Science.gov

Sample records for stevens-johnson syndrome complicating

  1. Stunted root development: A rare dental complication of Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Aditi; Sangwan, Pankaj; Dahiya, Parveen

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe cutaneous reaction seen rarely in clinical practice. Most often, it occurs as an adverse reaction to certain drugs. When it affects children at a very young age, arrested tooth root development may also be seen. We present a case of a 13 year old boy who suffered from SJ syndrome at the age of 7 years. Incomplete root development was observed in all teeth, as demonstrated by panaromic radiography. Clinical features of this condition and its management are further discussed. We aim to emphasise on the need for dental practitioners to be aware of the potential dental complications of SJS and enable them to recognise and manage the condition at the earliest so as to avoid any undesirable sequelae. Key words:Adverse drug reaction, amoxycillin, arrested root development, Stevens-Johnson syndrome. PMID:27703617

  2. Stevens - johnson syndrome induced by sodium valproate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P N Suresh; Kumar, S Kishore

    2004-07-01

    A case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) following treatment with sodium valproate is presented. A 55-year-old male suffering from manic episode was treated with sodium valproate in addition to haloperidol and trihexiphenidyl. After two weeks he developed cutaneous manifestations of SJS. He was treated with systemic steroids, antihistamines and topical calamine lotion and recovered after a few weeks.

  3. [Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bellakhal, S; Ben Kaab, B; Teyeb, Z; Souissi, A; Derbel, F; Douggui, M-H

    2015-09-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening dermatological conditions. Their most common cause is medication. However, in a small proportion of patients these dermatological conditions could be the first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We now describe a 34-year-old patient who presented with manifestations of Stevens-Johnson as a first feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus reveled by Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been infrequently reviewed in the previous literature. This diagnosis should be considered when cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur without clear drug causality.

  4. [Bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fielli, Mariano; Ceccato, Adrián; González, Alejandra; Villaverde, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is a severe disease which is characterized by fever and mucocutaneous lesions. It has also been described as a small airway compromise in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans. We report a 22-year-old male patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome due to antibiotic and antiepileptic drug treatment for brain abscess. After the improvement of mucocutaneous lesions, he went to the emergency department because of coughing and progressive shortness of breath. Pulmonary function test revealed a very severe irreversible obstructive defect and a computed tomography scan showed a mosaic attenuation pattern. We discuss this case of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson because of its low incidence.

  5. [Bullous systemic lupus mimicking a Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Claudia L; Echeverri, Andrés F; González, Martha L; Tobón, Gabriel; Serrano, Carlos D

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases represent a diagnostic challenge due to the wide spectrum of pathologies that share similar clinical features. This paper reports the case of a woman admitted with a supposed diagnosis of a Stevens-Johnson syndrome, in which the history, the profile of autoimmunity and interdisciplinary approach were of vital importance to clarify the clinical picture.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis Enable Javascript to view ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a ...

  7. Metolazone Associated Stevens Johnson Syndrome-Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ajay; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Tandon, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are severe mucocutaneous disease with high mortality rate. It is characterised by severe necrosis and detachment of the epidermis. Drugs are the most common triggering agent for SJS/TEN. These are commonly reported with the use of aromatic antiepileptics, antiretrovirals, allopurinol, NSAID’S and sulfonamide antibiotics. Non antibiotic sulfonamides rarely cause SJS/TEN. Metolazone is a well known diuretic and is extensively used by clinicians. Although this drug is in market for last several decades, no case of SJS/TEN has been reported till date. We report a rare case of metolazone induced SJS/TEN overlap in a 55-year-old lady. PMID:27134890

  8. Paracetamol induced Steven-Johnson syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Rajan; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Durgavanshi, Astha; Kanwar, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    In the contemporary era, use of drugs is the dominant paradigm of health care. The most quotidian drug used for fever and pain is paracetamol. Although adverse reactions to paracetamol in India are rare, at times they can cause life-threatening situations. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is one such potentially lethal adverse drug reaction. The most reported cases of analgesic-induced SJS were due to oxicams or propionic acid derivatives. There are very few detailed reports of SJS due to the use of paracetamol. We report a case of SJS, which occurred due to the use of paracetamol. The clinical features of this condition and multidisciplinary management of the patient are described in brief. PMID:26604588

  9. HLA-A*0206 with TLR3 Polymorphisms Exerts More than Additive Effects in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome with Severe Ocular Surface Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ueta, Mayumi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sotozono, Chie; Sawai, Hiromi; Tamiya, Gen; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute inflammatory vesiculobullous reaction of the skin and mucosa, often including the ocular surface, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) occurs with its progression. Although SJS/TEN is thought to be initiated by certain types of medication coupled with possible infection. In the present study we examined the multiplicative interaction(s) between HLA-A*0206 and 7 Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients with SJS/TEN. Principal Findings We analyzed the genotypes for HLA-A and 7 TLR3 SNPs in 110 Japanese SJS/TEN patients with severe ocular complications and 206 healthy volunteers to examine the interactions between the two loci. We found that HLA-A*0206 exhibited a high odds ratio for SJS/TEN (carrier frequency: OR = 5.1; gene frequency: OR = 4.0) and that there was a strong association with TLR3 rs.5743312T/T SNP (OR = 7.4), TLR3 rs.3775296T/T SNP (OR = 5.8), TLR3 rs.6822014G/G SNP (OR = 4.8), TLR3 rs.3775290A/A SNP (OR = 2.9), TLR3 rs.7668666A/A SNP (OR = 2.7), TLR3 rs.4861699G/G SNP (OR = 2.3), and TLR3 rs.11732384G/G SNP (OR = 1.9). There was strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between rs.3775296 and rs.5743312 and between rs.7668666 and rs.3775290. The results of interaction analysis showed that the pair, HLA-A*0206 and TLR3 SNP rs3775296T/T, which exhibited strong LD with TLR3 rs.5743312, exerted more than additive effects (OR = 47.7). The other pairs, HLA-A*0206 and TLR3 rs.3775290A/A SNP (OR = 11.4) which was in strong LD with TLR3 rs7668666A/A SNP, and TLR3 rs4861699G/G SNP (OR = 7.6) revealed additive effects. Moreover, the combination HLA-A*0206 and TLR3 rs3775296T/T was stronger than the TLR3 rs6822014G/G and TLR3 rs3775290A/A pair, which reflected the interactions within the TLR3 gene alone. Significance By interaction analysis, HLA-A*0206 and TLR3 SNP rs3775296T/T, which were in strong LD with TLR3 SNP rs5743312T

  10. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Anthony; Malvestiti, Andrey Augusto; Hafner, Mariana de Figueiredo Silva

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are uncommon, acute and potentially life-threatening adverse cutaneous drug reactions. These pathologies are considered a hypersensitivity reaction and can be triggered by drugs, infections and malignancies. The drugs most often involved are allopurinol, some antibiotics, including sulfonamides, anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine, and some non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Necrosis of keratinocytes is manifested clinically by epidermal detachment, leading to scalded skin appearance. The rash begins on the trunk with subsequent generalization, usually sparing the palmoplantar areas. Macular lesions become purplish, and epidermal detachment occurs, resulting in flaccid blisters that converge and break, resulting in extensive sloughing of necrotic skin. Nikolsky's sign is positive in perilesional skin. SJS and TEN are considered to be two ends of the spectrum of one disease, differing only by their extent of skin detachment. Management of patients with SJS or TEN requires three measures: removal of the offending drug, particularly drugs known to be high-risk; supportive measures and active interventions. Early diagnosis of the disease, recognition of the causal agent and the immediate withdrawal of the drug are the most important actions, as the course of the disease is often rapid and fatal. PMID:27656858

  11. Outbreak of Mycoplasma pneumoniae–Associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Louise K. Francois; Demirjian, Alicia; Lin, Xia; Robinson, Christine C.; Pretty, Kristin; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Diaz, Maureen H.; Miller, Lisa A.; Foo, Teresa A.; Mason, Melanie D.; Lauper, Ursula L.; Kupfer, Oren; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Glodé, Mary P.; Kutty, Preeta K.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an uncommon, sporadic disease and outbreaks are rare. In November 2013, an outbreak of SJS was identified at Children’s Hospital Colorado. METHODS: Outbreak cases were children aged 5–21 with a discharge diagnosis of SJS admitted from September 1 to November 30, 2013. Medical charts were reviewed using standardized data collection forms. Respiratory specimens were tested for viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We conducted a separate 4-year retrospective case-control study comparing hospitalized SJS cases with and without evidence of Mp infection. RESULTS: During the outbreak, 8 children met SJS criteria. Median age was 11.5 years (range 8–16 years); 5 (63%) were boys and 5 (63%) were Mp-PCR–positive. Of the 5 PCR-positive children, none had preceding medication exposure, and all had radiographic pneumonia. All outbreak Mp isolates were macrolide susceptible. The retrospective case-control analysis showed that Mp-associated SJS episodes (n = 17) were more likely to have pneumonia (odds ratio [OR] 10.0, confidence interval [CI] 1.3–5.1), preceding respiratory symptoms (OR 30.0, CI 1.6–72.6), an erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥35 mg/dL (OR 22.8, CI 2.1–244.9), and ≤3 affected skin sites (OR 4.5, CI 1.2–17.4) than non–Mp-associated SJS episodes (n = 23). CONCLUSIONS: We report the largest outbreak of SJS in children, which was also predominately associated with Mp infection. Mp-associated SJS was associated with a distinct clinical presentation that included less extensive skin disease, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and evidence of a preceding respiratory infection. PMID:26216320

  12. Stevens-Johnson syndrome: Twenty-three cases and their otolaryngologic significance.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M D

    1975-10-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is a symptom complex characterized by mucosal, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Prodromal symptoms of upper respiratory infection or pharyngitis are most common. These are followed by target lesions of skin, sloughing of musous membranes, and ocular inflammation. Twenty-three cases are presented. Most patients (61 percent) were between 10 and 39 years of age. Relapses occurred in three patients. Five patients developed pneumonia, and there were two fatalities. Over one-half of the patients had serious ocular complications. The etiology of this syndrome is uncertain. Multiple allergic factors, drugs (especially long-acting sulfonamides), and infectious agents (most recently mycoplasma pneumoniae) have been implicated. This study does not support any single cause. The use of systemic steroids is generally accepted by most authors. The death rate in this study (10 percent) is essentially unchanged from early reports on patients without steroid therapy. The complications rate directly attributable to steroids is significant in this study group. The major complications of this syndrome are ocular. Aggressive topical management of ocular inflammation is required; however, the morbidity rate remains high despite these measures. The otolaryngologist should be aware of this syndrome as the early symptoms, and the acute complications may require his awareness of the natural and treated courses of this disease.

  13. Concurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Bilateral Parotitis after Minocycline Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jimi; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Tae-Heung; Choi, Deok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Pyeong; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2010-06-01

    Minocycline is an antibiotic of tetracycline derivatives that is commonly used in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. It has been reported to cause rare adverse events from mild cutaneous eruption to severe forms including drug-induced lupus, serum sickness-like reaction, and hypersensitivity reactions, etc. The risks of adverse events attributed to minocycline have not been ascertained reliably and there are concerns about the safety of minocycline which could possibly result in life-threatening events such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Here we demonstrate an unusual case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in conjunction with bilateral parotitis after the intake of minocycline in a Korean boy suggesting discreet use of the drug.

  14. Concurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Bilateral Parotitis after Minocycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jimi; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Tae-Heung; Choi, Deok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Pyeong; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline is an antibiotic of tetracycline derivatives that is commonly used in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. It has been reported to cause rare adverse events from mild cutaneous eruption to severe forms including drug-induced lupus, serum sickness-like reaction, and hypersensitivity reactions, etc. The risks of adverse events attributed to minocycline have not been ascertained reliably and there are concerns about the safety of minocycline which could possibly result in life-threatening events such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Here we demonstrate an unusual case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in conjunction with bilateral parotitis after the intake of minocycline in a Korean boy suggesting discreet use of the drug. PMID:21103193

  15. Drug-mediated rash: erythema multiforme versus Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hidajat, Cassandra; Loi, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    A 92-year-old woman presented with an acute onset generalised maculopapular rash with associated mucosal involvement, on a background of recent start of griseofulvin. The rash progressed rapidly over 2 days to involve most of her body, however, mucosal involvement was limited to her oral mucosa. Characteristic target lesions appeared at 72 h, and a diagnosis of erythema multiforme secondary to griseofulvin was made after further investigation and skin biopsy. The patient was monitored closely for progression of the rash and other indicators of more severe dermatological conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. She was managed symptomatically, with resolution of the rash in 4 weeks and full recovery to her premorbid level of functioning. This case details the diagnostic and management approach to erythema multiforme, a condition that warrants thorough consideration for the differential of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. PMID:25246464

  16. Steven's Johnson syndrome with toxic epidermal necrolysis due to thalidomide in a case of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Sil, Amrita; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2014-01-01

    Thalidomide developed in 1954 for morning sickness had proven to be a teratogen and hence was withdrawn from market. Resurgence of thalidomide began as an immunomodulator when it was shown to be effective in the management of multiple myeloma and many conditions like erythema nodosum leprosum, graft versus host disease, recurrent aphthous ulcers etc. We report a case of Stevens Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis developing in an elderly male who was prescribed thalidomide after being diagnosed with multiple myeloma.

  17. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Patient Received Combination Chemotherapy Gemcitabine, Cisplatin, and 5-FU for Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aznab, Mozaffar; Khazaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been an acute, usually self-limiting disease of the skin and mucous membranes. This case report has presented an evidence of the development Stevens - Johnson syndrome associated with combination chemotherapy administration of 5FU, gemcitabin and cisplatin in a patient with biliary tract cancer. Our case was a 54-year-old woman patient, a case of biliary tract cancer who has developed more severe symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Diagnosis has confirmed by skin biopsy of an affected area .The patient has improved with supportive care, and during 25 day occurred recovery. Although Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been a rare toxicity, physicians should pay a special attention to the monitoring of biliary tract cancer patients on combination chemotherapy with 5FU, cisplatin and gemcitabin.

  18. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome plus intrahepatic cholestasis caused by clindamycin or chlorpheniramine].

    PubMed

    Sahagún Flores, J E; Soto Ortiz, J A; Tovar Méndez, C E; Cárdenas Ochoa, E C; Hernández Flores, G

    2009-05-15

    A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized with the diagnosis of hepatitis. She presented with symptoms of jaundice, headache, elevated bilirubin, and elevated hepatic enzymes. She related a recent episode of a bronchial infection that was treated during the previous eight days with paracetamol (500mg, 2 doses only), chlorpheniramine, betamethasone and clindamycin. After an initial clinical and laboratorial improvement, she began to complain of pruritus of the palms and soles. Thereafter, vesicles evolving to blisters developed and a deterioration of her general health ensued. Serologies for hepatitis A, B, and C viruses were negative. Intrahepatic cholestasis and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) were the final diagnosis. The association of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome and intrahepatic cholestasis simultaneously, related to adverse drug reactions, is very rare. The drugs reportedly involved are mainly antibiotics, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and erythromycin. Other drugs involved are non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs, such as mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and sulindac. The reactions can be minor or severe and can even cause death, an outcome that has been reported in patients of all races and ethnic groups, but appears to be more rare in patients of Latin origin. We present a discussion of this case and review the main characteristics of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome.

  19. Evaluation of the patients diagnosed with Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Çekiç, Şükrü; Canıtez, Yakup; Sapan, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe acute mucocutaneous diseases. In this study, we evaluated the clinical aspects of Steven Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap patients who admitted to our clinics in the last five years. Material and Methods: Eleven patients diagnosed as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap in Department of Pediatric Allergy in Uludağ University School of Medicine were included in this study. Clinical findings, laboratory tests and response to treatments were evaluated via electronic files. Results: Two of the patients had Stevens-Johnson syndrome, four had Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap, and five had toxic epidermal necrolysis. The median period for drug usage was 10 days (2–44 days). Herpes simpleks virus IgM antibody was detected two patients. The median healing time was 38 days 26–94 days). Maculopapular eruptions and oral mucositis were seen in all patients. Vesicul or bullae, epidermal detachment and ocular involvement in 10 of patients. Wound care, H1 antihistamine and methyl prednisolon were used in all patients, intravenous immunoglobulin were used in 7 patients and cyclosporine in 1 patient. Sequel lesions developed in 2 of the patients and there was no death. Conclusion: Anticonvulsants, antibiotics and non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs play a major role in the etiology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Anticonvulsants are associated with severe disease. The patients with proper wound care and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs can be recovered without or with minimal sequelae. PMID:27738400

  20. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim; Ye, Young-Min

    2016-08-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  1. [Severe drug-induced skin reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis].

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, M

    2014-05-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are characterized by extensive blistering of the skin and mucosa; they are considered as one disease entity with varying severity. They are rare but potentially life-threatening and accompanied by high mortality. A clear clinical diagnosis is needed to direct specific therapy, but supportive therapy remains most important. In order to identify and withdraw the inducing drug, a very detailed and thorough medication history has to be obtained. Among the highly suspected (strongly associated) agents are allopurinol, antibacterial sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the oxicam type, various anti-epileptics and nevaripine. Together they account for more than half of the cases of SJS/TEN. Although a drug is not always the cause, it is considered very like in approximately 75% of cases. Infections have also to be considered as etiologic factors. PMID:24820799

  2. [Is intravenous immunoglobulin effective in toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Navajas, Lucas; Rada, Gabriel

    2014-10-17

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions. Intravenous immunoglobulin is described as a therapeutic option, however its use is still controversial. Using Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening over 20 databases, we identified six systematic reviews, including 39 primary studies. We combined the evidence using tables for summary of findings, following the GRADE approach, and concluded there is uncertainty about the effects of intravenous immunoglobulin because the certainty of the evidence is very low; it probably leads to important adverse effects; and has high cost. Intravenous immunoglobulin should not be used outside the context of a clinical trial, or only in cases where other treatments have failed and there are no resource constraints.

  3. UK guidelines for the management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in adults 2016.

    PubMed

    Creamer, D; Walsh, S A; Dziewulski, P; Exton, L S; Lee, H Y; Dart, J K G; Setterfield, J; Bunker, C B; Ardern-Jones, M R; Watson, K M T; Wong, G A E; Philippidou, M; Vercueil, A; Martin, R V; Williams, G; Shah, M; Brown, D; Williams, P; Mohd Mustapa, M F; Smith, C H

    2016-06-01

    The overall objective of the guideline is to provide up-to-date, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of the full spectrum of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and SJS-TEN overlap in adults during the acute phase of the disease. The document aims to. PMID:27287213

  4. A 2-year-old girl with Stevens--Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Arca, Ercan; Köse, Osman; Erbil, A Hakan; Nişanci, Mustafa; Akar, Ahmet; Gür, Ali Riza

    2005-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are severe skin reactions, usually to drugs, associated with a widespread destruction of the epidermis. Widespread purpuric macules and epidermal detachment of less than 10% of the body surface is indicative of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, whereas epidermal detachment between 10% and 30% is called Stevens-Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap. Epidermal detachment involving more than 30% of the total body surface is designated as toxic epidermal necrolysis. These generalized reactions are known to occur in association with various drugs. Treatment is primarily supportive care, and there are no specific therapy regimens. Therapeutic modalities such as corticosteroids, cyclosporin, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis, usually based on a symptomatic approach, have been tried in single patients or in small series. Intravenous immunoglobulin has recently been shown to provide rapid improvement in all three of these skin reactions. We report a 2-year-old girl who developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap after receiving ampicillin-sulbactam for an upper respiratory tract infection. She was treated successfully with a 4-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin.

  5. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: an update on pharmacogenetics studies in drug-induced severe skin reaction.

    PubMed

    Rufini, Sara; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Politi, Cristina; Giardina, Emiliano; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe, life-threatening drug reactions involving skin and membranes mucous, which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and triggered, especially by drug exposure. Different studies have demonstrated that drug response is a multifactorial character and that the interindividual variability in this response depends on both environmental and genetic factors. The last ones have a relevant significance. In fact, the identification of new specific genetic markers involved in the response to drugs, will be of great utility to establish a more personalized therapeutic approach and to prevent the appearance of these adverse reactions. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the Pharmacogenetics studies related to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis reporting the major genetic factors identified in the last years as associated with the disease and highlighting the use of some of these genomic variants in the clinical practice.

  6. Mucous membrane grafting for the post-Steven-Johnson syndrome symblepharon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Medhi, Jnanankar; Chakravarty, Ranjay; Soibam, Ronel

    2011-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was referred with late sequelae of chloroquine-induced Steven-Johnson syndrome. At the time of presentation, the symblepharon was involving the upper lids to almost the whole of the cornea, and part of the lower bulbar conjunctiva with the lower lid bilaterally. Other ocular examinations were not possible due to the symblepharon. B-scan ultrasonography revealed acoustically clear vitreous, normal chorioretinal thickness, and normal optic nerve head, with an attached retina. Conjunctivo-corneal adhesion released by superficial lamellar dissection of the cornea. Ocular surface reconstruction was carried out with a buccal mucous membrane. A bandage contact lens was placed over the cornea followed by the symblepharon ring to prevent further adhesion. The mucosal graft was well taken up along with corneal re-epithelization. Best corrected visual acuity of 20/120 in both sides after 1 month and 20/80 after 3 months was achieved and maintained till the 2.5-year follow-up. PMID:21586847

  7. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Associated with Drugs and Vaccines in Children: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, Umberto; Rossi, Rossella; Da Cas, Roberto; Rafaniello, Concita; Mores, Nadia; Bersani, Giulia; Reale, Antonino; Pirozzi, Nicola; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Traversa, Giuseppe; in Drug and Children, Italian Multicenter Study Group for Vaccine Safety

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is one of the most severe muco-cutaneous diseases and its occurrence is often attributed to drug use. The aim of the present study is to quantify the risk of SJS in association with drug and vaccine use in children. Methods A multicenter surveillance of children hospitalized through the emergency departments for acute conditions of interest is currently ongoing in Italy. Cases with a diagnosis of SJS were retrieved from all admissions. Parents were interviewed on child’s use of drugs and vaccines preceding the onset of symptoms that led to the hospitalization. We compared the use of drugs and vaccines in cases with the corresponding use in a control group of children hospitalized for acute neurological conditions. Results Twenty-nine children with a diagnosis of SJS and 1,362 with neurological disorders were hospitalized between 1st November 1999 and 31st October 2012. Cases were more frequently exposed to drugs (79% vs 58% in the control group; adjusted OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0–6.1). Anticonvulsants presented the highest adjusted OR: 26.8 (95% CI 8.4–86.0). Significantly elevated risks were also estimated for antibiotics use (adjusted OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.5–7.2), corticosteroids (adjusted OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.8–9.9) and paracetamol (adjusted OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.5–6.9). No increased risk was estimated for vaccines (adjusted OR: 0.9; 95% CI 0.3–2.8). Discussion Our study provides additional evidence on the etiologic role of drugs and vaccines in the occurrence of SJS in children. PMID:23874553

  8. Recent advances in the genetics and immunology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Hung, Shuen-Iu

    2012-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN) are rare but life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), which are majorly (65-75%) induced by a variety of drugs. SJS/TEN could be recognized as SCARs or drug immune reactions, if the reactions are elicited by drugs. The recent studies suggested that SJS/TEN is a specific immune reaction initiated by the cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) via human leukocyte antigens (HLAs)-restricted pathway. The patho-mechanism involving HLA-restricted presentation of a drug or its metabolites for T-cell activation is supported by the findings of strong genetic associations with HLA alleles (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine-SJS/TEN, and HLA-B*58:01 and allopurinol-SJS/TEN). However, the genetic associations of SJS/TEN or drug induced cutaneous immune reactions are complex, which are drug specific and ethnicity specific. The genetic polymorphisms and diversity of HLA alleles may provide different binding affinities for drug antigens to launch the activation of specific CTLs responses, further leading to the unique clinical manifestations in SJS/TEN. Fas-FasL and perforin/granzyme B have been advocated mediating the epidermal necrosis in SJS/TEN. Our recent study showed that granulysin, a cytotoxic protein produced by CTLs or natural killer (NK) cells, is the key mediator for disseminated keratinocyte death in SJS/TEN. From the point of view of a physician, the profounder understanding of the genetic predisposition and patho-mechanism we discover, the better strategies for prevention, clinical management, and therapeutic methods of SJS/TEN we can develop in the near future.

  9. Healthcare utilization and cost of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis management in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dilokthornsakul, P; Sawangjit, R; Inprasong, C; Chunhasewee, S; Rattanapan, P; Thoopputra, T; Chaiyakunapruk, N

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening dermatologic conditions. Although, the incidence of SJS/TEN in Thailand is high, information on cost of care for SJS/TEN is limited. This study aims to estimate healthcare resource utilization and cost of SJS/TEN in Thailand, using hospital perspective. Methods: A retrospective study using an electronic health database from a university-affiliated hospital in Thailand was undertaken. Patients admitted with SJS/TEN from 2002 to 2007 were included. Direct medical cost was estimated by the cost-to-charge ratio. Cost was converted to 2013 value by consumer price index, and converted to $US using 31 Baht/1 $US. The healthcare resource utilization was also estimated. Results: A total of 157 patients were included with average age of 45.3±23.0 years. About 146 patients (93.0%) were diagnosed as SJS and the remaining (7.0%) were diagnosed as TEN. Most of the patients (83.4%) were treated with systemic corticosteroids. Overall, mortality rate was 8.3%, while the average length of stay (LOS) was 10.1±13.2 days. The average cost of managing SJS/TEN for all patients was $1,064±$2,558. The average cost for SJS patients was $1,019±$2,601 while that for TEN patients was $1,660±$1,887. Conclusions: Healthcare resource utilization and cost of care for SJS/TEN in Thailand were tremendous. The findings are important for policy makers to allocate healthcare resources and develop strategies to prevent SJS/TEN which could decrease length of stay and cost of care. PMID:27089110

  10. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis--A Comprehensive Review and Guide to Therapy. I. Systemic Disease.

    PubMed

    Kohanim, Sahar; Palioura, Sotiria; Saeed, Hajirah N; Akpek, Esen K; Amescua, Guillermo; Basu, Sayan; Blomquist, Preston H; Bouchard, Charles S; Dart, John K; Gai, Xiaowu; Gomes, José A P; Gregory, Darren G; Iyer, Geetha; Jacobs, Deborah S; Johnson, Anthony J; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mantagos, Iason S; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Perez, Victor L; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Sangwan, Virender S; Sippel, Kimberly C; Sotozono, Chie; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Tan, Donald T H; Tandon, Radhika; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Ueta, Mayumi; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The intent of this review is to comprehensively appraise the state of the art with regard to Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), with particular attention to the ocular surface complications and their management. SJS and TEN represent two ends of a spectrum of immune-mediated, dermatobullous disease, characterized in the acute phase by a febrile illness followed by skin and mucous membrane necrosis and detachment. The widespread keratinocyte death seen in SJS/TEN is rapid and irreversible, and even with early and aggressive intervention, morbidity is severe and mortality not uncommon. We have divided this review into two parts. Part I summarizes the epidemiology and immunopathogenesis of SJS/TEN and discusses systemic therapy and its possible benefits. We hope this review will help the ophthalmologist better understand the mechanisms of disease in SJS/TEN and enhance their care of patients with this complex and often debilitating disease. Part II (April 2016 issue) will focus on ophthalmic manifestations. PMID:26549248

  11. Oesophageal stricturing secondary to adult Stevens-Johnson syndrome: similarities in presentation and management to corrosive injury.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Bramble, M G; Shehade, S; Dean, J

    2003-05-01

    Clinical decisions often have to be made in the absence of evidence. In some cases, it is appropriate to use evidence from similar but more common conditions for which studies have resulted in evidence-based practice. This report describes a case of oesophageal stricture following Stevens-Johnson syndrome illustrating this concept, although it is likely that there are many other conditions in which the same principle will stand the clinician in good stead. Dilatation led to long-standing relief of dysphagia in our case. PMID:12701021

  12. Management of ocular conditions in the burn unit: thermal and chemical burns and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy; Patel, Neha; Yoo, David; DeMartelaere, Sheri; Bouchard, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Patients in burn intensive care units suffer from potentially life-threatening conditions including thermal or chemical burns and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. There is often involvement of the ocular surface or adnexal structures which may be present at the time of hospital admission or may develop later in the hospital course. This article will describe the types of ocular burns, the mechanisms and manifestations of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, the circumstances that may influence outcome, and acute and long-term treatment strategies, including new and evolving options.

  13. Acute and Chronic Ophthalmic Involvement in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis - A Comprehensive Review and Guide to Therapy. II. Ophthalmic Disease.

    PubMed

    Kohanim, Sahar; Palioura, Sotiria; Saeed, Hajirah N; Akpek, Esen K; Amescua, Guillermo; Basu, Sayan; Blomquist, Preston H; Bouchard, Charles S; Dart, John K; Gai, Xiaowu; Gomes, José A P; Gregory, Darren G; Iyer, Geetha; Jacobs, Deborah S; Johnson, Anthony J; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mantagos, Iason S; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Perez, Victor L; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Sangwan, Virender S; Sippel, Kimberly C; Sotozono, Chie; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Tan, Donald T H; Tandon, Radhika; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Ueta, Mayumi; Chodosh, James

    2016-04-01

    Our purpose is to comprehensively review the state of the art with regard to Stevens- Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), with particular attention to improving the management of associated ocular surface complications. SJS and TEN are two ends of a spectrum of immune-mediated disease, characterized in the acute phase by a febrile illness followed by skin and mucous membrane necrosis and detachment. Part I of this review focused on the systemic aspects of SJS/TEN and was published in the January 2016 issue of this journal. The purpose of Part II is to summarize the ocular manifestations and their management through all phases of SJS/TEN, from acute to chronic. We hope this effort will assist ophthalmologists in their management of SJS/TEN, so that patients with this complex and debilitating disease receive the best possible care and experience the most optimal outcomes in their vision and quality of life. PMID:26882981

  14. Combination of Steven-Johnson syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome following carbamazepine therapy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Gandhi, Pankaj; Dubey, Parul; Panagariya, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe, episodic, acute mucocutaneous reaction that is most often elicited by drugs and occasionally by infections. The drugs commonly implicated as the cause of SJS are anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been commonly implicated in SJS. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. Among the neuroleptics, haloperidol (parenteral) is implicated as a most common drug for NMS. Though rare, association of NMS with CBZ and association of NMS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a single patient after administration of neuroleptics has been reported in the literature before. However, a combination of NMS and SJS in a single patient after administration of CBZ has not been reported so far. We present a patient with seizure who developed SJS and NMS following administration of CBZ. PMID:23761563

  15. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN): Could Retinoids Play a Causative Role?

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R.; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1–4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression. PMID:25579087

  16. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  17. Carbamazepine-Induced Incomplete Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Report of a Case in Children without Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    PubMed

    Techasatian, Leelawadee; Panombualert, Sunee; Uppala, Rattapon; Jetsrisuparb, Charoon

    2015-08-01

    Incomplete Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare reactive skin condition. Most cases are occurred in children and all are associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection. We reported an unusual case of a 6-year-old boy who developed the presentation of isolated mucosal erosion with a lack of skin findings, which indicated incomplete SJS after two weeks of carbamazepine (CBZ) administration. Findings of positive HLA-B*1502 allele supported a possible causative influence of carbamazepine inducing SJS. Interestingly, this patient was tested negatively for M. pneumoniae. This is a significant finding since there is no previous report of incomplete SJS without M. pneumoniae infection. Discontinuation of CBZ and administration of systemic corticosteroids were accomplished to treat SJS, which resulted in complete recovery. Our interesting findings highlighted the manifestation of incomplete SJS, which can present with other causes rather than M. pneumoniae infection. Early manifestation of mucosal change without typical skin lesions should not be neglected in the diagnosis of incomplete SJS. PMID:26742396

  18. In Silico Risk Assessment of HLA-A*02:06-Associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Caused by Cold Medicine Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Hideto; Miyadera, Hiroko; Ueta, Mayumi; Sotozono, Chie; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe drug hypersensitivities with high mortality. Typical over-the-counter drugs of cold medicines are suggested to be causative. As multiple ingredients are generally contained in cold medicines, it is of particular interest to investigate which ingredients are responsible for SJS/TEN. However, experimental examination of causal relationships between SJS/TEN and a particular drug molecule is not straightforward. Significant association between HLA-A*02:06 and SJS/TEN with severe ocular surface complications has been observed in the Japanese. In the present study, we have undertaken in silico docking simulations between various ingredients contained in cold medicines available in Japan and the HLA-A*02:06 molecule. We use the composite risk index (CRI) that is the absolute value of the binding affinity multiplied by the daily dose to assess the potential risk of the adverse reactions. The drugs which have been recognized as causative drugs of SJS/TEN in Japan have revealed relatively high CRI, and the association between SJS/TEN and HLA-A*02:06 has been qualitatively verified. The results have also shown that some drugs whose links to SJS/TEN have not been clinically recognized in Japan show the high CRI and suggested that attention should be paid to their adverse drug reactions. PMID:24285954

  19. Skin rash in the intensive care unit: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, or a rare manifestation of a hidden cutaneous malignancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    AL-SAFFAR, FARAH; IBRAHIM, SAIF; PATEL, PUJAN; JACOB, RAFIK; PALACIO, CARLOS; CURY, JAMES

    2016-01-01

    Skin rashes are infrequently encountered in the intensive care units, either as a result or as a cause of admission. The entities of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) form a spectrum of desquamating skin diseases that have multiple etiologies, the most common being drug-related reactions; very rarely, the cause may be cutaneous malignancies. We herein present a unique case of a 54-year-old male patient with psoriasis treated with methotrexate, who presented with a cellulitis-like clinical picture, then developed a severe progressive systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and progressed clinically to SJS, then TEN even after discontinuing the antibiotics and methotrexate. A skin biopsy demonstrated an aggressive and rapidly-progressing T-cell lymphoma. The present case highlights the necessity of skin biopsy when encountering SJS and TEN in the ICU in order to identify potentially treatable/controllable causes. Although it appeared reasonable to correlate TEN solely to medications, the skin biopsies clearly demonstrated an aggressive T-cell skin lymphoma. In a patient with a better general condition it may have been helpful to treat this malignancy. TEN is a life-threatening condition and skin biopsy is the cornerstone of diagnosis, despite the presence of multiple risk factors and the typical physical findings of a drug-induced reaction. PMID:26998294

  20. HLA-B*59:01: a marker for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by methazolamide in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Xuan, J; Chen, J; Zhong, H; Luo, H; Zhou, P; Sun, X; He, L; Chen, S; Cao, Z; Luo, X; Xing, Q

    2016-02-01

    Methazolamide is an intraocular pressure-lowering drug that is used in the treatment of glaucoma and other ophthalmologic abnormalities. The use of methazolamide has been shown to cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in patients of Asian ancestry. Methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN is associated with the presence of HLA-B59 serotype/HLA-B*59:01 in Korean and Japanese populations. To better understand the genetic risk factors for these adverse reactions in the Han Chinese population, we characterized the HLA class I genotypes of eight Chinese patients with methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN from 2008 to 2014. The frequency of HLA-B*59:01 was 87.5% (7/8) in the case patients, which was significantly different from 0% (0/30) in the methazolamide-tolerant patients (odds ratio (OR)=305.0; P=6.3 × 10(-7)) and 0.35% (1/283) in healthy subjects from the human major histocompatibility complex database (OR=1974.0; P=2.0 × 10(-12)). HLA-C*01:02, which is closely linked to HLA-B*59:01, had a weaker but notable association with methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN compared with the tolerant controls (OR=12.1; P=0.016) and general population (OR=15.5; P=2.0 × 10(-3)). The distribution of the HLA-B*59:01-C*01:02 haplotype was also significantly different in cases and controls. This study demonstrated a strong association between HLA-B*59:01 and methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN in the Han Chinese population for the first time. Pretherapy screening for HLA-B*59:01 would be useful to reduce the risk of methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:25918017

  1. A decade of burn unit experience with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Clinical pathological diagnosis and risk factor awareness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victoria M; Do, Annie; Berger, Timothy G; Nguyen, Austin H; DeWeese, Jeffrey; Malone, J David; Jordan, Kathleen; Hom, Fred; Tuffanelli, Lucia; Fillari, Paula; Siu, Shirley; Grossman, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS)/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) is a rare and often fatal spectrum of mucocutaneous diseases usually attributable to severe adverse drug reactions. Burn units are referral centers for patients at the most extreme end of the disease continuum. Our burn center admits a much higher percentage of TEN (>30% BSA) cases than reported in most prior reviews. The purpose of this study was to analyze the diagnostic and prognostic value of variables collected on referred SJS/TEN patients. We retrospectively analyzed 94 patients admitted to our unit with a presumptive SJS/TEN diagnosis made in most cases by the referring center. Most of the diagnoses were clinical. Fifty of the 94 patients underwent biopsy when the clinical diagnosis was questionable. Of the 50 patients who underwent biopsy, 18 (36%) received an alternative diagnosis. Analysis was therefore limited to 76 patients, i.e. 44 patients felt to have firm clinical diagnoses plus 32 patients with diagnoses confirmed by biopsy. Mean age was 54.3 years (17-93) and overall gender ratio was 43 F vs. 33 M (56.6% vs. 43.4%). Mean LOS was 15.2 days (1-48) and overall mortality was 23.7% (18/76). Univariate analysis revealed percent body surface area (%BSA) did not show statistically significant association with mortality. Histopathological correlation for diagnosis is not standardized across institutions worldwide. Due to challenges in the diagnosis of SJS/TEN and the high incidence of error in clinical diagnosis, it is recommended that all patients with presumed SJS/TEN receive skin biopsies with H&E and direct immunofluorescence. We propose a diagnostic approach in order to address this need. Lack of association between %BSA and mortality suggests that all biopsy-proven SJS/TEN cases belong in specialty centers due to the unstable nature of the disease and risk for rapid progression. PMID:26847613

  2. Severe pneumonia caused by combined infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci, parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus, and Aspergillus fumigatus in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehoon; Bae, Yun-Jeong; Park, Soo-Kyung; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Han; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Tae-Bum

    2010-11-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs. We report here the first case of severe pneumonia caused by an unusual combined infection with Pneumocystis carinii (jiroveci), parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus fumigatus in a 63-year-old female patient with allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Following treatment with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin for SJS/TEN, her mucocutaneous lesions improved and she was due to be discharged. However, 15 days after cessation of corticosteroids, she developed pneumonia. Broncho-alveolar lavage revealed that the cause of infection was Pneumocystis carinii (jiroveci), parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus. These findings indicate that patients with SJS/TEN, particularly those treated with systemic corticosteroids, may be susceptible to infection with combinations of pathological agents resulting from damage to the bronchial epithelia. PMID:21057748

  3. Innovation Squared: Comparison of Models by Tony Wagner and Steven Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, Tony Wagner's model of innovation differs from Steven Johnson's. One explores the following: how might we develop a nation of innovators? The other offers seven patterns that mark environments for innovation. Drawing from triangulated data, both authors create regularities (not laws) that have new paradigm, scientific credibility.…

  4. Use of Cross-linked Donor Corneas as Carriers for the Boston Keratoprosthesis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-03

    Chemical Injuries; Unspecified Complication of Corneal Transplant; Autoimmune Diseases; Ocular Cicatricial Pemphigoid; Stevens Johnson Syndrome; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Other Autoimmune Diseases

  5. Compartment syndrome complicating tibial tubercle avulsion.

    PubMed

    Pape, J M; Goulet, J A; Hensinger, R N

    1993-10-01

    Avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon physeal injury. Complications from this fracture are infrequent. Adolescent boys developed compartment syndrome after tibial tubercle avulsion. Injury to the soft tissue surrounding the tibial tubercle avulsion may be more extensive than is usually appreciated. The anatomy of the proximal tibia and the tibial tubercle with nearby branches of the anterior tibial recurrent artery suggest a predisposing factor for the development of compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome should be added to the list of possible complications of tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

  6. Two unusual complications of neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, A.; Harrison, C. A.; Davies, H. G.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but well described complication of the administration of antipsychotic agents. Compartment syndrome, with increased pressures within the confined space of fascial sheaths leading to compression damage of the contained tissue, similarly is well described. Brachial plexus injuries caused by patient malposition are also very rare but a few cases have been reported. We report a case where these three complications occurred together. This was attributable to the patient developing NMS whilst asleep in the prone position overnight. PMID:23983420

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity. PMID:12532043

  8. Extrarenal complications of the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harris, R C; Ismail, N

    1994-04-01

    The systemic complications of nephrotic syndrome are responsible for much of the morbidity and mortality seen with this condition. This review discusses the causes for the hypoalbuminemia and the associated metabolic abnormalities of the nephrotic syndrome. No unifying hypothesis exists for the induction, maintenance, and resolution of nephrotic edema. In view of the wide spectrum of renal diseases leading to the nephrotic syndrome, more than a single mechanism may be responsible for the renal salt retention in these diverse conditions. Although hypoalbuminemia may be important, especially when plasma oncotic pressure is very low (serum albumin < 1.5 to 2.0 g/dL), primary impairment of salt and water excretion by the nephrotic kidney appears to be a major factor in pathogenesis of the edema. However, the decreased serum albumin and/or oncotic pressure seen with nephrotic syndrome is a major contributing factor to the development of the hyperlipidemia of nephrotic syndrome. Patients with unremitting nephrotic syndrome should be considered for combined dietary and lipid-lowering drug therapy. Urinary losses of binding proteins lead to the observed abnormalities in the endocrine system and in trace metals, and urinary losses of coagulation factors contribute to the hypercoagulable state. At present, selective renal venography is recommended when the suspicion of renal vein thrombosis is justified by clinical presentation. The impact on renal function caused by treating asymptomatic chronic renal vein thrombosis is undetermined, but anticoagulation for chronic renal vein thrombosis is associated with relatively few complications.

  9. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  10. [Thrombotic complications in the nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Keusch, G

    1989-08-01

    Thromboembolic episodes are one of the most serious complications in patients with nephrotic syndrome, with an overall incidence of 25%. The most frequent site of thrombosis is the renal vein, with a reported incidence varying from 2-42%. Arterial thromboses are much less common than venous thromboses, with an overall incidence of 3%. Clinical course of renal vein thrombosis may be acute or chronic. Renal venography is the method of choice in its diagnosis. Duplex scanning, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may be as accurate as venography. Once the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis is established, anticoagulation therapy should be started. Thrombectomy or thrombolytic therapy seem to have little to offer over oral anticoagulation. The increased incidence of thrombotic complications in nephrotic syndrome may be due to a hypercoagulable state distinguished by an increase in coagulation factors (V, VIII, X and fibrinogen); a decrease in the levels of coagulation inhibitors (antithrombin III, protein S); an increase in alpha 2-antiplasmin activity; and exaggerated platelet adhesiveness and aggregation. This pre-thrombotic state may be aggravated by additional rheological factors (immobilization, diuretic therapy etc.). Serum albumin has been found to be an appropriate parameter to assess the risk of thrombosis development in these patients. A serum albumin level below 20 g/l carries a high risk of thromboembolic complications. Prophylactic anticoagulation therapy is therefore indicated in patients with serum albumin below 20 g/l.

  11. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders. Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma. During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control. He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later. The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other “typical” clinical features. PMID:27258506

  12. Tapia's syndrome — a rare complication following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  13. Metabolic complications of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Qanta A

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a widely prevalent disorder, hallmarked by partial or total upper airway obstruction during sleep. These events fracture sleep integrity resulting in chronic partial sleep deprivation with destructive metabolic sequelae, the focus of this review.

  14. Nutcracker syndrome complicating with renal abscess.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Sevgi; Ece, Aydin; Corapli, Mahmut; Ilter, Cigdem; Guven, Rufat

    2016-04-01

    The nutcracker syndrome refers to compression of left renal vein between the superior mesenteric artery and aorta. Renal abscess consists of purulent and necrotic material localised to the renal parenchyma. These two entities are extremely rare and their coincidence has not previously been described in literature. Here, we report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed left renal abscess probably due to nutcracker syndrome.

  15. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  16. Compartment syndrome: a complication of acute extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Mabee, J R

    1994-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious potential complication of trauma to the extremities. Fractures, crush injuries, burns, and arterial injuries, among others, can result in increased tissue pressure within closed osseofascial or compartmental spaces. Prolonged exposure to elevated pressure can result in nerve and muscle necrosis. Extreme pain unrelieved with analgesia, subjective complaint of pressure, pain with passive muscle stretching, paresis, paresthesia, and intact pulses, in the presence of a physically tight compartment, should alert the physician to the presence of a compartment syndrome. The diagnosis is a clinical one, but it may be aided by measurements of intracompartmental tissue pressures. Compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency requiring prompt treatment by fasciotomy. Time is a critical factor; the longer the duration of elevated tissue pressure, the greater the potential for disastrous sequelae. Emergency medicine providers must be cognizant of this clinical syndrome so that early emergent surgical consultation can be obtained to avoid complications.

  17. Nutcracker syndrome complicated by left renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Jaidane, Mehdi; Mama, Nadia; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Isolated renal vein thrombosis is a rare entity. We present a patient whose complaint of flank pain led to the diagnosis of a renal vein thrombosis. In this case, abdominal computed tomography angiography was helpful in diagnosing the nutcracker syndrome complicated by the renal vein thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started and three weeks later, CTA showed complete disappearance of the renal vein thrombosis. To treat the Nutcracker syndrome, we proposed left renal vein transposition that the patient consented to.

  18. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance.

  19. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  20. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: An Infrequent Complication of Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Turgut; Bayraktar, Adem; Dikici, Fatih; Balık, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare condition that causes a proximal small intestinal obstruction due to contraction of the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta. Scoliosis surgery is one of the 15 reasons for superior mesenteric artery syndrome, which can present with acute or chronic manifestations. Although conservative treatment is usually possible, surgical treatment is required in certain cases that cannot be treated using conservative methods. In this paper, we describe a patient who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome after scoliosis surgery and was treated with duodenojejunostomy due to failure and complications of conservative treatment. PMID:25405053

  1. Diagnosis and complications of Cushing's syndrome: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Arnaldi, G; Angeli, A; Atkinson, A B; Bertagna, X; Cavagnini, F; Chrousos, G P; Fava, G A; Findling, J W; Gaillard, R C; Grossman, A B; Kola, B; Lacroix, A; Mancini, T; Mantero, F; Newell-Price, J; Nieman, L K; Sonino, N; Vance, M L; Giustina, A; Boscaro, M

    2003-12-01

    In October 2002, a workshop was held in Ancona, Italy, to reach a Consensus on the management of Cushing's syndrome. The workshop was organized by the University of Ancona and sponsored by the Pituitary Society, the European Neuroendocrine Association, and the Italian Society of Endocrinology. Invited international participants included almost 50 leading endocrinologists with specific expertise in the management of Cushing's syndrome. The consensus statement on diagnostic criteria and the diagnosis and treatment of complications of this syndrome reached at the workshop is hereby summarized.

  2. Fahr syndrome unknown complication: overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Dağ, Ersel; Yılmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  3. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Dağ, Ersel; Yılmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome. PMID:25140274

  4. Complications of Cushing's syndrome: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Isidori, Andrea M; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Newell-Price, John; Biller, Beverly M K; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a serious endocrine disease caused by chronic, autonomous, and excessive secretion of cortisol. The syndrome is associated with increased mortality and impaired quality of life because of the occurrence of comorbidities. These clinical complications include metabolic syndrome, consisting of systemic arterial hypertension, visceral obesity, impairment of glucose metabolism, and dyslipidaemia; musculoskeletal disorders, such as myopathy, osteoporosis, and skeletal fractures; neuropsychiatric disorders, such as impairment of cognitive function, depression, or mania; impairment of reproductive and sexual function; and dermatological manifestations, mainly represented by acne, hirsutism, and alopecia. Hypertension in patients with Cushing's syndrome has a multifactorial pathogenesis and contributes to the increased risk for myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, or stroke, which are the most common causes of death; risks of these outcomes are exacerbated by a prothrombotic diathesis and hypokalaemia. Neuropsychiatric disorders can be responsible for suicide. Immune disorders are common; immunosuppression during active disease causes susceptibility to infections, possibly complicated by sepsis, an important cause of death, whereas immune rebound after disease remission can exacerbate underlying autoimmune diseases. Prompt treatment of cortisol excess and specific treatments of comorbidities are crucial to prevent serious clinical complications and reduce the mortality associated with Cushing's syndrome. PMID:27177728

  5. Complications of Cushing's syndrome: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Isidori, Andrea M; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Newell-Price, John; Biller, Beverly M K; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a serious endocrine disease caused by chronic, autonomous, and excessive secretion of cortisol. The syndrome is associated with increased mortality and impaired quality of life because of the occurrence of comorbidities. These clinical complications include metabolic syndrome, consisting of systemic arterial hypertension, visceral obesity, impairment of glucose metabolism, and dyslipidaemia; musculoskeletal disorders, such as myopathy, osteoporosis, and skeletal fractures; neuropsychiatric disorders, such as impairment of cognitive function, depression, or mania; impairment of reproductive and sexual function; and dermatological manifestations, mainly represented by acne, hirsutism, and alopecia. Hypertension in patients with Cushing's syndrome has a multifactorial pathogenesis and contributes to the increased risk for myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, or stroke, which are the most common causes of death; risks of these outcomes are exacerbated by a prothrombotic diathesis and hypokalaemia. Neuropsychiatric disorders can be responsible for suicide. Immune disorders are common; immunosuppression during active disease causes susceptibility to infections, possibly complicated by sepsis, an important cause of death, whereas immune rebound after disease remission can exacerbate underlying autoimmune diseases. Prompt treatment of cortisol excess and specific treatments of comorbidities are crucial to prevent serious clinical complications and reduce the mortality associated with Cushing's syndrome.

  6. Gastrointestinal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, Peter H.; Murdoch, J. Lamont; Votteler, Theodore

    1969-01-01

    The gastrointestinal abnormalities encountered in 125 patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been described. Spontaneous perforation of the intestine and massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage are uncommon but potentially lethal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Less dangerous abnormalities, such `as external hernia, hiatus hernia, eventration of the diaphragm, intestinal diverticula, and rectal prolapse were all encountered in patients in the series. Abdominal surgery in affected patients may be made difficult by fragility of tissues and a bleeding tendency. In the postoperative period, tearing out of sutures and wound dehiscence may occur. PMID:5308459

  7. Upper limb compartment syndrome: an unusual complication of stroke thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, Wallace J; Wu, Teddy Y; Van Dijck, Stephanie A; Snow, Barry J

    2014-05-01

    Bleeding is the most important complication of treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke. Neurologists are familiar with intracranial hemorrhage, the most feared site for bleeding following thrombolysis, but extracranial bleeding can also occur resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. We describe an 88-year-old woman with an acute stroke who developed bleeding into the left arm complicated by hemodynamic instability and compartment syndrome following intravenous thrombolysis. The patient was treated conservatively in view of the risks associated with fasciotomy and her other medical comorbidities.

  8. Case Report: Cervical chondrocalcinosis as a complication of Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zahra; Mead, Paul; Sayer, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy leading to a hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Most cases are due to mutations in SLC12A3, encoding the apical thiazide sensitive co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. Musculoskeletal effects of Gitelman syndrome are common, including muscle weakness, tetany and cramps. Chronic hypomagnesaemia can lead to chondrocalcinosis, which often affects knees but can affect other joints. Here we present a case of Gitelman syndrome complicated by cervical chondrocalcinosis leading to neck pain and numbness of the fingers. Treatments directed at correcting both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia were initiated and allowed conservative non-surgical management of the neck pain. Recognition of chondrocalcinosis is important and treatments must be individualised to correct the underlying hypomagnesaemia. PMID:27303630

  9. Case Report: Cervical chondrocalcinosis as a complication of Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zahra; Mead, Paul; Sayer, John A

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy leading to a hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Most cases are due to mutations in SLC12A3, encoding the apical thiazide sensitive co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. Musculoskeletal effects of Gitelman syndrome are common, including muscle weakness, tetany and cramps. Chronic hypomagnesaemia can lead to chondrocalcinosis, which often affects knees but can affect other joints. Here we present a case of Gitelman syndrome complicated by cervical chondrocalcinosis leading to neck pain and numbness of the fingers. Treatments directed at correcting both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia were initiated and allowed conservative non-surgical management of the neck pain. Recognition of chondrocalcinosis is important and treatments must be individualised to correct the underlying hypomagnesaemia. PMID:27303630

  10. Grisel's syndrome: a rare complication following traditional uvulectomy.

    PubMed

    Elyajouri, Abdelhakim; Assermouh, Abdellah; Abilkacem, Rachid; Agadr, Aomar; Mahraoui, Chafiq

    2015-01-01

    A case is reported of an eight-month-old female patient who had traditional uvulectomy for sore throat complicated by Grisel's syndrome. She was admitted into the hospital one week after uvulectomy with Torticolis. Grisel's syndrome is a nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation, usually secondary of an infection or an inflammation at the head and neck area, or after surgery in the same area. Patients typically suffer from painful torticollis. Diagnosis of Grisel's syndrome is largely based on suspicion of the patient who has recently undergone surgery or has a history of an infection in head and neck area. Physical examination and imaging techniques assist in diagnosis. Thus, clinicians should be aware of acute nontraumatic torticollis if patient had a recent surgery in the head or neck area or undergone an upper respiratory tract infection. In this paper, a case of an eight-month-old female patient who had Grisel's syndrome after uvulectomy is discussed. This case is reported to highlight this neurogical threatening complication following traditional uvulectomy as well as highlighting the unnecessary morbidity and mortality associated with this persisting mode of treatment in Africa.

  11. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chee-Huan; Tzeng, Shiau-Tzu; Chen, Chiang-Sang; Chen, Po-Quang

    2007-02-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare complication following correction of scoliosis with either nonoperative or operative methods. If the patient diagnosed with this syndrome is not managed timely and adequately, mortality may result. We report two cases of SMAS complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis using modern segmental derotation instrumentation system. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical presentations, laboratory findings, radiologic features, and management of the syndrome. The first patient had the syndrome after two-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between two stages, and the second patient after three-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between the first and second surgeries. The first patient responded well to conservative treatment. However, the second patient failed to respond to conservative treatment and needed a gastrojejunostomy operation to bypass the duodenal obstruction. Clinicians treating post scoliosis surgery patients should always have a high index of suspicion for this potential life-threatening condition. Early diagnosis will enable a multidisciplinary team approach to be initiated early to provide optimal care for the patient. Nutritional and fluid supplementation is mandatory during conservative treatment. The duration for trial of conservative treatment should not exceed 1 week.

  12. Iliotibial band syndrome following hip arthroscopy: An unreported complication

    PubMed Central

    Seijas, Roberto; Sallent, Andrea; Galán, María; Alvarez-Diaz, Pedro; Ares, Oscar; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip arthroscopy is considered a safe procedure, considering the relatively low rate of complications. Despite several complications have been described following this surgical procedure, the present event has not yet been described. The purpose of the present study is to report an unpublished complication following hip arthroscopy, after reviewing 162 hip arthroscopies and finding iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) in the knee during followup. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 162 hip arthroscopies performed between September 2007 and June 2011 was carried out, evaluating patients who presented ITBS during followup. Indication for hip arthroscopy was failure of conservative treatment in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement. Results: During a minimum followup of 2 years, nine patients (5.5%) developed ITBS. All patients were diagnosed with ITBS within the first 45 postoperative days. Conservative treatment was successful in 6 patients while 3 had to undergo surgery. The increased internal rotation, synovitis and increased adduction of the hip can be attributed as predisposing factors to the development of ITBS. Conclusions: This is a newly described observation within followup of hip arthroscopy. These findings may help orthopedic surgeons when planning rehabilitation after hip arthroscopy, including stretching exercises to prevent this syndrome. PMID:27746490

  13. Neurological complications of Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Desmond

    2012-12-01

    Behçet's syndrome is an autoinflammatory disease of uncertain cause characterized by mucous membrane ulceration, arthritis and inflammation within most tissues. Its prevalence differs throughout different populations, but neurological complications arise in 10 % of all those affected. The majority develop inflammation within the central nervous system which may remit but may also progressively worsen without treatment. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, natural history and management of the disorders, and emphasizes recent considerable advances in our understanding of the various treatments which may be beneficial across the spectrum of disease types. PMID:23007835

  14. Locus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G; Broekman, Marike; Robe, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. PMID:25903199

  15. Buried bumper syndrome: A complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Cyrany, Jiri; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method of nutrition delivery for patients with long-term insufficiency of oral intake. The PEG complication rate varies from 0.4% to 22.5% of cases, with minor complications being three times more frequent. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is a severe complication of this method, in which the internal fixation device migrates alongside the tract of the stoma outside the stomach. Excessive compression of tissue between the external and internal fixation device of the gastrostomy tube is considered the main etiological factor leading to BBS. Incidence of BBS is estimated at around 1% (0.3%-2.4%). Inability to insert, loss of patency and leakage around the PEG tube are considered to be a typical symptomatic triad. Gastroscopy is indicated in all cases in which BBS is suspected. The depth of disc migration in relation to the lamina muscularis propria of the stomach is critical for further therapy and can be estimated by endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound. BBS can be complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, intra-abdominal and abdominal wall abscesses, or phlegmon, and these complications can lead to fatal outcomes. The most important preventive measure is adequate positioning of the external bolster. A conservative approach should be applied only in patients with high operative risk and dismal prognosis. Choice of the method of release is based on the type of the PEG set and depth of disc migration. A disc retained inside the stomach and completely covered by the overgrowing tissue can be released using some type of endoscopic dissection technique (needle knife, argon plasma coagulation, or papillotome through the cannula). Proper patient selection and dissection of the overgrowing tissue are the major determinants for successful endoscopic therapy. A disc localized out of the stomach (lamina muscularis propria) should be treated by a surgeon. PMID:26811611

  16. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozbay, Isa; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  17. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  18. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Ozbay, Isa; Oghan, Fatih; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic.

  19. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications.

  20. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Ozbay, Isa; Oghan, Fatih; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  1. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances-serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  2. Neurologic complications of systemic lupus erythematosus, sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shamik; Helfgott, Simon M

    2014-09-01

    Neurologic complications are frequent and often morbid in systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although all are systemic inflammatory syndromes, each disease affects the nervous system distinctly, such as peripheral neuropathy in Sjögren syndrome, cerebrovascular disease in lupus, and cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis. Some neurologic complications share convergent pathophysiology across diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders in both Sjögren syndrome and lupus. Ill-defined cognitive complaints are especially common in lupus and Sjögren syndrome. For the majority of the complications, evidence for treatment efficacy is limited and requires further investigation.

  3. HELLP syndrome: a diagnostic conundrum with severe complications.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devika; Chaudhari, Nikulkumar Kumar; Moore, Robert Michael; Jim, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    The HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome is believed to be part of the spectrum of pre-eclampsia, which falls within the category of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Maternal and fetal complications are more severe in HELLP as opposed to pre-eclampsia alone. We describe a 26-year-old primigravida woman with no medical history who presents with signs of HELLP with marked transaminitis and mild disseminated intravascular coagulation at 35 weeks of gestation who required emergent delivery of the fetus; the patient also sustained acute kidney injury requiring continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration and a prolonged intensive care unit admission. Remarkably, with supportive care, all laboratory derangements, including renal function, normalised after 4 weeks. We discuss the diagnostic conundrum when faced with the possible diagnosis of HELLP in discriminating from its many imitators in order to assume proper treatment. PMID:27535735

  4. A new mouse model of metabolic syndrome and associated complications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Zheng, Yue; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MS) encompasses a clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. We characterized a new mouse model carrying a dominant mutation, C57BL/6J-Nmf15/+ (B6-Nmf15/+), which develops additional complications of MS such as adipose tissue inflammation and cardiomyopathy. A backcross was used to genetically map the Nmf15 locus. Mice were examined in the CLAMS™ animal monitoring system, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and blood chemistry analyses were performed. Hypothalamic LepR, SOCS1 and STAT3 phosphorylation were examined. Cardiac function was assessed by Echo- and Electro Cardiography. Adipose tissue inflammation was characterized by in situ hybridization and measurement of Jun kinase activity. The Nmf15 locus mapped to distal mouse chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 13.8. Nmf15 mice developed obesity by 12 weeks of age. Plasma leptin levels were significantly elevated in pre-obese Nmf15 mice at 8 weeks of age and an attenuated STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus suggests a primary leptin resistance. Adipose tissue from Nmf15 mice showed a remarkable degree of inflammation and macrophage infiltration as indicated by expression of the F4/80 marker and increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Lipidosis was observed in tubular epithelial cells and glomeruli of the kidney. Nmf15 mice demonstrate both histological and pathophysiological evidence of cardiomyopathy. The Nmf15 mouse model provides a new entry point into pathways mediating leptin resistance and obesity. It is one of few models that combine many aspects of metabolic syndrome and can be useful for testing new therapeutic approaches for combating obesity complications, particularly cardiomyopathy. PMID:19398498

  5. [Pseudoexfoliation syndrome and cataract surgery. Avoidance and treatment of complications].

    PubMed

    Menapace, R

    2012-10-01

    Eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome often exhibit insufficient mydriasis, zonular weakness and pronounced fibrotic capsular shrinkage. This may make cataract surgery as such difficult but also leads to postoperative complications, such as rhexis ovalization or phimosis (capsule contraction syndrome) or progressive zonular weakening with final spontaneous dislocation of the capsule-implant complex (CIC). To avoid or correct for this special techniques and implants may be used: as prophylaxis, intracameral adrenalin and retroiridal capsulorhexis, iris retractors or dilators, various models of capsular tension and bending rings, bimanual capsule ring implantation, capsular bag stabilization with iris retractors or segments and secondary capsulorhexis may be used. Rhexis phimosis may be excised by a special diathermic probe, a subluxated CIC may be sutured to the sclera either in toto or the lens only after removal from the capsule bag, the latter also to the posterior iris surface. When luxated into the vitreous cavity, the CIC may be lifted to the iris plane and refixed as described or exchanged for a new lens sutured into the sulcus or an angle or iris-supported anterior chamber lens.

  6. [Pseudoexfoliation syndrome and cataract surgery. Avoidance and treatment of complications].

    PubMed

    Menapace, R

    2012-10-01

    Eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome often exhibit insufficient mydriasis, zonular weakness and pronounced fibrotic capsular shrinkage. This may make cataract surgery as such difficult but also leads to postoperative complications, such as rhexis ovalization or phimosis (capsule contraction syndrome) or progressive zonular weakening with final spontaneous dislocation of the capsule-implant complex (CIC). To avoid or correct for this special techniques and implants may be used: as prophylaxis, intracameral adrenalin and retroiridal capsulorhexis, iris retractors or dilators, various models of capsular tension and bending rings, bimanual capsule ring implantation, capsular bag stabilization with iris retractors or segments and secondary capsulorhexis may be used. Rhexis phimosis may be excised by a special diathermic probe, a subluxated CIC may be sutured to the sclera either in toto or the lens only after removal from the capsule bag, the latter also to the posterior iris surface. When luxated into the vitreous cavity, the CIC may be lifted to the iris plane and refixed as described or exchanged for a new lens sutured into the sulcus or an angle or iris-supported anterior chamber lens. PMID:23053332

  7. Erythema multiforme

    MedlinePlus

    Lyell's syndrome; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; Erythema multiforme minor; Erythema multiforme major ... more severe. It is also known as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This form is usually caused by reactions ...

  8. Complications after spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Guan, Zheng; Gao, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Since little has been reported about complications of spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS), we sought to delineate the characteristics of the condition.A total of 4 cases of adult TCS after spinal anesthesia were reviewed. The medical charts of the patients were obtained. Anesthesia, which was combined spinal and epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia was performed, and follow-up were carried out in all patients.The most common neurological symptom of adult TCS before surgery was occasional severe pain in back, perineal region, or legs. Frequent micturition, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, and difficulty in bending were exhibited in partial patients. Paraesthesia of perineal region or/and lower extremities existed 2 to 3 days after spinal anesthesia in all the cases. Weakness of lower extremities existed in 1 case. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the low location of conus medullaris. At follow-up, 3 cases recovered completely within 3 weeks, and 1 case underwent permanent disability.These cases suggest anesthesiologists and surgeons alert to the association of adult TCS and spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia should be prohibited in patients with adult TCS to prevent neurological damages. PMID:27442670

  9. Complications and challenges associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Falbo, Angela; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common endocrine dysfunction in fertile women and it is considered a heterogeneous and multifaceted disorder, with multiple reproductive and metabolic phenotypes which differently affect the early- and long-term syndrome’s risks. Women with PCOS present an adverse reproductive profile, including a high risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Patients with PCOS present not only a higher prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, but also of nonclassic cardiovascular risk factors, including mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Moreover, at the moment, clinical data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women with PCOS are controversial. Finally, women with PCOS show an increased risk of endometrial cancer compared to non-PCOS healthy women, particularly during premenopausal period. Currently, we are unable to clarify if the increased PCOS early- and long-term risks are totally due to PCOS per se or mostly due to obesity, in particular visceral obesity, that characterized the majority of PCOS patients. In any case, the main endocrine and gynecological scientific societies agree to consider women with PCOS at increased risk of obstetric, cardiometabolic, oncology, and psychological complications throughout life, and it is recommended that these women be accurately assessed with periodic follow-up. PMID:26261426

  10. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome: A preventable fatal acute complication.

    PubMed

    Mah, D Y; Yia, H J; Cheong, W S

    2016-04-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a neurological disorder with varying severity that is postulated to be associated with cerebral oedema. We described a case of DDS resulting in irreversible brain injury and death following acute haemodialysis. A 13-year-old male with no past medical history and weighing 30kg, presented to hospital with severe urosepsis complicated by acute kidney injury (Creatinine 1422mmol/L; Urea 74.2mmol/L, Potassium 6.3mmol/L, Sodium 137mmol/L) and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99, HC03 1.7mmol/L). Chest radiograph was normal. Elective intubation was done for respiratory distress. Acute haemodialysis performed due to refractory metabolic acidosis. Following haemodialysis, he became hypotensive which required inotropes. His Riker's score was low with absence of brainstem reflexes after withholding sedation. CT Brain showed generalised cerebral oedema consistent with global hypoxic changes involving the brainstem. The symptoms of DDS are caused by water movement into the brain causing cerebral oedema. Two theories have been proposed: reverse osmotic shift induced by urea removal and a fall in cerebral intracellular pH. Prevention is the key to the management of DDS. It is important to identify high risk patients and haemodialysis with reduced dialysis efficacy and gradual urea reduction is recommended. Patients who are vulnerable to DDS should be monitored closely. Low efficiency haemodialysis is recommended. Acute peritoneal dialysis might be an alternative option, but further studies are needed. PMID:27326954

  11. Vibrio vulnificus infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, S M; Liu, C C; Chiou, Y Y; Yang, H B; Chen, C T

    2000-05-01

    A 9-year-old girl with nephrotic syndrome visited a local hospital after developing fever, chills, and edematous changes and multiple hemorrhagic bullae on both legs over 2 days. Cultures of blood and an aspirate from the bullae yielded Vibrio vulnificus. The patient was transferred to our hospital because of persistent fever, generalized edema, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. We treated this patient as a V. vulnificus infection complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. With minocycline and ceftazidime combination therapy was instituted. Emergency fasciotomy and continuous peritoneal dialysis were performed. The patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during the hospitalization, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. She eventually died. The histopathological findings showed diffuse alveolar damage with lobular pneumonitis. Hyaline membranes, composed of proteinaceous exudate and cellular debris, covered the alveolar surfaces. Microscopic examinations of lung could not distinguish the effects of cytolysin from other insults to lungs that occur in ARDS. This report highlights the postmortem pathological findings in V. vulnificus infection in a child with nephrotic syndrome complicated by ARDS.

  12. Thromboembolic complications in the nephrotic syndrome: pathophysiology and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Rajni; Brimble, K Scott

    2006-01-01

    Patients with the nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk of developing venous and arterial thromboembolism, the most common of which is renal vein thrombosis. There are several unanswered or controversial issues relating to the nephrotic syndrome and thromboembolism, which include the mechanism of thromboembolism, and optimal diagnostic and anticoagulant management strategies. This review will discuss several of these issues: the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of thromboembolic disease occurring in patients with the nephrotic syndrome; the pathophysiology of the hypercoagulable state associated with the nephrotic syndrome; the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis in the nephrotic syndrome; and the evidence for prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulation strategies in such patients.

  13. Oxidative stress and cardiovascular complications in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hyderali, Barkath Nisha; Mala, Kanchana

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine condition which is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications. It is elevated to a metabolic disorder with significant long term health ramification due to the high prevalence of insulin resistance (IR), impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes (T2D), dyslipidemia and numerous cardiovascular risk factors in PCOS women. This article concentrates on the recent developments in the regulation of oxidative stress (OS) in PCOS and on the association between PCOS and CVD outcomes. The prognostic events that define the severity of PCOS and involvement of cardiovascular risk in PCOS include endothelial dysfunction (ED) and impaired cardiac structure. Fact is that, in PCOS women, the circulating biomarkers of OS are in abnormal levels that are independent of overweight, which depicts the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of this common derangement. In addition, hyperglycemia (HG) per se, promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in PCOS. When the destructive ROS outbalances the concentration of physiological antioxidants, OS occurs. The resultant OS, directly stimulates hyperandrogenism and causes extensive cellular injury, DNA damage and/or cell apoptosis. To further the burden, the total serum antioxidant level in PCOS women is compromised, which diminishes the body's defense against an oxidative milieu. Thus, it is evident that OS regulates several cellular mechanisms in PCOS. Improving our understanding about the regulation of OS, critical role of ROS and protein biomarkers in PCOS should lead to novel therapeutic strategies in addressing PCOS-induced CVD. Besides, it is possible that the beneficial effects of dietary or therapeutic antioxidants have significant clinical relevance in PCOS.

  14. Two cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Abe, Yoshinobu; Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a life-threatening complication in trauma patients. Not only regional neuromuscular disability, but also systemic organ disorders can result from prolonged tissue ischemia. In this report, we describe 2 cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke. In both cases, emergency fasciotomy was rapidly performed after recognition of the syndrome, but serious regional neuromuscular disabilities remained. Microvascular endothelial injury is an important mechanism of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome. Thrombi diffusely formed in the compartmental space hinder establishment of reperfusion even after fasciotomy. Furthermore, disruption of fibrinolysis due to heat stroke could enhance this damage.

  15. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  16. An Unexpected Airway Complication in a Male Patient with Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sadie; Gadhok, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Goltz syndrome, also known as focal dermal hypoplasia, is a rare X-linked dominant multisystem syndrome presenting with cutaneous, skeletal, dental ocular, central nervous system and soft tissue abnormalities. This case report discusses an adult male patient with Goltz syndrome that was noted to have large, papillomatous, hypopharyngeal lesions upon induction of general anesthesia. We highlight challenges with airway management intraoperatively and postoperatively in patients with Goltz syndrome. Our aim is to increase awareness of the potential airway complications associated with this genetic disorder and to provide suggestions for optimal perioperative management for patients afflicted with Goltz syndrome. PMID:27721997

  17. Long-term complications after surgical correction of Laubry-Pezzi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sbizzera, Marc; Cosset, Benoit; Koffel, Catherine; Obadia, Jean François; Robin, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Laubry-Pezzi syndrome is a rare congenital heart disease (CHD) combining a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and an aortic regurgitation (AR) due to a prolapse of the right coronary or, less frequently, non-coronary cusp. In the literature there are very few reports of long-term complications after surgical correction of this syndrome. We present the late occurrence of an aortic root pseudoaneurysm and a residual VSD in a patient with Laubry-Pezzi syndrome operated during childhood. PMID:27076977

  18. Lethal Complications of the Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, P.

    1968-01-01

    Death from arterial bleeding or gastrointestinal perforation has previously been reported in more than 15 patients with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. On a basis of 100 personally examined patients and a review of published accounts, these events seem particularly likely to occur in two distinct and recognizable forms (the gravis and the ecchymotic forms) of the syndrome. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 1 PMID:5673215

  19. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  20. Hemoptysis Complicating Scimitar Syndrome: From Diagnosis to Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nedelcu, Cosmina; Carette, Marie-France; Parrot, Antoine; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Marsault, Claude; Khalil, Antoine

    2008-07-15

    We report the case of a 24-year-old patient with known scimitar syndrome presenting with hemoptysis. Multidetector CT angiography showed the scimitar vein draining the right lung to the inferior vena cava associated with right lower lobe bronchopulmonary sequestration. The presence of hemoptysis associated with scimitar syndrome is likely secondary to an anomalous systemic arterial blood supply. We treated this patient successfully with transcatheter occlusion of the anomalous feeding arterial vessels.

  1. Thromboembolic complications in nephrotic syndrome. Coagulation abnormalities, renal vein thrombosis, and other conditions.

    PubMed

    Llach, F

    1984-11-01

    In patients with nephrotic syndrome, the presence of a hypercoagulable state is thought to give rise to a high incidence of thromboembolic phenomena. Renal vein thrombosis is a common complication in nephrotic patients, mainly in those with membranous nephropathy, and many other types of thromboembolic complications also occur. The mortality rate in nephrotic patients with thromboembolic complications may be significantly increased, with pulmonary emboli likely being the most common cause of death.

  2. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following bariatric surgery: A rare but important complication

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bernadette; Heath, Dugal

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal Compartment Syndrome is a rare condition caused by excessive pressure within the gluteal compartments which leads to a number of potentially serious sequelae including rhabdomyolysis, nerve damage, renal failure and death. As bariatric patients are heavy and during prolonged bariatric procedures lie in one position for extended periods of time, they are especially susceptible to developing this complication. It is therefore essential that bariatric surgeons are aware of this complication and how to minimise the chances of it occurring and how to diagnose it. We describe a case of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome in a patient following a gastric bypass and review the aetiology, pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of this complication. PMID:25750728

  3. Acute brain ischemia as a complication of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the case series.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Michal; Majos, Marcin A; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Majos, Agata

    2014-10-01

    Vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome involves many severe complications leading not only to organ-specific symptoms but often ends in a sudden death. The aim of this paper was to present a diagnostic possibilities and its efficiency rate in patients with vascular complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who suffered from artery dissection resulting in acute brain or limb ischemia. We analysed three patients with diagnosed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who were referred to radiology department for diagnostic imaging of affected vascular beds, each experienced brain ischemia. The paper also aims at offering some general recommendations for patients suffering from possible complications of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome basing on our own experience and available literature data.

  4. [Neurological complications following anesthesia--part I. Perioperative stroke, postoperative visual loss, anticholinergic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adam, Christian; Quabach, Ralf; Standl, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Neurological complications following anesthesia deteriorate patients' outcome, and increase hospital costs because of prolonged hospitalization and supplemental medical care. Moreover, patients' satisfaction is negatively influenced by neurological sequelae after anesthesia. Improving anesthesiologic management based on consequent prevention measures can help to reduce the incidence of neurological complications after anesthesia. In case of neurological complications in the perioperative phase an interdisciplinary approach in immediate diagnosis and treatment may prevent patients from permanent damage. The present review article gives an overview over incidences, diagnostic and therapeutic issues of neurologic complications in operative patients, such as perioperative stroke, postoperative visual loss and the anticholinergic syndrome. PMID:20665352

  5. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-12-20

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome.

  6. Nephrotic syndrome complicated with portal, splenic, and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong Soo; Park, Sihyung; Jin, Kyubok; Choi, Gibok; Park, Kang Min; Jo, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yang Wook

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism is a major complication of nephrotic syndrome. Renal vein thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis are relatively common, especially in membranous nephropathy. However, the incidence of portal vein and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) thrombosis in patients with nephrotic syndrome is very rare. To date, several cases of portal vein thrombosis treated by anticoagulation therapy, not by thrombolytic therapy, have been reported as a complication of nephrotic syndrome. Here, we report a case of portal, splenic, and SMV thrombosis in a patient with a relapsed steroid dependent minimal change disease who was treated successfully with anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy using urokinase. Radiologic findings and his clinical conditions gradually improved. Six months later, a complete remission of the nephrotic syndrome was observed and the follow-up computed tomography scan showed the disappearance of all portal vein, splenic vein, and SMV thrombi.

  7. [Unusual complications of the Peutz-Jeghers-syndrome in two consecutive generations of the same family].

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Ch; Papaziogas, B; Atmatzidis, K; Kalaitzis, E; Pavlidis, T; Papaziogas, T

    2002-02-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease, characterized by the presence of hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract and perioral mucocutaneous pigmentation. The incidence of surgical complications in these patients is relatively rare, and correlates with the size and location of the polyps. We report on two complications of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome which occurred in two generations of the same family. There was a perforation and an invagination of the small intestine. Both cases were treated by resection of the small intestine.

  8. Complications of the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: results of a population based study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Ladusans, E J; Rimmer, S; Burnell, L D; Thakker, N; Farndon, P A

    1993-01-01

    There are many potential complications which have been reported in association with the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. We have been able to show the relative frequencies of these problems in a population based study of 84 cases in the north west of England. The major complications of basal cell carcinomas and jaw cysts occur in over 90% of patients by 40 years of age, but may both occur before 10 years of age. Less well described complications are ovarian calcification or fibroma (24%), medulloblastoma (5%), cardiac fibroma (3%), cleft palate (5%), and ophthalmic abnormalities such as squint or cataract (26%). This study more clearly defines the possible complications of the syndrome and gives clearer guidelines for counselling and screening affected and at risk persons. Images PMID:8326488

  9. Kawasaki shock syndrome complicating a recurrence of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Tissandier, Côme; Lang, Matthieu; Lusson, Jean René; Bœuf, Benoit; Merlin, Etienne; Dauphin, Claire

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of recurrent Kawasaki disease (KD) in a non-Asian 6-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with typical KD without cardiac involvement at age 3 years. He was admitted to the PICU 3 years later for heart failure, hypotension, and deterioration of his general condition. Ultrasonography revealed left ventricular dysfunction with a 44% ejection fraction and grade I mitral valve failure without coronary artery involvement. Subsequent observation of hyperemic conjunctiva, bilateral cervical adenopathies with erythematous skin (normal neck ultrasound and computed axial tomography findings), peeling of the fingertips at day 8 of the illness, and occurrence of an inflammatory syndrome led to a diagnosis of incomplete recurrent KD with a clinical picture of Kawasaki shock syndrome (KSS). Clinical improvement was rapidly obtained after intravenous immunoglobulin and intravenous corticosteroid therapy (30 mg/kg per day for 3 subsequent days). Left ventricular function gradually improved, with ultrasound returning to normal after 3 months. Diagnosis was difficult to establish because of the recurrence of the disease and the incomplete clinical picture, with clinical features of KSS. Physicians need to be aware of these pitfalls in the management of patients with clinical signs of KD. PMID:25384485

  10. [Vitamin D deficiency rickets complicating Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Barraud, C; Cano, A; Boulay, C; Milh, M; Bollini, G; Chabrol, B

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency rickets remains a public health issue in many parts of the world. In France, this diagnosis has almost disappeared since 1992 with routine vitamin D supplementation for children. Therefore, it is more difficult for doctors to identify risk factors and early signs of this disease. In this article, we report a rickets diagnosis acquired by vitamin D deficiency in a child who presented with the onset of a genu valgum and difficulty walking at the age of 9½ years. This patient was a Comorian child followed up from his birth for Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome is a rare disease, with about 80 cases reported in the literature. It belongs to the group of neutral lipid storage diseases (NLSD) characterized especially on the skin by ichthyosis. This child presented risk factors for vitamin D deficiency (dark skin color, prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding, premature end of supplementation, and particularly severe ichthyosis) that should have alerted us to the risk of vitamin D deficiency and the need for supplementation. This case highlights the importance of vitamin D, especially if there are risk factors such as ichthyosis, and the need to remain watchful in monitoring all chronic diseases.

  11. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Soon; Hogan, Patrick; McKenzie, Scott; Gibbs, Harry; Strutton, Geoff; Wong, Richard

    2007-08-01

    "MAGIC syndrome" (Mouth And Genital ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage) has been proposed to describe patients with clinical features of both relapsing polychondritis and Behcet disease. A total of 18 cases have been reported with only 1 case associated with aneurysmal aortitis described in 1997. Herein, we describe a patient with MAGIC syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis requiring cardiothoracic surgery and intensive immunosuppression. Monitoring for the possible development of inflammatory aortic aneurysms should thus be considered in patients with MAGIC syndrome who have persistently elevated serum inflammatory markers. If an aortic aneurysm is detected, cardiothoracic surgical referral is necessary, close monitoring for enlargement is mandatory, and intensification of immunosuppressive therapy should be considered.

  12. Osteomalacia complicating renal tubular acidosis in association with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ati, Zohra; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Boulahya, Ghada; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede other complaints. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal disease in SS and may lead to renal tubular acidosis (RTA), which in turn may cause osteomalacia. Nevertheless, osteomalacia rarely occurs as the first manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to SS. We herewith describe a 43-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for weakness, lumbago and inability to walk. X-ray of the long bones showed extensive demineralization of the bones. Laboratory investigations revealed chronic kidney disease with serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL and creatinine clearance of 40 mL/min, hypokalemia (3.2 mmol/L), hypophosphatemia (0.4 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (2.14 mmol/L) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis (chlorine: 114 mmol/L; alkaline reserve: 14 mmol/L). The serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated. The serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D were low and borderline low, respectively, and the parathyroid hormone level was 70 pg/L. Urinalysis showed inappropriate alkaline urine (urinary PH: 7), glycosuria with normal blood glucose, phosphaturia and uricosuria. These values indicated the presence of both distal and proximal RTA. Our patient reported dryness of the mouth and eyes and Schirmer's test showed xerophthalmia. An accessory salivary gland biopsy showed changes corresponding to stage IV of Chisholm and Masson score. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse and severe tubulo-interstitial nephritis with dense lymphoplasmocyte infiltrates. Sicca syndrome and renal interstitial infiltrates indicated SS as the underlying cause of the RTA and osteomalacia. The patient received alkalinization, vitamin D (Sterogyl ®), calcium supplements and steroids in an initial dose of 1 mg/kg/day, tapered to 10 mg daily. The prognosis was favorable and the serum creatinine level was 1.7 mg/dL, calcium was 2.2 mmol/L and serum phosphate was 0.9 mmol/L. PMID:25193912

  13. Osteomalacia complicating renal tubular acidosis in association with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ati, Zohra; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Boulahya, Ghada; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede other complaints. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal disease in SS and may lead to renal tubular acidosis (RTA), which in turn may cause osteomalacia. Nevertheless, osteomalacia rarely occurs as the first manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to SS. We herewith describe a 43-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for weakness, lumbago and inability to walk. X-ray of the long bones showed extensive demineralization of the bones. Laboratory investigations revealed chronic kidney disease with serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL and creatinine clearance of 40 mL/min, hypokalemia (3.2 mmol/L), hypophosphatemia (0.4 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (2.14 mmol/L) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis (chlorine: 114 mmol/L; alkaline reserve: 14 mmol/L). The serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated. The serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D were low and borderline low, respectively, and the parathyroid hormone level was 70 pg/L. Urinalysis showed inappropriate alkaline urine (urinary PH: 7), glycosuria with normal blood glucose, phosphaturia and uricosuria. These values indicated the presence of both distal and proximal RTA. Our patient reported dryness of the mouth and eyes and Schirmer's test showed xerophthalmia. An accessory salivary gland biopsy showed changes corresponding to stage IV of Chisholm and Masson score. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse and severe tubulo-interstitial nephritis with dense lymphoplasmocyte infiltrates. Sicca syndrome and renal interstitial infiltrates indicated SS as the underlying cause of the RTA and osteomalacia. The patient received alkalinization, vitamin D (Sterogyl ®), calcium supplements and steroids in an initial dose of 1 mg/kg/day, tapered to 10 mg daily. The prognosis was favorable and the serum creatinine level was 1.7 mg/dL, calcium was 2.2 mmol/L and serum phosphate was 0.9 mmol/L.

  14. Management of xerostomia and other complications of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andres

    2014-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the published literature in English in the past 63 years involving the management of xerostomia and other oral complications of Sjögren's syndrome. The evidence supporting studied interventions was evaluated using published criteria.

  15. Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Hydatid Cyst of the Liver Managed by Venoplasty and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Sarawagi, Radha Keshava, Shyamkumar N. Surendrababu, Narayanam R. S.; Zachariah, Uday G. Eapen, Eapen C.

    2011-02-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal hypertension is an uncommon complication of hydatid cyst of the liver. Previous reports describe cyst excision or portosystemic shunt surgery for such patients. Here we present a case of hydatid cyst of the liver with BCS that was treated successfully with hepatic venoplasty and transjugular stent placement.

  16. Organophosphate poisoning complicated by a tachyarrhythmia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Nel, L; Hatherill, M; Davies, J; Andronikou, S; Stirling, J; Reynolds, L; Argent, A

    2002-10-01

    A 9-year-old child presented with documented organophosphate insecticide poisoning. His course was initially complicated by a tachyarrhythmia with QT-interval prolongation that responded promptly to intravenous magnesium. However, following partial recovery, he developed progressive acute respiratory distress syndrome characterized by irreversible fibrosis and obliteration of the lung parenchyma. PMID:12354276

  17. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-12-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS. Most importantly, TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), for example losartan, has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS. A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months. So, a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon. Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade, doxycyclin and statins. Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS. PMID:22783312

  18. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  19. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel P; Philippo, Sean M; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  20. Tuberculous meningitis complicated with hydrocephalus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a three-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Ming; Chen, Chu-Chin; Chiu, Pao-Chin; Cheng, Ming-Fang; Chiu, Ching-Lan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2004-09-01

    Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) is a syndrome of hyponatremia and natriuresis described in patients with intracranial diseases. We describe a 3-year-old boy with tuberculous meningitis complicated by hydrocephalus and CSWS and emphasize the different clinical presentation and management of patients with CSWS and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone.

  1. Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children—clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert Opika; Aanyu, Hellen T; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Piloya-Were, Theresa; Namusoke, Hanifa; Musoke, Sarah Bonita; Nalugya, Joyce; Bangirana, Paul; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; White, Steven; Chong, Kling; Atai-Omoruto, Anne D; Mworozi, Edison; Nankunda, Jolly; Kiguli, Sarah; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Tumwine, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children. Design Case series. Participants 22 children with nodding syndrome brought to Mulago National Referral Hospital for assessment. Outcome measures Clinical features, physical and functional disabilities, EEG and brain MRI findings and a staging system with a progressive development of symptoms and complications. Results The median age of symptom onset was 6 (range 4–10) years and median duration of symptoms was 8.5 (range 2–11) years. 16 of 22 families reported multiple affected children. Physical manifestations and complications included stunting, wasting, lip changes and gross physical deformities. The bone age was delayed by 2 (range 1–6) years. There was peripheral muscle wasting and progressive generalised wasting. Four children had nodding as the only seizure type; 18 in addition had myoclonic, absence and/or generalised tonic–clonic seizures developing 1–3 years after the onset of illness. Psychiatric manifestations included wandering, aggression, depression and disordered perception. Cognitive assessment in three children demonstrated profound impairment. The EEG was abnormal in all, suggesting symptomatic generalised epilepsy in the majority. There were different degrees of cortical and cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI, but no hippocampal changes. Five stages with worsening physical, EEG and brain imaging features were identified: a prodrome, the development of head nodding and cognitive decline, other seizure types, multiple complications and severe disability. Conclusions Nodding syndrome is a neurological disorder that may be characterised as probably

  2. Use of Eculizumab in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bermea, Rene S; Sharma, Niharika; Cohen, Kenneth; Liarski, Vladimir M

    2016-09-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by the presence of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and end-organ injury. In this report, we describe two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with findings compatible with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, complicated by acute kidney injury that was refractory to conventional therapies. Both patients exhibited a response to eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement protein C5, with stabilization of their platelet count. On 1-year follow-up from their initial presentation, their hematologic disease remained in remission without recurrence. PMID:27556240

  3. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  4. Preventing the aortic complications of Marfan syndrome: a case-example of translational genomic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Li-Wan-Po, Alain; Loeys, Bart; Farndon, Peter; Latham, David; Bradley, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The translational path from pharmacological insight to effective therapy can be a long one. We aim to describe the management of Marfan syndrome as a case-example of how pharmacological and genomic insights can contribute to improved therapy. We undertook a literature search for studies of Marfan syndrome, to identify milestones in description, understanding and therapy of the syndrome. From the studies retrieved we then weaved an evidence-based description of progress. Marfan syndrome shows considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentation. It relies on defined clinical criteria with confirmation based on FBN1 mutation testing. Surgical advances have prolonged life in Marfan syndrome. First-line prophylaxis of complications with β-adrenoceptor blockers became established on the basis that reduction of aortic pressure and heart rate would help. Over-activity of proteinases, first suggested in 1980, has since been confirmed by evidence of over-expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), notably MMP-2 and MMP-9. The search for MMP inhibitors led to the evaluation of doxycycline, and both animal studies and small trials, provided early evidence that this widely used antimicrobial agent was useful. Identification of the importance of TGF-β led to evaluation of angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) blockers with highly promising results. Combination prophylactic therapy would appear rational. Pharmacological and genomic research has provided good evidence that therapy with losartan and doxycycline would prevent the aortic complications of Marfan syndrome. If on-going well designed trials confirm their efficacy, the outlook for Marfan syndrome patients would be improved considerably. PMID:21276043

  5. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  6. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  7. Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome: A Potential Complication Following Anterior Interbody Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Glenn S.; Castro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Baastrup's Syndrome is a condition that occurs when there is abnormal contact between two adjacent spinous processes resulting in back pain. An alteration in lumbar spinal alignment and/or adjacent segment compensatory motion is thought to be potential causative factors. The objective of this study was to present a case series of what appears to be iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome as a mid-to-late term complication following anterior lumbar interbody surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients undergoing anterior lumbar surgery for either fusion or disc replacement to determine the prevalence of Baastrup's Syndrome. Results Over a 12-year period, 855 patients who had undergone an anterior approach for lumbar spine surgery were identified. Of them 8 patients with evidence of Baastrup's Syndrome were found; this demonstrated a prevalence of 0.9%. Diagnostic injection was a helpful clinical tool in confirming the diagnosis of iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome. The partial removal of the impinging spinous processes resulted in excellent clinical relief. Conclusions Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome may be an iatrogenic result of anterior lumbar surgery in small group of patients. Spinous process excision is a suggested treatment option. Further studies are necessary to explore the above phenomenon. This study is a Level 3 retrospective case series. PMID:26767158

  8. Generalized tetanus could be complicated with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Yun Su; Cho, Ji Hyun

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with tetanus was conducted to evaluate the occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Two of 13 tetanus cases were complicated with GBS. Their symptoms and signs related to GBS improved markedly after a 5-day infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin. Physicians should keep in mind that GBS can be an important cause of muscle weakness in patients with tetanus.

  9. [Tumor lysis syndrome in a pregnancy complicated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Goris, M P; Sánchez-Zamora, R; Torres-Aguilar, A A; Briones Garduño, J C

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is rare during pregnancy, affects about 1 in 75,000 pregnancies, of all leukemias diagnosed only 28% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this is a risk factor to develop spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome, it's a oncologic complication potentially deadly if the prophylactic treatment its avoided. Cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with pregnancy has been poorly documented in the literature the association of these two entities to pregnancy is the first report published worldwide, so the information is limited. PMID:27443101

  10. Cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar diverticula complicating long-standing ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, R; Urbach, H; Zierz, S

    1994-12-01

    A patient with cauda equina syndrome complicating long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis is described. The first neurological symptoms started 15 years after the onset of ankylosing spondylitis. Over a follow-up period of 12 years the cauda equina syndrome showed a slowly progressive but disabling course leading to sensory disturbances in the lumbar and sacral dermatomes, weakness and wasting of the muscles innervated by these nerve roots, sphincter disturbances, and impotence. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and lumbar myelography showed enlargement of the dural sac with multiple lubar diverticula eroding the lumbosacral vertebrae. The pathophysiology of the cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis is unclear. Surgical treatment seems justified only in patients with a short history of neurological symptoms.

  11. Wound complications after cleft repair in children with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jodi L P; Canady, John W; Brookes, James T; Wehby, George L; L'Heureux, Jamie; Schutte, Brian C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Dunnwald, Martine

    2010-09-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS; OMIM 119300) is an autosomal-dominant condition associated with clefts of the lip and/or palate and lower lip pits and is caused by mutations in interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6). The standard of practice for children born with cleft lip/palate is surgical repair, which requires proper wound healing. We tested the hypothesis that children with VWS are more likely to have wound complications after cleft repair than children with nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCLP). Furthermore, we hypothesized that children with VWS have more surgical procedures. A retrospective, case-controlled study was performed. Seventeen children with VWS and 68 matched controls with NSCLP were scored for the presence of wound complications after cleft repair, for the severity of complications, and for number of surgeries from age 0 to 10. Of the 17 children with VWS, 8 had wound complications. Of 68 controls, 13 had wound complications (P = 0.02). Of 8 wound complications in the VWS group, 6 were major, whereas of 13 complications in the control group, 9 were major (P = 0.04). Most wound complications were fistulae and occurred in isolated cleft palate and bilateral cleft lip. The mean number of surgeries in the VWS group was 3.0 compared with 2.8 in the control group (P = 0.67). Our studies suggest that children with VWS have an increased risk for wound complications after cleft repair compared with children with NSCLP. Furthermore, these data support a role for IRF6 in wound healing. PMID:20856020

  12. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical.

  13. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Shahriyar; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Sharifian, Rayka; Fereydouni, Mohammad Amin

    2014-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:25535508

  14. Atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome complicated by microangiopathic antiphospholipid-associated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meglic, A; Grosek, S; Benedik-Dolnicar, M; Avcin, T

    2008-09-01

    A 4-year-old boy with an atypical course of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), who developed microangiopathic antiphospholipid-associated syndrome (MAPS) with signs of multiple organ failure during the course of his disease, is reported. Early and aggressive treatment with intravenous gammaglobulin, pulse methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis resulted in an excellent clinical recovery. Our patient showed a concomitant presence of multiple factors that could precipitate atypical HUS, including positive antiphospholipid antibodies, decreased level of factor H and positive anti-ADAMTS-13 antibodies. We suggest that, along with infections, autoimmune conditions or defined genetic abnormalities of complement regulatory genes, MAPS should be considered among the pathogenic mechanisms in patients with atypical HUS.

  15. Complications in 54 frontofacial distraction procedures in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jesse A; Paliga, James Thomas; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis manifest midfacial hypoplasia often treated by midfacial advancement. Benefits of midfacial advancement by distraction osteogenesis have been well studied; little is known about the perioperative morbidity of these procedures, specifically relating to device selection. This study compares the perioperative complications between semiburied- and halo-type distraction osteogenesis of the midface. A retrospective review was performed on all patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent midface distraction with semiburied- or halo-type external distractors. Demographic information and operative/postoperative course were reviewed. Complications were categorized as hardware-related, infectious, and either as major (requiring additional intervention) or minor (requiring medication only). Chi-squared and Fisher exact test were used to compare variables.From 1999 to 2012, a total of 54 patients underwent midface distraction osteogenesis, including 23 patients with Apert syndrome, 19 patients with Crouzon syndrome, 10 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and 2 patients with other craniofacial syndromes. Thirty-three patients underwent a total of 34 subcranial Le Fort III distraction procedures and 21 underwent 21 monobloc distraction procedures. The mean age during surgery was 8.0 (range, 4.0-17.7) years, whereas the mean time between distractor placement and removal was 102.9 days. Thirty procedures were performed with external halo-type distractors (18 Le Fort III and 12 monobloc distractions), whereas 25 were performed with buried midface distractors (16 Le Fort III and 9 monobloc distractions). There were no significant differences in diagnoses or interventions between the distraction devices. Of the 19 distractor-related complications, there were a total of 10 (18.2%) in the halo group including 5 (9.1%) requiring separate operative intervention as well as 9 (16.4%) in the buried distractor group including 6 (10.1%) requiring

  16. Complications in 54 frontofacial distraction procedures in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jesse A; Paliga, James Thomas; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis manifest midfacial hypoplasia often treated by midfacial advancement. Benefits of midfacial advancement by distraction osteogenesis have been well studied; little is known about the perioperative morbidity of these procedures, specifically relating to device selection. This study compares the perioperative complications between semiburied- and halo-type distraction osteogenesis of the midface. A retrospective review was performed on all patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent midface distraction with semiburied- or halo-type external distractors. Demographic information and operative/postoperative course were reviewed. Complications were categorized as hardware-related, infectious, and either as major (requiring additional intervention) or minor (requiring medication only). Chi-squared and Fisher exact test were used to compare variables.From 1999 to 2012, a total of 54 patients underwent midface distraction osteogenesis, including 23 patients with Apert syndrome, 19 patients with Crouzon syndrome, 10 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and 2 patients with other craniofacial syndromes. Thirty-three patients underwent a total of 34 subcranial Le Fort III distraction procedures and 21 underwent 21 monobloc distraction procedures. The mean age during surgery was 8.0 (range, 4.0-17.7) years, whereas the mean time between distractor placement and removal was 102.9 days. Thirty procedures were performed with external halo-type distractors (18 Le Fort III and 12 monobloc distractions), whereas 25 were performed with buried midface distractors (16 Le Fort III and 9 monobloc distractions). There were no significant differences in diagnoses or interventions between the distraction devices. Of the 19 distractor-related complications, there were a total of 10 (18.2%) in the halo group including 5 (9.1%) requiring separate operative intervention as well as 9 (16.4%) in the buried distractor group including 6 (10.1%) requiring

  17. Nephrotic Syndrome Complicated with Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Akira; Inoue, Makoto; Imai, Toshimi; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Kondo, Mariko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities is a rare but important clinical illness, which leads to severe complications such as pulmonary embolism. Unlike DVT in the lower extremities, which is mainly induced by a hypercoagulable state, DVT in the upper extremities is usually caused by mechanical obstruction or anatomical stenosis in the venous system. We herein report a case in which DVT developed in the left upper limb during treatment of nephrotic syndrome. This is the first case report of upper-extremity DVT in association with nephrotic syndrome in the literature. Our patient was a 56-year-old male with nephrotic syndrome due to idiopathic membranous nephropathy who was treated with 40 mg/day of prednisolone. During corticosteroid therapy, he developed a swelling of the left upper limb. Computed tomography revealed thrombi in the left internal jugular vein and the left subclavian vein without anatomical abnormalities in his venous system. Thus, he was diagnosed with DVT of the upper extremities. After the initiation of warfarin treatment and subsequent regression of nephrotic syndrome, the swelling disappeared and the thrombi significantly diminished. DVT should be considered when upper-extremity edema is observed in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:25849667

  18. Down syndrome and postoperative complications after paediatric cardiac surgery: a propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Roland; Szántó, Péter; Prodán, Zsolt; Lex, Daniel J; Sápi, Erzsébet; Szatmári, András; Gál, János; Szántó, Tamás; Székely, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The incidence of congenital heart disease is ∼50%, mostly related to endocardial cushion defects. The aim of our study was to investigate the postoperative complications that occur after paediatric cardiac surgery. METHODS Our perioperative data were analysed in paediatric patients with Down syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analysed the data from 2063 consecutive paediatric patients between January 2003 and December 2008. After excluding the patients who died or had missing data, the analysed database (before propensity matching) contained 129 Down patients and 1667 non-Down patients. After propensity matching, the study population comprised 222 patients and 111 patients had Down syndrome. RESULTS Before propensity matching, the occurrences of low output syndrome (21.2 vs 32.6%, P = 0.003), pulmonary complication (14 vs 28.7%, P < 0.001) and severe infection (11.9 vs 22.5%, P = 0.001) were higher in the Down group. Down patients were more likely to have prolonged mechanical ventilation [median (interquartile range) 22 (9–72) h vs 49 (24–117) h, P = 0.007]. The total intensive care unit length of stay [6.9 (4.2–12.4) days vs 8.3 (5.3–13.2) days, P = 0.04] and the total hospital length of stay [17.3 (13.3–23.2) days vs 18.3 (15.1–23.6) days, P = 0.05] of the Down patients were also longer. Mortality was similar in the two groups before (3.58 vs 3.88%, P = 0.86) and after (5.4 vs 4.5%, P = 1.00) propensity matching. After propensity matching, there was no difference in the occurrence of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS After propensity matching Down syndrome was not associated with increased mortality or complication rate following congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23832837

  19. Prevalence of ocular pseudoexfoliation syndrome and associated complications in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saleh, Sulaiman A.; Al-Dabbagh, Najwa M.; Al-Shamrani, Saad M.; Khan, Nusrat M.; Arfin, Misbahul; Tariq, Mohammad; Al-Faleh, Hafez M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX), and associated ophthalmic complications among Saudi patients. Methods: The prevalence of PEX and associated ocular co-morbidities were determined among the Saudi patients visiting the Primary Care Clinic of Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 2009 and January 2010. A total of 1967 patients were examined biomicoscopically by ophthalmologists to determine the presence of PEX and associated ocular complications. Results: Sixty-nine of the 1967 examined patients (3.5%) showed the presence of PEX with no significant gender difference. There was an age dependent increase in the prevalence of PEX after the age of 50 years. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome was associated with higher intraocular pressure, cataract, and poor vision. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of PEX in male and female Saudi patients. Conclusion: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is an age-related disorder, and its prevalence increases with age. Further larger population based studies are warranted to assess the prevalence of PEX and associated risk factors. PMID:25630014

  20. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  1. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Andrea M; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first 'Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome' workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome.

  2. [Chilaiditi's syndrome complicated by subdiaphragmatic perforated appendicitis: unusual manifestation of a rare condition].

    PubMed

    Lenz, M; Kindler, M; Schilling, M; Pollack, T; Schwab, W; Becker, M

    2011-09-01

    We report on a case of an 80-year-old female patient who presented to the emergency room of with right upper quadrant abdominal pain since the day before. During the initial diagnostic an abdominal x-ray study revealed an air-filled colonic section of the bowel under the right hemidiaphragm corresponding to Chilaiditi's sign. The clinical symptoms and laboratory results were mild at this time. After 12 h the patient developed right upper quadrant peritonitis due to a perforated, subdiaphragmatic appendicitis based on Chilaiditi's syndrome. During surgical treatment the cecum and parts of the ascending colon were found to be interposed between the liver and right hemidiaphragm. A right hemicolectomy was performed which led to complete recovery of the patient. In addition to presenting this interesting case this article highlights the regime of the diagnostics and therapy of a complication of the very rare condition of Chilaiditi's syndrome.

  3. [Maternal adrenal necrosis in the third trimester of pregnancy: a rare complication of antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Legendre, G; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Cornet, A; Al Hawari, M; Renard-Penna, R; Piette, J-C; Dommergues, M

    2008-04-01

    Adrenal necrosis, a rare life threatening complication of antiphospholipid syndrome, is difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with bilateral adrenal necrosis which started during the third trimester of her second pregnancy. Antiphospholipid syndrome had been diagnosed few years ago, after a thrombotic event. The pregnancy was uneventful until 36 weeks plus five days, when the patient was admitted for bilateral back ache, initially considered as uterine contractions. Labour was induced because pain persisted and was associated with major thrombocytopenia. A healthy infant was delivered vaginally on the second day, adrenal failure was diagnosed based on intense asthenia, persistent severe lumbar pain, low blood sodium and cortisol. Bilateral adrenal oedema was documented by CT scan and MRI. Symptoms resolved following administration of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. This case illustrates the difficulty to diagnose adrenal necrosis in the third trimester of pregnancy.

  4. Lumboatrial shunt in a patient with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Khattab, Mohamed H; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C Rory; Rekate, Harold L; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    A 25-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri and multiple shunt failures presented with progressive back and neck pain, intermittent headaches, and associated vomiting secondary to shunt infection. Due to his previous history of repeated failure of both ventriculoperitoneal and lumboperitoneal (LP) shunting procedures, the decision was made to place a lumboatrial (LA) shunt via an approach through the internal jugular vein. The procedure was uncomplicated and the man's symptoms were relieved. Despite significant improvement, the LA shunt limited his exercise tolerance, and as an avid runner and weight lifter, he requested reconversion back to an LP shunt. At a follow-up of 20months, he continued to do well both clinically and radiographically. This case report summarizes the successful placement and use of an LA shunt for the treatment of intracranial hypertension in the setting of Crouzon syndrome. PMID:26021731

  5. [A case of respiratory distress syndrome complicated by the development of interstitial emphysema and pneumomediastinum].

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, K P; Bogatyr', M N; Chezhin, A N; Leĭman, V A; Smirnova, O R

    2000-01-01

    A 15-year-old patient has been admitted to the intensive care unit for severe respiratory distress syndrome that developed as a result of pneumonia. Interstitial lung edema was confirmed by computer-aided tomography. It was successfully treated by positive pressure ventilation (PPV). Although PEEP did not exceed 7 cm H2O, PPV was complicated by interstitial emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and bilateral pneumothorax as a result of barotrauma. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) were monitored. High PCWP values were inconsistent with the diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The authors suggest that high PCWP was caused by high intraalveolar pressure, pneumomediastinum, and venule constriction in the hypoxic sites of the lung.

  6. Ulcerative colitis complicated by dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma in a man with Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; German, J; Ashby, K; French, S W

    1999-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare genetic disorder in which the major clinical feature is growth deficiency. The genome in BS somatic cells is unstable, and hypermutability explains many clinical features. Most notably, affected persons are at enormously increased risk of developing many types of cancers at different sites. It has been well known that ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with the spectrum of epithelial changes signifying dysplasia and the progression to frank carcinoma. We report here a case of UC complicated by dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma sequence in a 37-year-old man with BS. PMID:10372944

  7. Osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome from congenital megaesophagus-megaduodenum.

    PubMed

    Manicourt, D H; Orloff, S

    1979-01-01

    A young female with osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome associated with congenital megaduodenum is described. In this case, the correction of vitamin D malabsorption by administration of antibiotics highlights the role of massive intraluminal bacterial overgrowth from destruction of vitamin D, or decreased unicellar solubilization due to deconjugation of biliary acids. The importance of cutaneous vitamin D synthesis in patients with osteomalacia of gastrointestinal origin is emphasized. The detection of megaduodenum and megaesophagus in the patient's father may be the first report of a familial association of these gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  8. Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating essential thrombocythemia in an adolescent: favorable outcome of TIPS procedure.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza Abdel-Gawad; Adly, Amira Abdel-Monem; Elhenawy, Yasmine Ibrahim

    2015-09-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a liver disorder characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction, mainly resulting from thrombosis of the terminal part of the hepatic veins or the inferior vena cava. It causes hepatic congestion, ascites, portal hypertension, and collateral circulation between the obstructed and contiguous patent venous territories. BCS is reported complicating myeloproliferative disorders, as well other prothrombotic events. Essential thrombocythemia is one of the most frequent myeloproliferative disorders that cause BCS, and in some cases, it may be the initial presentation. Many treatment options have been proposed for BCS, routine anticoagulation therapy being recommended as the first therapeutic approach.

  9. [Loco-regional complications of pharyngitis: the example of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tschopp, J; Chuard, C

    2015-10-01

    Pharyngitis is a common cause of consultation in ambulatory medicine. Although it is benign in most cases, serious complications may happen and must be recognized quickly. Lemierre's syndrome is one of them. It consists in the association of thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and septic emboli that generally involve the lungs and is classically associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum. It is usually found in young and healthy adults and has an estimated mortality of 5%. Diagnosis relies essentially on the characteristic presentation of the disease. Therapy consists of surgical drainage of purulent collections and necrotic tissues associated with a prolonged course of antibiotics. Some authors also recommend a anticoagulation. PMID:26638515

  10. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  11. Hodgkin lymphoma as a complication of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabella; Carneiro, Ana Suellen B; Amorim, Caroline Alencar; Santiago, Mittermayer Barreto

    2008-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, mainly the salivary and lachrymal glands, usually manifesting with xerostomia and xerophthalmia. Around 50% of patients with primary SS develop systemic complications, lymphoma being the most feared of these. The majority of these neoplasias originate from B cells and are of the non-Hodgkin type. We describe here a rare case of SS in which the patient developed a Hodgkin lymphoma. We also review the literature on this subject. PMID:18311531

  12. Blood rheology and platelet function in untreated early-stage essential hypertensives complicated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Hiroko; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Kinuno, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Hiroko; Masutani, Toshitaka; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether hemorheology and platelet function are affected in essential hypertensives (EHTs) of the World Health Organization stage I when complicated with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In 156 untreated EHTs, blood viscosity and platelet surface markers were determined. Blood viscosity was significantly elevated in 54 subjects with Mets compared with 102 subjects without Mets. Hematocrit and plasma viscosity increased in the group with Mets, although red blood cell rigidity index "k" did not differ between groups. As a whole group, blood viscosity correlated positively with hematocrit and plasma viscosity. Additionally, plasma viscosity correlated positively with plasma leptin, triglyceride, homeostasis model assessment index, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen, but negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In contrast, no differences were seen in platelet surface markers between groups. In conclusion, EHTs of the early stage complicated with Mets are characterized by increased blood viscosity due to hemoconcentration and increased plasma viscosity. PMID:22570768

  13. [ROLE OF ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF SUPPURATIVE-NECROTIC COMPLICATIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, O M

    2015-07-01

    The microbial landscape of wounds with suppurative-necrotic complications in diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) was investigated. Capabilities by inhibiting the formation of bacterial biofilms using ultrasonic cavitation (USC) were determined. In 32 patients over the purulent necrotic complications DFS USC applied using the apparatus "Sonoca-180" company Soring (Germany), 20 patients performed a basic therapy. Qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora were determined by the results of microbiological investigations using parallel transmission electron microscopy dynamics with USC. In patients with DFS noted the formation of bacterial biofilms that contained clusters of microorganisms in a polysaccharide matrix and were fixed to the wound surface. In the microbial landscape of wounds dominated gram-negative microorganisms. Application of USC contributed to the rapid cleanse wounds.

  14. Life-Threatening Complication During Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Gland Metastasis: Takotsubo Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Buy, Xavier; Zickler, Pierre; Zupan, Michel Douchet, Marie-Pierre; Gangi, Afshin

    2010-06-15

    A rare life-threatening complication during percutaneous cryoablation of an adrenal gland metastasis from a lung carcinoma is reported. The patient presented hypertensive crisis at the beginning of the thawing cycle, followed by electrocardiographic change which necessitated interruption of the procedure and his transfer to the intensive care unit with suspicion of heart infarct. There was a slight increase in cardiac enzyme levels, and ventricular angiography demonstrated transient hypokinesis-dyskinesis of the mid left ventricular segments without apical involvement, while the coronary arteries showed no significant stenosis on coronarography. These findings led to the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy left ventricular dysfunction syndrome. This is the first case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurring as a complication during percutaneous ablation of an adrenal gland tumor.

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) as a complication of Guillain-Barre' syndrome (GBS).

    PubMed

    Nabi, Sumaira; Rajput, Haris Majid; Badshah, Mazhar; Ahmed, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old Pakistani female patient presented with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis with nerve conduction studies showing demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with Guillain-Barre' syndrome. She was treated with 4 plasmapheresis sessions. She developed raised blood pressure, headache, visual loss and generalised seizures on the 13th day of admission. MRI of the brain on contrast showed findings of altered signals low on T1-weighted image, high on T2-weighted image and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in the white matter of bilateral occipital, parietal and right frontal lobe consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was administered antiepileptic and antihypertensive drugs to control seizures and blood pressure. She was discharged in a stable state. On follow-up her visual loss had recovered completely and she had regained full motor strength in all four extremities after 6 weeks. Fresh MRI of the brain revealed complete resolution of lesions. Antihypertensive and antiepileptic medication was discontinued. She is independent in all her daily activities. PMID:27489061

  16. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Isidori, Andrea M.; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G.; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M.; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first ‘Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome’ workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome. PMID:25415766

  17. Early dumping syndrome is not a complication but a desirable feature of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Laurenius, A; Engström, M

    2016-10-01

    Early dumping syndrome after gastric bypass surgery due to rapid delivery of hyperosmolar nutrients into the bowel causing intense symptoms is often described as a complication. Twelve patients, mean age 47 years, were interviewed approximately 9 years post-operation. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, followed by an inductive content analysis to reveal patients' experience of the dumping syndrome. The core category 'Dumping syndrome is a positive consequence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and a tool to control food intake' was identified based on the following four sub-categories: (i) 'The multidimensional emergence and effects of dumping syndrome', (ii) 'Dumping syndrome as something positive although unpleasant', (iii) 'Developing coping mechanisms and ingenious strategies' and (iv) 'My own fault if I expose myself to dumping syndrome'. From the patients' perspective, dumping syndrome gives control over food intake; although the symptoms were unpleasant, patients considered dumping syndrome as a positive protection against over-consumption. Hence, healthcare professionals should not present dumping syndrome as a complication but rather as an aid to control eating behaviour and excessive food intake.

  18. Early dumping syndrome is not a complication but a desirable feature of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Laurenius, A; Engström, M

    2016-10-01

    Early dumping syndrome after gastric bypass surgery due to rapid delivery of hyperosmolar nutrients into the bowel causing intense symptoms is often described as a complication. Twelve patients, mean age 47 years, were interviewed approximately 9 years post-operation. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, followed by an inductive content analysis to reveal patients' experience of the dumping syndrome. The core category 'Dumping syndrome is a positive consequence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and a tool to control food intake' was identified based on the following four sub-categories: (i) 'The multidimensional emergence and effects of dumping syndrome', (ii) 'Dumping syndrome as something positive although unpleasant', (iii) 'Developing coping mechanisms and ingenious strategies' and (iv) 'My own fault if I expose myself to dumping syndrome'. From the patients' perspective, dumping syndrome gives control over food intake; although the symptoms were unpleasant, patients considered dumping syndrome as a positive protection against over-consumption. Hence, healthcare professionals should not present dumping syndrome as a complication but rather as an aid to control eating behaviour and excessive food intake. PMID:27487971

  19. Characterization of vascular complications in experimental model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Dsokey, Nora; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important complication associated with metabolic syndrome (MS). Here we fully characterized vascular complications in a rat model of fructose-induced MS. MS was induced by adding fructose (10%) to drinking water to male Wistar rats of 6 weeks age. Blood pressure (BP) and isolated aorta responses phenylephrine (PE), KCl, acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were recorded after 6, 9, and 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, serum levels of glucose, insulin, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), lipids, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and arginase activity were determined. Furthermore, aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, hemeoxygenase-1 expression, and collagen deposition were examined. Fructose administration resulted in a significant hyperinslinemia after 6 weeks which continued for 12 weeks. It was also associated with a significant increase in BP after 6 weeks which was stable for 12 weeks. Aorta isolated from MS animals showed exaggerated contractility to PE and KCl and impaired relaxation to ACh compared with control after 6 weeks which were clearer at 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, MS animals showed significant increases in serum levels of lipids, uric acid, AGEs, TNFα, and arginase enzyme activity after 12 weeks of fructose administration. Furthermore, aortae isolated from MS animals were characterized by increased ROS generation and collagen deposition. In conclusion, adding fructose (10%) to drinking water produces a model of MS with vascular complications after 12 weeks that are characterized by insulin resistance, hypertension, disturbed vascular reactivity and structure, hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia, and low-grade inflammation.

  20. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  1. Lower extremity anterior compartment syndrome complicating bilateral mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tashakkor, A Yashar; Macadam, Sheina A

    2012-01-01

    ‘Well leg compartment syndrome’ refers to compartment syndrome occurring in a nontraumatic setting. This occurs most commonly in the lower limb during surgery performed with the patient in an anatomically vulnerable position. While this complication is well documented in the setting of orthopedic, urological and gynecological surgeries, it is an exceptionally rare complication in plastic surgery; only seven cases have been published on compartment syndrome complicating an operation performed on a supine patient. A case involving a 56-year-old woman who developed an anterior compartment syndrome of her right lower leg following a bilateral mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is presented. A detailed literature review is also included. PMID:23730157

  2. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Coincidence of unusual complication?

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S.A.; Williams, C.A.; Gray, B.A.

    1996-09-06

    We report on two patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The first, a 9-year-old girl, presented with microcephaly, characteristic face, congenital heart disease, and velopharyngeal insufficiency. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study showed deletion of D22S75 (N25), confirming the diagnosis of VCFS. At age 7, she developed joint pain, and polyarticular JRA was diagnosed. Awareness of this case led to the subsequent diagnosis of VCFS (also confirmed by FISH) in another, unrelated 12-year-old girl with characteristic face, hypernasal speech, and obesity. JRA was first diagnosed in this case at age 5 years, and she subsequently developed severe polyarticular disease. Neither patient had clinical or laboratory evidence of immunodeficiency. This observation represents the first report of the association of JRA with VCFS and raises the question of whether this is a coincidental association or a rare complication of this condition. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Chronic Disseminated Candidiasis Complicated by Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ukielska, Bogna; Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Konatkowska, Benigna; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis also known as chronic disseminated candidiasis is a rare manifestation of invasive fungal infection typically observed in patients with acute leukemia in prolonged, deep neutropenia. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an inflammatory disorder triggered by rapid resolution of neutropenia. Diagnosis and treatment of IRIS are still challenging due to a variety of clinical symptoms, lack of certain diagnostic criteria, and no standards of treatment. The diagnosis of IRIS is even more difficult in patients with hematological malignancies complicated by “probable” invasive fungal infection, when fungal pathogen is still uncertain. We report a case of probable hepatic candidiasis in 4-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite proper antifungal therapy, there was no clinical and radiological improvement, so diagnosis of Candida-related IRIS was made and corticosteroid therapy was added to antifungal treatment achieving prompt resolution of infection symptoms. PMID:27800196

  4. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome and its associated complications in Iranian women: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Anahita; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Khodaee, Zahra; Akbari, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and is the most common cause of infertility due to anovulation. There is no single criterion for the diagnosis of this syndrome. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of PCOS and its associated complications in Iranian women using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of PCOS was investigated from the SID, Goggle scholar, PubMed, Magiran, Irandoc, and Iranmedex, and weighting of each study was calculated according to sample size and prevalence of the binomial distribution. Data were analyzed using a random-effects model meta-analysis (Random effects model) and the software R and Stata Version 11.2. Results: 30 studies conducted between the years 2006 to 2011 were entered into meta-analysis. The total sample size was 19, 226 women aged between 10-45 years. The prevalence of PCOS based on National institute of child health and human disease of the U.S was, 6.8% (95 % CI: 4.11–8.5), based on Rotterdam was 19.5% (95 % CI: 2.24-8.14), and based on ultrasound was 4.41% (95% CI: 5.68-4.14). Also, the prevalence of hirsutism was estimated to be 13%, acne 26%, androgenic alopecia 9%, menstrual disorders 28%, overweight 21%, obesity 19%, and infertility 8%. Conclusion: The prevalence of PCOS in Iran is not high. However, given the risk of complications such as heart disease - cardiovascular and infertility, prevention of PCOS is important; we suggest that health officials must submit plans for the community in this respect. PMID:26644787

  5. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  6. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Naofumi; Koyama, Yasushi; Sato, Shinji; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  7. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy.

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis: A Pediatric Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders.Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma.During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control.He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later.The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other "typical" clinical features. PMID:27258506

  9. FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: expansion of the phenotype to include vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mitzi L; Yang, Margaret; Fauth, Christine; Byers, Peter H

    2014-07-01

    Biallelic mutations in FKBP14 cause a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss. To date, four children and one adult with this condition have been reported. We recently identified a 42-year-old man with severe kyphoscoliosis, restrictive/obstructive lung disease, short stature, mild hearing loss, decreased muscle mass, and a dissection of the celiac artery at age 41. He also had complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery with compensatory flow through an enlarged and tortuous inferior mesenteric artery. He was homozygous for a previously identified FKBP14 mutation, c.362dupC, p.(Glu122Argfs*7). He had no mutations in COL3A1, ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, or SMAD3. The FKBP14 mutations in our patient occurred on the same haplotype as others with this same mutation. Although one family member in a previous report was thought to have early vascular complications, it could not be confirmed that she had biallelic mutations in FKBP14. This report expands the phenotype of FKBP14-related EDS to include risk for vascular complications and also raises the question of whether the shared haplotype represents a risk allele or founder mutation.

  10. FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: expansion of the phenotype to include vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mitzi L; Yang, Margaret; Fauth, Christine; Byers, Peter H

    2014-07-01

    Biallelic mutations in FKBP14 cause a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss. To date, four children and one adult with this condition have been reported. We recently identified a 42-year-old man with severe kyphoscoliosis, restrictive/obstructive lung disease, short stature, mild hearing loss, decreased muscle mass, and a dissection of the celiac artery at age 41. He also had complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery with compensatory flow through an enlarged and tortuous inferior mesenteric artery. He was homozygous for a previously identified FKBP14 mutation, c.362dupC, p.(Glu122Argfs*7). He had no mutations in COL3A1, ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, or SMAD3. The FKBP14 mutations in our patient occurred on the same haplotype as others with this same mutation. Although one family member in a previous report was thought to have early vascular complications, it could not be confirmed that she had biallelic mutations in FKBP14. This report expands the phenotype of FKBP14-related EDS to include risk for vascular complications and also raises the question of whether the shared haplotype represents a risk allele or founder mutation. PMID:24677762

  11. [Prevention and treatment of the complications of polycystic ovarian syndrome--the significance of evidence-based, interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-12-13

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The complex feature of the syndrome requires an interdisciplinary approach to treatment, where cooperation of paediatrician, internist, gynaecologist, endocrinologist, dermatologist, psychologist and oncologist is essential. The prevention and the treatment should be based on the best available evidence. This should include physical examination, laboratory tests for hormones, serum insulin, glucose, lipids, in addition patient's preferences should be considered, too. To maximise health gain of polycystic ovarian syndrome, adequate, effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular complications of the syndrome, and discusses the relevant evidence published in the literature. PMID:26639643

  12. [Prevention and treatment of the complications of polycystic ovarian syndrome--the significance of evidence-based, interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-12-13

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The complex feature of the syndrome requires an interdisciplinary approach to treatment, where cooperation of paediatrician, internist, gynaecologist, endocrinologist, dermatologist, psychologist and oncologist is essential. The prevention and the treatment should be based on the best available evidence. This should include physical examination, laboratory tests for hormones, serum insulin, glucose, lipids, in addition patient's preferences should be considered, too. To maximise health gain of polycystic ovarian syndrome, adequate, effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular complications of the syndrome, and discusses the relevant evidence published in the literature.

  13. Obstetric complications in women with IVF conceived pregnancies and polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tandulwadkar, Sunita R; Lodha, Pooja A; Mangeshikar, Nirzari T

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is often accompanied by infertility that necessitates ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate, gonadotropins or even in vitro fertilization (IVF). These treatment methods are known to increase the incidence of multiple pregnancies as well as some negative consequences, including a rise in the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, etc., Furthermore, pregnancies established after IVF carry an increased risk for maternal complications. However, the increased risk of developing adverse obstetric complications has been suggested to occur independently of obesity as well as in populations without assisted reproductive techniques. Many studies have been performed to study the effect of PCOS on pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on PCOS. The hormonal milieu that is exaggerated in PCOS women is quite well understood at the biochemical and genetic levels. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of PCOS women who have undergone in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) have not been widely studied till date. This review aims to evaluate the current evidence regarding adverse obstetric outcomes of PCOS women undergoing IVF-ET. The rationale of this review is to study whether the adverse obstetric outcomes are increased in PCOS women in general, or particularly in those PCOS women who are undergoing IVF-ET. It is also important to analyze via a literature review whether the increased adverse outcomes are due to infertility in general or PCOS per se. An attempt has been made to give evidence regarding preventive strategies for obstetric complications in PCOS women who have undergone IVF-ET. PMID:24829525

  14. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome: Association with Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Complications in an Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gisela Cipullo; Cipullo, José Paulo; Ciorlia, Luiz Alberto Souza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a set of cardiovascular risk factors and type 2 diabetes, responsible for a 2.5-fold increased cardiovascular mortality and a 5-fold higher risk of developing diabetes. Objectives 1-to evaluate the prevalence of MS in individuals over 18 years associated with age, gender, socioeconomic status, educational levels, body mass index (BMI), HOMA index and physical activity; moreover, to compare it to other studies; 2-to compare the prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP), high triglycerides and plasma glucose levels, low HDL cholesterol and high waist circumference among individuals with MS also according to gender; 3-to determine the number of risk factors in subjects with MS and prevalence of complications in individuals with and without MS aged over 40 years. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1369 Individuals, 667 males (48.7%) and 702 females (51.3%) was considered to evaluate the prevalence of MS and associated factors in the population. Results The study showed that 22.7% (95% CI: 19.4% to 26.0%) of the population has MS, which increases with age, higher BMI and sedentary lifestyle. There was no significant difference between genders until age ≥70 years and social classes. Higher prevalence of MS was observed in lower educational levels and higher prevalence of HOMA positive among individuals with MS. The most prevalent risk factors were elevated blood pressure (85%), low HDL cholesterol (83.1%) and increased waist circumference (82.5%). The prevalence of elevated BP, low HDL cholesterol and plasma glucose levels did not show significant difference between genders. Individuals with MS had higher risk of cardiovascular complications over 40 years. Conclusion The prevalence of MS found is similar to that in developed countries, being influenced by age, body mass index, educational levels, physical activity, and leading to a higher prevalence of cardiovascular complications after the 4th decade of life. PMID:25180496

  15. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  16. Obstetric complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder in women of childbearing age. The risk of pregnancy and neonatal complications in women with PCOS is debatable. In order to determine the risk of pregnancy and neonatal complications, evidence regarding these risks was examined. Methods Literature searches were performed in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL based on the established strategy and eligible tries were included according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. A systematic literature review looking at rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), preeclampsia, premature delivery, neonatal birth weight, caesarean section and admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was conducted in women with PCOS. Pregnancy outcomes between women with PCOS versus controls were included. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the reliability of the available evidence and to validate the results. The study was performed with the approval of the ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University. Results A total of 27studies, involving 4982 women with PCOS and 119692 controls were eligible for the meta-analysis. Women with PCOS demonstrated a significantly higher risk of developing GDM (OR3.43; 95% CI: 2.49–4.74), PIH (OR3.43; 95% CI: 2.49–4.74), preeclampsia (OR2.17; 95% CI: 1.91–2.46), preterm birth (OR1.93; 95%CI: 1.45–2.57), caesarean section (OR 1.74; 95% CI: 1.38–2.11) compared to controls. Their babies had a marginally significant lower birth weight (WMD −0.11g; 95%CI: -0.19 – -0.03), and higher risk of admission to NICU (OR 2.32; 95% CI: 1.40–3.85) compared to controls. Conclusions Women with PCOS have increased risk of adverse pregnancy and neonatal complications. It is necessary to establish guidelines for supervision during pregnancy and parturition to prevent these complications. PMID:23800002

  17. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody That Attenuates Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Related Pregnancy Complications and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Chieko; Lanier, Lane; Jung, Eunjeong; Sengupta, Samarpita; Ulrich, Victoria; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Tarango, Cristina; Osunbunmi, Olutoye; Shen, Yu-Min; Salmon, Jane E; Brekken, Rolf A; Huang, Xianming; Thorpe, Philip E; Shaul, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    In the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), patients produce antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that promote thrombosis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Current therapy with anticoagulation is only partially effective and associated with multiple complications. We previously discovered that aPL recognition of cell surface β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) initiates apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2)-dependent signaling in endothelial cells and in placental trophoblasts that ultimately promotes thrombosis and fetal loss, respectively. Here we sought to identify a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to β2-GPI that negates aPL-induced processes in cell culture and APS disease endpoints in mice. In a screen measuring endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity in cultured endothelial cells, we found that whereas aPL inhibit eNOS, the mAb 1N11 does not, and instead 1N11 prevents aPL action. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed that 1N11 decreases pathogenic antibody binding to β2-GPI, and it blocks aPL-induced complex formation between β2-GPI and apoER2. 1N11 also prevents aPL antagonism of endothelial cell migration, and in mice it reverses the impairment in reendothelialization caused by aPL, which underlies the non-thrombotic vascular occlusion provoked by disease-causing antibodies. In addition, aPL inhibition of trophoblast proliferation and migration is negated by 1N11, and the more than 6-fold increase in fetal resorption caused by aPL in pregnant mice is prevented by 1N11. Furthermore, the promotion of thrombosis by aPL is negated by 1N11. Thus, 1N11 has been identified as an mAb that attenuates APS-related pregnancy complications and thrombosis in mice. 1N11 may provide an efficacious, mechanism-based therapy to combat the often devastating conditions suffered by APS patients. PMID:27463336

  18. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody That Attenuates Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Related Pregnancy Complications and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, Chieko; Lanier, Lane; Jung, Eunjeong; Sengupta, Samarpita; Ulrich, Victoria; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Tarango, Cristina; Osunbunmi, Olutoye; Shen, Yu-Min; Salmon, Jane E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Huang, Xianming; Shaul, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), patients produce antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that promote thrombosis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Current therapy with anticoagulation is only partially effective and associated with multiple complications. We previously discovered that aPL recognition of cell surface β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) initiates apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2)-dependent signaling in endothelial cells and in placental trophoblasts that ultimately promotes thrombosis and fetal loss, respectively. Here we sought to identify a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to β2-GPI that negates aPL-induced processes in cell culture and APS disease endpoints in mice. In a screen measuring endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity in cultured endothelial cells, we found that whereas aPL inhibit eNOS, the mAb 1N11 does not, and instead 1N11 prevents aPL action. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed that 1N11 decreases pathogenic antibody binding to β2-GPI, and it blocks aPL-induced complex formation between β2-GPI and apoER2. 1N11 also prevents aPL antagonism of endothelial cell migration, and in mice it reverses the impairment in reendothelialization caused by aPL, which underlies the non-thrombotic vascular occlusion provoked by disease-causing antibodies. In addition, aPL inhibition of trophoblast proliferation and migration is negated by 1N11, and the more than 6-fold increase in fetal resorption caused by aPL in pregnant mice is prevented by 1N11. Furthermore, the promotion of thrombosis by aPL is negated by 1N11. Thus, 1N11 has been identified as an mAb that attenuates APS-related pregnancy complications and thrombosis in mice. 1N11 may provide an efficacious, mechanism-based therapy to combat the often devastating conditions suffered by APS patients. PMID:27463336

  19. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case–control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0–252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years

  20. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis complicating Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Jei; Wu, Hau-Shin; Chu, Tzong-Shinn

    2011-07-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease, characterized by specific autoimmune antibodies anti-Ro and anti-La, and it can involve multiple organs, such as the kidneys, lungs, muscles, and nervous system. The most common renal complication of Sjögren's syndrome is tubulointerstitial nephritis, and glomerulonephritis is relatively uncommon. We report the case of an 86-year-old man presenting with recurrent fever, poor appetite, decreased salivary secretion, and body weight loss. Laboratory investigation revealed that serum creatinine was 4.2 mg/dL, proteinuria was 3+, and there was microscopic hematuria. Positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-La antibodies were detected. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with scanty immune complex deposition. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren's syndrome complicated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Unlike the patients of other case reports, our patient's renal function did not recover after immunosuppressant treatment, and he finally received long-term hemodialysis. Pauci-immune glomerulonephritis is a rare renal complication of Sjögren's syndrome, and progress to renal failure in such patients is possible.

  1. Warfarin-induced venous limb ischemia/gangrene complicating cancer: a novel and clinically distinct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Cook, Richard J; Sarode, Ravi; Sloane, Debi A; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-07-23

    Venous limb gangrene (VLG) can occur in cancer patients, but the clinical picture and pathogenesis remain uncertain. We identified 10 patients with metastatic cancer (7 pathologically proven) who developed severe venous limb ischemia (phlegmasia/VLG) after initiating treatment of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT); in 8 patients, cancer was not known or suspected at presentation. The patients exhibited a novel, clinically distinct syndrome: warfarin-associated supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR; median, 6.5) at onset of limb ischemia, rising platelet count during heparin anticoagulation, and platelet fall after stopping heparin. Despite supratherapeutic INRs, patient plasma contained markedly elevated thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels (indicating uncontrolled thrombin generation) and protein C (PC) depletion; this profile resembles the greatly elevated TAT/PC activity ratios reported in patients with warfarin-associated VLG complicating heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Analyses of vitamin K-dependent factors in 6 cancer patients with available serial plasma samples showed that variations in the INR corresponded most closely with changes in factor VII, with a highly collinear relationship between VII and PC. We conclude that venous limb ischemia/gangrene is explained in some cancer patients by profoundly disturbed procoagulant-anticoagulant balance, whereby warfarin fails to block cancer-associated hypercoagulability while nonetheless contributing to severe PC depletion, manifest as a characteristic supratherapeutic INR caused by parallel severe factor VII depletion. PMID:25979950

  2. A Rare Case of Subclinical Primary Aldosteronism and Subclinical Cushing's Syndrome without Cardiovascular Complications.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Natsumi; Seki, Toshiro; Yasuda, Atsushi; Oki, Masayuki; Takagi, Atsushi; Hanai, Kazuya; Terachi, Toshiro; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of subclinical primary aldosteronism (PA) and subclinical Cushing's syndrome (CS). A 49-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of an adrenal incidentaloma. The patient had no previous medical history and no family history of notable illness. Her blood pressure was 103/60 mmHg. She had no Cushingoid features. Routine laboratory examinations were within the normal ranges including normokalemia. Based on the endocrinological results and imaging findings, we finally made a diagnosis of subclinical PA caused by both adrenal glands and subclinical CS caused by bilateral adrenal tumors. Interestingly, this patient had no risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In addition, the optimal management of patients with subclinical CS and subclinical PA has not been established. Therefore, we are observing her without medical therapy. Four years after diagnosis, no cardiovascular complications have been detected, including cerebral infarction, chronic kidney disease, cardiomegaly on echocardiography, and atherosclerosis on carotid ultrasonography. One important question is why the excessive hormone secretion did not affect the cardiovascular status of this patient. In this regard, we discuss several possible mechanisms including mineralocorticoid resistance and glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:27050894

  3. Compartment syndrome as a complication of ileofemoral deep venous thrombosis:a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, David R; Schranz, Craig

    2014-02-01

    A 22-year-old morbidly obese, nonpregnant woman presented with left ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as low back pain and bilateral, left greater than right, leg swelling and pain for 2 days. While on heparin, she developed compartment syndrome in her left leg and had evidence of dead muscle tissue at the time of fasciotomy. Three options exist for treatment of ileofemoral DVT: catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical thrombectomy. Catheter-directed thrombolysis alone or in conjunction with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in patients with low risk of bleeding has shown significant lysis of occlusion in 79% of patients with ileofemoral DVT with relatively low complication rates. Surgical thrombectomy and fasciotomy have not proven to be as effective but are appropriate alternatives if CDT is not available. Standard anticoagulation alone is likely not a sufficient treatment for ileofemoral DVT. Other therapies including CDT, CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, or surgical thrombectomy to address lysis of the clot should be attempted first or in conjunction with anticoagulation for appropriate patients. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is the preferred initial treatment.

  4. A possible role of polycystic ovary syndrome for pregnancy complications in women with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Clara; Caldarola, Giacomo; Corbeddu, Marialuisa; Moro, Francesca; Tropea, Anna; Moretta, Gaia; Apa, Rosanna

    2014-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, relapsing immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) of the skin. IMIDs are multifactorial diseases characterized by common molecular pathways leading to a systemic inflammation. Patients with an IMID are also at higher risk of developing co-morbidities, such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, than the general population. A higher rate of pregnancy complications have been seen in inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The data for psoriasis are inconsistent but it appears that women with moderate-to-severe psoriasis may also have an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. The cause of this association is unknown, although it may be related to elevated proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α, the high prevalence of comorbidities and other unhealthy behaviours, or the high prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In a recent study, PCOS prevalence in a psoriatic cohort (n = 51) was higher than in non-psoriatic women (n = 102) (47% versus 11%), and women with PCOS and psoriasis had a greater probability of insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia, and dyslipidaemia as well as a more severe skin condition, than those with psoriasis alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the impact of psoriasis on pregnancy and in particular if these effects are mediated by concomitant PCOS.

  5. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A; Townsend, Katy L

    2016-09-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27587891

  6. [Cardiac complications in a metamizole-induced type I Kounis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Juste, Jose F Martínez; Garces, Tomas Ruiz; Enguita, Rafael Gonzalez; Blasco, Pedro Cia; Trallero, Jara Altemir

    2016-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coincidental occurrence of allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome secondary to vasospasm. Anti-inflammatory drugs are included as one of the multiple causes. Current data available about this syndrome come from case reports. We present the case of a patient who suffered Kounis syndrome with cardiogenic shock and asystole after intravenous infusion of Metamizole, and in which no lesions were observed in coronariography.

  7. Cardiac complications in a metamizole-induced type I Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juste, Jose F Martínez; Garces, Tomas Ruiz; Enguita, Rafael Gonzalez; Blasco, Pedro Cia; Trallero, Jara Altemir

    2016-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coincidental occurrence of allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome secondary to vasospasm. Anti-inflammatory drugs are included as one of the multiple causes. Current data available about this syndrome come from case reports. We present the case of a patient who suffered Kounis syndrome with cardiogenic shock and asystole after intravenous infusion of Metamizole, and in which no lesions were observed in coronariography.

  8. Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29 weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29 + 5 weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops. PMID:22840187

  9. Clinical correlates of complicated grief among individuals with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Stefano; Gesi, Camilla; Abelli, Marianna; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco; Bertoli, Daniele; Borelli, Lucia; Michi, Paola; Oligeri, Claudia; Balbarini, Alberto; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed at exploring bereavement and complicated grief (CG) symptoms among subjects without a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) at the time of a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to evaluate the relationship of CG symptoms and ACS. Method Overall, 149 subjects with ACS (namely, acute myocardial infarct with or without ST-segment elevation or unstable angina), with no previous history of CHD, admitted to three cardiac intensive care units were included and evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief (SCI-CG), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36). Results Of the total sample of 149 subjects with ACS, 118 (79.2%) met criteria for DSM-5 persistent complex bereavement disorder. Among these, subjects who lost a partner, child, or sibling were older (P=0.008), less likely to be working (P=0.032), and more likely to be suffering from hypertension (P=0.021), returned higher scores on the SCI-CG (P=0.001) and developed the index ACS more frequently between 12 and 48 months after the death than those who lost a parent or another relative (P≤0.0001). The occurrence of ACS 12–48 months (P=0.019) after the loss was positively correlated with SCI-CG scores. An inverse relationship with SCI-CG scores was observed for patients who experienced ACS more than 48 months after the loss (P=0.005). The SCI-CG scores significantly predicted lower scores on the “general health” domain of MOS-SF-36 (P=0.030), as well as lower scores on “emotional well-being” domain (P=0.010). Conclusion A great proportion of subjects with ACS report the loss of a loved one. Among these, the loss of a close relative and the severity of CG symptoms are associated with poorer health status. Our data corroborate previous data indicating a strong relationship between CG symptoms and severe cardiac problems. PMID:26504390

  10. [An operated case of retroperitoneal venous hemangioma complicated with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome which was well controlled by danaparoid sodium].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Aya; Iwahashi, Kiyoshi; Onishi, Yoshiki; Kita, Hisaaki; Nishio, Akira; Kanno, Tomoyo; Matsuura, Tamiko; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ono, Akiko; Mizuno, Tatsunori; Chiba, Miho; Maeda, Kosaku; Aketa, Hiroshi; Naito, Masafumi; Michida, Tomoki; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Yoshio; Kasugai, Tsutomu

    2009-11-01

    A 32-year-old woman was admitted with intermittent rectal bleeding with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy. CT and MRI revealed a retroperitoneal tumor, and we diagnosed giant retroperitoneal hemangioma complicated with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, following blood pool scintigraphy. Corticosteroid and interferon-alpha were not effective, and gabexate mesilate was also ineffective for coagulopathy. Immediately after receiving danaparoid sodium, she recovered from DIC. We performed tumor resection successfully, and she had no symptoms of coagulopathy thereafter. PMID:19893297

  11. Plummer-Vinson syndrome complicated by gastric cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Susami, E; Ebihara, T

    1990-06-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome has been brought to attention as a precancerous lesion of hypopharyngeal and cervical lesions of the esophagus, but that involving the stomach is uncommon. We report a case of Plummer-Vinson syndrome with gastric cancer. A brief literature review of this disorder is presented, and possible causes in this unusual case are discussed.

  12. Myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome with peculiar change in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Sano, Soichi; Yamagami, Keiko; Morikawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Katsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) could occurs in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), because of infiltration of leukemic cells into the neurohypophysis or some other reason and it is closely associated with abnormalities of chromosome 7. We report a case of MDS with abnormalities of chromosome 7, presenting as CDI followed by deterioration of polyuria and hyponatremia with a decreased extracellular fluid volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetrically enhanced lesions in the hypothalamus. Fludrocortisone treatment normalized his serum sodium level and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) was suspected.

  13. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis – a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  14. Efficacy of desmopressin in preventing hemorrhagic complications in a patient with Marfan syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino

    2006-06-01

    In this case report, we describe the successful use of desmopressin as prophylaxis against hemorrhage in a patient with a bleeding tendency associated with Marfan syndrome and a platelet function defect undergoing cardiovascular surgery.

  15. Compartment syndrome as a rare complication of iloprost infusion for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory P; Kadam, Sameer; Mohammed, Mohammed; Andrews, Brian T E

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of acute compartment syndrome associated with the use of iloprost in the treatment of Buerger's disease. After a four-compartmental fasciotomy of the affected lower limb, the patient made a complete recovery.

  16. Pheochromocytoma presenting as an acute coronary syndrome complicated by acute heart failure: The challenge of a great mimic.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Giuseppe Damiano; Talanas, Giuseppe; Fiore, Giuseppina; Canu, Antonella; Terrosu, Pierfranco

    2016-10-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor with a highly variable clinical presentation. The serious and potentially lethal cardiovascular complications of these tumors are related to the effects of secreted catecholamines. We describe a case of a 50-year-old woman urgently admitted to our hospital because of symptoms and clinical and instrumental findings consistent with an acute coronary syndrome complicated by acute heart failure. Urgent coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries. During her hospital stay, the recurrence of episodes characterized by a sudden increase in blood pressure, cold sweating, and nausea allowed us to hypothesize a pheochromocytoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by elevated levels of urinary catecholamines and by the finding of a left adrenal mass on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy. Therefore, the initial diagnosis was critically reappraised and reviewed as a cardiac manifestation of a pheochromocytoma during catecholaminergic crisis. PMID:27688679

  17. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, an unusual complication of heroin intoxication: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gang; Luo, Qiancheng; Guo, Enwei; Yao, Yulan; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Bingyu; Li, Longxuan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) has rarely been described in patients with heroin intoxication. Here, we report a rare case of MODS involving six organs, due to heroin intoxication. The patient was a 32-year-old Chinese man with severe heroin intoxication complicated by acute pulmonary edema and respiratory insufficiency, shock, myocardial damage and cardiac insufficiency, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal insufficiency, acute liver injury and hepatic insufficiency, toxic leukoencephalopathy, and hypoglycemia. He managed to survive and was discharged after 10 weeks of intensive care. The possible pathogenesis and therapeutic measures of MODS induced by heroin intoxication and some suggestions for preventing and treating severe complications of heroin intoxication, based on clinical evidence and the pertinent literature, are discussed in this report.

  18. Studies on Budd-chiari syndrome complicated with hepatocellular carcinoma: most patients without inferior vena cava obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaowei; Li, Luhao; Li, Suxin; Wang, Yafei; Li, Hai; Xu, Shaokai; Xu, Peiqin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the characteristics of Budd-Chiari syndrome (B-CS) types, rate of HCC complicated by different types of B-CS and values of CTA in diagnosis of B-CS and HCC complicated by B-CS. Material and Methods: 494 patients with B-CS were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent CTA, which was used to assess the accuracy of diagnosing B-CS and the rate of HCC complicated by various kinds of B-CS. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pathological examination were used as gold standard. Results: Among 494 patients diagnosed by DSA, there were 21 (4.3%) cases of inferior vena cava type, 80 (16.2%) cases of hepatic vein type and 393 (79.6%) cases of hepatic vein combined with inferior vena cava complex type. The accuracy of diagnosing B-CS by CTA was 86.6% (428/494), in which the accuracy of diagnosing inferior vena cava type was 85.7% (18/21), 83.8% (67/80) for hepatic vein type and 87.3% (343/393) for complex type. The rate of HCC complicated by B-CS was 12.8% (63/494), among which inferior vena cava type was 4.8% (1/21), hepatic vein type was 11.3% (9/80) and complex type was 13.5% (53/393). There were no statistic differences between these three types (P=0.459). The accuracy of diagnosing HCC by CTA was 82.5% (52/63). Conclusion: B-CS in patients from China’s Yellow River basin is mainly hepatic vein combined with inferior vena cava complex type, which is more likely to be complicated by HCC. CTA plays an important role in diagnosing B-CS and HCC complicated by B-CS. PMID:26309561

  19. Specific complications of monochorionic twin pregnancies: twin-twin transfusion syndrome and twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, G E; Stirnemann, J J; Salomon, L J; Essaoui, M; Quibel, T; Ville, Y

    2010-12-01

    Monochorionic twins are subjected to specific complications which originate in either imbalance or abnormality of the single placenta serving two twins. This unequal placental sharing can cause complications including twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), twin anemia-polycythemia sequence (TAPS), selective intrauterine growth restriction or twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP). Monochorionicity also makes the management of these specific complications as well as that of a severe malformation in one twin hazardous since the spontaneous death of one twin exposes the co-twin to a risk of exsanguination into the dead twin and its placenta. The latter is responsible for the death of the co-twin in up to 20% of the cases and in ischemic sequelae in about the same proportions in the survivors. Although the symptoms of all these complications are very different, the keystone of their management comes down to either surgical destruction of the inter-twin anastomoses on the chorionic plate when aiming at dual survival or selective and permanent occlusion of the cord of a severely affected twin aiming at protecting the normal co-twin. This can be best achieved by fetoscopic selective laser coagulation and bipolar forceps cord coagulation respectively. PMID:20855238

  20. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Anasarca in a Female Patient with Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome Complicated by Respiratory and Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Muhammad Abdul Mabood; Ghazni, Muhammad Salman; Tan, Jackson; Naseer, Nazish; Khalil, Muhammad Ashhad Ullah

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) was first described in 1960. It may occur as a complication of gonadotropin hormone therapy during assisted pregnancy or for primary infertility. A 26-year-old female patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome and primary infertility was treated to conceive. She received intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) along with follicle-stimulating hormone in an outside private clinic. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal and chest pain, loose stool, vomiting, shortness of breath and decreasing urine output. She was found to have edema, ascites, effusion and acute kidney injury (AKI). Considering the symptoms preceding the drug history and anasarca, a diagnosis of severe OHSS was made. Ascites was further complicated by spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), which had already been reported before. We speculate that low immunity due to decreased immunoglobulin in patients with OHSS makes them prone to SBP. In our case, septicemia secondary to SBP and fluid loss due to capillary leakage from OHSS resulted in AKI and respiratory failure. This critically ill patient was treated in a special care unit, and she fully recovered with supportive measures. Severe OHSS may present as anasarca including ascites which can develop SBP leading to sepsis and multiorgan failure. PMID:27721728

  1. Nephrotic syndrome complicated by tubular dysfunction. Case report and review of possible mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Luder, A. S.; Cohen, S. L.; Fisher, C.

    1980-01-01

    A 35-year-old-man presented with nephrotic syndrome due to mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis; he later developed a potassium-losing state, generalized amino aciduria and glycosuria. Clinical and biochemical improvement occurred after steroid therapy. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7433334

  2. Occam Paradox? A Variation of Tapia Syndrome and an Unreported Complication of Guidewire-Assisted Pedicle Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Emohare, Osa; Peterson, Erik; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Janus, Seth; Morgan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Clinical Question The clinical aim is to report on a previously unknown association between guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion and neuropraxia of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and how this may overlap with the signs of Tapia syndrome; we also report our approach to the clinical management of this patient. Methods A 17-year-old male patient with idiopathic scoliosis experienced Tapia syndrome after posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis at the level of T1–L1. After extubation, the patient had a hoarse voice and difficulty in swallowing. Imaging showed a breach in the cortex of the anterior body of T1 corresponding to the RLN on the right. Results Otolaryngological examination noted right vocal fold immobility, decreased sensation of the endolarynx, and pooling of secretions on flexible laryngoscopy that indicated right-sided cranial nerve X injury and left-sided tongue deviation. Aspiration during a modified barium swallow prompted insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube before the patient was sent home. On postoperative day 20, a barium swallow demonstrated reduced aspiration, and the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. The feeding tube was removed, and the patient resumed a normal diet 1 month later. Tapia syndrome, or persistent unilateral laryngeal and hypoglossal paralysis, is an uncommon neuropraxia, which has previously not been observed in association with a breached vertebral body at T1 along the course of the RLN. Conclusion Tapia syndrome should be a differential diagnostic consideration whenever these symptoms persist postoperatively and spine surgeons should be aware of this as a potential complication of guidewires in spinal instrumentation. PMID:24436711

  3. [Epidemiology, diagnostics, and treatment of complications after neuroinfections: chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Verner, O M; Murashko, N K

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiology information which testify to prevalence syndrome of chronic ustalostti (SV) is resulted in the article, and from some data this diagnosis is covered at more than 20% patients which carried neyroinfection. SV meets more frequent only in age 40-59, thus for women a disease is marked in 4 times more frequent, than for men. Today etiology of disease remains unknown, but the value of genetic, immunological factors, pathogens, neurogenic violations and features of feed is examined. Possibility of infectious etiology SV causes considerable interest of researchers, but at first this syndrome was examined as a sharp viral infection, where the most reliable exciter is consider the virus of Epshteyna-barr. Using of intravenous introduction of globulin for SV carries experimental character and grounded on a hypothesis about immunological or infectious etiology of this disease.

  4. Beneficial Role of Bitter Melon Supplementation in Obesity and Related Complications in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Subhan, Nusrat; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Reza, Hasan Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome are becoming epidemic both in developed and developing countries in recent years. Complementary and alternative medicines have been used since ancient era for the treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Bitter melon is widely used as vegetables in daily food in Bangladesh and several other countries in Asia. The fruits extract of bitter melon showed strong antioxidant and hypoglycemic activities in experimental condition both in vivo and in vitro. Recent scientific evaluation of this plant extracts also showed potential therapeutic benefit in diabetes and obesity related metabolic dysfunction in experimental animals and clinical studies. These beneficial effects are mediated probably by inducing lipid and fat metabolizing gene expression and increasing the function of AMPK and PPARs, and so forth. This review will thus focus on the recent findings on beneficial effect of Momordica charantia extracts on metabolic syndrome and discuss its potential mechanism of actions. PMID:25650336

  5. Zika virus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome--case report, French Polynesia, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Oehler, E; Watrin, L; Larre, P; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lastere, S; Valour, F; Baudouin, L; Mallet, Hp; Musso, D; Ghawche, F

    2014-03-06

    Zika fever, considered as an emerging disease of arboviral origin, because of its expanding geographic area, is known as a benign infection usually presenting as an influenza-like illness with cutaneous rash. So far, Zika virus infection has never led to hospitalisation. We describe the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring immediately after a Zika virus infection, during the current Zika and type 1 and 3 dengue fever co-epidemics in French Polynesia.

  6. Ceacal perforation in a premature newborn infant complicating milk curd syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Karkiner, Aytaç; Temir, Günyüz; Hoşgör, Münevver; Günşar, Cüneyt; Karaca, Irfan

    2003-06-01

    A 34-weeks-old female baby having a closed ceacal perforation due to milk curd syndrome is reported. The obstructing milk curd was located in the transvers colon and the perforation was in the ceacum. Primary repair of the ceacal perforation, aspiration of the material from an enterotomy and a protective ileostomy were performed. The patient died in the second postoperative day as a result of cardiopulmonary arrest and septic shock.

  7. Staphylococcal Scalded-Skin Syndrome Complicating Wound Infection in a Preterm Infant with Postoperative Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bjoern; Hentschel, Juliane; Mau, Harald; Halle, Elke; Witte, Wolfgang; Obladen, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The course of infection in a 3-week-old premature newborn suffering from extensive dermatitis with flaccid blisters is described. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from a local wound infection around a chest tube inserted to drain a postoperative chylothorax. The strain isolated tested positive for the eta gene for exfoliative toxin A, the causative agent of staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS). In this case, prematurity and loss of chylus with consecutive lymphopenia may have contributed to development of SSSS. PMID:9738069

  8. Association between primary Sjögren's syndrome and pregnancy complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Upala, Sikarin; Yong, Wai Chung; Sanguankeo, Anawin

    2016-08-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders may interfere with normal reproductive function resulting in negative outcome of pregnancy. Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a common rheumatic disease that mostly affects females. There are many reports that this condition may increase risk of pregnancy complications and fetal loss. However, data regarding these adverse outcomes are scarce and inconclusive. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available articles that assess the association between pSS and adverse pregnancy outcome. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE from their dates of inception to March 2016 and reviewed papers with validity criteria. A random-effects model was used to evaluate pregnancy complications in patients with pSS and healthy controls. From 20 full-text articles, 7 studies involving 544 patients and 1586 pregnancies were included in the meta-analysis. Fetal complications included spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, neonatal deaths, and intrauterine growth retardation. Compared with healthy pregnancy, patients with pSS had significantly higher chance of neonatal deaths (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 1.77, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 1.46, p = 0.01). However, there were no significant associations between pSS and premature birth (OR = 2.10, 95 % CI 0.59-7.46, p = 0.25), spontaneous abortion (OR = 1.46, 95 % CI 0.72-2.93, p = 0.29), artificial abortion (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI 0.52-2.61, p = 0.71), or stillbirth (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI 0.38-2.97, p = 0.92). There is an increased risk of fetal loss in pregnant patients with pSS. The presented evidence further supports multidisciplinary care for these patients to prevent complications during pregnancy. PMID:27271701

  9. [The "buried bumper" syndrome--a rare complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Gawenda, M; Schmidt, R; Schönau, E

    1996-07-01

    Since initially being described in 1980, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has had a dramatic impact on enteral access and alimentation techniques. Knowledge of the problems makes it possible to lower the complication rate of this method. We report a case of partial penetration of the gastric wall by the internal bolster of the tube. We focus on the prevention, recognition, and management of this PEG-related problem.

  10. Breast lymphoma in Sjögren's syndrome complicated by acute monocular blindness.

    PubMed

    Soldevilla, Helmar F; Molina, Ramon Miguel M; Navarra, Sandra V

    2010-05-01

    A 69-year-old hypertensive woman presented with eye and mouth dryness, bilateral parotid gland enlargement, associated with anasarca and proteinuria. Family history was notable for malignancies including breast, nasopharyngeal and colon cancers. Physical exam disclosed hypertension, bilaterally enlarged, firm, non-tender parotid glands, fine bibasilar crackles and bipedal edema. Anti Ro/Sjögren's syndrome antigen A antibody was positive, with negative tests for anti La/Sjögren's syndrome antigen B and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA). Chest radiographs showed basal infiltrates. Sjögren's syndrome associated with glomerulonephritis and interstitial lung disease was diagnosed, and she received pulse methylprednisololone followed by oral prednisone with dramatic improvement. Two months later, while on prednisone 5 mg/day, she returned to the clinic with an enlarging fixed non-tender right breast mass. She underwent modified radical mastectomy of the right breast, and pathologic report revealed diffuse, small cell, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the breast; axillary lymph nodes were negative for tumor. She opted for alternative therapy and did not return to the clinic until 7 months later when she developed sudden monocular blindness in the right eye with no other systemic manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed swelling and enhancement of intracanalicular and pre-chiasmatic segments of the right optic nerve and right side of the optic chiasm. Considerations were Devic's disease versus metastases. She received pulse methylprednisolone therapy (1 g/day for 3 days) with partial recovery of vision. She is scheduled for lymphoma chemotherapy to include rituximab.

  11. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari: une complication rare de la sarcoïdose hépatique (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Sghier, Ismael Ait; Billah, Nabil Moatassim

    2016-01-01

    L'atteinte hépatique au cours de la sarcoïdose est une localisation fréquente, habituellement asymptomatique. La cholestase anictérique et l'hypertension portale représentent ses principales complications. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari est une complication peu connue qui demeure exceptionnelle. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de syndrome de Budd-Chiari compliquant une sarcoïdose hépatique chez une jeune femme de 45 ans. PMID:27200114

  12. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder complicated with Sjogren syndrome successfully treated with tocilizumab: A case report.

    PubMed

    Komai, Toshihiko; Shoda, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Sakurai, Keiichi; Shibuya, Mihoko; Kubo, Kanae; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman with relapsing longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis and Sjogren's syndrome (SS) was admitted with lower extremity muscle weakness. Studies showed high serum titer of anti-aquaporin4 antibody and gadolinium-enhanced-MRI T1-weighted lesions within thoracic cord. Clinical findings suggested neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorder (NMO-SD). High-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange and cyclophosphamide were not effective. After starting tocilizumab, her neurological findings gradually improved. This report describes the first evidence to show tocilizumab could be effective for NMO-SD with SS.

  13. Macular pigmentation complicating irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhoyrul, B; Paulus, J

    2016-04-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare acquired disorder characterized by macu-lar pigmentation of the lips and oral mucosa, with frequent longitudinal melanonychia. Involvement of other areas, such as the genitalia and fingers, has rarely been described. LHS is a benign condition with no known systemic manifestations. We report the case of a woman who developed melanotic macules on her fingers and elbow 16 years after the onset of pigmentation of her lips. This unusual feature of LHS in our patient was associated with irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts. Only two cases of an association with an inflammatory dermatosis have been reported previously in the literature.

  14. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair.

  15. Glue embolus complicating the endovascular treatment of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marine, Leopoldo; Gupta, Rishi; Gornik, Heather L; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2010-11-01

    A 34-year-old [corrected] woman was diagnosed with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Five months later, the patient presented with a symptomatic 2.6-cm subclavian pseudoaneurysm. Staged endovascular treatment was initiated with left vertebral artery embolization, followed by sac ablation and stent graft exclusion. The pseudoaneurysm cavity was filled with n-butylcyanoacrylate ("glue") via a microcatheter. Despite balloon occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm orifice, a small amount of glue debris embolized to the brachial artery, necessitating a vein bypass. In this case, distal embolization of glue may have been avoided by leaving a microcatheter in the aneurysm sac for glue injection after first deploying the stent graft.

  16. Spinal cord infarction as a rare complication of fat embolism syndrome following bilateral intramedullary nailing of femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Kearsley, RoseMarie; Galbraith, John; Dalton, David; Motherway, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare and potentially fatal complication occurring most often after long bone or pelvic fractures and orthopaedic procedures. It can consist of pulmonary, central nervous system and cutaneous manifestations. The exact pathophysiology of emboli reaching the arterial circulation is poorly understood.1 It is suggested that this may occur by either 'paradoxical' embolism or microembolism.2 3 Its true incidence is unknown but increases in the presence of multiple closed fractures. It can be a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians and if suspected diffusion-weighted MRI is the modality of choice for the investigation of the central nervous system.4 We present the case of a 22-year-old man who developed multifocal cerebral infarcts, a right-sided cerebellar infarct and an infarct in the anterior cord bilaterally at the level of C5-C6 as a result of FES. PMID:27624445

  17. Endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices complicated by Isaacs' syndrome involving difficulty with conventional sedation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Sato, Ken; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old male consulted a local doctor with a chief complaint of systemic convulsions and muscle stiffness and was diagnosed with Isaacs' syndrome based on positive findings for antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels in 2009. He subsequently experienced repeated hematemesis in 2013, at which time he was taken to our hospital by ambulance. Emergent endoscopy revealed esophageal varices with spurting bleeding. The bleeding was stopped with urgent endoscopic variceal ligation. Three days later, the patient developed sudden dyspnea with stridor during inspiration under sedation with an intravenous injection of low-dose flunitrazepam prior to receiving additional treatment and was aroused with intravenous flumazenil, after which his dyspnea immediately improved. Dyspnea may be induced by muscle cramps associated with Isaacs' syndrome exacerbated by sedation. Endoscopic variceal ligation was performed safely using multiple ligation devices in an awake state following pre-medication with hydroxyzine, without sudden dyspnea. Endoscopists should be cautious of the use of sedatives in patients with diseases associated with muscle twitching or stiffness, as in the current case. In addition, it is necessary to administer endoscopic treatment in an awake state or under conscious sedation in patients with a high risk of dyspnea. PMID:26862027

  18. Late-onset cytomegalovirus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome in a kidney transplant recipient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaban, E; Gohh, R; Knoll, B M

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a common infection after solid-organ transplantation. In the general population CMV disease is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an autoimmune disease leading to an acute peripheral neuropathy, in 1 of 1000 cases. Interestingly, GBS is a rarely observed complication in solid-organ transplant recipients, possibly related to maintenance immunosuppression. We describe a case of CMV infection complicated by GBS in a kidney transplant recipient and review the literature.

  19. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: postoperative complication in tumours of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Arístegui, Miguel; García-Leal, Roberto; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; Lowy, Alejandro; Martin-Oviedo, Carlos; Panadero, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is a rare complication in posterior fossa tumour surgery. We present two patients with cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours who developed cerebral salt wasting postoperatively. Both patients deteriorated in spite of intensive fluid and salt replacement. On CT scan the patients presented mild to moderate ventricular dilation, which was treated with an external ventricular drainage. After the resolution of hydrocephalus, fluid balance rapidly returned to normal in both patients and the clinical status improved. Identification and treatment of secondary obstructive hydrocephalus may contribute to the management of CSW associated to posterior fossa tumour surgery.

  20. Primary intracranial neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome: A rare and complicated case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAILONG; ZHANG, MINGSHAN; WANG, XUAN; QU, YANMING; ZHANG, HONGWEI; YU, CHUNJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are frequent in adult patients. However, primary intracranial NETs, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH, high serum ACTH level and treated with anterior skull base reconstruction, are rare and complicated. We herein present a case of a primary intracranial NET immunonegative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. A 40-year-old woman presented with intermittent rhinorrhea, rapid weight gain, polydipsia, polyuria, hypertension, dimness, bilateral exophthalmus, diminution of vision in the left eye and pigmentation of the skin of the face and trunk. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a sizeable enhancing tumor in the anterior cranial fossa, which infiltrated the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses bilaterally, the left maxillary sinus and the nasal cavity. Abdominal CT scans revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. The biochemical findings included hypokalemia and high glucose, cortisol, plasma ACTH, 24-h urinary free cortisol and testosterone levels. The neoplasm was exposed through a right frontal craniotomy, while anterior skull base reconstruction was performed during surgery. The intracranial surgery achieved gross removal of the tumor; however, part of the tumor remained in the nasal cavity. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low-grade small-cell NET, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH. A postoperative abdominal CT scan demonstrated bilateral regression of the adrenal gland hyperplasia and the serum ACTH level returned to normal after 16 days. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of primary intracranial NETs, immunohistochemically negative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. PMID:27330775

  1. [Necrotizing soft tissue infection of upper extremity complicated with toxic shock syndrome--clinical presentation and treatment options].

    PubMed

    Oberhofer, Dagmar; Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja; Huljev, Dubravko

    2008-12-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) are uncommon infections associated with considerable morbidity and mortality (20%-40%). They are characterized by rapidly progressive necrosis of soft tissue that primarily involves subcutaneous fat and fascia with variable involvement of the overlying skin and muscle. Extensive soft tissue necrosis is often accompanied by systemic toxicity. Establishing the diagnosis in the early stage of the infection can be difficult, which leads to a delay in surgical treatment and a poor outcome. The principles of treatment are early and aggressive surgical debridement, broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy administered empirically and reassessed pending culture and sensitivity results, and intensive care management. We report a case of NSTI of the arm in a 64-year-old female patient caused by group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus complicated with toxic shock-like syndrome with emphasis on the pathophysiology of toxic shock-like syndrome and treatment modalities. NSTI developed 10 days after a knife cut wound of the thumb. The patient had no significant comorbidity. Treatment included aggressive surgical debridement with removal of necrotic tissue and extensive fasciotomies 24 h of admission, cardiovascular stabilization and monitoring at intensive care unit, and repeat surgical debridement at 72 h of admission. Early triple drug antimicrobial therapy included high-dose clindamycin, which inhibits protein synthesis and bacterial exotoxin production that is responsible for inflammatory response and toxic shock-like syndrome. In addition, the patient received hyperbaric oxygen therapy (8 treatments in total). The above management led to control of the infective process. Prolonged surgical wound care followed by thin split-skin grafting and placement of secondary sutures on day 36 of admission preserved the extremity with good functional and cosmetic result.

  2. Spectrum of X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome, and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1): Clincal review with six additional families

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Hoeweler, C.; Jones, M.

    1995-05-22

    X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS) (MIM{sup *}307000), MASA syndrome (MIM {sup *}303350), and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1) (MIM {sup *}3129000) are closely related. Soon after delineation, SPG1 was incorporated into the spectrum of MASA syndrome. HSAS and MASA syndrome show great clinical overlap; DNA linkage analysis places the loci at Xq28. In an increasing number of families with MASA syndrome or HSAS, mutations in L1CAM, a gene located at Xq28, have been reported. In order to further delineate the clinical spectrum, we studied 6 families with male patients presenting with MASA syndrome, HSAS, or a mixed phenotype. We summarized data from previous reports and compared them with our data. Clinical variability appears to be great, even within families. Problems in genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, the possible overlap with X-linked corpus callosum agenesis and FG syndrome, and the different forms of X-linked complicated spastic paraplegia are discussed. Since adducted thumbs and spastic paraplegia are found in 90% of the patients, the condition may be present in males with nonspecific mental retardation. We propose to abandon the designation MASA syndrome and use the term HSAS/MASA spectrum, incorporating SPG1. 79 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Clival osteomyelitis and hypoglossal nerve palsy--rare complications of Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Jingzhou; Lam, Jonathan Chun Leuk; Adlan, Tarig

    2015-01-01

    An increasingly reported entity, Lemierre's syndrome classically presents with a recent oropharyngeal infection, internal jugular vein thrombosis and the presence of anaerobic organisms such as Fusobacterium necrophorum. The authors report a normally fit and well 17-year-old boy who presented with severe sepsis following a 5-day history of a sore throat, myalgia and neck stiffness requiring intensive care admission. Blood cultures grew F. necrophorum and radiological investigations demonstrated left internal jugular vein, cavernous sinus and sigmoid sinus thrombus, left vertebral artery dissection and thrombus within the left internal carotid artery. Imaging also revealed two areas of acute ischaemia in the brain, consistent with septic emboli, skull base (clival) osteomyelitis and an extensive epidural abscess. The patient improved on meropenem and metronidazole and was warfarinised for his cavernous sinus thrombosis. He has an on-going left-sided hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve palsy. PMID:26323975

  4.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  5. Pediatric Fulminant Leptospirosis Complicated by Pericardial Tamponade, Macrophage Activation Syndrome and Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbaş, Osman; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Hatipoğlu, Nevin; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Although it is usually asymptomatic and self-limited, severe potentially fatal illness accompanied by multi-organ failure may occur. Case Report: Here we report an unusual case of severe leptospirosis successfully treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF) and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). The patient presented with pericardial tamponade, renal failure and macrophage activation syndrome, and later suffered prolonged jaundice and sclerosing cholangitis during hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). To the best of our knowledge, sclerosing cholangitis due to leptospirosis has not been reported in the literature. Conclusion: Leptospirosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of sepsis and septic shock with fever, thrombocytopenia, jaundice and renal failure. TPE and CVVHF should start early after the diagnosis of leptospirosis with multiorgan failure. PMID:27761292

  6. Development of a complicated pain syndrome following cyanide poisoning in a U.S. soldier.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Mark; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Kim, Moon J; Plunkett, Anthony R

    2010-04-01

    A majority of modern war wounds are caused by blasts and high-energy ballistics. Extremity injuries predominate since modern body armor does not protect these areas due to mobility limitations. A less known and more insidious mechanism of enemy attack among our soldiers involves treachery by the local populace posing as noncombatants. One such recent event involved the contamination of tobacco with cyanide (CN). We describe a case of a soldier with CN intoxication due to ingestion of tobacco purchased from a local merchant. The soldier developed a complex neuropathic pain syndrome and was successfully treated with an inpatient high-dose intravenous ketamine infusion in combination with continuous peripheral nerve blockade. PMID:20446507

  7. The Ochoa urofacial syndrome: recognize the peculiar smile and avoid severe urological and renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Atila Victal; Leslie, Bruno; Netto, José Murillo Bastos; de Freitas, Ricardo Garcia; Ortiz, Valdemar; Macedo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ochoa syndrome is rare and its major clinical problems frequently unrecognized. We describe facial characteristics of six patients to help health professional recognize the inverted smile that these patients present and refer them to proper treatment. Patients’ medical records were reviewed and patients’ urological status clinically reassessed. At last evaluation patients’ mean age was 15.5 years, and age ranged from 12 to 32 years. Mean follow-up was 35 months (12 to 60). Initial symptoms were urinary tract infections in four patients (67%) associated with enuresis and incontinence in three of them (50%). One patient had only urinary tract infection and two lower urinary tract symptoms without infections. Initial treatment consisted of clean intermittent catheterization with anticholinergics for all patients. Four patients (67%) were submitted to bladder augmentation. Two patients had end-stage renal disease during follow-up, one received kidney transplantation and one patient remained on the waiting list for a renal transplantation. Familial consanguinity was present in only one case. This significant condition is rare, but it must be recognized by pediatricians, nephrologists and urologists in order to institute early aggressive urological treatment. PMID:25946049

  8. [Neonatal herpes simplex type II virus infection complicated with meningitis and virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Arai, Chie; Nozawa, Tomo; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Momomura, Mei; Kizawa, Toshiki; Tanoshima, Reita; Kita, Maiko; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Miyamae, Takako; Iwasaki, Shiho; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shunpei

    2012-01-01

    A 14-day-old neonate was transferred to our university hospital because of respiratory distress and mild disturbance of consciousness. He had no history of abnormal pregnancy or delivery, but had developed apnea at 6 days old. Thereafter, respiratory distress progressed and his condition deteriorated. On admission to our hospital, several vesicles were found on the left upper arm, and moderate hepatomegaly was also present. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type II genome was detected from serum, spinal fluid, and bone marrow. Laboratory examinations revealed typical abnormalities of disseminated intravascular coagulation, increased levels of serum ferritin, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Bone marrow aspiration demonstrated activated macrophages and hemophagocytosis. Spinal tap revealed numerous mononuclear cells. Meningitis and virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS) due to systemic HSV type II infection were thus diagnosed. Acyclovir (60 mg/kg/day) and vidarabine were promptly administered. Dexamethasone palmitate and intravenous cyclosporine were also administered for systemic inflammation due to VAHS. Finally, these aggressive therapies rescued the patient without any sequelae. In general, neonatal systemic HSV infection is life-threatening and results in poor intact survival. Our case report suggests that not only antiviral treatment for HSV, but also anti-inflammatory treatment including steroid and cyclosporine should be considered from the early phase of neonatal systemic HSV infection.

  9. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to minocycline complicated by severe myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Kyoko; Sakai, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Yutaka; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with a 13-day history of a generalized erythematous rash accompanied by fever, periorbital edema and axillary lymphadenopathy. Prior to the appearance of the rash, the patient had been treated with intermittent courses of oral minocycline for cystitis. The patient was diagnosed with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to minocycline. During the admission, infectious endocarditis was suspected and the patient was treated with i.v. gammaglobulin (0.4 g/kg per day). The following day, the patient suffered from systemic deterioration and symptomatic low blood pressure that prompted repeat echocardiography which revealed an ejection fraction of 10%. DIHS-associated myocarditis was suspected and management with circulation assistance devices and steroid pulse therapy were started, resulting in satisfactory resolution. A rise in titer of human herpesvirus-6, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus-1 antibodies was detected. Although minocycline-induced myocarditis is rare, this severe drug reaction should be considered with DIHS.

  10. Clinical analysis of primary Sjögren's syndrome complicating anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Guo; Qing, Yu-Feng; Jiang, Li; Yang, Qi-Bin; Luo, Wen-Feng

    2010-05-01

    This is a cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence and causes of anemia in the primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). One hundred and thirty-two consecutive patients with pSS were enrolled into the study. Standard hematological and immunological tests and examination of bone marrow were performed. Anemia occurred in 45 (34.1%) patients. The causes of anemia included anemia of chronic disease (69%), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, 18%), iron deficiency anemia (9%) and other causes (4%), of which AIHA caused the most severe anemia. The prevalence of ANA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB was much higher in patients with anemia than those without anemia. Anticardiolipin antibodies were most commonly detected in AIHA; the prevalence of IgG and hypocomplementemia in AIHA was much higher in patients without anemia. Abnormal bone marrow changes were observed in two cases with anemia, one with morphological changes in the myeloid, megakaryocytic, and erythroid lineages and one with hypocellularity in the erythroid lineage. Therefore, pSS patients with anemia may be associated with destruction of peripheral mature blood cells, impaired red cells production, and hematopoietic abnormalities due to an immune mechanism, although the concrete pathogenesis is still unclear.

  11. [The presence of dry eye syndrome and corneal complications in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its association with -174 gene polymorphism for interleukin 6].

    PubMed

    Polanská, V; Serý, O; Fojtík, Z; Hlinomazová, Z

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of the dry eye syndrome and corneal complications in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to assess its association with the -174 gene polymorphism for interleukin 6. The group consisted of 123 patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis (20 men, 103 women); the mean age was 53 years (+/- 13.6). Every patient had completely ophthalmologic examination and special attention was paid to the amount of tears. The presence of corneal complications was detected in the medical history and evaluated during the slit lamp examination. In all patients the polymorphism-174 IL-6 examinations were performed. For the statistical data processing, the chi square (chi2) test for nominal variable was used. The dry eye syndrome (DES) was found in 98 eyes (79.7%), severe dry eye syndrome was detected in 53 patients (43.1%). Corneal complications appeared in 9 patients (7.3%). DES was present in 32 patients with the GG genotype (91.4%, n1 = 35), in 49 patients with the CG genotype (71.0%, n2 = 69), and in 8 patients with the CC genotype (42.1%, n3 = 19). After the statistical evaluation we have found the association between the dry eye syndrome and the GG genotype (chi2 = 8.9) and the association between less common dry eye syndrome appearance and the presence of the CC genotype (chi2 = 10.3). Severe dry eye syndrome we proved in 18 patients with GG genotype (51.4%, n1 = 35), in 31 patients with CG genotype (44.9%, n2 = 69), and in 4 patients with CC genotype CC (21.1%, n3 = 19). We proved statistically significant association between CC genotype and less often appearance of the severe dry eye syndrome (chi2 = 4.45). Corneal complications we noticed in one patient with GG genotype (2.8%, n1 = 35), in 5 patients with CG genotype (7.2%, n2 = 69), and in 3 patients with CC genotype (15.8%, n3 = 19). We did not prove statistically significant association between the 174 IL-6 polymorphism and corneal complications appearance. The 174 IL-6

  12. [Perioperative management of an obese patient complicated with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) undergoing awake craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Komayama, Noriaki; Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Both obesity (BMI over 30) and SAS are risks for Supper airway maintenance. We report an obese patient (BMI 33.5) with SAS who underwent awake craniotomy. Weight reduction was instructed 1 month before the operation, and the patient lost enough weight to use intraoperative MRI. Under general anesthesia, surgical pads containing 2% lidocaine with adrenaline were inserted into the nasal cavities. The patient's airway S was secured by i-gel® until dura was opened. A nasal airway was then inserted to confirm the upper airway patency and anesthetics were terminated The patient regained consciousness and started respiration. The i-gel® was removed. The nasal airway was changed to an RAE tracheal tube ; the tube was fixed above the vocal cords under bronchofiberscopic observation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via RAE tube was started. Neither coughing nor epistaxis was observed.The RAE tube prevented glossoptosis and did not disturb speech mapping. Emergent endotracheal intubation was easily managed because the tube was close to the glottis. The RAE tube was removed and nasal CP AP was applied overnight Carefully prepared CP AP support via nasal RAE tube was practical in keeping upper airway patency for an obese patient complicated with SAS undergoing awake craniotomy.

  13. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  14. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Gabriel Núncio; Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  15. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. PMID:27232927

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates vascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome: Effect on endothelial dependent relaxation and NO production.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Hassan, Nadia; Zakaria, Mohamed N M

    2014-11-01

    Protective effect of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction from hypertension was previously reported in a diabetic animal model. Here, the effect of HO-1 induction on vascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) was investigated. MetS was induced in rats by fructose drinking for 12weeks while HO-1 was induced by hemin or curcumin administration in the last 6weeks. Then, aortic HO-1 protein expression was assessed, blood pressure (BP) was recorded and serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured. Concentration response curves for phenylephrine (PE), KCl, and acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained in thoracic aortic cross sections. Aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation were also studied. Both hemin and curcumin significantly inhibited the elevated systolic and diastolic BP seen in MetS animals. While not affected by MetS, HO-1 expression was significantly increased by hemin and curcumin treatment. HO-1 induction did not affect the exaggerated vasoconstriction response to KCl and PE. However, HO-1 induction prevented the impaired relaxation and NO generation in aorta isolated from MetS animals. In addition, the HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin, abolished the hemin protective effect on relaxation and NO generation. HO-1 induction prevented the elevated hyperinsulinemia associated with MetS. Furthermore, HO-1 induction inhibited ROS production in aorta isolated from MetS animals. In conclusion, Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates vascular complications associated in MetS through maintaining endothelial-dependent relaxation and NO generation in addition to improving insulin sensitivity.

  17. Evolution of iron overload in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: iron chelation therapy and organ complications.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Ángel F; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Villegas, Ana; Durán, María Soledad; Hermosín, Lourdes; de Paz, Raquel; Garcia, Marta; Diez Campelo, Maria; Sanz, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the evolution of iron overload, assessed by serum ferritin (SF), in transfusion-dependent lower risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as to describe the occurrence of organ complications, and to analyze its relationship with iron chelation therapy. This observational retrospective study was conducted from March 2010 to March 2011 in 47 Spanish hospitals. A total of 263 patients with lower risk MDS (International Prognostic Scoring System [IPSS] low/intermediate-1 risk or Spanish Prognostic Index [SPI] 0-1 risk), transfusion-dependent, and who had received ≥10 packed red blood cells (PRBC) were included. At MDS diagnosis, patients received a mean of 2.8 ± 3.9 PRBC/month, and 8.7% of patients showed SF ≥1000 μg/L. Over the course of the disease, patients received a mean of 83.4 ± 83.3 PRBC, and 36.1% of patients presented SF ≥2500 μg/L. Cardiac, hepatic, endocrine, or arthropathy complications appeared/worsened in 20.2, 11.4, 9.9, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. According to investigator, iron overload was a main cause of hepatic (70.0%) and endocrine (26.9%) complications. A total of 96 (36.5%) patients received iron chelation therapy for ≥6 months, being deferasirox the most frequent first chelation treatment (71.9%). Chelation-treated patients showed longer overall survival (p < 0.001), leukemia-free survival (p = 0.007), and cardiac event-free survival (p = 0.017) than non-chelated patients. In multivariable analyses, age (p = 0.011), IPSS (p < 0.001), and chelation treatment (p = 0.015) were predictors for overall survival; IPSS (p = 0.014) and transfusion frequency (p = 0.001) for leukemia-free survival; and chelation treatment (p = 0.040) and Sorror comorbidity index (p = 0.039) for cardiac event-free survival. In conclusion, these results confirm the potential survival benefit of iron chelation therapy and provide additional evidence on the

  18. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome: A Case-Control, Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0-252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years. Therefore

  19. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome: A Case-Control, Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0-252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years. Therefore

  20. An autopsy case of macroglobulinemia complicated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) like hyponatremia, hypopituitarism and AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chika; Yoneda, Chihiro; Ogino, Jun; Fukushima, Sayaka; Kodama, Shoko; Asano, Chihiro; Masuda, Michihiko; Horie-Tajima, Kanako; Toyonaga, Aiko; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Kawamura, Shunji; Hashimoto, Naotake

    2014-01-01

    An 88-year-old male patient with macroglobulinemia was admitted to our hospital because of severe hyponatremia and unconsciousness. Laboratory findings showed decreased inhibition of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and he was diagnosed with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). Hyponatremia improved with only limitation of water intake and the patient was followed up on a continuing outpatient basis. However, soon after discharge from hospital, his legs started swelling with edema and hyponatremia worsened. He was re-admitted due to a fall at home. Hyponatremia was observed at re-admission. A CRH challenge test showed partial dysfunction of ACTH secretion. Corticosteroid therapy was performed, but the patient subsequently died from pneumonia. Pathological findings at autopsy revealed invasion of plasma cells and amyloid depositions in multiple organs, including the pituitary, adrenal cortex, heart, liver, kidney, lymph nodes and bone marrow. Consistent with these results, fibrosis was observed in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, suggesting that the autopsy findings were related to the clinical observations and diagnosis. This is the first reported case of macroglobulinemia complicated with multiple hormone dysfunction.

  1. [Successful treatment for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis complicated by cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, V G; Konovalenko, I B; Oksema, E V; Filippova, L N; Dulaeva, E N; Derevyannykh, N A; Krasnoruzhsky, A I; Klimovich, A V; Klimko, N N; Medvedeva, N V

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a common agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is one of the rare causes of severe hyponatremia in patients with CNS diseases. The paper describes the first clinical case of a patient, whose onset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was complicated by cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with mental disorders and severe electrolytic imbalance. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B and fluconazole could alleviate an infectious process and metabolic disturbances. PMID:26821425

  2. [Successful treatment for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis complicated by cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, V G; Konovalenko, I B; Oksema, E V; Filippova, L N; Dulaeva, E N; Derevyannykh, N A; Krasnoruzhsky, A I; Klimovich, A V; Klimko, N N; Medvedeva, N V

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a common agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is one of the rare causes of severe hyponatremia in patients with CNS diseases. The paper describes the first clinical case of a patient, whose onset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was complicated by cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with mental disorders and severe electrolytic imbalance. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B and fluconazole could alleviate an infectious process and metabolic disturbances.

  3. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  4. Pregnancy Complications: HELLP Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... top 5 tips Share these tips to help us #ZAPzika GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. Sign the petition to #ZAPzika Urge Congress to approve funding to prevent the Zika virus from spreading GO News Moms Need Blog Read ...

  5. False diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and its complications in Wolfram syndrome--is it the reason for the low number of reported cases of this abnormality?

    PubMed

    Homa, Katarzyna; Stefański, Adam; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Molęda, Piotr; Bryśkiewicz, Marta Ewa; Majkowska, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness), is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome (1/770,000 in the United Kingdom), characterised by juvenile onset of diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy, diabetes insipidus, sensorineural deafness, renal tract and neurological abnormalities, and primary gonadal atrophy. WS is caused mainly by biallelic mutations in the WFS1 gene, which encodes wolframin. Wide tissue distribution of wolframin and many mutations in the wolframin gene resulting in Wolfram syndrome may contribute to different phenotypes and the unusual combinations of clinical features. We describe a female patient with Wolfram syndrome diagnosed at the age of 25, with a previous false diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and misdiagnosed diabetic complications. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for two novel mutations in exon 8 of WFS1 gene: a 2-bp deletion AT at nt 1539 leading to a frameshift (Y513fs) and a single-base substitution 1174C > T resulting in a stop codon (Q392X). A detailed analysis of the patient's medical history and a review of the literature suggest that many cases of Wolfram syndrome may remain undiagnosed due to misdiagnosis as type 1 diabetes mellitus and incorrect interpretation of clinical symptoms of neurodegenerative abnormalities, especially in their early stages.

  6. Severe Intimal Thickening of Interlobular Arteries Revealed by a Renal Biopsy in an Adult with Prader-Willi Syndrome Complicated by IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takayasu; Ishikawa, Eiji; Fujimoto, Mika; Murata, Tomohiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Renal complications are rare in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We herein experienced a 31-year-old woman with PWS, in whom a renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy and severe intimal thickening of the interlobular arteries. The patient was admitted to our hospital due to proteinuria and microscopic hematuria after an upper respiratory infection. The occurrence of cardiovascular events has been reported as a cause of death in obese PWS patients. Because chronic kidney disease is generally a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, early detection checkups are essential in obese PWS patients to monitor the possible development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26781016

  7. La para-osteo-arthropathie neurogene dans le syndrome de guillain barre: complication rare (à propos d'un cas et revue de la littérature)

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Hatim; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Shimi, Mohamed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Les para-ostéo-arthropathies neurogènes sont des complications classiques des affections neurologiques centrales, surtout dans les contextes traumatiques. Elles surviennent principalement au voisinage des grosses articulations. Leur physiopathologie exacte reste inconnue malgré de très nombreux travaux et cas rapportés. Il semble que leur survenue au décours d'affections neurologiques périphériques soit exceptionnelle. Nous présentons le cas d'une para-ostéo-arthropathie de hanche bilatérale compliquant un syndrome de Guillain-Barré. PMID:26161168

  8. [Survival and complications in remote period of follow-up in patients with Marfan syndrome after correction of aneurism of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Cypiene, R; Grebelis, A; Semeniene, P; Nogiene, G

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (n=44) and ascending aorta aneurism combined with aortic insufficiency were followed up for 1 month - 16 years after graft repair of the ascending aorta aneurysm and replacement of aortic valve. Patients were divided into two groups: with dissecting aneurism (n=25) and chronic nondissecting aneurism (n=19). In remote postoperative period 11 patients had 13 complications (2 patients had 2 complications each - graft dysfunction and arterial thromboembolism). Repetitive surgery was carried out in 5 patients after 67.2 +/- 19.4 months because of expansion of dissection to the abdominal aorta, dysfunction of mitral valve prosthesis. In remote period of follow up 15 patients (34.1%) died. Causes of death were graft dysfunction, extension of aortic dissection, myocardial failure. Total survival was 80, 54 and 46% for 1 month, 10 and 15 years, respectively. PMID:18260913

  9. Guillain-Barré syndrome as first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare manifestation complicated by IVIg-induced splenic infarct.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Richard M; Chen, Ioana; Somal, Navjot

    2015-11-25

    A 44-year-old woman presented with progressively worsening neurological symptoms of 1 week duration. Physical examination revealed absent reflexes of the lower extremities and proximal muscle weakness, bilaterally. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrophysiological studies were consistent with the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and the patient was started on intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. Along with positive neurological findings, rheumatological work up revealed elevated antinuclear antibody titres, positive double-stranded DNA and anti-Smith antibodies. These results, in conjunction with positive clinical findings, confirmed an underlying diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient's hospital course was complicated by an episode of severe left upper quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tachycardia and elevated inflammatory markers. CT scan of the abdomen revealed a splenic infarct following completion of IVIg infusion, making this a contributor to thrombus formation in the setting of an already thrombophilic state, and a rare complication of an approved method of treatment.

  10. Neuregulin 1-induced AKT and ERK phosphorylation in patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and intellectual disability associated with obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Tamás; Bánsági, Boglárka; Kelemen, Oguz; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2014-09-01

    Animal models of fragile X syndrome (FXS) suggest the impairment of the intracellular AKT messenger system, which is activated by neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a key regulator of neurodevelopment. We investigated NRG1-induced activation of the AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) systems by the measurement of the phosphorylated AKT/ERK to total AKT/ERK ratio in peripheral B lymphoblasts of patients with FXS, IQ-matched controls with intellectual disability (obstetric complications, preterm birth, perinatal hypoxia, and low birth weight), and typically developed healthy participants. Results revealed that patients with FXS displayed decreased AKT but normal ERK activation after the administration of NRG1. IQ-matched controls with intellectual disability displayed intact AKT/ERK activation. In conclusion, FXS, but not intellectual disability associated with obstetric complications, is associated with decreased NRG1-induced AKT phosphorylation.

  11. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  12. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  13. Jacobsen Syndrome: Surgical Complications due to Unsuspected Diagnosis, the Importance of Molecular Studies in Patients with Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Linares Chávez, Etzalli P.; Toral López, Jaime; Valdés Miranda, Juan M.; González Huerta, Luz M.; Perez Cabrera, Adrian; del Refugio Rivera Vega, María; Messina Baas, Olga M.; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is an uncommon contiguous gene syndrome. About 85-92% of cases have a de novo origin. Clinical variability and severity probably depend on the size of the affected region. The typical clinical features in JBS include intellectual disability, growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism as well as craniosynostosis, congenital heart disease, and platelet abnormalities. The proband was a 1 year/3-month-old Mexican male. Oligonucleotide-SNP array analysis using the GeneChip Human Cytoscan HD was carried out for the patient from genomic DNA. The SNP array showed a 14.2-Mb deletion in chromosome 11q23.3q25 (120,706-134,938 Mb), which involved 163 RefSeq genes in the database of genomic variation. We report a novel deletion in JBS that increases the knowledge of the variability in the mutation sites in this region and expands the spectrum of molecular and clinical defects in this syndrome. PMID:26997943

  14. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Fernandez, Thomas V; Brown, Lawrence W; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J; de Bruijn, Sebastian F T M; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L; Grice, Dorothy E; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L; Openneer, Thaïra J C; Plessen, Kerstin J; Rath, Judith J G; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H; State, Matthew W; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1.46) and severity (b = 2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b = 1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR = 1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD. PMID:27494079

  15. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Fernandez, Thomas V; Brown, Lawrence W; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J; de Bruijn, Sebastian F T M; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L; Grice, Dorothy E; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L; Openneer, Thaïra J C; Plessen, Kerstin J; Rath, Judith J G; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H; State, Matthew W; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1.46) and severity (b = 2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b = 1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR = 1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD.

  16. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  17. Is There any Relationship Between Extra-Pulmonary Manifestations of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection and Atopy/Respiratory Allergy in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory infections in children, but sometimes extra-pulmonary diseases can be observed. The immunological mechanisms involved in these extra-respiratory complications are unknown. Here, we report a small case series of Mycoplasma-related diseases including 5 children who developed: i) aseptic meningitis; ii) urticarial rash and pericardial effusion; iii) pleural effusion with severe eosinophilia; iv) Stevens-Johnson syndrome; v) multiform erythema. Interestingly, all children were moderately to highly atopic, as a common immunologic feature. PMID:27114818

  18. Large offspring or large placenta syndrome? Morphometric analysis of late gestation bovine placentomes from somatic nuclear transfer pregnancies complicated by hydrallantois.

    PubMed

    Constant, F; Guillomot, M; Heyman, Y; Vignon, X; Laigre, P; Servely, J L; Renard, J P; Chavatte-Palmer, P

    2006-07-01

    Somatic nuclear transfer (NT) in cattle is often complicated by fetal oversize (i.e., large offspring syndrome), hydrallantois, and placentomegaly in late gestation. The aims of this work were to obtain data on the placentome structure in NT-recipient cows with hydrallantois (NTH) and to relate these with fetal and placental weights to better understand the abnormalities observed in NTH pregnancies during the third trimester. Pregnant cows were slaughtered between Gestation Days 180 and 280. The fetuses were weighed, and the placentomes were numbered and weighed. Placentomes were examined by histologic and stereological techniques. Macroscopic data showed that placental overgrowth preceded fetal overgrowth, and the ratio of the fetal to the total placentome weight in the NTH group was lower than that in controls after Gestation Day 220. This suggests that placental overgrowth is due to placental default rather than due to fetal overgrowth, as shown also by stereological analysis showing primary deregulation of the growth of cotyledonary tissues. Observed alterations, such as thinning of the maternal epithelium within placentomes and increased trophoblastic surface, could be secondary adaptations. Thus, placental growth deregulations would be due to modifications of the expression of placental factors. Various examples of placental deficiency were observed, suggesting that some fetal abnormalities observed in NTH calves, such as enlarged heart, enlarged umbilical cord, and abdominal ascites, are consequences of placental dysfunction. Therefore, the condition described by the term "large offspring syndrome" might better be described by "large placenta syndrome," because this syndrome affects an average of 50% of late-gestation NT pregnancies. No conclusion can be drawn from this work on apparently normal pregnancies.

  19. Neonatal urinary ascites complicated by ileal perforation in a recipient of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik; Frost, Jodie; Ninan, G K

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of iatrogenic neonatal urinary ascites following antenatal amnioreduction in one of the monochorionic diamniotic recipient twin 2 of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). He had ileal perforation following postnatal abdominal paracentesis. The patient had an uneventful recovery following exploratory laparotomy, resection of perforated segment of ileum with end-to-end anastomosis and open vesicostomy with subsequent closure of the vesicostomy.

  20. Thermal dysregulation in Prader-Willi syndrome: a potentially fatal complication in adolescence, not just in infancy.

    PubMed

    McVea, Steven; Thompson, Andrew James; Abid, Noina; Richardson, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a background of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) was admitted to the regional paediatric intensive care unit, with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite a week of intravenous antibiotics, resolution of inflammatory markers and resolving consolidation on radiograph, he remained feverish. Fever of unknown origin investigations were negative and he was diagnosed with central thermal dysregulation secondary to hypothalamic dysfunction in PWS. Following a hyperpyrexia period, secondary rhabdomyolysis and renal failure developed. This was successfully managed with active cooling, ventilation and haemofiltration. After weaning from haemofiltration, the patient was successfully extubated to non-invasive respiratory support. PMID:27358096

  1. [Prolonged blockade of nervus ischiadicus in a system of complex treatment of patients, suffering complicated diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Shapoval, S D; Savon, I L; Sofilkanych, M M

    2015-03-01

    General principles of treatment in patients, suffering diabetic foot syndrome, are adduced. There was proved, that reconvalescence of the patients depends not only on quality of complex treatment, but from optimal choice of anesthesia method, its impact on postoperative period course. Application of prolonged blockade of n. ischiadicus gives possibility to perform operative intervention on the lower extremity in full volume, guarantees sufficient motor and sensory block, permits patients to reject from application of narcotic analgetics, to reduce the dose of strong nonnarcotic analgetics, the terms of transition of the wound process phase I into phase II, promotes early activization of patients postoperatively, constitutes alternative for other methods of anesthesiological support.

  2. A Case of Scrub Typhus Complicated by Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Successful Management with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Young; Lee, Seung Yun; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae Hyoung; Durey, Areum; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Young Sam; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed as having scrub typhus with pneumonitis. On admission, she was started on a combination therapy with levofloxacin and doxycycline. However, the patient developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) on the 2nd day, and as a result, she underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). She was weaned from ECMO on the 10th day, as her respiratory status gradually improved. She was discharged without sequelae on the 23rd day. The outcome suggests that the use of ECMO should be considered for patients with ARDS induced from scrub typhus. PMID:27458040

  3. Nonketotic hyperosmolar syndrome as an acute complication of type 1 diabetes onset in a 20-month-old boy with congenital central nervous system defect.

    PubMed

    Chumiecki, Miron; Minkina-Pedras, Mariola; Chobot, Agata; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is one of the most severe acute complications of type 2 diabetes, but may also be developed in type 1 diabetes. Similar to ketoacidosis,HHS still remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes,despite a significant progress in understanding its pathogenesis and greater consensus on HHS diagnosis and treatment. It is mainly observed in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. However,it may also occur in children,especially in infants and those with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) defects or suffering from severe infections associated with dehydration. The authors report a case of HHS in a 20-month-old child with central nervous system abnormality. Symptoms observed in our patient are characteristic for HHS. It must be emphasized that HHS may accompany diabetes onset also in children.

  4. [Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Mejías, María Pilar; Panek, Analía C; Cabrera, Gabriel G; Exeni, Ramón A; Palermo, Marina S

    2011-01-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  5. Le syndrome des loges du bras: une complication inhabituelle de l'intoxication au monoxyde de carbone

    PubMed Central

    Chkoura, Khalid; Kechna, Hicham; Loutid, Jaouad; Ouzad, Omar; Cherradi, Toufiq; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Le monoxyde de carbone (CO) surnommé “Silent killer” par les Anglo-Saxons représente la première cause de mortalité par intoxication accidentelle ou volontaire en Europe comme aux États-Unis. Au Maroc, le centre anti poison a collecté entre 1991 et 2008, 12976 cas d'intoxication au monoxyde de carbone dont 98,7% étaient accidentelles. Cette intoxication est très exceptionnellement compliquée d'un syndrome de loge qui peut contribuer à une aggravation certaine du pronostic fonctionnel et vital quand il est ignoré ou dominé par d'autres symptômes en particulier neurologiques. Nous rapportons le cas d'un gardien de nuit qui a présenté un syndrome de loge particulier par sa localisation (bras) au cours d'une intoxication au CO qui a évolué favorablement. PMID:26301009

  6. Atypical Parathyroid Adenoma Complicated with Protracted Hungry Bone Syndrome after Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Juárez-León, Óscar Alfredo; Gómez-Sámano, Miguel Ángel; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; López-Flores A La Torre, Manuel Alejandro; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hungry Bone Syndrome refers to the severe and prolonged hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia, following parathyroidectomy in patients with hyperparathyroidism. We present the case of an eighteen-year-old woman with a four-year history of hyporexia, polydipsia, weight loss, growth retardation, and poor academic performance. The diagnostic work-up demonstrated primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia of 13.36 mg/dL, a PTH level of 2551 pg/mL, bone brown tumors, and microcalcifications within pancreas and kidneys. Neck ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid adenoma of 33 × 14 × 14 mm, also identified on (99)Tc-sestamibi scan. Bone densitometry showed decreased Z-Score values (total lumbar Z-Score of -4.2). A right hemithyroidectomy and right lower parathyroidectomy were performed. Pathological examination showed an atypical parathyroid adenoma, of 3.8 g of weight and 2.8 cm in diameter. After surgery she developed hypocalcemia with tetany and QTc interval prolongation. The patient required 3 months of oral and intravenous calcium supplementation due to Hungry Bone Syndrome (HBS). After 42 months, she is still under oral calcium. Usually HBS lasts less than 12 months. Therefore we propose the term "Protracted HBS" in patients with particularly long recovery of 1 year. We present a literature review of the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HBS. PMID:26640724

  7. Atypical Parathyroid Adenoma Complicated with Protracted Hungry Bone Syndrome after Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-León, Óscar Alfredo; Gómez-Sámano, Miguel Ángel; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; López-Flores A La Torre, Manuel Alejandro; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hungry Bone Syndrome refers to the severe and prolonged hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia, following parathyroidectomy in patients with hyperparathyroidism. We present the case of an eighteen-year-old woman with a four-year history of hyporexia, polydipsia, weight loss, growth retardation, and poor academic performance. The diagnostic work-up demonstrated primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia of 13.36 mg/dL, a PTH level of 2551 pg/mL, bone brown tumors, and microcalcifications within pancreas and kidneys. Neck ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid adenoma of 33 × 14 × 14 mm, also identified on 99Tc-sestamibi scan. Bone densitometry showed decreased Z-Score values (total lumbar Z-Score of −4.2). A right hemithyroidectomy and right lower parathyroidectomy were performed. Pathological examination showed an atypical parathyroid adenoma, of 3.8 g of weight and 2.8 cm in diameter. After surgery she developed hypocalcemia with tetany and QTc interval prolongation. The patient required 3 months of oral and intravenous calcium supplementation due to Hungry Bone Syndrome (HBS). After 42 months, she is still under oral calcium. Usually HBS lasts less than 12 months. Therefore we propose the term “Protracted HBS” in patients with particularly long recovery of 1 year. We present a literature review of the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HBS. PMID:26640724

  8. Major intra-abdominal complications following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van der Eecken, H; Schatteman, P; Carpentier, P; Mottrie, A; Fonteyne, E

    2002-12-01

    A retroperitoneal bleeding is an unusual complication of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), which can be treated in a conservative way most of the time. However, an intra-abdominal bleeding after ESWL is extremely rare, which can cause life-threatening situations and requires an immediate intervention. Probably, only patients with a certain tissue fragility or connective tissue disorder are at risk to develop such an intra-abdominal bleeding. We present a case of a serious intra-abdominal bleeding due to a rupture of the vena mesenterica superior in an Ehlers-Danlos patient, evoked by an ESWL.

  9. Acute Liver Failure in an Adult, a Rare Complication of Alagille Syndrome: Case Report and Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Frongillo, F; Bianco, G; Silvestrini, N; Lirosi, M C; Sanchez, A M; Nure, E; Gaspari, R; Avolio, A W; Sganga, G; Agnes, S

    2015-09-01

    Alagille syndrome (AS) is an autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder affecting the liver, heart, eyes, skeleton, and face. The manifestations are predominantly pediatric. Diagnosis is based on findings of a paucity of bile ducts on liver biopsy combined with ≥3 of 5 major clinical criteria. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only option for treating patients who developed liver failure, portal hypertension, severe itching, and xanthomatosis. It is difficult to establish clear criteria for OLT; indications are controversial because of the wide variety of clinical symptoms and the multisystem involvement. Generally, AS-associated liver disease is never an acute illness. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with AS who underwent urgent OLT for acute liver failure. At 24 months posttransplant, the patient is in good clinical condition and with normal hepatic and renal function. PMID:26361673

  10. Sjögren Syndrome Complicated by Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma and Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fatma; Raslan, Osama; Muzaffar, Razi; Parkar, Nadeem; Marwaha, Nitin; Osman, Medhat M

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease with exocrine glands dysfunction and multiorgan involvement. It is associated with increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders, especially B-cell marginal zone lymphoma. While the role of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) for evaluation of lymphoma has been established, its use in patients with a chronic history of SS to evaluate for possible lymphoproliferative disorders or multiorgan involvement is limited. We present a case of chronic SS in which F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated FDG avid intraparotid and cervical lymph nodes pathologically proven to be mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In addition, the patient had bibasilar cystic changes consistent with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  11. [Clinical observation on treatment of 40 cases of apoplexy hemiplegia complicated shoulder-hand syndrome with electro-acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Guo, Z X; Wang, R S; Guo, X C

    1995-11-01

    The authors treated 40 cases of shoulder-hand syndrome of apoplexy hemiplegia with electro-acupuncture (EA) and filiform needle acupuncture (FNA) respectively. The results showed that EA had better results in treating hand back swelling, hand skin temperature elevating and the bending finger caused pain than that with FNA (P < 0.05). The finger joint and shoulder joint improvement (the functional scoring increased for 3 points or more) in EA was also better than that of FNA (P < 0.05). The total marked effective rate was higher in EA group (75%) than that in FNA (50%), P < 0.05). It suggested that EA produced rhythmic muscle contraction which had a "shoulder-hand pump" like action, and is significant in eliminating hand back swelling and preventing atrophy of hand muscles.

  12. Extensive cutaneous necrosis in a 12-year-old girl: an unusual complication of secondary cold agglutinin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kirtisudha; Singla, Shilpy; Batra, Vineeta Vijay; Basu, Srikanta; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-12-01

    Cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to infection is rare, usually presenting with anaemia and minor skin changes. A 12-year-old girl with secondary CAS associated with extensive cutaneous necrosis is reported. She presented with fever and multiple necrotic lesions over both cheeks, the tip of nose, ear margins, hands and buttocks, along with pallor, hepatospenomegaly, acrocyanosis and gangrene of the fifth digit of the right hand. She had anaemia, unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and a positive direct antiglobulin test owing to cold agglutinins of the IgM type with anti-i specificity and titres of 1:512 at 4°C. Results of bone marrow examination were normal and cryoglobulins were negative. Cold antibodies released even during a brief, self-limited febrile illness can cause widespread cutaneous gangrene. We believe this is the first report in the paediatric age group. PMID:24091086

  13. Herpesvirus-6 encephalitis complicated by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a pediatric recipient of unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, E; Verdeguer, A; Fernández, J M; Cañete, A; Castel, V

    2001-12-01

    A 10-year-old girl with M2 acute myeloid leukemia underwent an unrelated cord blood transplantation in refractory first relapse. On day +13, after 48 hours with fever, she showed a measles-like rash, and on day +15, she began experiencing neurologic symptoms (headache, tremors, weakness, nystagmus, mild confusion, speaking, taste, and behavior disturbances, and focal seizures). She also had amnesia for recent events with disability to learn, mimicking Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Computed tomography of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and electroencephalogram were nonspecific. We found human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA in CSF and cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Treatment with ganciclovir and foscarnet was effective, with total resolution of symptoms.

  14. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Edirne and its districts concomitant comorbid conditions and secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Güler, Sibel; Caylan, Ayşe; Nesrin Turan, F; Dağdeviren, Nezih; Çelik, Yahya

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of restless legs syndrome in Edirne and its districts, located in Western Thrace, which is the most western part of Turkey. In this study, 4003 individuals who could communicate and agreed to participate in the study were evaluated. To obtain the data from the applicants in 30 Family Health Centres in Edirne and its districts, a face-to-face questionnaire that consisted of 54 questions was prepared by the researchers. The questionnaire included general information, questions to evaluate potential concomitant comorbid conditions and questions regarding the symptomatology used in restless legs syndrome (RLS) diagnosis, as well as questions to evaluate insomnia and tension-type headache secondary to insomnia according to the ICD-II Criteria (International Classification of Sleep Disorders-II Criteria). Of 4003 individuals, 282 were diagnosed with RLS according to the questionnaire results from Edirne and its districts, and the prevalence of RLS was 7%. Approximately, 47.9% of the patients with RLS were male, and 52.1% were female, which was not significantly different (p > 0.05). Anaemia was identified in 41.1 % of the cases and control group was detected in 19.4 %, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). Secondary insomnia was identified in 64.2% of the cases with RLS and was not detected in 35.8%, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). RLS prevalence studies will increase the awareness of the community and provide early diagnosis and treatment, as well as serve as a basis to reduce morbidity and improve the quality of life.

  15. Chronic dietary n-3 PUFA intervention improves dyslipidaemia and subsequent cardiovascular complications in the JCR:LA- cp rat model of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Borthwick, Faye; Hassanali, Zahra; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Ruth, Megan; Shi, Danni; Jaeschke, Anja; Russell, James C; Field, Catherine J; Proctor, Spencer D; Vine, Donna F

    2011-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential chronic beneficial effects of dietary n-3 PUFA on the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and associated cardiovascular complications. We have recently established that increased dietary n-3 PUFA has a profound acute benefit on fasting lipids and the postprandial pro-inflammatory response in the JCR:LA-cp rat, a model of the MetS. However, it is unclear to what extent chronic dietary n-3 PUFA intervention can modulate the progression of end-stage metabolic and vascular complications. The present study aimed to determine the chronic effects of dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation on fasting and non-fasting dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and vascular complications in the JCR:LA-cp rodent model. JCR:LA-cp rats were fed an isoenergetic lipid-balanced diet supplemented with 5 % n-3 PUFA (w/w) of the total fat (fish oil-derived EPA/DHA) for 16 weeks. Fasting and non-fasting (postprandial) plasma lipid profile was assessed. Hepatic and adipose tissue was probed for the expression of lipogenic proteins (acyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1)), while the activity of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was assessed via Western blot to target phosphorylated JNK protein in primary enterocytes. The frequency of myocardial lesions was assessed by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Increased dietary n-3 PUFA improved both the fasting and postprandial lipid profiles (TAG, cholesterol and apoB48) in the JCR:LA-cp rat, potentially via the down-regulation of the hepatic or adipose tissue expression of lipogenic enzymes (ACC, FAS and SREBP-1). Rats fed the 5 % n-3 PUFA diet had lower (58·2 %; P < 0·01) enterocytic phosphorylated JNK protein and secreted less cholesterol (30 %; P < 0·05) into mesenteric lymph compared with the control. The chronic metabolic benefits of dietary n-3 PUFA may underlie the potential to reduce vascular complications during the MetS, including the observed

  16. The burden of comorbidity and the C-reactive protein levels in nonthyroidal illness syndrome with metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Cola, Silvia; Frugoni, Patrizia; Indiano, Ilaria; D'Urso, Rosaria; Falaschi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Thyroid hormones undergo significant modifications during severe illnesses, and the low T3 levels are the hallmark of nonthyoidal illness syndrome (NTIS), due to a reduced extrathyroidal conversion from T4. We examined 41 patients with NTIS by a modified cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) and the measurement of FT3, FT4, TSH, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Fifty-seven control subjects were enrolled. We observed reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels in NTIS patients (P < 0.05). The CIRS scores (severity and comordity index) were inversely related to FT3 and positively related to FT4 levels (P < 0.05). The CRP and the FT4 concentrations were positively associated (P < 0.01). Our study showed that the reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels were significantly related to the comorbidity and severity of systemic illnesses, probably as a result of impairment in the peripheral hormonal conversion. The CIRS scale and the CRP are useful tools for a better evaluation of these patients.

  17. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis complicating myelodysplastic syndrome results in worsening of prognosis: a retrospective cohort study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (sPAP) is a very rare lung disorder comprising approximately 10% of cases of acquired PAP. Hematological disorders are the most common underlying conditions of sPAP, of which 74% of cases demonstrate myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the impact of sPAP on the prognosis of underlying MDS remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether development of sPAP worsens the prognosis of MDS. Methods Thirty-one cases of sPAP and underlying MDS were retrospectively classified into mild and severe cases consisting of very low-/low-risk groups and intermediate-/high-/very high-risk groups at the time of diagnosis of MDS, according to the prognostic scoring system based on the World Health Organization classification. Next, we compared the characteristics, disease duration, cumulative survival, and prognostic factors of the groups. Results In contrast to previous reports on the prognosis of MDS, we found that the cumulative survival probability for mild MDS patients was similar to that in severe MDS patients. This is likely due to the poor prognosis of patients with mild MDS, whose 2-year survival rate was 46.2%. Notably, 75% and 62.5% of patients who died developed fatal infectious diseases and exacerbation of PAP, respectively, suggesting that the progression of PAP per se and/or PAP-associated infection contributed to poor prognosis. The use of corticosteroid therapy and a diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide of less than 44% were predictive of poor prognosis. Conclusion Development of sPAP during the course of MDS may be an important adverse risk factor in prognosis of patients with mild MDS. PMID:24597668

  18. Respiratory Complication in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya S; Ansari, Sikandar; Fisher, Micah

    2016-07-01

    Cirrhosis, the twelfth leading cause of death, accounts for 1.1% of all deaths in the United States. Although there are multiple pulmonary complications associated with liver disease, the most important complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality are hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatic hydrothorax, and portopulmonary hypertension. Patients with cirrhosis who complain of dyspnea should be evaluated for these complications. This article reviews these complications. PMID:27339676

  19. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  20. Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation, and Complications in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Living at High vs Low Altitudes in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Huthi, Mohamed Ali; Ahmed Raja'a, Yahia; Al-Noami, Mohammed; Rahman, Abdul Rashid Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Background A comparative retrospective study was performed to compare the distribution of risk factors and complications in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) at high-altitude vs low-altitude areas in Yemen. Methods The records of 768 patients from Sana'a (high altitude) and Aden (low altitude) were reviewed. Risk factors assessed were age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and reported history and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complications of ACS of interest were heart failure, arrhythmias, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and death. Results The mean age of ACS patients at high altitude was significantly lower than those at low altitude (55.3 years [SD = 8.2] vs 56.8 years [SD = 7.1]; P = .007). History of hyperlipidemia was significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (49.2% vs 38.3%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.563; P = .002). Reported history of CAD was also significantly higher at higher altitudes (16.7% vs 9.4%; OR = 1.933; P = .003). Previous history of diabetes mellitus and tobacco smoking was slightly higher with borderline significance. Hypertension and reported family history of CAD were comparable among high- and low-altitude patients. In terms of in-hospital complications, CVAs were significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (7.8% vs 4.4%; P = .0001). Heart failure, arrhythmias, and death rates were comparable in both groups of patients. Wall motion abnormalities were comparable, whereas the ejection fraction was lower in the high-altitude patients (49.8% [SD = 16.08] vs 54.8% [SD = 16.23]; P = .0001). Conclusions ACS occurs at a younger age at high altitudes. Patients who live in high-altitude regions are also more likely to have hyperlipidemia and a previous history of CAD. Stroke and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) occur more commonly in high-altitude ACS patients. High altitude may generally be a risk factor for

  1. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT.

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium tuberculosis in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ebrahim S.; Baharoon, Salim A.; Alsafi, Eiman; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss our center’s experience with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a major tertiary referral hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium TB infection who were admitted for critical care in a single center of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 2004 to 2013. Results: In our review of 350 patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to Intensive Care Unit, 11 cases of TB complicated with ARDS were identified. The mean age of patients was 51.9 years. The median time from hospital admission to pulmonary TB diagnosis and start of therapy was 5 days, while the median time from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment was 18 days. The mortality rate was 64%, and the median length of hospital stay before death was 21.4 days. Delayed treatment, as well as high acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and CURB-65 scores at presentation, were independent risk factors for death. Conclusion: Patients with pulmonary TB infrequently present to intensive care with acute symptoms that meet all criteria for ARDS. Such a presentation of TB carries a high mortality risk. PMID:27570853

  3. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  4. Bing-Neel syndrome, a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: analysis of 44 cases and review of the literature. A study on behalf of the French Innovative Leukemia Organization (FILO).

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Laurence; Fitsiori, Aikaterini; Lemal, Richard; Dupuis, Jehan; Carpentier, Benjamin; Boudin, Laurys; Corby, Anne; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Gastaud, Lauris; Talbot, Alexis; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Mahe, Béatrice; Payet, Camille; Soussain, Carole; Bonnet, Charlotte; Vincent, Laure; Lissandre, Séverine; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kremer, Stéphane; Leblond, Véronique; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by malignant cells is a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and this clinicopathological entity is referred to as the Bing-Neel syndrome. There is currently no consensus on the diagnostic criteria, therapeutic approaches and response evaluation for this syndrome. In this series, we retrospectively analyzed 44 French patients with Bing-Neel syndrome. Bing-Neel syndrome was the first manifestation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia in 36% of patients. When Waldenström macroglobulinemia was diagnosed prior to Bing-Neel syndrome, the median time interval between this diagnosis and the onset of Bing-Neel syndrome was 8.9 years. This study highlights the possibility of the occurrence of Bing-Neel syndrome without any other evidence of progression of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The clinical presentation was heterogeneous without any specific signs or symptoms. Biologically, the median lymphocyte count in the cerebrospinal fluid was 31/mm3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in 78% of the cases. The overall response rate after first-line treatment was 70%, and the overall survival rate after the diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome was 71% at 5 years. Altogether, these results suggest that Bing-Neel syndrome should be considered in the context of any unexplained neurological symptoms associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The diagnostic approach should be based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal axis. It still remains difficult to establish treatment recommendations or prognostic factors in the absence of large-scale, prospective, observational studies. PMID:26385211

  5. A case of thyroid storm with a markedly elevated level of circulating soluble interleukin-2 receptor complicated by multiple organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Satoh, Tetsurou; Takahashi, Hiroki; Katano-Toki, Akiko; Ozawa, Atsushi; Tomaru, Takuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Kaira, Kyoichi; Nishioka, Masaki; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Wakino, Shu; Mori, Masatomo; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid storm (TS) is a life-threatening endocrine emergency. However, the pathogenesis of TS is poorly understood. A 40-year-old man was admitted to a nearby hospital with body weight loss and jaundice. Five days after a contrasted abdominal computerized tomography (CT) scan, he exhibited high fever and disturbance of consciousness. He was diagnosed with TS originating from untreated Graves' disease and was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital. The patient exhibited impaired consciousness (E4V1M4 in Glasgow coma scale), high fever (39.3°C), and atrial flutter with a pulse rate 162/min, and was complicated by heart failure, acute hepatic failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome (DIC). His circulating level of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), a serum marker of an activated immune response, was highly elevated (7,416 U/mL, reference range: 135-483). Multiple organ failure (MOF) and DIC were successfully managed by multimodality treatments using inorganized iodide, glucocorticoids, anti-thyroid drugs, beta-blockers, and diuretics as well as an anticoagulant agent and the transfusion of platelet concentrate and fresh frozen plasma. sIL-2R levels gradually decreased during the initial treatment, but were still above the reference range even after thyroidectomy. Mild elevations in serum levels of sIL-2R have previously been correlated with thyroid hormone levels in non-storm Graves' disease. The present study demonstrated, for the first time, that circulating sIL-2R levels could be markedly elevated in TS. The marked increase in sIL-2R levels was speculated to represent an inappropriate generalized immune response that plays an unknown role in the pathogenesis of TS.

  6. Complicated unroofed coronary sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Ghulam; Ahmed, Bilal; Suleman, Naeem; Khan, Ghufranullah

    2005-03-01

    A young boy planned for the surgical closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) and mitral valve regurgitation (MR) was found peroperatively as having a complete unroofed coronary sinus (URCS). Intracardiac re-routing of left superior vena cava (LSVC) and mitral valve replacement (MVR) were performed concomitantly with success. PMID:15808100

  7. Post-heart transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Birati, Edo Y; Rame, J Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Managing patients after heart transplantation is challenging, since these patients have unique clinical complications (associated with the immunosuppressive therapy and cardiac allograft rejection) together with atypical clinical presentations for infection and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Survival rates have improved substantially with the use of new immunosuppressive drugs. High vigilance, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention for allograft-related and non-allograft-related syndromes with significant morbidity and mortality are the keys to long-term survival of patients after transplantation. PMID:24996612

  8. Unusual complications of quinalphos poisoning.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia.

  9. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  10. Complicated Migraines.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Alyssa E; Victorio, M Cristina; Berenson, Frank R

    2016-02-01

    Migraines are a common paroxysmal disorder that may present with a multitude of neurologic symptoms. Migraines have been re-categorized in the most recent edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. In this article, we review the literature on hemiplegic migraines, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, migraine with brainstem aura, retinal migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, Alice in Wonderland syndrome, and acute confusional migraine. We also discuss the principal clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and treatment options for these disorders. PMID:27017017

  11. Chiropractic management of a US Army veteran with low back pain and piriformis syndrome complicated by an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Cynthia; Bakkum, Barclay W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present the case of a patient with an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle who had a piriformis syndrome and was managed with chiropractic care. Case Report A 32-year-old male patient presented to a chiropractic clinic with a chief complaint of low back pain that radiated into his right buttock, right posterior thigh, and right posterior calf. The complaint began 5 years prior as a result of injuries during Airborne School in the US Army resulting in a 60% disability rating from the Veterans Administration. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mildly decreased intradiscal T2 signal with shallow central subligamentous disk displacement and low-grade facet arthropathy at L5/S1, a hypolordotic lumbar curvature, and accessory superior bundles of the right piriformis muscle without morphologic magnetic resonance imaging evidence of piriformis syndrome. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic treatment included lumbar and sacral spinal manipulation with soft tissue massage to associated musculature and home exercise recommendations. Variations from routine care included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretches, electric muscle stimulation, acupressure point stimulation, Sacro Occipital Technique pelvic blocking, CranioSacral therapy, and an ergonomic evaluation. Conclusion A patient with a piriformis anomaly with symptoms of low back pain and piriformis syndrome responded positively to conservative chiropractic care, although the underlying cause of the piriformis syndrome remained. PMID:22942838

  12. [Specific features of neurological complications developing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: possibility for correction and prevention].

    PubMed

    Shishkova, V N

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and preceding metabolic disturbances has reached epidemic proportions. Oxidative stress plays a significant role in the development of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with DM. The accumulation of free radicals is responsible for the development of systemic and vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulable and ischemic states. Since vascular and nervous system damages do not level off even under adequate glycemic control, there is a need for complex pathogenetic treatment strategies. Antioxidant therapy using mexidol is one of the compulsory components of combination therapy for complications of DM.

  13. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  14. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis.

  15. [Clinical picture of pure corneal ulcers of different localizations].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L N; Kudriashova, Iu I

    1999-01-01

    Pure corneal ulcers can be localized at the periphery and in the center. Peripheral ulcers are bilateral in 66% and multifocal in 48% cases. They are combined with local vasculitis of perilimbic vessels of the conjunctiva. In 84% cases the disease occurred in patients with connective tissue and articular diseases. Clinical picture of the peripheral corneal ulcer differs from Mourene's phagodenic ulcer. Central corneal ulcers are bilateral in 40% patients, are associated with primary and secondary "dry eye" syndrome in Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and in 18% patients with cicatricial deformation of the conjunctiva after Stevens-Johnson's syndrome, trachoma, and chemical burns of the eyes. Pure corneal ulcers run a chronic relapsing course, complicated in one-fourth of patients by corneal perforation and secondary infections.

  16. Further delineation of FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A patient with early vascular complications and non-progressive kyphoscoliosis, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Chiara; Ciaccio, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-08-01

    FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an extremely rare recessive connective tissue disorder described for the first time in 2012 by Baumann and coworkers. The causal gene, FKBP14, encodes a member of the F506-binding family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases. The paucity of patients described so far makes this disorder poorly defined at clinical level. Here, we report an additional pediatric patient, who is compound heterozygous for a recurrent and a novel FKBP14 mutation, and compare his phenotype with those available in literature. This evaluation confirms that kyphoscoliosis (either progressive or non-progressive), myopathy, joint hypermobility, and congenital hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed) are the typical features of the syndrome. Since the patient showed a severe cardiovascular event in childhood and atlantoaxial instability, this report expands the phenotype of the disorder and the allelic repertoire of FKBP14. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Further delineation of FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A patient with early vascular complications and non-progressive kyphoscoliosis, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Chiara; Ciaccio, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-08-01

    FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an extremely rare recessive connective tissue disorder described for the first time in 2012 by Baumann and coworkers. The causal gene, FKBP14, encodes a member of the F506-binding family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases. The paucity of patients described so far makes this disorder poorly defined at clinical level. Here, we report an additional pediatric patient, who is compound heterozygous for a recurrent and a novel FKBP14 mutation, and compare his phenotype with those available in literature. This evaluation confirms that kyphoscoliosis (either progressive or non-progressive), myopathy, joint hypermobility, and congenital hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed) are the typical features of the syndrome. Since the patient showed a severe cardiovascular event in childhood and atlantoaxial instability, this report expands the phenotype of the disorder and the allelic repertoire of FKBP14. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27149304

  18. [A clinical case of hemangioma of the face and tongue concurrent with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome complicated by cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances].

    PubMed

    Konovalova, K I; Elfimova, E M; Butorova, E A; Aksenova, A V; Galitsin, P V; Bulkina, O S; Litvin, A Yu; Chazova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the presence of congenital hemangioma of the face, soft palate, and tongue concurrent with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and sinoatrial block (maximally up to 3.9 sec). Continuous positive airway pressure therapy could reduce the number of paroxysms of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia and eliminate sinoatrial block.

  19. [A clinical case of hemangioma of the face and tongue concurrent with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome complicated by cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances].

    PubMed

    Konovalova, K I; Elfimova, E M; Butorova, E A; Aksenova, A V; Galitsin, P V; Bulkina, O S; Litvin, A Yu; Chazova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the presence of congenital hemangioma of the face, soft palate, and tongue concurrent with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and sinoatrial block (maximally up to 3.9 sec). Continuous positive airway pressure therapy could reduce the number of paroxysms of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia and eliminate sinoatrial block. PMID:27636935

  20. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Complicated by Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Graves' Disease in Slowly Progressive Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (SPIDDM): A Case Report and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Naotaro; Hasegawa, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Osamu; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of diabetes was admitted for nausea and vomiting with body weight loss. A blood examination revealed high plasma glucose and thyroid hormone levels and metabolic acidosis. She was therefore diagnosed with both diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperthyroidism. Nausea and vomiting continued intermittently despite the administration of saline and insulin. The patient was further diagnosed with superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after abdominal computed tomography revealed that a horizontal portion of the duodenum was sandwiched between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Clinicians should be vigilant for SMAS in patients with both DKA and hyperthyroidism who present body weight loss. PMID:27477411

  1. Le syndrome d'ogilvie post césarienne: une complication mystérieuse: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Amourak, Sarah; Tayae, Mariam; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatimazahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome d'ogilvie ou appeler encore Pseudo-occlusion colique aiguë (acute colonic pseudo-obstruction), décrit par Sir William Ogilvie en 1948 et correspond à une dilatation aiguë du colon antérieurement sain, survenant en l'absence d'obstruction mécanique avec un diamètre cæcal > 9 cm, La symptomatologie correspond à celle d'une occlusion intestinale basse, d'installation rapide et l'imagerie fait d'ASP et de TDM abdominale permet de mettre en évidence la distension cæcale dont la mesure de son diamètre permet de prédire le risque de perforation. A travers notre cas et une revue de la littérature nous invitons les obstétriciens à ne pas méconnaitre ce syndrome car seul un diagnostic précoce permet de réduire le risque de perforation cæcale PMID:25932081

  2. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  3. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  4. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  5. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  6. Cardiovascular complications in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Vitale, G; Pivonello, R; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2004-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased in acromegaly. In fact, GH and IGF-I excess induces a specific cardiomyopathy. The early stage of acromegaly is characterized by the hyperkinetic syndrome (high heart rate and increased systolic output). Frequently, concentric biventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in acromegaly, leading to an impaired systolic function ending in heart failure if the disease is untreated or unsuccessfully untreated. Besides, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of valves have been also described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes, aggravates the acromegalic cardiomyopathy. The suppression of GH/IGF-I following an efficacious therapy could decrease left ventricular mass and improve cardiac function. In conclusion, a careful evaluation of cardiac function, morphology and activity seems to be mandatory in acromegaly.

  7. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA) revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA). Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative. PMID:20034382

  8. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  9. Complicated intestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Miller, R C

    1979-05-01

    In this group of 45 intestinal atresia patients (duodenum, 16; jejunum, 24; ileum five) at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, individual hospitalizations ranged up to 245 days. Twelve patients required multiple operations, and the overall mortality rate was 22% (ten patients). While the patients with duodenal atresia had the greatest incidence of other congenital anomalies, including Down's syndrome, the patients with jejunal atresia presented with the most challenging surgical problems. Of the 24 jejunal atresia patients, only three had a single, simple area of obstruction. The remainder were complicated by other gastrointestinal lesions (five patients), by multiple areas of atresia (seven patients) including those in one surviving patient with 22 separate atretic segments, and by the Christmas tree deformity (nine patients). Intraoperative management of the complicated atresia should include: 1) grouping of multiple atresias during resection, 2) adequate resection of the dilated proximal atonic loop, 3) end-to-end anastomoses, 4) avoidance of intraluminal catheters, 5) additional resection of a segment of the distal loop in the Christmas tree deformity and 6) consideration of the shish kebab technique for multiple atretic webs. Postoperative management should involve early intravenous nutrition and repeated exploration for continued obstruction.

  10. Complications of the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Andy; Wood, Edward V

    2009-12-01

    Since the first reports in the medical literature of treatment of the Achilles tendon, complications have been recognized from both non-operative and operative techniques. These include tendon rerupture, sural nerve morbidity, wound healing problems, changes in tendon morphology, venous thromboembolism, elongation of the tendon, complex regional pain syndrome, and compartment syndrome. This article delineates the incidence for each of these complications, with differing techniques, methods of avoiding these complications and treatment methods if they occur. PMID:19857846

  11. Toxic epidermal necrolysis triggered by clobazam: a case report in a 13-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Dang, Chuong D; Beets-Shay, Linda; Kahn, Estelle C

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) triggered by clobazam in a 13-year-old girl who was subsequently treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. In December 2013 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released a warning that clobazam might cause "serious skin reactions" such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or TEN and approved label changes. PMID:25690725

  12. Acute inpatient presentation of kwashiorkor: not just a diagnosis of the developing world.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Kevin P; Andea, Aleodor; Hughey, Lauren C

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of an infant with presumed Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Through a history, physical, and histopathology, we were able to diagnose the patient with kwashiorkor. Physicians should be aware of this disorder, which is commonly thought of as a developing world problem, because it is increasing in incidence in industrialized nations because of changing dietary habits.

  13. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed.

  14. Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

  15. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  16. [Refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  17. Review of the refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Michael D; Btaiche, Imad F; Sacks, Gordon S

    2005-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome describes a constellation of metabolic disturbances that occur as a result of reinstitution of nutrition to patients who are starved or severely malnourished. Patients can develop fluid and electrolyte disorders, especially hypophosphatemia, along with neurologic, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular, and hematologic complications. We reviewed literature on refeeding syndrome and the associated electrolyte abnormalities, fluid disturbances, and associated complications. In addition to assessing scientific literature, we also considered clinical experience and judgment in developing recommendations for prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk for developing refeeding syndrome, institute nutrition support cautiously, and correct and supplement electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies to avoid refeeding syndrome. We provide suggestions for the prevention of refeeding syndrome and suggestions for treatment of electrolyte disturbances and complications in patients who develop refeeding syndrome, according to evidence in the literature, the pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome, and clinical experience and judgment.

  18. Respiratory complications during artificial barbiturate coma.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Signoroni, G; Meli, M; Lobascio, A E; Massei, R; Infuso, L

    1981-01-01

    Artificial barbiturate coma was induced in 13 patients with disorders of consciousness from traumatic or spontaneous diseases. Early respiratory complications consisting with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) were found in 10 out of these 13 patients; on the contrary, only 2 out of 13 patients, treated with routine intensive care therapy without barbiturate, showed analogous respiratory complications. The literature on the subject and the possible pathophysiological mechanism of respiratory distress are discussed.

  19. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-07-14

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  20. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  1. Empty sella syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary gland. Prolactin stimulates breast development and milk production in women. Complications of secondary empty sella syndrome are related to the cause of pituitary gland disease or to the effects of too little pituitary hormone.

  2. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  3. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  4. 2016 Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Complicating Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to classify 428 patient profiles as having or not having MAS, based on clinical and laboratory features at the time of disease onset. The 428 profiles comprised 161 patients with systemic JIA-associated MAS and 267 patients with a condition that could potentially be confused with MAS (active systemic JIA without evidence of MAS, or systemic infection). Next, the ability of candidate criteria to classify individual patients as having MAS or not having MAS was assessed by evaluating the agreement between the classification yielded using the criteria and the consensus classification of the experts. The final criteria were selected in a consensus conference. Experts achieved consensus on the classification of 391 of the 428 patient profiles (91.4%). A total of 982 candidate criteria were tested statistically. The 37 best-performing criteria and 8 criteria obtained from the literature were evaluated at the consensus conference. During the conference, 82% consensus among experts was reached on the final MAS classification criteria. In validation analyses, these criteria had a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.99. Agreement between the classification (MAS or not MAS) obtained using the criteria and the original diagnosis made by the treating physician was high (κ=0.76). We have developed a set of classification criteria for MAS complicating systemic JIA and provided preliminary evidence of its validity. Use of these criteria will potentially improve understanding of MAS in systemic JIA and enhance efforts to discover effective therapies, by ensuring appropriate patient enrollment in studies.

  5. [Epileptic seizures complicated by Takotsubo syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garea Garcia-Malvar, M J; Gonzalez-Silva, Y; Epureanu-Epureanu, V

    2014-11-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de takotsubo es un trastorno caracterizado por disfuncion ventricular reversible, dolor precordial de tipo anginoso y cambios electrocardiograficos sin evidencia de obstruccion coronaria en coronariografia. Se desencadena por estres, y es frecuente tras crisis epilepticas. Presentamos el caso de una paciente que inicia esta miocardiopatia tras una crisis epileptica al finalizar su sesion de hemodialisis. Caso clinico. Mujer de 55 años en hemodialisis por insuficiencia renal cronica, con epilepsia secundaria a lesion residual frontoparietal derecha por un hematoma que preciso evacuacion quirurgica. Tras una sesion de hemodialisis experimenta una crisis epileptica focal con generalizacion secundaria y, horas despues de esta, dolor centrotoracico. En seriacion enzimatica se objetiva elevacion de troponina I y, electrocardiograficamente, ondas T negativas en derivaciones precordiales (V2-V6). Se realiza coronariografia, cuyo resultado es normal, y se demuestran alteraciones de la contractilidad, confirmadas como de caracter transitorio en un estudio ecocardiografico seriado. Todos los datos anteriores hacen sospechar el diagnostico de sindrome de takotsubo. Conclusion. Las complicaciones cardiacas son una de las causas de morbimortalidad en la epilepsia, y entre ellas se encuentra el sindrome de takotsubo. La incidencia real de dicho sindrome se desconoce, pero dada su implicacion en la mortalidad de causa cardiaca en la epilepsia es importante sospecharlo ante la presencia de disfuncion cardiaca tras una crisis epileptica.

  6. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  7. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  8. Refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S C

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  9. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  10. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  12. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  14. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  15. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article.

  16. Complications of nephropathia epidemica: three cases.

    PubMed

    Forslund, T; Saltevo, J; Anttinen, J; Auvinen, S; Brummer-Korvenkontio, M; Korhonen, A; Poutiainen, M

    1992-07-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Scandinavia is called nephropathia epidemica (NE), and is caused by the Puumala-virus, which belongs to the Hanta-virus genus. The clinical course of NE is mostly benign, complications are uncommon, and deaths are rarely observed. We report the cases of three patients who developed serious complications in the course of NE caused by the Puumala-virus. One patient died within 24 h after admission, another developed progressive neuromuscular dysfunction (Guillain-Barré syndrome) which required auxiliary ventilation for several weeks before a slow recovery, and a third patient developed empty sella syndrome with pituitary gland insufficiency. In the first two cases the diagnosis of NE was confirmed by a rapid avidity assay for IgG antibody against Puumala-virus. In the third case the clinical course, and demonstration of NE immunity 16 years later, suggested that NE might have caused the hypopituitarism. Some patients with NE caused by the Puumala-virus may require intensive-care treatment, and the development of late complications such as empty sella syndrome and hypopituitarism should be taken into consideration.

  17. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  18. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nassi, Rossella; Ladu, Cristina; Vezzosi, Chiara; Mannelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in the general population and is even less common during pregnancy with only a few cases reported in literature. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome may be difficult during pregnancy because the typical features of the disorder and pregnancy may overlap. However, Cushing's syndrome results in increased fetal and maternal complications, and diagnosis and treatment are critical. This report describes a case of 26-year-old female at the 19th week of pregnancy with symptoms and signs of hypercortisolism, where ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed and treated by robotic laparoscopic adrenalectomy at the 21th week of gestation.

  19. Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome and steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Andrew P.; Reich, Patrick; Sigdel, Binayak; Davis, T. Keefe

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (pHUS) is a rare but severe complication of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. We report the case of a 12-year-old female with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (H.P. Acthar® Gel), who developed pneumococcal pneumonia and subsequent pHUS. While nephrotic syndrome is a well-known risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, this is the first reported case of pHUS in an adolescent patient with nephrotic syndrome, and reveals novel challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and potential prevention of this complication. PMID:27478599

  20. [Pulmonary complications of malaria: An update].

    PubMed

    Cabezón Estévanez, Itxasne; Górgolas Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-04-15

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease worldwide, being a public health challenge in more than 90 countries. The incidence of pulmonary manifestations has increased in recent years. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe form within the pulmonary complications of malaria, with high mortality despite proper management. This syndrome manifests with sudden dyspnoea, cough and refractory hypoxaemia. Patients should be admitted to intensive care units and treated with parenteral antimalarial drug treatment and ventilatory and haemodynamic support without delay. Therefore, dyspnoea in patients with malaria should alert clinicians, as the development of respiratory distress is a poor prognostic factor.

  1. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; House, Andrew; Gorini, Antonio; Santoboni, Alberto; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death represent main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenesis includes close linkage between heart and kidneys and involves traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors. According to a well-established classification of cardiorenal syndrome, cardiovascular involvement in CKD is known as "type-4 cardiorenal syndrome" (chronic renocardiac). The following review makes an overview about epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular complications in CKD patients. PMID:25344016

  2. [Complicated jejunoileal diverticulosis. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Rogati, L; Bosco, A; Destradis, E; Ciaccio, V; Pucciarini, L G; Tristaino, B

    1991-01-01

    The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum is an uncommon pathology, that is often revealed just from the complications which it presents. The clinical case reported by the Authors describes a woman who reached to admission for a serious condition of shock secondary to a jejunum bleeding diverticulosis and who underwent an intestinal resection. The patient was discharged home on IX p.o. day. From the review of literature results that the incidence of the diverticulosis of jejunum ileum consists of 0.1%-0.11% of all the gastrointestinal's diverticula and the predominance is for the female, especially in the middle age. The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum can be congenital or acquired; the first one came to the antimesenteric side of the intestines, the second one to the mesenteric side of the same. The diverticulosis is generally asymptomatic, but often produces many complications as the intestinal occlusion, secondary to a bridle, a volvulus, an invagination, also if the peritonitis caused by a diverticulosis's perforation represents the most frequent complication of them. Others rarest complications are the massive haemorrhage of diverticula, the stagnant loop syndrome, the malabsorption's syndrome due to lack of B12 vitamin and growth of bacteria within them, the diverticulitis caused by infection. The therapy of all complicated cases of jejunum ileum diverticula is necessarily the surgery only and exactly the intestinal resection.

  3. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  4. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Ohnishi, T; Okamoto, S; Yamakado, T; Isaka, N; Nakano, T

    1998-01-01

    We report a patient who presented with severe nephrotic syndrome complicated with infrarenal aortic and right renal arterial thrombosis. The nephrotic syndrome frequently causes thromboembolic complications in veins, but arterial thrombosis is relatively rare, especially in the aorta. Various predisposing factors leading to thromboembolic complications are discussed. In this case, the thromboembolic complication may have some clinical association with the hypercoagulable state in nephrotic syndrome.

  5. Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  6. Infantile haemangioma: a complicated disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2015-06-01

    Infantile haemangiomas (IH) are common benign vascular tumors of childhood. They are characterised by rapid growth during the first year of life and slow regression that is usually completed by 7-10 years of age. The underlying mechanism of action of IH is aberrant angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and involves the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. IH become a challenge if they are part of a syndrome, are located in certain areas of the body, or if complications develop. The beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising new candidate for first-line systemic therapy. This review focuses on the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and management of IH.

  7. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  8. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  9. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  10. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  11. The imperative to prevent diabetes complications: a broadening spectrum and an increasing burden despite improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Stephen M; Wong, Jencia

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are common; the complications are, of themselves, a major reason to manage diabetes. Recent data from Australia and similar developed health care systems overseas indicate that morbidity and mortality outcomes relating to diabetes complications are improving. However, these benefits are offset by increasing numbers of people diagnosed with diabetes, resulting in an increased disease burden with significant health care implications. Thus the imperative to prevent diabetes and diabetes complications has never been greater. Furthermore, the recognised spectrum of diabetes complications is broadening, especially complications relating to lipid levels, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Clinicians now need to be aware of both traditional complications (eg, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease) and non-traditional complications (eg, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, some cancers and eating disorders). Complications outcomes could be further improved by decreasing the evidence-treatment gap - for example, by increasing personalisation of care in managing diabetes complications.

  12. Refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  13. [Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Ramadan, E; Chaimoff, C

    1992-04-15

    92% of our first 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were successful. Postoperative complications included fever in 10 cases (17%), urinary retention in 5 (8%), intraabdominal abscess in 2 (3%), biliary leakage in 1 (2%) and unexplained abdominal pain in 10 (17%). Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has obvious advantages, it also has major as well as minor complications. PMID:1398315

  14. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  15. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  16. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  17. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

  18. Imaging manifestations of a dreaded obstetric complication in the immediate postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Cannon, Walter

    2014-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet) syndrome is a dreaded complication that may develop during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period. Rarely this syndrome manifests itself with imaging findings. We report a case of HELLP syndrome in which the diagnosis was reaffirmed via imaging findings. PMID:24688204

  19. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    PubMed

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  20. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  1. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  2. Syndrome in Question*

    PubMed Central

    Tonolli, Vanessa Mello; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Tonello, Cláudio Sampieri; Pires, Rafaelle Batistella; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Hay-Wells syndrome or AEC (Ankyloblepharon, Ectodermal dysplasia and Cleft lip and palate syndrome) is a rare ectodermal disorder. The treatment is aimed to prevent clinical complications. We describe the case of a four-month old male patient with erosions on the scalp, trunk and arms, trachyonychia, deformity of the ears, micropenis, cleft palate, decreased eyebrow and eyelash hairs, in addition to antecedents of surgical correction of ankyloblepharon. The importance of the correct diagnosis is emphasized, besides the investigation of the associated diseases, treatment of complications and genetic counseling of the parents. PMID:24770526

  3. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  4. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  5. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  6. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  7. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  8. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  9. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  10. Recognizing and preventing refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is an uncommon but potentially fatal phenomenon that can occur in patients receiving parenteral, enteral, or oral feedings after a period of sustained malnutrition or starvation. This syndrome is characterized by hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, and hypomagnesemia. The purpose of this article was to bring an acute awareness of refeeding syndrome to the critical care nurse. The recognition, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, potential life threatening complications, and treatment are presented.

  11. Ifosfamide induced Fanconi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buttemer, Samantha; Pai, Mohan; Lau, Keith K

    2011-01-01

    Ifosfamide (IFA) is a powerful chemotherapeutic drug that is active against a variety of paediatric malignancies. However, renal toxicities such as haemorrhagic cystitis and Fanconi syndrome are major hazards that hinder its use in clinical practice. The authors present a case of a patient treated for Wilms’ tumour with IFA who developed rickets with Fanconi syndrome. Patients undergoing IFA treatment must be carefully monitored for the development of iatrogenic complications. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the underlying pathomechanism of IFA induced Fanconi syndrome, and selective renal protection against during chemotherapy with IFA may be possible soon. PMID:22669992

  12. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  13. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  14. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  15. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  16. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  17. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment.

  18. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José Maria

    2005-01-01

    The thoracic outlet syndrome is a polymorphic clinical entity, whose nature is essentially anatomic, caused by the chronic compression of the neurovascular structures that are originated in the chest or neck and course to the upper extremity. According to the most affected structure, they can be classified as neurologic, arterial or venous syndromes, that may cause discomfort, pain and disability, sometimes definite and irreparable. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to recognize in clinical practice and it is important to emphasize some peculiar symptoms or signs that each syndrome may present, through specific maneuvers or adequate complementary studies. The great majority of patients may improve with physical therapy or postural correction, and a minority is indicated for surgical therapy. The main features of the diverse thoracic outlet syndromes, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, conventional and surgical management, surgical access, complications and prognosis are described and discussed in this paper dedicated to a complete review of the entity. PMID:16234911

  19. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear. PMID:27241746

  20. Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis complicating AIDS-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Afsari, Khosrow; Frank, Jeffrey; Vaksman, Yulia; Nguyen, Thanhan V

    2003-03-01

    An alert and oriented 27-year-old African American woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of fever, cough productive of yellow sputum, nausea, and vomiting and a 1-day history of excruciating headache and photophobia. Her condition rapidly deteriorated into a coma with decorticate and then decerebrate posture, and she died 3 weeks later. There was evidence of extensive intracranial venous sinus thrombosis (ICVST), renal vein thrombosis (RVT), and multiple cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts due to a hypercoagulable state complicating AIDS-associated nephrotic syndrome. This is the first reported case of fatal ICVST and RVT with extensive cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts complicating nephrotic syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

  1. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  2. Cutaneous reactions to analgesic-antipyretics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Analysis of reports to the spontaneous reporting system of the Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the cutaneous reactions to systemic analgesic-antipyretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reported to the spontaneous reporting system of the Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia (GISED). The system has been active since 1988, with periodic intensive surveillance exercises, and 202 dermatologists have collaborated. Up to December 1991, 2,137 reactions had been collected, of which 713 were reactions to systemic analgesic-antipyretics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A general profile of the reactions was identifiable. It included, in order of frequency, urticaria/angioedema, fixed eruptions, exanthemas, erythema multiforme and Stevens Johnson syndrome. Fixed eruptions and Stevens Johnson syndrome were reported with exceedingly high frequency in association with feprazone. Our system also revealed previously unreported reactions, including fixed eruption to nimesulide, fixed eruption to piroxicam and fixed eruption to flurbiprofen.

  3. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  4. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  5. The antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-08-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and venous or arterial thrombosis or obstetric complications. In spite of the recent progresses, many aspects of this disease remain unclear. In this review, we briefly focus on the most important advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  6. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  7. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  8. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise.

  9. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, R H; Haverkamp, D; Campo, M M; van der Vis, H M

    2012-03-01

    A 62year old man developed a compartment syndrome of the thigh after total knee arthroplasty. Twelve years previously he had a HTO of the same knee complicated by a compartment syndrome of the calf. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed with intracompartmental pressure measurement. Following fasciotomy pressures were normalized and further course was uncomplicated. Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare, but potentially devastating, complication following total knee arthroplasty. A previous compartment syndrome of the calf is identified as a risk factor.

  10. Cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2

    PubMed Central

    Işikay, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 is characterised by partial albinism and primary immunodeficiency. We present a case of a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2. Neurological complications may accompany Griscelli syndrome, however, to the best of my knowledge there are only a few case reports of cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2 in the literature. PMID:25315806

  11. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  12. Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. The syndrome may be linked to ...

  13. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  14. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  15. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  16. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  17. Complications from radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhermain, Frédéric; Barani, Igor J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) of the brain is associated with significant stigma in the neuro-oncology community. This is primarily because of the potentially severe complications with which it may be associated. These complications, especially in subacute and latent settings, are often unpredictable, potentially progressive, and irreversible. The onset of complications may start from the first fraction of 2 Gy, continuing over several months after end of RT with persistent drowsiness and apathy. It may also extend over many years with progressive onset of neurocognitive impairments such as memory decline, and diminished focus/attention. For long-term survivors, such as young patients irradiated for a favorable low-grade glioma, quality of life can be seriously impacted by RT. It is essential, as in the pediatric field, to propose patient-specific regimens from the very outset of therapy. The use of molecular biomarkers to better predict survival, control of comorbidities along with judicious use of medications such as steroids and antiepileptics, improved targeting with the help of modern imaging and RT techniques, modulation of the dose, and fractionation aimed at limiting integral dose to the healthy brain all have the potential to minimize treatment-related complications while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy for which RT is known. Sparing "radiosensitive" areas such as hippocampi could have a modest but measurable impact with regard to cognitive preservation, an effect that can possibly be enhanced when used in conjunction with memantine and/or donepezil. PMID:26948357

  18. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  19. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  20. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  1. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  2. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  3. Neuromuscular complications of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pickett, J B; Layzer, R B; Levin, S R; Scheider, V; Campbell, M J; Sumner, A J

    1975-07-01

    Seventeen consecutive acromegalic patients were evaluated for evidence of neuromuscular dysfunction and followed for 1 year after hypophysectomy. Before treatment, four patients had both a myopathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome, five had myopathy alone, four had carpal tunnel syndrome alone, and four had neither. The myopathy was caracterized by mild, strictly promixal weakness and flabbiness of muscles; electromyography revealed typical myopathic abnormalities, but serum enzymes and muscle biopsy usually were normal. The presence of myopathy or the carpal tunnel syndrrome could not be correlated with the magnitude of growth hormone elevation or any secondary endocrine derangement, but myopathy was associated with a longer duration of acromegaly. Carpal tunnel symptoms usually improved in the first 6 weeks after hypophysectomy, while myopathy improved more slowly and sometimes was detectable 1 year later.

  4. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  5. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:27226847

  6. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:27226847

  7. Complications of varicella zoster.

    PubMed

    Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Citak, Elvan Cağlar; Elli, Murat; Serdaroğlu, Ayse; Citak, Funda Erkasar

    2002-02-01

    Primary infection with varicella zoster is characterzed by a generalized vesicular rash usually without significant systemic illness. Encephalitis, pneumonitis, pancreatitis, nephritis, Reye and Guillan-Barre syndrome transvers myelitis, myocarditis have been reported before, but there is not any case having all these system to be involved during the same infection in a sequential manner ending up with multiorgan failure. We wanted to represent 21-month-old boy had a multiorgan failure due to varicella zoster infection.

  8. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  9. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  10. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  11. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial. PMID:26564075

  12. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  13. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ingall, T J; Tennant, C

    1986-11-01

    The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a relatively rare but potentially fatal complication of the use of major tranquillizers; mortality may be as high as 20%. The syndrome is manifest by the onset of hyperpyrexia, muscular rigidity and tremor, impaired consciousness and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology is thought to be by way of dopamine receptor blockade. The syndrome is managed by cessation of the neuroleptic medication, by supportive measures and by instituting treatment with one or more of a number of specific drugs whose use is based on theoretical considerations rather than empirical evidence of efficacy; these drugs include anticholinergics, L-dopa, bromocriptine amantidine and dantrolene sodium. Although not proven, early recognition and treatment may reduce both the mortality and the longer term morbidity of this syndrome. PMID:3773831

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaquis, J

    1987-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is estimated to affect 2 million to 3 million Americans. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a breathing pattern characterized by periods of apnea alternating with periods of arousal and breathing, a pattern that recurs throughout the sleep cycle. It is important for the nurse practitioner to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of the syndrome in order to initiate diagnostic testing. The role of the nurse practitioner also involves education of the client and family regarding the disease process and treatment modalities. The client and client's family will need help in coping with the diagnosis and possibly with the physical and psychological symptoms experienced. This article outlines the disease process, treatment modalities, possible complications and the role of the nurse practitioner in assisting the client with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  15. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  16. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  17. Complications of vasectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Awsare, Ninaad S.; Krishnan, Jai; Boustead, Greg B.; Hanbury, Damian C.; McNicholas, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasectomy is a common method of sterilisation. However, it is less popular than tubal ligation world-wide. It is also a frequent cause of litigation relating to its complications. This article reviews the early and late risks associated with the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data collection was done using the internet to search Medline for obtaining evidence-based medicine reviews. Cross-references were obtained from key articles. Websites of government bodies and medical associations were searched for guidelines relating to vasectomy. DISCUSSION: Early complications include haematoma, wound and genito-urinary infections, and traumatic fistulae. Vasectomy failure occurs in 0-2% of patients. Late recanalisation causes failure in 0.2% of vasectomies. Significant chronic orchalgia may occur in up to 15% of men after vasectomy, and may require epididyectomy or vasectomy reversal. Antisperm antibodies develop in a significant proportion of men post-vasectomy, but do not increase the risk of immune-complex or atherosclerotic heart disease. Similarly, vasectomy does not enhance risk of testicular or prostate cancer. Vasectomy has a lower mortality as compared to tubal occlusion, but is still significantly high in non-industrialised countries because of infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomy, though safe and relatively simple, requires a high level of expertise to minimise complications. Adequate pre-operative counselling is essential to increase patient acceptability of this method of permanent contraception. PMID:16263006

  18. Unusual complication after genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

    2014-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature. PMID:24621765

  19. DRESS syndrome in ophthalmic patients.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jacqueline Martins de; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed. We were unable to identify the causal drug owing to the large number of medications concurrently administered. The second case presented with DRESS syndrome symptoms during ocular toxoplasmosis treatment. In this case, a clearer association with pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine was observed. As a result of the regular prescription of pharmacological agents associated with DRESS syndrome, ophthalmologists should be aware of the potentially serious complications of DRESS syndrome. PMID:27463633

  20. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  1. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  2. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  3. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  4. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  5. [Acute complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Obel, E

    1976-02-01

    The complications accompanying the various methods of abortion as studied in different surveys are reported. In studies of dilation and curettage (D and C) and vaccuum aspiration (VA), lethality ranges from .5 to 2.9 deaths/100,000 cases. Metrorrhagia occurred in 2.5-6% of the D and C cases studied and in 2.9-3.5% of the VA cases. The bleeding was accompanied by infection in most cases where abortive tissue remained in the uterus, which occured in .4-.8% of the D and C cases and in .6-.9% of the VA cases studied. Postabortive bleeding occurred through the 10th day in up to 25% of the patients and was related to the length of the gestation period before abortion. Pelvic infection, mostly of the endometrium, occurred in about 1.4% of the D and C patients and in .3-1.2% of the VA patients. 1.4% of the D and C patients and .6% of the VA patients experienced a rise in body temperature as the only complication of abortion. Perforation of the uterus occurred in about .8% of the D and C patients and in .1-.6% of VA patients. Lesions of the cervix had to be sutured in .1% of the D and C group and .3% of the VA group. Saline instillation, used for abortions in the second trimest er, had a mortality rate of about 20/100,000 cases. Since the success rate of saline instillation is 90-98%, complications are more frequent, often requiring treatment with oxytocin or curettage. Extensive bleeding occurred in 2.3-4%. Curettage of the placenta was required in about 2.1-16.9% of the cases. Pelvic inflammation occurred in about 2.5% and temperature elevation in 1-3.4%. Abdominal hysterotomies had a lethality of 208/100,000. Pelvic hemorrhage occurred in 31%, inflammation in 4.7%, temperature elevation in 13%, and febrile reactions in 31% of the abdominal hysterotomies studied. It is necessary to establish international definitions of abortion complications for better documentation, and postoperative observations should be recorded more conscientiously. PMID:1251502

  6. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Güngor Gündoğan, Tuğba; Jacquemyn, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital vascular disorder, and only few cases have been described in pregnancy. We describe two cases, in one patient without complications, the other patient developed postpartum deep venous thrombosis. PMID:21209709

  7. Postpericardiotomy syndrome following temporary and permanent transvenous pacing

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, B.; Evans, K.; Thomas, P.

    1999-01-01

    The postpericardiotomy syndrome may occur as a complication of temporary and permanent pacing. Physicians involved in procedures which may be complicated by this condition therefore need to be aware of its diagnosis and management.


Keywords: postpericardiotomy syndrome; cardiac pacing PMID:10435173

  8. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  9. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  10. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  11. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much glucocorticosteroid medicine. This form of Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are ...

  12. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  13. Syndrome in Question*

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sheila Itamara Ferreira do Couto; de Andrade, Sônia Maria Fonseca; Gomes, Maria Fernanda; Castro, Fernanda Almeida Nunes; Tebcherani, Antonio José

    2014-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber Syndrome also known as Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia is a rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia, with dominant autosomal inheritance. It is characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasia, visceral arteriovenous malformation and positive family history. There may be hematologic, neurologic, dermatologic and gastrointestinal complications. Therapy is supportive and aimed at preventing complications. In this article we report a case of Rendu-Osler-Weber in a 64 year-old man, with history of mucocutaneous telangiectasia since the third decade of life, recurrent epistaxis, positive family history and vascular ectasia in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25054766

  14. Ventricular Septal Defect from Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caplow, Julie; Quatromoni, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo Syndrome is a transient condition characterized by left ventricular systolic dysfunction with apical akinesis/dyskinesis and ballooning. Although the prognosis with medical management is excellent in most cases, rare cases of serious complications can occur. We present here a case of a 71-year-old woman presenting with acute decompensated heart failure with initial findings consistent with a myocardial infarction, who was found instead to have an acute ventricular septal defect as a complication of Takotsubo Syndrome. PMID:27563471

  15. Does post septoplasty nasal packing reduce complications?

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2011-01-01

    The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not).Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:21425063

  16. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  17. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  18. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  19. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  20. [Acute ischemia of the hand, an unknown complication of the hydrogen peroxide irrigation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Zemirline, A; Loaëc, F; Hélaine, L; Richou, J; Le Nen, D

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of acute transitional ischemia of the hand with acute compartment syndrome of the forearm, following hydrogen peroxide irrigation of a wound. We discuss the physiopathology and management of this complication. Along with numerous related cases of gas embolism, this complication emphasizes the risks of using hydrogen peroxide under pressure, notably in hand surgery.

  1. [CENTRAL ANTICHOLINERGIC... SYNDROME?].

    PubMed

    Danilov, M S; Lebedinskii, K M

    2015-01-01

    While reading special literature in diferent languages the authors noted surprising fact: the term and concept of "central anticholinergic syndrome" is well-known as common anaesthesia complication in German (abbr: ZAS) and partially Spanish sources, but in Russian, English or French literature is used only in toxicological context. Describing etiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of the complication manifesting with comatose, agitated or shivering forms, the authors analyzing the reasons for such a noticeably diferent approaches to the situation reaching 10% of all the general anaesthesia cases. Probably, ZAS isn't nosologically clearly defined syndrome, but just adverse appearance of one of the fundamental general anaesthesia mechanisms? Anyway, the problem of central cholinergic activity suppression, excessive by its amplitude and/or duration, exists all over the world. German concept of ZAS allows the anaesthesiologist to resolve it on pathogenically generalized basis, while in other professional communities various symptomatic approaches seem to be more common. PMID:27025142

  2. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  3. [ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS AND LONG TERM MATERNAL CARDIOVASCULAR MORBIDITY].

    PubMed

    Kessous, Roy; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Parientel, Gali; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-05-01

    In recent years there is a significant increase in the rate of the metabolic syndrome. Correspondingly, and possibly due to this increase, there is a significant increase in cardiovascular events in women. Contradictory to the concept that obstetric complication is limited to pregnancy, some obstetric complications may cause or seemingly provide a preliminary sign for future maternal morbidity. In recent years there have been an increasing number of studies that examined the theory that vascular-related complications of pregnancy may be associated with increased risk for future maternal cardiovascular morbidity. We present a review of the literature, in addition to a series of studies conducted in Soroka University Medical Center that examined the association between pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm delivery, placental abruption and recurrent pregnancy loss and future long term maternal cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:27526556

  4. [Guideline for management of tumor lysis syndrome].

    PubMed

    2011-02-01

    A right management of the tumor lysis syndrome is essential for the ongoing improvement in survival and treatment of patients with hematological malignancies. This guide establishes clinical and laboratory criteria for confirming diagnosis, states initial laboratory tests, enumerates risk factors-based stratification criteria, and develops guidelines for prevention and treatment of the syndrome and its complications.

  5. Complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gasche, C

    2000-01-01

    Complications in inflammatory bowel disease determine the severity of disease as well as the complexities of medical or surgical treatment opportunities. Therefore, in known inflammatory bowel disease, the prevention, the early detection and the adequate therapeutic response to certain complications are important goals in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Disease complications are separated into intestinal and extraintestinal complications. Intestinal complications are somewhat disease specific, which means that they occur exclusively in either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (e.g., enteric fistulas are particularly found in Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon in ulcerative colitis). Most extraintestinal complications occur in both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., anemia, thromboembolic events or osteoporosis). The current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, prevention and treatment of certain intestinal and extraintestinal complications is reviewed. PMID:10690585

  6. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  7. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  8. Complications and Monitoring – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 11

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, W. H.; Jauch, K. W.; Parhofer, K.; Rittler, P.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to enteral or hypocaloric oral nutrition, the use of PN (parenteral nutrition) is not associated with increased mortality, overall frequency of complications, or longer length of hospital stay (LOS). The risk of PN complications (e.g. refeeding-syndrome, hyperglycaemia, bone demineralisation, catheter infections) can be minimised by carefully monitoring patients and the use of nutrition support teams particularly during long-term PN. Occuring complications are e.g. the refeeding-syndrome in patients suffering from severe malnutrition with the initiation of refeeding or metabolic, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycaemia, osteomalacia and osteoporosis, and hepatic complications including fatty liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis, cholecystitis, and cholelithiasis. Efficient monitoring in all types of PN can result in reduced PN-associated complications and reduced costs. Water and electrolyte balance, blood sugar, and cardiovascular function should regularly be monitored during PN. Regular checks of serum electrolytes and triglycerides as well as additional monitoring measures are necessary in patients with altered renal function, electrolyte-free substrate intake, lipid infusions, and in intensive care patients. The metabolic monitoring of patients under long-term PN should be carried out according to standardised procedures. Monitoring metabolic determinants of bone metabolism is particularly important in patients receiving long-term PN. Markers of intermediary, electrolyte and trace element metabolism require regular checks. PMID:20049074

  9. Complications and monitoring - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 11.

    PubMed

    Hartl, W H; Jauch, K W; Parhofer, K; Rittler, P

    2009-11-18

    Compared to enteral or hypocaloric oral nutrition, the use of PN (parenteral nutrition) is not associated with increased mortality, overall frequency of complications, or longer length of hospital stay (LOS). The risk of PN complications (e.g. refeeding-syndrome, hyperglycaemia, bone demineralisation, catheter infections) can be minimised by carefully monitoring patients and the use of nutrition support teams particularly during long-term PN. Occuring complications are e.g. the refeeding-syndrome in patients suffering from severe malnutrition with the initiation of refeeding or metabolic, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycaemia, osteomalacia and osteoporosis, and hepatic complications including fatty liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis, cholecystitis, and cholelithiasis. Efficient monitoring in all types of PN can result in reduced PN-associated complications and reduced costs. Water and electrolyte balance, blood sugar, and cardiovascular function should regularly be monitored during PN. Regular checks of serum electrolytes and triglycerides as well as additional monitoring measures are necessary in patients with altered renal function, electrolyte-free substrate intake, lipid infusions, and in intensive care patients. The metabolic monitoring of patients under long-term PN should be carried out according to standardised procedures. Monitoring metabolic determinants of bone metabolism is particularly important in patients receiving long-term PN. Markers of intermediary, electrolyte and trace element metabolism require regular checks.

  10. [Metabolic syndrome--psychosomatic associations].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, D B; Rapoport, S I

    2008-01-01

    According to epidemiological investigations data, 10 to 35% of all population suffers from metabolic syndrome. However, until now, in spite of researches, metabolic syndrome remains little-studied complex problem. The aim of the review is summarized analysis of the researches results, going out the limits of internal diseases clinics and reflecting more complicated, psychosomatic mechanisms of the syndrome development. The data of literature indicate the row of patterns in development of psyche and metabolic processes disturbances. Analysis of various directions in study of metabolic syndrome with concomitant mental disturbances is represented in the article. The authors propose to perform further investigation subject to "multisectorality" of the disease, marking out prevailing mechanisms of development of metabolic syndrome subject to somatic and mental factors. PMID:18368784

  11. [Practical update of Tsaktubo syndrome].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Martínez-Losas, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, apical ballooning or «broken heart» syndrome, is a growing diagnostic entity which clinically mimics an acute coronary syndrome. Included into the stress cardiomyopathy group of cardiopathies, this condition is characterized by the absence of potentially responsible coronary lesions, while displaying a transient abnormal ventricular motion, usually affecting various coronary territories. It is generally observed in postmenopausal women and frequently seen in the presence of a stressful situation, both physical and emotional. With a prevalence of 1.2% among patients undergoing a cardiac catheterization with a suspected diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes, Takotsubo syndrome usually has a good prognosis. However, complications can occur in the acute phase, generally heart failure, which can even lead to death. In this review we discuss the latest available information on this disease and present it in a practical and useful way for the attending physician.

  12. [Practical update of Tsaktubo syndrome].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Martínez-Losas, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, apical ballooning or «broken heart» syndrome, is a growing diagnostic entity which clinically mimics an acute coronary syndrome. Included into the stress cardiomyopathy group of cardiopathies, this condition is characterized by the absence of potentially responsible coronary lesions, while displaying a transient abnormal ventricular motion, usually affecting various coronary territories. It is generally observed in postmenopausal women and frequently seen in the presence of a stressful situation, both physical and emotional. With a prevalence of 1.2% among patients undergoing a cardiac catheterization with a suspected diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes, Takotsubo syndrome usually has a good prognosis. However, complications can occur in the acute phase, generally heart failure, which can even lead to death. In this review we discuss the latest available information on this disease and present it in a practical and useful way for the attending physician. PMID:26205669

  13. Ureteral Cannulation as a Complication of Urethral Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary catheterization is a common procedure, particularly among patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury. Urethral catheterization is associated with the well-recognized complications of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and limited genitourinary trauma. Unintentional ureteral cannulation represents a rare complication of urethral catheterization and has been previously described in only eight cases within the literature. We describe two cases of aberrant ureteral cannulation involving two patients with quadriplegia. These cases along with prior reports identify the spastic, insensate bladder and altered pelvic sensorium found in upper motor neuron syndromes as major risk factors for ureteral cannulation with a urinary catheter. PMID:25405021

  14. Nelson syndrome: definition and management.

    PubMed

    Barber, T M; Adams, E; Wass, J A H

    2014-01-01

    Nelson syndrome is an important complication of treatment with total bilateral adrenalectomy (TBA) for patients with refractory Cushing's disease. Although early cases of Nelson syndrome often presented with the clinical features of large sellar masses, the modern face of Nelson syndrome has changed primarily due to earlier detection (with highly resolved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sensitive ACTH assays) and greater awareness of the condition, resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality. Although lack of administration of neoadjuvant pituitary radiotherapy post-TBA surgery may predict future development of Nelson syndrome, other predictive factors remain controversial. Therefore, Nelson syndrome should be screened for closely and long-term in all patients with a history of Cushing's disease and TBA. The diagnosis of Nelson syndrome remains controversial, and the pathogenesis of this condition is incompletely understood. Current hypotheses include the "released negative feedback" mechansism (residual pituitary corticotropinoma cells are "released" from the negative feedback effects of cortisol following TBA), and the "aggressive corticotropinoma" mechanism (Nelson syndrome is most likely to develop in those patients with refractory treatments - including TBA - for an underlying aggressive corticotropinoma). Effective management of Nelson syndrome with pituitary surgery and radiotherapy is often a challenge. Other therapies (such as Gamma Knife surgery and temozolomide) play an important role and merit further research into their efficacy and placement in the management pathway of Nelson syndrome. PMID:25248597

  15. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  16. Carotid Stent Fracture from Stylocarotid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jeffrey D; Joyner, David A; Farley, Edward P; Khan, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a rare condition resulting from elongation of the temporal styloid process or calcification of its associated stylohyoid ligaments. Although usually presenting with pain or odynophagia, Eagle syndrome has been reported to cause a multitude of neurologic symptoms or vascular complications, some of which can be life-threatening. We present a case in which an endovascularly placed internal carotid artery stent in close proximity to a calcified stylohyoid ligament resulted in stent fracture with subsequent stent and vessel occlusion. We review and discuss the presentation, diagnosis, etiology, complications and treatment options of the syndrome. PMID:27761179

  17. Mind the Sump! – Diagnostic Challenge of a Rare Complication of Choledochoduodenostomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeuge, Ulf; Fehr, Martin; Meyenberger, Christa; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2014-01-01

    Sump syndrome is a rare long-term complication of side-to-side choledochoduodenostomy (CDD), a common surgical procedure in patients with biliary tract disease in the era before endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Frequently only pneumobilia, serving as sign for functioning biliary-enteric anastomosis, is reminiscent of the former surgery. We present the case of an 81-year-old patient with sump syndrome who presented with clinical signs of ascending cholangitis, decades after the initial CDD procedure. Finally the detailed medical history that was taken very thoroughly in combination with the presence of pneumobilia led to the suspicion of sump syndrome. Sump syndrome was diagnosed by ERCP, and after endoscopic debris extraction and antibiotic treatment the patient recovered quickly. In the ERCP era little is known about CDD and its long-term complications, especially by young colleagues and trainees. Therefore this report provides an excellent opportunity to refresh the knowledge and raise awareness for this syndrome. PMID:25520606

  18. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  19. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Ali; Al-Share, Bayan; Al Asad, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease. PMID:27478673

  20. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Al-Share, Bayan; Al Asad, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease. PMID:27478673

  1. Complications of hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Michael J; Solish, Nowell

    2009-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid filler use, user groups, and indications have expanded significantly in the past several years. This group of fillers is extremely safe in experienced hands. Complications are infrequent but can be devastating. There can be no substitution for recognized and specific training. Prompt recognition and proper treatment of serious complication can moderate and even prevent serious sequelae. This article describes the most frequent and serious complications, their prevention, and treatment.

  2. Constrictive pericarditis after lung transplantation: an under-recognized complication.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Wojtek; Cypel, Marcelo; Chen, Fengshi; Daniel, Lorretta; Chaparro, Cecilia; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2010-05-01

    Primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, and infection account for most of the early morbidity after lung transplantation, with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome accounting for most late morbidity. Mediastinal and pericardial complications, in the form of constriction, are not common. We present 4 patients with constrictive pericarditis after lung transplantation and recommend that constrictive pericarditis be considered in the differential diagnosis in lung transplant recipients who present with signs and symptoms of systemic and pulmonary venous congestion. PMID:20207169

  3. Purtscher-like retinopathy: A rare complication of peribulbar anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Siddharth; Saravanan, V R; Pereira, Merlyn

    2016-01-01

    Purtscher and Purtscher-like retinopathy is a distinctive retinal syndrome characterized by ischemic retinal whitening in a peripapillary pattern. We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy in a healthy 64-year-old man after a routine peribulbar anesthetic injection for cataract surgery. Although peribulbar anesthesia is considered to be a safer alternative to retrobulbar anesthesia, it has been associated with unusual but grave complications including central retinal artery occlusion. PMID:27488158

  4. The Internal-Candidate Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author explains the complications involved when an internal candidate is included in an open search for a leadership position in an academic institution. Internal-candidate syndrome is a dilemma faced by institutions when they have to choose between an internal candidate and an external one. There are two reasons why…

  5. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions caused by antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Rezakovic, Saida; Pastar, Zrinjka; Kostovic, Kresimir

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug antituberculosis regimen is associated with diverse clinical patterns of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR), ranging from mild and moderate such as pruritus, maculopapular exanthems, lichenoid eruptions, fixed drug eruptions and urticaria to severe and even life threatening ones like acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). These adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs are commonly observed adverse events. This is of particular importance for high HIV prevalence settings and developing countries where tuberculosis is common infection resulting in higher occurrence rate of these reactions. There is still significant heterogenity in definition and classification of CADR, as well as diversity in treatment modalities following adverse reactions and rechallenge management. The aim of this review is to discuss clinical presentation, occurrence of CADR caused by antituberculosis drugs, to identify risk factors for intolerance of the standard therapy as well as to draw attention to importance of multi-disciplinary approach, early detection, prompt diagnosis and in time management of antituberculosis drugs associated CADR. CADR can cause significant treatment interruption and alteration, resulting in increased risk of treatment failure, drug resistance, relapses and increased risk of complications including even lethal outcome. Finally, it can be concluded that it is of great importance to identify the best possible treatment and preventive regimens in order to enable continuity of the antituberculosis therapy to the full extent. PMID:25039910

  6. A case report with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Muschart, X

    2015-10-01

    Fitz-Hugh-Curtis (FHC) syndrome, also known as acute perihepatitis, was discovered in 1930 and is a rare disorder characterised by inflammation of the peritoneum and the tissues surrounding the liver. This syndrome can arise as a potential complication from a pelvic inflammatory disease caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. This syndrome is not well known in the medical community and is often underdiagnosed. In this case report, we revisit FHC syndrome, particularly its noninvasive diagnosis and complications. PMID:26743574

  7. Infectious complications in living related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, S; Tanaka, K; Fujita, S; Sano, K; Shirahase, I; Kato, H; Yamamoto, E; Inomata, Y; Ozawa, K

    1994-04-01

    During the last 31 months, 50 children between 3 months and 15 years of age have undergone living related liver transplantation (LRLT) for end-stage liver diseases (39 biliary atresia, 2 Budd-Chiari syndrome, 2 progressive intrahepatic cholestasis, 3 liver cirrhosis, 1 Wilson disease, 1 protoporphyria, 1 tyrosinemia, and 1 fulminant hepatitis). Combined FK-506 and low-dose steroids were routinely used for immunosuppression. There were seven deaths, two of which were related to infection (Candida pneumonia and Epstein-Barr virus [EBV]-associated lymphoproliferative syndrome [LPS]). Five patients had a bacterial infection, all of which were associated with surgical complications. Three patients had Candida infection, all of which were malnourished, had biliary atresia, and had been managed with prolonged antibiotics against obstinate ascending cholangitis. There were 14 symptomatic viral infections (1 herpes simplex virus, 1 herpes zoster virus, 5 cytomegalovirus [CMV], 6 EBV, and 1 EBV-associated LPS). Three of the five CMV infections appeared in patients whose graft was ABO-incompatible, who were managed with prophylactic OKT-3. Most of the viral infections (except 1 EBV-associated LPS) were minor and were treated successfully. The low incidence and successful treatment of CMV infection are related to the high compatibility and low incidence of allograft rejection in LRLT. Bacterial and fungal infections can be decreased by greater refinement of surgical technique and more aggressive preoperative management. Treatment of EBV infection is still an unsolved problem.

  8. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  9. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robin R.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonary, cerebral and cutaneous dysfunction and confirmed by the demonstration of arterial hypoxemia in the absence of other disorders. Treatment of fat embolism syndrome consists of general supportive measures, including splinting, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and the administration of oxygen. Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilatory assistance can be indicated. The role of corticosteroids remains controversial. Early stabilization of long bone fractures has been shown to decrease the incidence of pulmonary complications. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that the exact method of fracture fixation plays a minor role in the development of pulmonary dysfunction. As more is learned about the specifics of the various triggers for the development of fat embolism syndrome, it is hoped that the prospect of more specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of this disorder will become a reality. PMID:9336522

  10. Varicella complicated by scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Taner; Parlak, Ali Haydar; Kocabay, Kenan

    2003-10-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with varicella complicated by cellulitis and scarlet fever. He developed a typical rash of scarlet fever following the onset of varicella. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from the ulcers due to varicella. The present case suggests that scarlet fever may rarely develop following varicella and should be considered in children with complicated varicella.

  11. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  12. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  13. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  14. [Urinary complications after anorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Cristache, C; Popescu, R; Botea, F; Panait, L

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary complications after various anorectal operations was studied in a group of 273 patients. The overall prevalence of urinary complications was 26.7%; most of these complications affected men between 41 and 50, mainly after hemorrhoidectomy. In 10.6% of patients, bladder catheterization was needed. These urinary complications result from nervous reflexes originating from the anus and determined by the operative trauma and/or rectal distinction. In the treatment of these urinary complications, the role of the muses is essential for reassuring the patients. Parasympathomimetic drugs are often efficient. Urinary catheterization must be delayed until the 18th hour. Fluid restriction may be useful to prevent urinary retention. PMID:14870531

  15. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  16. Complications of the Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Delaney, Ruth; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure is an operation performed either arthroscopically or open for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, in the setting of glenoid bone loss; with good to excellent functional results. Despite excellent clinical results, the complication rates are reported between 15 and 30 %. Intraoperative complications such as graft malpositioning, neurovascular injury, and graft fracture can all be mitigated with meticulous surgical technique and understanding of the local anatomy. Nonunion and screw breakage are intermediate-term complications that occur in less than 5 % of patients. The long-term complications such as graft osteolysis are still an unsolved problem, and future research is required to understand the etiology and best treatment option. Recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure can be managed with iliac crest bone graft reconstruction of the anterior glenoid. Shoulder arthritis is another complication reported after the Latarjet procedure, which poses additional challenges to both the surgeon and patient.

  17. Emerging hepatic syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Gaetano; Privitera, Graziella; Purrello, Francesco; Demma, Shirin; Crisafulli, Emanuele; Spadaro, Luisa; Koukias, Nikolaos; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2016-10-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly due to complications of portal hypertension. In this article, we review the current understanding on the pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria and the available therapeutic options for patients with emerging hepatic syndromes in cirrhosis, namely the hepatorenal, hepato-adrenal and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The hepatorenal syndrome is a well-recognized complication of advanced cirrhosis and is usually associated with an accelerated course to death unless liver transplantation is performed. The hepatopulmonary syndrome is often missed in the evaluation of patients with cirrhosis; however, early recognition is essential for the efficient management of individual patients. The hepato-adrenal syndrome, although not fully characterized, offers an exciting field for research and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:27273018

  18. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Renal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Kyew; Park, Sung Kwang

    1987-01-01

    The coexistence of nephrotic syndrome and renal vein thrombosis has been of medical interest since Rayer’s description in 1840. Renal vein thrombosis has been underdiagnosed because of its variable clinical and radiological findings but it becomes a more frequently recognizable clinical entity since diagnosis can be easily established by modern angiographic techniques. Generally it has been believed that renal vein thrombosis may cause nephrotic syndrome. But recent articles strongly suggest that renal vein thrombosis is a complication of the nephrotic syndrome rather than a cause. We report three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with renal vein thrombosis. PMID:3154812

  19. Hyperbiliverdinemia in the bronze baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purcell, S M; Wians, F H; Ackerman, N B; Davis, B M

    1987-01-01

    The bronze baby syndrome is an unusual complication of phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in the neonate. The pigment or pigments responsible for the discoloration in this syndrome have not yet been identified. Suspected pigments include photodegradation products of bilirubin and copper-porphyrins. We present here the case of a neonate with bronze baby syndrome whose serum had increased spectral absorbance in the region of maximum absorbance for biliverdin. We suggest that biliverdin pigments may also contribute to the "bronze" color associated with this syndrome.

  20. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  1. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  2. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  3. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  5. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  6. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  7. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  8. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment: side effects and complications of fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2013-05-01

    Even skilled surgeons will have complications after antireflux surgery. Fortunately, the mortality is low (<1%) with laparoscopic surgery, immediate postoperative morbidity is uncommon (5%-20%), and conversion to an open operation is <2.5%. Common late postoperative complications include gas-bloat syndrome (up to 85%), dysphagia (10%-50%), diarrhea (18%-33%), and recurrent heartburn (10%-62%). Most of these complications improve during the 3-6 months after surgery. Dietary modifications, pharmacologic therapies, and esophageal dilation may be helpful. Failures after antireflux surgery usually occur within the first 2 years after the initial operation. They fall into 5 patterns: herniation of the fundoplication into the chest, slipped fundoplication, tight fundoplication, paraesophageal hernia, and malposition of the fundoplication. Reoperation rates range from 0%-15% and should be performed by experienced foregut surgeons.

  10. Complications of pneumoconiosis: radiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  11. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  12. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Roy, Swapan; Bhattyacharya, Sukanta; Pal, Priyankar; Dhar, Sandipan

    2011-11-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis) after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum). She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications. PMID:22345792

  13. Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome associated with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greco, M; Fiorillo, M A; Ribuffo, D; Corona, A; Vitagliano, T

    2010-07-01

    We present a clinical case of Melkersson-Rosenthal (M-R) syndrome associated with Down syndrome. No evidence of this association is described in the literature. We also present a technique for the macrocheilia treatment of lower lip caused by M-R syndrome in a patient with Down syndrome. This patient during pediatric age had many events of facial nerve paralysis and edematous episodes of lower lip with unknown etiology. This technique is based on a wedge full thickness central excision of the lower lip and on a transversal lozenge excision in the vermilion portion with orbicular muscle to reverse the chin-labial corner. The results are an agreeable aspect of the lip and physiological digestive and phonetic processes. The technique is safe and simple and the aesthetic functional result is very good. In our case, the postoperative complication is caused by an insufficient collaboration of the patient and it is solved in three weeks. PMID:20707255

  14. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  15. [Rare complication after stapled hemorrhoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Šuchá, R; Duchoň, R; Pinďák, D; Dolník, J

    2013-09-01

    Statistics show that more than half of the population suffers from hemorrhoids at different clinical stages. Only a small percentage of them (5 to 10%) require surgical treatment. The gold standard is open hemorrhoidectomy (most commonly Milligan-Morgan operation). Circular stapled hemorrhoidopexy by Longo is an alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy. The main advantages of this procedure are: less postoperative pain, earlier return to work and to social life. The complication rate is similar to open hemorrhoidectomy. This method, however, also brings new kinds of complications, some of them potentially life-threatening. Our case report presents one of these rare complications.

  16. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding.

  17. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  18. Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juneja, A; Sultan, A

    2011-12-01

    Sotos syndrome is a well-defined childhood overgrowth syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal overgrowth, developmental delay, advanced bone age, and a typical facial gestalt including macrodolichocephaly with frontal bossing, frontoparietal sparseness of hair, apparent hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, and facial flushing. This report presents a case of Sotos syndrome in a 5½-year-old child. PMID:22169837

  19. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  20. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...