant location of the two C-4 demethylations in the sterol pathway requires distinct SMOs with respective substrate specificity. Combination of genetic and molecular enzymological approaches allowed a thorough identification and functional characterization of two distinct families of SMOs genes and two 3βHSD/D genes. For the latter, these studies provided the first molecularly and functionally characterized HSDs from a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family in plants, and the first data on 3-D molecular interactions of an enzyme of the postoxidosqualene cyclase sterol biosynthetic pathway with its substrate in animals, yeast and higher plants. Characterization of these three new components involved in C-4 demethylation participates to the completion of the molecular inventory of sterol synthesis in higher plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Emergent insights from the synthesis of conceptual frameworks for biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Gurevitch, J; Fox, G A; Wardle, G M; Inderjit; Taub, D

    2011-04-01

    A general understanding of biological invasions will provide insights into fundamental ecological and evolutionary problems and contribute to more efficient and effective prediction, prevention and control of invasions. We review recent papers that have proposed conceptual frameworks for invasion biology. These papers offer important advances and signal a maturation of the field, but a broad synthesis is still lacking. Conceptual frameworks for invasion do not require invocation of unique concepts, but rather should reflect the unifying principles of ecology and evolutionary biology. A conceptual framework should incorporate multicausality, include interactions between causal factors and account for lags between various stages. We emphasize the centrality of demography in invasions, and distinguish between explaining three of the most important characteristics by which we recognize invasions: rapid local population increase, monocultures or community dominance, and range expansion. As a contribution towards developing a conceptual synthesis of invasions based on these criteria, we outline a framework that explicitly incorporates consideration of the fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes involved. The development of a more inclusive and mechanistic conceptual framework for invasion should facilitate quantitative and testable evaluation of causal factors, and can potentially lead to a better understanding of the biology of invasions.

  2. Free sterol composition of species in the dinoflagellate genus Pyrocystis: a spectrum of sterol diversity.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Jeremy L; Leblond, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    The dinoflagellate genus Pyrocystis includes a small number of marine species, which spend the majority of their life cycles as nonmotile cells within a carbohydrate sheath, and which are found ubiquitously throughout the world's oceans. The biochemistry of this model dinoflagellate genus has been widely studied due to its ability to bioluminesce. However, Pyrocystis has been comparatively understudied with respect to its lipid biochemistry, in particular that of sterols. To date, examination of the sterols of Pyrocystis has focused primarily upon Pyrocystis lunula, which produces cholesterol and 4,24-dimethyl-5α-cholestan-3β-ol as its predominant sterols, while it lacks the common dinoflagellate sterol, dinosterol. We have examined the sterol composition of the two other commercially available species of Pyrocystis, Pyrocystis fusiformis and Pyrocystis noctiluca. Pyrocystis noctiluca possesses dinosterol as its most abundant sterol, while P. fusiformis possesses dinosterol and 4,24-dimethyl-5α-cholestan-3β-ol as the predominant sterols, placing it at an intermediate position between P. lunula and P. noctiluca, as based on sterol composition. The potential limitations of the dinoflagellate sterol biomarker dinosterol are also explored in this study due to its notable absence in P. lunula. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  3. The ABCG8 G574R Variant, Serum Plant Sterol Levels, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in the Old Order Amish

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Richard B.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Post, Wendy S.; Lütjohann, Dieter; von Bergmann, Klaus; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Terrin, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Steinle, Nanette I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether long-term exposure to moderate elevations in plasma plant sterol levels increases risk for atherosclerosis. Methods and Results In Old Order Amish participants aged 18 to 85 years, with (n=110) and without (n=181) 1 copy of the ABCG8 G574R variant, we compared mean plasma levels of plant sterols and cholesterol precursors and carotid intima-media wall thickness. Carriers of a single 574R allele had increased plant sterol levels (eg, 35%–37% higher plasma levels of sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) and increased plant sterol/cholesterol ratios (P<0.001 for all). 574R carriers had significantly decreased levels of lathosterol and lanosterol, precursors in a pathway for endogenous cholesterol synthesis, suggesting that plant sterols may alter regulation of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. The G574R variant was not associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Compared with noncarriers, 574R carriers had decreased carotid intima-media wall thickness (0.62 versus 0.66 mm; age- and sex-adjusted P=0.03). Adjustment for body weight, blood pressure, and standard lipid measures (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) did not alter this association. Conclusion Although the G574R variant is associated with moderately elevated plant sterol levels, carriers of the 574R allele had modestly lower levels of carotid wall thickness compared with noncarriers. PMID:23241408

  4. The ABCG8 G574R variant, serum plant sterol levels, and cardiovascular disease risk in the Old Order Amish.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Richard B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Post, Wendy S; Lütjohann, Dieter; von Bergmann, Klaus; Ryan, Kathleen A; Terrin, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; Steinle, Nanette I

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether long-term exposure to moderate elevations in plasma plant sterol levels increases risk for atherosclerosis. In Old Order Amish participants aged 18 to 85 years, with (n=110) and without (n=181) 1 copy of the ABCG8 G574R variant, we compared mean plasma levels of plant sterols and cholesterol precursors and carotid intima-media wall thickness. Carriers of a single 574R allele had increased plant sterol levels (eg, 35%-37% higher plasma levels of sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) and increased plant sterol/cholesterol ratios (P<0.001 for all). 574R carriers had significantly decreased levels of lathosterol and lanosterol, precursors in a pathway for endogenous cholesterol synthesis, suggesting that plant sterols may alter regulation of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. The G574R variant was not associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Compared with noncarriers, 574R carriers had decreased carotid intima-media wall thickness (0.62 versus 0.66 mm; age- and sex-adjusted P=0.03). Adjustment for body weight, blood pressure, and standard lipid measures (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) did not alter this association. Although the G574R variant is associated with moderately elevated plant sterol levels, carriers of the 574R allele had modestly lower levels of carotid wall thickness compared with noncarriers.

  5. The major cellular sterol regulatory pathway is required for Andes virus infection.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Josiah; Drake, Mary Jane; Bruce, Emily A; Riblett, Amber M; Didigu, Chukwuka A; Wilen, Craig B; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection.

  6. Reassessment of the role of phospholipids in sexual reproduction by sterol-auxotrophic fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, J L; Duddles, N D

    1989-01-01

    Several genera of oomycete fungi which are incapable of de novo sterol synthesis do not require these compounds for vegetative growth. The requirement for an exogenous source of sterols for sexual reproduction by several members of the Pythiaceae has been questioned by reports of apparent induction and maturation of oospores on defined media supplemented with phospholipids in the absence of sterols. A more detailed examination of this phenomenon suggested that trace levels of sterols in the inoculum of some pythiaceous fungi act synergistically with phospholipid medium supplements containing unsaturated fatty acid moieties to induce oosporogenesis. Phospholipid analysis of one species, Pythium ultimum, suggested that only the fatty acid portion of the exogenous phospholipid is taken up by the fungus. Enrichment of the phospholipid fraction of total cell lipid of P. ultimum with unsaturated fatty acids promoted oospore induction, and enhanced levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the neutral lipid fraction increased oospore viability. For some pythiaceous fungi, the levels of sterols required for the maturation of oospores with appropriate phospholipid medium supplementation suggest that these compounds are necessary only for the sparking and critical domain roles previously described in other fungi. PMID:2738023

  7. Non-Cholesterol Sterol Levels Predict Hyperglycemia and Conversion to Type 2 Diabetes in Finnish Men

    PubMed Central

    Cederberg, Henna; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A.; Paananen, Jussi; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Smith, Ulf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the levels of non-cholesterol sterols as predictors for the development of hyperglycemia (an increase in the glucose area under the curve in an oral glucose tolerance test) and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Finnish men (METSIM Study, N = 1,050) having non-cholesterol sterols measured at baseline. Additionally we determined the association of 538,265 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with non-cholesterol sterol levels in a cross-sectional cohort of non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetes (the Kuopio cohort of the EUGENE2 Study, N = 273). We found that in a cross-sectional METSIM Study the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol absorption were reduced as a function of increasing fasting glucose levels, whereas the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol synthesis were increased as a function of increasing 2-hour glucose levels. A cholesterol synthesis marker desmosterol significantly predicted an increase, and two absorption markers (campesterol and avenasterol) a decrease in the risk of hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up of the METSIM cohort, mainly attributable to insulin sensitivity. A SNP of ABCG8 was associated with fasting plasma glucose levels in a cross-sectional study but did not predict hyperglycemia or incident type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, the levels of some, but not all non-cholesterol sterols are markers of the worsening of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23840693

  8. Sterols from the Madagascar Sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp

    PubMed Central

    Aknin, Maurice; Gros, Emmanuelle; Vacelet, Jean; Kashman, Yoel; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp. (order Dictyoceratida, Family Thorectidae) from the west coast of Madagascar (Indian Ocean) is a particularly rich source of bioactive nitrogenous macrolides. The previous studies on this organism led to the suggestion that the latter should originate from associated microsymbionts. In order to evaluate the influence of microsymbionts on lipid content, 10 samples of Fascaplysinopsis sp. were investigated for their sterol composition. Contrary to the secondary metabolites, the sterol patterns established were qualitatively and quantitatively stable: 14 sterols with different unsaturated nuclei, Δ5, Δ7 and Δ5,7, were identified; the last ones being the main sterols of the investigated sponges. The chemotaxonomic significance of these results for the order Dictyoceratida is also discussed in the context of the literature. The conjugated diene system in Δ5,7 sterols is known to be unstable and easily photo-oxidized during storage and/or experiments to produce 5α,8α-epidioxy sterols. However, in this study, no 5α,8α-epidioxysterols (or only trace amounts) were observed. Thus, it was supposed that photo-oxidation was avoided thanks to the natural antioxidants detected in Fascaplysinopsis sp. by both the DPPH and β-caroten bleaching assays. PMID:21339959

  9. Sterols from the Madagascar sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Aknin, Maurice; Gros, Emmanuelle; Vacelet, Jean; Kashman, Yoel; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne

    2010-12-17

    The sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp. (order Dictyoceratida, Family Thorectidae) from the west coast of Madagascar (Indian Ocean) is a particularly rich source of bioactive nitrogenous macrolides. The previous studies on this organism led to the suggestion that the latter should originate from associated microsymbionts. In order to evaluate the influence of microsymbionts on lipid content, 10 samples of Fascaplysinopsis sp. were investigated for their sterol composition. Contrary to the secondary metabolites, the sterol patterns established were qualitatively and quantitatively stable: 14 sterols with different unsaturated nuclei, Δ(5), Δ(7) and Δ(5,7), were identified; the last ones being the main sterols of the investigated sponges. The chemotaxonomic significance of these results for the order Dictyoceratida is also discussed in the context of the literature. The conjugated diene system in Δ(5,7) sterols is known to be unstable and easily photo-oxidized during storage and/or experiments to produce 5α,8α-epidioxy sterols. However, in this study, no 5α,8α-epidioxysterols (or only trace amounts) were observed. Thus, it was supposed that photo-oxidation was avoided thanks to the natural antioxidants detected in Fascaplysinopsis sp. by both the DPPH and β-caroten bleaching assays.

  10. Plant sterols in food: No consensus in guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Weingärtner, Oliver; Baber, Ronny; Teupser, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Plant sterols are used as food supplement to reduce serum cholesterol levels. • Reductions in serum cholesterol levels are achieved at the expense of increased plant sterol levels. • The potential atherogenicity of increased serum plant sterol levels is controversially debated. • This dispute is reflected by different guideline recommendations in regard to plant sterols. - Abstract: Plant sterols are supplemented in foods to reduce cardiovascular risk. Randomized controlled trials show 2 g of plant sterols a day reduce serum cholesterol by about 10%. This reduction in serum cholesterol levels is achieved at the expense of increased serum plant sterol levels. Findings in patients with phytosterolemia, in experimental studies and in clinical trials have lead to speculations that plant sterols might be atherogenic. In view of emerging safety issues the role of plant sterols in cardiovascular prevention has become controversial. This review reflects the ongoing controversial scientific debate and points out recent developments in guidelines of national and international societies.

  11. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J.; Kasson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol’s ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  12. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-19

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion.

  13. Purification, characterization and catalytic properties of human sterol 8-isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W David; Zhou, Wenxu; Dennis, Allen L; Li, Haoxia; Jia, Zhonghua; Keith, Richard A; Piser, Timothy M; Furlong, Stephen T

    2002-01-01

    CHO 2, encoding human sterol 8-isomerase (hSI), was introduced into plasmids pYX213 or pET23a. The resulting native protein was overexpressed in erg 2 yeast cells and purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme exhibited a K (m) of 50 microM and a turnover number of 0.423 s(-1) for zymosterol, an isoelectric point of 7.70, a native molecular mass of 107000 Da and was tetrameric. The structural features of zymosterol provided optimal substrate acceptability. Biomimetic studies of acid-catalysed isomerization of zymosterol resulted in formation of cholest-8(14)-enol, whereas the enzyme-generated product was a Delta(7)-sterol, suggesting absolute stereochemical control of the reaction by hSI. Using (2)H(2)O and either zymosterol or cholesta-7,24-dienol as substrates, the reversibility of the reaction was confirmed by GC-MS of the deuterated products. The positional specific incorporation of deuterium at C-9alpha was established by a combination of (1)H- and (13)C-NMR analyses of the enzyme-generated cholesta-7,24-dienol. Kinetic analyses indicated the reaction equilibrium ( K (eq)=14; DeltaG(o')=-6.5 kJ/mol) for double-bond isomerization favoured the forward direction, Delta(8) to Delta(7). Treatment of hSI with different high-energy intermediate analogues produced the following dissociation constants ( K (i)): emopamil (2 microM)=tamoxifen (1 microM)=tridemorph (1 microM)<25-azacholesterol (21 microM) sterol formation in cholesterol synthesis. PMID:12133002

  14. Involvement of the Phospholipid Sterol Acyltransferase1 in Plant Sterol Homeostasis and Leaf Senescence1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Berna, Anne; Noiriel, Alexandre; Compagnon, Vincent; Carlsson, Anders S.; Banas, Antoni; Stymne, Sten; Schaller, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoding sterol ester-forming enzymes were recently identified in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome. One belongs to a family of six members presenting homologies with the mammalian Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferases. The other one belongs to the superfamily of Membrane-Bound O-Acyltransferases. The physiological functions of these genes, Phospholipid Sterol Acyltransferase1 (PSAT1) and Acyl-CoA Sterol Acyltransferase1 (ASAT1), respectively, were investigated using Arabidopsis mutants. Sterol ester content decreased in leaves of all mutants and was strongly reduced in seeds from plants carrying a PSAT1-deficient mutation. The amount of sterol esters in flowers was very close to that of the wild type for all lines studied. This indicated further functional redundancy of sterol acylation in Arabidopsis. We performed feeding experiments in which we supplied sterol precursors to psat1-1, psat1-2, and asat1-1 mutants. This triggered the accumulation of sterol esters (stored in cytosolic lipid droplets) in the wild type and the asat1-1 lines but not in the psat1-1 and psat1-2 lines, indicating a major contribution of the PSAT1 in maintaining free sterol homeostasis in plant cell membranes. A clear biological effect associated with the lack of sterol ester formation in the psat1-1 and psat1-2 mutants was an early leaf senescence phenotype. Double mutants lacking PSAT1 and ASAT1 had identical phenotypes to psat1 mutants. The results presented here suggest that PSAT1 plays a role in lipid catabolism as part of the intracellular processes at play in the maintenance of leaf viability during developmental aging. PMID:19923239

  15. Effects of sterols on the development and aging of caenorhabditis elegans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because Caenorhabditis elegans lacks several components of the de novo sterol biosynthesis pathway, it requires sterols as essential nutrients. Supplemented cholesterol undergoes extensive enzymatic modification in C. elegans to form other sterols of unknown function. Because sterol metabolism in ...

  16. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Fabio R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and non-classic (all others) NHRs; 17 non-classic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and non-sterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and non-classic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review we summarize the roles of non-classic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  17. Insights into RNA synthesis, capping, and proofreading mechanisms of SARS-coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Sevajol, Marion; Subissi, Lorenzo; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-12-19

    The successive emergence of highly pathogenic coronaviruses (CoVs) such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV) in 2003 and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology. This research has provided significant new insight into functions and activities of the replication/transcription multi-protein complex. The latter directs both continuous and discontinuous RNA synthesis to replicate and transcribe the large coronavirus genome made of a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of ∼30 kb. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of SARS-CoV enzymes involved in RNA biochemistry, such as the in vitro characterization of a highly active and processive RNA polymerase complex which can associate with methyltransferase and 3'-5' exoribonuclease activities involved in RNA capping, and RNA proofreading, respectively. The recent discoveries reveal fascinating RNA-synthesizing machinery, highlighting the unique position of coronaviruses in the RNA virus world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Involvement of membrane sterols in hypergravity-induced modifications of growth and cell wall metabolism in plant stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, T.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Suzuki, M.; Muranaka, T.; Hoson, T.

    Organisms living on land resist the gravitational force by constructing a tough body Plants have developed gravity resistance responses after having first went ashore more than 500 million years ago The mechanisms of gravity resistance responses have been studied under hypergravity conditions which are easily produced on earth by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which is involved in synthesis of terpenoids such as membrane sterols In the present study we examined the role of membrane sterols in gravity resistance in plants by analyzing sterol levels of stem organs grown under hypergravity conditions and by analyzing responses to hypergravity of the organs whose sterol level was modulated Hypergravity inhibited elongation growth but stimulated lateral expansion of Arabidopsis hypocotyls and azuki bean epicotyls Under hypergravity conditions sterol levels were kept high as compared with 1 g controls during incubation Lovastatin an inhibitor HMGR prevented lateral expansion as the gravity resistance response in azuki bean epicotyls Similar results were obtained in analyses with loss of function mutants of HMGR in Arabidopsis It has been shown that sterols play a role in cellulose biosynthesis probably as the primer In wild type Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity increased the cellulose content but it did not influence the content in HMGR mutants These results suggest that hypergravity increases

  19. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  20. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  1. Novel sterol metabolic network of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic and bloodstream forms

    PubMed Central

    Nes, Craigen R.; Singha, Ujjal K.; Liu, Jialin; Ganapathy, Kulothungan; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.; Lepesheva, Galina I.; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W. David

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the protozoan parasite that causes African trypanosomiasis, a neglected disease of people and animals. Co-metabolite analysis, labelling studies using [methyl-2H3]-methionine and substrate/product specificities of the cloned 24-SMT (sterol C24-methyltransferase) and 14-SDM (sterol C14-demethylase) from T. brucei afforded an uncommon sterol metabolic network that proceeds from lanosterol and 31-norlanosterol to ETO [ergosta-5,7,25(27)-trien-3β-ol], 24-DTO [dimethyl ergosta-5,7,25(27)-trienol] and ergosterol [ergosta-5,7,22(23)-trienol]. To assess the possible carbon sources of ergosterol biosynthesis, specifically 13C-labelled specimens of lanosterol, acetate, leucine and glucose were administered to T. brucei and the 13C distributions found were in accord with the operation of the acetate–mevalonate pathway, with leucine as an alternative precursor, to ergostenols in either the insect or bloodstream form. In searching for metabolic signatures of procyclic cells, we observed that the 13C-labelling treatments induce fluctuations between the acetyl-CoA (mitochondrial) and sterol (cytosolic) synthetic pathways detected by the progressive increase in 13C-ergosterol production (control <[2-13C]leucine<[2-13C]acetate<[1-13C]glucose) and corresponding depletion of cholesta-5,7,24-trienol. We conclude that anabolic fluxes originating in mitochondrial metabolism constitute a flexible part of sterol synthesis that is further fluctuated in the cytosol, yielding distinct sterol profiles in relation to cell demands on growth. PMID:22176028

  2. The Sterol Methyltransferases SMT1, SMT2, and SMT3 Influence Arabidopsis Development through Nonbrassinosteroid Products1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Carland, Francine; Fujioka, Shozo; Nelson, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Plant sterols are structural components of cell membranes that provide rigidity, permeability, and regional identity to membranes. Sterols are also the precursors to the brassinosteroid signaling molecules. Evidence is accumulating that specific sterols have roles in pattern formation during development. COTYLEDON VASCULAR PATTERNING1 (CVP1) encodes C-24 STEROL METHYLTRANSFERASE2 (SMT2), one of three SMTs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). SMT2 and SMT3, which also encodes a C-24 SMT, catalyze the reaction that distinguishes the synthesis of structural sterols from signaling brassinosteroid derivatives and are highly regulated. The deficiency of SMT2 in the cvp1 mutant results in moderate developmental defects, including aberrant cotyledon vein patterning, serrated floral organs, and reduced stature, but plants are viable, suggesting that SMT3 activity can substitute for the loss of SMT2. To test the distinct developmental roles of SMT2 and SMT3, we identified a transcript null smt3 mutant. Although smt3 single mutants appear wild type, cvp1 smt3 double mutants show enhanced defects relative to cvp1 mutants, such as discontinuous cotyledon vein pattern, and produce novel phenotypes, including defective root growth, loss of apical dominance, sterility, and homeotic floral transformations. These phenotypes are correlated with major alterations in the profiles of specific sterols but without significant alterations to brassinosteroid profiles. The alterations to sterol profiles in cvp1 mutants affect auxin response, demonstrated by weak auxin insensitivity, enhanced axr1 auxin resistance, ectopically expressed DR5:β-glucuronidase in developing embryos, and defective response to auxin-inhibited PIN2-green fluorescent protein endocytosis. We discuss the developmental roles of sterols implied by these results. PMID:20421456

  3. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam; Feizi, Amir; Buskov, Steen; Hallström, Björn M; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-10-03

    Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Transmembrane Peptides Influence the Affinity of Sterols for Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Joel H.; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mβCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mβCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mβCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins

  5. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  6. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  7. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E.; Dean, Andrew F.; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  8. Biological removal of phyto-sterols in pulp mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Mahmood-Khan, Zahid; Hall, Eric R

    2013-12-15

    Phyto-sterols and extractives found in pulp mill effluents are suspected to cause endocrine abnormalities in receiving water fish. The control of sterols in pulp mill effluents through biological secondary wastewater treatment was studied using two lab-scale bioreactor systems. After achieving a stable performance, both bioreactor systems successfully removed (>90%) sterols and the estimated biodegradation was up to 80%. Reactor 1 system operating at 6.7 ± 0.2 pH effectively treated pulp mill effluent sterols spiked up to 4500 μg/L in 11 h HRT and 11 day SRT. However, Reactor 2 system operating at 7.6 ± 0.2 pH performed relatively poorly. Retention time reductions beyond critical values deteriorated the performance of treatment systems and quickly reduced the sterols biodegradation. The biodegradation loss was indicated by mixed liquor sterols content that started increasing. This biodegradation loss was compensated by the increased role of bio-adsorption and the overall sterols removal remained relatively high. Hence, a relatively small (20-30%) loss in the overall sterols removal efficiency did not fully reflect the associated major (60-70%) loss in the sterols biodegradation because the amount of sterols accumulated in the sludge due to adsorption increased so the estimate of sterols removal through adsorption increased from 30-40% to 70-80% keeping the overall sterols removal still high. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sterol 3β-glucosyltransferase biocatalysts with a range of selectivities, including selectivity for testosterone.

    PubMed

    Malik, Vatsala; Zhang, Meng; Dover, Lynn G; Northen, Julian S; Flinn, Anthony; Perry, Justin J; Black, Gary W

    2013-11-01

    The main objectives of this work were to characterise a range of purified recombinant sterol 3β-glucosyltransferases and show that rational sampling of the diversity that exists within sterol 3β-glucosyltransferase sequence space can result in a range of enzyme selectivities. In our study the catalytically active domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 3β-glucosyltransferase was used to mine putative sterol 3β-glucosyltransferases from the databases. Selected diverse sequences were expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and shown to have different selectivities for the 3β-hydroxysteroids ergosterol and cholesterol. Surprisingly, three enzymes were also selective for testosterone, a 17β-hydroxysteroid. This study therefore reports for the first time sterol 3β-glucosyltransferases with selectivity for both 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroids and is also the first report of recombinant 3β-glucosyltransferases with selectivity for steroids with a hydroxyl group at positions other than C-3. These enzymes could therefore find utility in the pharmaceutical industry for the green synthesis of a range of glycosylated compounds of medicinal interest.

  10. Unraveling and engineering the production of 23,24-bisnorcholenic steroids in sterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Qin; Liu, Yong-Jun; Yao, Kang; Liu, Hao-Hao; Tao, Xin-Yi; Wang, Feng-Qing; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The catabolism of sterols in mycobacteria is highly important due to its close relevance in the pathogenesis of pathogenic strains and the biotechnological applications of nonpathogenic strains for steroid synthesis. However, some key metabolic steps remain unknown. In this study, the hsd4A gene from Mycobacterium neoaurum ATCC 25795 was investigated. The encoded protein, Hsd4A, was characterized as a dual-function enzyme, with both 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities in vitro. Using a kshAs-null strain of M. neoaurum ATCC 25795 (NwIB-XII) as a model, Hsd4A was further confirmed to exert dual-function in sterol catabolism in vivo. The deletion of hsd4A in NwIB-XII resulted in the production of 23,24-bisnorcholenic steroids (HBCs), indicating that hsd4A plays a key role in sterol side-chain degradation. Therefore, two competing pathways, the AD and HBC pathways, were proposed for the side-chain degradation. The proposed HBC pathway has great value in illustrating the production mechanism of HBCs in sterol catabolism and in developing HBCs producing strains for industrial application via metabolic engineering. Through the combined modification of hsd4A and other genes, three HBCs producing strains were constructed that resulted in promising productivities of 0.127, 0.109 and 0.074 g/l/h, respectively. PMID:26898409

  11. Algal sterols are as effective as β-sitosterol in reducing plasma cholesterol concentration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingnan; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Yue; Bi, Yanlan; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2014-01-22

    The present study examined the cholesterol-lowering activity of sterol extract (SE) derived from alga Schizochytrium sp. and its interaction with gene expression of transporters, receptors, and enzymes involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism. GC-MS analyses found that SE was a mixture of various sterols including lathosterol, ergosterol, stigmasterol, 24-ethylcholesta-5,7,22-trienol, stigmasta-7,24(24(1))-dien-3β-ol, and cholesterol. Results showed that SE at doses of 0.06 and 0.30 g/kg diet were able to decrease plasma cholesterol concentration by 19.5 and 34%, respectively, compared with the control, in hamsters maintained on a 0.1% high-cholesterol diet. SE at a dose of 0.30 g/kg diet was as effective as β-sitosterol in reducing plasma total cholesterol (TC). SE-induced reduction in plasma TC was accompanied by down-regulation of intestinal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. Addition of SE to the diet increased the excretion of total fecal sterols. It was concluded that SE possessed the same cholesterol-lowering activity as β-sitosterol and the underlying mechanisms were mediated by increasing sterol excretion and decreasing cholesterol absorption and synthesis.

  12. Absence of sterols constrains carbon transfer between cyanobacteria and a freshwater herbivore (Daphnia galeata).

    PubMed Central

    von Elert, Eric; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Le Coz, Jean R

    2003-01-01

    A key process in freshwater plankton food webs is the regulation of the efficiency of energy and material transfer. Cyanobacterial carbon (C) in particular is transferred very inefficiently to herbivorous zooplankton, which leads to a decoupling of primary and secondary production and the accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass, which is associated with reduced recreational quality of water bodies and hazards to human health. A recent correlative field study suggested that the low transfer efficiency of cyanobacterial C is the result of the absence of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet of the zooplankton. By supplementation of single-lipid compounds in controlled growth experiments, we show here that the low C transfer efficiency of coccal and filamentous cyanobacteria to the keystone herbivore Daphnia is caused by the low sterol content in cyanobacteria, which constrains cholesterol synthesis and thereby growth and reproduction of the herbivore. Estimations of sterol requirement in Daphnia suggest that, when cyanobacteria comprise more than 80% of the grazed phytoplankton, growth of the herbivore may be limited by sterols and Daphnia may subsequently fail to control phytoplankton biomass. Dietary sterols therefore may play a key role in freshwater food webs and in the control of water quality in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria. PMID:12816661

  13. Synthesis of arborane triterpenols by a bacterial oxidosqualene cyclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Amy B.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Gill, Clare C. C.; Giner, José-Luis; Welander, Paula V.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic triterpenoids are a broad class of polycyclic lipids produced by bacteria and eukaryotes. They are biologically relevant for their roles in cellular physiology, including membrane structure and function, and biochemically relevant for their exquisite enzymatic cyclization mechanism. Cyclic triterpenoids are also geobiologically significant as they are readily preserved in sediments and are used as biomarkers for ancient life throughout Earth's history. Isoarborinol is one such triterpenoid whose only known biological sources are certain angiosperms and whose diagenetic derivatives (arboranes) are often used as indicators of terrestrial input into aquatic environments. However, the occurrence of arborane biomarkers in Permian and Triassic sediments, which predates the accepted origin of angiosperms, suggests that microbial sources of these lipids may also exist. In this study, we identify two isoarborinol-like lipids, eudoraenol and adriaticol, produced by the aerobic marine heterotrophic bacterium Eudoraea adriatica. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the E. adriatica eudoraenol synthase is an oxidosqualene cyclase homologous to bacterial lanosterol synthases and distinct from plant triterpenoid synthases. Using an Escherichia coli heterologous sterol expression system, we demonstrate that substitution of four amino acid residues in a bacterial lanosterol synthase enabled synthesis of pentacyclic arborinols in addition to tetracyclic sterols. This variant provides valuable mechanistic insight into triterpenoid synthesis and reveals diagnostic amino acid residues to differentiate between sterol and arborinol synthases in genomic and metagenomic datasets. Our data suggest that there may be additional bacterial arborinol producers in marine and freshwater environments that could expand our understanding of these geologically informative lipids.

  14. Control of crystallite and particle size in the synthesis of layered double hydroxides: Macromolecular insights and a complementary modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Tiago L P; Neves, Cristina S; Caetano, Ana P F; Maia, Frederico; Mata, Diogo; Malheiro, Eliana; Ferreira, Maria J; Bastos, Alexandre C; Salak, Andrei N; Gomes, José R B; Tedim, João; Ferreira, Mário G S

    2016-04-15

    Zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides with nitrate intercalated (Zn(n)Al-NO3, n=Zn/Al) is an intermediate material for the intercalation of different functional molecules used in a wide range of industrial applications. The synthesis of Zn(2)Al-NO3 was investigated considering the time and temperature of hydrothermal treatment. By examining the crystallite size in two different directions, hydrodynamic particle size, morphology, crystal structure and chemical species in solution, it was possible to understand the crystallization and dissolution processes involved in the mechanisms of crystallite and particle growth. In addition, hydrogeochemical modeling rendered insights on the speciation of different metal cations in solution. Therefore, this tool can be a promising solution to model and optimize the synthesis of layered double hydroxide-based materials for industrial applications.

  15. Sitosterol-containing lipoproteins trigger free sterol-induced caspase-independent death in ACAT-competent macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liping; Li, Yankun; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald; Tabas, Ira

    2006-11-03

    Sitosterolemia is a disease characterized by very high levels of sitosterol and other plant sterols and premature atherothrombotic vascular disease. One theory holds that plant sterols can directly promote atherosclerosis, but the mechanism is not known. Unesterified, or "free," cholesterol (FC) is a potent inducer of macrophage death, which causes plaque necrosis, a precursor to atherothrombosis. FC-induced macrophage death, however, requires dysfunction of the sterol esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), which likely occurs slowly during lesion progression. In contrast, plant sterols are relatively poorly esterified by ACAT, and so they may cause macrophage death and plaque necrosis in an accelerated manner. In support of this hypothesis, we show here that macrophages incubated with sitosterol-containing lipoproteins accumulate free sterols and undergo death in the absence of an ACAT inhibitor. As with FC loading, sitosterol-induced macrophage death requires sterol trafficking to the endoplasmic reticulum, and sitosterol-enriched endoplasmic reticulum membranes show evidence of membrane protein dysfunction. However, whereas FC induces caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of the unfolded protein response and JNK, sitosterol-induced death is caspase-independent and involves neither the unfolded protein response nor JNK. Rather, cell death shows signs of necroptosis and autophagy and is suppressed by inhibitors of both processes. These data establish two new concepts. First, a relatively subtle change in sterol structure fundamentally alters the type of death program triggered in macrophages. Understanding the basis of this alteration should provide new insights into the molecular basis of death pathway signaling. Second, sitosterol-induced macrophage death does not require ACAT dysfunction and so may occur in an accelerated fashion. Pending future in vivo studies, this concept may provide at least one mechanism for

  16. C27 to C32 sterols found in Pneumocystis, an opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised mammals.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, E S; Wyder, M A

    2000-03-01

    Pneumocystis carinii is the paradigm of opportunistic infections in immunocompromised mammals. Prior to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and the use of immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplant and cancer patients, P. carinii was regarded as a curiosity, rarely observed clinically. Interest in this organism exploded when it was identified as the agent of P. carinii pneumonia (PcP), the direct cause of death among many AIDS patients. Aggressive prophylaxis has decreased the number of acute PcP cases, but it remains among the most prevalent opportunistic infections found within this patient population. The taxonomic assignment of P. carinii has long been argued; molecular genetics data now demonstrate that it is a fungus. Several antimycotic drugs are targeted against ergosterol or its biosynthesis, but these are not as effective against PcP as they are against other fungal infections. This can now be explained in part by the identification of the sterols of P. carinii. The organism lacks ergosterol but contains distinct C28 and C29 delta7 24-alkylsterols. Also, 24-methylenelanost-8-en-3beta-ol (C31) and pneumocysterol, (24Z)-ethylidenelanost-8-en-3beta-ol (C32) were recently identified in organisms infecting humans. Together, the delta7 24-alkylsterols and pneumocysterol are regarded as signature lipids of the pathogen that can be useful for the diagnosis of PcP, since no other lung pathogen is known to contain them. Cholesterol (C27), the dominant sterol component in P. carinii, is probably totally scavenged from the host. De novo synthesis of sterols has been demonstrated by the presence of lovastatin-sensitive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, the incorporation of radiolabeled mevalonate and squalene into P. carinii sterols, and the reduction in cellular ATP in cells treated with inhibitors of enzymes in sterol biosynthesis.

  17. Sterols Regulate Development and Gene Expression in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Xian; Fujioka, Shozo; Li, Tsai-Chi; Kang, Shin Gene; Seto, Hideharu; Takatsuto, Suguru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Jang, Jyan-Chyun

    2003-01-01

    Sterols are important not only for structural components of eukaryotic cell membranes but also for biosynthetic precursors of steroid hormones. In plants, the diverse functions of sterol-derived brassinosteroids (BRs) in growth and development have been investigated rigorously, yet little is known about the regulatory roles of other phytosterols. Recent analysis of Arabidopsis fackel (fk) mutants and cloning of the FK gene that encodes a sterol C-14 reductase have indicated that sterols play a crucial role in plant cell division, embryogenesis, and development. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulatory role of sterols in plant development has not been revealed. In this report, we demonstrate that both sterols and BR are active regulators of plant development and gene expression. Similar to BR, both typical (sitosterol and stigmasterol) and atypical (8, 14-diene sterols accumulated in fk mutants) sterols affect the expression of genes involved in cell expansion and cell division. The regulatory function of sterols in plant development is further supported by a phenocopy of the fk mutant using a sterol C-14 reductase inhibitor, fenpropimorph. Although fenpropimorph impairs cell expansion and affects gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, neither effect can be corrected by applying exogenous BR. These results provide strong evidence that sterols are essential for normal plant growth and development and that there is likely a BR-independent sterol response pathway in plants. On the basis of the expression of endogenous FK and a reporter gene FK::β-glucuronidase, we have found that FK is up-regulated by several growth-promoting hormones including brassinolide and auxin, implicating a possible hormone crosstalk between sterol and other hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:12644676

  18. Sterols regulate development and gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Xian; Fujioka, Shozo; Li, Tsai-Chi; Kang, Shin Gene; Seto, Hideharu; Takatsuto, Suguru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Jang, Jyan-Chyun

    2003-03-01

    Sterols are important not only for structural components of eukaryotic cell membranes but also for biosynthetic precursors of steroid hormones. In plants, the diverse functions of sterol-derived brassinosteroids (BRs) in growth and development have been investigated rigorously, yet little is known about the regulatory roles of other phytosterols. Recent analysis of Arabidopsis fackel (fk) mutants and cloning of the FK gene that encodes a sterol C-14 reductase have indicated that sterols play a crucial role in plant cell division, embryogenesis, and development. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulatory role of sterols in plant development has not been revealed. In this report, we demonstrate that both sterols and BR are active regulators of plant development and gene expression. Similar to BR, both typical (sitosterol and stigmasterol) and atypical (8, 14-diene sterols accumulated in fk mutants) sterols affect the expression of genes involved in cell expansion and cell division. The regulatory function of sterols in plant development is further supported by a phenocopy of the fk mutant using a sterol C-14 reductase inhibitor, fenpropimorph. Although fenpropimorph impairs cell expansion and affects gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, neither effect can be corrected by applying exogenous BR. These results provide strong evidence that sterols are essential for normal plant growth and development and that there is likely a BR-independent sterol response pathway in plants. On the basis of the expression of endogenous FK and a reporter gene FK::beta-glucuronidase, we have found that FK is up-regulated by several growth-promoting hormones including brassinolide and auxin, implicating a possible hormone crosstalk between sterol and other hormone-signaling pathways.

  19. Melissa officinalis essential oil reduces plasma triglycerides in human apolipoprotein E2 transgenic mice by inhibiting sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c-dependent fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Jia, Yaoyao; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Byun, Hanna; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the hypolipidemic effects of Melissa officinalis essential oil (MOEO) in human APOE2 transgenic mice and lipid-loaded HepG2 cells. Plasma TG concentrations were significantly less in APOE2 mice orally administered MOEO (12.5 μg/d) for 2 wk than in the vehicle-treated group. Cellular TG and cholesterol concentrations were also significantly decreased in a dose- (400 and 800 mg/L) and time- (12 and 24 h) dependent manner in HepG2 cells stimulated with MOEO compared with controls. Mouse hepatic transcriptome analysis suggested MOEO feeding altered several lipid metabolic pathways, including bile acid and cholesterol synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. In HepG2 cells, the rate of fatty acid oxidation, as assessed using [1-(14)C]palmitate, was unaltered; however, the rate of fatty acid synthesis quantified with [1-(14)C]acetate was significantly reduced by treatment with 400 and 800 mg/L MOEO compared with untreated controls. This reduction was due to the decreased expression of SREBP-1c and its responsive genes in fatty acid synthesis, including FAS, SCD1, and ACC1. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis further demonstrated that the binding of p300/CBP-associated factor, a coactivator of SREBP-1c, and histone H3 lysine 14 acetylation at the FAS, SCD1, and ACC1 promoters were significantly reduced in the livers of APOE2 mice and HepG2 cells treated with MOEO compared with their controls. Additionally, MOEO stimulation in HepG2 cells induced bile acid synthesis and reduced the nuclear form of SREBP-2, a key transcription factor in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. These findings suggest that the intake of phytochemicals with pleasant scent could have beneficial metabolic effects.

  20. Sterols from the Green Alga Ulva australis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Liang; Guo, Wei-Jie; Wang, Guang-Bao; Wang, Rong-Rong; Hou, Yu-Xue; Liu, Kun; Liu, Yang; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-28

    Three new sterols, (24R)-5,28-stigmastadiene-3β,24-diol-7-one (1), (24S)-5,28-stigmastadiene-3β,24-diol-7-one (2), and 24R and 24S-vinylcholesta-3β,5α,6β,24-tetraol (3), together with three known sterols (4-6) were isolated from the green alga Ulva australis. The structures of the new compounds (1-3) were elucidated through 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as mass spectrometry. Compounds 4-6 were identified as isofucoterol (4), 24R,28S and 24S,28R-epoxy-24-ethylcholesterol (5), and (24S)-stigmastadiene-3β,24-diol (6) on the basis of spectroscopic data analyses and comparison with those reported in the literature. Compounds 4-6 were isolated from U. australis for the first time. These compounds, together with the previously isolated secondary metabolites of this alga, were investigated for their inhibitory effects on human recombinant aldose reductase in vitro. Of the compounds, 24R,28S and 24S,28R-epoxy-24-ethylcholesterol (5), 1-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(6'-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl) glycerol, (2S)-1-O-palmitoyl-3-O-[α-d-galactopyranosyl(1→2)β-d-galactopyranosyl] glycerol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 8-hydroxy-(6E)-octenoic acid weakly inhibited the enzyme, while the three new sterols, 1-3, were almost inactive.

  1. Treatment of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome and Other Sterol Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Melissa D.; Christie, Jill M.; Eroglu, Yasemen; Freeman, Kurt A.; Steiner, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive genetic condition with a broad phenotype that results from deficiency of the final enzyme of the cholesterol synthesis pathway. This defect causes low or low-normal plasma cholesterol levels and increased 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol (DHC) levels. Many therapies for SLOS and other disorders of sterol metabolism have been proposed, and a few of them have been undertaken in selected patients, but robust prospective clinical trials with validated outcome measures are lacking. We review the current literature and expert opinion on treatments for SLOS and other selected sterol disorders, including dietary cholesterol therapy, statin treatment, bile acid supplementation, medical therapies and surgical interventions, as well as directions for future therapies and treatment research. PMID:23042642

  2. Translesion Synthesis: Insights into the Selection and Switching of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linlin; Washington, M. Todd

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication is constantly challenged by DNA lesions, noncanonical DNA structures and difficult-to-replicate DNA sequences. Two major strategies to rescue a stalled replication fork and to ensure continuous DNA synthesis are: (1) template switching and recombination-dependent DNA synthesis; and (2) translesion synthesis (TLS) using specialized DNA polymerases to perform nucleotide incorporation opposite DNA lesions. The former pathway is mainly error-free, and the latter is error-prone and a major source of mutagenesis. An accepted model of translesion synthesis involves DNA polymerase switching steps between a replicative DNA polymerase and one or more TLS DNA polymerases. The mechanisms that govern the selection and exchange of specialized DNA polymerases for a given DNA lesion are not well understood. In this review, recent studies concerning the mechanisms of selection and switching of DNA polymerases in eukaryotic systems are summarized. PMID:28075396

  3. [Plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols: small amounts, big effects].

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Vesa M; Gylling, Helena; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Noncholesterol sterols are present in the body in very low concentrations compared with cholesterol. Minor structural changes in sterols give them completely individual biological activities. Steroid hormones are the best known example of this. The knowledge of other relatives of cholesterol, particularly plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols, their properties, physiological effects, significance in disease processes and diagnostic applications has recently undergone a rapid increase.

  4. Distribution of sterols in the fungi. I - Fungal spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Laseter, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Mass spectrometry was used to examine freely extractable sterols from spores of several species of fungi. Ergosterol was the most common sterol produced by any individual species, but it was completely absent from two species belonging to apparently distantly related groups of fungi: the aquatic Phycomycetes and the rust fungi. This fact could have taxonomic or phylogenetic implications. The use of glass capillary columns in the resolution of the sterols is shown to eliminate some of the difficulty inherent in this process.

  5. Distribution of sterols in the fungi. I - Fungal spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Laseter, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Mass spectrometry was used to examine freely extractable sterols from spores of several species of fungi. Ergosterol was the most common sterol produced by any individual species, but it was completely absent from two species belonging to apparently distantly related groups of fungi: the aquatic Phycomycetes and the rust fungi. This fact could have taxonomic or phylogenetic implications. The use of glass capillary columns in the resolution of the sterols is shown to eliminate some of the difficulty inherent in this process.

  6. Serum lipids, plant sterols, and cholesterol kinetic responses to plant sterol supplementation in phytosterolemia heterozygotes and control individuals123

    PubMed Central

    Myrie, Semone B; Mymin, David; Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Jones, Peter JH

    2012-01-01

    Background: Plant sterol (PS) supplementation is increasingly accepted as a dietary strategy to lower plasma cholesterol concentrations. However, information is scarce about the effect of increased PS intake in potentially vulnerable groups, such as phytosterolemia heterozygotes (HET). Objective: This study assessed the responsiveness of circulating PS and lipid concentrations and cholesterol kinetics (absorption and synthesis) to daily PS supplementation in HET (ABCG8 S107X mutation) compared with a healthy control cohort. Design: A double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 10 HET and 15 control subjects. The participants had a mean (±SEM) age of 34 ± 2 y and a BMI (in kg/m2) of 29.9 ± 1.1 and consumed ∼1.6 g PS or placebo capsules daily with supper for 4 wk. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis were assessed by using [13C]cholesterol and deuterium oxide, respectively. Results: Plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased (P = 0.006) in both groups after PS supplementation (HET: 2.73 ± 0.19 mmol/L; control: 3.11± 0.19 mmol/L) compared with placebo (HET: 3.12 ± 0.20 mmol/L; control: 3.50 ± 0.21 mmol/L), whereas PS concentrations (campesterol+β-sitosterol) increased (P = 0.03) in both groups after PS supplementation (HET: 39.72 ± 6.05 μmol/L; control: 24.03 ± 1.65 μmol/L) compared with placebo (HET: 27.32 ± 3.80 μmol/L; control: 21.12 ± 2.05 μmol/L). Cholesterol absorption efficiency decreased (P = 0.010) by ∼22% and ∼17% and synthesis rates increased (P = 0.040) by ∼20% and ∼24% in the HET and control groups, respectively, in response to PS consumption compared with placebo. Conclusion: These data suggest that heterozygosity for the ABCG8 S107X mutation does not influence the action of dietary PS on circulating cholesterol concentrations but may affect sterol absorption. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01102647. PMID:22378727

  7. Sterol and lipid composition of three Adriatic Sea sponges.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Salvatore; Seizova, Katya; Kamenarska, Zornitsa; Petrova, Assia; Iodice, Carmine; Stefanov, Kamen; Popov, Simeon

    2006-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid composition of three Adriatic Sea sponges (Geodia cydonium and two unidentified Tedania sp.), collected at the same time and same place, was established. Twenty-four sterols and forty fatty acids were identified. The identical ecological conditions, including the diet, allowed us to apply the results obtained for taxonomical conclusions, based on the biodiversity of the investigated sponges. On the basis of the sterol composition they can be separated into two groups: Tedania and Geodia sponges. The sterol and fatty acid composition indicates that the two investigated Tedania samples might be different species or subspecies.

  8. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Bioconversion and binding of sterols by thermophilic moulds.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, T; Chavant, L

    1987-01-01

    None of the fourteen thermophilic moulds was able to break down the aliphatic side chain of sterols, viz. cholesterol, lanosterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol so as to yield 4-androstene-3,17-dione, 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione and progesterone. In Acremonium alabamensis and Talaromyces emersonii, cholestenone was detected as a product of fermentation of cholesterol whereas the former yielded stigmastadienone from stigmasterol and sitosterol. Lanosterol appeared to be resistant to fungal bioconversion. All the thermophilic moulds exhibited avidity for binding sterols to the mycelium, but the ability to bind sterol seemed to depend upon the nature of the organism and the sterol.

  10. Kinetic insights into ϵ-caprolactone synthesis: Improvement of an enzymatic cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Scherkus, Christian; Schmidt, Sandy; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Gröger, Harald; Kara, Selin; Liese, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    A computational approach for the simulation and prediction of a linear three-step enzymatic cascade for the synthesis of ϵ-caprolactone (ECL) coupling an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), and a lipase for the subsequent hydrolysis of ECL to 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid (6-HHA). A kinetic model was developed with an accuracy of prediction for a fed-batch mode of 37% for substrate cyclohexanol (CHL), 90% for ECL, and >99% for the final product 6-HHA. Due to a severe inhibition of the CHMO by CHL, a batch synthesis was shown to be less efficient than a fed-batch approach. In the fed-batch synthesis, full conversion of 100 mM CHL was 28% faster with an analytical yield of 98% compared to 49% in case of the batch synthesis. The lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of ECL to 6-HHA circumvents the inhibition of the CHMO by ECL enabling a 24% higher product concentration of 6-HHA compared to ECL in case of the fed-batch synthesis without lipase. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1215-1221. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Δ24-Sterol Methyltransferase Plays an Important Role in the Growth and Development of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Borba-Santos, Luana P.; Visbal, Gonzalo; Gagini, Thalita; Rodrigues, Anderson M.; de Camargo, Zoilo P.; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.; Ishida, Kelly; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Δ24-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMT) in Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis was investigated in vitro. The effects on fungal growth and sterol composition of the 24-SMT inhibitor 22-hydrazone-imidazolin-2-yl-chol-5-ene-3β-ol (H3) were compared to those of itraconazole. MIC and MFC analysis showed that H3 was more effective than itraconazole against both species in both their filamentous and yeast forms. H3 showed fungistatic activity in a time-kill assay, with inhibitory activity stronger than that of itraconazole. GC analysis of cell sterol composition showed that sterols present in control cells (ergosterol and precursors) were completely replaced by 14α-methylated sterols after H3 exposure. Itraconazole only partially inhibited ergosterol synthesis but completely arrested synthesis of other sterols found in control cells, promoting accumulation of nine 14α-methyl sterols. Based on these results, we propose a schematic model of sterol biosynthesis pathways in S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Effects on cell morphology due to 24-SMT inhibition by H3 as analyzed by SEM and TEM included irregular cell shape, reduced cytoplasmic electron-density, and reduced thickness of the microfibrillar cell wall layer. Moreover, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 promoted mitochondrial disturbance, as demonstrated by alterations in MitoTracker® Red CMXRos fluorescence intensity evaluated by flow cytometry. When used in conjunction with itraconazole, H3 enhanced the effectiveness of itraconazole against all tested strains, reducing at least half (or more) the MIC values of itraconazole. In addition, cytotoxicity assays revealed that H3 was more selective toward these fungi than was itraconazole. Thus, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 was an effective antifungal strategy against S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Inhibition of the methylation reaction catalyzed by 24-SMT has a strong antiproliferative effect via disruption of ergosterol homeostasis

  12. Δ(24)-Sterol Methyltransferase Plays an Important Role in the Growth and Development of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Borba-Santos, Luana P; Visbal, Gonzalo; Gagini, Thalita; Rodrigues, Anderson M; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M; Ishida, Kelly; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Δ(24)-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMT) in Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis was investigated in vitro. The effects on fungal growth and sterol composition of the 24-SMT inhibitor 22-hydrazone-imidazolin-2-yl-chol-5-ene-3β-ol (H3) were compared to those of itraconazole. MIC and MFC analysis showed that H3 was more effective than itraconazole against both species in both their filamentous and yeast forms. H3 showed fungistatic activity in a time-kill assay, with inhibitory activity stronger than that of itraconazole. GC analysis of cell sterol composition showed that sterols present in control cells (ergosterol and precursors) were completely replaced by 14α-methylated sterols after H3 exposure. Itraconazole only partially inhibited ergosterol synthesis but completely arrested synthesis of other sterols found in control cells, promoting accumulation of nine 14α-methyl sterols. Based on these results, we propose a schematic model of sterol biosynthesis pathways in S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Effects on cell morphology due to 24-SMT inhibition by H3 as analyzed by SEM and TEM included irregular cell shape, reduced cytoplasmic electron-density, and reduced thickness of the microfibrillar cell wall layer. Moreover, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 promoted mitochondrial disturbance, as demonstrated by alterations in MitoTracker(®) Red CMXRos fluorescence intensity evaluated by flow cytometry. When used in conjunction with itraconazole, H3 enhanced the effectiveness of itraconazole against all tested strains, reducing at least half (or more) the MIC values of itraconazole. In addition, cytotoxicity assays revealed that H3 was more selective toward these fungi than was itraconazole. Thus, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 was an effective antifungal strategy against S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Inhibition of the methylation reaction catalyzed by 24-SMT has a strong antiproliferative effect via disruption of ergosterol homeostasis

  13. Effects of sterol-binding agent nystatin on wheat roots: the changes in membrane permeability, sterols and glycoceramides.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Julia N; Minibayeva, Farida V; Kotlova, Ekaterina R; Novikov, Alexander V; Shavarda, Alexey L; Murtazina, Lyaisan I; Ryzhkina, Irina S

    2011-10-01

    Plant sterols are important multifunctional lipids, which are involved in determining membrane properties. Biophysical characteristics of model lipid and isolated animal membranes with altered sterol component have been intensively studied. In plants however, the precise mechanisms of involvement of sterols in membrane functioning remain unclear. In present work the possible interactions between sterols and other membrane lipids in plant cells were studied. A useful experimental approach for elucidating the roles of sterols in membrane activity is to use agents that specifically bind with endogenous sterols, for example the antibiotic nystatin. Membrane characteristics and the composition of membrane lipids in the roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings treated with nystatin were analyzed. The application of nystatin greatly increased the permeability of the plasma membrane for ions and SH-containing molecules and decreased the total sterol level mainly as a consequence of a reduction in the amount of β-sitosterol and campesterol. Dynamic light-scattering was used to confirm the in vitro formation of stable complexes between nystatin and β-sitosterol or cholesterol. Sterol depletion was accompanied by a significant rise in total glycoceramide (GlCer) content after 2h treatment with nystatin. Analysis of the GlCer composition using mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization demonstrated that nystatin induced changes in the ratio of molecular species of GlCer. Our results suggest that changes in the sphingolipid composition can contribute to the changes in plasma membrane functioning induced by sterol depletion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Green and Rapid Synthesis of Anticancerous Silver Nanoparticles by Saccharomyces boulardii and Insight into Mechanism of Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Abhishek; Jain, Sanyog; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly developing field of nanobiotechnology dealing with metallic nanoparticle (MNP) synthesis is primarily lacking control over size, shape, dispersity, yield, and reaction time. Present work describes an ecofriendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by cell free extract (CFE) of Saccharomyces boulardii. Parameters such as culture age (stationary phase growth), cell mass concentration (400 mg/mL), temperature (35°C), and reaction time (4 h), have been optimized to exercise a control over the yield of nanoparticles and their properties. Nanoparticle (NP) formation was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental composition by EDX (energy dispersive X-rays) analysis, and size and shape by transmission electron microscopy. Synthesized nanoparticles had the size range of 3–10 nm with high negative zeta potential (−31 mV) indicating excellent stability. Role of proteins/peptides in NP formation and their stability were also elucidated. Finally, anticancer activity of silver nanoparticles as compared to silver ions was determined on breast cancer cell lines. PMID:24298556

  15. Green and rapid synthesis of anticancerous silver nanoparticles by Saccharomyces boulardii and insight into mechanism of nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Abhishek; Jain, Sanyog; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly developing field of nanobiotechnology dealing with metallic nanoparticle (MNP) synthesis is primarily lacking control over size, shape, dispersity, yield, and reaction time. Present work describes an ecofriendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by cell free extract (CFE) of Saccharomyces boulardii. Parameters such as culture age (stationary phase growth), cell mass concentration (400 mg/mL), temperature (35°C), and reaction time (4 h), have been optimized to exercise a control over the yield of nanoparticles and their properties. Nanoparticle (NP) formation was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental composition by EDX (energy dispersive X-rays) analysis, and size and shape by transmission electron microscopy. Synthesized nanoparticles had the size range of 3-10 nm with high negative zeta potential (-31 mV) indicating excellent stability. Role of proteins/peptides in NP formation and their stability were also elucidated. Finally, anticancer activity of silver nanoparticles as compared to silver ions was determined on breast cancer cell lines.

  16. Hepatic entrapment of esterified cholesterol drives continual expansion of whole body sterol pool in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Aqul, Amal; Lopez, Adam M.; Posey, Kenneth S.; Taylor, Anna M.; Repa, Joyce J.; Burns, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) results from loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Hepatomegaly and deposition of esterified cholesterol (EC) in multiple organs ensue. The present studies quantitated rates of synthesis, absorption, and disposition of cholesterol, and whole body cholesterol pool size in a mouse model of CESD. In 50-day-old lal−/− and matching lal+/+ mice fed a low-cholesterol diet, whole animal cholesterol content equalled 210 and 50 mg, respectively, indicating that since birth the lal−/− mice sequestered cholesterol at an average rate of 3.2 mg·day−1·animal−1. The proportion of the body sterol pool contained in the liver of the lal−/− mice was 64 vs. 6.3% in their lal+/+ controls. EC concentrations in the liver, spleen, small intestine, and lungs of the lal−/− mice were elevated 100-, 35-, 15-, and 6-fold, respectively. In the lal−/− mice, whole liver cholesterol synthesis increased 10.2-fold, resulting in a 3.2-fold greater rate of whole animal sterol synthesis compared with their lal+/+ controls. The rate of cholesterol synthesis in the lal−/− mice exceeded that in the lal+/+ controls by 3.7 mg·day−1·animal−1. Fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal bile acid excretion were unchanged in the lal−/− mice, but their rate of neutral sterol excretion was 59% higher than in their lal+/+ controls. Thus, in this model, the continual expansion of the body sterol pool is driven by the synthesis of excess cholesterol, primarily in the liver. Despite the severity of their disease, the median life span of the lal−/− mice was 355 days. PMID:25147230

  17. Hepatic entrapment of esterified cholesterol drives continual expansion of whole body sterol pool in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Aqul, Amal; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Taylor, Anna M; Repa, Joyce J; Burns, Dennis K; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-10-15

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) results from loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Hepatomegaly and deposition of esterified cholesterol (EC) in multiple organs ensue. The present studies quantitated rates of synthesis, absorption, and disposition of cholesterol, and whole body cholesterol pool size in a mouse model of CESD. In 50-day-old lal(-/-) and matching lal(+/+) mice fed a low-cholesterol diet, whole animal cholesterol content equalled 210 and 50 mg, respectively, indicating that since birth the lal(-/-) mice sequestered cholesterol at an average rate of 3.2 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). The proportion of the body sterol pool contained in the liver of the lal(-/-) mice was 64 vs. 6.3% in their lal(+/+) controls. EC concentrations in the liver, spleen, small intestine, and lungs of the lal(-/-) mice were elevated 100-, 35-, 15-, and 6-fold, respectively. In the lal(-/-) mice, whole liver cholesterol synthesis increased 10.2-fold, resulting in a 3.2-fold greater rate of whole animal sterol synthesis compared with their lal(+/+) controls. The rate of cholesterol synthesis in the lal(-/-) mice exceeded that in the lal(+/+) controls by 3.7 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). Fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal bile acid excretion were unchanged in the lal(-/-) mice, but their rate of neutral sterol excretion was 59% higher than in their lal(+/+) controls. Thus, in this model, the continual expansion of the body sterol pool is driven by the synthesis of excess cholesterol, primarily in the liver. Despite the severity of their disease, the median life span of the lal(-/-) mice was 355 days.

  18. Insights into Fourier Synthesis and Analysis: Part I--Using Simple Programs and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Guy S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Introduced is a unique generation method of Fourier series requiring simple mathematical skills and using computer programs. Discusses Fourier synthesis by microcomputer, and Fourier analysis with simple equipment. Shown are a circuit diagram, computer programs, monitor displays and tables of data. (YP)

  19. Effects of plant sterols derived from Aloe vera gel on human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and on skin condition in Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miyuki; Misawa, Eriko; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Ishizaki, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Aloe is known for its topical use for treating wounds and burns. Many previous studies reported the healing effects of Aloe vera. However, there are few clinical studies on the effect of orally administered A. vera gel on the skin. Aloe sterols are a type of plant sterols that have the capability to regulate the metabolism of glucose and lipids. In a recent study, we confirmed that ingested Aloe sterols reached the peripheral tissues through the bloodstream. However, their influence on dermal fibroblasts has not been investigated. Methods First, we investigated the capability of Aloe sterols (cycloartenol and lophenol) to stimulate human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Then, we investigated the effect of intake of Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) containing 40 μg Aloe sterols on the skin conditions in Japanese women with dry skin in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Results After cocultivation with Aloe sterols, the production of collagen and hyaluronic acid increased by approximately two-fold and 1.5-fold, and gene expression levels of these enzymes responsible for their synthesis were also observed in human dermal fibroblasts. An increase in arm skin hydration was observed at 8 weeks in the AVGP group, whereas a slight decrease in arm skin hydration was noted in the placebo group. However, there was no statistical difference between AVGP and placebo groups in skin moisture. In subgroup analysis, the change in the mean wrinkle depth was significantly lower in the AVGP group than in the control group. In addition, percent body fat after 8 weeks was significantly lower in the AVGP group. No AVGP intake-dependent harmful phenomenon was observed during the intake period. Conclusion The present study confirms that daily oral Aloe sterol-containing AVGP significantly reduced facial wrinkles in women aged ≥40 years, and Aloe sterols stimulate collagen and hyaluronic acid production by human dermal fibroblasts. PMID:25759593

  20. Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Chiral Spiro-9-silabifluorenes by Dehydrogenative Silylation: Mechanistic Insights into the Construction of Tetraorganosilicon Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Takeuchi, Yutaro; Yamauchi, Kanae; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-18

    Mechanistic insight into the construction of quaternary silicon chiral centers by rhodium-catalyzed synthesis of spiro-9-silabifluorenes through dehydrogenative silylation is reported. The C2 -symmetric bisphosphine ligand, BINAP, was effective in controlling enantioselectivity, and axially chiral spiro-9-silabifluorenes were obtained in excellent yields with high enantiomeric excess. Monitoring of the reaction revealed the presence of a monohydrosilane intermediate as a mixture of two constitutional isomers. The reaction proceeded through two consecutive dehydrogenative silylations, and the absolute configuration was determined in the first silylative cyclization. Competitive reactions with electron-rich and electron-deficient dihydrosilanes indicated that the rate of silylative cyclization increased with decreasing electron density on the silicon atom of the starting dihydrosilane. Further investigation disclosed a rare interconversion between the two constitutional isomers of the monohydrosilane intermediate with retention of the absolute configuration.

  1. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is a Principal Regulator of Anaerobic Gene Expression in Fission Yeast†

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Bridget L.; Stewart, Emerson V.; Burg, John S.; Hughes, Adam L.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Fission yeast sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), called Sre1p, functions in an oxygen-sensing pathway to allow adaptation to fluctuating oxygen concentrations. The Sre1p-Scp1p complex responds to oxygen-dependent sterol synthesis as an indirect measure of oxygen availability. To examine the role of Sre1p in anaerobic gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we performed transcriptional profiling experiments after a shift to anaerobic conditions for 1.5 h. Of the 4,940 genes analyzed, expression levels of 521 (10.5%) and 686 (13.9%) genes were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, under anaerobic conditions. Sre1p controlled 68% of genes induced ≥2-fold. Oxygen-requiring biosynthetic pathways for ergosterol, heme, sphingolipid, and ubiquinone were primary targets of Sre1p. Induction of glycolytic genes and repression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation genes largely did not require Sre1p. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated that Sre1p acts directly at target gene promoters and stimulates its own transcription under anaerobic conditions. sre1+ promoter analysis identified two DNA elements that are both necessary and sufficient for oxygen-dependent, Sre1p-dependent transcription. Interestingly, these elements are homologous to sterol regulatory elements bound by mammalian SREBP, highlighting the evolutionary conservation between Sre1p and SREBP. We conclude that Sre1p is a principal activator of anaerobic gene expression, upregulating genes required for nonrespiratory oxygen consumption. PMID:16537923

  2. Role of membrane sterols and cortical microtubules in gravity resistance in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Koizumi, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Kumasaki, S.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Sakaki, T.

    Resistance to the gravitational force is a principal graviresponse in plants comparable to gravitropism Nevertheless only limited information has been obtained for this graviresponse We have examined mechanisms of signal perception transformation and transduction of the perceived signal and response to the transduced signal in gravity resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid a key precursor of terpenoids such as membrane sterols Geranyl diphosphate synthase gene was also up-regulated by hypergravity whereas the expression of other genes involved in membrane lipid metabolism was not influenced Hypergravity caused an increase in sterol content in azuki bean epicotyls but not in phospholipid glycolipid or fatty acid content Also hypergravity did not influence fatty acid composition in any lipid class Thus the effect of hypergravity on membrane lipid metabolism was specific for sterol synthesis On the other hand alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were up-regulated by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls Hypergravity also induced reorientation of cortical microtubules in azuki epicotyls the percentage of epidermal cells with transverse microtubles was decreased whereas that with longitudinal microtubules was increased Inhibitors of HMGR action and microtubule-disrupting agents completely prevented the gravity resistance

  3. [THE SPIRIT CHOLESTEROL, BIOLOGICA L ROLE AT STAGES OF PHYLOGENESIS, MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF SYNTHESIS OF STEROL BY STATINS, FACTORS OF PHARMACOGENOMICS AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Kotlovskii, M Yu; Pokrovskii, A A; Kotlovskaia, O S; Osedko, A V; Titova, N M; Kotlovskii, Yu V; Digaii, A M

    2015-04-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of statins is realized by inhibition of synthesis of local pool of cholesterol spirit in endoplasmic net of hepatocytes. The cholesterol spirit covers all hydrophobic medium of triglycerides with polar mono layer of phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol spirit prior to secretion of lipoproteins of very low density into hydrophilic medium. The lesser mono layer between lipase enzyme and triglycerides substrate contains of cholesterol spirit the higher are the parameters of hydrolysis of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density. The sequence of effect of statins is as follows: blocking of synthesis in hepatocytes and decreasing of content of unesterified cholesterol spirit in blood plasma; activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density; formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells by force of apoB-100 endocytosis; decreasing in blood of content of polyenoic fatty acids, equimolar esterified by cholesterol spirit, polyethers of cholesterol spirit and decreasing of level of cholesterol spirit-lipoproteins of very low density. There is no way to eliminate aphysiological effect of disordered biological function of trophology (nutrition) on metabolism of fatty acids in population by means of pharmaceuticals intake. It is necessary to eliminate aphysiological effect of environment. To decrease rate of diseases of cardiovascular system one has to decrease in food content of saturated fatty acids and in the first instance palmitic saturated fatty acid, trans-form fatty acid, palmitoleic fatty acids up to physiological values and increase to the same degree the content of polyenoic fatty acids. The saturated fatty acids block absorption of polyenoic fatty acids by cells. The atherosclerosis is a deficiency of polyenoic fatty acids under surplus of palmitic saturated fatty acid.

  4. STEROLS AS BIOMARKERS IN GYMNODINIUM BREVE DISTRIBUTION IN DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of marine microalgae has been shown to be a chemotaxonomic property potentially of value in distinguishing members of different algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae display sterol compositions ranging from as few as two (cholesterol ...

  5. Composition of plant sterols and stanols in supplemented food products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    All fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant materials contain small amounts of plant sterols, which are essential for the function of the biological membranes in living cells. The average human consumption of plant sterols has been estimated to be about 150-350 mg/day and trace amounts of stanol...

  6. Detailed sterol compositions of two pathogenic rust fungi.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Zhao, Hui

    2004-08-01

    Teliospores of cedar-apple rust Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae were collected from the eastern red cedar Juniperus virginiana, and aeciospores of quince rust G. clavipes were collected from the fruit of English hawthorn Crataegus laevigata. The sterol fractions were separated by HPLC, and their identities were determined by 600 MHz 1H NMR. Twenty-six sterols were isolated from G. juniperi-virginianae and 18 sterols were isolated from G. clavipes. The principal sterol of both fungi was (Z)-stigmasta-7,24(28)-dien-3beta-ol. Other major sterols were (24S)-ergost-7-en-3beta-ol, (24S)-stigmast-7-en-3beta-ol, and (24S)-stigmasta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol. The sterols of the hosts were found to be very different from those of the fungi. The 24-alkyl sterols of the fungi had the 24alpha-configuration, whereas those of the hosts had the 24beta-configuration. Similarities to the sterol composition of the AIDS pneumonia fungus Pneumocystis carinii are discussed.

  7. Composition of Plant Sterols and Stanols in Supplemented Food Products.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    All fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant materials contain small amounts of plant sterols, which are essential for the function of the biological membranes in living cells. The average human consumption of plant sterols has been estimated to be about 150-350 mg/day and trace amounts of stanols (which are defined as saturated sterols such as sitostanol), but this number varies regionally and is higher for vegetarians. When consumed in the diet, plant sterols reduce the levels of serum cholesterol. In 1995 the first functional food product, Benecol spread (enriched in plant stanol fatty acid esters), was developed by Raisio and marketed, first in Finland and then globally. Since then many other functional food products have been developed and are now available globally. In addition to stanol esters, other functional food products contain plant sterol esters and/or free (unesterified) plant sterols and stanols. In essentially all of the current functional foods that are enriched in sterols and stanols, the feedstock from which the sterols and stanols are obtained is either tall oil (a byproduct/coproduct of the pulping of pine wood) or vegetable oil deodorizer distillate (a byproduct/coproduct of the refining of vegetable oils).

  8. Sterol methyltransferase 1 controls the level of cholesterol in plants.

    PubMed

    Diener, A C; Li, H; Zhou, W; Whoriskey, W J; Nes, W D; Fink, G R

    2000-06-01

    The side chain in plant sterols can have either a methyl or ethyl addition at carbon 24 that is absent in cholesterol. The ethyl addition is the product of two sequential methyl additions. Arabidopsis contains three genes-sterol methyltransferase 1 (SMT1), SMT2, and SMT3-homologous to yeast ERG6, which is known to encode an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent C-24 SMT that catalyzes a single methyl addition. The SMT1 polypeptide is the most similar of these Arabidopsis homologs to yeast Erg6p. Moreover, expression of Arabidopsis SMT1 in erg6 restores SMT activity to the yeast mutant. The smt1 plants have pleiotropic defects: poor growth and fertility, sensitivity of the root to calcium, and a loss of proper embryo morphogenesis. smt1 has an altered sterol content: it accumulates cholesterol and has less C-24 alkylated sterols content. Escherichia coli extracts, obtained from a strain expressing the Arabidopsis SMT1 protein, can perform both the methyl and ethyl additions to appropriate sterol substrates, although with different kinetics. The fact that smt1 null mutants still produce alkylated sterols and that SMT1 can catalyze both alkylation steps shows that there is considerable overlap in the substrate specificity of enzymes in sterol biosynthesis. The availability of the SMT1 gene and mutant should permit the manipulation of phytosterol composition, which will help elucidate the role of sterols in animal nutrition.

  9. STEROL METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 Controls the Level of Cholesterol in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Andrew C.; Li, Haoxia; Zhou, Wen-xu; Whoriskey, Wendy J.; Nes, W. David; Fink, Gerald R.

    2000-01-01

    The side chain in plant sterols can have either a methyl or ethyl addition at carbon 24 that is absent in cholesterol. The ethyl addition is the product of two sequential methyl additions. Arabidopsis contains three genes—sterol methyltransferase 1 (SMT1), SMT2, and SMT3—homologous to yeast ERG6, which is known to encode an S-adenosylmethionine–dependent C-24 SMT that catalyzes a single methyl addition. The SMT1 polypeptide is the most similar of these Arabidopsis homologs to yeast Erg6p. Moreover, expression of Arabidopsis SMT1 in erg6 restores SMT activity to the yeast mutant. The smt1 plants have pleiotropic defects: poor growth and fertility, sensitivity of the root to calcium, and a loss of proper embryo morphogenesis. smt1 has an altered sterol content: it accumulates cholesterol and has less C-24 alkylated sterols content. Escherichia coli extracts, obtained from a strain expressing the Arabidopsis SMT1 protein, can perform both the methyl and ethyl additions to appropriate sterol substrates, although with different kinetics. The fact that smt1 null mutants still produce alkylated sterols and that SMT1 can catalyze both alkylation steps shows that there is considerable overlap in the substrate specificity of enzymes in sterol biosynthesis. The availability of the SMT1 gene and mutant should permit the manipulation of phytosterol composition, which will help elucidate the role of sterols in animal nutrition. PMID:10852933

  10. Sterol composition in larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shinji; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Sterols in silkworm larvae were analyzed. Cholesterol was predominantly detected in all tissues examined. Dietary phytosterols and desmosterol, a putative biosynthetic intermediate from phytosterols to cholesterol, were also detected, indicating that imperfect intestinal conversion from phytosterols to cholesterol influences the sterol composition in larval tissues.

  11. Plant sterols in vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Normén, L; Johnsson, M; Andersson, H; van Gameren, Y; Dutta, P

    1999-04-01

    Plant sterols are known to have serum cholesterol lowering effects. A high dietary intake might therefore have a positive impact on health. All food items of vegetable origin contain some amount of plant sterols. The aim of this study was to analyse the plant sterol content of vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden, and to compare fresh and cooked samples of the same items. Altogether 20 different vegetables and 14 fruits were analysed. All vegetables and fruits were purchased in two shops in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden. Lyophilization was performed within one month of the items being purchased. The samples were frozen at -20 (C and analysed within six months, with a GLC method after acid hydrolysis, alkaline hydrolysis and silylation with tri-methylsilylether. The acid hydrolysis was done in order to detect the fraction of glycosylated plant sterols, which are split during boiling with HCl. The median plant sterol content of vegetables was 14 (3.8-50) mg/100 g edible portion. The highest concentrations were found in broccoli. Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and olives. The median plant sterol content of fruits was 16 (3-44) mg/100 g edible portion. The highest concentrations were found in oranges and passion fruits. The plant sterol concentrations were thus low in vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden. A serum cholesterol lowering effect attributed to the plant sterols in vegetables and fruits would therefore be of limited significance.

  12. STEROLS AS BIOMARKERS IN GYMNODINIUM BREVE DISTRIBUTION IN DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of marine microalgae has been shown to be a chemotaxonomic property potentially of value in distinguishing members of different algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae display sterol compositions ranging from as few as two (cholesterol ...

  13. Design, synthesis and insight into the structure-activity relationship of 1,3-disubstituted indazoles as novel HIF-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    An, Hongchan; Kim, Nam-Jung; Jung, Jong-Wha; Jang, Hannah; Park, Jong-Wan; Suh, Young-Ger

    2011-11-01

    Design, synthesis and insight into the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 1,3-disubstituted indazoles as novel HIF-1 inhibitors are described. In particular, the substituted furan moiety on indazole skeleton as well as its substitution pattern turns out crucial for the high HIF-1 inhibition.

  14. Chemical synthesis of erythropoietin glycoforms for insights into the relationship between glycosylation pattern and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masumi; Kiuchi, Tatsuto; Nishihara, Mika; Tezuka, Katsunari; Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The role of sialyloligosaccharides on the surface of secreted glycoproteins is still unclear because of the difficulty in the preparation of sialylglycoproteins in a homogeneous form. We selected erythropoietin (EPO) as a target molecule and designed an efficient synthetic strategy for the chemical synthesis of a homogeneous form of five EPO glycoforms varying in glycosylation position and the number of human-type biantennary sialyloligosaccharides. A segment coupling strategy performed by native chemical ligation using six peptide segments including glycopeptides yielded homogeneous EPO glycopeptides, and folding experiments of these glycopeptides afforded the correctly folded EPO glycoforms. In an in vivo erythropoiesis assay in mice, all of the EPO glycoforms displayed biological activity, in particular the EPO bearing three sialyloligosaccharides, which exhibited the highest activity. Furthermore, we observed that the hydrophilicity and biological activity of the EPO glycoforms varied depending on the glycosylation pattern. This knowledge will pave the way for the development of homogeneous biologics by chemical synthesis.

  15. Chemical synthesis of erythropoietin glycoforms for insights into the relationship between glycosylation pattern and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masumi; Kiuchi, Tatsuto; Nishihara, Mika; Tezuka, Katsunari; Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The role of sialyloligosaccharides on the surface of secreted glycoproteins is still unclear because of the difficulty in the preparation of sialylglycoproteins in a homogeneous form. We selected erythropoietin (EPO) as a target molecule and designed an efficient synthetic strategy for the chemical synthesis of a homogeneous form of five EPO glycoforms varying in glycosylation position and the number of human-type biantennary sialyloligosaccharides. A segment coupling strategy performed by native chemical ligation using six peptide segments including glycopeptides yielded homogeneous EPO glycopeptides, and folding experiments of these glycopeptides afforded the correctly folded EPO glycoforms. In an in vivo erythropoiesis assay in mice, all of the EPO glycoforms displayed biological activity, in particular the EPO bearing three sialyloligosaccharides, which exhibited the highest activity. Furthermore, we observed that the hydrophilicity and biological activity of the EPO glycoforms varied depending on the glycosylation pattern. This knowledge will pave the way for the development of homogeneous biologics by chemical synthesis. PMID:26824070

  16. Sterols and Fatty Acids of the Harmful Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Ceballos, Harriette; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Gobler, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Sterol and fatty acid compositions were determined for Cochlodinium polykrikoides, a toxic, bloom-forming dinoflagellate of global significance. The major sterols were dinosterol (40% of total sterols), dihydrodinosterol (32%), and the rare 4α-methyl Δ(8(14)) sterol, amphisterol (23%). A minor sterol, 4α-methylergost-24(28)-enol was also detected (5.0%). The fatty acids had a high proportion of PUFAs (47%), consisting mainly of EPA (20%) and the relatively uncommon octadecapentaenoic acid (18 : 5, 22%). While unlikely to be responsible for toxicity to fish, these lipids may contribute to the deleterious effects of this alga to invertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  17. Diversity of Sterol Composition in Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Mezni, Faten; Labidi, Arbia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Martine, Lucy; Berdeaux, Olivier; Khaldi, Abdelhamid

    2016-05-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. seed oil is used in some Mediterranean forest area for culinary and medicinal purposes. In this study, we aim to examine, for the first time, the effect of growing area on sterol content of Pistacia lentiscus seed oil. Fruits were harvested from 13 different sites located in northern and central Tunisia. Gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to quantify sterols and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify them. The major sterol identified was β-sitosterol with a value ranging from 854.12 to 1224.09 mg/kg of oil, thus making up more than 54% of the total sterols. The other two main sterols were cycloartenol (11%) and 24-methylene-cycloartenol (5%). Statistical results revealed that growing location significantly (P < 0.001) affected phytosterol levels in these oils.

  18. New insights into the electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7: Convergent paired electrochemical synthesis of new aminonaphthol derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Shima; Nematollahi, Davood

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7 has been exhaustively studied in aqueous solutions with different pH values, using cyclic voltammetry and constant current coulometry. This study has provided new insights into the mechanistic details, pH dependence and intermediate structure of both electrochemical oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Surprisingly, the results indicate that a same redox couple (1-iminonaphthalen-2(1H)-one/1-aminonaphthalen-2-ol) is formed from both oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Also, an additional purpose of this work is electrochemical synthesis of three new derivatives of 1-amino-4-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol (3a–3c) under constant current electrolysis via electrochemical oxidation (and reduction) of acid orange 7 in the presence of arylsulfinic acids as nucleophiles. The results indicate that the electrogenerated 1-iminonaphthalen-2(1 H)-one participates in Michael addition reaction with arylsulfinic acids to form the 1-amino-3-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol derivatives. The synthesis was carried out in an undivided cell equipped with carbon rods as an anode and cathode.

  19. New insights into the electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7: Convergent paired electrochemical synthesis of new aminonaphthol derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Shima; Nematollahi, Davood

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7 has been exhaustively studied in aqueous solutions with different pH values, using cyclic voltammetry and constant current coulometry. This study has provided new insights into the mechanistic details, pH dependence and intermediate structure of both electrochemical oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Surprisingly, the results indicate that a same redox couple (1-iminonaphthalen-2(1H)-one/1-aminonaphthalen-2-ol) is formed from both oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Also, an additional purpose of this work is electrochemical synthesis of three new derivatives of 1-amino-4-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol (3a–3c) under constant current electrolysis via electrochemical oxidation (and reduction) of acid orange 7 in the presence of arylsulfinic acids as nucleophiles. The results indicate that the electrogenerated 1-iminonaphthalen-2(1 H)-one participates in Michael addition reaction with arylsulfinic acids to form the 1-amino-3-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol derivatives. The synthesis was carried out in an undivided cell equipped with carbon rods as an anode and cathode. PMID:28165049

  20. New insights into the electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7: Convergent paired electrochemical synthesis of new aminonaphthol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Shima; Nematollahi, Davood

    2017-02-06

    Electrochemical behavior of acid orange 7 has been exhaustively studied in aqueous solutions with different pH values, using cyclic voltammetry and constant current coulometry. This study has provided new insights into the mechanistic details, pH dependence and intermediate structure of both electrochemical oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Surprisingly, the results indicate that a same redox couple (1-iminonaphthalen-2(1H)-one/1-aminonaphthalen-2-ol) is formed from both oxidation and reduction of acid orange 7. Also, an additional purpose of this work is electrochemical synthesis of three new derivatives of 1-amino-4-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol (3a-3c) under constant current electrolysis via electrochemical oxidation (and reduction) of acid orange 7 in the presence of arylsulfinic acids as nucleophiles. The results indicate that the electrogenerated 1-iminonaphthalen-2(1 H)-one participates in Michael addition reaction with arylsulfinic acids to form the 1-amino-3-(phenylsulfonyl)naphthalen-2-ol derivatives. The synthesis was carried out in an undivided cell equipped with carbon rods as an anode and cathode.

  1. Insig-mediated, sterol-accelerated degradation of the membrane domain of hamster 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew D; Lee, Soo Hee; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2009-09-25

    Sterol-accelerated degradation of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase is one of several mechanisms through which cholesterol synthesis is controlled in mammalian cells. This degradation results from sterol-induced binding of the membrane domain of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2, which are carriers of a ubiquitin ligase called gp78. The ensuing gp78-mediated ubiquitination of reductase is a prerequisite for its rapid, 26 S proteasome-mediated degradation from endoplasmic reticulum membranes, a reaction that slows a rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. Here, we report that the membrane domain of hamster reductase is subject to sterol-accelerated degradation in Drosophila S2 cells, but only when mammalian Insig-1 or Insig-2 are co-expressed. This degradation mimics the reaction that occurs in mammalian cells with regard to its absolute requirement for the action of Insigs, sensitivity to proteasome inhibition, augmentation by nonsterol isoprenoids, and sterol specificity. RNA interference studies reveal that this degradation requires the Drosophila Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase and several other proteins, including a putative substrate selector, which associate with the enzyme in yeast and mammalian systems. These studies define Insigs as the minimal requirement for sterol-accelerated degradation of the membrane domain of reductase in Drosophila S2 cells.

  2. The effect of methyl jasmonate on triterpene and sterol metabolisms of Centella asiatica, Ruscus aculeatus and Galphimia glauca cultured plants.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Susana; Bonfill, Mercè; Osuna, Lidia; Moyano, Elisabeth; Tortoriello, Jaime; Cusido, Rosa M; Piñol, M Teresa; Palazón, Javier

    2006-09-01

    Considering that exogenously applied methyl jasmonate can enhance secondary metabolite production in a variety of plant species and that 2,3-oxidosqualene is a common precursor of triterpenes and sterols in plants, we have studied Centella asiatica and Galphimia glauca (both synthesizing triterpenoid secondary compounds) and Ruscus aculeatus (which synthesizes steroidal secondary compounds) for their growth rate and content of free sterols and respective secondary compounds, after culturing with or without 100 microM methyl jasmonate. Our results show that elicited plantlets of G. glauca and to a higher degree C. asiatica (up to 152-times more) increased their content of triterpenoids directly synthesized from 2,3-oxidosqualene (ursane saponins and nor-seco-friedelane galphimines, respectively) at the same time as growth decreased. In contrast, the free sterol content of C. asiatica decreased notably, and remained practically unaltered in G. glauca. However, in the case of R. aculeatus, which synthesizes steroidal saponins (mainly spirostane type) indirectly from 2,3-oxidosqualene after the latter is converted to the plant phytosterol-precursor cycloartenol, while the growth rate and free sterol content clearly decreased, the spirostane saponine content was virtually unchanged (aerial part) or somewhat lower (roots) in presence of the same elicitor concentration. Our results suggest that while methyl jasmonate may be used as an inducer of enzymes involved in the triterpenoid synthesis downstream from 2,3-oxidosqualene in both C. asiatica and G. glauca plantlets, in those of C. asiatica and R. aculeatus it inhibited the enzymes involved in sterol synthesis downstream from cycloartenol.

  3. Profiling and Metabolism of Sterols in the Weaver Ant Genus Oecophylla.

    PubMed

    Vidkjær, Nanna H; Jensen, Karl-Martin V; Gislum, René; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential to insects because they are vital for many biochemical processes, nevertheless insects cannot synthesize sterols but have to acquire them through their diet. Studies of sterols in ants are sparse and here the sterols of the weaver ant genus Oecophylla are identified for the first time. The sterol profile and the dietary sterols provided to a laboratory Oecophylla longinoda colony were analyzed. Most sterols originated from the diet, except one, which was probably formed via dealkylation in the ants and two sterols of fungal origin, which likely originate from hitherto unidentified endosymbionts responsible for supplying these two compounds. The sterol profile of a wild Oecophylla smaragdina colony was also investigated. Remarkable qualitative similarities were established between the two species despite the differences in diet, species, and origin. This may reflect a common sterol need/aversion in the weaver ants. Additionally, each individual caste of both species displayed unique sterol profiles.

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  5. Lathosterol to cholesterol ratio in serum predicts cholesterol lowering response to plant sterol consumption in a dual center, randomized, single-blind placebo controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Benefits of plant sterols (PS) for cholesterol lowering are compromised by large variability in efficacy across individuals. High fractional cholesterol synthesis measured by deuterium incorporation has been associated with non-response to PS consumption; however, prospective studies showing this as...

  6. Determining Antifungal Target Sites in the Sterol Pathway of the Yeasts Candida and Saccharomyces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    sensitivity to the azoles. The erg6 mutants were shown to be hypersensitive to a number of sterol synthesis and metabolic inhibitors including terbinafine ...composition of the plasma membrane present in the erg6 mutants. The other compounds, however, show increased efficiency of inhibition. Terbinafine , an...15 fHol ]-A3 YPD Nystatin 10 jig/mL Clotrimazole 1.0 gg/m Ketoconazole 1.0 gig/mL Tridemorph 0.03 jig/mL Terbinafine 1 ttg/mL Brefeldin A 1 lgg/mL

  7. Synthesis, biological characterization and molecular modeling insights of spirochromanes as potent HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Florian; Moretti, Loris; Amici, Raffaella; Abate, Agnese; Colombo, Andrea; Carenzi, Giacomo; Fulco, Maria Carmela; Boggio, Roberto; Dondio, Giulio; Gagliardi, Stefania; Minucci, Saverio; Sartori, Luca; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro

    2016-01-27

    In the last decades, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC) have become an important class of anti-cancer agents. In a previous study we described the synthesis of spiro[chromane-2,4'-piperidine]hydroxamic acid derivatives able to inhibit histone deacetylase enzymes. Herein, we present our exploration for new derivatives by replacing the piperidine moiety with various cycloamines. The goal was to obtain highly potent compounds with a good in vitro ADME profile. In addition, molecular modeling studies unravelled the binding mode of these inhibitors.

  8. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  9. Sterols of Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg6 Knockout Mutant Expressing the Pneumocystis carinii S-Adenosylmethionine:Sterol C-24 Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Johnston, Laura Q; Nkinin, Stephenson W; Romero, Becky I; Giner, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS-associated lung pathogen Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus although Pneumocystis has several distinct features such as the absence of ergosterol, the major sterol of most fungi. The Pneumocystis carinii S-adenosylmethionine:sterol C24-methyltransferase (SAM:SMT) enzyme, coded by the erg6 gene, transfers either one or two methyl groups to the C-24 position of the sterol side chain producing both C28 and C29 24-alkylsterols in approximately the same proportions, whereas most fungal SAM:SMT transfer only one methyl group to the side chain. The sterol compositions of wild-type Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the erg6 knockout mutant (Δerg6), and Δerg6 expressing the P. carinii or the S. cerevisiae erg6 gene were analyzed by a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures to examine functional complementation in the yeast expression system. Detailed sterol analyses were obtained using high performance liquid chromatography and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). The P. carinii SAM:SMT in the Δerg6 restored its ability to produce the C28 sterol ergosterol as the major sterol, and also resulted in low levels of C29 sterols. This indicates that while the P. carinii SAM:SMT in the yeast Δerg6 cells was able to transfer a second methyl group to the side chain, the action of Δ(24(28)) -sterol reductase (coded by the erg4 gene) in the yeast cells prevented the formation and accumulation of as many C29 sterols as that found in P. carinii. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  10. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A.; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Schon, Eric A.; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53–36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.—Gulati, S., Balderes, D., Kim, C., Guo, Z. A., Wilcox, L., Area-Gomez, E., Snider, J., Wolinski, H., Stagljar, I., Granato, J. T., Ruggles, K. V., DeGiorgis, J. A., Kohlwein, S. D., Schon, E. A., Sturley, S. L. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification. PMID:26220175

  11. Mutations in the human SC4MOL gene encoding a methyl sterol oxidase cause psoriasiform dermatitis, microcephaly, and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    He, Miao; Kratz, Lisa E.; Michel, Joshua J.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Ferris, Laura; Kelley, Richard I.; Hoover, Jacqueline J.; Jukic, Drazen; Gibson, K. Michael; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Zwick, Michael E.; Vockley, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Defects in cholesterol synthesis result in a wide variety of symptoms, from neonatal lethality to the relatively mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay found in individuals with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. We report here the identification of mutations in sterol-C4-methyl oxidase–like gene (SC4MOL) as the cause of an autosomal recessive syndrome in a human patient with psoriasiform dermatitis, arthralgias, congenital cataracts, microcephaly, and developmental delay. This gene encodes a sterol-C4-methyl oxidase (SMO), which catalyzes demethylation of C4-methylsterols in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. C4-Methylsterols are meiosis-activating sterols (MASs). They exist at high concentrations in the testis and ovary and play roles in meiosis activation. In this study, we found that an accumulation of MASs in the patient led to cell overproliferation in both skin and blood. SMO deficiency also substantially altered immunocyte phenotype and in vitro function. MASs serve as ligands for liver X receptors α and β (LXRα and LXRβ), which are important in regulating not only lipid transport in the epidermis, but also innate and adaptive immunity. Deficiency of SMO represents a biochemical defect in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, the clinical spectrum of which remains to be defined. PMID:21285510

  12. Sterol-induced dislocation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase from membranes of permeabilized cells.

    PubMed

    Elsabrouty, Rania; Jo, Youngah; Dinh, Tammy T; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2013-11-01

    The polytopic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of cholesterol and nonsterol isoprenoids. Excess sterols cause the reductase to bind to ER membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2, which are carriers for the ubiquitin ligases gp78 and Trc8. The resulting gp78/Trc8-mediated ubiquitination of reductase marks it for recognition by VCP/p97, an ATPase that mediates subsequent dislocation of reductase from ER membranes into the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. Here we report that in vitro additions of the oxysterol 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), exogenous cytosol, and ATP trigger dislocation of ubiquitinated and full-length forms of reductase from membranes of permeabilized cells. In addition, the sterol-regulated reaction requires the action of Insigs, is stimulated by reagents that replace 25-HC in accelerating reductase degradation in intact cells, and is augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of deubiquitinating enzymes markedly enhances sterol-dependent ubiquitination of reductase in membranes of permeabilized cells, leading to enhanced dislocation of the enzyme. Considered together, these results establish permeabilized cells as a viable system in which to elucidate mechanisms for postubiquitination steps in sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase.

  13. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into the Listeria monocytogenes Two-enzyme Lipoteichoic Acid Synthesis System*

    PubMed Central

    Campeotto, Ivan; Percy, Matthew G.; MacDonald, James T.; Förster, Andreas; Freemont, Paul S.; Gründling, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component required for proper cell growth in many Gram-positive bacteria. In Listeria monocytogenes, two enzymes are required for the synthesis of this polyglycerolphosphate polymer. The LTA primase LtaPLm initiates LTA synthesis by transferring the first glycerolphosphate (GroP) subunit onto the glycolipid anchor and the LTA synthase LtaSLm extends the polymer by the repeated addition of GroP subunits to the tip of the growing chain. Here, we present the crystal structures of the enzymatic domains of LtaPLm and LtaSLm. Although the enzymes share the same fold, substantial differences in the cavity of the catalytic site and surface charge distribution contribute to enzyme specialization. The eLtaSLm structure was also determined in complex with GroP revealing a second GroP binding site. Mutational analysis confirmed an essential function for this binding site and allowed us to propose a model for the binding of the growing chain. PMID:25128528

  14. Anatomical distribution of sterols in oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Gordon, D T; Collins, N

    1982-11-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) contain at least 8 predominant sterols as determined by gas liquid chromatography and a modified Liebermann-Burchard reaction. These sterols and the average amount found in mg/100 are: C26-sterol (22-trans-24-norcholesta-5, 22-diene-3 beta-ol), 19.1; 22-dehydrocholesterol, 15.1; cholesterol, 46.8; brassicasterol, 27.2; delta 5,7-sterols (i.e., 7-dehydrocholesterol) 22.5; 24-methylenecholesterol 29.1; 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-diene-3 beta-ol, 1.2; and 24-ethylcholesta-5-en-3 beta-ol, 12.7. The distribution of these sterols appears uniform (r2 = 0.938) between 5 major organs of the oyster. The percent body mass vs percent total sterols in these 5 organs are: mantle 44.1--41.4; visceral mass 30.3--36.7; gills 13.2--11.7; adductor muscle 8.3--3.7; and labial palps 4.2--6.5. The possible sources of these sterols are discussed.

  15. Sterols of a contemporary lacustrine sediment. [in English postglacial lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, S. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for detailed sterol analyses of several depths (corresponding to between zero and about 150 yr in age) in a contemporary lacustrine sediment from a freshwater lake of postglacial origin in England. Delta 5-, delta 22-, and delta 5,22-sterols are identified along with 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanols as well as a C26 stanol with a C7 side chain. Solvent extraction yields carbon number distributions for the 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanol sediment constituents that parallel the corresponding delta 5-sterol distributions. The amounts of 5 alpha-stanols are found to exceed those of 5 beta-stanols in the sediment, and variations in the ratio of 5 alpha- to 5 beta-stanol between sediment samples from similar depths are shown to suggest an inhomogeneity of the sediment. It is found that the sterol composition of sediment cores varies markedly with depth, reflecting both the effects of a sterol hydrogenation process and a changing input to the sediment. It is concluded that C29 sterols, of probable higher-plant origin, predominate at lower sediment depths while C27 sterols, possibly derived from autochthonous sources, are more abundant in the surface sediment.

  16. Fecal Sterol and Runoff Analysis for Nonpoint Source Tracking.

    PubMed

    Fahrenfeld, N L; Del Monaco, N; Coates, J T; Elzerman, A W

    2016-01-01

    Fecal pollution source identification is needed to quantify risk, target installation of source controls, and assess performance of best management practices in impaired surface waters. Sterol analysis is a chemical method for fecal source tracking that allows for differentiation between several fecal pollution sources. The objectives of this study were to use these chemical tracers for quantifying human fecal inputs in a mixed-land-use watershed without point sources of pollution and to determine the relationship between land use and sterol ratios. Fecal sterol analysis was performed on bed and suspended sediment from impaired streams. Human fecal signatures were found at sites with sewer overflow and septic inputs. Different sterol ratios used to indicate human fecal pollution varied in their sensitivity. Next, geospatial data was used to determine the runoff volumes associated with each land-use category in the watersheds. Fecal sterol ratios were compared between sampling locations and correlations were tested between ratio values and percentage of runoff for a given land-use category. Correlation was not observed between percentage of runoff from developed land and any of the five tested human-indicating sterol ratios in streambed sediments, confirming that human fecal inputs were not evenly distributed across the urban landscape. Several practical considerations for adopting this chemical method for microbial source tracking in small watersheds are discussed. Results indicate that sterol analysis is useful for identifying the location of human fecal nonpoint-source inputs.

  17. Sterols of a contemporary lacustrine sediment. [in English postglacial lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, S. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for detailed sterol analyses of several depths (corresponding to between zero and about 150 yr in age) in a contemporary lacustrine sediment from a freshwater lake of postglacial origin in England. Delta 5-, delta 22-, and delta 5,22-sterols are identified along with 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanols as well as a C26 stanol with a C7 side chain. Solvent extraction yields carbon number distributions for the 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanol sediment constituents that parallel the corresponding delta 5-sterol distributions. The amounts of 5 alpha-stanols are found to exceed those of 5 beta-stanols in the sediment, and variations in the ratio of 5 alpha- to 5 beta-stanol between sediment samples from similar depths are shown to suggest an inhomogeneity of the sediment. It is found that the sterol composition of sediment cores varies markedly with depth, reflecting both the effects of a sterol hydrogenation process and a changing input to the sediment. It is concluded that C29 sterols, of probable higher-plant origin, predominate at lower sediment depths while C27 sterols, possibly derived from autochthonous sources, are more abundant in the surface sediment.

  18. Quantification of sterol lipids in plants by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wewer, Vera; Dombrink, Isabel; vom Dorp, Katharina; Dörmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Glycerolipids, sphingolipids, and sterol lipids constitute the major lipid classes in plants. Sterol lipids are composed of free and conjugated sterols, i.e., sterol esters, sterol glycosides, and acylated sterol glycosides. Sterol lipids play crucial roles during adaption to abiotic stresses and plant-pathogen interactions. Presently, no comprehensive method for sterol lipid quantification in plants is available. We used nanospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS) to resolve and identify the molecular species of all four sterol lipid classes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Free sterols were derivatized with chlorobetainyl chloride. Sterol esters, sterol glycosides, and acylated sterol glycosides were ionized as ammonium adducts. Quantification of molecular species was achieved in the positive mode after fragmentation in the presence of internal standards. The amounts of sterol lipids quantified by Q-TOF MS/MS were validated by comparison with results obtained with TLC/GC. Quantification of sterol lipids from leaves and roots of phosphate-deprived A. thaliana plants revealed changes in the amounts and molecular species composition. The Q-TOF method is far more sensitive than GC or HPLC. Therefore, Q-TOF MS/MS provides a comprehensive strategy for sterol lipid quantification that can be adapted to other tandem mass spectrometers. PMID:21382968

  19. Quantification of sterol lipids in plants by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wewer, Vera; Dombrink, Isabel; vom Dorp, Katharina; Dörmann, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Glycerolipids, sphingolipids, and sterol lipids constitute the major lipid classes in plants. Sterol lipids are composed of free and conjugated sterols, i.e., sterol esters, sterol glycosides, and acylated sterol glycosides. Sterol lipids play crucial roles during adaption to abiotic stresses and plant-pathogen interactions. Presently, no comprehensive method for sterol lipid quantification in plants is available. We used nanospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS) to resolve and identify the molecular species of all four sterol lipid classes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Free sterols were derivatized with chlorobetainyl chloride. Sterol esters, sterol glycosides, and acylated sterol glycosides were ionized as ammonium adducts. Quantification of molecular species was achieved in the positive mode after fragmentation in the presence of internal standards. The amounts of sterol lipids quantified by Q-TOF MS/MS were validated by comparison with results obtained with TLC/GC. Quantification of sterol lipids from leaves and roots of phosphate-deprived A. thaliana plants revealed changes in the amounts and molecular species composition. The Q-TOF method is far more sensitive than GC or HPLC. Therefore, Q-TOF MS/MS provides a comprehensive strategy for sterol lipid quantification that can be adapted to other tandem mass spectrometers.

  20. Interaction of the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Transporter with Sterols.

    PubMed

    Clay, Adam T; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J

    2015-11-03

    The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) actively exports structurally diverse substrates from within the lipid bilayer, leading to multidrug resistance. Many aspects of Pgp function are altered by the phospholipid environment, but its interactions with sterols remain enigmatic. In this work, the functional interaction between purified Pgp and various sterols was investigated in detergent solution and proteoliposomes. Fluorescence studies showed that dehydroergosterol, cholestatrienol, and NBD-cholesterol interact intimately with Pgp, resulting in both quenching of protein Trp fluorescence and enhancement of sterol fluorescence. Kd values indicated binding affinities in the range of 3-9 μM. Collisional quenching experiments showed that Pgp-bound NBD-cholesterol was protected from the external milieu, resonance energy transfer was observed between Pgp Trp residues and the sterol, and the fluorescence emission of bound sterol was enhanced. These observations suggested an intimate interaction of bound sterols with the transporter at a protected nonpolar site. Cholesterol hemisuccinate altered the thermal unfolding of Pgp and greatly stabilized its basal ATPase activity in both a detergent solution and reconstituted proteoliposomes of certain phospholipids. Other sterols, including dehydroergosterol, did not stabilize the basal ATPase activity of detergent-solubilized Pgp, which suggests that this is not a generalized sterol effect. The phospholipid composition and cholesterol hemisuccinate content of Pgp proteoliposomes altered the basal ATPase and drug transport cycles differently. Sterols may interact with Pgp and modulate its structure and function by occupying part of the drug-binding pocket or by binding to putative consensus cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) motifs located within the transmembrane domains.

  1. Terpenoids and sterols from some Japanese mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Yasunori; Kikuchi, Masao; Machida, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    Over the past twenty years, our research group has been studying the chemical constituents of mushrooms. From nineteen species, namely, Amanita virgineoides Bas (Amanitaceae), Daedaleopsis tricolor (Bull.: Fr.) Bond. et Sing. (Polyporaceae), Grifolafrondosa (Fr.) S. F. Gray (Polyporaceae), Hericium erinaceum (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (Hericiaceae), Hypsizigus marmoreus (Peck) Bigelow (Tricholomataceae), Lactarius piperatus (Scop.: Fr.) S. F. Gray (Russulaceae), Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Sing. (Pleurotaceae), Lyophyllyum connatum (Schum.: Fr.) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), Naematoloma sublateritium (Fr.) Karst. (Strophariaceae), Ompharia lapidescens Schroeter (Polyporaceae), Panellus serotinus (Pers.: Fr.) Kuhn. (Tricholomataceae), Pholiota nameko (T. Ito) S. Ito et Imai in Imai (Strophariaceae), Pleurotus eringii (DC.: Fr.) Quel. (Pleurotaceae), Polyporus umbellatus Fries (Polyporaceae), Russula delica Fr. (Russulaceae), Russula sanguinea (Bull.) Fr. (Russulaceae), Sarcodon aspratus (Berk.) S. Ito (Thelephoraceae), Tricholoma matsutake (S. Ito et Imai) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), and Tricholomaportentosum (Fr.) Quel. (Tricholomataceae), we isolated eight new sesquiterpenoids, six new meroterpenoids, three new triterpenoids, and twenty eight new sterols. In this review, structural features of these new compounds are discussed.

  2. Antiprotozoal Nitazoxanide Derivatives: Synthesis, Bioassays and QSAR Study Combined with Docking for Mechanistic Insight

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Lozano-Aponte, Jorge; Ajmani, Subhash; Hernández-Montero, Eduardo; Chávez-Silva, Fabiola; Hernández-Núñez, Emanuel; Moo-Puc, Rosa; Fraguela-Collar, Andres; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In view of the serious health problems concerning infectious diseases in heavily populated areas, we followed the strategy of lead compound diversification to evaluate the near-by chemical space for new organic compounds. To this end, twenty derivatives of nitazoxanide (NTZ) were synthesized and tested for activity against Entamoeba histolytica parasites. To ensure drug-likeliness and activity relatedness of the new compounds, the synthetic work was assisted by a quantitative structure-activity relationships study (QSAR). Many of the inherent downsides – well-known to QSAR practitioners – we circumvented thanks to workarounds which we proposed in prior QSAR publication. To gain further mechanistic insight on a molecular level, ligand-enzyme docking simulations were carried out since NTZ is known to inhibit the protozoal pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) enzyme as its biomolecular target. PMID:25872791

  3. Human behavioral ecology, phenotypic (developmental) plasticity, and agricultural origins: insights from the emerging evolutionary synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gremillion, Kristen J; Piperno, Dolores R

    2009-10-01

    The fields of human behavioral ecology (HBE) and evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) both stand to make significant contributions to our understanding of agricultural origins. These two approaches share a concern with phenotypic-plasticity and its evolutionary significance. HBE considers the adaptive plasticity of the human phenotype in response to resource distribution in time and space and has helped to advance understanding of the economic costs and benefits of food production. However, evo-devo and the associated subject of phenotypic (developmental) plasticity have so far been largely neglected as sources of insight into the domestication of plants, despite growing evidence for their evolutionary importance in nature and their roles in the origins of novel traits. We argue that it is important to consider environmentally induced phenotypic variation resulting directly from both natural- and human-induced ecological change as a source of the distinctive morphologies of domesticated plants.

  4. Climate controls over ecosystem metabolism: insights from a fifteen-year inductive artificial neural network synthesis for a subalpine forest.

    PubMed

    Albert, Loren P; Keenan, Trevor F; Burns, Sean P; Huxman, Travis E; Monson, Russell K

    2017-05-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) datasets have provided insight into climate determinants of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and evapotranspiration (ET) in natural ecosystems for decades, but most EC studies were published in serial fashion such that one study's result became the following study's hypothesis. This approach reflects the hypothetico-deductive process by focusing on previously derived hypotheses. A synthesis of this type of sequential inference reiterates subjective biases and may amplify past assumptions about the role, and relative importance, of controls over ecosystem metabolism. Long-term EC datasets facilitate an alternative approach to synthesis: the use of inductive data-based analyses to re-examine past deductive studies of the same ecosystem. Here we examined the seasonal climate determinants of NEP and ET by analyzing a 15-year EC time-series from a subalpine forest using an ensemble of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) at the half-day (daytime/nighttime) time-step. We extracted relative rankings of climate drivers and driver-response relationships directly from the dataset with minimal a priori assumptions. The ANN analysis revealed temperature variables as primary climate drivers of NEP and daytime ET, when all seasons are considered, consistent with the assembly of past studies. New relations uncovered by the ANN approach include the role of soil moisture in driving daytime NEP during the snowmelt period, the nonlinear response of NEP to temperature across seasons, and the low relevance of summer rainfall for NEP or ET at the same daytime/nighttime time step. These new results offer a more complete perspective of climate-ecosystem interactions at this site than traditional deductive analyses alone.

  5. Climate controls over ecosystem metabolism: insights from a fifteen-year inductive artificial neural network synthesis for a subalpine forest

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, Loren P.; Keenan, Trevor F.; Burns, Sean P.; ...

    2017-03-25

    Eddy covariance (EC) datasets have provided insight into climate determinants of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and evapotranspiration (ET) in natural ecosystems for decades, but most EC studies were published in serial fashion such that one study’s result became the following study’s hypothesis. Our approach reflects the hypothetico-deductive process by focusing on previously derived hypotheses. A synthesis of this type of sequential inference reiterates subjective biases and may amplify past assumptions about the role, and relative importance, of cont rols over ecosystem metabolism. Long-term EC datasets facilitate an alternative approach to synthesis: the use of inductive data-based analyses to re-examine pastmore » deductive studies of the same ecosystem. Here we examined the seasonal climate determinants of NEP and ET by analyzing a 15-year EC time-series from a subalpine forest using an ensemble of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) at the half-day (daytime/nighttime) time-step. We also extracted relative rankings of climate drivers and driver–response relationships directly from the dataset with minimal a priori assumptions. The ANN analysis revealed temperature variables as primary climate drivers of NEP and daytime ET, when all seasons are considered, consistent with the assembly of past studies. New relations uncovered by the ANN approach include the role of soil moisture in driving daytime NEP during the snowmelt period, the nonlinear response of NEP to temperature across seasons, and the low relevance of summer rainfall for NEP or ET at the same daytime/nighttime time step. These new results offer a more complete perspective of climate–ecosystem interactions at this site than traditional deductive analyses alone.« less

  6. Synthesis of β-galactosylamides as ligands of the peanut lectin. Insights into the recognition process.

    PubMed

    Cano, María Emilia; Varela, Oscar; García-Moreno, María Isabel; García Fernández, José Manuel; Kovensky, José; Uhrig, María Laura

    2017-03-23

    The synthesis of mono and divalent β-galactosylamides linked to a hydroxylated chain having a C2 symmetry axis derived from l-tartaric anhydride is reported. Reference compounds devoid of hydroxyl groups in the linker were also prepared from β-galactosylamine and succinic anhydride. After functionalization with an alkynyl residue, the resulting building blocks were grafted onto different azide-equipped scaffolds through the copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Thus, a family of structurally related mono and divalent β-N-galactopyranosylamides was obtained and fully characterized. The binding affinities of the ligands towards the model lectin PNA were measured by the enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). The IC50 values were significantly higher than that of galactose but the presence of hydroxyl groups in the aglycone chain improved lectin recognition. Docking and molecular dynamics experiments were in accordance with the hypothesis that a hydroxyl group properly disposed in the linker could mimic the Glc O3 in the recognition process. On the other hand, divalent presentation of the ligands led to lectin affinity enhancements.

  7. Suppressing Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Alters Chloroplast Development and Triggers Sterol-Dependent Induction of Jasmonate- and Fe-Related Responses.

    PubMed

    Manzano, David; Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Altabella, Teresa; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes (FPS1 and FPS2) encoding FPS. Single fps1 and fps2 knockout mutants are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, while fps1/fps2 double mutants are embryo lethal. To assess the effect of FPS down-regulation at postembryonic developmental stages, we generated Arabidopsis conditional knockdown mutants expressing artificial microRNAs devised to simultaneously silence both FPS genes. Induction of silencing from germination rapidly caused chlorosis and a strong developmental phenotype that led to seedling lethality. However, silencing of FPS after seed germination resulted in a slight developmental delay only, although leaves and cotyledons continued to show chlorosis and altered chloroplasts. Metabolomic analyses also revealed drastic changes in the profile of sterols, ubiquinones, and plastidial isoprenoids. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction transcriptomic analysis showed that a reduction in FPS activity levels triggers the misregulation of genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses, the most prominent one being the rapid induction of a set of genes related to the jasmonic acid pathway. Down-regulation of FPS also triggered an iron-deficiency transcriptional response that is consistent with the iron-deficient phenotype observed in FPS-silenced plants. The specific inhibition of the sterol biosynthesis pathway by chemical and genetic blockage mimicked these transcriptional responses, indicating that sterol depletion is the primary cause of the observed alterations. Our results highlight the importance of sterol homeostasis for normal chloroplast development and function and reveal important clues about how isoprenoid and sterol metabolism is integrated within plant physiology and development.

  8. Effects of dietary plant meal and soya-saponin supplementation on intestinal and hepatic lipid droplet accumulation and lipoprotein and sterol metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael; Hansen, Anne Kristine; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Altered lipid metabolism has been shown in fish fed plant protein sources. The present study aimed to gain further insights into how intestinal and hepatic lipid absorption and metabolism are modulated by plant meal (PM) and soya-saponin (SA) inclusion in salmon feed. Post-smolt Atlantic salmon were fed for 10 weeks one of four diets based on fishmeal or PM, with or without 10 g/kg SA. PM inclusion resulted in decreased growth performance, excessive lipid droplet accumulation in the pyloric caeca and liver, and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. Intestinal and hepatic gene expression profiling revealed an up-regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein (LP) synthesis (apo, fatty acid transporters, microsomal TAG transfer protein, acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase, choline kinase and choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase A), cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase) and associated transcription factors (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and PPARγ). SA inclusion resulted in reduced body pools of cholesterol and bile salts. The hepatic gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid biosynthesis (cytochrome P450 7A1 (cyp7a1)) as well as the transcription factor liver X receptor and the bile acid transporter abcb11 (ATP-binding cassette B11) was down-regulated by SA inclusion. A significant interaction was observed between PM inclusion and SA inclusion for plasma cholesterol levels. In conclusion, gene expression profiling suggested that the capacity for LP assembly and cholesterol synthesis was up-regulated by PM exposure, probably as a compensatory mechanism for excessive lipid droplet accumulation and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. SA inclusion had hypocholesterolaemic effects on Atlantic salmon, accompanied by decreased bile salt metabolism.

  9. Characteristics of a new sterol-nonrequiring Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Tully, J G; Razin, S

    1969-06-01

    Two Mycoplasma strains recovered from tissue culture environments were found to grow in complex media devoid of serum or serum fractions containing cholesterol and in a cholesterol-free synthetic medium. Neither strain was capable of synthesizing pigmented carotenoids, although these compounds are present in, and characteristic of, other sterol-nonrequiring mycoplasmas. Serological tests and an analysis of their cell protein patterns obtained by gel electrophoresis indicated that the isolates were similar to each other but distinct from other sterol-nonrequiring serotypes, Mycoplasma laidlawii and M. granularum, as well as from sterol-requiring species. The existence of Mycoplasma other than M. laidlawii and M. granularum without sterol requirements suggested the need for some taxonomic changes in this group of organisms.

  10. New Cytotoxic Oxygenated Sterols from the Marine Bryozoan Cryptosula pallasiana

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiang-Rong; Tang, Hai-Feng; Li, Yu-Shan; Lin, Hou-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Li; Ma, Ning; Yao, Min-Na; Zhang, Ping-Hu

    2011-01-01

    Six new sterols (1-6), together with seven known sterols (7-13), were isolated from the CCl4 extract of the marine bryozoan Cryptosula pallasiana, four (3-6) of which have already been reported as synthetic sterols. This is the first time that these compounds (3-6) are reported as natural sterols. The structures of the new compounds were determined on the basis of the extensive spectroscopic analysis, including two-dimensional (2D) NMR and HR-ESI-MS data. Compounds 1-4, 7 and 10-13 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cell line, and all of the evaluated compounds exhibited moderate cytotoxicity to HL-60 cells with a range of IC50 values from 14.73 to 22.11 µg/mL except for compounds 12 and 13. PMID:21566793

  11. New cytotoxic oxygenated sterols from the marine bryozoan Cryptosula pallasiana.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiang-Rong; Tang, Hai-Feng; Li, Yu-Shan; Lin, Hou-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Li; Ma, Ning; Yao, Min-Na; Zhang, Ping-Hu

    2011-01-28

    Six new sterols (1-6), together with seven known sterols (7-13), were isolated from the CCl(4) extract of the marine bryozoan Cryptosula pallasiana, four (3-6) of which have already been reported as synthetic sterols. This is the first time that these compounds (3-6) are reported as natural sterols. The structures of the new compounds were determined on the basis of the extensive spectroscopic analysis, including two-dimensional (2D) NMR and HR-ESI-MS data. Compounds 1-4, 7 and 10-13 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cell line, and all of the evaluated compounds exhibited moderate cytotoxicity to HL-60 cells with a range of IC(50) values from 14.73 to 22.11 µg/mL except for compounds 12 and 13.

  12. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-23

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15mx0.25mm, 0.25{mu}m film thickness, in a temperature program from 50 deg. C for 1 min, then ramped at 15 deg. C/min to 300 deg. C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  13. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-01

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15m×0.25mm, 0.25μm film thickness, in a temperature program from 50°C for 1 min, then ramped at 15°C/min to 300°C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  14. Digitonide precipitable sterols: a reevaluation with special attention to lanosterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cenedella, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    The ability of digitonin to precipitate lanosterol from prepared mixtures and biological sources was evaluated. Commercially available lanosterol was determined to be composed of about 60% lanosterol and 40% dihydrolanosterol. Both sterols were only partially precipitated by digitonin under all conditions examined. The presence of cholesterol increased the precipitation of lanosterol, but never to completion. About 40% of the lanosterols from saponified sheep's-wool fat was not precipitated by digitonin. Also /sup 14/C-labeled lanosterol recovered from rat brain following intracerebral injection of 2-(/sup 14/C)mevalonate was only 70% precipitated by digitonin. Steric hinderance by the methyl groups at carbon -4 is suggesed to explain the poor precipitability of this sterol. In conclusion, lanosterol can not be considered to be a digitonide-precipitable sterol equivalent to cholesterol. Caution should be exercised in situations where digitonin-precipitable sterols are being prepared from sources containing significant concentrations of lanosterol (i.e., mass and/or radiolabel).

  15. Free and glycosylated sterol bioaccumulation in developing Cycas micronesica seeds.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Shaw, Christopher A

    2009-07-15

    The bioaccumulation of free and glycosylated forms of stigmasterol and β-sitosterol were determined from Cycas micronesica K.D. Hill seeds throughout seed ontogeny. Per-seed pool of the four compounds increased linearly from 2 to 24 months, indicating no developmental period elicited a major shift in the rate of bioaccumulation. The slopes were not homogeneous, signifying a change in relative sterol profile concomitant with seed maturation. This shift was in favour of the glucosides, as their rate of accumulation exceeded that of the free sterols. Stigmasterol content exceeded that of β-sitosterol, but ontogeny did not influence the ratio of these dominant sterols. The quantity and quality of sterol exposure during consumption of foods prepared from gametophytes by humans is strongly influenced by age of harvested seeds. Results are critical for a further understanding of the link between human neurodegenerative diseases and historical consumption of foods derived from the seed gametophyte tissue.

  16. Hollow alloy nanostructures templated by Au nanorods: synthesis, mechanistic insights, and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mengmeng; Tan, Yiwei

    2014-11-07

    A unique methodology having access to Au nanorods (AuNRs)-based hollow alloy nanostructures has been developed. The syntheses and characterization of the hollow Pt-Au nanoalloys with ellipsoidal and cylindrical shapes together with a rattle-type hollow Cu-Au nanoheterostructure are described. Unlike the conventional nanoscale Kirkendall process, the formation of these AuNRs-based hollow nanostructures occurs under extremely mild conditions, indicating a distinctive underlying mechanism. The key step for this present synthesis method is the incubation of AuNRs with CuCl2 at 60 °C in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The selective etching of the tips of AuNRs caused by Cu(2+) ions combined with the dissolved molecular oxygen promotes the generation of defects and vacancies, leading to a facile alloying reaction by the crystal fusion of AuNRs. Particularly, the results of the formation of the hollow nanoalloys in conjunction with various control experiments demonstrate that the halide ions that are specifically adsorbed on the AuNR surface afford sinks for vacancy accumulation and condensation during the unbalanced interdiffusion of alloying atoms, presumably because of the disproportion in the equilibrium concentration of vacancies. Thus, the void formation becomes kinetically favorable. The Pt-Au nanocages can provide modified surface electronic structures, resulting from their non-uniform crystalline structures and the surface segregation of Pt in the nanocages. These characteristics enable them to exhibit excellent electrocatalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).

  17. Insights into the rise in HIV infections, 2001 to 2008: a Bayesian synthesis of prevalence evidence.

    PubMed

    Presanis, Anne M; Gill, O Noel; Chadborn, Timothy R; Hill, Caterina; Hope, Vivian; Logan, Louise; Rice, Brian D; Delpech, Valerie C; Ades, A E; De Angelis, Daniela

    2010-11-27

    To estimate trends in prevalence of HIV infection, undiagnosed and total, among adults aged 15-44 years in England and Wales since 2001. Multiple surveillance systems and survey data are available to inform different aspects of the HIV epidemic in England and Wales. To coherently and consistently combine this information to estimate trends in HIV prevalence, we apply a multiparameter evidence synthesis in a Bayesian statistical framework. The study population is stratified by exposure group and region of residence. We synthesize data from behavioural and community surveys, unlinked anonymous seroprevalence surveys, and an annual survey of individuals with diagnosed HIV infection. Prevalence estimates are given with 95% credible intervals. The estimated number of prevalent HIV infections in 15-44-year-olds has increased from 32,400 (29,600-35,900) in 2001 to 54,500 (50,500-59,100) in 2008, corresponding to an estimated prevalence of 1.5 per 1000 (1.4-1.7) rising to 2.4 per 1000 (2.3-2.6) in 2008. A rise in prevalence of diagnosed infection contributes substantially to the increase. There is no evidence of a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of undiagnosed infection. The proportion of infections that are diagnosed has therefore also increased. Although the increase in the proportion of infections that are diagnosed is encouraging, the rise in HIV prevalence and lack of evidence of a decrease in prevalence of undiagnosed infection suggest that diagnosis rates are not high enough to reduce the pool of individuals unaware of their infection and that new infections must be occurring.

  18. Recharacterization of ancient DNA miscoding lesions: insights in the era of sequencing-by-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Binladen, Jonas; Miller, Webb; Wiuf, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske; Poinar, Hendrik; Carlson, John E; Leebens-Mack, James H; Schuster, Stephan C

    2007-01-01

    Although ancient DNA (aDNA) miscoding lesions have been studied since the earliest days of the field, their nature remains a source of debate. A variety of conflicting hypotheses exist about which miscoding lesions constitute true aDNA damage as opposed to PCR polymerase amplification error. Furthermore, considerable disagreement and speculation exists on which specific damage events underlie observed miscoding lesions. The root of the problem is that it has previously been difficult to assemble sufficient data to test the hypotheses, and near-impossible to accurately determine the specific strand of origin of observed damage events. With the advent of emulsion-based clonal amplification (emPCR) and the sequencing-by-synthesis technology this has changed. In this paper we demonstrate how data produced on the Roche GS20 genome sequencer can determine miscoding lesion strands of origin, and subsequently be interpreted to enable characterization of the aDNA damage behind the observed phenotypes. Through comparative analyses on 390,965 bp of modern chloroplast and 131,474 bp of ancient woolly mammoth GS20 sequence data we conclusively demonstrate that in this sample at least, a permafrost preserved specimen, Type 2 (cytosine-->thymine/guanine-->adenine) miscoding lesions represent the overwhelming majority of damage-derived miscoding lesions. Additionally, we show that an as yet unidentified guanine-->adenine analogue modification, not the conventionally argued cytosine-->uracil deamination, underpins a significant proportion of Type 2 damage. How widespread these implications are for aDNA will become apparent as future studies analyse data recovered from a wider range of substrates.

  19. Structural insights into inhibition of lipid I production in bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ben C; Mashalidis, Ellene H; Tanino, Tetsuya; Kim, Mijung; Matsuda, Akira; Hong, Jiyong; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-05-26

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is a serious threat to public health. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis is a well-established target for antibiotic development. MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) catalyses the first and an essential membrane step of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. It is considered a very promising target for the development of new antibiotics, as many naturally occurring nucleoside inhibitors with antibacterial activity target this enzyme. However, antibiotics targeting MraY have not been developed for clinical use, mainly owing to a lack of structural insight into inhibition of this enzyme. Here we present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) in complex with its naturally occurring inhibitor, muraymycin D2 (MD2). We show that after binding MD2, MraYAA undergoes remarkably large conformational rearrangements near the active site, which lead to the formation of a nucleoside-binding pocket and a peptide-binding site. MD2 binds the nucleoside-binding pocket like a two-pronged plug inserting into a socket. Further interactions it makes in the adjacent peptide-binding site anchor MD2 to and enhance its affinity for MraYAA. Surprisingly, MD2 does not interact with three acidic residues or the Mg(2+) cofactor required for catalysis, suggesting that MD2 binds to MraYAA in a manner that overlaps with, but is distinct from, its natural substrate, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. We have determined the principles of MD2 binding to MraYAA, including how it avoids the need for pyrophosphate and sugar moieties, which are essential features for substrate binding. The conformational plasticity of MraY could be the reason that it is the target of many structurally distinct inhibitors. These findings can inform the design of new inhibitors targeting MraY as well as its paralogues, WecA and TarO.

  20. Structural insights into inhibition of Lipid I production in bacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tanino, Tetsuya; Kim, Mijung; Matsuda, Akira; Hong, Jiyong; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is a serious threat to public health. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis is a well-established target for antibiotic development. MraY (phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase) catalyzes the first and an essential membrane step of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. It is considered a very promising target for the development of new antibiotics, as many naturally occuring nucleoside inhibitors with antibacterial activity target this enzyme1-4. However, antibiotics targeting MraY have not been developed for clinical use mainly due to a lack of structural insight into inhibition of this enzyme. Here we present the crystal structure of MraY from Aquifex aeolicus (MraYAA) in complex with its naturally occurring inhibitor, muraymycin D2 (MD2). Upon binding MD2, MraYAA undergoes remarkably large conformational rearrangements near the active site, which lead to the formation of a nucleoside-binding pocket and a peptide-binding site. MD2 binds the nucleoside-binding pocket like a two-pronged plug inserting into a socket. Additional interactions it makes in the adjacent peptide-binding site anchor MD2 to and enhance its affinity for MraYAA. Surprisingly, MD2 does not interact with three acidic residues or the Mg2+ cofactor required for catalysis, suggesting that MD2 binds to MraYAA in a manner that overlaps with, but is distinct from its natural substrate, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. We have deciphered the chemical logic of MD2 binding to MraYAA, including how it avoids the need for pyrophosphate and sugar moieties, which are essential features for substrate binding. The conformational plasticity of MraY could be the reason that it is the target of many structurally distinct inhibitors. These findings can inform the design of new inhibitors targeting MraY as well as its paralogs, WecA and TarO. PMID:27088606

  1. Sterols in a unicellular relative of the metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Kodner, Robin B.; Summons, Roger E.; Pearson, Ann; King, Nicole; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular clocks suggest that animals originated well before they first appear as macroscopic fossils, but geologic tests of these hypotheses have been elusive. A rare steroid hydrocarbon, 24-isopropylcholestane, has been hypothesized to be a biomarker for sponges or their immediate ancestors because of its relatively high abundance in pre-Ediacaran to Early Cambrian sedimentary rocks and oils. Biolipid precursors of this sterane have been reported to be prominent in several demosponges. Whether 24-isopropylcholestane can be interpreted as a sponge (and, hence, animal) biomarker, and so provide clues about early metazoan history, depends on an understanding of the distribution of sterol biosynthesis among animals and their protistan relatives. Accordingly, we characterized the sterol profile of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, a representative of the unicellular sister group of animals. M. brevicollis does not produce a candidate sterol precursor for 24-isopropylcholestane under our experimental growth conditions. It does, however, produce a number of other sterols, and comparative genomics confirms its biosynthetic potential to produce the full suite of compounds recovered. Consistent with the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates, the sterol profile and biosynthetic pathway of M. brevicollis display characteristics of both fungal and poriferan sterol biosynthesis. This is an example in which genomic and biochemical information have been used together to investigate the taxonomic specificity of a fossil biomarker. PMID:18632573

  2. Expression of SREBP-1c Requires SREBP-2-mediated Generation of a Sterol Ligand for LXR in Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Shunxing; Cortés, Víctor A; Rashid, Shirya; Anderson, Norma N; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Liang, Guosheng; Moon, Young-Ah; Hammer, Robert E; Horton, Jay D

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids (FA) in the liver is independently regulated by SREBP-2 and SREBP-1c, respectively. Here, we genetically deleted Srebf-2 from hepatocytes and confirmed that SREBP-2 regulates all genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, the LDL receptor, and PCSK9; a secreted protein that degrades LDL receptors in the liver. Surprisingly, we found that elimination of Srebf-2 in hepatocytes of mice also markedly reduced SREBP-1c and the expression of all genes involved in FA and triglyceride synthesis that are normally regulated by SREBP-1c. The nuclear receptor LXR is necessary for Srebf-1c transcription. The deletion of Srebf-2 and subsequent lower sterol synthesis in hepatocytes eliminated the production of an endogenous sterol ligand required for LXR activity and SREBP-1c expression. These studies demonstrate that cholesterol and FA synthesis in hepatocytes are coupled and that flux through the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is required for the maximal SREBP-1c expression and high rates of FA synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25015.001 PMID:28244871

  3. SURVEY OF THE STEROL COMPOSITION OF THE MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES KARENIA BREVIS, KARENIA MIKIMOTOI, AND KARLODINIUM MICRUM: DISTRIBUTION OF STEROLS WITHIN OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS DINOPHYCEAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of different marine microalgae was examined to determine the utility of sterols as biomarkers to distinguish members of various algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae possess certain 4-methyl sterols, such as dinosterol, which are rare...

  4. SURVEY OF THE STEROL COMPOSITION OF THE MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES KARENIA BREVIS, KARENIA MIKIMOTOI, AND KARLODINIUM MICRUM: DISTRIBUTION OF STEROLS WITHIN OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS DINOPHYCEAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of different marine microalgae was examined to determine the utility of sterols as biomarkers to distinguish members of various algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae possess certain 4-methyl sterols, such as dinosterol, which are rare...

  5. Osh proteins regulate membrane sterol organization but are not required for sterol movement between the ER and PM

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander; Sullivan, David P.; Kersting, Michael C.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Beh, Christopher T.; Menon, Anant K.

    2011-01-01

    Sterol transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM) occurs by an ATP-dependent, non-vesicular mechanism that is presumed to require sterol transport proteins (STPs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologues of the mammalian oxysterol-binding protein (Osh1–7) have been proposed to function as STPs. To evaluate this proposal we took two approaches. First we used dehydroergosterol (DHE) to visualize sterol movement in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. DHE was introduced into the PM under hypoxic conditions and observed to redistribute to lipid droplets on growing the cells aerobically. Redistribution required ATP and the sterol acyltransferase Are2, but did not require PM-derived transport vesicles. DHE redistribution occurred robustly in a conditional yeast mutant (oshΔ osh4-1ts) that lacks all functional Osh proteins at 37°C. In a second approach we used a pulse-chase protocol to analyze the movement of metabolically radiolabeled ergosterol from the ER to the PM. Arrival of radiolabeled ergosterol at the PM was assessed in isolated PM-enriched fractions as well by extracting sterols from intact cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These experiments revealed that whereas ergosterol is transported effectively from the ER to the PM in Osh-deficient cells, the rate at which it moves within the PM to equilibrate with the methyl-β-cyclodextrin extractable sterol pool is slowed. We conclude (i) that the role of Osh proteins in nonvesicular sterol transport between the PM, ER and lipid droplets is either minimal, or subsumed by other mechanisms and (ii) that Osh proteins regulate the organization of sterols at the PM. PMID:21689253

  6. Sterol Carrier Protein-2: Binding Protein for Endocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Liedhegner, Elizabeth Sabens; Vogt, Caleb D.; Sem, Daniel S.; Cunningham, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of eCB ligands and the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), subserves retrograde, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the brain. eCB signaling occurs “on-demand,” thus the processes regulating synthesis, mobilization and degradation of eCBs are also primary mechanisms for the regulation of CB1R activity. The eCBs, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are poorly soluble in water. We hypothesize that their aqueous solubility, and, therefore, their intracellular and transcellular distribution, are facilitated by protein binding. Using in silico docking studies, we have identified the nonspecific lipid binding protein, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP-2), as a potential AEA binding protein. The docking studies predict that AEA and AM404 associate with SCP-2 at a putative cholesterol binding pocket with ΔG values of −3.6 and −4.6 kcal/mol, respectively. These values are considerably higher than cholesterol (−6.62 kcal/mol) but consistent with a favorable binding interaction. In support of the docking studies, SCP-2-mediated transfer of cholesterol in vitro is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AEA; and heterologous expression of SCP-2 in HEK 293 cells increases time-related accumulation of AEA in a temperature-dependent fashion. These results suggest that SCP-2 facilitates cellular uptake of AEA. However, there is no effect of SCP-2 transfection on the cellular accumulation of AEA determined at equilibrium or the IC50 values for AEA, AM404 or 2-AG to inhibit steady state accumulation of radiolabelled AEA. We conclude that SCP-2 is a low affinity binding protein for AEA that can facilitate its cellular uptake but does not contribute significantly to intracellular sequestration of AEA. PMID:24510313

  7. Sterol biosynthesis de nova via cycloartenol by the soil amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed Central

    Raederstorff, D; Rohmer, M

    1985-01-01

    The soil amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga is capable of synthesizing its sterols de novo from acetate. The major sterols are ergosterol and poriferasta-5,7,22-trienol. Furthermore C28 and C29 sterols of still unknown structure with an aromatic B-ring are also synthesized by the amoeba. The first cyclic sterol precursor is cycloartenol, which is the sterol precursor in all photosynthetic phyla. No trace of lanosterol, which is the sterol precursor in animals and fungi, could be detected. These results show that at least some of the biochemical processes of Acanthamoeba polyphaga might be phylogenetically related to those of unicellular algae. Addition of exogenous sterols to the culture medium does not influence the sterol biosynthesis and the sterol composition of the cells. PMID:4074326

  8. Sterol composition of phaeodactylum tricornutum as influenced by growth temperature and light spectral quality.

    PubMed

    Véron, B; Billard, C; Dauguet, J C; Hartmann, M A

    1996-09-01

    In a detailed sterol analysis of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, free sterols as well as esterified and glycosylated conjugates were found. When the alga was grown under standard conditions (i.e., at 13 degrees C under white light), 64% of total sterols were steryl glycosides. In all sterol classes, except steryl esters, (24S)-24-methylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3 beta-ol (epibrassicasterol) was the major (80 to 99%) sterol component. Eight other sterols were identified. Growth under different light spectral quality (red, blue, yellow, and green) at 13 and 23 degrees C was examined. At 23 degrees C, a dramatic decrease in total sterol content was observed, especially under blue light. The distribution of sterols between free and conjugated forms as well as sterol profile inside each class was found to be strongly dependent on the light spectral quality at both temperatures.

  9. Lanostane triterpenoids and sterols from Antrodia camphorata.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Hseu, You-Cheng; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Tsai, Yao-Ching; Chien, Shih-Chang; Amagaya, Sakae; Chen, Yu-Chang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2012-12-01

    Four lanostane triterpenes, 3,7,11-trioxo-5α-lanosta-8,24(E)-dien-26-oic acid, methyl 11α-3,7-dioxo-5α-lanosta-8,24(E)-dien-26-oate, methyl 3,7,11,12,15,23-hexaoxo-5α-lanost-8-en-26-oate, and ethyl 3,7,11,12,15,23-hexaoxo-5α-lanost-8-en-26-oate, two sterols, (14α,22E)-14-hydroxyergosta-7,22-diene-3,6-dione and a steroid named as camphosterol A were isolated from a mixture of fruiting bodies and mycelia of solid cultures of Antrodia camphorata. The ¹H and ¹³C NMR spectra of all compounds were fully assigned using a combination of 2D NMR experiments, including COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY sequences. Six compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against several human tumor cell lines, all of which has moderate activity.

  10. Sterols of Pneumocystis carinii hominis Organisms Isolated from Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Edna S.; Amit, Zunika; Chandra, Jyotsna; Baughman, Robert P.; Contini, Carlo; Lundgren, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii causes pneumonia (P. carinii pneumonia, or PCP) in immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. Rat-derived P. carinii carinii organisms have distinct sterols which are not synthesized by mammals and not found in other microbes infecting mammalian lungs. The dominant sterol present in the organism is cholesterol (which is believed to be scavenged from the host), but other sterols in P. carinii carinii have an alkyl group at C-24 of the sterol side chain (C28 and C29 24-alkylsterols) and a double bond at C-7 of the nucleus. Recently, pneumocysterol (C32), which is essentially lanosterol with a C-24 ethylidene group, was detected in lipids extracted from a formalin-fixed human P. carinii-infected lung, and its structures were elucidated by gas-liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry in conjunction with analyses of chemically synthesized authentic standards. The sterol composition of isolated P. carinii hominis organisms has yet to be reported. If P. carinii from animal models is to be used for identifying potential drug targets and for developing chemotherapeutic approaches to clear human infections, it is important to determine whether the 24-alkylsterols of organisms found in rats are also present in organisms in humans. In the present study, sterol analyses of P. carinii hominis organisms isolated from cryopreserved human P. carinii-infected lungs and from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were performed. Several of the same distinct sterols (e.g., fungisterol and methylcholest-7-ene-3β-ol) previously identified in P. carinii carinii were also present in organisms isolated from human specimens. Pneumocysterol was detected in only some of the samples. PMID:10548595

  11. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed.

  12. Plant sterol biosynthesis: identification of a NADPH dependent sterone reductase involved in sterol-4 demethylation.

    PubMed

    Pascal, S; Taton, M; Rahier, A

    1994-07-01

    Microsomes obtained from maize embryos were shown to catalyze the reduction of various sterones to produce stereoselectively the corresponding 3 beta-hydroxy derivatives. Enzymatic assay conditions have been developed to characterize this reduction step and the kinetics of the microsomal system has been established. Sterone reduction shows exclusive dependence on NADPH and is inactive with NADH. It is not sensitive to the azole inhibitors pyrifenox, ketoconazole, and itraconazole nor to phenobarbital nor pyrazole. Based on these coenzyme requirements and inhibitor susceptibility, and according to the common pattern of their classification, the maize microsomal sterone-reducing enzyme belongs to the family of ketone reductases. From a series of incubations with natural or synthetic sterones, the substrate specificity of the reduction at C-3 was determined. Our data indicate particularly that 4 alpha-methyl-9 beta,19-cyclo-C30-sterones and 4-desmethyl-delta 7-C27- or C30-sterones are preferentially reduced, while 4,4-dimethyl-C30- or C31-sterones react poorly. The results support the conclusion that the reductase activity identified is a constitutive component of the microsomal sterol 4-demethylation complex recently identified in photosynthetic organisms (S. Pascal et al., 1993, J. Biol. Chem. 268, 11639). They are consistent with the conclusion that 4 alpha-methylsterones are demethylation products of 4,4-gem-dimethylsterols rather than early intermediates in the 4 alpha-monomethyl-sterols-4-demethylation process.

  13. Role of a disordered steroid metabolome in the elucidation of sterol and steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, Cedric H L

    2012-01-01

    In 1937 Butler and Marrian found large amounts of the steroid pregnanetriol in urine from a patient with the adrenogenital syndrome, a virilizing condition known to be caused by compromised adrenal secretion even in this pre-cortisol era. This introduced the concept of the study of altered excretion of metabolites as an in vivo tool for understanding sterol and steroid biosynthesis. This approach is still viable and has experienced renewed significance as the field of metabolomics. From the first cyclized sterol lanosterol to the most downstream product estradiol, there are probably greater than 30 steps. Based on a distinctive metabolome clinical disorders have now been attributed to about seven post-squalene cholesterol (C) biosynthetic steps and around 15 en-route to steroid hormones or needed for further metabolism of such hormones. Forty years ago it was widely perceived that the principal steroid biosynthetic defects were known but interest rekindled as novel metabolomes were documented. In his career this investigator has been involved in the study of many steroid disorders, the two most recent being P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and apparent cortisone reductase deficiency. These are of interest as they are due not to mutations in the primary catalytic enzymes of steroidogenesis but in ancillary enzymes needed for co-factor oxido-reduction A third focus of this researcher is Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), a cholesterol synthesis disorder caused by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase mutations. The late George Schroepfer, in whose honor this article has been written, contributed greatly to defining the sterol metabolome of this condition. Defining the cause of clinically severe disorders can lead to improved treatment options. We are now involved in murine gene therapy studies for SLOS which, if successful could in the future offer an alternative therapy for this severe condition.

  14. Distinct biochemical activities and heat shock responses of two UDP-glucose sterol glucosyltransferases in cotton.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianliang; Xia, Tao; Huang, Jiangfeng; Guo, Kai; Liu, Xu; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Wen; Wang, Xuezhe; Feng, Shengqiu; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-04-01

    UDP-glucose sterol glucosyltransferase (SGT) are enzymes typically involved in the production of sterol glycosides (SG) in various organisms. However, the biological functions of SGTs in plants remain largely unknown. In the present study, we identified two full-length GhSGT genes in cotton and examined their distinct biochemical properties. Using UDP-[U-(14)C]-glucose and β-sitosterol or total crude membrane sterols as substrates, GhSGT1 and GhSGT2 recombinant proteins were detected with different enzymatic activities for SG production. The addition of Triton (X-100) strongly inhibited the activity of GhSGT1 but caused an eightfold increase in the activity of GhSGT2. The two GhSGTs showed distinct enzyme activities after the addition of NaCl, MgCl2, and ZnCl2, indicating that the two GhSGTs exhibited distinct biochemical properties under various conditions. Furthermore, after heat shock treatment, GhSGT1 showed rapidly enhanced gene expression in vivo and low enzyme activity in vitro, whereas GhSGT2 maintained extremely low gene expression levels and relatively high enzyme activity. Notably, the GhSGT2 gene was highly expressed in cotton fibers, and the biochemical properties of GhSGT2 were similar to those of GhCESA in favor for MgCl2 and non-reduction reaction condition. It suggested that GhSGT2 may have important functions in cellulose biosynthesis in cotton fibers, which must be tested in the transgenic plants in the future. Hence, the obtained data provided insights into the biological functions of two different GhSGTs in cotton and in other plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioactivities of six sterols isolated from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Sun, Jianfan; Ma, Wanlei; Fang, Wei; Chen, Zhefan; Yang, Bin; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-02-01

    Epidioxy sterols and sterols with special side chains, such as hydroperoxyl sterols, usually obtained from marine natural products, are attractive for bioactivities. To isolate and screen bioactive and special sterols from China Sea invertebrates. Two hydroperoxyl sterols (1 and 2) from the sponge Xestospongia testudinaria Lamarck (Petrosiidae), three epidioxy sterols (3-5) from the sea urchin Glyptocidaris crenularis A. Agassiz (Glyptocidaridae), sponge Mycale sp. (Mycalidae) and gorgonian Dichotella gemmacea Milne Edwards and Haime (Ellisellidae) and an unusual sterol with 25-acetoxy-19-oate (6) also from D. gemmacea were obtained and identified. Using high-throughput screening, their bioactivities were tested toward Forkhead box O 3a (Foxo3a), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase gene fluorescent protein (HMGCR-GFP), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) luciferase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Their structures were determined by comparing their nuclear magnetic resonance data with those reported in the literature. Three epidioxy sterols (3-5) showed inhibitory activities toward Foxo3a, HMGCR-GFP and NF-κB-luciferase with the IC50 values 4.9-6.8 μg/mL. The hydroperoxyl sterol 29-hydroperoxystigmasta-5,24(28)-dien-3-ol (2) had diverse inhibitory activities against Foxo3a, HMGCR-GFP, NF-κB-luciferase, PGC-1α, PTP1B and MMP, with IC50 values of 3.8-19.1 μg/mL. The bioactivities of 3-5 showed that 5α,8α-epidioxy is the active group. Otherwise, the most plausible biosynthesis pathway for 1 and 2 in sponge involves the abstraction of an allylic proton by an activated oxygen, such as O2, along with migration of carbon-carbon double bond. Therefore, the bioactive and unstable steroid should be biosynthesized in sponge under a special ecological environment to act as a defensive

  16. Sterols indicate water quality and wastewater treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Reichwaldt, Elke S; Ho, Wei Y; Zhou, Wenxu; Ghadouani, Anas

    2017-01-01

    As the world's population continues to grow, water pollution is presenting one of the biggest challenges worldwide. More wastewater is being generated and the demand for clean water is increasing. To ensure the safety and health of humans and the environment, highly efficient wastewater treatment systems, and a reliable assessment of water quality and pollutants are required. The advance of holistic approaches to water quality management and the increasing use of ecological water treatment technologies, such as constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs), challenge the appropriateness of commonly used water quality indicators. Instead, additional indicators, which are direct measures of the processes involved in the stabilisation of human waste, have to be established to provide an in-depth understanding of system performance. In this study we identified the sterol composition of wastewater treated in WSPs and assessed the suitability of human sterol levels as a bioindicator of treatment efficiency of wastewater in WSPs. As treatment progressed in WSPs, the relative abundance of human faecal sterols, such as coprostanol, epicoprostanol, 24-ethylcoprostanol, and sitostanol decreased significantly and the sterol composition in wastewater changed significantly. Furthermore, sterol levels were found to be correlated with commonly used wastewater quality indicators, such as BOD, TSS and E. coli. Three of the seven sterol ratios that have previously been used to track sewage pollution in the environment, detected a faecal signal in the effluent of WSPs, however, the others were influenced by high prevalence of sterols originating from algal and fungal activities. This finding poses a concern for environmental assessment studies, because environmental pollution from waste stabilisation ponds can go unnoticed. In conclusion, faecal sterols and their ratios can be used as reliable indicators of treatment efficiency and water quality during wastewater

  17. Effects of seaweed sterols fucosterol and desmosterol on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Bagatolli, Luis A; Duelund, Lars; Garvik, Olav; Ipsen, John H; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2017-03-30

    Higher sterols are universally present in large amounts (20-30%) in the plasma membranes of all eukaryotes whereas they are universally absent in prokaryotes. It is remarkable that each kingdom of the eukaryotes has chosen, during the course of evolution, its preferred sterol: cholesterol in animals, ergosterol in fungi and yeast, phytosterols in higher plants, and e.g., fucosterol and desmosterol in algae. The question arises as to which specific properties do sterols impart to membranes and to which extent do these properties differ among the different sterols. Using a range of biophysical techniques, including calorimetry, fluorescence microscopy, vesicle-fluctuation analysis, and atomic force microscopy, we have found that fucosterol and desmosterol, found in red and brown macroalgae (seaweeds), similar to cholesterol support liquid-ordered membrane phases and induce coexistence between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains in lipid bilayers. Fucosterol and desmosterol induce acyl-chain order in liquid membranes, but less effectively than cholesterol and ergosterol in the order: cholesterol>ergosterol>desmosterol>fucosterol, possibly reflecting the different molecular structure of the sterols at the hydrocarbon tail.

  18. Origin assessment of EV olive oils by esterified sterols analysis.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Rosa; Giuliano, Salvatore; Gulotta, Eleonora; Monfreda, Maria; Presti, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    In this study extra virgin olive oils of Italian and non-Italian origin (from Spain, Tunisia and blends of EU origin) were differentiated by GC-FID analysis of sterols and esterified sterols followed by chemometric tools. PCA allowed to highlight the high significance of esterified sterols to characterise extra virgin olive oils in relation to their origin. SIMCA provided a sensitivity and specificity of 94.39% and 91.59% respectively; furthermore, an external set of 54 extra virgin olive oils bearing a designation of Italian origin on the labelling was tested by SIMCA. Prediction results were also compared with organoleptic assessment. Finally, the poor correlation found between ethylesters and esterified sterols allowed to hazard the guess, worthy of further investigations, that esterified sterols may prove to be promising in studies of geographical discrimination: indeed they appear to be independent of those factors causing the formation of ethyl esters and related to olive oil production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multicolor bleach-rate imaging enlightens in vivo sterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Elucidation of in vivo cholesterol transport and its aberrations in cardiovascular diseases requires suitable model organisms and the development of appropriate monitoring technology. We recently presented a new approach to visualize transport of the intrinsically fluorescent sterol, dehydroergosterol (DHE) in the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). DHE is structurally very similar to cholesterol and ergosterol, two sterols used by the sterol-auxotroph nematode. We developed a new computational method measuring fluorophore bleaching kinetics at every pixel position, which can be used as a fingerprint to distinguish rapidly bleaching DHE from slowly bleaching autofluorescence in the animals. Here, we introduce multicolor bleach-rate sterol imaging. By this method, we demonstrate that some DHE is targeted to a population of basolateral recycling endosomes (RE) labelled with GFP-tagged RME-1 (GFP-RME-1) in the intestine of both, wild-type nematodes and mutant animals lacking intestinal gut granules (glo1-mutants). DHE-enriched intestinal organelles of glo1-mutants were decorated with GFPrme8, a marker for early endosomes. No co-localization was found with a lysosomal marker, GFP-LMP1. Our new methods hold great promise for further studies on endosomal sterol transport in C. elegans. PMID:20798830

  20. A data mining approach to dinoflagellate clustering according to sterol composition: Correlations with evolutionary history.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the sterol compositions of 102 dinoflagellates (including several previously unexamined species) using clustering techniques as a means of determining the relatedness of the organisms. In addition, dinoflagellate sterol-based relationships were compared statistically to dinoflag...

  1. Comparative seasonal sterol profiles in edible parts of Mediterranean fish and shellfish species.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Gülsün; Kuley, Esmeray; Etyemez, Miray; Ozoğul, Fatih

    2013-06-01

    The effect of different seasons on sterol content of seafoods was investigated. There were four sterols (cholesterol, sitosterol, desmosterol and stigmasterol) identified, with cholesterol being the predominant sterol. Stigmasterol was a minor component in fish muscle, whilst sitosterol was one of the main phytosterols found in fish muscle. Cholesterol content of fish consisted of 38-100% of total sterols in fish and 54-80% of total sterols in shellfish. The highest cholesterol content of fish muscle was found in summer and the lowest in autumn, whereas season did not have any effect on cholesterol level of green tiger prawn and speckled shrimp. Total sterol content of fish muscle ranged from 49 to 110 mg/100 g, although the range of total sterols in shrimp muscle was between 62 and 91 mg/100 g. The result of the study showed that total sterols in fish were generally found at lower levels in winter compared with other seasons.

  2. New Marine Sterols from a Gorgonian Pinnigorgia sp.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Chao, Chih-Hua; Sung, Ping-Jyun

    2017-03-03

    Continuous chemical investigation of the gorgonian coral Pinnigorgia sp. resulted in the isolation of two new sterols, 5α,6α-epoxy-(22E,24R)-3β,11-dihydroxy-9,11-secoergosta-7-en-9-one (1) and (22R)-acetoxy-(24ξ)-ergosta-5-en-3β,25-diol (2). The structures of sterols 1 and 2 were elucidated using spectroscopic methods. Sterol 1 displayed inhibitory effects on the generation of superoxide anions and the release of elastase by human neutrophils with IC50 values of 8.65 and 5.86 μM, respectively. The structure of a known metabolite, pubinernoid A (3), is revised as (+)-loliolide (4).

  3. Neural HO-1/sterol interactions in vivo: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hascalovici, J R; Song, W; Liberman, A; Vaya, J; Khatib, S; Holcroft, C; Laferla, F; Schipper, H M

    2014-11-07

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol (CH) metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased (AD) neural tissues. We previously provided evidence of significant HO-1/sterol interactions in vitro (cultured rat astroglia) and in post-mortem human AD brain (Religious Orders Study). The current experiments were designed to further delineate these interactions in vivo by comparing the behavior of HO-1/sterol interactions in two mouse models; (1) a novel HO-1 transgenic mouse (GFAP.HMOX1) engineered to selectively express human HO-1 in the astrocytic compartment and (2) the previously described triple transgenic AD mouse (3xTg-AD). In samples of frontal cortex, total CH, CH precursors and relevant oxysterols were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and HO-1 protein expression was assessed by ELISA. The relationships of HO-1 expression to total CH, CH precursors and total oxysterols were determined for both mouse models using linear regression analysis. HO-1 expression is increased in GFAP.HMOX1 mice relative to wild type and in 11-12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice (with AD-like phenotype) relative to control mice and 5-6-month-old 3xTg-AD mice (no AD-like phenotype). Total oxysterols significantly decreased as HO-1 expression increased in GFAP.HMOX1 mice expressing high levels of HO-1, whereas total oxysterols increased as HO-1 expression increased in aged 3xTg-AD mice. Total CH and total CH precursors increased as HO-1 protein expression increased in 11-12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice relative to 5-6-month old 3xTg-AD mice. Our findings indicate a differential impact of HO-1 on patterns of brain sterol and redox homeostasis that is contingent on the presence or absence of AD-like neuropathology. These data provide fresh insight concerning the regulation of sterol homeostasis within the aging and degenerating CNS which may inform the development of novel therapeutic and preventive strategies for the management of AD and related

  4. Effects of terconazole and other azole antifungal agents on the sterol and carbohydrate composition of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Riley, J; Koerner, T

    1990-01-01

    The effects of terconazole, a triazole antifungal, on the sterol and carbohydrate composition of Candida albicans was compared with that of three imidazoles: clotrimazole, miconazole, and butoconazole. Exposure of C. albicans to terconazole resulted in a profound depletion of ergosterol with a corresponding increase in lanosterol content versus control cells. Carbohydrate analysis revealed a significant (245%) increase in chitin and a minimal effect on glucan and mannan in terconazole-treated cells. Similar effects on sterol and carbohydrate composition were observed with clotrimazole and miconazole. Butoconazole had a similar effect on sterol composition but had no effect on carbohydrate composition. The decreased ergosterol and increased lanosterol content is consistent with 14 alpha-demethylase inhibition by terconazole and the other azoles. The increase in cell wall chitin is most likely due to deregulation of chitin synthesis secondary to ergosterol depletion in the cell membrane. Because both chitin and ergosterol are critical components of the fungal cell, perturbation of the production and localization of these components by terconazole is likely to contribute to the selective toxicity of this compound for C. albicans and other fungi.

  5. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A.; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650–540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago. PMID:26903629

  6. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Summons, Roger E

    2016-03-08

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650-540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago.

  7. Non-cholesterol sterols in serum, lipoproteins, and red cells in statin-treated FH subjects off and on plant stanol and sterol ester spreads.

    PubMed

    Ketomäki, Anna; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A

    2005-03-01

    Serum plant sterol levels are increased by consumption of statins and dietary plant sterols, and decreased by dietary plant stanols, but little is known about combination therapy of statin and plant sterols. We measured plant sterols in serum, lipoproteins, and red cells in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (n=18) treated with variable doses of statins off and on plant stanol (STA) and sterol ester (STE) spreads. STA and STE spreads lowered LDL cholesterol approximately 15%. Plant sterols were decreased in serum, lipoproteins, and red cells by approximately 25% with STA and increased from 37% to 80% with STE, especially with high statin doses. The changes in serum were related to those in red cells. The baseline levels of serum plant sterols were negatively (r-range -0.639 to -0.935) and positively (r-range 0.526 to 0.598) correlated with the respective changes evoked by the STA and STE spreads. STE reduces LDL cholesterol, but increases serum, lipoprotein, and red cell plant sterol levels in statin-treated FH subjects, while all the respective values are decreased with STA. Recent predictions that elevated serum plant sterols pose an increased coronary risk suggest that increases of serum plant sterol levels should be avoided, especially in atherosclerosis-prone individuals, such as subjects with FH.

  8. Inhibitory effects of various oxygenated sterols on the differentiation and function of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangrude, G.J.; Sherris, D.; Daynes, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light (UVL) is capable of causing many biological and biochemical changes in this complex organ. One early consequence is the oxidation of epidermal plasma membrane cholesterol, causing the induction of a wide variety of photoproducts. It is well recognized that some oxygenated sterols possess potent biological activity on mammalian cells by their ability to inhibit endogeneous mevalonate and cholesterol biosynthesis. In the few immunological systems that have been studied, there is general agreement that lymphocyte function is altered in the presence of certain oxygenated sterols. Insight into the biochemical basis for altered lymphocyte function is lacking, as both afferent and efferent blockades have been suggested. These studies were undertaken to determine the effect of various oxygenated sterols (representing a number of known cholesterol-derived photoproducts) on the generation (afferent) and function (efferent) of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Cell-mediated immune responses which result in the generation of both alloantigen-specific and syngeneic tumor-specific CTLs were evaluated. (JMT)

  9. Protein Mediators of Sterol Transport Across Intestinal Brush Border Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Yu, Liqing

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol balance contributes significantly to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), the leading cause of death in the United States. The intestine has the unique capability to act as a gatekeeper for entry of cholesterol into the body, and inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption is now widely regarded as an attractive non-statin therapeutic strategy for ASCVD prevention. In this chapter we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding sterol transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. The purpose of this work is to summarize substantial progress made in the last decade in regards to protein-mediated sterol trafficking, and to discuss this in the context of human disease. PMID:20213550

  10. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take place in

  11. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    Treesearch

    Rachel A. Stong; Eli Kolodny; Rick G. Kelsey; M.P. Gonzalez-Hernandez; Jorge M. Vivanco; Daniel K. Manter

    2013-01-01

    Elicitin-mediated acquisition of plant sterols is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. This study examined the interactions between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. Ground leaf tissue, sterols, and tannin-enriched extracts were obtained from three different plant species (California bay laurel, California black oak, and Oregon...

  12. Simultaneous effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Piepho, Maike; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Wacker, Alexander

    2010-12-31

    Sterol profiles of microalgae and their change with environmental conditions are of great interest in ecological food web research and taxonomic studies alike. Here, we investigated effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton and assessed potential interactive effects of these important environmental factors on the sterol composition of algae. We identified sterol contents of four common phytoplankton genera, Scenedesmus, Chlamydomonas, Cryptomonas and Cyclotella, and analysed the change in sterol content with varying light intensities in both a high-phosphorus and a low-phosphorus approach. Sterol contents increased significantly with increasing light in three out of four species. Phosphorus-limitation reversed the change of sterol content with light intensity, i.e., sterol content decreased with increasing light at low phosphorus supply. Generally sterol contents were lower in low-phosphorus cultures. In conclusion, both light and phosphorus conditions strongly affect the sterol composition of algae and hence should be considered in ecological and taxonomic studies investigating the biochemical composition of algae. Data suggest a possible sterol limitation of growth and reproduction of herbivorous crustacean zooplankton during summer when high light intensities and low phosphorus supply decrease sterol contents of algae.

  13. Plant Sterol Metabolism. Δ7-Sterol-C5-Desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ5,7-Sterol-Δ7-Reductase (DWARF5) and Δ24-Sterol-Δ24-Reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) Show Multiple Subcellular Localizations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Heynh) L

    PubMed Central

    Silvestro, Daniele; Andersen, Tonni Grube; Schaller, Hubert; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2013-01-01

    Sterols are crucial lipid components that regulate membrane permeability and fluidity and are the precursors of bioactive steroids. The plant sterols exist as three major forms, free sterols, steryl glycosides and steryl esters. The storage of steryl esters in lipid droplets has been shown to contribute to cellular sterol homeostasis. To further document cellular aspects of sterol biosynthesis in plants, we addressed the question of the subcellular localization of the enzymes implicated in the final steps of the post-squalene biosynthetic pathway. In order to create a clear localization map of steroidogenic enzymes in cells, the coding regions of Δ7-sterol-C5-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ24-sterol-Δ24-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) and Δ5,7-sterol-Δ7-reductase (DWARF5) were fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines deficient in the corresponding enzymes. All fusion proteins were found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum in functionally complemented plants. The results show that both Δ5,7-sterol-Δ7-reductase and Δ24-sterol-Δ24-reductase are in addition localized to the plasma membrane, whereas Δ7-sterol-C5-desaturase was clearly detected in lipid particles. These findings raise new challenging questions about the spatial and dynamic cellular organization of sterol biosynthesis in plants. PMID:23409184

  14. Plant sterol metabolism. Δ(7)-Sterol-C5-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ(5,7)-sterol-Δ(7)-reductase (DWARF5) and Δ(24)-sterol-Δ(24)-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) show multiple subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Heynh) L.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Daniele; Andersen, Tonni Grube; Schaller, Hubert; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2013-01-01

    Sterols are crucial lipid components that regulate membrane permeability and fluidity and are the precursors of bioactive steroids. The plant sterols exist as three major forms, free sterols, steryl glycosides and steryl esters. The storage of steryl esters in lipid droplets has been shown to contribute to cellular sterol homeostasis. To further document cellular aspects of sterol biosynthesis in plants, we addressed the question of the subcellular localization of the enzymes implicated in the final steps of the post-squalene biosynthetic pathway. In order to create a clear localization map of steroidogenic enzymes in cells, the coding regions of Δ(7)-sterol-C(5)-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ(24)-sterol-Δ(24)-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) and Δ(5,7)-sterol-Δ(7)-reductase (DWARF5) were fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines deficient in the corresponding enzymes. All fusion proteins were found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum in functionally complemented plants. The results show that both Δ(5,7)-sterol-Δ(7)-reductase and Δ(24)-sterol-Δ(24)-reductase are in addition localized to the plasma membrane, whereas Δ(7)-sterol-C(5)-desaturase was clearly detected in lipid particles. These findings raise new challenging questions about the spatial and dynamic cellular organization of sterol biosynthesis in plants.

  15. In Vitro Antileishmanial Activity of Sterols from Trametes versicolor (Bres. Rivarden).

    PubMed

    Leliebre-Lara, Vivian; Monzote Fidalgo, Lianet; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Kunert, Olaf; Nogueiras Lima, Clara; Bauer, Rudolf

    2016-08-10

    Two ergostanes, 5α,8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol (1) and 5α-ergost-7,22-dien-3β-ol (2), and a lanostane, 3β-hydroxylanostan-8,24-diene-21-oic acid (trametenolic acid) (3), were isolated from an n-hexane extract prepared from the fruiting body of Trametes versicolor (Bres. Rivarden). The activity of the isolated sterols was evaluated against promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis Lainson and Shaw, 1972. The lanostane, compound (3), showed the best inhibitory response (IC50 promastigotes 2.9 ± 0.1 μM and IC50 amastigotes 1.6 ± 0.1 μM). This effect was 25-fold higher compared with its cytotoxic effect on peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice. Therefore, trametenolic acid could be regarded as a promising lead for the synthesis of compounds with antileishmanial activity.

  16. Relative abundance of Delta(5)-sterols in plasma membrane lipids of root-tip cells correlates with aluminum tolerance of rice.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Shahadat Hossain; Tawaraya, Keitarou; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Murayama, Tetsuya; Chuba, Masaru; Kambayashi, Mihoko; Shiono, Yoshihito; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Wagatsuma, Tadao

    2009-01-01

    We investigated variations in aluminum (Al) tolerance among rice plants, using ancestor cultivars from the family line of the Al-tolerant and widely cultivated Japonica cultivar, Sasanishiki. The cultivar Rikuu-20 was Al sensitive, whereas a closely related cultivar that is a descendant of Rikuu-20, Rikuu-132, was Al tolerant. These two cultivars were compared to determine mechanisms underlying variations in Al tolerance. The sensitive cultivar Rikuu-20 showed increased permeability of the plasma membrane (PM) and greater Al uptake within 1 h of Al treatment. This could not be explained by organic acid release. Lipid composition of the PM differed between these cultivars, and may account for the difference in Al tolerance. The tolerant cultivar Rikuu-132 had a lower ratio of phospholipids to Delta(5)-sterols than the sensitive cultivar Rikuu-20, suggesting that the PM of Rikuu-132 is less negatively charged and less permeabilized than that of Rikuu-20. We used inhibitors of Delta(5)-sterol synthesis to alter the ratio of phospholipids to Delta(5)-sterols in both cultivars. These inhibitors reduced Al tolerance in Rikuu-132 and its Al-tolerant ancestor cultivars Kamenoo and Kyoku. In addition, Rikuu-132 showed a similar level of Al sensitivity when the ratio of phospholipids to Delta(5)-sterols was increased to match that of Rikuu-20 after treatment with uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of obtusifoliol-14alpha-demethylase. These results indicate that PM lipid composition is a factor underlying variations in Al tolerance among rice cultivars.

  17. LM cell growth and membrane lipid adaptation to sterol structure.

    PubMed

    Rujanavech, C; Silbert, D F

    1986-06-05

    Using a sterol auxotroph of the LM cell mouse fibroblast, we demonstrate that relatively few cholesterol analogues can substitute for cholesterol as a growth factor. The auxotroph grows normally on desmosterol and trans-22-dehydrocholesterol and at reduced rates on dihydrocholesterol, campesterol, and 22,23-dihydrobrassicasterol. It does not grow with beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ergosterol, or cis-22-dehydrocholesterol when the sterol is present as sole supplement but does grow at normal rates when the analogue is supplied with suboptimal amounts of cholesterol. Two contrasting types of membrane lipid changes are observed in cells grown on cholesterol analogues. In cells grown with dihydrocholesterol, a marked increase in desaturation and elongation of fatty acids is noted. Conversely, when cells are grown with cis-22-dehydrocholesterol, desaturation and elongation of fatty acids are severely curtailed. Cells grown on alkyl sterols respond like cells grown on cis-22-dehydrocholesterol but in a less pronounced fashion. The effects of sterol substitution in mammalian cells versus in lower eukaryotes are compared, and an explanation for the secondary changes in fatty acid composition in terms of phospholipid phase behavior is suggested.

  18. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  19. Sterols and squalene in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) kernel oils: the variety as a key factor.

    PubMed

    Rudzińska, Magdalena; Górnaś, Paweł; Raczyk, Marianna; Soliven, Arianne

    2017-01-01

    The profile of sterols and squalene content in oils recovered from the kernels of 15 apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) varieties were investigated. Nine sterols (campesterol, β-sitosterol, Δ5-avenasterol, 24-methylene-cycloartanol, cholesterol, gramisterol, Δ7-stigmasterol, Δ7-avenasterol and citrostadienol) were identified in apricot kernel oils. The β-sitosterol was the predominant sterol in each cultivar and consisted of 76-86% of the total detected sterols. The content of total sterols and squalene were significantly affected by the variety and ranged between 215.7-973.6 and 12.6-43.9 mg/100 g of oil, respectively.

  20. Occurrence of squalene and sterols in Cellulomonas dehydrogenans (Arnaudi 1942) comb. nov. Hester 1971.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, O B; Francesconi, M D

    1978-01-01

    The neutral lipid fraction of the photochromogenic, coryneform bacterium Cellulomonas dehydrogenans (Arnaudi 1942) comb. nov. contains the sterol precursor squalene and at least two sterols, cholesterol and beta-sitosterol. The compounds were characterized by mass spectrometry and combination gas-liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry. De novo sterol biosynthetic ability was shown from incorporation of 14C from D-[U-14C]glucose into squalene and the sterol fraction. The squalene concentration approximated 0.002 to 0.005% of the total dry cell weight, and the sterols approximated 0.03 to 0.05%. Images PMID:101527

  1. Insight into methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Cu(111): Complex reaction network and the effects of H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yafan; Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Jun; Mei, Donghai

    2011-05-31

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on supported Cu catalysts is of considerable importance in the chemical and energy industries. Although extensive experimental and theoretical efforts have been carried out in the past decades, the most fundamental questions such as the reaction mechanisms and the key reaction intermediates are still in debate. In the present work, a comprehensive reaction network for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on Cu(111) was studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All of the elementary reaction steps in the reaction network were identified in an unbiased way with the dimer method. Our calculation results show that methanol synthesis from direct hydrogenation of formate on Cu(111) is not feasible due to the high activation barriers for some of the elementary steps. Instead, we find that CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarboxyl (trans-COOH) is kinetically more favorable than formate in the presence of H2O via a unique proton transfer mechanism. The trans-COOH is then converted into hydroxymethylidyne (COH) via dihydroxycarbene (COHOH) intermediates, followed by three consecutive hydrogenation steps to form hydroxymethylene (HCOH), hydroxymethyl (H2COH), and methanol. This is consistent with recent experimental observations [1], which indicate that direct hydrogenation of formate will not produce methanol under dry hydrogen conditions. Thus, both experiment and computational modeling clearly demonstrate the important role of trace amounts of water in methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Cu catalysts. The proposed methanol synthesis route on Cu(111) not only provides new insights into methanol synthesis chemistry, but also demonstrates again that spectroscopically observed surface species are often not critical reaction intermediates but rather spectator species. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Red cell and plasma plant sterols are related during consumption of plant stanol and sterol ester spreads in children with hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ketomäki, Anna M; Gylling, Helena; Antikainen, Marjatta; Siimes, Martti A; Miettinen, Tatu A

    2003-05-01

    To show whether the ratios of squalene and cholesterol precursor sterols to cholesterol and cholestanol and plant sterols to cholesterol change differently in plasma and especially in the red cells of hypercholesterolemic children during consumption of plant stanol and sterol ester spreads. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, hypercholesterolemic children (n = 23) consumed low-fat plant stanol and sterol ester spreads for 5-week periods separated by a 5-week washout period. Plasma and red cell lipids, squalene, and noncholesterol sterols were measured before and at the end of each period. The plant stanol and sterol ester spreads lowered plasma total (-9% and -6%, respectively) and low-density lipoprotein (-12% and -9%) cholesterol but had no effect on red cell cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or plasma triglycerides. The ratios of plasma and red cell sitosterol and campesterol to cholesterol decreased by 32% to 36% (P <.001) with the plant stanol ester and increased by 40% to 52% (P <.001) with the sterol ester spread. Consumption of plant sterols increases and consumption of plant stanols decreases the ratios of plant sterols to cholesterol in red cells of hypercholesterolemic children proportionately to the respective changes in plasma.

  3. Free Fatty acids and sterols in swine manure.

    PubMed

    Loughrin, John H; Szogi, Ariel A

    2006-01-01

    Free fatty acids and sterols were assessed in fresh manure and anaerobic lagoon sludge from swine production facilities in North Carolina. Eight free fatty acids and five sterols were identified and quantified in both manure and sludge samples. Compound identification was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and compound quantities were determined by gas chromatography after solid phase extraction with a 50:50 mixture of diethyl ether and hexane. The free fatty acids occurring in greatest abundance in both fresh manure and lagoon sludge were palmitic, oleic, and stearic. Free fatty acid content in fresh manure ranged from approximately 3 microg g(-1) dry weight (dw) to over 45 microg g(-1) dw. In lagoon sludge, free fatty acid content ranged from about 0.8 microg g(-1) dw to nearly 4 microg g(-1) dw. Coprostanol and epicoprostanol were the sterols in largest concentrations in fresh manure and lagoon sludge samples. Total sterol content ranged from approximately 0.5 microg g(-1) dw to around 11 microg g(-1) dw in fresh manure and from 3.5 microg g(-1) dw to almost 9 microg g(-1) dw in lagoon sludge. Fresh manure and lagoon sludge both had high levels of inorganic cations (e.g., Ca, Mg, Fe) capable of binding free fatty acids and forming insoluble complexes, thereby potentially reducing fatty acid biodegradation. In anaerobic lagoons, sterols are an organic fraction of sludge that are resistant to bacterial degradation. In the case of fresh manure, fatty acids could represent a potential source of energy via the manufacture of biodiesel fuel, if efficient means for their extraction and transesterification can be devised.

  4. Steroleosin, a sterol-binding dehydrogenase in seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Jen; Tai, Sorgan S K; Peng, Chi-Chung; Tzen, Jason T C

    2002-04-01

    Besides abundant oleosin, three minor proteins, Sop 1, 2, and 3, are present in sesame (Sesamum indicum) oil bodies. The gene encoding Sop1, named caleosin for its calcium-binding capacity, has recently been cloned. In this study, Sop2 gene was obtained by immunoscreening, and it was subsequently confirmed by amino acid partial sequencing and immunological recognition of its overexpressed protein in Escherichia coli. Immunological cross recognition implies that Sop2 exists in seed oil bodies of diverse species. Along with oleosin and caleosin genes, Sop2 gene was transcribed in maturing seeds where oil bodies are actively assembled. Sequence analysis reveals that Sop2, tentatively named steroleosin, possesses a hydrophobic anchoring segment preceding a soluble domain homologous to sterol-binding dehydrogenases/reductases involved in signal transduction in diverse organisms. Three-dimensional structure of the soluble domain was predicted via homology modeling. The structure forms a seven-stranded parallel beta-sheet with the active site, S-(12X)-Y-(3X)-K, between an NADPH and a sterol-binding subdomain. Sterol-coupling dehydrogenase activity was demonstrated in the overexpressed soluble domain of steroleosin as well as in purified oil bodies. Southern hybridization suggests that one steroleosin gene and certain homologous genes may be present in the sesame genome. Comparably, eight hypothetical steroleosin-like proteins are present in the Arabidopsis genome with a conserved NADPH-binding subdomain, but a divergent sterol-binding subdomain. It is indicated that steroleosin-like proteins may represent a class of dehydrogenases/reductases that are involved in plant signal transduction regulated by various sterols.

  5. New insights on nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferases: a versatile biocatalyst for one-pot one-step synthesis of nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Fresco-Taboada, A; de la Mata, I; Arroyo, M; Fernández-Lucas, J

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, glycosiltransferases have arisen as standard biocatalysts for the enzymatic synthesis of a wide variety of natural and non-natural nucleosides. Such enzymatic synthesis of nucleoside analogs catalyzed by nucleoside phosphorylases and 2'-deoxyribosyltransferases (NDTs) has demonstrated to be an efficient alternative to the traditional multistep chemical methods, since chemical glycosylation reactions include several protection-deprotection steps. This minireview exhaustively covers literature reports on this topic with the final aim of presenting NDTs as an efficient option to nucleoside phosphorylases for the synthesis of natural and non-natural nucleosides. Detailed comments about structure and catalytic mechanism of described NDTs, as well as their possible biological role, substrate specificity, and advances in detection of new enzyme specificities towards different non-natural nucleoside synthesis are included. In addition, optimization of enzymatic transglycosylation reactions and their application in the synthesis of natural and non-natural nucleosides have been described. Finally, immobilization of NDTs is shown as a practical procedure which leads to the preparation of very interesting biocatalysts applicable to industrial nucleoside synthesis.

  6. Insight into the influence of liquid paraffin for methanol synthesis on Cu(110) surface using continuum and atomistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Wei-Hong; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Zuo, Zhi-Jun; Ren, Rui-Peng; Gao, Zhi-Hua; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO/CO2 hydrogenation and water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu(110) in liquid paraffin and vacuum have been systematically researched with density functional theory calculation (DFT). For methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + H → HCO → H2CO → H3CO → H3COH; in the case of WGS, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + 2H2O → CO + 2OH + 2H → CO + H2O + O + H2 → CO2 + H2O + H2; the reaction pathways of methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO2 + H → HCOO → H2COO → H2CO → H3CO → H3COH and CO2 + H → HCOO → HCOOH → H2COOH → H3CO → H3COH, respectively. The result shows that liquid paraffin does not affect the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO and WGS, but it changes the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. Hirshfeld charge and the d-band centers indicate that the catalytic activity of Cu(110) in liquid paraffin is smaller than that in vacuum. Our results also show that it is necessary to consider both continuum and atomistic models in the slurry bed.

  7. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Forster, Thorsten; Blanc, Mathieu; Lu, Hongjin; Crick, Peter J; Yutuc, Eylan; Watterson, Steven; Martin, Kimberly; Griffiths, Samantha J; Enright, Anton J; Yamamoto, Mami; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Lennox, Kimberly A; Behlke, Mark A; Talbot, Simon; Haas, Jürgen; Dölken, Lars; Griffiths, William J; Wang, Yuqin; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN) signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1). Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway.

  8. Suppressing Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Alters Chloroplast Development and Triggers Sterol-Dependent Induction of Jasmonate- and Fe-Related Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Arró, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes (FPS1 and FPS2) encoding FPS. Single fps1 and fps2 knockout mutants are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, while fps1/fps2 double mutants are embryo lethal. To assess the effect of FPS down-regulation at postembryonic developmental stages, we generated Arabidopsis conditional knockdown mutants expressing artificial microRNAs devised to simultaneously silence both FPS genes. Induction of silencing from germination rapidly caused chlorosis and a strong developmental phenotype that led to seedling lethality. However, silencing of FPS after seed germination resulted in a slight developmental delay only, although leaves and cotyledons continued to show chlorosis and altered chloroplasts. Metabolomic analyses also revealed drastic changes in the profile of sterols, ubiquinones, and plastidial isoprenoids. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction transcriptomic analysis showed that a reduction in FPS activity levels triggers the misregulation of genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses, the most prominent one being the rapid induction of a set of genes related to the jasmonic acid pathway. Down-regulation of FPS also triggered an iron-deficiency transcriptional response that is consistent with the iron-deficient phenotype observed in FPS-silenced plants. The specific inhibition of the sterol biosynthesis pathway by chemical and genetic blockage mimicked these transcriptional responses, indicating that sterol depletion is the primary cause of the observed alterations. Our results highlight the importance of sterol homeostasis for normal chloroplast development and function and reveal important clues about how isoprenoid and sterol metabolism is integrated within plant physiology and development. PMID

  9. Mechanistic Insight into a Sugar-Accelerated Tin-Catalyzed Cascade Synthesis of α-Hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone from Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Matsuo, Takeaki; Motokura, Ken; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-11-01

    Applications of the formose reaction, which involves the formation of sugars from formaldehyde, have previously been confined to the selective synthesis of unprotected sugars. Herein, it is demonstrated that α-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (HBL), which is one of the most important intermediates in pharmaceutical syntheses, can be produced from paraformaldehyde. In the developed reaction system, homogeneous tin chloride exhibits high catalytic activity and the addition of mono- and disaccharides accelerates the formation of HBL. These observations suggest that the formose reaction may serve as a feasible pathway for the synthesis of important chemicals.

  10. Distribution of sterols and the sources of pollution in surface sediments of Ulungur lake, Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zilong; Ran, Dan; Huang, Yating

    2013-01-01

    Domestic sewage discharged into lakes brings great pressure to the ecological environment. This study selected sediment from an inland lake as a research object to evaluate pollution of the environment. Eight sterols were used to evaluate the content of pollutants, while the ratios of sterols were used as the index to analyze the sources of pollution. The correlations were analyzed between sterols and total organic carbon (TOC), salinity and particle size. The distribution and composition of sterol compounds were determined in 12 surface sediment samples collected from Ulungur lake. The total concentrations of detected sterols in the sediments ranged from 1.3 to 36.3 μg/g.dw. The most abundant sterol detected was β-sitosterol (STI) with average concentrations of 2.6 μg/g.dw, followed by cholesterol (CHOE), stigmasterol (STIG) and stigmastanol (STAN). The concentration of coprostanol (COP) was between 0.03 and 1.66 μg/g.dw. Through correlation analysis, it was found that there was a significant correlation between fecal sterols and plant sterols. So the plant sterols shall not be neglected in evaluating the sources of pollution for their impact to identify the fecal sources. The study suggests that the composition and distribution of sterols in surface sediment provide useful information for environmental contamination monitoring and assessment in the inland lake.

  11. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Iaea, David B.; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and nonvesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t1/2 =12–15 min. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP independent and therefore is nonvesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. A soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of nonvesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that nonvesicular sterol transport mechanisms and STARD4 in particular account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC. PMID:28209730

  12. Tracing origins of sewage and organic matter using dissolved sterols in Masan and Haengam Bay, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Hong, Sang Hee; Kim, Moonkoo; Ha, Sung Yong; An, Soon Mo; Shim, Won Joon

    2011-06-01

    Masan and Haengam Bays in Korea are highly polluted and semi-enclosed. Domestic and industrial effluents are directly or indirectly discharged into the bays through sewage treatment plants (STP) and creeks. In this study, 15 dissolved sterol compounds were determined in order to understand their sources and relative contribution. Freshwater samples were taken from 13 creeks and at two STP sites on a monthly basis. Total dissolved sterol concentrations ranged from 993 to 4158 ng/L. The concentrations of sterols in winter were higher than in summer. Among the sterols analyzed, cholesterol, β-sitosterol, coprostanol and cholestanone were major compounds in creek water. Seawater samples were concurrently collected at 21 stations in Masan Bay. Total sterol concentrations ranged 118-6,956 ng/L. Inner bay showed high concentrations of sterols in summer, while outer bay showed high sterol concentrations in winter. Among the sterols, cholesterol, β-sitosterol and brassicasterol were major compounds in seawater. In order to examine the contribution of urban sewage, the concentration of coprostanol and fecal sterol ratios were calculated. Most of the creek water, inner bay and near STP outlet samples were affected by sewage. Terrestrial organic matters accounted for a high proportion of dissolved organic matter origin. Fecal origins were relatively high in the inner bay areas and in the STP outlet, while sterols of marine origin were high in the outer bay areas.

  13. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-02-16

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and non-vesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analog, dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t1/2 of 12-15 minutes. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP-independent and, therefore, non-vesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. We found that a soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of non-vesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that non-vesicular sterol transport mechanisms, and STARD4 in particular, account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC.

  14. Effects of a diet high in plant sterols, vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers (dietary portfolio) on circulating sterol levels and red cell fragility in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J; Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Vidgen, Edward; Trautwein, Elke A; Lapsley, Karen G; Marchie, Augustine; Cunnane, Stephen C; Connelly, Philip W

    2005-02-01

    Plant sterols, soy proteins, viscous fibers, and nuts are advised for cholesterol reduction, but their combined effect on plant sterol absorption has never been tested. We assessed their combined action on serum sterols in hyperlipidemic subjects who were following low-saturated fat diets before starting the study and who returned to these diets post-test. The 1-mon test (combination) diet was high in plant sterols (1 g/1,000 kcal), soy protein (23 g/1,000 kcal), viscous fiber (9 g/1,000 kcal), and almonds (14 g/1000 kcal). Fasting blood was obtained for serum lipids and sterols, and erythrocytes were obtained for fragility prior to and at 2-wk intervals during the study. The combination diet raised serum campesterol concentrations by 50% and beta-sitosterol by 27%, although these changes were not significant after Bonferroni correction; near-maximal rises were found by the end of the first week, but no change was found in red cell fragility despite a 29% reduction in the LDL cholesterol level. No significant associations were observed between changes in red cell fragility and blood lipids or sterols. We conclude that plant sterols had a minimal impact on serum sterol concentrations or red cell fragility in hyperlipidemic subjects on diets that greatly reduced their serum lipids.

  15. The effect of variations in phospholipid and sterol structure on the nature of lipid-sterol interactions in lipid bilayer model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mannock, David A; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McMullen, Todd P W; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2010-06-01

    This review deals with the effect of variations in phospholipid and sterol structure on the nature and magnitude of lipid-sterol interactions in lipid bilayer model membranes. The first portion of the review covers the effect of Chol itself on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of a variety of different glycero- and sphingolipid membrane lipid classes, varying in the structure and charge of their polar headgroups and in the length and structure of their fatty acyl chains. The second part of this review deals with the effect of variations in sterol structure on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization primarily of the well studied DPPC model membrane system. In the third section, we focus on some of the contributions of sterol functional group chemistry, molecular conformation and dynamics, to sterol-lipid interactions. Using those studies, we re-examine the results of recently published experimental and computer-modeling studies to provide a new more dynamic molecular interpretation of sterol-lipid interactions. We suggest that the established view of the rigid sterol ring system and extended alkyl side-chain obtained from physical studies of cholesterol-phospholipid mixtures may not apply in lipid mixtures differing in their sterol chemical structure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. RNA-Seq analysis uncovers non-coding small RNA system of Mycobacterium neoaurum in the metabolism of sterols to accumulate steroid intermediates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhu, Zhan-Tao; Tao, Xin-Yi; Wang, Feng-Qing; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2016-04-25

    Understanding the metabolic mechanism of sterols to produce valuable steroid intermediates in mycobacterium by a noncoding small RNA (sRNA) view is still limited. In the work, RNA-seq was implemented to investigate the noncoding transcriptome of Mycobacterium neoaurum (Mn) in the transformation process of sterols to valuable steroid intermediates, including 9α-hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione (9OHAD), 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD), and 22-hydroxy-23, 24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-3-one (1,4-BNA). A total of 263 sRNA candidates were predicted from the intergenic regions in Mn. Differential expression of sRNA candidates was explored in the wide type Mn with vs without sterol addition, and the steroid intermediate producing Mn strains vs wide type Mn with sterol addition, respectively. Generally, sRNA candidates were differentially expressed in various strains, but there were still some shared candidates with outstandingly upregulated or downregulated expression in these steroid producing strains. Accordingly, four regulatory networks were constructed to reveal the direct and/or indirect interactions between sRNA candidates and their target genes in four groups, including wide type Mn with vs without sterol addition, 9OHAD, ADD, and BNA producing strains vs wide type Mn with sterol addition, respectively. Based on these constructed networks, several highly focused sRNA candidates were discovered to be prevalent in the networks, which showed comprehensive regulatory roles in various cellular processes, including lipid transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, signal transduction, cell envelope biosynthesis and ATP synthesis. To explore the functional role of sRNA candidates in Mn cells, we manipulated the overexpression of candidates 131 and 138 in strain Mn-9OHAD, which led to enhanced production of 9OHAD from 1.5- to 2.3-fold during 6 d' fermentation and a slight effect on growth rate. This study revealed the complex and important regulatory

  17. Fragility of plasma membranes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enriched with different sterols.

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, J A; Rose, A H

    1976-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366, grown under strictly anaerobic conditions to induce requirements for an unsaturated fatty acid (supplied by Tween 80) and a sterol, contained free sterol fractions enriched to the extent of 67 to 93% with the exogenously supplied sterol (campesterol, cholesterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol, 22, 23-dihydrobrassicasterol, beta-sitosterol, or stigmasterol). Cells enriched in any one of the sterols did not differ in volume, growth rate, contents of free sterol, esters and phospholipids, or phospholipid composition. Cholesterol-enriched cells contained about 2% more lipid than cells enriched in any of the other sterols, which was largely accounted for by increased contents of triacylglycerols and, to a lesser extent, esterified sterols. Phospholipids were enriched to the extent of about 52 to 63% with C18:1 residues. Cells enriched in ergosterol or stigmasterol were slightly less susceptible to the action of a wall-digesting basidiomycete glucanase than cells enriched with any one of the other sterols. The capacity of the plasma membrane to resist stretching, as indicated by the stability and volume of spheroplasts suspended in hypotonic solutions of buffered sorbitol (particularly in the range 0.9 to 0.7 M), was greater with spheroplasts enriched in sterols with an unsaturated side chain at C17 (ergosterol or stigmasterol) than with any of the other sterols. Plasma membranes were obtained from spheroplasts enriched in cholesterol or stigmasterol and had free sterol fractions containing 70 and 71%, respectively, of the sterol supplied exogenously to the cells. The sterol-phospholipid molar ratios in these membranes were, respectively, 1:7 and 1:8. PMID:776948

  18. Two families of sterol methyltransferases are involved in the first and the second methylation steps of plant sterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bouvier-Navé, P; Husselstein, T; Benveniste, P

    1998-08-15

    Two methyl transfers are involved in the biosynthesis of 24-methyl and 24-ethyl sterols, which play major roles in plant growth and development. The first methyl transfer applies to cycloartenol, the second to 24-methylene lophenol. About ten cDNA clones encoding S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) sterol methyltransferases (SMTs) have been isolated so far from various plants. According to their deduced amino acid sequences, they were classified in two families, smtl and smt2; in addition, smt2 cDNAs were shown to encode a 24-methylene lophenol C24 methyltransferase [Bouvier-Navé, P., Husselstein, T., Desprez, T. & Benveniste, P. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem. 246, 518-529]. We now report the comparison of two cDNAs isolated from Nicotiana tabacum, Ntsmt1-1 which belongs to the first SMT cDNA family and Ntsmt2-1 which belongs to the second. Both cDNAs were expressed in the yeast null mutant erg6, deficient in SMT. Whereas erg6 is devoid of 24-alkyl sterols, erg6 Ntsmt1-1 contained a majority of 24-methylene sterols and erg6 Ntsmt2-1, a majority of 24-ethylidene sterols, indicating distinct functions for the expression products of these cDNAs. In the presence of AdoMet, delipidated microsomes from erg6 Ntsm1-1 efficiently converted cycloartenol into 24-methylene cycloartanol, but did not produce any 24-ethylidene lophenol upon incubation with 24-methylene lophenol. This demonstrates that cDNA Ntsmt1-1 (and most probably the other plant SMT cDNAs of the first family) encode(s) a cycloartenol C24 methyltransferase. In contrast, delipidated microsomes of erg6 Ntsmt2-1 were shown to methylate preferentially 24-methylene lophenol, as expected from an SMT encoded by an smt2 cDNA. In summary, among various cDNAs isolated from N. tabacum, one (Ntsmt1-1) belongs to the first family of plant SMT cDNAs according to its deduced amino acid sequence and was shown to encode a cycloartenol C24 methyltransferase, whereas another (Ntsmt2-1) belongs to the second family and was shown to encode

  19. New anti-inflammatory sterols from a gorgonian Pinnigorgia sp.

    PubMed

    Su, Yin-Di; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Sung, Ping-Jyun

    2016-07-01

    Chemical investigation on the EtOAc-soluble fraction from the MeOH/DCM extract of a gorgonian Pinnigorgia sp. afforded two new sterols, 11-acetoxy-24S-methyl-3β,5α,6α-trihydroxy-9,11-secocholest-7-en-9-one (1) and 5β,6β-epoxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-8,22-diene-3β,7β-diol (2). The structures of sterols 1 and 2 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their spectroscopic data with those of related analogues. Both 1 and 2 were shown to significantly inhibit the accumulation of the pro-inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Sterol extracts from Begonia Sinensis Rhizome against respiratory inflammation].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yu-shan

    2015-08-01

    The acute and chronic respiratory tract inflammation models were made to investigate the effect and mechanism of sterol extracts from Begonia Sinensis Rhizome (BSR). The first model of acute lung injury was made with Kunming mice by inhaling cigarette smoke, then the mice were treated with different concentrations of BSR sterol extracts. Lung tissue morphology was detected by HE staining, TNF-alpha/MPO were detected by Elisa, and cPLA2 protein were, detected by Western blotting respectively. Results showed that in model group, lung sheet became real, alveolar space shrank or disappeared, alveolar septum was thickened, plenty of inflammatory cells were infiltrated, capillary blood vessels were congestive and the expression of TNF-α, MPO, cPLA2 increased; after administration, a small amount of inflammatory cells were infiltrated, alveolar septum became obvious, capillary congestion status was significantly relieved and the expression of TNF-α, MPO, cPLA2 decreased (P < 0.05). The second model of chronic respiratory tract inflammation in BALB/c mice with bronchial asthma was induced by OVA, then the mice were treated with different concentrations of BSR sterol extracts. Lung tissue morphology was detected by HE staining, indexes such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 were detected by Elisa, and the cPLA2 protein expression was detected by Western blotting respectively. Results showed that in model group, a lot of inflammatory cells around lung vessels and bronchi exuded, bronchial goblet cells proliferated and the expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, cPLA2 increased; after administration, inflammatory and goblet cell hyperplasia reduced, the expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, cPLA2 also decreased (P < 0.05). The above results showed BSR sterol extracts could resist against respiratory inflammation by inhibiting cPLA2 in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. A lanostane triterpenoid and three cholestane sterols from Tilia kiusiana.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Marie; Ozawa, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Kojiro; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Kishida, Akio; Ohsaki, Ayumi

    2014-01-01

    Kiusianins A-D (1-4) were isolated from the leaves of a Japanese endemic plant, Tilia kiusiana, together with 14 known compounds. The structures of a new lanostane-type triterpenoid 1 and three new cholestane-type sterols 2-4 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including two dimensional (2D) NMR. All the compounds isolated were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines, HeLa and HL-60.

  2. Attenuation of Leishmania infantum chagasi metacyclic promastigotes by sterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chaoqun; Gaur Dixit, Upasna; Barker, Jason H; Teesch, Lynn M; Love-Homan, Laurie; Donelson, John E; Wilson, Mary E

    2013-07-01

    The infectious metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania protozoa establish infection in a mammalian host after they are deposited into the dermis by a sand fly vector. Several Leishmania virulence factors promote infection, including the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane-anchored major surface protease (MSP). Metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating reagent, causing a 3-fold reduction in total cellular sterols as well as enhancing MSP release without affecting parasite viability in vitro. MβCD-treated promastigotes were more susceptible to complement-mediated lysis than untreated controls and reduced the parasite load 3-fold when inoculated into BALB/c mice. Paradoxically, MβCD-treated promastigotes caused a higher initial in vitro infection rate in human or murine macrophages than untreated controls, although their intracellular multiplication was hindered upon infection establishment. There was a corresponding larger amount of covalently bound C3b than iC3b on the parasite surfaces of MβCD-treated promastigotes exposed to healthy human serum in vitro, as well as loss of MSP, a protease that enhances C3b cleavage to iC3b. Mass spectrometry showed that MβCD promotes the release of proteins into the extracellular medium, including both MSP and MSP-like protein (MLP), from virulent metacyclic promastigotes. These data support the hypothesis that plasma membrane sterols are important for the virulence of Leishmania protozoa at least in part through retention of membrane virulence proteins.

  3. Attenuation of Leishmania infantum chagasi Metacyclic Promastigotes by Sterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gaur Dixit, Upasna; Barker, Jason H.; Teesch, Lynn M.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The infectious metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania protozoa establish infection in a mammalian host after they are deposited into the dermis by a sand fly vector. Several Leishmania virulence factors promote infection, including the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane-anchored major surface protease (MSP). Metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating reagent, causing a 3-fold reduction in total cellular sterols as well as enhancing MSP release without affecting parasite viability in vitro. MβCD-treated promastigotes were more susceptible to complement-mediated lysis than untreated controls and reduced the parasite load 3-fold when inoculated into BALB/c mice. Paradoxically, MβCD-treated promastigotes caused a higher initial in vitro infection rate in human or murine macrophages than untreated controls, although their intracellular multiplication was hindered upon infection establishment. There was a corresponding larger amount of covalently bound C3b than iC3b on the parasite surfaces of MβCD-treated promastigotes exposed to healthy human serum in vitro, as well as loss of MSP, a protease that enhances C3b cleavage to iC3b. Mass spectrometry showed that MβCD promotes the release of proteins into the extracellular medium, including both MSP and MSP-like protein (MLP), from virulent metacyclic promastigotes. These data support the hypothesis that plasma membrane sterols are important for the virulence of Leishmania protozoa at least in part through retention of membrane virulence proteins. PMID:23630964

  4. Distribution of free and glycosylated sterols within Cycas micronesica plants.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Shaw, Christopher A

    2010-02-02

    Flour derived from Cycas micronesica seeds was once the dominant source of starch for Guam's residents. Cycad consumption has been linked to high incidence of human neurodegenerative diseases. We determined the distribution of the sterols stigmasterol and β-sitosterol and their derived glucosides stigmasterol β-d-glucoside and β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside among various plant parts because they have been identified in cycad flour and have been shown to elicit neurodegenerative outcomes. All four compounds were common in seeds, sporophylls, pollen, leaves, stems, and roots. Roots contained the greatest concentration of both free sterols, and photosynthetic leaflet tissue contained the greatest concentration of both steryl glucosides. Concentration within the three stem tissue categories was low compared to other organs. Reproductive sporophyll tissue contained free sterols similar to seeds, but greater concentration of steryl glucosides than seeds. One of the glucosides was absent from pollen. Concentration in young seeds was higher than old seeds as reported earlier, but concentration did not differ among age categories of leaf, sporophyll, or vascular tissue. The profile differences among the various tissues within these organs may help clarify the physiological role of these compounds.

  5. Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51)

    PubMed Central

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least two obvious features that must be considered upon targeting specific metabolic pathways/enzymes for drug development: the pathway must be essential and the enzyme must allow the design of pharmacologically useful inhibitors. Here, we describe Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14α-demethylase as a promising target for anti-Chagasic chemotherapy. The use of anti-fungal azoles, which block sterol biosynthesis and therefore membrane formation in fungi, against the protozoan parasite has turned out to be highly successful: a broad spectrum anti-fungal drug, the triazole compound posaconazole, is now entering phase II clinical trials for treatment of Chagas disease. This review summarizes comparative information on anti-fungal azoles and novel inhibitory scaffolds selective for Trypanosomatidae sterol 14α-demethylase through the lens of recent structure/functional characterization of the target enzyme. We believe our studies open wide opportunities for rational design of novel, pathogen-specific and therefore more potent and efficient anti-trypanosomal drugs. PMID:21820552

  6. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  7. Dietary phosphilipids and sterols protective against peptic ulceration.

    PubMed

    Tovey, F I; Bardhan, K D; Hobsley, M

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of duodenal ulceration in regions of developing countries with a stable diet is related to the staple food(s) in that diet. A higher prevalence occurs in areas where the diet is principally milled rice, refined wheat or maize, yams, cassava, sweet potato or green bananas, and a lower prevalence in areas where the staple diet is based on unrefined wheat or maize, soya, certain millets or certain pulses. Experiments using animal peptic ulcer models showed that the lipid fraction in foods from the staple diets of low prevalence areas gave protection against both gastric and duodenal ulceration, including ulceration due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and also promoted healing of ulceration. The protective activity was found to lie in the phospholipid, sterol and sterol ester fractions of the lipid. Amongst individual phospholipids present in the phospholipid fraction, phosphatidyl ethanolamine (cephalin) and phosphatidyl choline (Lecithin) predominated. The sterol fraction showing activity contained β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and an unidentified isomer of β-sitosterol. The evidence shows that dietary phytosterols and phospholipids, both individually and in combination, have a protective effect on gastroduodenal mucosa. These findings may prove to be important in the prevention and management of duodenal and gastric ulceration including ulceration due to NSAIDs.

  8. Sterols of Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg6 Knockout Mutant Expressing the Pneumocystis carinii S-Adenosylmethionine:Sterol C-24 Methyltransferase (SAM:SMT)

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Edna S.; Johnston, Laura Q.; Nkinin, Stephenson W.; Romero, Becky I.; Giner, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    The AIDS-associated lung pathogen Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus although Pneumocystis has several distinct features such as the absence of ergosterol, the major sterol of most fungi. The P. carinii S-adenosylmethionine:sterol C24-methyltransferase (SAM:SMT) enzyme, coded by the erg6 gene, transfers either one or two methyl groups to the C-24 position of the sterol side chain producing both C28 and C29 24-alkylsterols in approximately the same proportions whereas most fungal SAM:SMT transfer only one methyl group to the side chain. The sterol compositions of wild type Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the erg6 knockout mutant (Δerg6), and Δerg6 expressing the P. carinii or the S. cerevisiae erg6 gene were analyzed by a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures to examine functional complementation in the yeast expression system. Detailed sterol analyses were obtained using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR). The P. carinii SAM:SMT in the Δerg6 restored its ability to produce the C28 sterol ergosterol as the major sterol, and also resulted in low levels of C29 sterols. This indicates that while the P. carinii SAM:SMT in the yeast Δerg6 cells was able to transfer a second methyl group to the side chain, the action of Δ24(28)-sterol reductase (coded by the erg4 gene) in the yeast cells prevented the formation and accumulation of as many C29 sterols as that found in P. carinii. PMID:25230683

  9. Absence of sterols constrains food quality of cyanobacteria for an invasive freshwater bivalve.

    PubMed

    Basen, Timo; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass may severely affect the performance of aquatic consumers. Here, we investigated the role of sterols in determining the food quality of cyanobacteria for the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea, which has become a common benthic invertebrate in many freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. In standardized growth experiments, juvenile clams were fed mixtures of different cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis, Aphanothece clathrata, Synechococcus elongatus) or sterol-containing eukaryotic algae (Cryptomonas sp., Nannochloropsis limnetica, Scenedesmus obliquus). In addition, the cyanobacterial food was supplemented with different sterols. We provide evidence that somatic growth of C. fluminea on cyanobacterial diets is constrained by the absence of sterols, as indicated by a growth-enhancing effect of sterol supplementation. Thus, our findings contribute to our understanding of the consequences of cyanobacterial mass developments for benthic consumers and highlight the importance of considering sterols as potentially limiting nutrients in aquatic food webs.

  10. Nitrile-converting enzymes as a tool to improve biocatalysis in organic synthesis: recent insights and promises.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jin-Song; Shi, Jin-Song; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Li, Heng; Zhou, Zhe-Min; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Nitrile-converting enzymes, including nitrilase and nitrile hydratase (NHase), have received increasing attention from researchers of industrial biocatalysis because of their critical role as a tool in organic synthesis of carboxylic acids and amides from nitriles. To date, these bioconversion approaches are considered as one of the most potential industrial processes using resting cells or purified enzymes as catalysts for production of food additives, pharmaceutical, and agrochemical precursors. This review focuses on the distribution and catalytic mechanism research of nitrile-converting enzymes in recent years. Molecular biology aspects to improve the biocatalytic performance of microbial nitrilase and NHase are demonstrated. The process developments of microbial nitrilase and NHase for organic synthesis are also discussed.

  11. A mathematical model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 cholesterol biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bonhi S; Sweby, Peter K; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Jackson, Kim G; Tindall, Marcus J

    2014-05-21

    Cholesterol is one of the key constituents for maintaining the cellular membrane and thus the integrity of the cell itself. In contrast high levels of cholesterol in the blood are known to be a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. We formulate a deterministic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) cholesterol genetic regulatory pathway in a hepatocyte. The mathematical model includes a description of genetic transcription by SREBP-2 which is subsequently translated to mRNA leading to the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), a main regulator of cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol synthesis subsequently leads to the regulation of SREBP-2 via a negative feedback formulation. Parameterised with data from the literature, the model is used to understand how SREBP-2 transcription and regulation affects cellular cholesterol concentration. Model stability analysis shows that the only positive steady-state of the system exhibits purely oscillatory, damped oscillatory or monotic behaviour under certain parameter conditions. In light of our findings we postulate how cholesterol homeostasis is maintained within the cell and the advantages of our model formulation are discussed with respect to other models of genetic regulation within the literature.

  12. A mathematical model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 cholesterol biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bonhi S.; Sweby, Peter K.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Jackson, Kim G.; Tindall, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the key constituents for maintaining the cellular membrane and thus the integrity of the cell itself. In contrast high levels of cholesterol in the blood are known to be a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. We formulate a deterministic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) cholesterol genetic regulatory pathway in a hepatocyte. The mathematical model includes a description of genetic transcription by SREBP-2 which is subsequently translated to mRNA leading to the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), a main regulator of cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol synthesis subsequently leads to the regulation of SREBP-2 via a negative feedback formulation. Parameterised with data from the literature, the model is used to understand how SREBP-2 transcription and regulation affects cellular cholesterol concentration. Model stability analysis shows that the only positive steady-state of the system exhibits purely oscillatory, damped oscillatory or monotic behaviour under certain parameter conditions. In light of our findings we postulate how cholesterol homeostasis is maintained within the cell and the advantages of our model formulation are discussed with respect to other models of genetic regulation within the literature. PMID:24444765

  13. Bilayer Interactions among Unsaturated Phospholipids, Sterols, and Ceramide.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J Peter; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Engberg, Oskar; Al Sazzad, Md Abdullah; Hautala, Victor; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Murata, Michio

    2017-04-25

    Using differential scanning calorimetry and lifetime analysis of trans-parinaric acid fluorescence, we have examined how cholesterol and cholesteryl phosphocholine (CholPC) affect gel-phase properties of palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleyol-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. By (2)H NMR, we also measured fluid-phase interactions among these lipids using deuterated analogs of POPC, PCer, and cholesterol. The PCer-rich gel phase in POPC bilayers (9:1 molar ratio of POPC to PCer) was partially and similarly dissolved (and thermostability decreased) by both cholesterol and CholPC (sterol was present equimolar to PCer, or in fourfold excess). In DOPC bilayers (4:1 DOPC/PCer molar ratio), CholPC was much more efficient in dissolving the PCer-rich gel phase when compared to cholesterol. This can be interpreted as indicating that PCer interaction with POPC was stronger than PCer interaction with DOPC. PCer-CholPC interactions were also more favored in DOPC bilayers compared to POPC bilayers. In the fluid POPC-rich phase, cholesterol increased the order of the acyl chain of d2-PCer much more than did CholPC. In DOPC-rich fluid bilayers, both cholesterol and CholPC increased d2-PCer acyl chain order, and the ordering induced by CholPC was more efficient in DOPC than in POPC bilayers. In fluid POPC bilayers, the ordering of 3-d1-cholesterol by PCer was weak. In summary, we found that in the gel phase, sterol effects on the PCer-rich gel phase were markedly influenced by the acyl chain composition of the fluid PC. The same was true for fluid-phase interactions involving the sterols. Our results further suggest that PCer did not display high affinity toward either of the sterols used. We conclude that the nature of unsaturated phospholipids (POPC versus DOPC) in bilayers has major effects on the properties of ceramide gel phases and on sterol-ceramide-phospholipid interactions in such complex bilayers

  14. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Brown, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. PMID:26729489

  15. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark

    2016-02-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice.

  16. New insights on the synthesis and electronic transport in bulk polycrystalline Pr-doped SrTiO{sub 3−δ}

    SciTech Connect

    Dehkordi, Arash Mehdizadeh; Bhattacharya, Sriparna; Darroudi, Taghi; Alshareef, Husam N.; Tritt, Terry M.

    2015-02-07

    Recently, we have reported a significant enhancement in the electronic and thermoelectric properties of bulk polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics via praseodymium doping. This improvement was originated from the simultaneous enhancement in the thermoelectric power factor and reduction in thermal conductivity, which was contributed to the non-uniform distribution of Pr dopants. In order to further understand the underlying mechanism, we herein investigate the role of praseodymium doping source (Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} versus Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}) on the synthesis and electronic transport in Pr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics. It was observed that the high-temperature electronic transport properties are independent of the choice of praseodymium doping source for samples prepared following our synthesis strategy. Theoretical calculations were also performed in order to estimate the maximum achievable power factor and the corresponding optimal carrier concentration. The result suggests the possibility of further improvement of the power factor. This study should shed some light on the superior electronic transport in bulk polycrystalline Pr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics and provide new insight on further improvement of the thermoelectric power factor.

  17. The physiology of sterol nutrition in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; T Behmer, Spencer; Lin, George G; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Douglas, Angela E

    2012-11-01

    The phloem sap of fava bean (Vicia faba) plants utilized by the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains three sterols, cholesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol, in a 2:2:1 ratio. To investigate the nutritional value of these sterols, pea aphids were reared on chemically-defined diets containing each sterol at 0.1, 1 and 10μgml(-1) with a sterol-free diet as control. Larval growth rate and aphid lifespan did not vary significantly across the diets, indicating that sterol reserves can buffer some performance indices against a shortfall in dietary sterol over at least one generation. However, lifetime reproductive output was depressed in aphids on diets containing stigmasterol or no sterol, relative to diets supplemented with cholesterol or sitosterol. The cholesterol density of embryos in teneral adults was significantly higher than in the total body; and the number and biomass of embryos in aphids on diets with stigmasterol and no sterols were reduced relative to diets with cholesterol or sitosterol, indicating that the reproductive output of the pea aphid can be limited by the amount and composition of dietary sterol. In a complementary RNA-seq analysis of pea aphids reared on plants and diets with different sterol contents, 7.6% of the 17,417 detected gene transcripts were differentially expressed. Transcript abundance of genes with annotated function in sterol utilization did not vary significantly among treatments, suggesting that the metabolic response to dietary sterol may be mediated primarily at the level of enzyme function or metabolite concentration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors affecting intestinal absorption of cholesterol and plant sterols and stanols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Various factors affect intestinal absorption of cholesterol and plant sterols and stanols. Plant sterols and stanols are generally less absorptive than cholesterol. Differential absorption rates among various plant sterols and stanols have been also reported. Although it was suggested that differential absorption among cholesterol and various plant sterols was determined by difference in excretion rates of sterols and stanols through ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) G5/ABCG8 of intestinal cells, our study suggests that affinity for and solubility in bile salt micelles can be important determinants for differential absorption of plant sterols and stanols. It was also suggested that plant sterols were transiently incorporated into intestinal cells and then excreted to intestinal lumen through ABCG5/ABCG8. However, in a rat study, transient incorporation of sitosterol into intestinal cells was not observed, suggesting that sitosterol is differentiated from cholesterol at the incorporation site of intestinal cells. It is well established that plant sterols inhibit intestinal absorption of cholesterol and exert a hypocholesterolemic activity. Plant sterols are solubilized in bile salt micelles as cholesterol. Our study clearly showed that because the sterol-solubilizing capacity of bile salt micelles was limited, plant sterols solubilized in micelles reduced the solubility of cholesterol. This can be the major cause of inhibition of cholesterol absorption by plant sterols. Pancreatic cholesterol esterase accelerates intestinal absorption of unesterified cholesterol. Although it was suggested that cholesterol esterase accelerated esterification of cholesterol incorporated into intestinal cells and acted as a transporter at the surface of intestinal cells, our research revealed that the accelerated cholesterol absorption was caused by hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in bile salt micelles. It is thought that hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine reduces the affinity of

  19. Bioactive sterols from marine resources and their potential benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Van Ta, Quang

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive agents from marine resources have shown their valuable health beneficial effects. Therefore, increase knowledge on novel functional ingredients with biological activities from marine animal and microbe has gained much attention. Sterols are recognized as potential in development functional food ingredients and pharmaceutical agents. Marine resources, with a great diversity, can be a very interesting natural resource of sterols. This chapter focuses on biological activities of marine animal and microbe sterols with potential health beneficial applications in functional foods and pharmaceuticals.

  20. Key principles for a national clinical decision support knowledge sharing framework: synthesis of insights from leading subject matter experts

    PubMed Central

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Lewis, Janet; Bell, Douglas S; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify key principles for establishing a national clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge sharing framework. Materials and methods As part of an initiative by the US Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) to establish a framework for national CDS knowledge sharing, key stakeholders were identified. Stakeholders' viewpoints were obtained through surveys and in-depth interviews, and findings and relevant insights were summarized. Based on these insights, key principles were formulated for establishing a national CDS knowledge sharing framework. Results Nineteen key stakeholders were recruited, including six executives from electronic health record system vendors, seven executives from knowledge content producers, three executives from healthcare provider organizations, and three additional experts in clinical informatics. Based on these stakeholders' insights, five key principles were identified for effectively sharing CDS knowledge nationally. These principles are (1) prioritize and support the creation and maintenance of a national CDS knowledge sharing framework; (2) facilitate the development of high-value content and tooling, preferably in an open-source manner; (3) accelerate the development or licensing of required, pragmatic standards; (4) acknowledge and address medicolegal liability concerns; and (5) establish a self-sustaining business model. Discussion Based on the principles identified, a roadmap for national CDS knowledge sharing was developed through the ONC's Advancing CDS initiative. Conclusion The study findings may serve as a useful guide for ongoing activities by the ONC and others to establish a national framework for sharing CDS knowledge and improving clinical care. PMID:22865671

  1. Progress and prospective of plant sterol and plant stanol research: report of the Maastricht meeting.

    PubMed

    Plat, J; Mackay, D; Baumgartner, S; Clifton, P M; Gylling, H; Jones, P J H

    2012-12-01

    Abundant evidence over past decades shows that foods with added plant sterols and plant stanols lower serum LDL cholesterol concentrations. However, despite the overwhelming data, numerous scientific questions still remain. The objective of this paper is to summarize the considerations of 60 academic and industrial experts who participated in the scientific meeting in Maastricht, the Netherlands, on issues related to the health effects of plant sterols and plant stanols. The meeting participants discussed issues including efficacy profiling, heterogeneity in responsiveness, effects beyond LDL-C lowering, and food formulation aspects of plant sterol and stanol consumption. Furthermore, aspects related to the potential atherogenicity of elevated circulatory plant sterol concentrations were discussed. Until the potential atherogenicity of plant sterols is resolved, based on the results >200 clinical trials, the risk to benefit of plant sterol use is favorable. Evidence on these topics in plant sterol and plant stanol research was presented and used to reach consensus where possible. It was concluded that endpoint studies looking at plant sterol and plant stanol efficacy are needed, however, there was no clear opinion on the best marker and best design for such a study. Based on the current scientific evidence, plant sterols and plant stanols are recommended for use as dietary options to lower serum cholesterol. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Sterols in Qingmuguan Underground River].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Shen, Li-cheng; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang Mei; LIAO, Yu; Xie, Zheng-lan; Zhang, Yuan-zhu

    2015-11-01

    Water samples were collected from the Qinmuguan underground river from July to November in 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), dissolved sterols were quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the average variation content of dissolved sterols ranges from 415 to 629 ng x L(-1), with the increasing migration distance of dissolved sterols in underground river, its contents are decreased. Between the inlet and outlet of Qingmuguan underground river, the average variation contents of dissolved sterol are between 724 and 374 ng x L(-1), and the average variation ratios of the content of stigmasterol with cholesterol range from 0.29 to 0.12. In short, their values are decreased accompanied by the increasing migration distance of underground river. The composing component in dissolved sterols varied differently between July to December, and the main component of dissolved sterols is cholesterin, the ratios of the content of dissolved sterols with cholesterin to the total dissolved sterols range from 37.30% to 94.85%. In addition, the ratios of the content of dissolved sterols with coprostanol to cholesterin, coprostanol to cholesterin are below 0.2 respectively, indicating the water quality of underground river is not contaminated by domestic sewage, but with the passage of time water quality tends to deterioration.

  3. Increased plant sterol deposition in vascular tissue characterizes patients with severe aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luister, Alexandra; Schött, Hans Frieder; Husche, Constanze; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Plat, Jogchum; Gräber, Stefan; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich; Weingärtner, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between phytosterols, oxyphytosterols, and other markers of cholesterol metabolism and concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement. Markers of cholesterol metabolism (plant sterols and cholestanol as markers of cholesterol absorption and lathosterol as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis) and oxyphytosterols were determined in plasma and aortic valve tissue from 104 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis (n=68 statin treatment; n=36 no statin treatment) using gas chromatography-flame ionization and mass spectrometry. The extent of CAD was determined by coronary angiography prior to aortic valve replacement. Patients treated with statins were characterized by lower plasma cholesterol, cholestanol, and lathosterol concentrations. However, statin treatment did not affect the sterol concentrations in cardiovascular tissue. The ratio of campesterol-to-cholesterol was increased by 0.46±0.34μg/mg (26.0%) in plasma of patients with CAD. The absolute values for the cholesterol absorption markers sitosterol and campesterol were increased by 18.18±11.59ng/mg (38.8%) and 11.40±8.69ng/mg (30.4%) in the tissues from patients with documented CAD compared to those without concomitant CAD. Campesterol oxides were increased by 0.06±0.02ng/mg (17.1%) in the aortic valve cusps and oxidized sitosterol-to-cholesterol ratios were up-regulated by 0.35±0.2ng/mg (22.7%) in the plasma of patients with CAD. Of note, neither cholestanol nor the ratio of cholestanol-to-cholesterol was associated with CAD. Patients with concomitant CAD are characterized by increased deposition of plant sterols, but not cholestanol in aortic valve tissue. Moreover, patients with concomitant CAD were characterized by increased oxyphytosterol concentrations in plasma and aortic valve cusps.

  4. Ultrasonic biodiesel synthesis from crude Jatropha curcas oil with heterogeneous base catalyst: mechanistic insight and statistical optimization.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Goswami, Partha Pratim; Malani, Ritesh S; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports studies in ultrasound-assisted heterogeneous solid catalyzed (CaO) synthesis of biodiesel from crude Jatropha curcas oil. The synthesis has been carried out in two stages, viz. esterification and trans-esterification. The esterification process is not influenced by ultrasound. The transesterification process, however, shows marked enhancement with ultrasound. A statistical experimental design has been used to optimize the process conditions for the synthesis. XRD analysis confirms formation of Ca(OMe)2, which is the active catalyst for transesterification reaction. The optimum values of parameters for the highest yield of transesterification have been determined as follows: alcohol to oil molar ratio ≈ 11, catalyst concentration ≈ 5.5 wt.%, and temperature ≈ 64°C. The activation energy of the reaction is calculated as 133.5 kJ/mol. The heterogeneity of the system increases mass transfer constraints resulting in approx. 4 × increase in activation energy as compared to homogeneous alkali catalyzed system. It is also revealed that intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound enhances the mass transfer characteristics of the system with ∼ 20% reduction in activation energy, as compared to mechanically agitated systems. Influence of catalyst concentration and alcohol to oil molar ratio on the transesterification yield is inter-linked through formation of methoxy ions and their diffusion to the oil-alcohol interface, which in turn is determined by the volume fractions of the two phases in the reaction mixture. As a result, the highest transesterification yield is obtained at the moderate values of catalyst concentration and alcohol to oil molar ratio.

  5. Dead biomass of Amazon yeast: A new insight into bioremediation and recovery of silver by intracellular synthesis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Marcia R; Ando, Rômulo A; Nascimento, Cláudio A Oller; Corrêa, Benedito

    2017-09-19

    This investigation was undertaken to describe a natural process for the removal of silver and the simultaneous recovery of Ag/Ag2O nanoparticles by dead biomass of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The removal of silver ions from aqueous solution and the synthesis of Ag/Ag2O nanoparticles were analyzed based on physicochemical factors and equilibrium concentration, combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A successful process for the synthesis of Ag/Ag2O nanoparticles was obtained, following the Langmuir isotherm model, showing a high biosorption capacity of silver (49.0 mg g(-1)). The nanoparticles were spherical, had an average size of 11.0 nm, were synthesized intracellularly and capped by yeast proteins. This sustainable protocol is an attractive platform for the industrial-scale production of silver nanoparticles and of a silver nanobiosorbent.

  6. Effect of temperature on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol: new insights into the reduction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitas-Salazar, Noralvis; Silva-Campa, Erika; Pedroso-Santana, Seidy; Tanori, Judith; Pedroza-Montero, Martín R.; Riera, Raúl

    2017-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules act as a reducing and stabilizing agent in the formation of silver nanoparticles. PEG undergoes thermal oxidative degradation at temperatures over 70 °C in the presence of oxygen. Here, we studied how the temperature and an oxidizing atmosphere could affect the synthesis of silver nanoparticles with PEG. We tested different AgNO3 concentrations for nanoparticles syntheses using PEG of low molecular weight, at 60 and 100 °C. At the higher temperature, the reducing action of PEG increased and the effect of PEG/Ag+ ratio on nanoparticles aggregation changed. These results suggest that different synthesis mechanisms operate at 60 and 100 °C. Thus, at 60 °C the reduction of silver ions can occur through the oxidation of the hydroxyl groups of PEG, as has been previously reported. We propose that the thermal oxidative degradation of PEG at 100 °C increases the number of both, functional groups and molecules that can reduce silver ions and stabilize silver nanoparticles. This degradation process could explain the enhancement of PEG reducing action observed by other authors when they increase the reaction temperature or use a PEG of higher molecular weight

  7. Impact of ice melting on distribution of particulate sterols in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H.; Riquelme, Pablo; Pantoja, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed variability in abundance and composition of sterols in waters of the fjord adjacent to glacier Jorge Montt, one of the fastest retreated glaciers in Patagonian Icefields. The study was carried out between August 2012 and November 2013 under different meltwater scenarios. Distribution of sterols in surface and bottom waters was determined by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry. Sterol concentration ranged from 18 to 1726 ng/L in surface and bottom waters and was positive correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. Under high melting conditions in austral summer, surface meltwaters showed high concentrations of sterols and were dominated by methylene-cholesterol, a representative sterol of centric diatoms. In the area near open ocean and in austral autumn, winter and spring in proglacial fjord, lower sterol concentrations in surface waters were accompanied by other microalgae sterols and an increase in relative abundance of plant sterols, evidencing a different source of organic matter. In autumn, when high meltwater flux was also evidenced, presence of stanols and an uncommon tri-unsaturated sterol suggests influence of meltwaters in composition of sterols in the downstream fjord. We conclude that ice melting can modify sterol composition by setting conditions for development of a singular phytoplankton population able to thrive in surface meltwater and by carrying glacier organic matter into Patagonian glacial fjords. In projected ice melting scenario, these changes in organic matter quantity and quality can potentially affect availability of organic substrates for heterotrophic activity and trophic status of glacial fjords. This research was funded by COPAS Sur-Austral (PFB-31)

  8. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  9. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-14

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome.

  10. Insights into polymer versus oligosaccharide synthesis: mutagenesis and mechanistic studies of a novel levansucrase from Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Homann, Arne; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Götze, Sven; Jahn, Dieter; Seibel, Jürgen

    2007-10-15

    A novel levansucrase was identified in the supernatant of a cell culture of Bacillus megaterium DSM319. In order to test for the contribution of specific amino acid residues to levansucrase catalysis, the wild-type enzyme along with 16 variants based on sequence alignments and structural information were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were characterized kinetically and the product spectrum of each variant was determined. Comparison of the X-ray structures of the levansucrases from Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus in conjunction with the corresponding product spectra identified crucial amino acid residues responsible for product specificity and catalysis. Highly conserved regions such as the previously described RDP and DXXER motifs were identified as being important. Two crucial structural differences localized at amino acid residues Arg370 and Asn252 were of high relevance in polymer compared with oligosaccharide synthesis.

  11. Scalable Synthesis of Efficient Water Oxidation Catalysts: Insights into the Activity of Flame-Made Manganese Oxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanyu; Hall, Jeremy; Nasiri, Noushin; Gengenbach, Thomas; Spiccia, Leone; Cheah, Mun Hon; Tricoli, Antonio

    2015-12-21

    Chemical energy storage by water splitting is a promising solution for the utilization of renewable energy in numerous currently impracticable needs, such as transportation and high temperature processing. Here, the synthesis of efficient ultra-fine Mn3O4 water oxidation catalysts with tunable specific surface area is demonstrated by a scalable one-step flame-synthesis process. The water oxidation performance of these flame-made structures is compared with pure Mn2O3 and Mn5O8, obtained by post-calcination of as-prepared Mn3O4 (115 m(2)  g(-1)), and commercial iso-structural polymorphs, probing the effect of the manganese oxidation state and synthetic route. The structural properties of the manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated by XRD, FTIR, high-resolution TEM, and XPS. It is found that these flame-made nanostructures have substantially higher activity, reaching up to 350 % higher surface-specific turnover frequency (0.07 μmolO2  m(-2)  s(-1)) than commercial nanocrystals (0.02 μmolO2  m(-2)  s(-1)), and production of up to 0.33 mmolO2  molMn (-1)  s(-1). Electrochemical characterization confirmed the high water oxidation activity of these catalysts with an initial current density of 10 mA cm(-2) achieved with overpotentials between 0.35 and 0.50 V in 1 m NaOH electrolyte. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase activity in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is associated with an unusual member of the CYP51 gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, David C; Fowler, Kay; Kieser, Tobias; Manning, Nigel; Podust, Larissa M; Waterman, Michael R; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2002-01-01

    The annotation of the genome sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) revealed a cytochrome P450 (CYP) resembling various sterol 14alpha-demethylases (CYP51). The putative CYP open reading frame (SC7E4.20) was cloned with a tetrahistidine tag appended to the C-terminus and expressed in Escherichia coli. Protein purified to electrophoretic homogeneity was observed to bind the 14-methylated sterols lanosterol and 24-methylene-24,25-dihydrolanosterol (24-MDL). Reconstitution experiments with E. coli reductase partners confirmed activity in 14alpha-demethylation for 24-MDL, but not lanosterol. An S. coelicolor A3(2) mutant containing a transposon insertion in the CYP51 gene, which will abolish synthesis of the functional haemoprotein, was isolated as a viable strain, the first time a CYP51 has been identified as non-essential. The role of this CYP in bacteria is intriguing. No sterol product was detected in non-saponifiable cell extracts of the parent S. coelicolor A3(2) strain or of the mutant. S. coelicolor A3(2) CYP51 contains very few of the conserved CYP51 residues and, even though it can catalyse 14alpha-demethylation, it probably has another function in Streptomyces. We propose that it is a member of a new CYP51 subfamily. PMID:12023899

  13. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  14. Altered sterol profile induced in Leishmania amazonensis by a natural dihydroxymethoxylated chalcone

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio; Sampaio-Santos, Maria Isabel; Buckner, Frederick S.; Yokoyama, Kohei; Gelb, Michael; Urbina, Julio A.; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The effects of the antileishmanial chalcone 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (DMC) on Leishmania amazonensis sterol composition and biosynthesis were investigated to obtain information about the mechanism of growth inhibition by DMC on this parasite. Methods The interference of sterol biosynthesis by DMC was studied in drug-treated promastigotes by two different methods. (i) Newly synthesized sterols from parasites grown in the presence of [3H]mevalonate were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC)/fluorography. (ii) Total sterols extracted from the parasites grown with or without DMC were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). Results TLC and GC/MS analyses of sterols extracted from DMC-treated promastigotes revealed the accumulation of early precursors and a reduction in the levels of C-14 demethylated and C-24 alkylated sterols, as well as a reduction in exogenous cholesterol uptake. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the natural chalcone DMC alters the sterol composition of L. amazonensis and suggests that the parasite target is different from other known sterol inhibitors. PMID:19176591

  15. Sterols as biomarkers in the surface microlayer of the estuarine areas.

    PubMed

    Alsalahi, Murad Ali; Latif, Mohd Talib; Ali, Masni Mohd; Dominick, Doreena; Khan, Md Firoz; Mustaffa, Nur Ili Hamizah; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Nasher, Essam; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2015-04-15

    This study aims to determine the concentration of sterols used as biomarkers in the surface microlayer (SML) in estuarine areas of the Selangor River, Malaysia. Samples were collected during different seasons through the use of a rotation drum. The analysis of sterols was performed using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID). The results showed that the concentrations of total sterols in the SML ranged from 107.06 to 505.55 ng L(-1). The total sterol concentration was found to be higher in the wet season. Cholesterol was found to be the most abundant sterols component in the SML. The diagnostic ratios of sterols show the influence of natural sources and waste on the contribution of sterols in the SML. Further analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct inputs of sterols derived from human activity (40.58%), terrigenous and plant inputs (22.59%) as well as phytoplankton and marine inputs (17.35%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The acquisition of plant sterols, mediated via elicitins, is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. In this paper, we looked at the interaction between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. When ground leaf tissue was added to growth media, P. ramorum growth and sporulation was greates...

  17. Sterols of the green-pigmented, aberrant plastid dinoflagellate, Lepidodinium chlorophorum (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Leblond, Jeffrey D; Lasiter, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Lepidodinium chlorophorum is a green-pigmented dinoflagellate with an aberrant, tertiary plastid of chlorophyte ancestry rather than the typical red algal, secondary endosymbiont found in the vast majority of photosynthetic dinoflagellates. To date, only one published study exists on the galactolipids of L. chlorophorum, with nothing known about other lipid classes, including sterols. Our objectives were to examine the sterol composition of L. chlorophorum to determine if it produces any unique sterols with the potential to serve as biomarkers, and to compare it to members of the Chlorophyceae to determine if it has inherited any signature green algal sterols from its chlorophyte-derived endosymbiont. We have found that L. chlorophorum produces 6 sterols, all with a 4α-methyl substituent and none of which are known to occur in the Chlorophyceae. Rather, the sterols produced by L. chlorophorum place it within a group of dinoflagellates that have the common dinoflagellate sterols, dinosterol and dinostanol, as part of their sterol composition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Specific Sterols Required for the Internalization Step of Endocytosis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Alan L.; Heese-Peck, Antje; Stevenson, Brian J.; Pichler, Harald; Riezman, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Sterols are major components of the plasma membrane, but their functions in this membrane are not well understood. We isolated a mutant defective in the internalization step of endocytosis in a gene (ERG2) encoding a C-8 sterol isomerase that acts in the late part of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. In the absence of Erg2p, yeast cells accumulate sterols structurally different from ergosterol, which is the major sterol in wild-type yeast. To investigate the structural requirements of ergosterol for endocytosis in more detail, several erg mutants (erg2Δ, erg6Δ, and erg2Δerg6Δ) were made. Analysis of fluid phase and receptor-mediated endocytosis indicates that changes in the sterol composition lead to a defect in the internalization step. Vesicle formation and fusion along the secretory pathway were not strongly affected in the ergΔ mutants. The severity of the endocytic defect correlates with changes in sterol structure and with the abundance of specific sterols in the ergΔ mutants. Desaturation of the B ring of the sterol molecules is important for the internalization step. A single desaturation at C-8,9 was not sufficient to support internalization at 37°C whereas two double bonds, either at C-5,6 and C-7,8 or at C-5,6 and C-8,9, allowed internalization. PMID:10564282

  19. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D; Andersen, Tonni G; Pomorski, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S. cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Yeast Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  20. Sterol metabolism in the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches, a legume root pathogen.

    PubMed

    Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Gaulin, Elodie; Dumas, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are isoprenoid-derived molecules that have essential functions in eukaryotes but whose metabolism remains largely unknown in a large number of organisms. Oomycetes are fungus-like microorganisms that are evolutionarily related to stramenopile algae, a large group of organisms for which no sterol metabolic pathway has been reported. Here, we present data that support a model of sterol biosynthesis in Aphanomyces euteiches, an oomycete species causing devastating diseases in legume crops. In silico analyses were performed to identify genes encoding enzymes involved in the conversion of the isoprenoid precursor 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A to isoprenoids. Several metabolic intermediates and two major sterol end-products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We show that A. euteiches is able to produce fucosterol (a sterol initially identified in brown algae) and cholesterol (the major animal sterol). Mycelium development is inhibited by two sterol demethylase inhibitors used as fungicides, namely tebuconazole and epoxiconazole. We propose the first sterol biosynthetic pathway identified in a stramenopile species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed close relationships between A. euteiches enzyme sequences and those found in stramenopile algae, suggesting that part of this pathway could be conserved in the Stramenopila kingdom.

  1. Applying Clustering and Phylogeny Analysis to Study Dinoflagellates based on Sterol Composition.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sterol compositions of dinoflagellates have been studied for several decades as a means of assessing whether certain species possess unique chemical biomarkers. However, no attempt has been made to compile the results from numerous studies to examine how sterol compositions may relate to the phylog...

  2. Processes of recovering fatty acids and sterols from tall oil pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R. E.

    1985-06-18

    An improved process of enhancing the recovery of fatty acids from tall oil pitch is disclosed. The process includes a hydrolysis step for increasing the free fatty acid available for recovery from tall oil pitch during the distillation process. The hydrolysis step also enables the recovery of sterols where the tall oil pitch is of the type which is rich in sterol esters.

  3. Characterization by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of sterols in saccharomyces cerevisiae during autolysis.

    PubMed

    Le Fur, Y; Maume, G; Feuillat, M; Maume, B F

    1999-07-01

    Yeast autolysis affects membrane stability and induces a release of vacuolar enzymes into the cell cytoplasm. Consecutively, it was important to study the evolution of sterol content in Saccharomycescerevisiae for a fourteen day period of accelerated autolysis. Unesterified and esterified sterols were analyzed both in the biomass and in the autolysis medium. Ten sterols were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A second group of six sterols was separated and partially characterized. Among the first group of 10 sterols, a dehydroergosterol was identified as ergosta-5, 7,9(11),22-tetraen-3beta-ol, not yet charaterized in S. cerevisiae. Yeast autolysis induced a decrease of esterified sterol content, especially first intermediates in the sequence of the ergosterol biosynthesis, as zymosterol. In contrast, the yeast autolysis resulted in the release of a low quantity of sterols into the medium. At the end of the fourteenth day of autolysis, 0.015% of the total sterol content of the initial biomass was found in the medium.

  4. Inhaled tobacco sterols: uptake by the lungs and disposition to selected organs of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, W.E.; Maier, J.M.; Liebler, J.M.; Malinow, M.R.

    1988-08-01

    Tobacco sterols (cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) are present in tobacco smoke and appear in plasma of mammals exposed to cigarette smoke. Because tobacco sterols may be important in the pathogenesis of smoking-induced lung and vascular diseases, we studied the pattern of deposition of cigarette sterols in the lungs and appearance of cigarette sterols in plasma and body organs of rats. After exposure to twenty 5 ml puffs of smoke from tobacco labeled with (4-/sup 14/C)cholesterol or beta-(4-/sup 14/C)sitosterol, rats were killed just after exposure (day 0) and on days 2, 5, 8, 11, 15, and 30, and the lungs and selected body organs analyzed for activity. We found that cigarette sterols are associated with particulates in cigarette smoke, deposited mostly in distal airspaces and parenchyma of the lungs, and appear in plasma and several body organs for more than 30 days after this single exposure to cigarette smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained relatively small amounts of radiolabel for only the first few days, suggesting that most of the sterols were rapidly incorporated in lung parenchyma. Because disorders of sterol metabolism have been implicated in a variety of diseases including atherosclerosis and cancer, the significance of tobacco sterols to human smoking-induced diseases deserves further study.

  5. Sterol targeting drugs reveal life cycle stage-specific differences in trypanosome lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aabha I; Olson, Cheryl L; Mamede, João I; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Epting, Conrad L; Almeida, Igor C; Engman, David M

    2017-08-22

    Cilia play important roles in cell signaling, facilitated by the unique lipid environment of a ciliary membrane containing high concentrations of sterol-rich lipid rafts. The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a single-celled eukaryote with a single cilium/flagellum. We tested whether flagellar sterol enrichment results from selective flagellar partitioning of specific sterol species or from general enrichment of all sterols. While all sterols are enriched in the flagellum, cholesterol is especially enriched. T. brucei cycles between its mammalian host (bloodstream cell), in which it scavenges cholesterol, and its tsetse fly host (procyclic cell), in which it both scavenges cholesterol and synthesizes ergosterol. We wondered whether the insect and mammalian life cycle stages possess chemically different lipid rafts due to different sterol utilization. Treatment of bloodstream parasites with cholesterol-specific methyl-β-cyclodextrin disrupts both membrane liquid order and localization of a raft-associated ciliary membrane calcium sensor. Treatment with ergosterol-specific amphotericin B does not. The opposite results were observed with ergosterol-rich procyclic cells. Further, these agents have opposite effects on flagellar sterol enrichment and cell metabolism in the two life cycle stages. These findings illuminate differences in the lipid rafts of an organism employing life cycle-specific sterols and have implications for treatment.

  6. A potential biochemical mechanism underlying the influence of sterol deprivation stress on Caenorhabditis elegans longevity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism for sterol-mediated alteration in aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we established sterol depletion conditions by treating worms with azacoprostane, which reduced mean lifespan of adult C. elegans by 35%. Proteomic analyses of egg proteins from treated and un...

  7. Surfactants and Sterols Concentrations in the Surface Microlayer of the Estuarine Areas of Selangor River, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. T.; Alsalahi, M. A.; Ali, M. M.; Dominick, D.; Khan, M. F.; Wahid, N. B. A.; Mustaffa, N. I. H.

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the concentration of surfactant and sterols as biomarkers in the surface microlayer (SML) in estuarine areas of the Selangor River, Malaysia. SML samples were collected during different seasons using a rotation drum method. The compositions of surfactants were determined as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and disulphine blue active substances (DBAS) as anionic and cationic surfactants respectively. The concentration of sterols was determined using a gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The results show that the concentrations of surfactants around the estuarine area were dominated by anionic surfactants (MBAS) with average concentrations of 0.39 µmol L-1. .The concentrations of total sterols in the SML ranged from 107.06 to 505.55 ng L-1. The surfactants and total sterol concentrations were found to be higher in the wet season compare to dry season. Cholesterol was found to be the most abundant sterols component in the SML of the Selangor River. The diagnostic ratios of sterols show the influence of natural sources and waste on the contribution of sterols in the SML. Further analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct inputs of sterols derived from human activity (40.58%), terrigenous and plant inputs (22.59%) as well as phytoplankton and marine inputs (17.35%).

  8. Regulation of Sterol Biosynthesis in the Human Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus: Opportunities for Therapeutic Development

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Sourabh; Cramer, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Sterols are a major component of eukaryotic cell membranes. For human fungal infections caused by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, antifungal drugs that target sterol biosynthesis and/or function remain the standard of care. Yet, an understanding of A. fumigatus sterol biosynthesis regulatory mechanisms remains an under developed therapeutic target. The critical role of sterol biosynthesis regulation and its interactions with clinically relevant azole drugs is highlighted by the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) class of transcription factors known as Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs regulate transcription of key ergosterol biosynthesis genes in fungi including A. fumigatus. In addition, other emerging regulatory pathways and target genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and drug interactions provide additional opportunities including the unfolded protein response, iron responsive transcriptional networks, and chaperone proteins such as Hsp90. Thus, targeting molecular pathways critical for sterol biosynthesis regulation presents an opportunity to improve therapeutic options for the collection of diseases termed aspergillosis. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of sterol biosynthesis regulation with a focus on mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by the SREBP family of transcription factors. PMID:28203225

  9. Transport of resistance-inducing sterols in phloem sap of barley.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, A T; Dugassa-Gobena, D; Vidal, S; Seifert, K

    2000-01-01

    After root application of [7alpha-3H]-7beta-hydroxysitosterol and [3alpha,6beta-3H2]-6alpha-hydroxylathosterol these sterols could be detected in the leaves and phloem sap feeding aphids. These results imply that the phloem sap is a sterol transport system in barley plants.

  10. Effect of sterol esters on lipid composition and antioxidant status of erythrocyte membrane of hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Avery; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cause of coronary heart disease. Erythrocyte membrane is affected during hypercholesterolemia. The effect of EPA-DHA rich sterol ester and ALA rich sterol ester on erythrocyte membrane composition, osmotic fragility in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats and changes in antioxidant status of erythrocyte membrane were studied. Erythrocyte membrane composition, osmotic fragility of the membrane and antioxidant enzyme activities was analyzed. Osmotic fragility data suggested that the erythrocyte membrane of hypercholesterolemia was relatively more fragile than that of the normal rats' membrane which could be reversed with the addition of sterol esters in the diet. The increased plasma cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats could also be lowered by the sterol ester administration. There was also marked changes in the antioxidant enzyme activities of the erythrocyte membrane. Antioxidant enzyme levels decreased in the membrane of the hypercholesterolemic subjects were increased with the treatment of the sterol esters. The antioxidative activity of ALA rich sterol ester was better in comparison to EPA-DHA rich sterol ester. In conclusion, rat erythrocytes appear to be deformed and became more fragile in cholesterol rich blood. This deformity and fragility was partially reversed by sterol esters by virtue of their ability to lower the extent of hypercholesterolemia.

  11. Sterol ratios as a tool for sewage pollution assessment of river sediments in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Matić Bujagić, Ivana; Grujić, Svetlana; Jauković, Zorica; Laušević, Mila

    2016-06-01

    In this work, source pollution tracing of the sediments of the Danube River and its tributaries in Serbia was performed using sterol ratios. Improved liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, which enabled complete chromatographic separation of four analytes with identical fragmentation reactions (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, epicholestanol and cholestanol), was applied for the determination of steroid compounds (hormones, human/animal and plant sterols). A widespread occurrence of sterols was identified in all analyzed samples, whereas the only detected hormones were mestranol and 17α-estradiol. A human-sourced sewage marker coprostanol was detected at the highest concentration (up to 1939 ng g(-1)). The ratios between the key sterol biomarkers, as well as the percentage of coprostanol relative to the total sterol amount, were applied with the aim of selecting the most reliable for distinction between human-sourced pollution and the sterols originated from the natural sources in river sediments. The coprostanol/(cholesterol + cholestanol) and coprostanol/epicoprostanol ratios do not distinguish between human and natural sources of sterols in the river sediments in Serbia. The most reliable sterol ratios for the sewage pollution assessment of river sediments in the studied area were found to be coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol), coprostanol/cholesterol and epicoprostanol/coprostanol. For the majority of sediments, human-derived pollution was determined. Two sediment samples were identified as influenced by a combination of human and natural biogenic sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of Sterol Content in Membranes by Subcellular Compartmentation of Steryl-Esters Accumulating in a Sterol-Overproducing Tobacco Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Gondet, L.; Bronner, R.; Benveniste, P.

    1994-01-01

    The study of sterol overproduction in tissues of LAB 1-4 mutant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi) (P. Maillot-Vernier, H. Schaller, P. Benveniste, G. Belliard [1989] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 165: 125-130) over several generations showed that the overproduction phenotype is stable in calli, with a 10-fold stimulation of sterol content when compared with wild-type calli. However, leaves of LAB 1-4 plants obtained after two steps of self-fertilization were characterized by a mere 3-fold stimulation, whereas calli obtained from these plants retained a typical sterol-overproducing mutant phenotype (i.e. a 10-fold increase of sterol content). These results suggest that the expression of the LAB 1-4 phenotype is dependent on the differentiation state of cells. Most of the sterols accumulating in the mutant tissues were present as steryl-esters, which were minor species in wild-type tissues. Subcellular fractionation showed that in both mutant and wild-type tissues, free sterols were associated mainly with microsomal membranes. In contrast, the bulk of steryl-esters present in mutant tissues was found in the soluble fraction of cells. Numerous lipid droplets were detected in the hyaloplasm of LAB 1-4 cells by cytochemical and cytological techniques. After isolation, these lipid granules were shown to contain steryl-esters. These results show that the overproduced sterols of mutant tissues accumulate as steryl-esters in hyaloplasmic bodies. The esterification process thus allows regulation of the amount of free sterols in membranes by subcellular compartmentation. PMID:12232218

  13. Development of a novel method for quantification of sterols and oxysterols by UPLC-ESI-HRMS: application to a neuroinflammation rat model.

    PubMed

    Ayciriex, Sophie; Regazzetti, Anne; Gaudin, Mathieu; Prost, Elise; Dargère, Delphine; Massicot, France; Auzeil, Nicolas; Laprévote, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Cholesterol and oxysterols are involved as key compounds in the development of severe neurodegenerative diseases and in neuroinflammation processes. Monitoring their concentration changes under pathological conditions is of interest to get insights into the role of lipids in diseases. For numerous years, liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry has been the method of choice for metabolites identification and quantification in biological samples. However, sterols and oxysterols are relatively apolar molecules poorly adapted to electrospray ionization (ESI). To circumvent this drawback, we developed a novel and robust analytical method involving derivatization of these analytes in cholesteryl N-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenyl carbamates under alkaline conditions followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis (UPLC-HRMS). Optimized UPLC conditions led to the separation of a mixture of 11 derivatized sterols and oxysterols especially side chain substituted derivatives after 6 min of chromatographic run. High sensitivity time-of-flight mass analysis allowed analytes to be detected in the nanomolar range. The method was validated for the analysis of oxysterols and sterols in mice brain in respect of linearity, limits of quantification, accuracy, precision, analyte stability, and recovery according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. The developed method was successfully applied to investigate the impact of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment on the rat cerebral steroidome.

  14. Juvenile Hormone Synthesis: “esterify then epoxidize” or “epoxidize then esterify”? Insights from the Structural Characterization of Juvenile Hormone Acid Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, L.A; Dolghih, E.; Roitberg, A.E.; Nouzova, M.; Mayoral, J.G; Noriega, F.G.; Turjanski, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormones (JHs) play key roles in regulating metamorphosis and reproduction in insects. The last two steps of JH synthesis diverge depending on the insect order. In Lepidoptera, epoxidation by a P450 monooxygenase precedes esterification by a juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT). In Orthoptera, Dictyoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera epoxidation follows methylation. The aim of our study was to gain insight into the structural basis of JHAMT’s substrate recognition as a means to understand the divergence of these pathways. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of Aedes aegypti JHAMT. The substrate binding site was identified, as well as the residues that interact with the methyl donor (S-adenosylmethionine) and the carboxylic acid of the substrate methyl acceptors, farnesoic acid (FA) and juvenile hormone acid (JHA). To gain further insight we generated the structures of Anopheles gambiae, Bombyx mori, Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum JHAMTs. The modeling results were compared with previous experimental studies using recombinant proteins, whole insects, corpora allata or tissue extracts. The computational study helps explain the selectivity towards the (10R)-JHA isomer and the reduced activity for palmitic and lauric acids. The analysis of our results supports the hypothesis that all insect JHAMTs are able to recognize both FA and JHA as substrates. Therefore, the order of the methylation/epoxidation reactions may be primarily imposed by the epoxidase’s substrate specificity. In Lepidoptera, epoxidase might have higher affinity than JHAMT for FA, so epoxidation precedes methylation, while in most other insects there is no epoxidation of FA, but esterification of FA to form MF, followed by epoxidation to JH III. PMID:21195763

  15. hydra Mutants of Arabidopsis Are Defective in Sterol Profiles and Auxin and Ethylene Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Souter, Martin; Topping, Jennifer; Pullen, Margaret; Friml, Jiri; Palme, Klaus; Hackett, Rachel; Grierson, Don; Lindsey, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The hydra mutants of Arabidopsis are characterized by a pleiotropic phenotype that shows defective embryonic and seedling cell patterning, morphogenesis, and root growth. We demonstrate that the HYDRA1 gene encodes a Δ8-Δ7 sterol isomerase, whereas HYDRA2 encodes a sterol C14 reductase, previously identified as the FACKEL gene product. Seedlings mutant for each gene are similarly defective in the concentrations of the three major Arabidopsis sterols. Promoter::reporter gene analysis showed misexpression of the auxin-regulated DR5 and ACS1 promoters and of the epidermal cell file–specific GL2 promoter in the mutants. The mutants exhibit enhanced responses to auxin. The phenotypes can be rescued partially by inhibition of auxin and ethylene signaling but not by exogenous sterols or brassinosteroids. We propose a model in which correct sterol profiles are required for regulated auxin and ethylene signaling through effects on membrane function. PMID:12034894

  16. Interferon Control of the Sterol Metabolic Network: Bidirectional Molecular Circuitry-Mediating Host Protection

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kevin A.; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The sterol metabolic network is emerging center stage in inflammation and immunity. Historically, observational clinical studies show that hypocholesterolemia is a common side effect of interferon (IFN) treatment. More recently, comprehensive systems-wide investigations of the macrophage IFN response reveal a direct molecular link between cholesterol metabolism and infection. Upon infection, flux through the sterol metabolic network is acutely moderated by the IFN response at multiple regulatory levels. The precise mechanisms by which IFN regulates the mevalonate-sterol pathway—the spine of the network—are beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the multifactorial mechanisms by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. We also consider bidirectional communications resulting in sterol metabolism regulation of immunity. Finally, we deliberate on how this fundamental interaction functions as an integral element of host protective responses to infection and harmful inflammation. PMID:28066443

  17. Method Development for the Determination of Free and Esterified Sterols in Button Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2016-05-04

    Ergosterol is the major sterol in button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) and can occur as free alcohol or esterified with fatty acids (ergosteryl esters). In this study, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM) was used to determine ergosterol and ergosteryl esters as well as other sterols and steryl esters in button mushrooms. Different quality control measures were established and sample preparation procedures were compared to prevent the formation of artifacts and the degradation of ergosteryl esters. The final method was then used for the determination of ergosterol (443 ± 44 mg/100 g dry matter (d.m.)) and esterified ergosterol (12 ± 6 mg/100 g d.m.) in button mushroom samples (n = 4). While the free sterol fraction was vastly dominated by ergosterol (∼90% of five sterols in total), the steryl ester fraction was more diversified (nine sterols in total, ergosterol ∼55%) and consisted primarily of linoleic acid esters.

  18. Plant sterols and stanols as cholesterol-lowering ingredients in functional foods.

    PubMed

    Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Moazzami, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews developments related to the use of plant sterols and stanols as cholesterol-lowering ingredients in foods and nutraceuticals preparations. Plant sterols and stanols are extracted from the deodorizer distillates of vegetable oil refining and from tall oil, a by-product of paper pulping industry. Plant sterols/stanols inhibit cholesterol absorption possibly by competitively inhibiting its incorporation into the mixed micelles in the small intestine although other mechanisms can not be excluded. Daily consumption of 1-2 grams of plant sterols or stanols was shown to cause 10-20% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol). Combinations of plant sterols/stanols with certain lipid-lowering ingredients were shown to potentate their cholesterol-lowering effects and, in some cases, add triacylglycerol-lowering effects. In this article, patents based information is also discussed.

  19. Interferon Control of the Sterol Metabolic Network: Bidirectional Molecular Circuitry-Mediating Host Protection.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin A; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The sterol metabolic network is emerging center stage in inflammation and immunity. Historically, observational clinical studies show that hypocholesterolemia is a common side effect of interferon (IFN) treatment. More recently, comprehensive systems-wide investigations of the macrophage IFN response reveal a direct molecular link between cholesterol metabolism and infection. Upon infection, flux through the sterol metabolic network is acutely moderated by the IFN response at multiple regulatory levels. The precise mechanisms by which IFN regulates the mevalonate-sterol pathway-the spine of the network-are beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the multifactorial mechanisms by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. We also consider bidirectional communications resulting in sterol metabolism regulation of immunity. Finally, we deliberate on how this fundamental interaction functions as an integral element of host protective responses to infection and harmful inflammation.

  20. Uptake of the antileishmania drug tafenoquine follows a sterol-dependent diffusion process in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Manzano, José Ignacio; Carvalho, Luis; García-Hernández, Raquel; Poveda, José Antonio; Ferragut, José Antonio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2011-11-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of tafenoquine uptake in Leishmania and its sterol dependence. Because tafenoquine is a fluorescent compound, spectrofluorimetric analysis allowed us to monitor its uptake by Leishmania promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes, and to evaluate the effect of temperature, energy and H+ gradient on drug entry. The influence of sterols on tafenoquine uptake in Leishmania parasites was determined in experiments using sterol-depleting agents such as methyl-β-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase. Tafenoquine exhibited fast entry kinetics into Leishmania in an energy-independent, but pH- and temperature-dependent, non-saturable process. Furthermore, sterol depletion decreased tafenoquine uptake. These findings suggest that Leishmania takes up tafenoquine by a diffusion process and that decreases in membrane sterol content may induce a decrease in drug uptake.

  1. Evaluation of bioactive potential of an Aloe vera sterol extract.

    PubMed

    Bawankar, Raksha; Deepti, V C; Singh, Pooja; Subashkumar, Rathinasamy; Vivekanandhan, Govindasamy; Babu, Subramanian

    2013-06-01

    We prepared a crude gel material from Aloe vera succulent leaf tissues. The ethanolic extract of lyophilized A. vera gel was used for the GC-MS analysis. Hexadecanoic acid (22.22%) was identified as major compound. Sitosterol and stigmasterol were found to be 2.89% and 2.1% in the extract. HPLC analysis was carried out to confirm the presence of stigmasterol. The concentration of sterol extract needed to scavenge DPPH free radical by 50% was calculated as 5.2 mg mL(-1). In the FRAP assay, the sterol extract showed significant hydroxyl radical scavenging in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 value 1.17 µg mL(-1)). Concentration of the sample required to reduce lipid peroxidation was found to be 4.18 µg mL(-1), and the extract also possessed acetylcholinesterase activity (IC50 - 5.26 µg mL(-1)). Catalase activity was 0.196 μM H2 O2 decomposed min(-1) µg(-1) protein, whereas the peroxidase activity was 17.01 μM of pyragallol oxidized min(-1) µg(-1) protein. The extract recorded higher activity against growth of S. greseus and C. albicans in the experiments carried out to determine antibacterial and antifungal activity, respectively. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Serum lipid and antioxidant responses in hypercholesterolemic men and women receiving plant sterol esters vary by apolipoprotein E genotype

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant sterol esters reduce serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), but with striking inter-individual variability. In this randomized, double-blind, controlled study, serum lipid, plant sterol, fat-soluble vitamin, and carotenoid responses to plant sterols were studied according to...

  3. Cholesterol-lowering effect of spreads enriched with microcrystalline plant sterols in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, L I; Lähteenmäki, P L; Mannelin, M R; Seppänen-Laakso, T E; Hiltunen, R V; Yliruusi, J K

    2001-04-01

    Plant sterols have been shown to reduce serum lipid concentrations. The effectiveness is highly dependent on the physical state of the plant sterols. By means of a new crystallizing method, plant sterols can be added into dietary fats and oils homogeneously. In this fat ingredient, plant sterols are in a microcrystalline form. We investigated the cholesterol-lowering effect and possible side effects of vegetable oil-based spreads fortified with two different doses of microcrystalline plant sterols. This double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled study consisted of a 6-wk run-in and a 6-month experimental period. During the run-in period, all 155 hypercholesterolemic subjects received rapeseed oil-based control spread. In the beginning of the experimental period subjects were randomly assigned into one of three experimental groups. The control group continued to use control spread, and the two test groups used spreads with added plant sterols of either 1.5 g/d or 3.0 g/d. The subjects consumed test spreads as a part of their normal diet without any restrictions in lifestyle and diet. Plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly reduced by 7.5-11.6% (0.46-0.62 mmol/1) in groups consuming margarine enriched with free plant sterols, compared with the control group. The effects were similar between the two groups consuming either 1.5g or 3.0 g plant sterols per day. No effect on HDL-cholesterol or triacylglycerol concentrations occurred. The test spreads did not induce any adverse effects in blood clinical chemistry, hematology or decreases in serum concentrations of lipid soluble vitamins. Microcrystalline plant sterols are effective in lowering serum total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations without obvious side effects. The daily dose of 1.5 g plant sterols is enough to reach the maximum effect.

  4. Facet-Controlling Agents Free Synthesis of Hematite Crystals with High-Index Planes: Excellent Photodegradation Performance and Mechanism Insight.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Huang, Yang; Zhou, Cuifeng; Liu, Zongwen; Ren, Jichang; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Jianhai; Zhang, Yuanjian; Lei, Zhongfang; Zhang, Zhenya; Zhi, Chunyi

    2016-01-13

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) crystals with uniform size and structure are synthesized through very facile one-pot hydrothermal methods without any additive. The as-synthesized sub-micrometer-sized α-Fe2O3 crystals with small surface areas perform superb visible light photodegradation activities, even much better than most other α-Fe2O3 nanostructures with large surface areas. Profound mechanism analyses reveal that the microwave-assisted hydrothermal (Mic-H) synthesized α-Fe2O3 is enclosed by 12 high-index {2-15} facets. The structure and the low unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the high-index planes result in the excellent photocatalytic activity. This is the first report on the formation of {2-15} plane group of hematite, and the synthesis of the hematite particles with the {2-15} planes is very simple and no any facet-controlling agent is used. This study may pave the way to further performance enhancement and practical applications of the cheap hematite materials.

  5. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation.

  6. Mechanistic Insights into Validoxylamine A 7'-Phosphate Synthesis by VldE Using the Structure of the Entire Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Yim, Young-Sun; Asamizu, Shumpei; Neau, David; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Mahmud, Taifo; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-09-09

    The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an “open” and “closed” conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  7. Template-Free Synthesis of Highly Porous Boron Nitride: Insights into Pore Network Design and Impact on Gas Sorption.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Sofia; McGilvery, Catriona M; Bailey, Josh; Petit, Camille

    2017-09-18

    Production of biocompatible and stable porous materials, e.g., boron nitride, exhibiting tunable and enhanced porosity is a prerequisite if they are to be employed to address challenges such as drug delivery, molecular separations, or catalysis. However, there is currently very limited understanding of the formation mechanisms of porous boron nitride and the parameters controlling its porosity, which ultimately prevents exploiting the material's full potential. Herein, we produce boron nitride with high and tunable surface area and micro/mesoporosity via a facile template-free method using multiple readily available N-containing precursors with different thermal decomposition patterns. The gases are gradually released, creating hierarchical pores, high surface areas (>1900 m(2)/g), and micropore volumes. We use 3D tomography techniques to reconstruct the pore structure, allowing direct visualization of the mesopore network. Additional imaging and analytical tools are employed to characterize the materials from the micro- down to the nanoscale. The CO2 uptake of the materials rivals or surpasses those of commercial benchmarks or other boron nitride materials reported to date (up to 4 times higher), even after pelletizing. Overall, the approach provides a scalable route to porous boron nitride production as well as fundamental insights into the material's formation, which can be used to design a variety of boron nitride structures.

  8. Dynamics and quantitative analysis of the synthesis of fermentative aromas by an evolved wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mouret, J R; Cadiere, A; Aguera, E; Rollero, S; Ortiz-Julien, A; Sablayrolles, J M; Dequin, S

    2015-01-01

    We performed a dynamic and quantitative analysis of the synthesis of fermentative aromas by an aromatic wine yeast, ECA5, obtained by adaptive evolution. During fermentation at pilot scale on synthetic and natural musts, ECA5 produced volatile compounds (higher alcohols and their acetates, ethyl esters) at higher rates than the ancestral strain, with the exception of propanol. Marked differences in the chronology of synthesis of several compounds were observed between the two strains. Overproduction of phenyl ethanol occurred mainly during the growth phase for ECA5, consistent with its higher flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, which plays a key role in biosynthetic processes. The kinetics of production of isobutanol and isoamyl alcohol were differently affected by different media (synthetic or natural must) and, in particular, according to the nature of the sterols in the media (ergosterol or phytosterols). We also observed differences in the chronology of synthesis of ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate or ethyl esters, suggesting that the regulation of the synthesis of these compounds in the evolved strain differs from that in the ancestral strain. This study shows that a dynamic analysis of volatile compounds, using high acquisition frequency online gas chromatography, can provide novel insights into the synthesis and regulation of aromas and is thus a potentially powerful tool for strain characterization. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A fluorescence method to detect and quantitate sterol esterification by lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Homan, Reynold; Esmaeil, Nadia; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Kato, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    We describe a simple but sensitive fluorescence method to accurately detect the esterification activity of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). The new assay protocol employs a convenient mix, incubate, and measure scheme. This is possible by using the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE) in place of cholesterol as the LCAT substrate. The assay method is further enhanced by incorporation of an amphiphilic peptide in place of apolipoprotein A-I as the lipid emulsifier and LCAT activator. Specific fluorescence detection of DHE ester synthesis is achieved by employing cholesterol oxidase to selectively render unesterified DHE nonfluorescent. The assay accurately detects LCAT activity in buffer and in plasma that is depleted of apolipoprotein B lipoproteins by selective precipitation. Analysis of LCAT activity in plasmas from control subjects and sickle cell disease (SCD) patients confirms previous reports of reduced LCAT activity in SCD and demonstrates a strong correlation between plasma LCAT activity and LCAT content. The fluorescent assay combines the sensitivity of radiochemical assays with the simplicity of nonradiochemical assays to obtain accurate and robust measurement of LCAT esterification activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of adenine nucleotide and sterol depletion on tight junction structure and function in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ladino, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The antitumor agent Hadacidin (H), N-formyl-hydroxyamino-acetic acid, reversibly inhibited the multiplication of clone 4 Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at a 4 mM concentration within 24-48 hours. Treated cells were arrested in the S phase of the cell cycle. Accompanying this action was a 16-fold increase in the area occupied b the cells and a refractoriness to trypsin treatment. To test whether this effect was due to an increase in tight junction integrity, electrical resistance (TER) was measured across H-treated monolayers. Addition of H at the onset of junction formation reversibly prevented the development of TER. ATP and cAMP levels were decreased by H, as well as the rate of ({sup 3}H)-leucine incorporation into protein. When 1 mM dibutyryl-cAMP (d.cAMP) and theophylline were added, H had no effect on cell division or protein synthesis, and TER was partially restored. The addition of 1 mM d.cAMP and 1 mM theophylline to control cultures decreased TER, indicating a biphasic effect on TER development/maintenance. In a separate study, the effect of sterol depletion on tight junctions formation/maintenance in wild-type MDCK cells was investigated.

  11. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  12. Sterol carrier protein-2 localization in endoplasmic reticulum and role in phospholipid formation.

    PubMed

    Starodub, O; Jolly, C A; Atshaves, B P; Roths, J B; Murphy, E J; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    2000-10-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2; also called nonspecific lipid transfer protein) binds fatty acids and fatty acyl-CoAs, its role in fatty acid metabolism is not fully understood. L-cell fibroblasts stably expressing SCP-2 were used to resolve the relationship between SCP-2 intracellular location and fatty acid transacylation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Indirect immunofluorescence double labeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy detected SCP-2 in peroxisomes > endoplasmic reticulum > mitochondria > lysosomes. SCP-2 enhanced incorporation of exogenous [(3)H]oleic acid into phospholipids and triacylglycerols of overexpressing cells 1.6- and 2.5-fold, respectively, stimulated microsomal incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleoyl-CoA into phosphatidic acid in vitro 13-fold, and exhibited higher specificity for unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl-CoA. SCP-2 enhanced the rate-limiting step in microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis mediated by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. SCP-2 also enhanced microsomal acyl-chain remodeling of phosphatidylethanolamine up to fivefold and phosphatidylserine twofold, depending on the specific fatty acyl-CoA, but had no effect on other phospholipid classes. In summary, these results were consistent with a role for SCP-2 in phospholipid synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Chemical Insights into the Design and Development of Face-Centered Cubic Ruthenium Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Liu, Jin-Xun; Gu, Jun; Zhou, Wu; Yao, Si-Yu; Si, Rui; Guo, Yu; Su, Hai-Yan; Yan, Chun-Hua; Li, Wei-Xue; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Ma, Ding

    2017-02-15

    Ruthenium is a promising low-temperature catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). However, its scarcity and modest specific activity limit its widespread industrialization. We demonstrate here a strategy for tuning the crystal phase of catalysts to expose denser and active sites for a higher mass-specific activity. Density functional theory calculations show that upon CO dissociation there are a number of open facets with modest barrier available on the face-centered cubic (fcc) Ru but only a few step edges with a lower barrier on conventional hexagonal-closest packed (hcp) Ru. Guided by theoretical calculations, water-dispersible fcc Ru catalysts containing abundant open facets were synthesized and showed an unprecedented mass-specific activity in the aqueous-phase FTS, 37.8 molCO·molRu(-1)·h(-1) at 433 K. The mass-specific activity of the fcc Ru catalysts with an average size of 6.8 nm is about three times larger than the previous best hcp catalyst with a smaller size of 1.9 nm and a higher specific surface area. The origin of the higher mass-specific activity of the fcc Ru catalysts is identified experimentally from the 2 orders of magnitude higher density of the active sites, despite its slightly higher apparent barrier. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with prediction of theory. The great influence of the crystal phases on site distribution and their intrinsic activities revealed here provides a rationale design of catalysts for higher mass-specific activity without decrease of the particle size.

  14. Ionic Liquid Solvation versus Catalysis: Computational Insight from a Multisubstituted Imidazole Synthesis in [Et2NH2][HSO4

    PubMed Central

    Abbasov, Vagif; Ducati, Lucas C.; Talybov, Avtandil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms of a tetrasubstituted imidazole [2‐(2,4,5‐triphenyl‐1 H‐imidazol‐1‐yl)ethan‐1‐ol] synthesis from benzil, benzaldehyde, ammonium acetate, and ethanolamine in [Et2NH2][HSO4] ionic liquid (IL) are studied computationally. The effects of the presence of the cationic and anionic components of the IL on transition states and intermediate structures, acting as a solvent versus as a catalyst, are determined. In IL‐free medium, carbonyl hydroxylation when using a nucleophile (ammonia) proceeds with a Gibbs free energy (ΔG ≠) barrier of 49.4 kcal mol−1. Cationic and anionic hydrogen‐bond solute–solvent interactions with the IL decrease the barrier to 35.8 kcal mol−1. [Et2NH2][HSO4] incorporation in the reaction changes the nature of the transition states and decreases the energy barriers dramatically, creating a catalytic effect. For example, carbonyl hydroxylation proceeds via two transition states, first proton donation to the carbonyl (ΔG ≠=9.2 kcal mol−1) from [Et2NH2]+, and then deprotonation of ammonia (ΔG ≠=14.3) via Et2NH. Likewise, incorporation of the anion component [HSO4]− of the IL gives comparable activation energies along the same reaction route and the lowest transition state for the product formation step. We propose a dual catalytic IL effect for the mechanism of imidazole formation. The computations demonstrate a clear distinction between IL solvent effects on the reaction and IL catalysis. PMID:27777839

  15. Synthesis and Spectral Properties of meso-Arylbacteriochlorins, Including Insights into Essential Motifs of their Hydrodipyrrin Precursors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Muthyala Nagarjuna; Zhang, Shaofei; Kim, Han-Je; Mass, Olga; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2017-04-14

    Synthetic bacteriochlorins-analogues of bacteriochlorophylls, Nature's near-infrared absorbers-are attractive for diverse photochemical studies. meso-Arylbacteriochlorins have been prepared by the self-condensation of a dihydrodipyrrin-carbinol or dihydrodipyrrin-acetal following an Eastern-Western (E-W) or Northern-Southern (N-S) joining process. The bacteriochlorins bear a gem-dimethyl group in each pyrroline ring to ensure stability toward oxidation. The two routes differ in the location of the gem-dimethyl group at the respective 3- or 2-position in the dihydrodipyrrin, and the method of synthesis of the dihydrodipyrrin. Treatment of a known 3,3-dimethyldihydrodipyrrin-1-carboxaldehyde with an aryl Grignard reagent afforded the dihydrodipyrrin-1-(aryl)carbinol, and upon subsequent acetylation, the corresponding dihydrodipyrrin-1-methyl acetate (dihydrodipyrrin-acetate). Self-condensation of the dihydrodipyrrin-acetate gave a meso-diarylbacteriochlorin (E-W route). A 2,2-dimethyl-5-aryldihydrodipyrrin-1-(aryl)carbinol underwent self-condensation to give a trans-A₂B₂-type meso-tetraarylbacteriochlorin (N-S route). In each case, the aromatization process entails a 2e(-)/2H⁺ (aerobic) dehydrogenative oxidation following the dihydrodipyrrin self-condensation. Comparison of a tetrahydrodipyrrin-acetal (0%) versus a dihydrodipyrrin-acetal (41%) in bacteriochlorin formation and results with various 1-substituted dihydrodipyrrins revealed the importance of resonance stabilization of the reactive hydrodipyrrin intermediate. Altogether 10 new dihydrodipyrrins and five new bacteriochlorins have been prepared. The bacteriochlorins exhibit characteristic bacteriochlorophyll-like absorption spectra, including a Qy band in the region 726-743 nm.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and insights into stable and well organized hexagonal mesoporous zinc-doped alumina as promising metathesis catalysts carrier.

    PubMed

    Abidli, Abdelnasser; Hamoudi, Safia; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2015-06-07

    A series of highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous alumina and zinc-modified mesoporous alumina samples are synthesized via a sol-gel method through an evaporation-induced self-assembly process using Pluronic F127 as nonionic templating agent and several aluminum precursors. The process was mediated using several carboxylic acids along with hydrochloric acid in ethanol. Successful impregnation of ZnCl2 was achieved while maintaining the ordered structure. The surface and textural properties of the materials were investigated. N2-physisorption analysis revealed a BET surface area of 394 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume around 0.55 cm(3) g(-1). Moreover, small-angle XRD diffraction patterns highlighted the well-organized hexagonal structure even upon the incorporation of zinc chloride. The organized-structure arrangement was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The Zn/Al composition of the final materials was confirmed by EDX and XPS analysis, and the zinc amount incorporated was analyzed by ICP. Furthermore, the surface modification with zinc chloride impregnation was analyzed by XPS, (1)H and (27)Al MAS-NMR and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the effects of synthesis conditions and the mechanism of the mesostructure formation were explored. The catalytic activity of several methyltrioxorhenium (MTO)-based catalysts supported on these hexagonal mesoporous alumina materials was tested for methyl oleate self-metathesis. The results showed improved kinetics using hexagonal alumina in comparison to those using wormhole-like alumina counterparts. This behavior could be attributed to better mass transfer features of hexagonal mesoporous alumina. The prepared materials with desirable pore size and structure are suitable candidates as catalyst supports for metathesis of bulky functionalized olefins and other catalytic transformations due to their enhanced Lewis acidity and more uniform pore networks favoring enhanced and selective mass

  17. The IDOL–UBE2D complex mediates sterol-dependent degradation of the LDL receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Goult, Benjamin T.; Calkin, Anna C.; Hong, Cynthia; Millard, Christopher J.; Tontonoz, Peter; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL as a sterol-dependent regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The molecular pathway underlying IDOL action, however, remains to be determined. Here we report the identification and biochemical and structural characterization of an E2–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for LDLR degradation. We identified the UBE2D family (UBE2D1–4) as E2 partners for IDOL that support both autoubiquitination and IDOL-dependent ubiquitination of the LDLR in a cell-free system. NMR chemical shift mapping and a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the IDOL RING domain–UBE2D1 complex revealed key interactions between the dimeric IDOL protein and the E2 enzyme. Analysis of the IDOL–UBE2D1 interface also defined the stereochemical basis for the selectivity of IDOL for UBE2Ds over other E2 ligases. Structure-based mutations that inhibit IDOL dimerization or IDOL–UBE2D interaction block IDOL-dependent LDLR ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative UBE2D enzyme inhibits the ability of IDOL to degrade the LDLR in cells. These results identify the IDOL–UBE2D complex as an important determinant of LDLR activity, and provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cholesterol uptake. PMID:21685362

  18. Mutations in UDP-Glucose:sterol glucosyltransferase in Arabidopsis cause transparent testa phenotype and suberization defect in seeds.

    PubMed

    DeBolt, Seth; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schrick, Kathrin; Auer, Manfred; Beisson, Fred; Bischoff, Volker; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Carroll, Andrew; Hematy, Kian; Li, Yonghua; Milne, Jennifer; Nair, Meera; Schaller, Hubert; Zemla, Marcin; Somerville, Chris

    2009-09-01

    In higher plants, the most abundant sterol derivatives are steryl glycosides (SGs) and acyl SGs. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes, UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, that encode UDP-Glc:sterol glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of SGs. Lines having mutations in UGT80A2, UGT80B1, or both UGT80A2 and UGT8B1 were identified and characterized. The ugt80A2 lines were viable and exhibited relatively minor effects on plant growth. Conversely, ugt80B1 mutants displayed an array of phenotypes that were pronounced in the embryo and seed. Most notable was the finding that ugt80B1 was allelic to transparent testa15 and displayed a transparent testa phenotype and a reduction in seed size. In addition to the role of UGT80B1 in the deposition of flavanoids, a loss of suberization of the seed was apparent in ugt80B1 by the lack of autofluorescence at the hilum region. Moreover, in ugt80B1, scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the outer integument of the seed coat lost the electron-dense cuticle layer at its surface and displayed altered cell morphology. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers confirmed a drastic decrease in aliphatic suberin and cutin-like polymers that was associated with an inability to limit tetrazolium salt uptake. The findings suggest a membrane function for SGs and acyl SGs in trafficking of lipid polyester precursors. An ancillary observation was that cellulose biosynthesis was unaffected in the double mutant, inconsistent with a predicted role for SGs in priming cellulose synthesis.

  19. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arcega-Cabrera, F; Velázquez-Tavera, N; Fargher, L; Derrien, M; Noreña-Barroso, E

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g(-1)) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g(-1)). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings

  20. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcega-Cabrera, F.; Velázquez-Tavera, N.; Fargher, L.; Derrien, M.; Noreña-Barroso, E.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g- 1) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g- 1). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings indicate

  1. Insights into Stabilization of the 99TcVO Core for Synthesis of 99TcVO Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Howell, Robertha C.; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of technetium-99 (99Tc; t1/2: 2.1 105 years, max: 253 keV) materials is of importance in studies of the nuclear fuel cycle where Tc is a major fission product (6percent thermal yield from 235U and 239Pu), in understanding radioactive tank waste composition, and in identifying 99mTc compounds for nuclear medicine imaging. One of the most useful synthetic starting materials, (NBu4)TcOCl4, is susceptible to disproportionation in water to form TcO4 and TcIV species, especially TcO2 2H2O. This unwanted reaction is especially problematic when working with ligands bearing hard donor atoms, such as oxygen, where the stability with the soft TcV=O3+ core may be low. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are such ligands. They possess defect sites with four hard oxygen atoms and show low (ca. 108) stability constants with transition metals. Tc complexes of POMs are molecular-level models for Tc metal oxide solid-state materials and can provide information on coordination and redox environments of metal oxides that stabilize low-valent Tc. In order to synthesize pure Tc POM complexes [TcVO(1-P2W17O61)]7 (TcVO-1) and [TcVO(2-P2W17O61)]7 (TcVO-2) from (NBu4)TcOCl4, we have identified strategies that minimize formation of TcIV species and optimize the formation of pure TcV species. The parameters that we consider are the amount of ethylene glycol, which is employed as a transfer ligand to prevent hydrolysis of (NBu4)TcOCl4, and the precipitating agent. The TcIV species that contaminates the non-optimized syntheses is likely a TcIV -oxido-bridged dimer [TcIV-(-O)2-TcIV]. We also employ a novel procedure where the 2 ligand is photoactivated and reduced (in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor) to subsequently reduce TcVIIO4 to an isolatable TcVO-2 product that is remarkably free of TcIV.

  2. Controls on northern wetland methane emissions: insights from regional synthesis studies and the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Czimczik, C. I.; Waldrop, M. P.; Olefeldt, D.; Fan, Z.; Kane, E. S.; McGuire, A. D.; Harden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane. Static chambers have been used to quantify variation in wetland CH4 flux for many decades. Regional to global scale synthesis studies of static chamber measurements show that relationships between temperature, water availability and CH4 emissions depend on wetland type (bog, fen, swamp), region (tropical, temperate, arctic) and disturbance. For example, while water table position and temperature serve as the dominant controls on bog and swamp CH4 flux, vegetation is an important control on emissions from fens. These studies highlight the fact that wetland types have distinct controls on CH4 emissions; however, it is unlikely that modeling of wetland CH4 flux will improve without a better mechanistic understanding of the processes underlying CH4 production, transport, and oxidation. At the Alaska Peatland Experiment, we are quantifying CH4 emission using static chambers, automated chambers, and towers. Our sites vary in permafrost regime, including groundwater fens without permafrost, forested peat plateaus with intact permafrost, and collapse scar bogs formed through permafrost thaw. Experimental studies that examine plant and microbial responses to altered water table position and soil temperature are complemented by a gradient approach, where we use a space-for-time substitutions to examine the consequences of thaw on time-scales of decades to centuries. Our results thus far have documented the importance of soil rewetting in governing large CH4 fluxes from northern wetland soils. Accounting for CH4, our collapse scar bog significantly contributed to the global warming potential of the landscape. A major objective of our work is to explore the role of permafrost C release in greenhouse gas fluxes from wetland soils, which we are assessing using radiocarbon as a natural tracer. We have shown, for example, that ebullition of CH4 is dominated by recently fixed C, but a significant fraction of CH4 in

  3. An acetylation/deacetylation cycle controls the export of sterols and steroids from S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rashi; Köffel, René; Schneiter, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells relies on the reciprocal interconversion of free sterols and steryl esters. Here we report the identification of a novel reversible sterol modification in yeast, the sterol acetylation/deacetylation cycle. Sterol acetylation requires the acetyltransferase ATF2, whereas deacetylation requires SAY1, a membrane-anchored deacetylase with a putative active site in the ER lumen. Lack of SAY1 results in the secretion of acetylated sterols into the culture medium, indicating that the substrate specificity of SAY1 determines whether acetylated sterols are secreted from the cells or whether they are deacetylated and retained. Consistent with this proposition, we find that acetylation and export of the steroid hormone precursor pregnenolone depends on its acetylation by ATF2, but is independent of SAY1-mediated deacetylation. Cells lacking Say1 or Atf2 are sensitive against the plant-derived allylbenzene eugenol and both Say1 and Atf2 affect pregnenolone toxicity, indicating that lipid acetylation acts as a detoxification pathway. The fact that homologues of SAY1 are present in the mammalian genome and functionally substitute for SAY1 in yeast indicates that part of this pathway has been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:18034159

  4. Evidence for metabolic and functional discrimination of sterols by Phytophthora cactorum

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W. David; Stafford, Allen E.

    1983-01-01

    When fed 10 ppm of one of the following sterols: cholesterol (cholest-5-en-3β-ol), wingsterol (21-isopentylcholesterol), desmosterol [cholesta-5,24(25)-dien-3β-ol], 24-methylenecholesterol [ergosta-5,24(28)-dien-3β-ol], or fucosterol [stigmasta-5,24(28)-dien-3β-ol], the pathogenic fungus Phytophthora cactorum, which is naturally unable to epoxidize squalene, accumulated each of the test compounds to similar levels. Fucosterol, the only sterol metabolized, was reduced to yield 24-ethylcholesterol. All the sterols tested induced the formation of sex structures. Fertilization and subsequent maturation of oospores capable of germination occurred only with the naturally occurring sterols. Wingsterol treatments resulted in aborted oospores. None of the sterols tested was inhibitory to growth, measured as changes in the 21-day mycelial dry weight. The results are consistent with the view that the accumulated sterol functions to regulate the life cycle of P. cactorum. However, the metabolism and kinds of recognition of the sterol molecule, in terms of uptake and effects on growth and induction of the various sexual events, contrast sharply with what is known for other oomycetous fungi such as Achlya and Saprolegnia. This implies that the evolutionary histories of the Oomycetes may be different. Images PMID:16593322

  5. Evidence for similarities and differences in the biosynthesis of fungal sterols.

    PubMed

    Nes, W D; Xu, S H; Haddon, W F

    1989-01-01

    The sterol composition of two ascomycetous fungi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Gibberella fujikuroi, was examined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (MS and 1H-NMR) methods. Of notable importance was that both fungi produced cholesterol and a homologous series of long chain fatty alcohols (C22 to C30). In addition to ergosterol two novel sterols, ergosta-5,7, 9(11), 22-tetraenol and ergosterol endoperoxide, were isolated as minor compounds in growth-arrested cultures of yeast and in mycelia of G. fujikuroi. 24-Ethylidenelanosterol was also detected in mycelia of G. fujikuroi. A shift in sterol biosynthesis was observed by treatment with 24 (RS), 25-epiminolanosterol (an inhibitor of the S-adenosylmethionine C-24 transferase) and by monitoring the sterol composition at various stages of development. The results are interpreted to imply that the genes for 24-desalkyl, e.g., cholesterol, and 24-alkyl sterols, e.g., 24 beta- methyl cholesterol and 24-ethyl cholesterol, are distributed (but not always expressed) generally throughout the fungi but the occurrence of one or another compounds is influenced by the fitness (structure and amount) for specific sterols to act functionally during fungal ontogeny; sterol fitness is coordinated with Darwinian selection pressures.

  6. Effects of plant sterols and stanols on intestinal cholesterol metabolism: suggested mechanisms from past to present.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Els; Mensink, Ronald P; Plat, Jogchum

    2012-07-01

    Plant sterols and stanols are natural food ingredients found in plants. It was already shown in 1950 that they lower serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. Meta-analysis has reported that a daily intake of 2.5 g plant sterols/stanols reduced serum LDL-C concentrations up to 10%. Despite many studies, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the proposed mechanisms that have been presented over the past decades will be described and discussed in the context of the current knowledge. In the early days, it was suggested that plant sterols/stanols compete with intestinal cholesterol for incorporation into mixed micelles as well as into chylomicrons. Next, the focus shifted toward cellular processes. In particular, a role for sterol transporters localized in the membranes of enterocytes was suggested. All these processes ultimately lowered intestinal cholesterol absorption. More recently, the existence of a direct secretion of cholesterol from the circulation into the intestinal lumen was described. First results in animal studies suggested that plant sterols/stanols activate this pathway, which also explains the increased fecal neutral sterol content and as such could explain the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols.

  7. Lipid-lowering Activity of Natural and Semi-Synthetic Sterols and Stanols.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of plant sterols/ stanols has long been demonstrated to reduce plasma cholesterol levels. The objective of this review is to demonstrate the lipid-lowering activity and anti-atherogenic effects of natural and semi-synthetic plant sterols/ stanols based on evidence from cell-culture studies, animal studies and clinical trials. Additionally, this review highlights certain molecular mechanisms by which plant sterols/ stanols lower plasma cholesterol levels with a special emphasis on factors that affect the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols. The crystalline nature and the poor oil solubility of these natural products could be important factors that limit their cholesterol-lowering efficiency. Several attempts have been made to improve the cholesterol-lowering activity by enhancing the bioavailability of crystalline sterols and stanols. Approaches involved reduction of the crystal size and/or esterification with fatty acids from vegetable or fish oils. However, the most promising approach in this context is the chemical modification of plant sterols /stanols into water soluble disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphates analogue by esterification with ascorbic acid. This novel semi-synthetic stanol derivative has improved efficacy over natural plant sterols/ stanols and can provide additional benefits by combining the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant stanols with the antioxidant potential of ascorbic acid. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  8. Inhibition of Sterol Biosynthesis Reduces Tombusvirus Replication in Yeast and Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    The replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on subcellular membranes. Recent genome-wide screens have revealed that the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG25 and ERG4 affected the replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a yeast model host. To further our understanding of the role of sterols in TBSV replication, we demonstrate that the downregulation of ERG25 or the inhibition of the activity of Erg25p with an inhibitor (6-amino-2-n-pentylthiobenzothiazole; APB) leads to a 3- to 5-fold reduction in TBSV replication in yeast. In addition, the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor lovastatin reduced TBSV replication by 4-fold, confirming the importance of sterols in viral replication. We also show reduced stability for the p92pol viral replication protein as well as a decrease in the in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase when isolated from APB-treated yeast. Moreover, APB treatment inhibits TBSV RNA accumulation in plant protoplasts and in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The inhibitory effect of APB on TBSV replication can be complemented by exogenous stigmasterol, the main plant sterol, suggesting that sterols are required for TBSV replication. The silencing of SMO1 and SMO2 genes, which are orthologs of ERG25, in N. benthamiana reduced TBSV RNA accumulation but had a lesser inhibitory effect on the unrelated Tobacco mosaic virus, suggesting that various viruses show different levels of dependence on sterol biosynthesis for their replication. PMID:20015981

  9. Plant sterol-fortified orange juice effectively lowers cholesterol levels in mildly hypercholesterolemic healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal; Vega-López, Sonia

    2004-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Therapeutic lifestyle changes include dietary modifications such as inclusion of phytosterols, which effectively lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in margarines and other fats. Their effectiveness in nonfat moieties is not yet established. The aim of this study was to examine if phytosterols alter the plasma lipoprotein profile when incorporated into nonfat orange juice. After a 2-week run-in phase with orange juice, 72 mildly hypercholesterolemic healthy subjects were randomized to receive either placebo orange juice (placebo OJ) or plant sterol-fortified orange juice (sterol OJ) (2g/d) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood was obtained at baseline, after 2 weeks of OJ, and after 8 weeks of placebo/sterol-OJ supplementation. Sterol OJ supplementation significantly decreased total (7.2%), LDL (12.4%), and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (7.8%) compared with baseline and compared with placebo OJ (P<0.01). Apolipoprotein B levels were significantly decreased (9.5%) with sterol OJ. There were no significant changes in HDL cholesterol or triglycerides with the sterol OJ. While folate and B12 levels significantly increased, homocysteine levels were unchanged. Orange juice fortified with plant sterols are effective in reducing LDL cholesterol and could easily be incorporated into the therapeutic lifestyle changes dietary regimen.

  10. Reduction in cholesterol absorption is enhanced by stearate-enriched plant sterol esters in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Guderian, David M; Wray, Curtis A; Dussault, Patrick H; Schlegel, Vicki L; Carr, Timothy P

    2006-11-01

    Consumption of plant sterol esters reduces plasma LDL cholesterol concentration by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Commercially available plant sterol esters are prepared by esterifying free sterols to fatty acids from edible plant oils such as canola, soybean, and sunflower. To determine the influence of the fatty acid moiety on cholesterol metabolism, plant sterol esters were made with fatty acids from soybean oil (SO), beef tallow (BT), or purified stearic acid (SA) and fed to male hamsters for 4 wk. A control group fed no plant sterol esters was also included. Hamsters fed BT and SA had significantly lower cholesterol absorption and decreased concentrations of plasma non-HDL cholesterol and liver esterified cholesterol, and significantly greater fecal sterol excretion than SO and control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was lowest in hamsters fed SA (7.5%), whereas it was 72.9% in control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was correlated with fecal sterol excretion (r = -0.72, P < 0.001), liver cholesterol concentration (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration (r = 0.85, P < 0.001). A multiple regression model that included each sterol ester type vs. cholesterol absorption indicated that intake of steryl stearate was the only dietary component that contributed significantly to the model (R2 = -0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, our results demonstrate that BT and SA are more effective than SO in reducing cholesterol absorption, liver cholesterol, and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration, suggesting that cardioprotective benefits can be achieved by consuming stearate-enriched plant sterol esters.

  11. Sterols of the green-pigmented, freshwater raphidophyte, Gonyostomum semen, from Scandinavian lakes.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Jeffrey D; Dahmen, Aaron S; Lebret, Karen; Rengefors, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Sterols are a class of membrane-reinforcing, ringed lipids which have a long history of examination in algae as a means of deriving chemotaxonomic relationships and as potential lipidic biomarkers. The Raphidophyceae represent a class of harmful, bloom-forming, marine and freshwater algae. To date, there have been four published examinations of their sterol composition, focusing primarily on brown-pigmented, marine species within the genera, Chattonella, Fibrocapsa, and Heterosigma. Lacking in these examinations has been the species Gonyostomum semen Ehrenb., which is a green-pigmented, freshwater raphidophyte with a worldwide distribution. The goal of this study was to examine the sterol composition of this nuisance alga, determine the potential of using its sterol profile as a biomarker, and finally to determine if there is any intraspecific variability between isolates. We have examined 21 isolates of G. semen from a number of Scandinavian lakes, and all were found to produce two major sterols, 24-ethylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3β-ol and 24-ethylcholest-5-en-3β-ol, and 24-methylcholest-5-en-3β-ol as a minor sterol; the presence of 24-ethylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3β-ol differentiates G. semen from brown-pigmented, marine raphidophytes which generally lack it. The results of this study indicate that isolates of G. semen from geographically separate lakes across Finland and Scandinavia have the same sterol biosynthetic pathway, and that there is no evolutionary divergence between the isolates with regard to sterol composition. The sterols of G. semen are not considered to be useful biomarkers for this particular organism because they are commonly found in other algae and plants. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. Contributions of other sterols to the estimation of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Munster, D J; Lever, M; Carrell, R W

    1976-04-15

    The responses of 5alpha-cholestan-3beta-ol, 5alpha-cholest-7-ene-3beta-ol and cholesta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol, normally found in human serum, were examined by: (1) the Liebermann-Burchard reaction, (2) the Zak (ferric chloride) reaction, (3) an enzymatic cholesterol method monitored by estimating the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced, (4) an enzymatic cholesterol method monitored by observing the change in absorbance at 240 nm, and (5) gas chromatography. The results show that none of these methods is specific for cholesterol; contributions from the sterols examined range from zero to more than 150% relative to cholesterol. For the first four methods contributions depend on the conditions under which each test is performed.

  13. Bioactive polyhydroxylated sterols from the marine sponge Haliclona crassiloba.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhong-Bin; Xiao, Han; Fan, Cheng-Qi; Lu, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Ge; Yin, Sheng

    2013-12-20

    Four new polyhydroxylated sterols, named halicrasterols A-D (1-4), together with six known analogs (5-10) were isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona crassiloba. Compounds 1 and 2 represented rare examples of steroids featuring 17(20)E-double bonds. The structures of 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and comparison with reported data. This is the first report of a steroid profile for this species. The antimicrobial activities of 1-10 were evaluated against a panel of bacterial and fungal strains in vitro, and compounds 4 and 9 showed moderate activity against some of the Gram-positive strains with MICs ranging from 4 to 32 μg/mL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sterols and triterpenes in cell culture of Hyssopus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Zuzanna; Wysokińska, Halina

    2003-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures from hypocotyl-derived callus of Hyssopus officinalis were found to produce two sterols i. e. beta-sitosterol (1) and stigmasterol (2), as well as several known pentacyclic triterpenes with an oleanene and ursene skeleton. The triterpenes were identified as oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (5), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6), 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (7), and 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (8). Compounds 5-8 were isolated as their acetates (6, 8) or bromolactone acetates (5, 7).

  15. Cell-free transfer of sterols by plant fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Morre, D.J.; Wilkinson, F.E.; Morre, D.M. ); Moreau, P. ); Sandelius, A.S. ); Penel, C.; Greppin, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Microsomes from etiolated hypocotyls of soybean or leaves of light-grown spinach radiolabeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)acetate or in vitro with ({sup 3}H)squalene or ({sup 3}H)cholesterol as donor transferred radioactivity to unlabeled acceptor membranes immobilized on nitrocellulose. Most efficient transfer was with plasma membrane or tonoplast as the acceptor. The latter were highly purified by aqueous two-phase partition (plasma membrane) and preparative free-flow electrophoresis (tonoplast and plasma membrane). Plasma membrane- and tonoplast-free microsomes and purified mitochondria were less efficient acceptors. Sterol transfer was verified by thin-layer chromatography of extracted lipids. Transfer was time- and temperature-dependent, required ATP but was not promoted by cytosol. The nature of the donor (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus or both) and of the transfer mechanism is under investigation.

  16. Sterol composition and phytosterol utilization and metabolism in the milkweed bug.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, J A; Dutky, S R; Robbins, W E; Kaplanis, J N

    1977-03-01

    Analysis of the sterols of the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) and dietary sunflowerseeds revealed that there is little, if any, conversion of dietary C28 OR C29 phytosterols to cholesterol in this phytophagous insect. The dietary sterols are apparently utilized with little alteration both during development to the adult stage and egg production, and cholesterol comprises less than 1% of the sterols in either adult males and females or in the eggs. The significance of these findings are discussed in light of the recent discovery that the C28-ecdysone, makisterone A, is the predominant molting hormone inthe embryonated egg of the milkweed bug.

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry study of sterols from Pinus elliotti tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Evans, R.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A comparative study of the sterol components of slash pine (Pinus elliotti) callus tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings was carried out using GC-MS techniques. Cholesterol, desmosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and cycloeucalenol were identified in all tissues while lophenol and 24-methylenelophenol were identified in only the seed and seedlings. 24-Ethylidenelophenol was detected in trace concentrations in only the seedlings. Sitosterol was the predominant sterol component, i.e., 80.8, 38.1 and 47.8% of the tissue culture, seed and seedling sterols, respectively.

  18. Distribution and factors affecting adsorption of sterols in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Qiao, Xiuwen; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanman

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the concentrations and distribution of eight sterol compounds in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang, China. The ratios of sterols as diagnostic indices were used to identify pollution sources. The sediment of the two lakes was selected as an adsorbent to investigate the adsorption behaviour of sterols. Results showed that the sterols were widely distributed in the sediments of the lakes in the study areas. The total concentrations of the detected sterols in Bosten Lake and in Manas Lake were 1.584-27.897 and 2.048-18.373 μg g(-1)∙dw, respectively. In all of the sampling sites, the amount of faecal sterols was less than that of plant sterols. β-sitosterol was the dominant plant sterol with a mean concentration of 2.378 ± 2.234 μg g(-1)∙dw; cholesterol was the most abundant faecal sterol with a mean concentration of 1.060 ± 1.402 μg g(-1)∙dw. The pollution level was higher in Bosten Lake than in Manas Lake. Majority of the ratios clearly demonstrated that the contamination by human faecal sources was occurring at stations which are adjacent to residential areas and water inlets. The adsorption behaviour of sterols to sediment suggested that the sterol adsorption coefficients were reduced as temperature increased. As salinity increased, the adsorption quantity also increased. As pH increased, the sediment adsorption of sterol slightly increased because the strong alkaline solution is not conducive to the adsorption of sterols. The ratios between sterols did not change largely with the change in external factors.

  19. Triterpene alcohols and sterols from rice bran lower postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release and prevent diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Daisuke; Okahara, Fumiaki; Hashizume, Kohjiro; Yanagawa, Kiyotaka; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is now a worldwide health problem. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut hormone that is secreted following the ingestion of food and modulates energy metabolism. Previous studies reported that lowering diet-induced GIP secretion improved energy homeostasis in animals and humans, and attenuated diet-induced obesity in mice. Therefore, food-derived GIP regulators may be used in the development of foods that prevent obesity. Rice bran oil and its components are known to have beneficial effects on health. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of the oil-soluble components of rice bran on postprandial GIP secretion and obesity in mice. Triterpene alcohols [cycloartenol (CA) and 24-methylene cycloartanol (24Me)], β-sitosterol, and campesterol decreased the diet-induced secretion of GIP in C57BL/6J mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with a triterpene alcohol and sterol preparation (TASP) from rice bran for 23 wk gained less weight than control mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that fat utilization was higher in TASP-fed mice than in control mice. Fatty acid oxidation-related gene expression in the muscles of mice fed a TASP-supplemented diet was enhanced, whereas fatty acid synthesis-related gene expression in the liver was suppressed. The treatment of HepG2 cells with CA and 24Me decreased the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c. In conclusion, we clarified for the first time that triterpene alcohols and sterols from rice bran prevented diet-induced obesity by increasing fatty acid oxidation in muscles and decreasing fatty acid synthesis in the liver through GIP-dependent and GIP-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Unraveling sterol-dependent membrane phenotypes by analysis of protein abundance-ratio distributions in different membrane fractions under biochemical and endogenous sterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Zauber, Henrik; Szymanski, Witold; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2013-12-01

    During the last decade, research on plasma membrane focused increasingly on the analysis of so-called microdomains. It has been shown that function of many membrane-associated proteins involved in signaling and transport depends on their conditional segregation within sterol-enriched membrane domains. High throughput proteomic analysis of sterol-protein interactions are often based on analyzing detergent resistant membrane fraction enriched in sterols and associated proteins, which also contain proteins from these microdomain structures. Most studies so far focused exclusively on the characterization of detergent resistant membrane protein composition and abundances. This approach has received some criticism because of its unspecificity and many co-purifying proteins. In this study, by a label-free quantitation approach, we extended the characterization of membrane microdomains by particularly studying distributions of each protein between detergent resistant membrane and detergent-soluble fractions (DSF). This approach allows a more stringent definition of dynamic processes between different membrane phases and provides a means of identification of co-purifying proteins. We developed a random sampling algorithm, called Unicorn, allowing for robust statistical testing of alterations in the protein distribution ratios of the two different fractions. Unicorn was validated on proteomic data from methyl-β-cyclodextrin treated plasma membranes and the sterol biosynthesis mutant smt1. Both, chemical treatment and sterol-biosynthesis mutation affected similar protein classes in their membrane phase distribution and particularly proteins with signaling and transport functions.

  1. Cytochrome P450 metabolism of the post-lanosterol intermediates explains enigmas of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ačimovič, Jure; Goyal, Sandeep; Košir, Rok; Goličnik, Marko; Perše, Martina; Belič, Ales; Urlep, Žiga; Guengerich, F Peter; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-06-23

    Cholesterol synthesis is among the oldest metabolic pathways, consisting of the Bloch and Kandutch-Russell branches. Following lanosterol, sterols of both branches are proposed to be dedicated to cholesterol. We challenge this dogma by mathematical modeling and with experimental evidence. It was not possible to explain the sterol profile of testis in cAMP responsive element modulator tau (Crem τ) knockout mice with mathematical models based on textbook pathways of cholesterol synthesis. Our model differs in the inclusion of virtual sterol metabolizing enzymes branching from the pathway. We tested the hypothesis that enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily can participate in the catalysis of non-classical reactions. We show that CYP enzymes can metabolize multiple sterols in vitro, establishing novel branching points of cholesterol synthesis. In conclusion, sterols of cholesterol synthesis can be oxidized further to metabolites not dedicated to production of cholesterol. Additionally, CYP7A1, CYP11A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1 are parts of a broader cholesterol synthesis network.

  2. Cytochrome P450 metabolism of the post-lanosterol intermediates explains enigmas of cholesterol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ačimovič, Jure; Goyal, Sandeep; Košir, Rok; Goličnik, Marko; Perše, Martina; Belič, Ales; Urlep, Žiga; Guengerich, F. Peter; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol synthesis is among the oldest metabolic pathways, consisting of the Bloch and Kandutch-Russell branches. Following lanosterol, sterols of both branches are proposed to be dedicated to cholesterol. We challenge this dogma by mathematical modeling and with experimental evidence. It was not possible to explain the sterol profile of testis in cAMP responsive element modulator tau (Crem τ) knockout mice with mathematical models based on textbook pathways of cholesterol synthesis. Our model differs in the inclusion of virtual sterol metabolizing enzymes branching from the pathway. We tested the hypothesis that enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily can participate in the catalysis of non-classical reactions. We show that CYP enzymes can metabolize multiple sterols in vitro, establishing novel branching points of cholesterol synthesis. In conclusion, sterols of cholesterol synthesis can be oxidized further to metabolites not dedicated to production of cholesterol. Additionally, CYP7A1, CYP11A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1 are parts of a broader cholesterol synthesis network.

  3. Synthesis and supramolecular studies of chiral boronated platinum(II) complexes: insights into the molecular recognition of carboranes by β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Ching, H Y Vincent; Clifford, Sarah; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Clarke, Ronald J; Rendina, Louis M

    2012-11-05

    The synthesis and characterisation of a novel isomeric family of closo-carborane-containing Pt(II) complexes ((R/S)-(1-4)⋅2 NO(3)) are reported. Related complexes (5⋅NO(3) and 6⋅NO(3)) that contain the 7,8-nido-carborane cluster were obtained from the selective deboronation of the 1,2-closo-carborane analogues. The corresponding water-soluble supramolecular 1:1 host-guest β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) adducts ((R/S)-(1-4)⋅β-CD⋅2 NO(3)) were also prepared and fully characterised. HR-ESI-MS experiments confirmed the presence of the host-guest adducts, and 2D-(1) H{(11)B} ROESY NMR studies showed that the boron clusters enter the β-CD from the side of the wider annulus. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed enthalpically driven 1:1 and higher-order supramolecular interactions between β-CD and (R/S)-(1-4)⋅2 NO(3) in aqueous solution. A comparison of the predominate 1:1 binding mode established that the affinity of β-CD for the guest molecule is mainly influenced by the pyridyl ring substitution pattern and chirality of the host, whilst the nature of the closo-carborane isomer also plays some role, with the most favourable structural features for β-CD binding being the presence of the 4-pyridyl ring, 1,12-closo-carborane, and an S configuration. The results reported here represent the first comprehensive calorimetric study of the supramolecular interactions between closo-carborane compounds and β-CD, and it provides fascinating insights into the structural features influencing the thermodynamics of this phenomenon.

  4. Chemical Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B Affords Insight into the Molecular Structure, Iron Chelation, and Biological Activity of a Polycarboxylate Siderophore Deployed by the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Julie L H; Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-07-22

    Staphyloferrin B (SB) is a citrate-based polycarboxylate siderophore produced and utilized by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus for acquiring iron when colonizing the vertebrate host. The first chemical synthesis of SB is reported, which enables further molecular and biological characterization and provides access to structural analogues of the siderophore. Under conditions of iron limitation, addition of synthetic SB to bacterial growth medium recovered the growth of the antibiotic resistant community isolate S. aureus USA300 JE2. Two structural analogues of SB, epiSB and SBimide, were also synthesized and employed to investigate how epimerization of the citric acid moiety or imide formation influence its function as a siderophore. Epimerization of the citric acid stereocenter perturbed the iron-binding properties and siderophore function of SB as evidenced by experimental and computational modeling studies. Although epiSB provided growth recovery to S. aureus USA300 JE2 cultured in iron-deficient medium, the effect was attenuated relative to that of SB. Moreover, SB more effectively sequestered the Fe(III) bound to human holo-transferrin, an iron source of S. aureus, than epiSB. SBimide is an imide analogous to the imide forms of other citric acid siderophores that are often observed when these molecules are isolated from natural sources. Here, SBimide is shown to be unstable, converting to native SB at physiological pH. SB is considered to be a virulence factor of S. aureus, a pathogen that poses a particular threat to public health because of the number of drug-resistant strains emerging in hospital and community settings. Iron acquisition by S. aureus is important for its ability to colonize the human host and cause disease, and new chemical insights into the structure and function of SB will inform the search for new therapeutic strategies for combating S. aureus infections.

  5. Sustained and selective suppression of intestinal cholesterol synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an inhibitor of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase, in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterol cyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A.

  6. Can non-cholesterol sterols and lipoprotein subclasses distribution predict different patterns of cholesterol metabolism and statin therapy response?

    PubMed

    Gojkovic, Tamara; Vladimirov, Sandra; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Vekic, Jelena; Kalimanovska-Ostric, Dimitra; Djuricic, Ivana; Sobajic, Sladjana; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2017-03-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis disorders may cause dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis progression and coronary artery disease (CAD) development. Evaluation of non-cholesterol sterols (NCSs) as synthesis and absorption markers, and lipoprotein particles quality may indicate the dyslipidemia early development. This study investigates associations of different cholesterol homeostasis patterns with low-density (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) subclasses distribution in statin-treated and statin-untreated CAD patients, and potential use of aforementioned markers for CAD treatment optimization. The study included 78 CAD patients (47 statin-untreated and 31 statin-treated) and 31 controls (CG). NCSs concentrations were quantified using gas chromatography- flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Lipoprotein subclasses were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis. In patients, cholesterol-synthesis markers were significantly higher comparing to CG. Cholesterol-synthesis markers were inversely associated with LDL size in all groups. For cholesterol homeostasis estimation, each group was divided to good and/or poor synthetizers and/or absorbers according to desmosterol and β-sitosterol median values. In CG, participants with reduced cholesterol absorption, the relative proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in those with increased cholesterol synthesis compared to those with reduced synthesis (p<0.01). LDL I fraction was significantly higher in poor synthetizers/poor absorbers subgroup compared to poor synthetizers/good absorbers (p<0.01), and good synthetizers/poor absorbers (p<0.01). Statin-treated patients with increased cholesterol absorption had increased proportion of LDL IVB (p<0.05). The results suggest the existence of different lipoprotein abnormalities according to various patterns of cholesterol homeostasis. Desmosterol/β-sitosterol ratio could be used for estimating individual propensity toward dyslipidemia development and direct the future treatment.

  7. Hair and skin sterols in normal mice and those with deficient dehydrosterol reductase (DHCR7), the enzyme associated with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Montserrat; Matabosch, Xavier; Ying, Lee; Watson, Gordon; Shackleton, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies have focused on cholesterol synthesis in mouse models for 7-dehydrosterolreductase (DHCR7) deficiency, also known as Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Investigations of such mutants have relied on tissue and blood levels of the cholesterol precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) and its 8-dehydro isomer. In this investigation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we have identified and quantified cholesterol and its precursors (7DHC, desmosterol, lathosterol, lanosterol and cholest-7,24-dien-3β-ol) in mouse hair. The components were characterized and their concentrations were compared to those found in mouse skin and serum. Hair appeared unique in that desmosterol was a major sterol component, almost matching in concentration cholesterol itself. In DHCR7 deficient mice, dehydrodesmosterol (DHD) was the dominant hair Δ7 sterol. Mutant mouse hair had much higher concentrations of 7-dehydrosterols relative to cholesterol than did serum or tissue at all ages studied. The 7DHC/C ratio in hair was typically about sevenfold the value in serum or skin and the DHD/D ratio was 100X that of the serum 7DHC/C ratio. Mutant mice compensate for their DHCR7 deficiency with maturity, and the tissue and blood 7DHC/C become close to normal. That hair retains high relative concentrations of the dehydro precursors suggests that the apparent up-regulation of Dhcr7 seen in liver is slower to develop at the site of hair cholesterol synthesis. PMID:20804844

  8. Plant sterols as dietary adjuvants in the reduction of cardiovascular risk: theory and evidence.

    PubMed

    Patch, Craig S; Tapsell, Linda C; Williams, Peter G; Gordon, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Plant sterol-enriched foods are an effective dietary adjuvant in reducing cardiovascular risk by lowering total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) in serum by up to approximately 15%. The mechanism of action of plant sterols is different from those of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins) and thus their effect is additive. Combining plant sterols with other dietary components known to reduce cholesterol in a portfolio approach has proven to be most effective for reduction of hypercholesterolemia and provide an alternative treatment option for clinicians. Plant sterol-enriched foods provides clinicians with a relatively cheap, safe, and effective way to help patients manage their cardiovascular risk.

  9. Isolation of a biodegradable sterol-rich fraction from industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Dias, A C P; Fernandes, P; Cabral, J M S; Pinheiro, H M

    2002-05-01

    Several industrial waste materials were screened for their sterol content. The possibility of using these industrial by-products as sterol sources for the microbiological production of 4-androsten-3,17-dione (AD) and 1,4-androsta-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) was investigated. Two methods of obtaining the sterol fraction from wastes were developed. Sterol-rich (96-98%) fractions were isolated in a yield above 70%, from a tall-oil effluent of a paper pulp industry and from edible-oil deodorizates. These fractions were subsequently used as a substrate for microbial degradation by a Mycobacterium sp. strain and proved to be easily converted to AD and ADD.

  10. Investigation of the Sterol Composition and Azole Resistance in Field Isolates of Septoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Joseph-Horne, T.; Hollomon, D.; Manning, N.; Kelly, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    We report here a biochemical study of resistance to azole antifungal agents in a field isolate (S-27) of a fungal phytopathogen. Isolates of Septoria tritici were compared in vitro, and their responses reflected that observed in the field, with S-27 exhibiting resistance relative to RL2. In untreated cultures, both RL2 and S-27 contained isomers of ergosterol and ergosta-5,7-dienol, although in differing concentrations. Under azole treatment, this phytopathogen exhibited a response similar to that of other pathogenic fungi, with a reduction in desmethyl sterols and an accumulation of 14(alpha)-methyl sterols, indicative of inhibition of the P450-mediating sterol 14(alpha)-demethylase. Growth arrest was attributed to the reduction of ergosterol combined with an accumulation of nonutilizable sterols. Strain S-27 exhibited an azole-resistant phenotype which was correlated with decreased cellular content of azole. PMID:16535210

  11. Effect of ethanol on the sterols of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Koukkou, A I; Tsoukatos, D; Drainas, C

    1993-08-01

    Ergosterol, lanosterol and two further unidentified sterols were detected and quantified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell extracts. In cells grown under anaerobic conditions, the levels of these sterols were dramatically reduced with a concomitant increase of their squalene precursor as compared with cells growing under aerobic conditions. Presence of ethanol resulted in a decrease in the sterol content under aerobic conditions. On the contrary, under anaerobic conditions presence of ethanol resulted in a three-fold increase of total sterols. Lanosterol was the main constituent of this elevation. It is suggested that lanosterol in parallel with unsaturated fatty acids is responsible for maintaining membrane integrity of S. pombe cells growing in the presence of ethanol.

  12. Plant Sterols as Dietary Adjuvants in the Reduction of Cardiovascular Risk: Theory and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patch, Craig S; Tapsell, Linda C; Williams, Peter G; Gordon, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Plant sterol-enriched foods are an effective dietary adjuvant in reducing cardiovascular risk by lowering total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) in serum by up to ∼15%. The mechanism of action of plant sterols is different from those of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins) and thus their effect is additive. Combining plant sterols with other dietary components known to reduce cholesterol in a portfolio approach has proven to be most effective for reduction of hypercholesterolemia and provide an alternative treatment option for clinicians. Plant sterol-enriched foods provides clinicians with a relatively cheap, safe, and effective way to help patients manage their cardiovascular risk. PMID:17319460

  13. CYP710A genes encoding sterol C22-desaturase in Physcomitrella patens as molecular evidence for the evolutionary conservation of a sterol biosynthetic pathway in plants.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Tomomi; Saga, Hirohisa; Hashizume, Hiroko; Ohta, Daisaku

    2009-05-01

    We have characterized cytochromes P450, CYP710A13, and CYP710A14, as the sterol C22-desaturase in the moss Physcomitrella patens. GC-MS analyses demonstrated that P. patens accumulated stigmasterol as the major sterol (56-60% of total sterol) and sitosterol to a lesser extent (8-12%); this sterol profile contrasts with those in higher plants accumulating stigmasterol as a minor component. Recombinant CYP710A13 and CYP710A14 proteins prepared using a baculovirus/insect cell system exhibited the C22-desaturase activity with beta-sitosterol to produce stigmasterol, while campesterol and 24-epi-campesterol were not accepted as the substrates. The K(m) values for beta-sitosterol of CYP710A13 (1.0 +/- 0.043 microM) and CYP710A14 (2.1 +/- 0.17 microM) were at comparable levels of those reported with higher plant CYP710A proteins. In Arabidopsis T87 cells over-expressing CYP710A14, stigmasterol contents reached a level 20- to 72-fold higher than those in the basal level of T87 cells, confirming the C22-desaturase activity of this P450 enzyme. The occurrence of the end-products together with the enzymes involved in the last step of the pathway substantiated the presence of an entire sterol biosynthetic pathway in P. patens, providing evidence for the conservation of the sterol biosynthetic pathway through the evolutionary process of land plants.

  14. Characterization, mutagenesis and mechanistic analysis of an ancient algal sterol C24-methyltransferase: Implications for understanding sterol evolution in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Brad A; Collins, Emily K; Howard, Alicia L; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J; Miller, Matthew B; Thomas, Crista D; Pleasant, Stephanie K; Nes, W David

    2015-05-01

    Sterol C24-methyltransferases (SMTs) constitute a group of sequence-related proteins that catalyze the pattern of sterol diversity across eukaryotic kingdoms. The only gene for sterol alkylation in green algae was identified and the corresponding catalyst from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) was characterized kinetically and for product distributions. The properties of CrSMT were similar to those predicted for an ancient SMT expected to possess broad C3-anchoring requirements for substrate binding and formation of 24β-methyl/ethyl Δ(25(27))-olefin products typical of primitive organisms. Unnatural Δ(24(25))-sterol substrates, missing a C4β-angular methyl group involved with binding orientation, convert to product ratios in favor of Δ(24(28))-products. Remodeling the active site to alter the electronics of Try110 (to Leu) results in delayed timing of the hydride migration from methyl attack of the Δ(24)-bond, that thereby produces metabolic switching of product ratios in favor of Δ(25(27))-olefins or impairs the second C1-transfer activity. Incubation of [27-(13)C]lanosterol or [methyl-(2)H3]SAM as co-substrates established the CrSMT catalyzes a sterol methylation pathway by the "algal" Δ(25(27))-olefin route, where methylation proceeds by a conserved SN2 reaction and de-protonation proceeds from the pro-Z methyl group on lanosterol corresponding to C27. This previously unrecognized catalytic competence for an enzyme of sterol biosynthesis, together with phylogenomic analyses, suggest that mutational divergence of a promiscuous SMT produced substrate- and phyla-specific SMT1 (catalyzes first biomethylation) and SMT2 (catalyzes second biomethylation) isoforms in red and green algae, respectively, and in the case of SMT2 selection afforded modification in reaction channeling necessary for the switch in ergosterol (24β-methyl) biosynthesis to stigmasterol (24α-ethyl) biosynthesis during the course of land plant evolution.

  15. Azole fungicides affect mammalian steroidogenesis by inhibiting sterol 14 alpha-demethylase and aromatase.

    PubMed

    Zarn, Jürg A; Brüschweiler, Beat J; Schlatter, Josef R

    2003-03-01

    Azole compounds play a key role as antifungals in agriculture and in human mycoses and as non-steroidal antiestrogens in the treatment of estrogen-responsive breast tumors in postmenopausal women. This broad use of azoles is based on their inhibition of certain pathways of steroidogenesis by high-affinity binding to the enzymes sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and aromatase. Sterol 14-alpha-demethylase is crucial for the production of meiosis-activating sterols, which recently were shown to modulate germ cell development in both sexes of mammals. Aromatase is responsible for the physiologic balance of androgens and estrogens. At high doses, azole fungicides and other azole compounds affect reproductive organs, fertility, and development in several species. These effects may be explained by inhibition of sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and/or aromatase. In fact, several azole compounds were shown to inhibit these enzymes in vitro, and there is also strong evidence for inhibiting activity in vivo. Furthermore, the specificity of the enzyme inhibition of several of these compounds is poor, both with respect to fungal versus nonfungal sterol 14-alpha-demethylases and versus other P450 enzymes including aromatase. To our knowledge, this is the first review on sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and aromatase as common targets of azole compounds and the consequence for steroidogenesis. We conclude that many azole compounds developed as inhibitors of fungal sterol 14-alpha-demethylase are inhibitors also of mammalian sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and mammalian aromatase with unknown potencies. For human health risk assessment, data on comparative potencies of azole fungicides to fungal and human enzymes are needed.

  16. Azole fungicides affect mammalian steroidogenesis by inhibiting sterol 14 alpha-demethylase and aromatase.

    PubMed Central

    Zarn, Jürg A; Brüschweiler, Beat J; Schlatter, Josef R

    2003-01-01

    Azole compounds play a key role as antifungals in agriculture and in human mycoses and as non-steroidal antiestrogens in the treatment of estrogen-responsive breast tumors in postmenopausal women. This broad use of azoles is based on their inhibition of certain pathways of steroidogenesis by high-affinity binding to the enzymes sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and aromatase. Sterol 14-alpha-demethylase is crucial for the production of meiosis-activating sterols, which recently were shown to modulate germ cell development in both sexes of mammals. Aromatase is responsible for the physiologic balance of androgens and estrogens. At high doses, azole fungicides and other azole compounds affect reproductive organs, fertility, and development in several species. These effects may be explained by inhibition of sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and/or aromatase. In fact, several azole compounds were shown to inhibit these enzymes in vitro, and there is also strong evidence for inhibiting activity in vivo. Furthermore, the specificity of the enzyme inhibition of several of these compounds is poor, both with respect to fungal versus nonfungal sterol 14-alpha-demethylases and versus other P450 enzymes including aromatase. To our knowledge, this is the first review on sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and aromatase as common targets of azole compounds and the consequence for steroidogenesis. We conclude that many azole compounds developed as inhibitors of fungal sterol 14-alpha-demethylase are inhibitors also of mammalian sterol 14-alpha-demethylase and mammalian aromatase with unknown potencies. For human health risk assessment, data on comparative potencies of azole fungicides to fungal and human enzymes are needed. PMID:12611652

  17. Plant sterols/stanols as cholesterol lowering agents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    AbuMweis, Suhad S.; Barake, Roula; Jones, Peter J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Consumption of plant sterols has been reported to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations by 5–15%. Factors that affect plant sterol efficacy are still to be determined. Objectives To more precisely quantify the effect of plant sterol enriched products on LDL cholesterol concentrations than what is reported previously, and to identify and quantify the effects of subjects’ characteristics, food carrier, frequency and time of intake on efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol lowering agents. Design Fifty-nine eligible randomized clinical trials published from 1992 to 2006 were identified from five databases. Weighted mean effect sizes were calculated for net differences in LDL levels using a random effect model. Results Plant sterol containing products decreased LDL levels by 0.31 mmol/L (95% CI, –0.35 to –0.27, P= < 0.0001) compared with placebo. Between trial heterogeneity was evident (Chi-square test, P = <0.0001) indicating that the observed differences between trial results were unlikely to have been caused by chance. Reductions in LDL levels were greater in individuals with high baseline LDL levels compared with those with normal to borderline baseline LDL levels. Reductions in LDL were greater when plant sterols were incorporated into fat spreads, mayonnaise and salad dressing, milk and yoghurt comparing with other food products such as croissants and muffins, orange juice, non-fat beverages, cereal bars, and chocolate. Plant sterols consumed as a single morning dose did not have a significant effect on LDL cholesterol levels. Conclusion Plant sterol containing products reduced LDL concentrations but the reduction was related to individuals’ baseline LDL levels, food carrier, and frequency and time of intake. PMID:19109655

  18. Quantitation of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus Chia) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa

    2006-10-04

    The chemical composition (fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols) of the oil from 14 samples of turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus L.) fruits is presented in this study. The oil content of the samples varied in a relatively small range between 38.4 g/100 g and 45.1 g/100 g. The dominating fatty acid of the oil is oleic acid, which accounted for 43.0 to 51.3% of the total fatty acids. The total content of vitamin E active compounds in the oils ranged between 396.8 and 517.7 mg/kg. The predominant isomers were alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, with approximate equal amounts between about 110 and 150 mg/kg. The seed oil of P. terebinthus also contained different tocotrienols, with gamma-tocotrienol as the dominate compound of this group, which amounted to between 79 and 114 mg/kg. The total content of sterols of the oils was determined to be between 1341.3 and 1802.5 mg/kg, with beta-sitosterol as the predominent sterol that accounted for more than 80% of the total amount of sterols. Other sterols in noteworthy amounts were campesterol, Delta5-avenasterol, and stigmasterol, which came to about 3-5% of the total sterols.

  19. Free, esterified and residual bound sterols in Black Sea Unit I sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, J. W.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schenck, P. A.; Volkman, J. K.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed compositional data for the sterols isolated from a surface, Unit I, sediment from the Black Sea are reported. A procedure based on digitonin precipitation has been used to separate the more abundant free sterols from those occurring in esterified forms. Saponification of the solvent extracted sediment residue liberated only a small quantity of residual bound sterols in contrast to studies of other sediments. 4-Methylsterols are much more abundant than 4-desmethylsterols in both the free and esterified sterol fractions which we attribute to a major dinoflagellate input, as in deeper Unit II sediment. The desmethylsterol fraction appears to derive from a variety of sources including dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, diatoms, terrigenous detritus and perhaps invertebrates. 5α(H)-Stanols are particularly abundant in the free sterol fraction. An analysis of the stanol/stenol ratios suggests that the 4-desmethyl-5α(H)-stanols are the result of specific microbial reductions of Δ 5-sterols and/or the reflection of a contribution of stanol containing source organisms.

  20. Inhibitors of Sterol Biosynthesis and Amphotericin B Reduce the Viability of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. carinii

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Edna S.; Collins, Margaret S.; Cushion, Melanie T.

    2000-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii synthesizes sterols with a double bond at C-7 of the sterol nucleus and an alkyl group with one or two carbons at C-24 of the side chain. Also, some human-derived Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis strains contain lanosterol derivatives with an alkyl group at C-24. These unique sterols have not been found in other pathogens of mammalian lungs. Thus, P. carinii may have important differences in its susceptibility to drugs known to block reactions in ergosterol biosynthesis in other fungi. In the present study, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, squalene epoxide-lanosterol cyclase, lanosterol demethylase, Δ8 to Δ7 isomerase, and S-adenosylmethionine:sterol methyltransferase were tested for their effects on P. carinii viability as determined by quantitation of cellular ATP levels in a population of organisms. Compounds within each category varied in inhibitory effect; the most effective included drugs targeted at squalene synthase, squalene epoxide-lanosterol cyclase, and Δ8 to Δ7 isomerase. Some drugs that are potent against ergosterol-synthesizing fungi had little effect against P. carinii, suggesting that substrates and/or enzymes in P. carinii sterol biosynthetic reactions are distinct. Amphotericin B is ineffective in clearing P. carinii infections at clinical doses; however, this drug apparently binds to sterols and causes permeability changes in P. carinii membranes, since it reduced cellular ATP levels in a dose-dependent fashion. PMID:10817720

  1. Total, free and conjugated sterolic forms in three microalgae used in mariculture.

    PubMed

    Mohammady, Nagwa Gamal

    2004-01-01

    Total, free and conjugated forms (steryl esters, steryl glycosides and acyl steryl glycosides) of sterols from three microalgae that are extensively used in mariculture (Tetraselmis chuii, Nannochloropsis salina and Skeletonema costatum) were examined. The results revealed that cholesterol is the only common fraction detected in all investigated species and distributed in free and all conjugated forms. However, the total sterol content of T. chuii was about 325 microg/g dry wt, most of it was concentrated amongst 24-methylcholesta-5,24-diene-3beta-ol and 24-methylcholest-5-en-3beta-ol. On the other hand, the majority of the fractions were distributed in the free form. The total sterol content of N. salina was about 180 microg/g dry wt, cholesterol was the major fraction that was detected. Nevertheless, the dominant distribution forms were esterified. While in S. costatum, the total sterol content was 76 microg/g dry wt, approximately most fractions are quantitatively alike and dominated in the free form. Furthermore, our study shows clearly that most sterols are not distributed regularly within each form, a result that encouraged us to suggest a distribution of specific sterol fraction as a free or conjugated can be used as a serving tool in chemotaxonomic studies.

  2. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Najle, Sebastián R; Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2016-07-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion-via a novel pathway-of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages.

  3. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals

    PubMed Central

    Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion—via a novel pathway—of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages. PMID:27383626

  4. Faecal sterols as indicators of sewage contamination in estuarine sediments of the Tay Estuary, Scotland: an extended baseline survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, A. D.; Patton, D.

    2005-06-01

    Sterol ratios are used to identify sources, occurrence and partitioning of faecal matter in sediments of the Tay Estuary, Scotland. The 5β/(5α+5β) ratio is used to discriminate between sewage and biogenic sterol sources by comparing the concentrations of coprostanols to cholesterol plus coprostanols. This index shows unambiguous sewage pollution in the Invergowrie Bay area (values >0.7). The coprostanol/epicoprostanol index is used to differentiate between human and non-human faecal inputs. Ratios confirmed the primary source as human-derived faecal material. The coprostanol/cholesterol ratio was calculated in order to elucidate the contribution of different biogenic sources to the sedimentary sterol budget. Ratios of >1 clearly indicate faecal sterol sources. Invergowrie Bay displayed no sterol signature other than sewage. A biogenic source of cholesterol influenced total sterol concentrations upstream of the City of Dundee. Attention is directed to the potential role of density fronts in compartmentalization of faecal material in bottom sediments.

  5. A structural appraisal of sterol carrier protein 2.

    PubMed

    Burgardt, Noelia I; Gianotti, Alejo R; Ferreyra, Raúl G; Ermácora, Mario R

    2017-05-01

    Sterol Carrier Protein 2 (SCP2) has been associated with lipid binding and transfer activities. However, genomic, proteomic, and structural studies revealed that it is an ubiquitous domain of complex proteins with a variety functions in all forms of life. High-resolution structures of representative SCP2 domains are available, encouraging a comprehensive review of the structural basis for its success. Most SCP2 domains pertain to three major families and are frequently found as stand-alone or at the C-termini of lipid related peroxisomal enzymes, acetyltransferases causing bacterial resistance, and bacterial environmentally important sulfatases. We (1) analyzed the structural basis of the fold and the classification of SCP2 domains; (2) identified structure-determined sequence features; (3) compared the lipid binding cavity of SCP2 and other lipid binding proteins; (4) surveyed proposed mechanisms of SCP2 mediated lipid transfer between membranes; and (5) uncovered a possible new function of the SCP2 domain as a protein-protein recognition device.

  6. Comparison of Sterol Import under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions in Three Fungal Species, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zavrel, Martin; Hoot, Sam J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol import has been characterized under various conditions in three distinct fungal species, the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two human fungal pathogens Candida glabrata and Candida albicans, employing cholesterol, the sterol of higher eukaryotes, as well as its fungal equivalent, ergosterol. Import was confirmed by the detection of esterified cholesterol within the cells. Comparing the three fungal species, we observe sterol import under three different conditions. First, as previously well characterized, we observe sterol import under low oxygen levels in S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which is dependent on the transcription factor Upc2 and/or its orthologs or paralogs. Second, we observe sterol import under aerobic conditions exclusively in the two pathogenic fungi C. glabrata and C. albicans. Uptake emerges during post-exponential-growth phases, is independent of the characterized Upc2-pathway and is slower compared to the anaerobic uptake in S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. Third, we observe under normoxic conditions in C. glabrata that Upc2-dependent sterol import can be induced in the presence of fetal bovine serum together with fluconazole. In summary, C. glabrata imports sterols both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the limited aerobic uptake can be further stimulated by the presence of serum together with fluconazole. S. cerevisiae imports sterols only in anaerobic conditions, demonstrating aerobic sterol exclusion. Finally, C. albicans imports sterols exclusively aerobically in post-exponential-growth phases, independent of Upc2. For the first time, we provide direct evidence of sterol import into the human fungal pathogen C. albicans, which until now was believed to be incapable of active sterol import. PMID:23475705

  7. Postprandial plasma oxyphytosterol concentrations after consumption of plant sterol or stanol enriched mixed meals in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sabine; Mensink, Ronald P; Konings, Maurice; Schött, Hans-F; Friedrichs, Silvia; Husche, Constanze; Lütjohann, Dieter; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent results on the relationship between increased plant sterol concentrations with cardiovascular risk, which might be related to the formation of oxyphytosterols (plant sterol oxidation products) from plant sterols. However, determinants of oxyphytosterol formation and metabolism are largely unknown. It is known, however, that serum plant sterol concentrations increase after daily consumption of plant sterol enriched products, while concentrations decrease after plant stanol consumption. Still, we have earlier reported that fasting oxyphytosterol concentrations did not increase after consuming a plant sterol- or a plant stanol enriched margarine (3.0g/d of plant sterols or stanols) for 4weeks. Since humans are in a non-fasting state for most part of the day, we have now investigated effects on oxyphytosterol concentrations during the postprandial state. For this, subjects consumed a shake (50g of fat, 12g of protein, 67g of carbohydrates), containing no, or 3.0g of plant sterols or plant stanols. Blood samples were taken up to 8h and after 4h subjects received a second shake (without plant sterols or plant stanols). Serum oxyphytosterol concentrations were determined in BHT-enriched EDTA plasma via GC-MS/MS. 7β-OH-campesterol and 7β-OH-sitosterol concentrations were significantly higher after consumption of a mixed meal enriched with plant sterol esters compared to the control and plant stanol ester meal. These increases were seen only after consumption of the second shake, illustrative for a second meal effect. Non-oxidized campesterol and sitosterol concentrations also increased after plant sterol consumption, in parallel with 7β-OH concentrations and again only after the second meal. Apparently, plant sterols and oxyphytosterols follow the same second meal effect as described for dietary cholesterol. However, the question remains whether the increase in oxyphytosterols in the postprandial phase is due to

  8. Distribution of fecal sterols in surface sediment of Sungai Tebrau, Johor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, N.; Ali, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    Decreasing quality of aquatic environments may harm human health in general. Sewage pollution from human and animal excretions is a major cause of environmental quality depletion. This study investigates the distribution of sewage contamination level in twenty surface sediment samples taken from Sungai Tebrau, Johor. Four principal fecal sterols have been identified and were found in all sediment samples, which are coprostanol, cholesterol, epicoprostanol and also cholestanol. Cholesterol as the major sterol and most abundant compound derived from a variety of sources ranged from 32.92 to 1,100.55 ngg-1 dry weights. Meanwhile, major fecal sterol, coprostanol has the lowest quantity of total sterol in all samples, constituting only 13% of total sterol. It ranged from 12.63 to 565.42 ngg-1 dry weights, but only two stations (ST12 and ST14) are sewage contaminated. Squatters and residential areas are a major contributor of poorly treated sewage into the aquatic environment. Coprostanol concentration alone is not reliable to indicate sewage contamination; diagnostic indices enhance reliability of sterols as a marker for sewage contamination. Indices applied in this study are coprostanol/cholesterol, coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and also epicoprostanol/coprostanol. Resultsof coprostanol/cholesterol, coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) indices supported the findings that both ST12 and ST14 samples are contaminated with sewage. All samples consist of relativelyhigh concentration of epicoprostanol and high ratio value of epicoprostanol/coprostanol. Generally, it can be concluded that these sampling sites are not contaminated with sewage even though fecal sterols were detected in all samples as they were found to be at low concentration.

  9. Antiproliferative effect of polyphenols and sterols of virgin argan oil on human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bennani, H; Drissi, A; Giton, F; Kheuang, L; Fiet, J; Adlouni, A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of our study has to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of polyphenols and sterols extracted from the virgin argan oil on three human prostatic cell lines (DU145, LNCaP, and PC3). Cytotoxicity, anti-proliferative effects and nuclear morphological changes of cells were analyzed after treatment with sterols and polyphenols. The results were compared to 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME(2)) as positive control. Polyphenols and sterols of virgin argan oil and 2ME(2) exhibited a dose-response cytotoxic effect and antiproliferative action on the three tested cell lines. The antiproliferative effect of polyphenols was similar for the DU145 and LNCaP cell lines; the GI(50) (defined as the concentration inhibiting growth by 50% in comparison with the control) was respectively 73 and 70microg/ml. The antiproliferative effect of sterols was 46 and 60microg/ml as GI(50) for the DU145 and LNCaP cell lines. For the PC3 cell line, the best antiproliferative effect was obtained by argan sterols with GI(50)=43microg/ml. On the other hand, the nuclear morphology analyses have shown an increased proportion of pro-apoptotic of nuclei in LNCaP cell treated with IC(50) of polyphenols or sterols compared to control cells. Our results show for the first time the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of polyphenols and sterols extracted from virgin argan oil and confirm the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 2ME(2) on prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that argan oil may be interesting in the development of new strategies for prostate cancer prevention.

  10. Crystal structure of cytochrome P450 14α-sterol demethylase (CYP51) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in complex with azole inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Podust, Larissa M.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 14α-sterol demethylases (CYP51) are essential enzymes in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. CYP51 removes the 14α-methyl group from sterol precursors such as lanosterol, obtusifoliol, dihydrolanosterol, and 24(28)-methylene-24,25-dihydrolanosterol. Inhibitors of CYP51 include triazole antifungal agents fluconazole and itraconazole, drugs used in treatment of topical and systemic mycoses. The 2.1- and 2.2-Å crystal structures reported here for 4-phenylimidazole- and fluconazole-bound CYP51 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTCYP51) are the first structures of an authentic P450 drug target. MTCYP51 exhibits the P450 fold with the exception of two striking differences—a bent I helix and an open conformation of BC loop—that define an active site-access channel running along the heme plane perpendicular to the direction observed for the substrate entry in P450BM3. Although a channel analogous to that in P450BM3 is evident also in MTCYP51, it is not open at the surface. The presence of two different channels, with one being open to the surface, suggests the possibility of conformationally regulated substrate-in/product-out openings in CYP51. Mapping mutations identified in Candida albicans azole-resistant isolates indicates that azole resistance in fungi develops in protein regions involved in orchestrating passage of CYP51 through different conformational stages along the catalytic cycle rather than in residues directly contacting fluconazole. These new structures provide a basis for rational design of new, more efficacious antifungal agents as well as insight into the molecular mechanism of P450 catalysis. PMID:11248033

  11. Silicon Incorporated Morpholine Antifungals: Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Known morpholine class antifungals (fenpropimorph, fenpropidin, and amorolfine) were synthetically modified through silicon incorporation to have 15 sila-analogues. Twelve sila-analogues exhibited potent antifungal activity against different human fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus niger. Sila-analogue 24 (fenpropimorph analogue) was the best in our hands, which showed superior fungicidal potential than fenpropidin, fenpropimorph, and amorolfine. The mode of action of sila-analogues was similar to morpholines, i.e., inhibition of sterol reductase and sterol isomerase enzymes of ergosterol synthesis pathway. PMID:26617963

  12. Effect of plant sterols on the lipid profile of patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Randomised, experimental study.

    PubMed

    Párraga, Ignacio; López-Torres, Jesús; Andrés, Fernando; Navarro, Beatriz; del Campo, José M; García-Reyes, Mercedes; Galdón, María P; Lloret, Angeles; Precioso, Juan C; Rabanales, Joseba

    2011-09-12

    Studies have been conducted on supplementing the daily diet with plant sterol ester-enriched milk derivatives in order to reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and, consequently, cardiovascular risk. However, clinical practice guidelines on hypercholesterolaemia state that there is not sufficient evidence to recommend their use in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia. The main objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of the intake of 2 g of plant sterol esters a day in lowering LDL-cholesterol levels in patients diagnosed with hypercholesterolaemia. The specific objectives are: 1) to quantify the efficacy of the daily intake of plant sterol esters in lowering LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypercholesterolaemia; 2) to evaluate the occurrence of adverse effects of the daily intake of plant sterol esters; 3) to identify the factors that determine a greater reduction in lipid levels in subjects receiving plant sterol ester supplements. Randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled experimental trial carried out at family doctors' surgeries at three health centres in the Health Area of Albacete (Spain). The study subjects will be adults diagnosed with "limit" or "defined" hypercholesterolaemia and who have LDL cholesterol levels of 130 mg/dl or over. A dairy product in the form of liquid yoghurt containing 2 g of plant sterol ester per container will be administered daily after the main meal, for a period of 24 months. The control group will receive a daily unit of yogurt not supplemented with plant sterol esters that has a similar appearance to the enriched yoghurt. The primary variable is the change in lipid profile at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The secondary variables are: change in cardiovascular risk, adherence to the dairy product, adverse effects, adherence to dietary recommendations, frequency of food consumption, basic physical examination data, health problems, lipid-lowering medication, physical activity

  13. Plant sterols and plant stanols in the management of dyslipidaemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gylling, Helena; Plat, Jogchum; Turley, Stephen; Ginsberg, Henry N; Ellegård, Lars; Jessup, Wendy; Jones, Peter J; Lütjohann, Dieter; Maerz, Winfried; Masana, Luis; Silbernagel, Günther; Staels, Bart; Borén, Jan; Catapano, Alberico L; De Backer, Guy; Deanfield, John; Descamps, Olivier S; Kovanen, Petri T; Riccardi, Gabriele; Tokgözoglu, Lale; Chapman, M John

    2014-02-01

    This EAS Consensus Panel critically appraised evidence relevant to the benefit to risk relationship of functional foods with added plant sterols and/or plant stanols, as components of a healthy lifestyle, to reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, and thereby lower cardiovascular risk. Plant sterols/stanols (when taken at 2 g/day) cause significant inhibition of cholesterol absorption and lower LDL-C levels by between 8 and 10%. The relative proportions of cholesterol versus sterol/stanol levels are similar in both plasma and tissue, with levels of sterols/stanols being 500-/10,000-fold lower than those of cholesterol, suggesting they are handled similarly to cholesterol in most cells. Despite possible atherogenicity of marked elevations in circulating levels of plant sterols/stanols, protective effects have been observed in some animal models of atherosclerosis. Higher plasma levels of plant sterols/stanols associated with intakes of 2 g/day in man have not been linked to adverse effects on health in long-term human studies. Importantly, at this dose, plant sterol/stanol-mediated LDL-C lowering is additive to that of statins in dyslipidaemic subjects, equivalent to doubling the dose of statin. The reported 6-9% lowering of plasma triglyceride by 2 g/day in hypertriglyceridaemic patients warrants further evaluation. Based on LDL-C lowering and the absence of adverse signals, this EAS Consensus Panel concludes that functional foods with plant sterols/stanols may be considered 1) in individuals with high cholesterol levels at intermediate or low global cardiovascular risk who do not qualify for pharmacotherapy, 2) as an adjunct to pharmacologic therapy in high and very high risk patients who fail to achieve LDL-C targets on statins or are statin- intolerant, 3) and in adults and children (>6 years) with familial hypercholesterolaemia, in line with current guidance. However, it must be acknowledged that there are no randomised, controlled

  14. Effect of plant sterols on the lipid profile of patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Randomised, experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have been conducted on supplementing the daily diet with plant sterol ester-enriched milk derivatives in order to reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and, consequently, cardiovascular risk. However, clinical practice guidelines on hypercholesterolaemia state that there is not sufficient evidence to recommend their use in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia. The main objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of the intake of 2 g of plant sterol esters a day in lowering LDL-cholesterol levels in patients diagnosed with hypercholesterolaemia. The specific objectives are: 1) to quantify the efficacy of the daily intake of plant sterol esters in lowering LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypercholesterolaemia; 2) to evaluate the occurrence of adverse effects of the daily intake of plant sterol esters; 3) to identify the factors that determine a greater reduction in lipid levels in subjects receiving plant sterol ester supplements. Methods/Design Randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled experimental trial carried out at family doctors' surgeries at three health centres in the Health Area of Albacete (Spain). The study subjects will be adults diagnosed with "limit" or "defined" hypercholesterolaemia and who have LDL cholesterol levels of 130 mg/dl or over. A dairy product in the form of liquid yoghurt containing 2 g of plant sterol ester per container will be administered daily after the main meal, for a period of 24 months. The control group will receive a daily unit of yogurt not supplemented with plant sterol esters that has a similar appearance to the enriched yoghurt. The primary variable is the change in lipid profile at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The secondary variables are: change in cardiovascular risk, adherence to the dairy product, adverse effects, adherence to dietary recommendations, frequency of food consumption, basic physical examination data, health problems, lipid

  15. Rapid Analysis of Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Sedimentary Algal Sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménot-Combes, G.; Sessions, A. L.; Hayes, J. M.; Altabet, M. A.; Higginson, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a new procedure to produce highly resolved records of the carbon isotopic composition of algal sterols. The procedure includes: (i) recovery of geolipids from dry sediments by extraction in organic solvents; (ii) chromatographic fractionation of the extract on silica gel; and (iii) removal of n-alcohols with Silicalite. Simplifications allow processing of 24 samples per day. Miniaturization has reduced the amount of sediment required to 300 mg. The carbon isotopic composition of the extract is measured using a moving-wire combustion system initially developed to accept the effluent of a liquid chromatograph (Brand and Dobberstein, Isotopes Environ. Health Stud. 32, 275-283, 1996). Analyses are made at 25-sec intervals with an average standard error of 0.15‰ for samples ranging from 200 to 900 ngC. Comparison of the resulting records of the isotopic composition of algal lipids to parallel analyses of inorganic carbon allows calculation of the isotopic fractionation associated with primary production and thus provides information about conditions in the photic zone. It serves also to identify samples in which more detailed, compound-specific analysis would be worthwhile. A highly-resolved record of 13C in polar lipids from a sediment core collected on the Oman Margin (ODP 723B) indicates fractionations between 20 and 25‰ . Events occurring on timescales of a few hundred years have caused variations as large as 4‰ . Increases in the fractionation could be caused by slowed rates of growth, an increase of the surface area/volume ratio of the community or an increase in the concentration of CO2. Such changes could be related to varying strengths of upwelling, supplies of key nutrients, or to changes in the dominant population in the producer community. Characterization of the lipids present at selected depths, as well as the comparison of our profile with existing paleoceanographic records from the Oman Margin, should allow refinement of these

  16. Analysis of Vascular Development in the hydra Sterol Biosynthetic Mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Margaret; Clark, Nick; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background The control of vascular tissue development in plants is influenced by diverse hormonal signals, but their interactions during this process are not well understood. Wild-type sterol profiles are essential for growth, tissue patterning and signalling processes in plant development, and are required for regulated vascular patterning. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigate the roles of sterols in vascular tissue development, through an analysis of the Arabidopsis mutants hydra1 and fackel/hydra2, which are defective in the enzymes sterol isomerase and sterol C-14 reductase respectively. We show that defective vascular patterning in the shoot is associated with ectopic cell divisions. Expression of the auxin-regulated AtHB8 homeobox gene is disrupted in mutant embryos and seedlings, associated with variably incomplete vascular strand formation and duplication of the longitudinal axis. Misexpression of the auxin reporter proIAA2∶GUS and mislocalization of PIN proteins occurs in the mutants. Introduction of the ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutation partially rescues defective cell division, localization of PIN proteins, and vascular strand development. Conclusions The results support a model in which sterols are required for correct auxin and ethylene crosstalk to regulate PIN localization, auxin distribution and AtHB8 expression, necessary for correct vascular development. PMID:20808926

  17. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Stong, Rachel A; Kolodny, Eli; Kelsey, Rick G; González-Hernández, M P; Vivanco, Jorge M; Manter, Daniel K

    2013-06-01

    Elicitin-mediated acquisition of plant sterols is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. This study examined the interactions between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. Ground leaf tissue, sterols, and tannin-enriched extracts were obtained from three different plant species (California bay laurel, California black oak, and Oregon white oak) in order to evaluate the effect of differing sterol/tannin contents on Phytophthora ramorum growth. For all three species, high levels of foliage inhibited P. ramorum growth and sporulation, with a steeper concentration dependence for the two oak samples. Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation were inhibited by either phytosterols or tannin-enriched extracts. High levels of sterols diminished elicitin gene expression in P. ramorum; whereas the tannin-enriched extract decreased the amount of 'functional' or ELISA-detectable elicitin, but not gene expression. Across all treatment combinations, P. ramorum growth and sporulation correlated strongly with the amount of ELISA-detectable elicitin (R (2) = 0.791 and 0.961, respectively).

  18. Fomentarols A-D, sterols from the polypore macrofungus Fomes fomentarius.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yi; Xiong, Juan; Zhai, Wen-Zhu; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Sheng-Ping; Tang, Yu; Wang, Ji; Su, Jing-Jing; Yang, Guo-Xun; Zhao, Yun; Fan, Hui; Xia, Gang; Wang, Chuan-Gui; Hu, Jin-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Four (1-4) hitherto unknown and seven (5-11) known ergostane-type sterols were isolated from the EtOH extract of the dried fruiting bodies of the polypore macrofungus Fomes fomentarius. On the basis of spectroscopic analysis, the structures of polyhydroxylated sterols 1-4 were elucidated to be (22E,24R)-3β,5α,6β,14α-tetrahydroxyergosta-7,9(11),22-triene (fomentarol A, 1), (22E,24R)-3β,5β,6α,7α-tetrahydroxy-8α,9α-dihydroergosta-14,22-diene (fomentarol B, 2), (22E,24R)-3β,5α-dihydroxy-6β-ethoxyergosta-7,22-diene (fomentarol C, 3), and (22E,24S)-3β,25-dihydroxy-15α-O-β-D-glucopyranosylergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (fomentarol D, 4), respectively. Rings A/B and B/C are in turn cis-fused in compound 2, which is uncommon in natural ergostane-type sterols. The potential biogenetic relationship of 2 and other ergostane-type sterols isolated from F. fomentarius was briefly discussed. Moderate cytotoxic effects of the isolated sterols against a small panel of human cancer cell lines were also established. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant sterols: factors affecting their efficacy and safety as functional food ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Alvin; Jones, Peter JH; Abumweis, Suhad S

    2004-01-01

    Plant sterols are naturally occurring molecules that humanity has evolved with. Herein, we have critically evaluated recent literature pertaining to the myriad of factors affecting efficacy and safety of plant sterols in free and esterified forms. We conclude that properly solubilized 4-desmetyl plant sterols, in ester or free form, in reasonable doses (0.8–1.0 g of equivalents per day) and in various vehicles including natural sources, and as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, are important dietary components for lowering low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and maintaining good heart health. In addition to their cholesterol lowering properties, plant sterols possess anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenicity, and anti-oxidation activities, and should thus be of clinical importance, even for those individuals without elevated LDL cholesterol. The carotenoid lowering effect of plant sterols should be corrected by increasing intake of food that is rich in carotenoids. In pregnant and lactating women and children, further study is needed to verify the dose required to decrease blood cholesterol without affecting fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoid status. PMID:15070410

  20. Plant sterols in "rafts": a better way to regulate membrane thermal shocks.

    PubMed

    Beck, Johannes G; Mathieu, Damien; Loudet, Cécile; Buchoux, Sébastien; Dufourc, Erick J

    2007-06-01

    Specialized lipid domains (rafts) that are generally enriched in sterols and sphingolipids, are most likely present in cell membranes of animals, plants and fungi. While cholesterol and ergosterol are predominant in vertebrates and fungi, plants possess complex sterol profiles, dominated by sitosterol and stigmasterol in Arabidopsis thaliana. Fully hydrated model membranes of composition approaching those found in rafts of mammals, fungi and plants were investigated by means of solid-state 2H-NMR, using deuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (2H(62)-DPPC). The dynamics of such membranes was determined through measuring of membrane ordering or disordering properties. The presence of the liquid-ordered, lo, phase, which may be an indicator of rigid sterol-sphingolipid domains, was detected in all binary or ternary mixtures of all sterols investigated. Of great interest, the dynamics of ternary mixtures mimicking rafts in plants (phytosterol/glucosylcerebroside/DPPC), showed a lesser temperature sensitivity to thermal shocks, on comparing to systems mimicking rafts in mammals and fungi. This effect was particularly marked with sitosterol. The presence of an ethyl group branched on the alkyl chain of sitosterol and stigmasterol is proposed as reinforcing the membrane cohesion by additional attractive van der Waals interactions with the alkyl chains of sphingolipids and phospholipids. As a side result, the elevated resolution of NMR spectra in the presence of sitosterol also suggests domains of smaller size than with other sterols. Finally, the role of phytosterols in maintaining plant membranes in a state of dynamics less sensitive to temperature shocks is discussed.

  1. How sterol tilt regulates properties and organization of lipid membranes and membrane insertions

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Harries, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Serving as a crucial component of mammalian cells, cholesterol critically regulates the functions of biomembranes. This review focuses on a specific property of cholesterol and other sterols: the tilt modulus χ that quantifies the energetic cost of tilting sterol molecules inside the lipid membrane. We show how χ is involved in determining properties of cholesterol-containing membranes, and detail a novel approach to quantify its value from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, we link χ with other structural, thermodynamic, and mechanical properties of cholesterol-containing lipid membranes, and delineate how this useful parameter can be obtained from the sterol tilt probability distributions derived from relatively small-scale unbiased MD simulations. We demonstrate how the tilt modulus quantitatively describes the aligning field that sterol molecules create inside the phospholipid bilayers, and we relate χ to the bending rigidity of the lipid bilayer through effective tilt and splay energy contributions to the elastic deformations. Moreover, we show how χ can conveniently characterize the “condensing effect” of cholesterol on phospholipids. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of this cholesterol aligning field to the proper folding and interactions of membrane peptides. Given the relative ease of obtaining the tilt modulus from atomistic simulations, we propose that χ can be routinely used to characterize the mechanical properties of sterol/lipid bilayers, and can also serve as a required fitting parameter in multi-scaled simulations of lipid membrane models to relate the different levels of coarse-grained details. PMID:23291283

  2. A Novel Sterol Desaturase-Like Protein Promoting Dealkylation of Phytosterols in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomazic, Mariela L.; Najle, Sebastián R.; Nusblat, Alejandro D.; Uttaro, Antonio D.; Nudel, Clara B.

    2011-01-01

    The gene TTHERM_00438800 (DES24) from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila encodes a protein with three conserved histidine clusters, typical of the fatty acid hydroxylase superfamily. Despite its high similarity to sterol desaturase-like enzymes, the phylogenetic analysis groups Des24p in a separate cluster more related to bacterial than to eukaryotic proteins, suggesting a possible horizontal gene transfer event. A somatic knockout of DES24 revealed that the gene encodes a protein, Des24p, which is involved in the dealkylation of phytosterols. Knocked-out mutants were unable to eliminate the C-24 ethyl group from C29 sterols, whereas the ability to introduce other modifications, such as desaturations at positions C-5(6), C-7(8), and C-22(23), were not altered. Although C-24 dealkylations have been described in other organisms, such as insects, neither the enzymes nor the corresponding genes have been identified to date. Therefore, this is the first identification of a gene involved in sterol dealkylation. Moreover, the knockout mutant and wild-type strain differed significantly in growth and morphology only when cultivated with C29 sterols; under this culture condition, a change from the typical pear-like shape to a round shape and an alteration in the regulation of tetrahymanol biosynthesis were observed. Sterol analysis upon culture with various substrates and inhibitors indicate that the removal of the C-24 ethyl group in Tetrahymena may proceed by a mechanism different from the one currently known. PMID:21257793

  3. Subinhibitory concentration of octenidine and pirtenidine: influence on the lipid and sterol contents of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, M A; Moussa, N M; Whittaker, P; Swairjo, I; Abu-Elteen, K H

    1992-01-01

    The effect of subinhibitory concentrations of octenidine and pirtenidine on the lipid and sterol composition of Candida albicans was investigated. The total lipid and sterol contents of C. albicans grown in the presence of either octenidine or pirtenidine were reduced compared with control-grown cells. The major differences in the lipid composition of drug-grown and control cells were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, which increased in the presence of octenidine and pirtenidine. Lower proportions of phosphatidic acid were found in yeasts grown in the presence of the drugs when compared with control C. albicans. Fatty acid analysis of control-grown cells showed that the major fatty acids were C16 and C18. Drug-grown cells had higher proportions of palmitic and linolenic acids but lower proportion of oleic acid. The C16/C18 ratios were higher for octenidine- and pirtenidine-grown cells than control cells. Differences in the fatty acid composition of major phospholipids and neutral lipids between drug-grown and control yeasts were also observed. Sterol analysis of control-grown cells showed that the major sterol present was ergosterol (65.9%). A significant increase in squalene and 4,14-dimethylzymosterol was observed in pirtenidine-treated cells, while octenidine-treated cells showed an increase in zymosterol and obtusifoliol contents. Our results suggest that octenidine and pirtenidine affect the lipids and sterol of C. albicans in different ways. The implications of these findings on the mode of action of these two drugs is discussed.

  4. Sterolic composition of Chétoui virgin olive oil: Influence of geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Temime, Sonia Ben; Manai, Hedia; Methenni, Kaouther; Baccouri, Bechir; Abaza, Leila; Daoud, Douja; Casas, Jacinto Sánchez; Bueno, Emilio Osorio; Zarrouk, Mokhtar

    2008-09-15

    The sterol profile of Tunisian virgin olive oils produced from Chétoui cultivar, the second main variety cultivated in the north of the country, grown under different environmental conditions, was established by gas chromatography using a flame ionisation detector. More than ten compounds were identified and characterised. As expected for virgin olive oil, the main sterols found in all Chétoui olive oils were β-sitosterol, Δ5-avenasterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. Cholesterol, 24-methylenecholesterol, clerosterol, campestanol, sitostanol, Δ7-stigmastenol, Δ5,24-stigmastadienol, and Δ7-avenasterol were also found in all samples, but in lower amounts. Most of these compounds are significantly affected by the geographical origin. The majority of the Chétoui virgin olive oils analysed respected EC Regulation No. 2568, and in all cases total sterol amounts were higher than the minimum limit set by legislation, ranging from 1017 to 1522mg/kg. Two triterpenic dialcohols (erythrodiol and uvaol), were also detected besides the sterolic components. Their content was below the upper legal limit of 4% in all analysed samples, with a range from 1.2% to 3.2%. These results suggest that, besides the genetic factor, environmental conditions influence the sterolic fraction.

  5. Comparison and analysis of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in eight vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Changmo; Yao, Yunping; Zhao, Guozhong; Cheng, Wen; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Zhen; Chen, Yao; Wang, Shuo

    2011-12-14

    The similarities and differences of eight vegetable oils produced in China were investigated in terms of their fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol compositions and subsequent data processing by hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The lipid profiles, acquired by analytical techniques tailored to each lipid class, revealed great similarities among the fatty acid profiles of corn and sesame oil as well as few differences in their sterol profiles. It turns out that not only was there great similarity between the fatty acid profiles of corn oil and sesame oil but also there were not too many differences for the sterol profiles. Sunflower and tea-seed oil showed similar sterol compositions, while the tea-seed oil tocopherol was very similar to palm oil. The results demonstrated that the use of only one of these profiles was unreliable for indentifying oil origin and authenticity. In contrast, the use of the sterol or tocopherol profile together with the fatty acid profile more accurately discriminates these oils.

  6. Plasma Membrane Sterol Distribution Resembles the Surface Topography of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cellular membranes. It has been suggested that cholesterol segregates into sterol-rich and -poor domains in the plasma membrane, although clear evidence for this is lacking. By fluorescence imaging of the natural sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE), the lateral sterol distribution has been visualized in living cells. The spatial labeling pattern of DHE coincided with surface structures such as ruffles, microvilli, and filopodia with correlation lengths in the range of 0.8–2.5 μm. DHE staining of branched tubules and of nanotubes connecting two cells was detected. Dynamics of DHE in folded and plane membrane regions was comparable as determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. DHE colocalized with fluid membrane-preferring phospholipids in surface structures and at sites of cell attachment as well as in the cleavage furrow of dividing cells, but it was not particularly enriched in those regions. Fluorescent sterol showed homogeneous staining in membrane blebs induced by F-actin disruption. Cross-linking the ganglioside GM1—a putative raft marker—did not affect the cell surface distribution of DHE. The results suggest that spatial heterogeneities of plasma membrane staining of DHE resolvable by light microscopy reflect the cell surface topography but not phase-separated sterol domains in the bilayer plane. PMID:17065557

  7. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  8. Crystal structure of the human sterol transporter ABCG5/ABCG8

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jyh-Yeuan; Kinch, Lisa N.; Borek, Dominika M.; Wang, Jin; Wang, Junmei; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Xie, Xiao-Song; Grishin, Nikolai V.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Hobbs, Helen H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters play critical roles in maintaining sterol balance in higher eukaryotes. The ABCG5/ABCG8 heterodimer (G5G8) mediates excretion of neutral sterols in liver and intestines1–5. Mutations disrupting G5G8 cause sitosterolaemia, a disorder characterized by sterol accumulation and premature atherosclerosis. Here we use crystallization in lipid bilayers to determine the X-ray structure of human G5G8 in a nucleotide-free state at 3.9 Å resolution, generating the first atomic model of an ABC sterol transporter. The structure reveals a new transmembrane fold that is present in a large and functionally diverse superfamily of ABC transporters. The transmembrane domains are coupled to the nucleotide-binding sites by networks of interactions that differ between the active and inactive ATPases, reflecting the catalytic asymmetry of the transporter. The G5G8 structure provides a mechanistic framework for understanding sterol transport and the disruptive effects of mutations causing sitosterolaemia. PMID:27144356

  9. Osh4p exchanges sterols for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate between lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    de Saint-Jean, Maud; Delfosse, Vanessa; Douguet, Dominique; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Bourguet, William

    2011-01-01

    Osh/Orp proteins transport sterols between organelles and are involved in phosphoinositide metabolism. The link between these two aspects remains elusive. Using novel assays, we address the influence of membrane composition on the ability of Osh4p/Kes1p to extract, deliver, or transport dehydroergosterol (DHE). Surprisingly, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) specifically inhibited DHE extraction because PI(4)P was itself efficiently extracted by Osh4p. We solve the structure of the Osh4p–PI(4)P complex and reveal how Osh4p selectively substitutes PI(4)P for sterol. Last, we show that Osh4p quickly exchanges DHE for PI(4)P and, thereby, can transport these two lipids between membranes along opposite routes. These results suggest a model in which Osh4p transports sterol from the ER to late compartments pinpointed by PI(4)P and, in turn, transports PI(4)P backward. Coupled to PI(4)P metabolism, this transport cycle would create sterol gradients. Because the residues that recognize PI(4)P are conserved in Osh4p homologues, other Osh/Orp are potential sterol/phosphoinositol phosphate exchangers. PMID:22162133

  10. Sterol biosynthesis via cycloartenol and other biochemical features related to photosynthetic phyla in the amoeba Naegleria lovaniensis and Naegleria gruberi.

    PubMed

    Raederstorff, D; Rohmer, M

    1987-04-15

    The sterols and sterol precursors of two amoebae of the genus Naegleria, Naegleria lovaniensis and Naegleria gruberi were investigated. Cycloartenol, the sterol precursor in photosynthetic organisms, is present in both amoebae. In N. lovaniesis, it is accompanied by lanosterol and parkeol, as well as by the 24,25-dihydro derivatives of these triterpenes. One of the most striking features of these amoebae is the accumulation of 4 alpha-methylsterols which are present in similar amounts as those of 4,4-desmethylsterols (3-5 mg/g, dry weight). 4 alpha-Methylergosta-7,22-dienol was identified as a new compound. Ergosterol was the major 4,4-desmethylsterol, accompanied by small amounts of C27 and other C28 sterols. Treatment of N. lovaniensis with fenpropimorph modified the sterol pattern of this amoeba and inhibited its growth. This fungicide, known to inhibit steps of sterol biosynthesis in fungi and plants, induced the disappearance of 4 alpha-methyl-delta 7-sterols and the appearance of the unusual delta 6,8,22-ergostatrienol as in A. polyphaga. These results might be explained by a partial inhibition of the delta 8----delta 7 isomerase, the small amounts of delta 7-sterols formed being converted into ergosterol which is still present in fenpropimorph-exposed cells. De novo sterol biosynthesis in N. lovaniensis was shown by incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into sterols and sterol precursors, especially cycloartenol. Lanosterol and parkeol were not significantly labelled. Furthermore, [3-3H]squalene epoxide was efficiently cyclized by a cell-free system of this amoeba into cycloartenol, and again no significant radioactivity was detected in lanosterol and parkeol. This shows that cycloartenol, the sterol precursor in plants and algae, is also the sterol precursor in Naegleria species, and that these amoebae, like A. polyphaga, are related by some biosynthetic pathways to photosynthetic phyla. Lanosterol, the sterol precursor in non-photosynthetic phyla (animal and

  11. Expression and properties of three novel fungal lipases/sterol esterases predicted in silico: comparison with other enzymes of the Candida rugosa-like family.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Lipases from the Candida rugosa-like family are enzymes with great biotechnological interest. In a previous work, several enzymes from this family were identified by in silico mining of fungal genomes. Here, we describe the cloning, expression, and characterization of putative lipases from the genomes of Nectria haematococca, Trichoderma reesei, and Aspergillus niger and compared their catalytic properties with those of OPE, a well-characterized sterol esterase/lipase from Ophiostoma piceae. All of them hydrolyzed p-nitrophenol esters and triglycerides with different efficiency, but their activity against sterol esters was dissimilar, and the enzyme from A. niger was unable of hydrolyzing these substrates while OPE showed the best k cat values, which in general leads to an improved catalytic efficiency. Similarly, OPE was the best catalyst in the synthesis of β-sitostanyl oleate, followed by the commercial CRL from C. rugosa, while the A. niger enzyme was unable to produce this compound. When the enzymes were evaluated for caprolactone oligomerization, the A. niger enzyme gave similar results than CRL, being OPE slightly more efficient. The expression of the putative selected proteins allowed their functional validation, suggesting that the hydrophobicity of the lid region may be an important factor, although the enzymatic efficiency is also influenced by other parameters, as the aggregation state and the size and morphology of the tunnel, where substrate recognition and catalysis takes place.

  12. Distribution of sterol carrier protein/sub 2/ (SCP/sub 2/) in rat tissues and evidence for slow turnover in liver and adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kharroubi, A., Chanderbhan, R.; Fiskum, G.; Noland, B.J.; Scallen, T.J.; Vahouny, G.V.

    1986-03-05

    Sterol carrier protein/sub 2/ (SCP/sub 2/) has been implicated in the regulation of the terminal stages of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, and in sterol utilization for adrenal steroid hormone and hepatic bile acid synthesis. In the present studies, a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay, using (/sup 125/I) SCP/sub 2/, has been developed. Highest levels of SCP/sub 2/ were found in rat liver with progressively lower levels in intestinal mucosa, adrenal, kidney, lung and testis. SCP/sub 2/ levels were low or absent in heart, brain, skeletal muscle and serum. Liver SCP/sub 2/ was largely (44%) associated with the microsomal fraction, while in adrenal, 46% was associated with mitochondria, a distribution which is consistent with the proposed roles for SCP/sub 2/ in these tissues. Levels of SCP/sub 2/ in AS 30D hepatoma cells were only 5% of those in normal liver. In liver there was no indication of diurnal rhythm of SCP/sub 2/ in the cytosol and only slight variation of the microsomal SCP/sub 2/ levels. Fasting has only slight effects on SCP/sub 2/ concentration of rat liver microsomes and cytosol. Neither ACTH nor cycloheximide treatment of rats had a significant effect on SCP/sub 2/ distribution in the adrenal. In general, these findings indicate that SCP/sub 2/ has a low turn-over rate.

  13. Synthesis of 1 nm Pd Nanoparticles in a Microfluidic Reactor: Insights from in Situ X ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Small-Angle X ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Ayman M.; Al Hasan, Naila M.; Ivanov, Sergei A.; Siefert, Soenke; Kelly, Ryan T.; Hallfors, Nicholas G.; Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Jenkins, Aaron; Winans, R. E.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we show that the temporal separation of nucleation and growth is not a necessary condition for the colloidal synthesis of monodisperse nanoparticles. The synthesis mechanism of Pd nanoparticles was determined by in situ XAFS and SAXS in a microfluidic reactor capable of millisecond up to an hour time resolution. The SAXS results showed two autocatalytic growth phases, a fast growth phase followed by a very slow growth phase. The steady increase in the number of particles throughout the two growth phases indicates the synthesis is limited by slow continuous nucleation. The transition from fast to slow growth was caused by rapid increase in bonding with the capping agent as shown by XAFS. Based on this fundamental understanding of the synthesis mechanism, we show that 1 nm monodisperse Pd nanoparticles can be synthesized at low temperature using a strong binding capping agent such as trioctylphosphine (TOP).

  14. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis markers in individuals with and without a CHD event during pravastatin therapy: insights from the PROSPER trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cholesterol homeostasis, defined as the balance between absorption and synthesis, influences circulating cholesterol concentrations and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Statin therapy targets the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and is efficacious in lowering CHD events ...

  15. Reduction of Cholesterol and Glycoalkaloid Levels in Transgenic Potato Plants by Overexpression of a Type 1 Sterol Methyltransferase cDNA1

    PubMed Central

    Arnqvist, Lisa; Dutta, Paresh C.; Jonsson, Lisbeth; Sitbon, Folke

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Désirée) plants overexpressing a soybean (Glycine max) type 1 sterol methyltransferase (GmSMT1) cDNA were generated and used to study sterol biosynthesis in relation to the production of toxic glycoalkaloids. Transgenic plants displayed an increased total sterol level in both leaves and tubers, mainly due to increased levels of the 24-ethyl sterols isofucosterol and sitosterol. The higher total sterol level was due to increases in both free and esterified sterols. However, the level of free cholesterol, a nonalkylated sterol, was decreased. Associated with this was a decreased glycoalkaloid level in leaves and tubers, down to 41% and 63% of wild-type levels, respectively. The results show that glycoalkaloid biosynthesis can be down-regulated in transgenic potato plants by reducing the content of free nonalkylated sterols, and they support the view of cholesterol as a precursor in glycoalkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:12692338

  16. Relation of acidity and sensory quality with sterol content of olive oil from stored fruit.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Varona, I; Albi, M A

    2000-04-01

    Composition of the sterol fraction, fatty acid, acidity, and the sensorial evaluation of virgin olive oils were studied in two eastern Spanish varieties grown and processed under the same conditions. Fruits were stored at 5 degrees C and ambient temperature for different times. During fruit storage, there was no significant variation (P = 0.05) in fatty acid composition. However, the sterol composition of the oil varied markedly (in particular, there was an increase in stigmasterol), acidity increased, and there was a very significant decrease in sensorial quality. The stigmasterol content presented a high correlation with the acidity and sensory evaluation (P < 10(-)(6)). The total sterol content increased gradually with olive storage time. Oils with stigmasterol greater than campesterol are graded to a low level (lampant). It is of interest that sensorial quality is revealed by stigmasterol content, a fact unknown until now.

  17. Sewage contamination of sediments from two Portuguese Atlantic coastal systems, revealed by fecal sterols.

    PubMed

    Rada, Jesica P A; Duarte, Armando C; Pato, Pedro; Cachada, Anabela; Carreira, Renato S

    2016-02-15

    Fecal sterols in sediments were used to assess the degree of sewage contamination in Ria de Aveiro lagoon and Mondego River estuary for the first time. Coprostanol, the major fecal sterol, averaged 1.82 ± 4.12 μg g(-1), with maxima of 16.6 μg g(-1). The northwestern sector of the Ria and a marina at Mondego estuary showed the highest level of sewage contamination. This scenario was confirmed by several diagnostic ratios based on fecal sterols and other phytosterols. Our data revealed that in spite of the improvements achieved in the last decades, there is still a need for control the organic inputs into the aquatic environment in the studied regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New marine sterols from an algal-bearing gorgonian coral Pinnigorgia sp.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Chen, Nan-Fu; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tseng, Chung-Chih; Wu, Tung-Ying; Peng, Bo-Rong; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Fang, Lee-Shing; Wu, Yang-Chang; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Sung, Ping-Jyun

    2016-11-01

    Four new marine sterols, (22E,24R)-ergosta-5,22-diene-3β,11α-diol (1), (24S)-ergosta-5-ene-3β,11α-diol (2), 5α,6α-epoxy-23-demethylgorgost-8-ene-3β,7α-diol (3), and 5α,6α-epoxy-23-demethylgorgost-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (4), along with a known metabolite, 23-demethylgorgost-7-ene-3β,5α,6β-triol (5), were isolated from an algal-bearing gorgonian coral Pinnigorgia sp., collected off the waters of Taiwan. The structures of these sterols were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. Sterols 1-5 were tested for in vitro cytotoxicity in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Proliferation of HSCs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant sterols as anticancer nutrients: evidence for their role in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grattan, Bruce J

    2013-01-31

    While many factors are involved in the etiology of cancer, it has been clearly established that diet significantly impacts one's risk for this disease. More recently, specific food components have been identified which are uniquely beneficial in mitigating the risk of specific cancer subtypes. Plant sterols are well known for their effects on blood cholesterol levels, however research into their potential role in mitigating cancer risk remains in its infancy. As outlined in this review, the cholesterol modulating actions of plant sterols may overlap with their anti-cancer actions. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women and there remains a need for effective adjuvant therapies for this disease, for which plant sterols may play a distinctive role.

  20. Plant Sterols as Anticancer Nutrients: Evidence for Their Role in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    While many factors are involved in the etiology of cancer, it has been clearly established that diet significantly impacts one’s risk for this disease. More recently, specific food components have been identified which are uniquely beneficial in mitigating the risk of specific cancer subtypes. Plant sterols are well known for their effects on blood cholesterol levels, however research into their potential role in mitigating cancer risk remains in its infancy. As outlined in this review, the cholesterol modulating actions of plant sterols may overlap with their anti-cancer actions. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women and there remains a need for effective adjuvant therapies for this disease, for which plant sterols may play a distinctive role. PMID:23434903

  1. Indomethacin Amides as a Novel Molecular Scaffold for Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi Sterol 14α-Demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Mary E.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; von Kries, Jens P.; Ridenour, Whitney; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Caprioli, Richard M.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Nes, W. David; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (TC) causes Chagas disease, which in its chronic stage remains incurable. We have shown recently that specific inhibition of TC sterol 14α-demethylase (TCCYP51) with imidazole derivatives is effective in killing both extracellular and intracellular human stages of TC. An alternative set of TCCYP51 inhibitors has been identified using optical high throughput screening followed by web-database search for similar structures. The best TCCYP51 inhibitor from this search was found to have structural similarity to a class of cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors, the indomethacin-amides. A number of indomethacin-amides were found to bind to TCCYP51, inhibit its activity in vitro and produce strong antiparasitic effects in the cultured TC cells. Analysis of TC sterol composition indicated that the mode of action of the compounds is by inhibition of sterol biosynthesis in the parasite. PMID:19354253

  2. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fiber and other components. (3) Scientific evidence demonstrates that diets that include plant sterol... and LDL cholesterol are major modifiable risk factors in the development of CHD. (2) The scientific... stigmasterol (combined weight). (2) FDA will measure plant sterol esters by the method entitled “Determination...

  3. Potential of the desert locust schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an unconventional source of dietary and therapeutic sterols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locu...

  4. Sterol Composition and Ecdysteroid Content of Eggs of the Root-knot Nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and M. arenaria

    PubMed Central<