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Sample records for stills disease complicated

  1. Cardiac tamponade: a life-threatening complication of Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Najam, F; Fuchs, H A

    2001-04-01

    Pericarditis, a common feature of adult-onset and juvenile-onset Still's disease, is rarely complicated by cardiac tamponade. We report one patient with juvenile-onset and another with adult-onset Still's disease presenting with pericardial tamponade. On the basis of our experience and analysis of literature, we suggest early identification of pericarditis and the life-threatening complication of tamponade, with institution of aggressive intervention with corticosteroids and, if necessary, pericardiocentesis and pericardial window formation. These cases remind physicians about the need to include Still's disease in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis and tamponade and to not neglect the potential of severe systemic inflammation to lead to fatal complications in this group of patients.

  2. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  3. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  4. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  5. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  6. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  7. Complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gasche, C

    2000-01-01

    Complications in inflammatory bowel disease determine the severity of disease as well as the complexities of medical or surgical treatment opportunities. Therefore, in known inflammatory bowel disease, the prevention, the early detection and the adequate therapeutic response to certain complications are important goals in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Disease complications are separated into intestinal and extraintestinal complications. Intestinal complications are somewhat disease specific, which means that they occur exclusively in either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (e.g., enteric fistulas are particularly found in Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon in ulcerative colitis). Most extraintestinal complications occur in both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., anemia, thromboembolic events or osteoporosis). The current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, prevention and treatment of certain intestinal and extraintestinal complications is reviewed. PMID:10690585

  8. Peyronie's Disease: Still a Surgical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Daniel; Ercole, Cesar E.; Hakky, Tariq S.; Kramer, Andrew; Carrion, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie's Disease (PD) remains a challenging and clinically significant morbid condition. Since its first description by François Gigot de la Peyronie, much of the treatment for PD remains nonstandardized. PD is characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques at the level of the tunica albuginea. Clinical manifestations include morphologic changes, such as curvatures and hourglass deformities. Here, we review the common surgical techniques for the management of patients with PD. PMID:22956943

  9. Respiratory Complication in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya S; Ansari, Sikandar; Fisher, Micah

    2016-07-01

    Cirrhosis, the twelfth leading cause of death, accounts for 1.1% of all deaths in the United States. Although there are multiple pulmonary complications associated with liver disease, the most important complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality are hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatic hydrothorax, and portopulmonary hypertension. Patients with cirrhosis who complain of dyspnea should be evaluated for these complications. This article reviews these complications. PMID:27339676

  10. Bartonella endocarditis mimicking adult Still's disease.

    PubMed

    De Clerck, K F; Van Offel, J F; Vlieghe, E; Van Marck, E; Stevens, W J

    2008-01-01

    We describe the case of a 39-year-old Caucasian woman who was admitted to the University Hospital of Antwerp with a clinical picture suggestive of adult Still's disease. Even though a transoesophageal echocardiography showed endocarditis of the aortic valve, blood cultures remained negative. Additional serological testing revealed a positive result for Bartonella henselae. Histology of the supraclavicular lymph node showed a reactive lymph node with a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Bartonella henselae. Prednisolone treatment was started in a dosage of 10 mg per day and rifampicin 600 mg/d in combination with doxycyclin 200 mg/d was given for 6 months. During therapy the patient gradually improved and signs of endocarditis disappeared on echocardiography. PMID:18714850

  11. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  12. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD.

  13. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  14. Periodontal disease and systemic complications.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Weidlich, Patricia; Musskopf, Marta Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health. PMID:23318743

  15. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  16. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-07-14

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  17. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  18. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  19. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  20. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    PubMed

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-10-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future. PMID:26795222

  1. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    PubMed

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-10-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future.

  2. Adult Celiac Disease and Its Malignant Complications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Adult celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disorder that has been estimated to affect up to 1-2% of the population in some nations. Awareness of the disease has increased, but still it remains markedly underdiagnosed. Celiac disease is a pathologically defined condition with several characteristic clinical scenarios that should lead the clinician to suspect its presence. Critical to diagnosis is a documented responsiveness to a gluten-free diet. After diagnosis and treatment, symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may recur and appear refractory to a gluten-free diet. Recurrent symptoms are most often due to poor diet compliance, a ubiquitous and unrecognized gluten source, an initially incorrect diagnosis, or an associated disease or complication of celiac disease. Some patients with persistent symptoms and biopsy-proven changes may not have celiac disease at all, instead suffering from a sprue-like intestinal disease, so-called unclassified sprue, which is a specific entity that does not appear to respond to a gluten-free diet. Some of these patients eventually prove to have an underlying malignant cause, particularly lymphoma. The risk of developing lymphoma and other malignancies is increased in celiac disease, especially if initially diagnosed in the elderly, or late in the clinical course of the disease. However, recent studies suggest that the risk of gastric and colon cancer is low. This has led to the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease may be protective, possibly due to impaired absorption and more rapid excretion of fat or fat-soluble agents, including hydrocarbons and other putative cocarcinogens, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:20431755

  3. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  4. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  5. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  6. Infantile haemangioma: a complicated disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2015-06-01

    Infantile haemangiomas (IH) are common benign vascular tumors of childhood. They are characterised by rapid growth during the first year of life and slow regression that is usually completed by 7-10 years of age. The underlying mechanism of action of IH is aberrant angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and involves the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. IH become a challenge if they are part of a syndrome, are located in certain areas of the body, or if complications develop. The beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising new candidate for first-line systemic therapy. This review focuses on the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and management of IH.

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity. PMID:12532043

  8. Adult-Onset Still's Disease: From Pathophysiology to Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Clio P.; Spyridakis, Evangelos G.; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting primarily young individuals. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. Given the lack of solid data in regard to the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms, treatment of AOSD has been for years largely empirical. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of several proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of new targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. PMID:22792508

  9. Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease Successfully Treated with Anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of Adult-Onset Still's disease (Still's disease). Whereas an increasing body of evidence supports interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade as a promising treatment for Still's disease, whether it is therapeutic for MAS associated with Still's disease remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old Caucasian man with one-decade history of TNF-blockade-responsive seronegative arthritis who presented with abrupt onset of fever, serositis, bicytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Striking hyperferritinemia was noted without evidence of infection, malignancy, or hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy. NK cells were undetectable in the peripheral blood, whereas soluble IL-2 receptor was elevated. His multiorgan disease resolved in association with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, Anakinra, and a tapering course of prednisone. This case reinforces the notion that Still's disease is inherently poised to manifest MAS as one of the clinical phenotypes by shedding light on the role of IL-1 underlying both Still's disease and related MAS.

  10. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  11. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  12. Complications of Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kofman, Oscar S.

    1983-01-01

    Despite several more effective combinations, the incidence of disability and intractable complications from levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease is unchanged. Many of these appear to be related to the development of denervation hypersensitivity as well as to drug tolerance and loss of effect. They include dyskinesia, `wearing off' phenomenon, `on-off' phenomenon, and various psychic changes. More current forms of therapy with bromocriptine and drug holidays are described, emphasizing methods of preventing and controlling the incapacitating complications associated with long term drug therapy. Some future therapeutic considerations are also described. PMID:21286582

  13. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; House, Andrew; Gorini, Antonio; Santoboni, Alberto; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death represent main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenesis includes close linkage between heart and kidneys and involves traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors. According to a well-established classification of cardiorenal syndrome, cardiovascular involvement in CKD is known as "type-4 cardiorenal syndrome" (chronic renocardiac). The following review makes an overview about epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular complications in CKD patients. PMID:25344016

  14. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  15. Alcohol and cardiovascular disease: still unresolved underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Roberto; Nocella, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic (ethanol-containing) beverages are consumed by most societies in the world. Low-to-moderate levels of ethanol consumption have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis. The decreased risk is likely due to alcohol's favorable pleiotropic effects on lipids, adhesion molecules, platelet activation and oxidative stress. However, there is also an abundance of clinical, experimental and epidemiological evidence showing that chronic high-dose ethanol consumption increases mortality, cardiovascular complications and also the progression of atherosclerosis. This last phenomenon appears to be due to the metabolism of ethanol, that leads to the formation of acetaldehyde, which is oxidized to acetate, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a toxic effect of ethanol on the formation of the atherosclerosis plaque. We will here briefly review the mechanisms through which high intakes of ethanol induce the formation of atherosclerotic plaque, focusing on increased oxidative stress as the main underlying mechanism.

  16. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  17. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  18. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

  19. Aluminium in Alzheimer's disease: are we still at a crossroad?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Anitha, S; Hegde, M L; Zecca, L; Garruto, R M; Ravid, R; Shankar, S K; Stein, R; Shanmugavelu, P; Jagannatha Rao, K S

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, an environmentally abundant non-redox trivalent cation has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the definite mechanism of aluminium toxicity in AD is not known. Evidence suggests that trace metal homeostasis plays a crucial role in the normal functioning of the brain, and any disturbance in it can exacerbate events associated with AD. The present paper reviews the scientific literature linking aluminium with AD. The focus is on aluminium levels in brain, region-specific and subcellular distribution, its relation to neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta, and other metals. A detailed mechanism of the role of aluminium in oxidative stress and cell death is highlighted. The importance of complex speciation chemistry of aluminium in relation to biology has been emphasized. The debatable role of aluminium in AD and the cross-talk between aluminium and genetic susceptibility are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded based on extensive literature that the neurotoxic effects of aluminium are beyond any doubt, and aluminium as a factor in AD cannot be discarded. However, whether aluminium is a sole factor in AD and whether it is a factor in all AD cases still needs to be understood.

  20. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    PubMed

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-10-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4(+) T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma.

  1. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  2. Levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: an old drug still going strong.

    PubMed

    Poewe, Werner; Antonini, Angelo; Zijlmans, Jan Cm; Burkhard, Pierre R; Vingerhoets, François

    2010-09-07

    After more than 40 years of clinical use, levodopa (LD) remains the gold standard of symptomatic efficacy in the drug treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Compared with other available dopaminergic therapies, dopamine replacement with LD is associated with the greatest improvement in motor function. Long-term treatment with LD is, however, often complicated by the development of various types of motor response oscillations over the day, as well as drug-induced dyskinesias. Motor fluctuations can be improved by the addition of drugs such as entacapone or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, which extend the half-life of levodopa or dopamine, respectively. However, dyskinesia control still represents a major challenge. As a result, many neurologists have become cautious when prescribing therapy with LD. This review summarizes the available evidence regarding the use of LD to treat PD and will also address the issue of LD delivery as a critical factor for the drug's propensity to induce motor complications.

  3. Thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis: an unusual complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Olushola; Mayooran, Nithiananthan; Iqbal, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis complicating Crohn's disease is a rare occurrence and mostly occurred in patients with Crohn's disease complicated by an abscess or fistulising disease. We report a case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis, occurring in a refractory Crohn's disease without contiguous abscess or fistula with the bowel. PMID:24916975

  4. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    .06-2.51), and small for gestational age (odds ratio, 4.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-20.08); no statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of preeclampsia (odds ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-6.70). The risk of preterm birth was still significantly higher both in the subgroup analysis of only women with diagnosed and treated celiac disease (odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.48) and in the subgroup analysis of only women with undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval; 1.06-5.87). Women with diagnosed and treated celiac disease had a significantly lower risk of the development of preterm birth, compared with undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.99). The individual participant data metaanalysis showed that women with celiac disease had a significantly higher risk of composite obstetric complications compared with control subjects (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.94). Our individual participant data concurs with the aggregate analysis for all the secondary outcomes. In summary, women with celiac disease had a significantly higher risk of the development of obstetric complications that included preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, low birthweight, and small for gestational age. Since the treatment with gluten-free diet leads to a significant decrease of preterm delivery, physicians should warn these women about the importance of a strict diet to improve obstetric outcomes. Future studies calculating cost-effectiveness of screening for celiac disease during pregnancy, which could be easily performed, economically and noninvasively, are needed. In addition, further studies are required to determine whether women with adverse pregnancy outcomes should be screened for celiac disease, particularly in countries where the prevalence is high.

  5. Yellow fever in China is still an imported disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-23

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease endemic to tropical regions of Africa and South America. A recent outbreak in Angola caused hundreds of deaths. Six cases of yellow fever imported from Angola were reported recently in China. This raised the question of whether it will spread in China and how it can be prevented. This article discusses the possibility of yellow fever transmission in China and the strategies to counter it.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease in Nigerians: still a rare diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Ukwenya, A Y; Ahmed, A; Odigie, V I; Mohammed, A

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been thought to have a low incidence among subSaharan Africans mainly because of the sporadic cases reported from the continent in comparison with the larger numbers reported from North America and Western European countries. Is this difference based on real demographic susceptibilities or a reflection of lower level of healthcare delivery? Three cases of ulcerative colitis and one case of Crohn's disease diagnosed in a tertiary institution in northern Nigeria in the span of three years are reported. Their presentation coincided with the creation of the Gastrointestinal Surgery Unit of our hospital and with it the availability of endoscopic diagnostic procedures. All four patients were indigenous Nigerians. Our findings suggest that IBD may be more common in this part of the world than previously thought. With an increased awareness of the disease in our population, a greater utilization of modern medicine as against alternative medicine and with wider availability of diagnostic tools in our hospitals, it is our guess that more cases may be found in the future to dispel the belief that Africans are somewhat immune to this affliction. PMID:21691027

  7. Crohn’s disease complicated by strictures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Remzi, Feza H; Sandborn, William J

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of strictures as a complication of Crohn’s disease is a significant clinical problem. No specific antifibrotic therapies are available. This systematic review comprehensively addresses the pathogenesis, epidemiology, prediction, diagnosis and therapy of this disease complication. We also provide specific recommendations for clinical practice and summarise areas that require future investigation. PMID:23626373

  8. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease, exposure to antiparkinsonian treatments and emotional reactions to having a disabling chronic illness. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the well-being of patients with Parkinson's disease and of their caregivers. Treatment is often efficacious but becomes a challenge in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. In this article, we review the key clinical features of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease as well as what is known about their epidemiologic characteristics, risk factors, pathophysiologic features and management. PMID:17146092

  9. Chest wall angiolipoma complicating von Recklinghausen disease.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruya; Takahashi, Koji; Fujinaga, Takuji

    2013-09-01

    We present the case of an 18-year-old man with chest wall angiolipoma and a medical history of von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis. The chest wall tumor was originally detected during an evaluation for chest pain. For diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, video-assisted thoracoscopic resection was performed, and the tumor was histopathologically confirmed to be an angiolipoma. Chest wall angiolipoma is exceptionally rare. Only two cases have been reported in the English literature, with no reports regarding chest wall angiolipoma in a patient with von Recklinghausen disease.

  10. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  11. [Natural history, complications, safety and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, María

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2015 (DDW 2015) on the natural history, complications, and safety of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as novel findings on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. The present article reviews presentations on the natural history of IBD, the risk of complications and their prevention, treatment safety, aspects related to fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding, as well as the risk of cancer and its association with IBD and with drugs used in its treatment. In the next few years, more data will become available on treatment safety and the possible complications that can develop in IBD patients due to the disease itself and the drugs employed in its treatment, which will allow measures to be adopted to improve prognosis. PMID:26520193

  12. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  13. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities.

  14. A matched case-control study of toxoplasmosis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: still a devastating complication.

    PubMed

    Conrad, A; Le Maréchal, M; Dupont, D; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Balsat, M; Labussière-Wallet, H; Barraco, F; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Gilis, L; Chidiac, C; Ferry, T; Wallet, F; Rabodonirina, M; Salles, G; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis (TXP) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Little is known about the risk factors and there is no consensus on prophylactic measures. To investigate the risk factors, we conducted a single-centre, retrospective matched case-control study among adults who underwent AHSCT from January 2006 to March 2015 in our hospital. TXP cases were identified from the prospectively maintained hospital's database. The 1:2 control population consisted of the two patients who received an AHSCT immediately before and after each case with similar donor relationship (related, unrelated) but who did not develop TXP. Risk factors were identified by conditional logistic regression. Clinical features and outcome of TXP were examined. Twenty-three (3.9%) cases of TXP (20 diseases, three infections) were identified among 588 AHSCT recipients. Twenty (87%) cases had a positive pre-transplant Toxoplasma gondii serology. In comparison with 46 matched control patients, risk factors were the absence of effective anti-Toxoplasma prophylaxis (odds ratio (OR) 11.95; 95% CI 3.04-46.88; p <0.001), high-grade (III-IV) acute graft-versus-host-disease (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.04-9.23; p 0.042) and receipt of the tumour necrosis factor-α blocker etanercept (OR 12.02; 95% CI 1.33-108.6; p 0.027). Mortality attributable to TXP was 43.5% (n = 10). Non-relapse mortality rates during the study period of cases and controls were 69.6% (n = 16) and 17.4% (n = 8), respectively. Lung involvement was the dominant clinical feature (n = 14). Two cases were associated with graft failure, one preceded by haemophagocytic syndrome. Given TXP-related morbidity and attributable mortality, anti-Toxoplasma prophylaxis is essential for optimized management of seropositive AHSCT recipients. PMID:27172809

  15. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  16. Chronic Chagas disease with advanced cardiac complications in Japan: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kazuo; Maeda, Takuya; Sayama, Yusuke; Osa, Morichika; Mikita, Kei; Kurane, Ichiro; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko; Miura, Sachio

    2015-10-01

    Due to the unprecedented recent increases in global migration, Chagas disease has become a global health threat and its epidemiology has drastically changed. Here we describe the first case in Japan of benznidazole treatment for chronic Chagas disease characterized by advanced cardiac complications. A 55-year-old Japanese-Brazilian woman who had previously presented with chronic heart failure was diagnosed as having Chagas disease and treated with benznidazole to prevent aggravation of her cardiac complications. However, benznidazole administration was stopped on day 56 due to severe drug-induced peripheral neuritis. Sixteen months later, her serologic test for Trypanosoma cruzi is still positive and she is being followed regularly by cardiology. Despite an estimated prevalence of over 4000 cases in Japan, only a few cases of Chagas disease have been reported. A Medline search revealed only 7 cases identified between 1995 and 2014 in Japan: in 6 cases, complications of chronic Chagas disease were apparent at the time of presentation, and sudden death occurred in 2 of these cases due to cardiac complications. This clinical case and literature review re-emphasize the urgent need to establish a surveillance network and improve the diagnostic methods and treatment framework for Chagas disease in Japan.

  17. The end of the BSE saga: do we still need surveillance for human prion diseases?

    PubMed

    Budka, Herbert; Will, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The epidemics of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) related to BSE-infected food are coming to an end. The decline in concern about these diseases may invite complacency and questions whether surveillance for human prion diseases is still necessary. This article reviews the main points of surveillance and why it is still needed: animal sources for human prion infection other than BSE cannot be excluded; the potentially increasing circulation of prions between humans by blood, blood products and medical procedures; the prevalence of vCJD prion carriers in the UK; and the scientific study of prion diseases as paradigm for other neurodegenerative diseases with "prion-like" spread of pathological proteins. We conclude that continuation of detailed surveillance of human prion disorders would be prudent in view of all these points that deserve clarification. PMID:26715203

  18. Complications of Cardiac Catheterization in Structural Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko Eun; Seo, Yeon Jeong; An, Hyo Soon; Song, Young Hwan; Kwon, Bo Sang; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cardiac catheterization is used to diagnose structural heart disease (SHD) and perform transcatheter treatment. This study aimed to evaluate complications of cardiac catheterization and the associated risk factors in a tertiary center over 10 years. Subjects and Methods Total 2071 cardiac catheterizations performed at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital from January 2004 to December 2013 were included in this retrospective study. Results The overall complication, severe complication, and mortality rates were 16.2%, 1.15%, and 0.19%, respectively. The factors that significantly increased the risk of overall and severe complications were anticoagulant use before procedure (odds ratio [OR] 1.83, p=0.012 and OR 6.45, p<0.001, respectively), prothrombin time (OR 2.30, p<0.001 and OR 5.99, p<0.001, respectively), general anesthesia use during procedure (OR 1.84, p=0.014 and OR 5.31, p=0.015, respectively), and total procedure time (OR 1.01, p<0.001 and OR 1.02, p<0.001, respectively). Low body weight (OR 0.99, p=0.003), severe SHD (OR 1.37, p=0.012), repetitive procedures (OR 1.7, p=0.009), and total fluoroscopy time (OR 1.01, p=0.005) significantly increased the overall complication risk. High activated partial thromboplastin time (OR 1.04, p=0.001), intensive care unit admission state (OR 14.03, p<0.001), and concomitant electrophysiological study during procedure (OR 3.41, p=0.016) significantly increased severe complication risk. Conclusion Currently, the use of cardiac catheterization in SHD is increasing and becoming more complex; this could cause complications despite the preventive efforts. Careful patient selection for therapeutic catheterization and improved technique and management during the peri-procedural period are required to reduce complications. PMID:27014356

  19. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of these clinical disorders that involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestine may represent the initial clinical presentation of celiac disease. These disorders should be considered in patients with celiac disease who develop recurrent or refractory symptoms despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. Detection of collagenous disorders that affect the luminal mucosa of the stomach or intestinal tract may result in recognition of underlying celiac disease. PMID:21694821

  20. Extra intestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Marineaţă, Anca; Rezuş, Elena; Mihai, Cătălina; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), doesn't affect only the intestinal tract, but also involve other organs such as: eyes, skin, joints, liver and biliary tracts, kidneys, lungs, vascular system. It is difficult to differentiate the true extraintestinal manifestations from secondary extraintestinal complications. The pathogenetic autoimmune mechanisms include genetic susceptibility, antigenic display of autoantigen, aberrant self-recognition and immunopathogenetic autoantibodies against organ-specific cellular antigens shared by colon and extra-colonic organs. An important role is owned by microbes due to molecular mimicry. This paper reviews the frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25076688

  1. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  2. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  3. Preclinical models of Graves' disease and associated secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder which consists of two opposing clinical syndromes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' (hyperthyroidism) disease. Graves' disease is characterized by goiter, hyperthyroidism, and the orbital complication known as Graves' orbitopathy (GO), or thyroid eye disease. The hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of function of thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR), resulting from the production of agonist antibodies to the receptor. A variety of induced mouse models of Graves' disease have been developed over the past two decades, with some reproducible models leading to high disease incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism. However, none of the models show any signs of the orbital manifestation of GO. We have recently developed an experimental mouse model of GO induced by immunization of the plasmid encoded ligand binding domain of human TSHR cDNA by close field electroporation that recapitulates the orbital pathology in GO. As in human GO patients, immune mice with hyperthyroid or hypothyroid disease induced by anti-TSHR antibodies exhibited orbital pathology and chemosis, characterized by inflammation of orbital muscles and extensive adipogenesis leading to expansion of the orbital retrobulbar space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head region in immune mice showed a significant expansion of the orbital space, concurrent with proptosis. This review discusses the different strategies for developing mouse models in Graves' disease, with a particular focus on GO. Furthermore, it outlines how this new model will facilitate molecular investigations into pathophysiology of the orbital disease and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  4. The Still Divided Academy: How Competing Visions of Power, Politics, and Diversity Complicate the Mission of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Stanley; Kelly-Woessner, April; Woessner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    "The Still Divided Academy" is a wonderful examination of the academic community that shows their inner workings by addressing a broad range of issues including: academic politics, tenure, perceived and real political imbalance, academic freedom, and diversity. Administrators, professors, and students have very different priorities, values, and…

  5. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  6. Manifestations and complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae disease: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the annual number of reports on extrapulmonary symptoms during Mycoplasma (M.) pneumoniae disease has increased. Clinical and epidemiological data indicate that symptoms from the skin and mucous membranes, from the central nervous system, from the heart, and perhaps from other organs as well are not quite uncommon manifestations of M. pneumoniae disease. Reports on unusual courses of the disease have also accumulated, including cases of severe respiratory symptoms, sometimes seen in patients with underlying disease or with a concomitant viral infection. Serious extrapulmonary manifestations have been common in fatal cases of M. pneumoniae disease. Some observations and experimental data on these manifestations and on the possible pathogenic mechanisms are dealt with. The conclusion is that such mechanisms are still largely unknown. PMID:6433567

  7. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD.

  8. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD. PMID:27499690

  9. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD. PMID:27499690

  10. Overuse of Computed Tomography in Patients with Complicated Gallstone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Boyd, Casey A.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND When compared to ultrasound, computed tomography scans (CT) are more expensive, have significant radiation exposure, and have lower sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for patients with gallstone disease. METHODS We reviewed data on patients emergently admitted with complicated gallstone disease between 1/2005 and 5/2010. The use of CT and ultrasound imaging on admission was described. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors predicting receipt of CT. RESULTS 562 consecutive patients presented emergently with complicated gallstone disease. The mean age was 45 years. 72% of patients were female, 46% were white, and 41% were Hispanic. 72% of patients had an ultrasound during the initial evaluation and 41% had a CT. Both studies were performed in 25% of patients (n=141), while 16% (n=93) had CT only and 47% (n=259) had ultrasound only. CT was performed first in 67% of those who underwent both studies. Evening imaging (7pm–7am; OR=4.44, 95% CI 2.88–6.85), increased age (OR=1.14 per 5-year increase, 95% CI 1.07–1.21), leukocytosis (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.10–2.53), and hyperamylasemia (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.16–3.51) predicted receipt of CT. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates the overuse of CT in the evaluation of complicated gallstone disease. Evening imaging was the biggest predictor of CT use, suggesting that CT is performed not to clarify the diagnosis, but rather a surrogate for the indicated study. Surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained to perform right upper quadrant ultrasounds to avoid receipt of unnecessary studies in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:21862355

  11. Radiological manifestations of hydatid disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pooja; Prakash, Mahesh; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease (HD) is endemic in many parts of the world. HD can affect virtually any organ system in body and should be kept as differential diagnosis of cystic lesion. HD is mostly asymptomatic; however, it demonstrates a variety of characteristic imaging findings depending on the site of involvement, stage of growth, mass effect, complications, or hematogenous spread, which helps in diagnosis. Radiography, ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used imaging modalities. Radiography is helpful in chest and for demonstrating calcification. USG demonstrates characteristic findings such as cystic nature, daughter vesicles, membranes, septa, and hydatid sand. CT and MRI are modalities of choice for number, size, anatomic location, identification of local complications, and systemic spread. CT is, especially helpful for osseous involvement, and MRI is better for biliary and neurological involvement. Knowledge of these imaging findings helps in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:27722098

  12. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  13. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  14. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written.

  15. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications, and Functional Outcomes After Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single-institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); conformal methods were used in 36 after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1-18.9 years). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls 27), race (white 43), extent of resection (gross-total 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurologic, endocrine, and cognitive effects. Results: With a median follow-up time of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range, 0.2-23.2 years), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died of disease, and 1 of central nervous system necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients, and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult-to-control seizures. The average values for intelligence quotient and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion: RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods.

  16. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease: A STROBE-compliant case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971-2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases.Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non-PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort).AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD.PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  17. Neurologic Complications of HIV Disease and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Everall, Ivan; Ances, Beau; Bharti, Ajay; McCutchan, J. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Substantial work on the peripheral and central nervous system complications of HIV was presented at the 16th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Six studies of more than 4500 volunteers identified that distal sensory polyneuropathy remains common, ranging from 19% to 66%, with variation based on disease stage, type of antiretroviral therapy, age, and height. Eight studies of more than 2500 volunteers identified that neurocognitive disorders are also common, ranging from 25% to 69%, with variation based on stage of disease, antiretroviral use, diabetes mellitus, and coinfection with hepatitis viruses. Therapy-focused studies identified that resistance testing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived HIV may improve management of people with HIV-associated neurologic complications, that poorly penetrating antiretroviral therapy is associated with persistent low-level HIV RNA in CSF, and that efavirenz concentrations in CSF are low but in the therapeutic range in most individuals. Neuroimaging reports identified that people living with HIV had abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (gray matter atrophy, abnormal white matter), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (lower neuronal metabolites), and blood-oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (lower cerebral blood flow). Other important findings on the basic neuroscience of HIV and diagnosis and management of neurologic opportunistic infections are discussed. PMID:19401607

  18. Pregnancy Complicated by Gorham–Stout Disease and Refractory Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Hellyer, Jessica; Oliver-Allen, Hunter; Shafiq, Majid; Tolani, Alisha; Druzin, Maurice; Jeng, Michael; Rockson, Stanley; Lowsky, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gorham–Stout Disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of bony destruction due to lymphangiomatosis, and is often triggered by hormones. One complication of GSD is the development of chylothorax, which carries a high mortality rate. Very little experience has been published to guide management in GSD during pregnancy to optimize both fetal and maternal health. Case Study A 20-year-old woman with known GSD presented with shortness of breath at 18 weeks of pregnancy, due to bilateral chylothoraces which required daily drainage. To minimize chylous fluid formation, she was placed on bowel rest with total parenteral nutrition (limiting lipid intake) and received octreotide to decrease splanchnic blood flow and chylous fluid drainage. Treatment options were limited due to her pregnancy. Twice daily home chest tube drainage of a single lung cavity, total parenteral nutrition, octreotide, and albumin infusions allowed successful delivery of a healthy 37 weeks' gestation infant by cesarean delivery. Discussion This case illustrates the management of a rare clinical disease of bone resorption and lymphangiomatosis complicated by bilateral, refractory chylothoraces, triggered by pregnancy, in whom treatment options are limited, and the need for a multidisciplinary health care team to ensure successful maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:27708981

  19. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eri; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  20. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  1. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS.

  2. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. PMID:27000538

  3. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann’s procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  4. Managing complicated Crohn's disease in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaz; Baldassano, Robert N; Mamula, Petar

    2005-12-01

    The natural history of Crohn's disease is characterized by recurrent exacerbations. A small, but significant, number of pediatric patients with Crohn's disease are resistant to standard medical therapies. The goal of therapy in pediatric patients is not only to achieve and maintain clinical remission, but also to promote growth, development and improve quality of life. All of this needs to be achieved within a relatively short window of opportunity, before growth and development deficiencies become permanent. The standard therapy for pediatric patients with Crohn's disease consists of 5-aminosalicylic-acid compounds, antibiotics and enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition has an excellent adverse-effect profile and, in addition to its therapeutic effect, positively impacts growth and nutritional status. Immunomodulating medications, such as azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, are frequently used to maintain remission, and to treat corticosteroid-dependent and perianal disease. Recently, biologic treatment with the anti-tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha antibody infliximab has dramatically changed the therapeutic approach. The long-term safety of this therapy still needs to be established. Limited data are available on other biologic therapies, which, at this point in time, are considered experimental and are only available through clinical trials.

  5. Orbital complications in children: differential diagnosis of a challenging disease.

    PubMed

    Welkoborsky, Hans-J; Graß, Sylvia; Deichmüller, Cordula; Bertram, Oliver; Hinni, Michael L

    2015-05-01

    improve or worsening of clinical symptoms during 24 h of therapy, signs for subperiostal abscess in CT scan, and/or vision loss. Patients with infectous orbital complications had fever, elevated CRP and white blood cell counts. This symptom complex is key in making the correct diagnosis. Interestingly, 61 % of patients in this study demonstrated non-sinusitis related diseases leading to acute orbital swelling, which also required prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. PMID:25056021

  6. Supradiaphragmatic early stage Hodgkin's disease: does mantle radiation therapy still have a role?

    PubMed

    Frezza, G; Barbieri, E; Zinzani, P L; Babini, L; Tura, S

    1996-01-01

    Extended field radiation therapy represents the main therapeutic option in early stage Hodgkin's disease with favorable prognostic features. Its role however has recently been criticized, mainly due to the high incidence of late complications in irradiated tissues. Furthermore, surgical staging, which in the opinion of many is mandatory for proper selection of patients for radiotherapy alone, has a well-known morbidity, and splenectomy has been associated with a high risk of secondary leukemias. Lastly, the failure rate after radiotherapy only is not negligible and second-line treatment is not always successful. A review of our experience and of the recent literature has allowed us to refute these objections. The results of radiotherapy, when properly performed, are highly reliable and have been reproducible in many Institutions. Chemotherapy alone cannot yet be regarded as an alternative to radiotherapy in these patients since data reported on this issue are conflicting. Present knowledge regarding the relationship between clinical features and the risk of occult subdiaphragmatic spread allows patients with localized disease to be selected without surgical staging; the results of radiotherapy in clinically staged patients confirm this statement. Concern for the late effects in irradiated tissues is justified, and future efforts should be directed at reducing the toxicity of this treatment. Associating a short chemotherapy course with low-dose radiotherapy to involved sites could help to achieve this goal.

  7. Supradiaphragmatic early stage Hodgkin's disease: does mantle radiation therapy still have a role?

    PubMed

    Frezza, G; Barbieri, E; Zinzani, P L; Babini, L; Tura, S

    1996-01-01

    Extended field radiation therapy represents the main therapeutic option in early stage Hodgkin's disease with favorable prognostic features. Its role however has recently been criticized, mainly due to the high incidence of late complications in irradiated tissues. Furthermore, surgical staging, which in the opinion of many is mandatory for proper selection of patients for radiotherapy alone, has a well-known morbidity, and splenectomy has been associated with a high risk of secondary leukemias. Lastly, the failure rate after radiotherapy only is not negligible and second-line treatment is not always successful. A review of our experience and of the recent literature has allowed us to refute these objections. The results of radiotherapy, when properly performed, are highly reliable and have been reproducible in many Institutions. Chemotherapy alone cannot yet be regarded as an alternative to radiotherapy in these patients since data reported on this issue are conflicting. Present knowledge regarding the relationship between clinical features and the risk of occult subdiaphragmatic spread allows patients with localized disease to be selected without surgical staging; the results of radiotherapy in clinically staged patients confirm this statement. Concern for the late effects in irradiated tissues is justified, and future efforts should be directed at reducing the toxicity of this treatment. Associating a short chemotherapy course with low-dose radiotherapy to involved sites could help to achieve this goal. PMID:8641642

  8. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  9. The Genetic Link between Parkinson's Disease and the Kynurenine Pathway Is Still Missing.

    PubMed

    Török, Nóra; Török, Rita; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Klivényi, Péter; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is substantial evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the normal physiology of the brain and is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. We set out to investigate the potential roles in PD of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from one of the key enzymes of the KP, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). Methods. 105 unrelated, clinically definitive PD patients and 131 healthy controls were enrolled to investigate the possible effects of the different alleles of KMO. Fluorescently labeled TaqMan probes were used for allele discrimination. Results. None of the four investigated SNPs proved to be associated with PD or influenced the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions. The genetic link between the KP and PD is still missing. The investigated SNPs presumably do not appear to influence the function of KMO and probably do not contain binding sites for regulatory proteins of relevance in PD. This is the first study to assess the genetic background behind the biochemical alterations of the kynurenine pathway in PD, directing the attention to this previously unexamined field.

  10. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  11. Adult-onset Still's disease with myocarditis and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Rare manifestation with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devika; Jagani, Rajat; Mendonca, Satish; Rathi, Khushi Ram

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by fever, evanescent pink salmon rash, arthritis, and multiorgan involvement. Here, we report an unusual manifestation of AOSD in a 40-year-old male who presented to our hospital with pyrexia of unknown origin and rash of 3 weeks duration. All his serological investigations and imaging studies were unremarkable. He was fulfilling clinical and laboratory criteria as per Yamaguchi for AOSD and was managed for the same. Our patient did not respond well to the treatment, had a downhill course, and succumbed to his illness. Autopsy confirmed myocarditis and florid bone marrow reactive hemophagocytosis as the cause of his death. PMID:26960645

  12. Dengue is still an imported disease in China: a case study in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shaowei; Chen, Bin; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Zhicong; Di, Biao; Wang, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaobo; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus and its four serotypes (DENV 1-4) infect approximately 390 million people worldwide each year, with most cases in tropical and subtropical regions. Because of repeated introduction of DENV from epidemic regions and suitable weather conditions, many regions have shifted from hypo-endemicity to hyper-endemicity over recent decades. Since the first dengue outbreak in 1978, it is crucial to understand the current situation in China over nearly 40 years. The purpose of the study was to examine whether dengue in China was endemic or not, which is essential for relevant dengue control and prevention strategy implementation in China. The study, combining epidemiological characteristics of dengue from the disease notification system, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses, showed that all four serotypes had been detected in Guangzhou, China, which was dominated by DENV 1-2. The Maximum Likelihood tree analytic results showed that the virus detected in Guangzhou localized in different clades, except of virus of 2002 and 2003 clustered together. There existed the mutual introductions between Guangzhou and Southeast Asia. Most of the viruses were imported from Southeast Asia and the sources of outbreaks in Guangzhou mainly originated from Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The study indicates that dengue in China still remains as an imported disease, with the possibility of localization.

  13. GB Virus C/Hepatitis G Virus (GBV-C/HGV): still looking for a disease

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, M A; Soni, P N; York, D

    2000-01-01

    GB Virus C and Hepatitis G Virus (GBV-C/HGV) are positive, single-stranded flaviviruses. GBV-C and HGV are independent isolates of the same virus. Transmission via the blood-borne route is the commonest mode, although vertical and sexual transmission is well documented. GBV-C/HGV is distributed globally; its prevalence in the general population is 10 fold higher in African countries than in non-African countries. High prevalences of GBV-C/HGV have been found in subjects with frequent parenteral exposure and in groups at high risk of exposure to blood and blood products. The clinical significance of human infection with GBV-C/HGV is currently unclear. The virus can establish both acute and chronic infection and appears to be sensitive to interferon. Only some 12–15% of chronic Non-A, B, C hepatitis cases are infected with GBV-C/HGV. A direct association with liver pathology is still lacking and it is not yet clear as to whether GBV-C/HGV is indeed a hepatotropic virus. Current evidence suggests that the spectrum of association of GBV-C/HGV infection with extrahepatic diseases ranges from haematalogical diseases, aplastic anaemia, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive idiopathic thrombocytopenia and thalassemia, through to common variable immune deficiency and cryoglobunemia. PMID:11168678

  14. [Periodontal disease and occlusal trauma: a still debated controversy? A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Sbordone, L; Bortolaia, C

    2002-03-01

    In the "Glossary of Periodontics Terms" written by the American Academy of Periodontology, the occlusal trauma is defined as "an injury to the attachment apparatus as a result of excessive occlusal forces". Nowadays, the effects of occlusal trauma on tooth support tissues, the onset and the progression of periodontal disease are still debated: many commonplaces have been disproved, but some doubts and not yet clear points remain, even owing to the difficult diagnosis of the presence and the real clinical impact of a traumatic occlusion. Then, ethical reasons prevent researchers from prospective clinical trials. At the beginning of the last century occlusal trauma has been supposed to be an etiologic factor of "alveolar pyorrhea", but several studies attending more strict scientific criteria failed to prove such correlation. On the basis of the bacterial genesis of periodontal disease, researchers started evaluating the possible effects of occlusal discrepancies on incidence, progression and treatment outcomes of periodontitis, but all the results underlined the more relevant role played by micro-organisms. The present review of the literature runs through this controversy again, analysing the most significant studies published.

  15. Neurologic Complications of HIV Disease and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Ances, Beau M.; McCutchan, J. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Findings on the nervous system complications of HIV disease and their impact on people living with HIV continue to accumulate. New reports at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this year confirmed that HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are common, even among effectively treated individuals. Risk of HAND correlated with nadir CD4+ cell counts and with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral loads that were at least as high as plasma viral loads. Other new data regarding risk factors for HAND implicated vascular disease, apolipoprotein E and mannose binding lectin genotypes, reduced resting cerebral blood flow, and HIV mutants that cause macrophages to shed the HIV gp120 protein. Two analyses linked worse neurocognitive performance to use of efavirenz, raising concerns about neurotoxicity. Analyses comparing differences in estimated distribution of antiretroviral drugs into the central nervous system (CNS) to neurocognitive outcomes using the 2008 version of the CNS penetration-effectiveness (CPE) ranking system did not support a hypothesis of neurotoxicity but did have mixed results, some supporting a benefit and some supporting no effect. Of note, a revised version of the CPE ranking system was presented that was more strongly associated with CSF viral loads than the 2008 version. Reports also estimated that primary CSF virologic failure occurs in 3% to 10% of treated individuals, although the clinical consequences of this remain uncertain. New data on common coinfections in people with HIV identified that a specific strain of Treponema pallidum may be more neurovirulent than other strains, that hepatitis C virus Core protein may be neurotoxic, and that hepatitis B virus may replicate in the nervous system. The extensive data presented will inform new research and clinical decisions in the coming year. PMID:20516524

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Cai-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Wang, Guo-Lin; Sun, Mei-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Xu, Liqin

    2015-12-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) has become useful for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory conditions, including rheumatic diseases, immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related disease and giant cell arteritis. However, few articles based on small sample sizes (n = 7) diagnosed as adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) have been published. The study aim was to observe the reliable characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD. Eligible patients were selected from among those who had undergone (18)F-FDG PET/CT between May 2007 and June 2014. Twenty-six consecutive AOSD patients were recruited retrospectively according to criteria set by Yamaguchi et al. All patients underwent evaluation by (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD were evaluated. All 26 patients had (18)F-FDG-avid lesion(s) related to their particular disease. Diffuse and homogeneous accumulation of (18)F-FDG was seen in the bone marrow (26/26; 100 %; maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax), 2.10-6.73) and spleen (25/26; 96.15 %). The SUVmax of affected lymph nodes was 1.3-9.53 (mean ± SD, 4.12 ± 2.24). The SUVmax and size factors (maximum diameter and areas) of affected lymph nodes were significantly different (P = 0.033 and P = 0.012, respectively). (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed the general distribution of (18)F-FDG accumulation. This factor helped to exclude malignant disease and aided the diagnosis of AOSD (42.3 %) in 11 cases when combined with clinical features and aided decisions regarding appropriate biopsy sites, such as the lymph nodes (n = 9) and bone marrow (n = 13). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is a unique imaging method for the assessment of metabolic activity throughout the body in subjects with AOSD. Characteristics or patterns of AOSD observed on (18)F-FDG PET/CT can be used for the

  17. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  18. Post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis and Legionnaires' disease in a patient with adult Still's disease during treatment with interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Legionellosis is a systemic disease that primarily affects the lungs. However, dysfunction in many organ systems, including the kidneys, has also been described. There are only a few reported cases of renal dysfunction in patients with legionellosis. Case presentation A 27-year-old Caucasian woman with known adult Still's disease was admitted to our hospital for community-acquired pneumonia, due to Legionella infection, with acute renal failure. Although her respiratory symptoms responded well to antibiotic treatment, her renal function worsened, with severe proteinuria and edema. A renal biopsy showed extracapillary and endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with accompanying chronic and acute interstitial nephritis. This was consistent with a post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis. After initiation of steroid therapy, her renal function improved. Additionally, therapy with diuretics and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor was initiated because of persistent proteinuria. Under this treatment regimen, her severe edema and proteinuria disappeared. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, there is only a handful of reported cases of post-infection glomerulonephritis with a nephrotic syndrome in a patient with legionellosis. Our findings suggest that, in patients with Legionnaires' disease with renal failure, post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis should be considered and steroid therapy may be an effective modality to treat the renal complication. PMID:21740588

  19. Is misery perfusion still a predictor of stroke in symptomatic major cerebral artery disease?

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kagawa, Shinya; Nishii, Ryuichi; Kudo, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kanji; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2012-08-01

    Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that misery perfusion is a predictor of subsequent stroke in medically treated patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease. A recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated no benefit of bypass surgery for such patients. In this light, outcome in patients with misery perfusion has regained interest. The purpose of this study was to determine whether misery perfusion is still a predictor of subsequent stroke despite recent improvements in medical treatment for secondary prevention of stroke, and if so, whether the predictive value of misery perfusion has changed in recent years. We prospectively studied 165 non-disabled patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive diseases who underwent positron emission tomography from 1999 to 2008. Misery perfusion was defined as decreased cerebral blood flow, increased oxygen extraction fraction and decreased ratio of cerebral blood flow to blood volume in the hemisphere supplied by the diseased artery. All patients were followed up for 2 years until stroke recurrence or death. Bypass surgery was performed in 19 of 35 patients with and 16 of 130 patients without misery perfusion. The 2-year incidence of ipsilateral ischaemic stroke was six and four patients with and without misery perfusion, including two and one after surgery, respectively (P < 0.002). Total strokes occurred in nine patients with misery perfusion and 12 patients without (P < 0.01). The relative risk conferred by misery perfusion in whole sample was 6.3 (95% confidence interval 1.7-22.4, P < 0.005) for ipsilateral ischaemic stroke and 3.5 (95% confidence interval 1.4-8.9, P < 0.01) for all strokes, while the respective values in medically treated patients were 12.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7-57.8, P < 0.005) and 4.7 (95% confidence interval 1.3-16.3, P < 0.02). The all-stroke incidence in patients entering the study from 2004 to 2008

  20. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: Late presentation is still the norm

    PubMed Central

    Adejumo, Oluseyi A.; Akinbodewa, Ayodeji A.; Okaka, Enajite I.; Alli, Oladimeji E.; Ibukun, Ifedayo F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem in Nigeria. Efforts are being geared toward early diagnosis and prevention of CKD. This study involved the evaluation of the referral pattern and mode of presentation of CKD patients at first contact in a tertiary health institution. Patients and Methods: Patients' records over an 18 month period were retrieved and the following information extracted: Sociodemographic data, referral hospital, mode of presentation, etiology of CKD, packed cell volume, blood pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at first presentation. Results: There were 202 CKD patients with a male: female ratio of 1.7:1 and a mean age of 48.15 ± 16.69 years. The median estimated GFR of the patients at presentation was 3.17 ml/min/1.73 m2. The common etiologies of CKD were chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obstructive nephropathy in 69 (34.2%), 47 (23.3%), 38 (18.8%), and 21 (10.4%) respectively. Among these patients, 111 (55%) and 98 (48.6%) had moderate to severe hypertension and anemia, respectively, 173 (85.6%) presented in CKD Stage 5, 101 (50%) required urgent hemodialysis whereas 123 (60.9%) required in-hospital admission. Only (18) 9% of these CKD patients presented by self-referral while (103) 51% were referred from secondary and private health facilities. Conclusion: Most Nigerian CKD patients still present very late to nephrologists implying that the present preventive strategies have not yielded desired results. Early diagnosis and referral of CKD patients could be better achieved through regular education of the public and retraining of health workers especially those in primary and secondary health institutions. PMID:27397961

  1. Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in the Prediction of Complicated Crohn's Disease Behavior – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Paul, Gisela; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Schleder, Stephan; Wolf, Alexandra; Kamm, Florian; Dirmeier, Andrea; Strauch, Ulrike; Obermeier, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Markers that predict the occurrence of a complicated disease behavior in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can permit a more aggressive therapeutic regimen for patients at risk. The aim of this cohort study was to test the blood levels of hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) for the prediction of complicated CD behavior and CD related surgery in an adult patient population. Methods Blood samples of 62 CD patients of the German Inflammatory Bowel Disease-network “Kompetenznetz CED” were tested for the levels of Hgb and Hct prior to the occurrence of complicated disease behavior or CD related surgery. The relation of these markers and clinical events was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and adjusted COX-proportional hazard regression models. Results The median follow-up time was 55.8 months. Of the 62 CD patients without any previous complication or surgery 34% developed a complication and/or underwent CD related surgery. Low Hgb or Hct levels were independent predictors of a shorter time to occurrence of the first complication or CD related surgery. This was true for early as well as late occurring complications. Stable low Hgb or Hct during serial follow-up measurements had a higher frequency of complications compared to patients with a stable normal Hgb or Hct, respectively. Conclusions Determination of Hgb or Hct in complication and surgery naïve CD patients might serve as an additional tool for the prediction of complicated disease behavior. PMID:25116048

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment: side effects and complications of fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2013-05-01

    Even skilled surgeons will have complications after antireflux surgery. Fortunately, the mortality is low (<1%) with laparoscopic surgery, immediate postoperative morbidity is uncommon (5%-20%), and conversion to an open operation is <2.5%. Common late postoperative complications include gas-bloat syndrome (up to 85%), dysphagia (10%-50%), diarrhea (18%-33%), and recurrent heartburn (10%-62%). Most of these complications improve during the 3-6 months after surgery. Dietary modifications, pharmacologic therapies, and esophageal dilation may be helpful. Failures after antireflux surgery usually occur within the first 2 years after the initial operation. They fall into 5 patterns: herniation of the fundoplication into the chest, slipped fundoplication, tight fundoplication, paraesophageal hernia, and malposition of the fundoplication. Reoperation rates range from 0%-15% and should be performed by experienced foregut surgeons.

  3. CT findings in complications of acquired renal cystic disease.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O; Miller, L R; Lichtman, J B

    1987-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with end-stage renal disease developed acquired renal cystic disease. The left kidney underwent tumorous degeneration necessitating nephrectomy. Eight months later acute hemorrhagic renal cyst rupture culminated in right nephrectomy.

  4. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  5. Painful muscle spasms complicating algodystrophy: central or peripheral disease?

    PubMed Central

    Robberecht, W; Van Hees, J; Adriaensen, H; Carton, H

    1988-01-01

    A 21 year old female patient developed Südeck's atrophy of the right foot secondary to a chronic Achilles tendinitis. The condition was complicated by the occurrence of painful muscle spasms in the right leg and incontinence of urine. The spasms had characteristics of both a tonic ambulatory foot response and a spinal flexor reflex. The movements disappeared during sleep. Regional anaesthesia of the right leg made the spasms disappear both in and outside the region of anaesthesia. Backaveraging of the EEG showed the involuntary spasms to be preceded by a cortical potential similar to a readiness potential, indicating a cortical potential similar to a readiness potential, indicating a cortical component in the pathophysiology of the muscle spasms complicating Südeck's atrophy. PMID:3379430

  6. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  7. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe.

  8. A case of Reiter's disease complicated by fulminating colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, P; Martin, M F; Brooks, S

    1982-01-01

    We describe a patient who, 6 months after the onset of Reiter's disease associated with a destructive peripheral arthritis and keratodermia blenorrhagica, developed fulminating colitis. The possible relationship between Reiter's disease and ulcerative colitis is discussed, and the need for further family studies to assess its validity is stressed. Images PMID:7073347

  9. [Legionnaires' disease complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: about a case].

    PubMed

    Bac, Arnaud; Ramadan, Ahmed Sabry; Youatou, Pierre; Mols, Pierre; Cerf, Dominique; Ngatchou, William

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial disease of the respiratory system caused by a gram-negative germ whose clinical manifestation can be benign limiting to flu-like syndrome or can be more severe being characterized by pneumonia which may be complicated by multisystem disease that can lead to death. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient with rhabdomyolysis complicated by acute renal failure following Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. We here highlight the pathophysiological aspects and treatment of this rare complication during Legionella infection. PMID:27642464

  10. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  11. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in infectious diseases: still a debate.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, F J; Mittermayr, M; Hoffmann, G; Schobersberger, W

    2001-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a central mediator of the endogenous response to infection and inflammation, is approved for use in the prevention of infection-related complications in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies during antineoplastic therapy associated with high risk of severe neutropenia. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor results in improvement of host defence paired with anti-inflammatory effects. There is evidence from animal and clinical studies that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor may also be beneficial in non-neutropenic infections. This review focuses mainly on the results of different animal and clinical studies of granulocyte colony stimulating factor used in the treatment of severe infections and sepsis.

  12. Genetic prediction of common diseases. Still no help for the clinical diabetologist!

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Sabrina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Pellegrini, Fabio; Doria, Alessandro; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with many common, multifactorial diseases which have been recently used to market genetic testing directly to the consumers. We here addressed the clinical utility of such GWAS-derived genetic information in predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients. In addition, the development of new statistical approaches, novel technologies of genome sequencing and ethical, legal and social aspects related to genetic testing have been also addressed. Available data clearly show that, similarly to what reported for most common diseases, genetic testing offered today by commercial companies cannot be used as predicting tools for T2DM and CAD, both in the general and in the diabetic population. Further studies taking into account the complex interaction between genes as well as between genetic and non genetic factors, including age, obesity and glycemic control which seem to modify genetic effects on the risk of T2DM and CAD, might mitigate such negative conclusions. Also, addressing the role of relatively rare variants by next-generation sequencing may help identify novel and strong genetic markers with an important role in genetic prediction. Finally, statistical tools concentrated on reclassifying patients might be a useful application of genetic information for predicting many common diseases. By now, prediction of such diseases, including those of interest for the clinical diabetologist, have to be pursued by using traditional clinical markers which perform well and are not costly. PMID:22819342

  13. Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease

    SciTech Connect

    Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

    1986-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

  14. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders. PMID:25455083

  15. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders.

  16. Kidney disease and related findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Kidney disease manifests clinically as elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or both, and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study tested whether intensive diabetes therapy (INT) aimed at lowering glucose concentrations as close as safely possible to the normal range reduces the risks of kidney disease and other diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the DCCT, 1,441 participants with T1D were randomly assigned to INT or conventional diabetes therapy (CON) for a mean duration of 6.5 years. Subsequently, participants have been followed for 18 years in the ongoing observational EDIC. Standardized longitudinal measurements of AER, estimated GFR, and blood pressure were made throughout the DCCT/EDIC. RESULTS During the DCCT, INT reduced the risks of incident microalbuminuria (AER ≥40 mg/24 h) and macroalbuminuria (AER ≥300 mg/24 h) by 39% (95% CI 21-52%) and 54% (29-74%), respectively. During EDIC years 1-8, participants previously assigned to DCCT INT continued to experience lower rates of incident microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, with risk reductions of 59% (39-73%) and 84% (67-92%), respectively. Beneficial effects of INT on the development of impaired GFR (sustained estimated GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and hypertension became evident during combined DCCT/EDIC follow-up, with risk reductions of 50% (18-69%) and 20% (6-21%), respectively, compared with CON. CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, INT resulted in clinically important, durable reductions in the risks of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, and hypertension.

  17. Risk Prediction of Cardiovascular Complications in Pregnant Women With Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luciana Carvalho; Freire, Claudia Maria Vilas; Capuruçu, Carolina Andrade Bragança; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rezende, Cezar Alencar de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart disease in pregnancy is the leading cause of non- obstetric maternal death. Few Brazilian studies have assessed the impact of heart disease during pregnancy. Objective To determine the risk factors associated with cardiovascular and neonatal complications. Methods We evaluated 132 pregnant women with heart disease at a High-Risk Pregnancy outpatient clinic, from January 2005 to July 2010. Variables that could influence the maternal-fetal outcome were selected: age, parity, smoking, etiology and severity of the disease, previous cardiac complications, cyanosis, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class > II, left ventricular dysfunction/obstruction, arrhythmia, drug treatment change, time of prenatal care beginning and number of prenatal visits. The maternal-fetal risk index, Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy (CARPREG), was retrospectively calculated at the beginning of prenatal care, and patients were stratified in its three risk categories. Results Rheumatic heart disease was the most prevalent (62.12%). The most frequent complications were heart failure (11.36%) and arrhythmias (6.82%). Factors associated with cardiovascular complications on multivariate analysis were: drug treatment change (p = 0.009), previous cardiac complications (p = 0.013) and NYHA class III on the first prenatal visit (p = 0.041). The cardiovascular complication rates were 15.22% in CARPREG 0, 16.42% in CARPREG 1, and 42.11% in CARPREG > 1, differing from those estimated by the original index: 5%, 27% and 75%, respectively. This sample had 26.36% of prematurity. Conclusion The cardiovascular complication risk factors in this population were drug treatment change, previous cardiac complications and NYHA class III at the beginning of prenatal care. The CARPREG index used in this sample composed mainly of patients with rheumatic heart disease overestimated the number of events in pregnant women classified as CARPREG 1 and > 1, and underestimated it in low-risk patients

  18. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come.

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  20. Motor and nonmotor complications in Parkinson's disease: an argument for continuous drug delivery?

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, K Ray; Rizos, Alexandra; Sethi, Kapil D

    2013-09-01

    The complications of long-term levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) include motor fluctuations, dyskinesias, and also nonmotor fluctuations-at least equally common, but less well appreciated-in autonomic, cognitive/psychiatric, and sensory symptoms. In seeking the pathophysiologic mechanisms, the leading hypothesis is that in the parkinsonian brain, intermittent, nonphysiological stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors destabilizes an already unstable system. Accordingly, a major goal of PD treatment in recent years has been the attainment of continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS)-or, less theoretically (and more clinically verifiable), continuous drug delivery (CDD). Improvements in the steadiness of the plasma profiles of various dopaminergic therapies may be a signal of progress. However, improvements in plasma profile do not necessarily translate into CDS, or even into CDD to the brain. Still, it is reassuring that clinical studies of approaches to CDD have generally been positive. Head-to-head comparative trials have often failed to uncover evidence favoring such approaches over an intermittent therapy. Nevertheless, the findings among recipients of subcutaneous apomorphine infusion or intrajejunal levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel suggest that nonmotor PD symptoms or complications may improve in tandem with motor improvement. In vivo receptor binding studies may help to determine the degree of CDS that a dopaminergic therapy can confer. This may be a necessary first step toward establishing whether CDS is, in fact, an important determinant of clinical efficacy. Certainly, the complexities of optimal PD management, and the rationale for an underlying strategy such as CDS or CDD, have not yet been thoroughly elucidated.

  1. Kawasaki shock syndrome complicating a recurrence of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Tissandier, Côme; Lang, Matthieu; Lusson, Jean René; Bœuf, Benoit; Merlin, Etienne; Dauphin, Claire

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of recurrent Kawasaki disease (KD) in a non-Asian 6-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with typical KD without cardiac involvement at age 3 years. He was admitted to the PICU 3 years later for heart failure, hypotension, and deterioration of his general condition. Ultrasonography revealed left ventricular dysfunction with a 44% ejection fraction and grade I mitral valve failure without coronary artery involvement. Subsequent observation of hyperemic conjunctiva, bilateral cervical adenopathies with erythematous skin (normal neck ultrasound and computed axial tomography findings), peeling of the fingertips at day 8 of the illness, and occurrence of an inflammatory syndrome led to a diagnosis of incomplete recurrent KD with a clinical picture of Kawasaki shock syndrome (KSS). Clinical improvement was rapidly obtained after intravenous immunoglobulin and intravenous corticosteroid therapy (30 mg/kg per day for 3 subsequent days). Left ventricular function gradually improved, with ultrasound returning to normal after 3 months. Diagnosis was difficult to establish because of the recurrence of the disease and the incomplete clinical picture, with clinical features of KSS. Physicians need to be aware of these pitfalls in the management of patients with clinical signs of KD. PMID:25384485

  2. The effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease.

    PubMed

    Lönnerfors, Celine; Reynisson, Petur; Geppert, Barbara; Persson, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The study objective was to assess the effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease. This is a retrospective cohort study. It is a Canadian Task Force classification II-2 study conducted at the University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were 949 women planned for robotic hysterectomy for malignant (75 %) and benign (25 %) gynecological disease between October 2005 and December 2013. They were continuously evaluated for the rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to 1-year post-surgery, the latter according to Clavien-Dindo classification following the introduction of robotic surgery with special awareness of complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors, the description of refinement of practice and assessment of the effect of these measures. The rate of intraoperative complications, the overall rate of complications and the rate of ≥grade 3 complications decreased from the first to the last time period (4.8 vs 2.6 %, p = 0.037, 34 vs 19 %, p = 0.003 and 13.5 vs 3.2 %, p = 0.0003, respectively). The rate of intraoperative complications and the rate of postoperative complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors was reduced from the first to the last time period (3.8 vs 0.6 %, p = 0.028 and 7.7 vs 1.5 %, p = 0.003, respectively). In patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease intraoperative and postoperative complications and complications possibly related to the robotic approach diminish with training, experience and refinement of practice. PMID:26530844

  3. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  5. Spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog with bronchopulmonary disease complicated by pyothorax and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Simone; Rocchi, Paola M.; Raiano, Vera; Diana, Daniela; Greci, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumopericardium is a rare condition consisting of pericardial gas in the absence of iatrogenic or traumatic causes; it has been described secondary to pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchopulmonary disease. This report describes a case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog presenting with dyspnea secondary to pyopneumothorax complicating a bronchopulmonary disease. PMID:25477548

  6. A case of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection with the rare complication of acquired angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I; Scott, G

    2014-06-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology, is a well-recognised complication of HIV disease. We present a case of MCD in an HIV-positive patient that is unusual on two counts: our patient's MCD first presented in the context of an immune restoration inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), following the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, her MCD was associated with the unusual complication of acquired angioedema (AAE), which resolved following treatment of the MCD. While AAE is frequently found to have an underlying diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disease, this is the first reported case linking AAE to MCD.

  7. Cerebrovascular complications in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    De Montalembert, M; Wang, W

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents were until recently responsible for much mortality and morbidity in children with sickle cell disease; the likelihood of a child with HbSS having a stroke was 11% before age 20 years, with a peak incidence of ischemic stroke between 2 and 5 years of age, and of hemorrhagic strokes between 20 and 29 years of age. Vessels occlusion is likely initiated by intimal proliferation and amplified by inflammation, excessive adhesion of cells to activated endothelium, hypercoagulable state, and vascular tone dysregulation. Silent infarcts may occur and are associated with decreased cognitive functions. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) was more recently demonstrated able to achieve early detection of the children at high risk for clinical strokes. A randomized study demonstrated that a first stroke may be prevented by monthly transfusion in children with abnormal TCD, leading to a recommendation for annual TCD screening of children aged between 2 and 16 years and monthly transfusion for those with abnormal results. In children who have had a first stroke, the risk of recurrence is more than 50% and is greatly reduced by chronic transfusion, although not completely abolished. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is indicated in children with cerebral vasculopathy who have an HLA-identical sibling.

  8. Supraesophageal complications of reflux disease and hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, P J

    2001-12-01

    A unifying theme of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increased acid exposure on vulnerable epithelia. In most cases, the vulnerable epithelium is the esophagus, but alternatively it may be that of the supraesophageal terrain, which includes the larynx, pharynx, and airways. In 50% to 94% of patients with GERD, hiatal hernia is a significant pathophysiologic factor. The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is anatomically and physiologically complex, making it vulnerable to dysfunction by several mechanisms, including transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), hypotensive LES, and anatomic disruption. The importance of hiatal hernia is obscured by imprecise use of the term and by the misconception that it is an all-or-none, one-dimensional phenomenon. Rather, hiatal hernia can be viewed as a continuum of progressive disruption of the EGJ, with larger hernias being of greater significance and invoking several pathogenetic mechanisms. The dynamic anatomy of the EGJ highlights the difficulty of defining hiatal hernia and of elucidating the relation between hiatal hernia, the diaphragmatic hiatus, the LES, and GERD, including supraesophageal reflux.

  9. Mast Cells are Important Modifiers of Autoimmune Disease: With so Much Evidence, Why is There Still Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Melissa A.; Hatfield, Julianne K.

    2012-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens, and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention. PMID:22701454

  10. Enteroscopy and radiology for the management of celiac disease complications: Time for a pragmatic roadmap.

    PubMed

    Branchi, Federica; Locatelli, Martina; Tomba, Carolina; Conte, Dario; Ferretti, Francesca; Elli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune enteropathy in Western countries, and is usually associated with a good response to the gluten free diet and an excellent prognosis. However, a minority of patients develop complications of the disease, such as refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and neoplastic complications such as adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. Neoplastic complications described in association with celiac disease have a high mortality rate, due to their aggressive behavior and to the usual advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, the detection of small bowel lesions has dramatically improved thank to the availability of highly performing radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The diagnostic delay of malignant complications in patients with celiac disease may be improved by establishing a pragmatic flowchart for the identification and follow up of "at risk" patients. We performed a comprehensive review of the articles published on this issue in order to promote a roadmap to be applied when facing with celiac patients with suspected small bowel complications.

  11. Impact of GOLD groups of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased postoperative complications. Recently, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classified COPD patients into four groups based on spirometry results and the severity of symptoms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of GOLD groups on postoperative complications. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of COPD patients who underwent preoperative spirometry between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We divided the patients into GOLD groups according to the results of spirometry and self-administered questionnaires that assessed the symptom severity and exacerbation history. GOLD groups, demographic characteristics, and operative conditions were analyzed. Results Among a total of 405 COPD patients, 70 (17.3%) patients experienced various postoperative complications, including infection, wound, or pulmonary complications. Thoracic surgery, upper abdominal surgery, general anesthesia, large estimated blood loss during surgery, and longer anesthesia time were significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Patients in high-risk group (GOLD groups C or D) had an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those in low-risk group (GOLD groups A or B). Conclusion COPD patients in GOLD groups representing a high exacerbation risk have an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those with low risk. PMID:26929613

  12. Cardiovascular complications in patients with end stage renal disease on maintenance haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sweety, S A; Arzu, J; Rahman, M; Salim, M A; Mahmood, M

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), National Institute of Kidney Diseases & Urology (NIKDU) and Kidney Foundation from July 2005 to June 2007 to find the cardiovascular complications in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Patients of both sexes with age ranging from 18-59 years and getting at least 8 hours of haemodialysis per week for the last 3 months were enrolled in the study. A total of 126 such patients were included in the study. Among 126 patients 77(61.1%) developed some types of cardiovascular complications. In terms of type of complications 63.6% of the patients had LVH, 23.4% had ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10.4% had congestive heart failure (CCF) and 2.6% cardiomyopathy. Over 96% patients were hypertensive, followed by 46.8% diabetics and 42.1% smokers. Presence of hypertension, diabetes, family history of diabetes and hypertension were observed to be significantly higher in patients who developed cardiovascular complications (p<0.05). It is deserved that cardiovascular complications (CVC) are very common in ESRD patients on maintenance haemodialysis (MHD). Poor control of blood pressure, low Haemoglobin level and poor glycaemic control are higher in ESRD patients on MHD and are possibly related to the development of cardiovascular complications. PMID:24858162

  13. Jejunal diverticular disease complicated by enteroliths: Report of two different presentations

    PubMed Central

    Chugay, Paul; Choi, John; Dong, Xiang Da

    2010-01-01

    Jejunal diverticula are quite rare. Furthermore, small bowel diverticular disease resulting in enteroliths can lead to complications necessitating surgical intervention. In this manuscript, we report two presentations of jejunal diverticulum with complications from enteroliths followed by a review of the literature. The first case was that of a 79-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and was found, on computed tomography (CT) scan, to have evidence of intestinal perforation. A laparotomy showed that he had perforated jejunal diverticulitis. The second case was that of an 89-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction. A laparotomy showed that she had an enterolith impacted in her jejunum in the presence of significant diverticular disease. Although a rare entity, familiarity with jejunal diverticular disease, its complications, and its management, should be part of every surgeon’s base of knowledge when considering abdominal pathology. PMID:21160831

  14. Pregnancy and the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Fertility, Treatment, Delivery, and Complications.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Ryan A; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-06-01

    For many women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the illness coincides with their childbearing years. IBD increases the risk of pregnancy complications and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multidisciplinary care team should emphasize the importance of medication adherence to achieve preconception disease control and maintain corticosteroid-free remission throughout pregnancy. Medication adjustments to reduce fetal exposure may be considered on an individualized basis in quiescent disease; however, any benefits of such adjustments remain theoretic and there is risk of worsening disease activity. Mode of delivery is determined by obstetric indications, except for women with active perianal disease who should consider cesarean delivery. PMID:27261899

  15. Beyond the definitions of the phenotypic complications of sickle cell disease: an update on management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Kesen, Muge R; Goldberg, Morton F; Lutty, Gerard A; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes.

  16. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  17. Systemic Complications of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: When the Liver Is Not an Innocent Bystander.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Ester; Marengo, Andrea; Mezzabotta, Lavinia; Bugianesi, Elisabetta

    2015-08-01

    The top three leading causes of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in descending order are cardiovascular disease, cancer, and liver disease. It is clear now that the increased risk of metabolic and macro- and microvascular complications in NAFLD stems from the associated features of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD itself may contribute to the spectrum of risk factors associated with insulin resistance. The primary focus of this review is to summarize the main systemic associations of NAFLD, as well as to discuss the mechanisms that link them to NAFLD. Hepatic lipid accumulation in NAFLD impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism further increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of cardiovascular disease, independently of established risk factors. The incidence, prevalence, and severity of these complications are proportional to the histological severity of liver damage suggesting that NAFLD, but particularly nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, can also contribute to the low-grade inflammatory state through the systemic release of several markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and of procoagulant factors. The clinical implication of these findings is that patients with NAFLD require a multidisciplinary evaluation, with a major focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease complications and may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for cardiovascular and kidney complications. PMID:26378641

  18. Current methods to diagnose the unresponsive and complicated forms of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Hadithi, M; Peña, A S

    2010-08-01

    Coeliac disease is a common disorder. Due to the protean manifestations of the disease and the often mild but indolent course, the diagnosis is often missed. The method to diagnose this in principle reversible disease after the introduction of a gluten-free diet has attracted the attention of several scientific disciplines to find the simplest and most patient-friendly test. This has resulted in a noticeable impact on the clinical practice next to a general increased awareness of its existence, its pathogenesis, its course and recent evidence of increased mortality. Amendments made in the diagnostic criteria of coeliac disease over the last half century have simplified the diagnosis. However, the aspect most relevant to the specialist in internal medicine is related to its grave consequences when the disease fails to respond to a gluten-free diet. These refractory cases may culminate in severe complications with sombre endings and malignancy. Fortunately, current technology can offer the specialist in internal medicine more facilities to diagnose the cause of the complicated cases in order to attempt to intervene in the course of disease and hopefully save these patients. We review the available tools that now exist and their indications that can be practiced in a modern clinical setting for the diagnosis of the complicated forms of this disease.

  19. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  20. Cardiovascular complications and risk of death in sickle-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-06-18

    In sickle-cell disease, a point mutation in the β-globin chain causes haemoglobin to polymerise within erythrocytes during deoxygenation, altering red blood cell rheology and causing haemolysis. Improvements in health infrastructure, preventive care, and clinical treatments have reduced the morbidity and mortality of sickle-cell disease in developed countries. However, as these patients live longer, the chronic effects of sustained haemolytic anaemia and episodic vaso-occlusive events drive the development of end-organ complications. Cardiopulmonary organ dysfunction and chronic kidney injury have a large effect on morbidity and premature mortality, and typically accelerate in the second decade of life. These processes culminate in the development of pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular diastolic heart disease, dysrhythmia, and sudden death. In this Series paper, we review the mechanisms, clinical features, and epidemiology of major cardiovascular complications in patients with sickle-cell disease and discuss how screening and intervention could reduce their incidence. PMID:27353687

  1. [Management of complications related to intraduodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, Diego; de Deus, Teresa; Lopez-Pazos, Elina; Macias-Arribi, Mercedes; Llaneza-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Echarri-Piudo, Ana; Carpintero, Pedro; de la Fuente-Fernandez, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Continuous infusion of intraduodenal levodopa/carbidopa is an effective treatment that improves the motor complications and the quality of life of patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. However, it is not free of complications. These may present in the post-operative period following surgery (gastrostomy) or in the long-term during the follow-up period and can be related with the medication (levodopa/carbidopa), the stoma, the gastrostomy or the device (pump, enteral tube, parts of the FREKA system). The aim of this review is to report on the management of the complications that can be observed in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated with continuous infusion of intraduodenal levodopa/carbidopa.

  2. Body Fat Composition Assessment Using Analytic Morphomics Predicts Infectious Complications After Bowel Resection in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Day, Nicholas M.; Bergmans, Carrie L.; Zahn, Katelin M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Su, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decisions between medical and surgical management of Crohn's disease (CD) incorporate risk assessments for potential complications of each therapy. Analytic morphomics is a novel method of image analysis providing quantifiable measurements of body tissue composition, characterizing body fat more comprehensively than body mass index alone. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with postoperative complications in CD, incorporating fat composition analysis using analytic morphomics. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of adults undergoing bowel resection for CD between 2004 and 2011 at a single center. Computed tomography obtained within 30 days prior to surgery underwent morphomic analysis for fat characterization. Postoperative infectious complications were defined as the need for a postoperative abdominal drain, intravenous antibiotics, or reoperation within 30 days. Bivariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression were used to generate a prediction model of infectious complications. Results: A total of 269 subjects met selection criteria; 27% incurred postoperative infectious complications. Bivariate analysis showed hemoglobin, albumin, surgical urgency, high-dose prednisone use, and subcutaneous-to-visceral fat volume distribution as predictors of complications. Body mass index, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapies, and immunomodulator use were not predictors of complication. Multivariate modeling demonstrated a c-statistic of 0.77 and a negative predictive value of 81.1% with surgical urgency (odds ratio = 2.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–6.02; P = 0.004), subcutaneous-to-visceral fat distribution (odds ratio = 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–3.19; P = 0.006), and hemoglobin (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.55–0.85; P = 0.001) as predictors of infectious complication. Conclusions: Fat subtype and distribution are predictive of postoperative infectious complications

  3. Clinicopathological study of Refsum's disease with particular reference to fatal complications.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, I V; Swallow, M; Nevin, N C; McCormick, D

    1978-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings in two brothers with biochemically diagnosed Refsum's disease are given. The pathology, in general, was that already described in this condition. An unusual complication in one case was the development of renal failure. Death was caused in the other by heart failure. Images PMID:77310

  4. [Prognostication of malignization and acute complications of gastric ulcer disease, using multiparametric neuronet clasterization].

    PubMed

    Dzyubanovskiy, I Ya; Selskiy, P R; Viytovych, L E

    2015-03-01

    Results of examination of 20 gastric ulcer disease patients were analyzed for delineation of a high risk group for an acute complications occurrence, and in whom the conduction of organ preserving preventive operative interventions is expedient. For prognostication such following indices were applied: quantity of cells-producents of various immunoglobulins, mitotic and apoptotic indices, relative volume of damaged epitheliocytes, the patients' age.

  5. Internal jugular vein thrombosis in Behcet’s disease: a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Muhammet; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Kimyon, Gezmis; Kisacik, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterised by oral/genital ulcers, ocular lesions, and gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological and major vessel involvements. Venous manifestations are more common than arterial involvements. In this case report, we present a patient with internal jugular vein thrombosis, which is a very rare complication of BD. PMID:25239979

  6. The clinical impact of MTHFR polymorphism on the vascular complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira Neto, F; Lourenço, D M; Noguti, M A E; Morelli, V M; Gil, I C P; Beltrão, A C S; Figueiredo, M S

    2006-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited diseases in the world and the patients present notorious clinical heterogeneity. It is known that patients with SCD present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises, but also during the steady state of the disease. We determined if the presence of the factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden), the prothrombin gene G20210A variant, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. We studied 53 patients with SCD (60% being women), 29 with SS (sickle cell anemia; 28 years, range: 13-52 years) and 24 with SC (sickle-hemoglobin C disease; 38.5 years, range: 17-72 years) hemoglobinopathy. Factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, and prothrombin G20210A variant were identified by PCR followed by further digestion of the PCR product with specific endonucleases. The following vascular complications were recorded: stroke, retinopathy, acute thoracic syndrome, and X-ray-documented avascular necrosis. Only one patient was heterozygous for factor V Leiden (1.8%) and there was no prothrombin G20210A variant. MTHFR 677TT polymorphism was detected in 1 patient (1.8%) and the heterozygous form 677TC was observed in 18 patients (34%, 9 with SS and 9 with SC disease), a prevalence similar to that reported by others. No association was detected between the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele and other genetic modulation factors, such as alpha-thalassemia, beta-globin gene haplotype and fetal hemoglobin. The presence of the MTHFR 677T allele was associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in SCD, although this association was not significant when each complication was considered separately. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a risk factor for vascular complications in SCD.

  7. Role of adipokines in atherosclerosis: interferences with cardiovascular complications in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications.

  8. Late-onset Pompe disease with complicated intracranial aneurysm: a Chinese case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Yuying; Liu, Junling; Li, Ling; Shan, Jingli; Zhao, Dandan; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease caused by genetic defects of acid maltase. This disease could be divided into two forms: infantile and late-onset, which mainly affect cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscle systems. Late-onset patients mainly show symptoms of skeletal muscle involvement, but recent reports have found that the central nervous system was also affected in some patients. Herein, we report a case of a female, adolescent-onset Pompe patient, who was diagnosed with complicated intracranial aneurysm in adulthood. PMID:27099502

  9. Late-onset Pompe disease with complicated intracranial aneurysm: a Chinese case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Yuying; Liu, Junling; Li, Ling; Shan, Jingli; Zhao, Dandan; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease caused by genetic defects of acid maltase. This disease could be divided into two forms: infantile and late-onset, which mainly affect cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscle systems. Late-onset patients mainly show symptoms of skeletal muscle involvement, but recent reports have found that the central nervous system was also affected in some patients. Herein, we report a case of a female, adolescent-onset Pompe patient, who was diagnosed with complicated intracranial aneurysm in adulthood. PMID:27099502

  10. Reduction of fatal complications from combined modality therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.M.; Canellos, G.P.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Hellman, S.

    1985-04-01

    A total of 464 pathologically staged IA through IIIB Hodgkin's disease patients were evaluated for the risk of developing acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or a fatal infection after treatment with radiation therapy (RT) alone, initial combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), or RT with MOPP administered at relapse. Patients received a standard six cycles of MOPP, and additional maintenance chemotherapy was not administered. Patients receiving total nodal irradiation (TNI) and MOPP chemotherapy have an 11. 9% actuarial risk of developing a fatal complication at ten years, as compared to a 0.8% risk for lesser field irradiation and MOPP. The risk with RT alone is 0.6%. Patients 40 years of age or older have a greater risk for complications. These data report a low risk for fatal complication with CMT when less than TNI is administered and when maintenance chemotherapy is not used.

  11. The relevance of hemodynamic factors to perioperative ischemic complications in childhood moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Iwama, T; Hashimoto, N; Yonekawa, Y

    1996-06-01

    Of 124 children younger than 15 years who underwent surgery for moyamoya disease, 21 (16.9%) experienced perioperative ischemic complications that could not be unequivocally attributed to the surgery. Eleven of the 21 patients experienced infarctions, and 10 experienced reversible ischemic neurological deficits without new lesions, as revealed by computed tomographic scans. An examination of the patients' perioperative clinical and laboratory data revealed that the mean values of intra- and postoperative minimum arterial carbon dioxide pressure, maximum arterial carbon dioxide pressure, and mean arterial pressure were similar in patients with and without ischemic complications. However, in patients with perioperative complications, the incidence of preoperative transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and intra- and postoperative hypercapnia (maximum arterial carbon dioxide pressure > 45 mm Hg) was significantly higher. In addition, 7 of the 11 perioperative infarctions occurred in patients with frequent preoperative TIAs and intra- and postoperative hypercapnia. Cerebral blood flow studies with preoperative acetazolamide loading showed that the new infarctions were located in areas in which the cerebral blood flow had been compromised. Our results suggest that the occurrence of frequent preoperative TIA is an important indicator of the instability of the cerebral hemodynamics and of the risk of perioperative ischemic complications. To prevent these complications, preoperative management aimed at stabilizing the hemodynamic status is very important. Children who have moyamoya disease and who experience frequent preoperative TIAs are at risk for ischemic brain damage caused by hypercapnia as well as hypocapnia and hypotension. The establishment and maintenance of normocapnia with normotension are highly desirable for the perioperative management of moyamoya disease in children.

  12. [FACTORIAL ANALYSIS IN PROGNOSTICATION OF INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS AFTER SIMULTANT OPERATIVE INTERVENTIONS FOR BILIARY CALCULOUS DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Avad, Ahl Shyrafi Mokhammed; Lutsenko, R V; Malyk, S V

    2016-03-01

    Prognostication of postoperative complications, having a certain high risk of occurrence in surgical treatment of biliary calculous disease, using laparoscopic and open access, peculiarly while performing simultant operative interventions, may promote the treatment efficacy rising in such patients. A multifactorial disperse analysis, using Statistica 6 for Windows (StatSoft), was applied for prognostication of risk for the infectious complications occurrence while a simultant operative interventions conduction for biliary calculous disease. The indices, which, in accordance to the pathophysiological processes character, may influence the postoperative complications occurrence rate, were analyzed. During conduction of this procedure, a great quantity of the parameters, which were determined in the patients, were transformed to a lesser quantity of independent causes. In the one cause a several variables were cojoined, which, as a rule, correlate with each other closely. On a subsequent stage a sum of the points of the prognosis causes for the risk of the postoperative purulent complications occurrence, as the points sum for the status severity and the operative intervention severity, were calculated. A prognostical validity of the algorithm proposed was tested in clinical conditions, its significance was estimated. PMID:27514087

  13. Prolonged remission state of refractory adult onset Still's disease following CD34-selected autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Dominici, M; Govoni, M; Moretti, S; Campioni, D; Corte, R L; Latorraca, A; Tieghi, A; Castagnari, B; Trotta, F; Castoldi, G

    2000-06-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient affected by refractory adult onset Still's disease who achieved a prolonged remission following CD34-selected ABMT. The conditioning regimen was based on the use of CY and anti-thymocyte globulin. A 3.0 and 2.0 log reduction of T (CD3+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes, respectively, was obtained using a Ceprate device to select CD34+ cells from PBSC. In the pre-transplant period (1994-1998) the patient had a chronic persistent disease course with frequent and recurrent systemic articular flares and loss of some functional abilities, despite daily prednisone, pulses of CY and immunosuppressive therapy (CYA or MTX). At the time of ABMT the patient had become non-ambulatory. Within 3 weeks of ABMT the patient showed a marked decrease in joint swelling, and morning stiffness. Joint pain and systemic symptoms disappeared, the patient was able to walk and run and gained general well being. ESR, C-reactive protein and WBC count were significantly decreased, while Hb level increased. This partial remission persisted for at least 1 year after ABMT, although at 15 months of follow-up a reappearance of moderate synovitis in the knees and wrists was noted. Our data further showed that both patient BM microenvironment and stem-progenitor cell function (as assessed by LTC-IC assay) were damaged even 1 year after CD34-selected ABMT, suggesting that the persistence of these alterations could have facilitated the favorable outcome of the disease following ABMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 1307-1310. PMID:10871738

  14. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically.

  15. The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson’s disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson’s disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and

  16. The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson's disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Cilia, Roberto; Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and

  17. [Prospects for improving the management tactics for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Trukhmanov, A S

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the new principles relative to adequate diagnosis, management tactics, and rational treatment regimens in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) complicated by the development of Barrett's esophagus. The paper contains up-to-date, mainly original information on the pathological physiology, clinical picture, and principles of diagnosis of this form of GERD. It outlines data on approaches to the early diagnosis and prevention of neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus, by taking into account recent advances in pharmacotherapy.

  18. Pelvic and perineal complications of Crohn's disease: assessment using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Haggett, P J; Moore, N R; Shearman, J D; Travis, S P; Jewell, D P; Mortensen, N J

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the demonstration of the pelvic and perianal complications of Crohn's disease. Twenty five patients with active Crohn's disease were studied (12 male; mean age 41.1 years). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5 Tesla system, within 14 days after clinical assessment. T1 and T2 weighted fast spin echo sequences in two or three orthogonal planes were performed, with fat suppression in some cases. The MRI results were correlated with surgical and clinical findings. In 16 patients, cutaneous, deep perineal or enterovesical fistulas or abscesses were diagnosed at MRI which showed close correlation with findings at examination under anaesthetic. In eight patients no fistulas or abscesses were seen at MRI nor was there any evidence of complications on clinical examination and flexible sigmoidoscopy. There was one false negative examination in a patient who had a colovesical fistula. In conclusion, MRI can accurately show the pelvic and perineal complications of Crohn's disease and may render examination under anaesthetic unnecessary. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7698701

  19. Oral and infusion levodopa-based strategies for managing motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Angelo; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Odin, Per

    2010-02-01

    Levodopa is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) signs and symptoms, and patients invariably will require it during the course of the disease. It also provides benefits in activities of daily living, quality of life and life expectancy. However, after a few years of levodopa treatment the majority of patients will experience motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Initial use of a dopamine receptor agonist may delay the emergence of motor fluctuations but at the cost of reduced symptomatic control compared with the use of levodopa in some cases. Adequate management of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia is essential to maintaining satisfactory quality of life at the advanced stage of disease. Various levodopa-based strategies are currently available that aim to control motor complications (wearing-off and dyskinesia) in PD and each approach has its own unique benefit and risk profile. Strategies such as dose fragmentation (smaller, more frequent dosing) or the use of orally administered, liquid levodopa formulations or melevodopa can reduce off-time intervals or facilitate absorption. More recently introduced, continuous delivery of dopaminergic medications may represent a more effective approach to treat motor complications in advanced PD and its effect can be perceived from improvement in clinical scales, as well as in health-related items. Indeed, continuous levodopa delivery by duodenal infusion may stabilize and significantly improve motor function as well as patients' quality of life. We propose a treatment algorithm that takes into account all currently available levodopa-based treatment strategies for motor complications in patients with PD.

  20. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  1. Behçet's disease complicated by pylephlebitis and hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Gelber, A C; Schachna, L; Mitchell, L; Schwartzman, G; Hartnell, G; Geschwind, J F

    2001-01-01

    A 22 year old man presented with fever, abdominal pain, weight loss and diarrhea. Past medical history revealed recurrent aseptic meningitis, uveitis, and erythema nodosum. Further inquiry unveiled a prominent history of oral aphthous ulcers; all features of Behçet's disease. Imaging revealed mesenteric arteritis and pylephlebitis, septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein, a previously unrecognized complication of Behçet's disease, with multiple intrahepatic abscesses. Portal venography demonstrated an extensively diseased, expanded, and obstructed portal venous system. Blood cultures and portal vein aspirate yielded polymicrobial flora. Percutaneous intraportal thrombolytic therapy and mechanical thrombectomy were attempted to restore flow to the portal venous system. This distinctly rare manifestation of Behçet's Disease, pylephlebitis, may result from ischemic injury and structural compromise of the bowel mucosa, resulting from underlying vasculitis.

  2. Tumour necrosis factor α blocking agents in refractory adult Still's disease: an observational study of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Fautrel, B; Sibilia, J; Mariette, X; Combe, B; the, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Consensus is lacking on treatment for corticosteroid resistant adult onset Still's disease (ASD). Objective: To assess anti-TNFα efficacy and tolerance in refractory ASD. Methods: All departments of rheumatology and internal medicine in France were contacted by mail to identify cases of refractory ASD for which anti-TNFα had been used. Medical information was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Results: Of 20 patients with mean age 40.7 years (range 18–74) at treatment start and mean disease duration 8.5 years (range 2–21), the clinical expression of ASD was predominantly systemic in five patients and polyarticular in 15. Response to corticosteroids and methotrexate had been considered inadequate in all patients. Infliximab was used to treat 15 patients, and etanercept used for 10; five had received both drugs consecutively. Steroids were concurrently used in 18 patients and an immunosuppressant in 17. At a mean (SD) follow up of 13 (14) months, complete remission had occurred in five cases (of 25 treatment sequences): one receiving etanercept and four infliximab. Partial response was observed in 16 cases (seven etanercept and nine infliximab). Treatment failed in four cases (two with each anti-TNFα). At the last visit, anti-TNFα therapy was discontinued in 17 cases, 11 times because of lack (or loss) of efficacy, four times because of a side effect, and twice for other reasons. Conclusion: Anti-TNFα therapy may be helpful for some patients with refractory ASD. However, most patients achieve only partial remission. Additional information is thus needed to evaluate more precisely the risk–benefit ratio of this treatment. PMID:15184196

  3. The French Gaucher’s disease registry: clinical characteristics, complications and treatment of 562 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical features, complications and treatments of Gaucher’s disease (GD), a rare autosomal–recessive disorder due to a confirmed lysosomal enzyme (glucocerebrosidase) deficiency, are described. Methods All patients with known GD, living in France, with ≥1 consultations (1980–2010), were included in the French GD registry, yielding the following 4 groups: the entire cohort, with clinical description; and its subgroups: patients with ≥1 follow-up visits, to investigate complications; recently followed (2009–2010) patients; and patients treated during 2009–2010, to examine complications before and during treatment. Data are expressed as medians (range) for continuous variables and numbers (%) for categorical variables. Results Among the 562 registry patients, 265 (49.6%) were females; 454 (85.0%) had type 1, 22 (4.1%) type 2, 37 (6.9%) perinatal–lethal type and 21 (3.9%) type 3. Median ages at first GD symptoms and diagnosis, respectively, were 15 (0–77) and 22 (0–84) years for all types. The first symptom diagnosing GD was splenomegaly and/or thrombocytopenia (37.6% and 26.3%, respectively). Bone-marrow aspiration and/or biopsy yielded the diagnosis for 54.7% of the patients, with enzyme deficiency confirming GD for all patients. Birth incidence rate was estimated at 1/50,000 and prevalence at 1/136,000. For the 378 followed patients, median follow-up was 16.2 (0.1–67.6) years. Major clinical complications were bone events (BE; avascular necrosis, bone infarct or pathological fracture) for 109 patients, splenectomy for 104, and Parkinson’s disease for 14; 38 patients died (neurological complications for 15 type-2 and 3 type-3 patients, GD complications for 11 type-1 and another disease for 9 type-1 patients). Forty-six had monoclonal gammopathy. Among 283 recently followed patients, 36 were untreated and 247 had been treated during 2009–2010; 216 patients received treatment in December 2010 (126 with imiglucerase, 45

  4. Inherited DNA mutations contributing to thrombotic complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, S A; Ware, R E

    1998-12-01

    Thrombosis may play an important role in the pathophysiology of certain complications of sickle cell disease (SCD), including stroke and avascular necrosis (AVN). Currently there is no laboratory or clinical parameter that can identify patients who are at highest risk of developing these thrombotic complications. We hypothesized that some patients with SCD have an inherited hypercoagulable state that results in an increased risk of developing stroke or AVN. We examined the role of two common inherited thrombophilic mutations that, in other populations, have been associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and are amenable to screening with DNA restriction enzyme analysis. The C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the C1565T mutation in the platelet glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) gene were evaluated. We analyzed genomic DNA from 86 children and adults with SCD, including 16 patients with a history of a clinical stroke and 14 patients with AVN, for the presence of these mutations. The C677T MTHFR mutation was found in 19% of patients with stroke, 14% of patients with AVN, and 14% of patients with neither complication (P = NS). The C1565T GPIIIa mutation was found in 25% of patients with stroke, 14% of patients with AVN, and 18% of patients with neither complication (P = NS). Although each of these mutations is relatively common in patients with SCD, neither is independently associated with an increased risk of developing stroke or AVN. PMID:9840906

  5. Severe multivalvular heart disease: a new complication of the ergot derivative dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Judit; Fross, Robin D; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Lerch, René; Stalder, Hans; Liaudat, Suzanne; Raskoff, William J; Flachsbart, Keith D; Rakowski, Harry; Pache, Jean-Claude; Burkhard, Pierre R; Lang, Anthony E

    2004-06-01

    We report on 4 new cases of valvular heart disease in Parkinson's disease patients treated with the ergot derivative dopamine agonists pergolide and cabergoline. Noninflammatory fibrotic degeneration of cardiac valves has been reported to occur in patients with carcinoid syndrome and to occasionally complicate therapies with the anti-migraine ergot alkaloid ergotamine and methysergide and with the appetite suppressants fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine. In these cases, the pathogenesis is suspected to involve serotonin-mediated abnormal fibrogenesis by means of the 5-HT2B receptors, which are expressed in the fibroblasts of heart valves. Based on strikingly similar echocardiographic and histopathological features, we strongly suspect that ergot-derived dopamine agonists may cause a valvular heart disease nearly identical to that seen in those conditions. These cases add to a rapidly growing and worrying list of similar published reports, suggesting that we may well be facing a novel, yet unrecognized, complication of this class of agents, which are widely used not only in Parkinson's disease but also in restless legs syndrome and various common endocrine dysfunctions. Therefore, until more is known about the true prevalence of this side effect, we propose that an assessment of cardiac function be performed before and in the course of a long-term therapy with ergot derivative dopamine agonists.

  6. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  7. 1H NMR metabonomics approach to the disease continuum of diabetic complications and premature death.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Soininen, Pasi; Forsblom, Carol; Parkkonen, Maija; Ingman, Petri; Kaski, Kimmo; Groop, Per-Henrik; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2008-01-01

    Subtle metabolic changes precede and accompany chronic vascular complications, which are the primary causes of premature death in diabetes. To obtain a multimetabolite characterization of these high-risk individuals, we measured proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) data from the serum of 613 patients with type I diabetes and a diverse spread of complications. We developed a new metabonomics framework to visualize and interpret the data and to link the metabolic profiles to the underlying diagnostic and biochemical variables. Our results indicate complex interactions between diabetic kidney disease, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We illustrate how a single 1H NMR protocol is able to identify the polydiagnostic metabolite manifold of type I diabetes and how its alterations translate to clinical phenotypes, clustering of micro- and macrovascular complications, and mortality during several years of follow-up. This work demonstrates the diffuse nature of complex vascular diseases and the limitations of single diagnostic biomarkers. However, it also promises cost-effective solutions through high-throughput analytics and advanced computational methods, as applied here in a case that is representative of the real clinical situation.

  8. Racial Disparities in Readmission, Complications and Procedures in Children with Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Jennifer L.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Chisolm, Deena J.; Crandall, Wallace V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Racial disparities in care and outcomes contribute to mortality and morbidity in children however the role in pediatric Crohn’s disease (CD) is unclear. In this study, we compared cohorts of Black and White children with CD to determine the extent race is associated with differences in readmissions, complications, and procedures among hospitalizations in the United States. Methods Data were extracted from the Pediatric Health Information System (January 1, 2004–June 30, 2012) for patients ≤21 years of age hospitalized with a diagnosis of CD. White and Black cohorts were randomly selected in a 2:1 ratio by hospital. The primary outcome was time from index hospital discharge to readmission. The most frequent complications and procedures were evaluated by race. Results There were 4377 patients. Black children had a shorter time to first readmission and higher probability of readmission (p=0.009), and a 16% increase in risk of readmission compared to White children (p=0.01). Black children had longer length of stay and higher frequency of overall and late (30 days–12 months post discharge) readmissions (p<0.001). During index hospitalization, more Black children had perianal disease and anemia (p<0.001). During any hospitalization, Black children had higher incidence of perianal disease, anemia, and vitamin D deficiency, and greater number of perianal procedures, endoscopies, and blood product transfusion (p<0.001). Conclusions There are differences in hospital readmissions, complications, and procedures among hospitalized children related to race. It is unclear whether these differences are due to genetic differences, worse intrinsic disease, adherence, access to treatment, or treatment disparities. PMID:25742396

  9. Increased risk of cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease: a possible role of leptin.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, Agnieszka; Dudka, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a small peptide hormone (16 kDa), a product of the obesity gene (Ob), and is mainly synthesized and secreted by adipocytes. It is removed from the blood by the kidneys. The kidney is not only a site of leptin clearance, but also a target organ for its action in different pathophysiological states. Several studies have documented a strong relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD) defined as a cardiorenal syndrome. Patients with stage 3 and 4 CKD develop cardiovascular complications and are at increased risk of death from CVD. Renal dysfunction promotes several mechanisms responsible for exacerbation of cardiovascular disease. These include activation of the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, elevated asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), low-grade inflammation with increased circulating cytokines, and dyslipidemia. Recently, it has been observed that plasma leptin level is elevated in patients with cardiorenal syndrome. In obesity, hyperleptinemia combined with selective leptin resistance appear to have a critical role in the development and progression of kidney disease, CVD and metabolic syndrome. This has clinical implications for the treatment of obesity-related hypertension and kidney disease. In this paper the role of leptin in chronic kidney disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease is out lined. The link between hyperleptinemia and development and progression of morphologic changes that effect kidney in obese patients is also discussed.

  10. Complicated pancreatic inflammatory disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic role of interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Casola, G.; Stauffer, A.E.; Polansky, A.D.; Coons, H.G.; Cabrera, O.A.; Gerver, P.S.

    1985-05-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiology techniques in 41 patients with complications of pancreatic inflammatory disease are described. Computed tomography or ultrasound-guided aspiration or percutaneous pancreatic ductography enabled specific diagnoses in 43 of 45 patients (96%). Single-step needle aspiration of noninfected pseudocysts was successful in only three of ten patients (30%). Catheter drainage cured six of seven noninfected pseudocysts (85.7%) and seven of nine infected pseudocysts (77.7%). Pancreatic abscesses were drained successfully in nine of 13 patients (69.2%); temporizing benefit was achieved in the other four who eventually underwent surgery in improved condition. Early diagnosis of the complications of pancreatitis may be established almost uniformly, and at least 70% of patients with infected or noninfected pseudocysts and pancreatic abscesses may be cured by nonoperative drainage.

  11. Ebola Virus Disease Complications as Experienced by Survivors in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Tiffany, Amanda; Vetter, Pauline; Mattia, John; Dayer, Julie-Anne; Bartsch, Maria; Kasztura, Miriam; Sterk, Esther; Tijerino, Ana Maria; Kaiser, Laurent; Ciglenecki, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Background. Thousands of people have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) during the ongoing outbreak. However, data about the frequency and risk factors of long-term post-EVD complications remain scarce. We describe the clinical characteristics of EVD survivors followed in a survivor clinic in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Methods. A survivor clinic opened within an Ebola treatment center compound in Freetown, Sierra Leone. At each visit, clinical and psychological assessments were conducted and free treatment was offered. Survivors were referred to a partner's hospitals if their condition could not be managed in the clinic. We used routinely collected data from the clinic to describe long-term complications of EVD and their risk factors. Results. A total of 1001 medical consultations for 166 patients were performed between 3 February and 21 June 2015. The most frequent complaints and diagnoses were arthralgia (n = 129 [77.7%]), fatigue (n = 116 [69.8%]), abdominal pain (n = 90 [54.2%]), headache (n = 87 [52.4%]), anemia (n = 83 [50%]), skin disorders (n = 81 [48.8%]), back pain (n = 54 [32.5%]), and alopecia (n = 53 [31.9%]). Ocular complications were diagnosed in 94 survivors (56.7%); uveitis was the most common (n = 57 [34%]). Survivors were 10 times more likely to develop uveitis post-EVD if they presented with red/injected eyes during the acute phase of their illness. Conclusions. Post-EVD complications among our patients were similar to those described previously and were detected early following the acute phase of disease. Follow-up of survivors should begin immediately after discharge to address sequelae as they arise and reduce the potential for development of long-term disabilities such as blindness. PMID:27001797

  12. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    PubMed

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen

  13. New approaches to the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patient with dual kidney-liver complications.

    PubMed

    Telega, Grzegorz; Cronin, David; Avner, Ellis D

    2013-06-01

    Improved neonatal medical care and renal replacement technology have improved the long-term survival of patients with ARPKD. Ten-yr survival of those surviving the first year of life is reported to be 82% and is continuing to improve further. However, despite increases in overall survival and improved treatment of systemic hypertension and other complications of their renal disease, nearly 50% of survivors will develop ESRD within the first decade of life. In addition to renal pathology, patients with ARPKD develop ductal plate malformations with cystic dilation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts resulting in CHF and Caroli syndrome. Many patients with CHF will develop portal hypertension with resulting esophageal varices, splenomegaly, hypersplenism, protein losing enteropathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Management of portal hypertension may require EBL of esophageal varices or porto-systemic shunting. Complications of hepatic involvement can include ascending cholangitis, cholestasis with malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and rarely benign or malignant liver tumors. Patients with ARPKD who eventually reach ESRD, and ultimately require kidney transplantation, present a unique set of complications related to their underlying hepato-biliary disease. In this review, we focus on new approaches to these challenging patients, including the indications for liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with severe chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplant. While survival in patients with ARPKD and isolated kidney transplant is comparable to that of age-matched pediatric patients who have received kidney transplants due to other primary renal diseases, 64-80% of the mortality occurring in ARPKD kidney transplant patients is attributed to cholangitis/sepsis, which is related to their hepato-biliary disease. Recent data demonstrate that surgical mortality among pediatric liver transplant recipients is decreased to <10% at one yr. The immunosuppressive regimen

  14. Solar still

    SciTech Connect

    Gruntman, L.R.

    1980-08-26

    A solar still adapted to float on a body of water has a toroidal evaporating chamber with sunlight admitting and absorbing, respectively, top and bottom walls for vaporizing water from the body admitted to overlie the bottom wall. A surrounding inner float ring and underlying toroidal inflatable float support the chamber. A condenser depends from and communicates with the evaporating chamber through elongate coaxial vapor outlet and air return tubes, and in turn supplies distillate to a pendent holding tank. A rotatable shaft extending coaxially down through the evaporating chamber carries a fan to propel vapor from the evaporating chamber into the condenser due to rotation of a windmill atop the chamber. A curved reflector is rotatably driven atop the inner ring to direct additional sunlight on the evaporating chamber as the sun moves overhead. An outer float ring loosely coaxially surrounds the inner float ring. The annular water surface between the float rings, covered by a transparent film, forms an oxygen production zone occupiable by oxygen producing phytoplankton fed by nutrients in water brought up from beneath the thermocline by thermosiphon flow between the warm condenser and a surrounding heat skirt. Pump units mounted on the outer float ring remove distilled water and any oxygen produced, the latter for example to a device for dissolving the oxygen below the thermocline in the body of water.

  15. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still Relevant? A Single Center Study from India

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, K; Prasad, D; Malhotra, V; Agrawal, D; Beniwal, P; Mathur, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: High cost of maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD) in India has made renal replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Repeated puncture PD although inferior to HD biochemically, is easily and freely available across Rajasthan, India, and is simple to perform, and does not require sophisticated machines, thus making it an attractive option for dialysis for ESRD. Aim: To analyze the outcomes of periodic PD in patients with ESRD requiring dialysis support. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study analyzing the data of patients who underwent PD between August 2010 and January 2013 in Sawai Man Singh Hospital, Jaipur, India was conducted. Patients were divided into three groups based on the time period between first and second session of PD. Detailed demographic and clinical data during the study period were collected along with PD related complications. The main outcome studied was technique survival 1 year post initiation of PD. Results: 234 patients received an initial session of PD, of which 174 had a good response and were included in the study. 19 patients received the second PD within 7 days of first (Group 1), 45 patients within 8–14 days (Group 2) and 110 patients within 15–21 days (Group 3). The overall 1 year technique survival was 68.4% (91/133), with a rate of 50% (5/10), 56.8% (21/37), and 75.6% (65/86) for Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. The time duration between first and second PD proved to be reliable indicator of the subsequent response, with a technique survival rate significantly lower in Group 1 patients compared to Groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.04). Median dialysis free days were 11, 16 and 21 days in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Peritonitis rate observed was 2.1% (49/2261) during the study period. Conclusion: Periodic PD is a simple, safe and cheap procedure, which can be considered as used as a palliative measure in

  16. Infliximab Combined with Enteral Nutrition for Managing Crohn's Disease Complicated with Intestinal Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Li; Tao, Li-Ping; Wu, Jian-Sheng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study was performed to evaluate the additional enteral nutrition (EN) in the efficacy of infliximab (IFX) compared with the conventional therapy in managing Crohn's disease (CD) complicated with intestinal fistulas. Methods. A total of 42 CD with intestinal fistulas were randomly divided into infliximab treatment group (n = 20) and conventional therapy group (n = 22). We evaluated the laboratory indexes, Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), Crohn's disease simplified endoscopic score (SES-CD), and healing of fistula in the two groups before treatment, at 14 weeks, and at 30 weeks, respectively. Results. In the IFX treatment group, the CDAI score, the SES-CD, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased during treatment compared with those before treatment. The body mass index and albumin levels were increased in both groups. Moreover, in the IFX treatment group, fistula healing was found in 8 at the 14th week and 18 at the 30th week, respectively, which was greater than that in the conventional therapy group. Conclusion. Our study suggested that infliximab combined with EN is an effective treatment for CD patients complicated with intestinal fistulas. PMID:27738427

  17. [Pancreatic tissue heterotopy in the stomach of a patient with complications due to peptic ulcerative disease].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Makovkin, V V; Gerasimov, V N

    2008-01-01

    In the literature there are reports on rare pancreatic tissue heterotopy that promotes the complicated course of duodenal or gastric ulcerative disease. In this connection, the authors have decided to share their observation of a 41-year-old female patient admitted to a hospital for perforated ulcer and ulcerous hemorrhage. Another ulcerative stenosis and ulcer penetration into the pancreas were found at surgery. Partial gastrectomy was carried out due to failure to suture the perforative opening. A gross biopsy specimen from the pyloric portion of the stomach displayed heterotopic parts in the pancreas with and without excretory ducts.

  18. Desbaric air embolism during diving: an unusual complication of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-L; Wang, H-C; Yang, P-C

    2004-08-01

    Cerebral manifestations of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease (OWRD, hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia) including telangiectases, venous malformations, and arteriovenous malformations, are usually under-recognised. The highest complication rate is observed in high flow cerebral arteriovenous malformations, which may present with headache, epilepsy, ischaemia, or haemorrhage. Cerebral air embolism during self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving as the first manifestation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) in OWRD patients has never been reported before. Here we report a 31 year old male who presented desbaric air embolism as the first manifestation of PAVM. As far as we know, this is the first such case published in English medical literature.

  19. [Laparoscopic lavage and drainage in the surgical treatment of diverticular disease complicated by peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lippi, Carlo Ettore; Beatini, Luca; Cervia, Silvio; Fabbricotti, Alaido; Miaruelli, Piero Antonio; Spessa, Elisabetta; Sturlese, Ivarco; Braini, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of peritonitis complicating diverticular disease of the colon is yet to be universally regarded as established practice and major differences in management are to be noted in the various surgical institutions. In the emergency setting, the minimally invasive approach is used by few surgeons and the most frequent therapeutic options are sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (with or without a diverting stoma) and Hartmann's procedure. The Authors report their preliminary experience (13 cases) with laparoscopic lavage and drainage without colonic resection in diverticulitis complicated by peritonitis and describe the technical details of the surgical procedure. They conduct a systematic review of the literature and, on the basis of their latest experience, compare the results of the traditional resective operations (resection with primary anastomosis and Hartmann's procedure) with those of laparoscopic conservative and non-resective treatment. Laparoscopic non-resective procedures reduce the frequency and severity of the surgical complications, as well as the hospital stay and costs of treatment. In conclusion, laparoscopic lavage and drainage can be used in the majority of patients, with excellent prospects of recovery, without disabling stomas, in a single operative stage. PMID:19845268

  20. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren's Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Colaci, Michele; Cassone, Giulia; Manfredi, Andreina; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable. PMID:25161786

  1. Efficacy and motor complications of original and generic levodopa in Parkinson’s disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kasemsap, Narongrit; Onsanit, Satrirat; Chiewthanakul, Piyawan; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Tanking, Chonthicha; Vorasoot, Nisa; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Tiamkao, Somsak

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, a generic drug is considered interchangeable with the original formulated drug. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), generic drug use remains debated. This study was aimed to investigate whether the generic drug was as effective as the original in improving the symptoms of PD and the prevalence of motor complications. Methods This study was a multicenter cohort study of patients with PD enrolled from three northeast hospitals in Thailand between February 2013 and February 2014. The patients were categorized into original and generic levodopa groups. The clinical characteristics, efficacy, and motor complications were compared between the groups. Results There were 400 eligible patients. Of these, 327 patients (81.75%) met the study criteria and were classified as the original levodopa group (200 patients, 61.16%) and the generic levodopa group (127 patients, 38.84%). The average age of all patients with PD was 65 years. The duration of PD and the modified Hoehn–Yahr stages were not different between the groups. The total doses of original and generic levodopa-equivalent doses were significantly different (199.97±127.08 versus 305.58±138.27 mg; P-value <0.001) and the actual doses were 198.10±117.92 versus 308.85±139.40 mg (P-value <0.001). Approximately 80% of patients with PD in both groups had good responses (P-value >0.999), but the development of motor complications was significantly greater in the original than in the generic group. Conclusion Generic levodopa was effective in improving the symptoms of PD. The prevalence of motor complications in the original compound group, at a lower dose of levodopa equivalent, was higher than in the generic group. PMID:27274254

  2. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: a new complication of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bocca, G; Stolk, R P; Scheenstra, R; Sauer, P J J

    2008-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a range of chronic liver diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis with liver failure. In children, NAFLD is mainly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, the results of an unhealthy lifestyle. Insulin resistance and free fatty acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. NAFLD can therefore be seen as a metabolic complication of obesity. Since the prevalence of obesity in Dutch children is increasing, the prevalence of NAFLD in children is expected to increase as well. Prevention of obesity and identification of children with an increased risk of NAFLD are important steps in preventing irreversible liver damage. Lifestyle changes aimed at improving insulin sensitivity through healthy food and sufficient physical activity are essential in the treatment of NAFLD. Pharmacological treatment may have additional value.

  3. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD. Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR. The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group. In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR. PMID:27015210

  4. Does gluten intake influence the development of celiac disease-associated complications?

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Discepolo, Valentina; Bardella, Maria T; Guandalini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is regarded as the most common autoimmune enteropathy in western countries. Epidemiological studies indicate that approximately 1:100 individuals may present with histologically proven CD. CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects after gluten ingestion. It usually subsides after gluten is withdrawn from their diet. Gluten is the only known environmental factor that affects the progression/regression of the intestinal villous atrophy, which is the hallmark of this disease. CD generally follows a benign course after gluten elimination. However, it is also associated with the development of other autoimmune disorders or of intestinal malignancies. The issue of whether such complications, sometimes of significant clinical and prognostic impact, are or are not the result of ongoing gluten ingestion, is an important one that has been investigated over the recent years with conflicting results. In terms of practical implications, the presence of a positive correlation between gluten intake and the development of severe complications would lead to the need for early diagnosis and mass screening. The lack of such correlation would instead suggest a less aggressive diagnostic strategy. This review aims at critically summarizing the evidence supporting either hypothesis.

  5. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  6. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression.

  7. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  8. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  9. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, Alberto C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria. PMID:24836779

  10. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, Alberto C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria.

  11. State of the Art: Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Mellitus: Complication of the Disease or of Anti-hyperglycemic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carlos A.; Lingvay, Ildiko; Vuylsteke, Valerie; Koffarnus, Robin L.; McGuire, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the principal complication and the leading cause of death for patients with diabetes (DM). The efficacy of anti-hyperglycemic treatments on cardiovascular disease risk remains uncertain. Cardiovascular risk factors are affected by anti-hyperglycemic medications, as are many intermediate markers of cardiovascular disease. Here we summarize the evidence assessing the cardiovascular effects of anti-hyperglycemic medications with regards to risk factors, intermediate markers of disease, and clinical outcomes. PMID:25963811

  12. Increased postoperative and respiratory complications in patients with congenital heart disease associated with heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Matthew; Jonas, Richard; Tian, Xin; Lee, Elaine S.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Leatherbury, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patients with heterotaxy and complex congenital heart disease (CHD) undergo cardiac surgery with high mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have revealed an association among heterotaxy, CHD, and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We undertook a retrospective review of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Children’s National Medical Center between 2004 to 2008 to explore the hypothesis that in heterotaxy patients there is increased mortality and respiratory complications. Methods and Results Retrospective review was performed on post-surgical outcomes of 87 patients with heterotaxy and CHD exhibiting the full spectrum of situs abnormalities associated with heterotaxy. As controls, 634 cardiac surgical patients with CHD but without laterality defects were selected, and surgical complexities were similar with a median RACHS-1 score of 3.0 for both groups. We found the mean length of postoperative hospital stay (17 vs 11 days) and mechanical ventilation (11 vs 4 days) were significantly increased in the heterotaxy patients. Also elevated were rates of tracheostomies (6.9% vs. 1.6%; Odds Ratio 4.6), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support (12.6% vs. 4.9%: Odds Ratio 2.8), prolonged ventilatory courses (23% vs. 12.3%; Odds Ratio 2.1) and post-surgical deaths (16.1% vs. 4.7%; Odds Ratio 3.9). Conclusions Our findings show heterotaxy patients had more post-surgical events with increased post-surgical mortality and risk for respiratory complications as compared to controls with similar RACHS-1 surgical complexity scores. We speculate that increased respiratory complications maybe due to ciliary dysfunction. Further, studies are needed to explore the basis for the increased surgical risks for heterotaxy patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:20884020

  13. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D’Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial “fingerprint”, characterized by the reduced ratio of “good” to “potentially pathogenic” bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  14. [PROPHYLAXIS OF COMPLICATIONS OF LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH THE ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Vasyhlchenko, D S; Desyateryk, V I; Sheyko, S O; Zverevych, T I

    2016-03-01

    Results of examination and surgical tratment of 56 patients, suffering chronic calculous cholecystitis with concomitant schemic heart disease, were analyzed. In all the patients a laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Monitoring of cardiovascular compli- cations was estimated with the help of a Helter recording of EGG intraoperatively and in the early postoperative period. Depending on a kind of preoperative preparation done, the patients were divided on two groups: those, to whom cardioprotection using a Vasopro preparation was conducted, and those without cardioprotection. Depending on the intraoperative pneumoperitoneum regime used in every group two subgroups were delineated: in intraabdominal pressure 5-7.9 mm Hg and 8-10 mm Hg. In the patients, to whom cardioprotection was conducted and operative intervention in a carboxyperitoneum regime performed while intraabdominal pressure 5-7.9 mm Hg, a frequency of cardiovascular complications was lesser than in a control group. PMID:27514086

  15. Evaluation of Complications of Heart Surgery in Children With Congenital Heart Disease at Dena Hospital of Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Sepahvand, Elham; Koshkaki, Afifeh Rahmanian; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Today, with progress in the field of congenital heart surgery, different complicated actions are done in children. These actions may be associated with several complications, especially open heart surgery in which the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is used. Serious complications can be caused high morbidity and mortality rates. Present study has been performed to determine the incidence of morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery in children. Method: In a cross-sectional retrospective, records of 203 patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease in Dena hospital during 2013-2015 were reviewed for incidence of complications. Data was analyzed by using descriptive and analytical statistics and using SPSS version 18. Results: The mean age of samples was 3/65±4/47 years. The majority of samples (73/8%) were undergoing open surgery. The overall adverse cardiovascular complications were respectively, renal complications (44/3%), lung (40/3%), anemia (35/9%), heart (34/4%), gastrointestinal (17/2%), brain (14/2%), need for re-intubation of the trachea 11/3%), infection (7/8%) required reoperation (5/9%) and vascular complications (1/4%). Conclusion: High incidence of complications after congenital heart surgery makes necessary attention to complications and their treatment after surgery. It is necessary to apply the measures and careful monitoring of patients to minimize these effects. PMID:26652092

  16. Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years).All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. PMID:25913493

  17. Complications after transsphenoidal surgery for patients with Cushing's disease and silent corticotroph adenomas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Huang, Kevin T; Nery, Breno; de Moura, Samuel Miranda; Cote, David J; Laws, Edward R

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT The purpose of this study was to describe complications associated with the endonasal, transsphenoidal approach for the treatment of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-positive staining tumors (Cushing's disease [CD] and silent corticotroph adenomas [SCAs]) performed by 1 surgeon at a high-volume academic medical center. METHODS Medical records from Brigham and Women's Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Selected for study were 82 patients with CD who during April 2008-April 2014 had consecutively undergone transsphenoidal resection or who had subsequent pathological confirmation of ACTH-positive tumor staining. In addition to demographic, patient, tumor, and surgery characteristics, complications were evaluated. Complications of interest included syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, diabetes insipidus (DI), CSF leakage, carotid artery injury, epistaxis, meningitis, and vision changes. RESULTS Of the 82 patients, 68 (82.9%) had CD and 14 (17.1%) had SCAs; 55 patients were female and 27 were male. Most common (n = 62 patients, 82.7%) were microadenomas, followed by macroadenomas (n = 13, 14.7%). A total of 31 (37.8%) patients underwent reoperation. Median follow-up time was 12.0 months (range 3-69 months). The most common diagnosis was ACTH-secreting (n = 68, 82.9%), followed by silent tumors/adenomas (n = 14, 17.1%). ACTH hyperplasia was found in 8 patients (9.8%). Of the 74 patients who had verified tumors, 12 (16.2%) had tumors with atypical features. The overall (CD and SCA) rate of minor complications was 35.4%; the rate of major complications was 8.5% (n = 7). All permanent morbidity was associated with DI (n = 5, 6.1%). In 16 CD patients (23.5%), transient DI developed. Transient DI was more likely to develop in CD patients who had undergone a second operation (37.9%) than in those who had undergone a first operation only (12.8%, p < 0.05). Permanent DI developed in 4 CD patients (5.9%) and 1 SCA patient (7.1%). For 1 CD

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to adult-onset Still's disease: Response to cyclosporine and sildenafil over 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Weatherald, Jason; Lategan, Johan; Helmersen, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an autoimmune disease characterized by systemic inflammation and is a rarely reported cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We describe the clinical course of a 40-year-old woman who presented with PAH 19 months after a diagnosis of AOSD. Sildenafil and immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine resulted in clinical and hemodynamic improvement with long-term survival 15 years after her initial presentation of AOSD. We review the literature for published cases of PAH due to AOSD and discuss the potential mechanisms relating inflammatory diseases and PAH. PMID:27408785

  19. Snippets From the Past: Cohort Analysis of Disease Rates—Another Piece in a Seemingly Still Incomplete Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  20. Insights into cerebrovascular complications and Alzheimer disease through the selective loss of GRK2 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis A; Cobb, Celia J; Shenk, Justin C; Méndez, Gina M; Fischbach, Kathryn; Smith, Mark A; Qasimov, Eldar K; Perry, George; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer disease (AD) and stroke are two leading causes of age-associated dementia. Increasing evidence points to vascular damage as an early contributor to the development of AD and AD-like pathology. In this review, we discuss the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) as it relates to individuals affected by AD and how the cardiovasculature plays a role in AD pathogenesis. The possible involvement of GRKs in AD pathogenesis is an interesting notion, which may help bridge the gap in our understanding of the heart–brain connection in relation to neurovisceral damage and vascular complications in AD, since kinases of this family are known to regulate numerous receptor functions both in the brain, myocardium, and elsewhere. The aim of this review is to discuss our findings of overexpression of GRK2 in the context of the early pathogenesis of AD, because increased levels of GRK2 immunoreactivity were found in vulnerable neurons of AD patients as well as in a two-vessel occlusion (2-VO) mammalian model of ischaemia. Also, we consider the consequences for this overexpression as a loss of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) regulation, as well as suggest a potential role for GPCRs and GRKs in a unifying theory of AD pathogenesis, particularly in the context of cerebrovascular disease. We synthesize this newer information and attempt to put it into context with GRKs as regulators of diverse physiological cellular functions that could be appropriate targets for future pharmacological intervention. PMID:19292735

  1. Poststroke chronic disease management: towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications.

    PubMed

    Brainin, Michael; Norrving, Bo; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Goldstein, Larry B; Cramer, Steven C; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Duncan, Pamela W; Francisco, Gerard; Good, David; Graham, Glenn; Kissela, Brett M; Olver, John; Ward, Anthony; Wissel, Jörg; Zorowitz, Richard

    2011-02-01

    This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60% of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10%. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.

  2. Interstitial Lung Disease in Systemic Scleroderma, Complicated with Bilateral Pulmonary Aspergilloma: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Saumen; Ghoshal, Loknath; Kundu, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Aspergilloma or mycetoma is a saprophytic fungal infection that colonizes pre-existing excavated lung lesion. However, its association with systemic sclerosis related interstitial lung disease is unusual and scarcely found in literature. We report a middle aged female with long standing systemic sclerosis, who was on immunosuppressive therapy for many years, presented with repeated haemoptysis. Although provisionally pulmonary tuberculosis was suspected, imaging investigations showed presence of bilateral masses inside bullous air spaces along with air-crescent sign suggestive of fungal ball. Subsequent Computed tomography guided needle aspiration from lung mass confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus as aetiologic agent on fungal culture. Patient was treated conservatively for haemoptysis and with oral antifungal drug as surgical removal of fungal ball was not an option due to poor pulmonary reserve. Although she had been treated with itraconazole for more than three years, she had recurrent haemoptysis during this period without any significant regression of size of the aspergilloma. Management of aspergilloma in a background of extensive interstitial lung disease remains poorly defined and complicated. Thereby, overall prognosis is unfavourable and depends on evolution of both underlying scleroderma as well as aspergilloma. PMID:26816937

  3. The epigenetic conductor: a genomic orchestrator in chronic kidney disease complications?

    PubMed

    Ekström, Tomas J; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics defines the cellularly heritable properties of genome function, which are not directly encoded in the DNA primary sequence. The underlying mechanisms orchestrate cell identity and memory and are targets for external and internal environmental influences. It becomes increasingly clear that genetic and epigenetic factors are completely interdependent for homeostasis. Subsequently, the same is certainly true for disease. Our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still lagging, and further studies are needed to understand the importance of, e.g., aberrant DNA methylation in relation to the uremic impact on the functional genome, organismal metabolism and associated premature vascular disease. More research in this field will also help us understand the links between altered gene regulation of specific genes by the uremic environment via epigenetic mechanisms, and initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The dynamic nature of epigenetic mechanisms prompts therapeutic investigations in CKD, targeting the epigenome with epigenetic drugs. The importance of 1-carbon metabolism for epigenetic modifications suggests that specific diets may also prove to play an important part as efficient remedies in CKD and associated atherosclerotic pathologies.

  4. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. The cohort consisted of all diagnosed GD patients in the Netherlands. Mutually exclusive disease states were defined as ‘asymptomatic’, ‘signs/symptoms’, ‘recovery’, ‘splenectomy’, ‘bone complication’, ‘multiple complications’ and ‘malignancy’. A natural history (NH) cohort was delineated based upon historical data on Dutch patients before ERT was available. Cumulative incidence curves were composed for progression from each disease state to the next. Two scenarios were applied for the ERT cohort: time to complications was calculated from A. start of ERT; B. entering the previous disease state. Median time for the development of signs and/or symptoms was 30.1 years (N = 73). In the NH cohort (N = 42), 9% had developed a bone complication after 10 years in the signs/symptoms phase, while 21% had undergone a splenectomy. In the ERT cohort (N = 29 (A), N = 28 (B)), 12% (A) or 4% (B) had developed a bone complication after 10 years in this phase and no patient was splenectomized. No patients in the NH cohort recovered, compared to 50% in the ERT cohort after 3.6 years (N = 28 (A)) or 22.4 years (N = 27 (B)) of treatment. Median time from a first to a second complication was 11 years in the NH cohort (N = 31), whereas 16 respectively 14 percent had developed a second complication after 10 years in the ERT cohort (N = 17, scenario A/B). Fourteen percent (scenario A/B) developed an associated malignancy after 10 years in the phase ‘multiple complications’ (N = 23). Associated malignancies occurred almost exclusively in advanced disease stages, therefore it

  5. The link between bone disease and cardiovascular complications in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikh, Noha; Sherif, Nevine; Zeid, Sameh Abou; Eldamarawy, Mervat; Ali, Ahmed; Sabry, Amal Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The burden on the cardiovascular system is the main cause of mortality in chronic renal patients, and bone disease, which also may cause disability, is one of the most important complications in those patients. The aim of this study was to determine the link between cardiovascular and bone disease, which frequently occur together. Methods In this matched case-control study, 70 subjects were subjected for full laboratory assessment as well as estimation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, vitamin D level, complete echocardiography, and dual energy absorptiometry. Of the 70 patients, 50 were on regular hemodialysis, and there were 20 normal controls matched with the patients with respect to age and gender. Results There was a significant decrease in the mean value of serum vitamin D in the hemodialysis patients, i.e., their mean value was 20.47 ± 9.60 whereas the controls had a mean value of 37.15 ± 7.67. Thus, there was a highly-significant, negative correlation between vitamin D and left ventricular mass (LVM) in the patients. We found that there was a highly-significant increase in the mean PTH levels of the patients (820.22 ± 393.51), whereas it was 57.60 ± 13.72 for the controls. The statistical significance was less than 0.001, a highly-significant increase in the mean of the T score levels in the patients (−2.15 ± 2.56), whereas it was −0.47 ± 0.71 for the controls with a statistical significance of less than 0.001. There also was a highly-significant correlation between the T score and LVM. Conclusion A significant correlation was found between bone disease and the occurrence of a left ventricular mass. We recommend early strict correction of the serum levels of vitamin D, PTH, calcium, and phosphorus. PMID:27504162

  6. Corticosteroid Therapy for a Patient with Relapsing Polychondritis Complicated by IgG4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Mari; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kan, Takamasa; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Ushijima, Ryoichi; Usagawa, Yuko; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare systemic disorder characterized by recurrent, widespread chondritis of the auricular, nasal, and tracheal cartilages. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic immune-mediated disease characterized by the infiltration of IgG4-bearing plasma cells into systemic organs. Although 25% to 35% of patients with RP have a concurrent autoimmune disease, coexistence of RP and IgG4-RD is rare. We herein report a case of RP complicated by IgG4-RD. A 63-year-old man developed recurrent bilateral ear pain and swelling, recurrent blurred and decreased vision, and migratory multiple joint pain, sequentially within one year. Fourteen months after the first symptom, he experienced dry cough and dyspnea with exertion. A computed tomography (CT) scan detected interstitial pneumonia, swelling of bilateral submandibular glands, bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and several nodules in bilateral kidneys. His serum levels of IgG and IgG4 were elevated. The biopsy specimen of auricular cartilage showed infiltrations of inflammatory cells and fibrosis consistent with RP. The IgG4-positive cells were not observed in auricular cartilage. The patient met the diagnostic criteria of RP, including bilateral auricular chondritis, conjunctivitis, iritis and polyarthritis. The biopsy specimens of lung and kidney revealed the significant infiltrations of IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis. We also diagnosed him as having IgG4-RD, affecting bilateral submandibular glands, hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, lungs, and kidneys. Thus, RP preceded the onset of IgG4-RD. Corticosteroid therapy improved the symptoms and CT scan findings. In conclusion, RP and IgG4-RD do coexist; however, the pathogenesis of their coexistence is unknown. PMID:27396510

  7. Fatal liver cyst rupture in polycystic liver disease complicated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fang; Liang, Yue; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Chen, Peng; Duan, Yijie; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-05-01

    A 59-year-old man was struck in the abdomen and later presented to the emergency room. His blood pressure dropped and eventually died 16h post trauma and just before emergency exploratory laparotomy. Autopsy revealed two polycystic kidneys and a giant polycystic liver with two ruptures. Blood (2225g) was observed in the peritoneum and the body-surface injury was minor. Genetic testing was performed to confirm that the man had an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated by polycystic liver disease (PLD). Autopsy, histopathology and medical history showed that the cause of death was the ruptures of liver cysts due to trauma. In this communication, we describe a fatal case and hope to increase awareness and recognition of PLD and ADPKD. We also wish to indicate that due to the fragile condition of liver cysts, trauma should be considered even if the body-surface injury is minor in fatal cases of PLD patient with a traumatic history. PMID:27050907

  8. Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  9. Comparison of early and late intravenous gamma globulin treatment of Kawasaki disease on fever and cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Iraj; Noei, Somayyeh; Babazadeh, Kazem; Zamani, Hassan; Barari-Savadkoohi, Rahim; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac involvement was the major leading cause of death in patients with Kawasaki and IVIG administration reduces cardiac complications. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of cardiovascular complications and duration of fever with regard to the time of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration of patients with Kawasaki disease. Methods: This follow-up study was done on all patients with Kawasaki disease who were hospitalized at Amirkola Children’s Hospital between 2006 and 2011. Diagnosis of Kawasaki was clinical and included fever more than 5 days with 4 of 5 signs containing mucosal changes, scaling and skin rash, bilateral nonexudative conjunctivitis, cervical lymph adenopathy and edema in lower extremities. After diagnosis of Kawasaki, all patients received standard treatment (intravenous immunoglobulins and aspirin) and undergoing cardiac echocardiography in 2 weeks, 2 months and 6 months. Information including age, sex, sign of diseases, laboratory findings, and cardiac complications in echocardiography were recorded. Results: This study was performed on 100 patients (61 boys and 39 girls) with Kawasaki disease. The mean age of children was 2.8±2.6 years. Cardiac complication rate was 47% at the onset of the disease and had reached to 7% at the end of the sixth month (P=0.000). Distribution of cardiovascular complications in the second week, the second month and the sixth month after treatment was not significantly different according to the start of time of treatment (p>0.05). Duration of fever in patients who received treatment before 10th day (1.5±1.3) did not have significant difference (P=0.78) with patients who received after 10th day (1.6±0.9). Conclusion: Result shows that most of patients (99%) responded to the treatment with IVIG and ASA and cardiovascular complication ratio decreased. There was not significant relationship between duration of fever and time of IVIG treatment initiation.

  10. Efficacy and long-term follow-up of IL-1R inhibitor anakinra in adults with Still's disease: a case-series study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To assess the efficacy and safety of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) inhibitor anakinra in adult patients with refractory Still's disease. Methods Twenty-five patients (13 males and 12 females, median age 32 years, median disease duration seven months) with Still's disease were treated with subcutaneous injections of anakinra (100 mg/day). Treatment was given as adjunct therapy in 16 patients and as standalone in 9 patients for a median time of 15 months (range 1.5-71). The clinical and laboratory parameters during follow-up were recorded. Results In 84% of patients the clinical activity resolved completely within a few days (median time 0.2 months), and response was maintained until the last visit in all but one patient. A complete response of all disease-related symptoms (clinical and laboratory) occurred subsequently within a median time of three months in 80% of patients. A partial clinical and laboratory improvement was shown in 12% and 16% of patients, respectively. The Visualized Analogue Scale and Health Assessment Questionnaire scores significantly decreased during treatment. The proportion of patients achieving the American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) score (20% improvement) was 82% at one month and improved to 100% at one year. The mean oral corticosteroid dose was significantly reduced at each visit. Anakinra was discontinued due to unresponsiveness in one patient and due to relapsing disease in another. Treatment was also withdrawn in three patients with severe skin reactions (urticaria). Seven patients experienced an infection during follow-up. Conclusions The rapid and sustained response in the majority of our patients encourages the use of anakinra in adults with Still's disease. PMID:21682863

  11. Pregnancy Complications as Markers for Subsequent Maternal Cardiovascular Disease: Validation of a Maternal Recall Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jennifer J.; Farland, Leslie V.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Zera, Chloe A.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We designed and tested the validity of a questionnaire to characterize maternal recall of pregnancy complications associated with increased future cardiovascular disease risk, based on the 2011 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. Methods: A maternal recall questionnaire of pregnancy history was administered to 971 patients who had participated in a previous cohort study of 1,608 pregnant women. Medical records from the study pregnancy served as the gold standard. Prevalence, sensitivity (sens), specificity (spec), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and/or Spearman's correlation coefficients (r) were calculated for each question. Results: A total of 526 (54%) individuals recontacted responded. Respondents were more likely to be older, white, educated, and nulliparous and were less likely to deliver low-birthweight infants in the study pregnancy than were individuals who did not respond. Mean length of recall was 4.35 years (standard deviation [SD] 0.46) postpartum. Maternal recall was most accurate for gestational diabetes (sens: 92%, spec: 98%, PPV: 79%, NPV: 99%), infant birthweight (r=0.95), and gestation length (r=0.85). Maternal recall was modest for preeclampsia (sens: 79%, spec: 97%, PPV: 68%, NPV: 98%) and pregnancy-associated hypertension, including preeclampsia or gestational hypertension (sens: 60%, spec: 95%, PPV: 64%, NPV: 94%). Conclusions: This validation study demonstrated that the majority of women could accurately recall a history of gestational diabetes, infant birthweight, and gestational age at delivery, 4 years postpartum on average. Recall of preeclampsia and pregnancy-associated hypertension overall was modest. Maternal report of these pregnancy conditions may help clinicians identify women at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26061196

  12. Cardiovascular Complications Secondary to Graves’ Disease: A Prospective Study from Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Tsymbaliuk, Iryna; Unukovych, Dmytro; Shvets, Nataliia; Dinets, Andrii

    2015-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease (GD) is a common cause of hyperthyroidism resulting in development of thyrotoxic heart disease (THD). Objectives to assess cardiovascular disorders and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with THD secondary to GD. Patients and Methods All patients diagnosed with THD secondary to GD between January 2011 and December 2013 were eligible for this study. Clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at the follow-up visit after the restoring of euthyroid state. HRQoL was studied with a questionnaire EQ-5D-5L. Results Follow-up data were available for 61 patients, but only 30 patients with THD secondary to GD were consented to participate in investigation of their HRQoL. The frequency of cardiovascular complications was significantly reduced as compared before and after the antithyroid therapy as follows: resting heart rate (122 vs. 74 bpm), blood pressure: systolic (155 vs. 123 mm Hg), diastolic (83 vs. 66 mm Hg), supraventricular premature contractions (71% vs. 7%), atrial fibrillation (72% vs. 25%), congestive heart failure (69% vs. 20%), thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy (77% vs. 26%), all p<0.01. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies were determined as independent predictor of left ventricular geometry changes, (b-coefficient = 0.04, 95%CI 0.01–0.07, p = 0.02). HRQoL was improved in all domains and self-rated health increased from 43 to 75 units by visual analogue score (p<0.001). Conclusions Restoring of euthyroid state in patients with GD is associated with significant elimination of cardiovascular disorders and improvement of HRQoL. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating Ukrainian patients with THD secondary to GD with focus on HRQoL. PMID:25803030

  13. Mechanical circulatory assistance for the treatment of complications of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, J J; Anagnostopoulos, C E; Al-Sadir, J; Gupta, D S; Lin, C Y; Replogle, R L; Resnekov, L; Skinner, D B

    1976-02-01

    Surgery has become an accepted method of treatment for coronary artery disease and its complications. Revascularization results in significant improvement in symptoms for patients with angina pectoris. Occasionally, patients requiring surgery for angina pectoris will sustain reversible ischemic damage during operation; such patients can be successfully weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with full recovery when intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation is used. Arrhythmias associated with ischemic damage to the myocardium also can be controlled when IABCP is used for physiologic assistance. Patients in cardiogenicshock of pulmonary edema after acute myocardial infarction have an ominous prognosis. When decompensation occurs, IABCP may be used to stabilize the patient and to allow study and corrective surgery if possible. The prognosis is better for patients with ventricular septal defect, although selected patients without a mechanical defect of the myocardium can be salvaged if the response to IABCP is favorable. Counterpulsation has also been shown to be useful in achieving pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass and in assisting high-risk patients through operation. External pressure circulatory assist (EPCA) is less effective than IABCP in assisting the failing myocardium; however, the external device is noninvasive and may be a useful adjunct in situations where IABCP is not feasible.

  14. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  15. Plasma levels of IL-8 predict early complications in patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyong; Li, Junyong; Gu, Jian; Li, Shuren; Dang, Yi; Wang, Tianhong

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8) for early complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The pre- and postprocedural plasma levels of IL-8 and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined by immunoassay, and the expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry. Early complications (abrupt occlusion, threatened abrupt occlusion, early recurrence of ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiac sudden death, and target vessel revascularization) occurred intra-procedure and 30 days after PCI and were observed in 121 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease. Sixteen patients with early complications had high preprocedural levels and high postprocedural differentials of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18 compared to those without complications (all P < 0.05). The occurrence of complications showed a significant increase in the patients according to the tertiles of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18. Preprocedural levels of IL-8 (RR = 5.864, CI = 1.658-20.734, P = 0.006) and diabetes (RR = 1.587, CI = 1.246-2.132, P = 0.038) were independent predictors of early complications. There were significant correlations in the postprocedural differential between IL-8 and CD11b/CD18 (r = 0.776, P = 0.002) in patients with complications. The results reveal that the early complications after PCI contribute to preprocedural inflammatory responses. Normal levels of IL-8 may be powerful negative predictors of early complications in patients with CHD following PCI. PMID:12906027

  16. Corticosteroid Use and Complications in a US Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Wiitala, Wyndy L.; Govani, Shail; Stidham, Ryan; Saini, Sameer; Hou, Jason; Feagins, Linda A.; Khan, Nabeel; Good, Chester B.; Vijan, Sandeep; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Corticosteroids are effective for the short-term treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Long-term use, however, is associated with significant adverse effects. To define the: (1) frequency and duration of corticosteroid use, (2) frequency of escalation to corticosteroid-sparing therapy, (3) rate of complications related to corticosteroid use, (4) rate of appropriate bone density measurements (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry [DEXA] scans), and (5) factors associated with escalation and DEXA scans. Methods Retrospective review of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) data from 2002–2010. Results Of the 30,456 Veterans with IBD, 32% required at least one course of corticosteroids during the study time period, and 17% of the steroid users had a prolonged course. Among these patients, only 26.2% underwent escalation of therapy. Patients visiting a gastroenterology (GI) physician were significantly more likely to receive corticosteroid-sparing medications. Factors associated with corticosteroid-sparing medications included younger age (OR = 0.96 per year,95%CI:0.95, 0.97), male gender (OR = 2.00,95%CI:1.16,3.46), GI visit during the corticosteroid evaluation period (OR = 8.01,95%CI:5.85,10.95) and the use of continuous corticosteroids vs. intermittent corticosteroids (OR = 2.28,95%CI:1.33,3.90). Rates of complications per 1000 person-years after IBD diagnosis were higher among corticosteroid users (venous thromboembolism [VTE] 9.0%; fragility fracture 2.6%; Infections 54.3) than non-corticosteroid users (VTE 4.9%; fragility fracture 1.9%; Infections 26.9). DEXA scan utilization rates among corticosteroid users were only 7.8%. Conclusions Prolonged corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of IBD is common and is associated with significant harm to patients. Patients with prolonged use of corticosteroids for IBD should be referred to gastroenterology early and universal efforts to improve the delivery of high quality care should be undertaken

  17. Compensatory stepping in Parkinson's disease is still a problem after deep brain stimulation randomized to STN or GPi

    PubMed Central

    St George, R. J.; Carlson-Kuhta, P.; King, L. A.; Burchiel, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. This study examined whether DBS randomized to the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 11) or globus pallidus interna (GPi; n = 10) improved compensatory stepping to recover balance after a perturbation. The standing surface translated backward, forcing subjects to take compensatory steps forward. Kinematic and kinetic responses were recorded. PD-DBS subjects were tested off and on their levodopa medication before bilateral DBS surgery and retested 6 mo later off and on DBS, combined with off and on levodopa medication. Responses were compared with PD-control subjects (n = 8) tested over the same timescale and 17 healthy control subjects. Neither DBS nor levodopa improved the stepping response. Compensatory stepping in the best-treated state after surgery (DBS+DOPA) was similar to the best-treated state before surgery (DOPA) for the PD-GPi group and the PD-control group. For the PD-STN group, there were more lateral weight shifts, a delayed foot-off, and a greater number of steps required to recover balance in DBS+DOPA after surgery compared with DOPA before surgery. Within the STN group five subjects who did not fall during the experiment before surgery fell at least once after surgery, whereas the number of falls in the GPi and PD-control groups were unchanged. DBS did not improve the compensatory step response needed to recover from balance perturbations in the GPi group and caused delays in the preparation phase of the step in the STN group. PMID:26108960

  18. [Is obesity an adverse prognostic factor for pulmonary manifestations of influenza? Lesson from complicated disease course H1N1].

    PubMed

    Zoubková, Renata; Máca, Jan; Handlos, Petr; Rudinská, Lenka; Nytra, Ivana; Chýlek, Václav; Vavrošová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics that occur at different times in both the northern and southern hemisphere. In cases of seasonal influenza these are usually mild forms of the disease, which rarely lead to death of the patient. Vulnerable groups include the elderly, the young or those with comorbidities, where the virus affects tens of thousands of victims around the world. Occasionally, however, large epidemics appear caused by a dangerous variant of a new virus, which is usually characterized by high contagiousness and pathogenicity (virulence). Consequently, it is often accompanied by a complicated disease course and associated with high mortality. In 2009, a viral pandemic disease marked pH1N1 2009 Influenza A appeared. Even though the initial predictions were far worse, the course of influenza caused by this virus was often complicated by acute respiratory failure in the form of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This formed part of the wider multiple organ failure syndrome (MODS). This type of virus often infects younger age groups and is more contagious compared to the seasonal flu. In order to illustrate the complicated forms of viral infections pH1N1 2009 Influenza A we present three case studies which demonstrate complicated pulmonary manifestation, which take the primary form of ARDS. PMID:25561242

  19. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianskiĭ, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  20. Heparin induced thrombosis: an important complication of heparin prophylaxis for thromboembolic disease in surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J B; Lonsdale, R J; Wenham, P W; Frostick, S P

    1993-01-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis, or the "white clot syndrome," is a rare but recognised complication of heparin therapy. The syndrome is idiosyncratic, immune mediated, and not dose dependent and therefore is equally likely to occur with prophylactic and therapeutic heparin dosage regimens. Despite published reports on the subject we were alarmed that many surgeons who regularly use heparin to prevent or treat thrombosis were unaware that heparin can induce thrombotic complications in susceptible patients. We present three typical case histories, a brief discussion of the condition, and some guidelines on its prevention and treatment. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:8280214

  1. Ocular Inflammation in Behçet’s Disease: Incidence of Ocular Complications and of Loss of Visual Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Kaçmaz, R. Oktay; Kempen, John H.; Newcomb, Craig; Gangaputra, Sapna; Daniel, Ebenezer; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Suhler, Eric B.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Foster, C. Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the risk of structural ocular complications and loss of visual acuity in cases of Behçet’s Disease (BD); to evaluate potential risk and protective factors for these events Design Retrospective cohort study Methods Setting Five academic center ocular inflammation subspecialty practices Study Population A total of 168 consecutive patients with BD-associated ocular inflammation Procedures Clinical data on these patients were ascertained by standardized chart review Outcome Measures Visual acuity, structural ocular complications of inflammation, intraocular pressure (IOP) Results Over a median follow-up of 1.05 years, the incidence of specific structural complications and IOP disturbances were common: the incidence rate of any ocular complication was 0.45/eye-year (EY). Rates of loss of visual acuity to 20/50 or worse and to 20/200 or worse were 0.12/EY and 0.09/EY respectively. Risk factors for loss of visual acuity during follow-up were persistent inflammatory activity, presence of posterior synechiae, presence of hypotony, and presence of elevated IOP. In a time-dependent analysis, current activity of ocular inflammation was associated with an increased risk of loss of visual acuity to 20/50 or worse (RR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.1–5.5, p = 0.03) and to 20/200 or worse (RR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.2–5.8, p = 0.01). Conclusions Loss of visual acuity and occurrence of ocular complications were common in patients with ocular inflammation associated with Behçet’s Disease, even with aggressive therapy. Ongoing inflammation during follow-up, presence/occurrence of posterior synechiae, hypotony, and elevated IOP were associated with an increased risk of loss of visual acuity. PMID:18708181

  2. [Congenital heart disease in adults: residua, sequelae, and complications of cardiac defects repaired at an early age].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, it is estimated that 85% of the infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) will survive to adulthood, thanks mainly to surgical or therapeutic procedures performed during infancy or childhood. The clinical profile and disease pattern of adults with CHD is changing. The prevalence of certain adult CHDs, such as tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries or univentricular heart, is rising, but these conditions have practically become new diseases as a result of therapy. Most surviving patients present residua, sequelae, or complications, which can progress during adult life. These disorders can present electrophysiological disturbances, valvular disease, persistent shunts, myocardial dysfunction, pulmonary or systemic vascular disease, problems caused by prosthetic materials, infectious complications, thromboembolic events, or extravascular disorders involving multiple organs or systems. In tetralogy of Fallot, the most striking problems that affect long-term prognosis are pulmonary valve regurgitation, right ventricle dysfunction, and atrial or ventricular arrhythmias. The main problems appearing after physiological atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries are related to right ventricular function, since it is structurally unprepared for systemic circulation, and atrial arrhythmias. Surgical repair of univentricular heart using Fontan techniques should be considered a palliative procedure that does not modify the underlying structural disorder and exposes the postoperative patient to severe complications and problems. The increase in the number of patients with CHD who will reach adulthood in the coming decades makes it necessary to carefully consider the new healthcare demands that are being generated, who should be responsible for them, and how and where solutions can be found.

  3. Cardiac complications of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sandhu, Paul; Boobes, Khlaed; Hatahet, Kamel; Raza, Farhan; Boobes, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of the death in dialysis patients. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are associated with lower mortality and are viewed as the desired access option in most patients with advanced kidney disease needing dialysis. However, AVFs have significant and potentially deleterious effects on cardiac functions particularly in the setting of preexisting heart disease. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review to what is known about the impact of AVFs on: congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease. PMID:26299166

  4. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on left sole and red maculopapular rashes on perianal skin. She had a history of exposure to HFMD. Fecal sample was positive for EV71 RNA by real-time PCR. Chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of the brain showed significant hypointensity in the brainstem on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. She recovered well. This case highlights severe HFMD in neonates is rare. Medical history and physical examination are important in making diagnosis. PMID:25097545

  5. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on left sole and red maculopapular rashes on perianal skin. She had a history of exposure to HFMD. Fecal sample was positive for EV71 RNA by real-time PCR. Chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of the brain showed significant hypointensity in the brainstem on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. She recovered well. This case highlights severe HFMD in neonates is rare. Medical history and physical examination are important in making diagnosis.

  6.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  7. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50 mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5 mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75 mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor α under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor α was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  8. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient. PMID:20850107

  9. Secondary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a complication of inherited renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bockenhauer, D; van’t Hoff, W; Dattani, M.; Lehnhardt, A; Subtirelu, M; Hildebrandt, F; Bichet, DG

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a serious condition with large water losses in the urine and risk of hypernatremic dehydration. Unrecognised, repeated episodes of hypernatremic dehydration can lead to permanent brain damage. Primary NDI is due to mutations in either AVPR2 or AQP2. NDI can also occur as a secondary complication, most commonly from obstructive uropathy or chronic lithium therapy. We observed NDI in patients with inherited tubulopathies and aimed to define the clinical and molecular phenotype. Methods We reviewed medical notes of four patients with clinical NDI and an underlying molecularly confirmed diagnosis of nephropathic cystinosis, Bartter syndrome, nephronophthisis and apparent mineralocorticoid excess, respectively. Results The patients all failed to concentrate their urine after DDAVP. None had an identifiable mutation in AVPR2 or AQP2, consistent with secondary NDI. Patients experienced repeated episodes of hypernatraemic dehydration and in two cases NDI was initially thought to be the primary diagnosis, delaying recognition of the underlying problem. Conclusion The recognition of this potential complication is important as it has direct implications for the clinical management. The occurrence of NDI in these conditions provides clues for the etiology of aquaporin deficiency. PMID:20733335

  10. [Disease management for diabetes mellitus to prevent the onset and progression of complications].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Nakashima, Naoki; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2012-11-01

    We developed a new critical pathway technique and an outbound-inbound call center system. The former is to support general physicians to care for outpatients with diabetes mellitus according to practice guidelines. We employed the "Overlay method" to develop personalized optimal critical pathways. Our overview critical pathways consist of basic sheets for regular examinations and optional sheets on which the kinds and frequencies of medical examinations are determined according to many parameters, such as methods of treatment, the severity of diabetic complications, and knowledge levels. The critical pathway is continually modified according to the change in the patient's condition. The latter is to maintain and enhance the treatment motivation of outpatients. Call center agents collect medical information, making outgoing calls using a questionnaire about the patient's health status and diabetic complications as well as receiving incoming calls. When patients do not visit on the appointment date, call center agents arrange the next consultation to prevent treatment dropout. These systems are now under evaluation in a clinical trial of outpatients with diabetes mellitus.

  11. Presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease. A case complicated by recombination within the D4S10 locus.

    PubMed

    Curtis, A; Millan, F; Holloway, S; Mennie, M; Crosbie, A; Raeburn, J A; Brock, D J

    1989-01-01

    Presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease (HD) is possible through the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) at the closely linked D4S10 locus. Recombination between the HD and D4S10 loci will occur in 4%-5% of meioses, and is a well-recognised complication of predictive testing. Recombination between RFLPs within the D4S10 locus is a rare event and can usually be ignored. We report a case where such an intra-locus recombination frustrated attempts to predict the chance of a high-risk individual inheriting the HD gene.

  12. [Point of note in the treatment of osteoporotic patients complicated with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes secondary hyperparathyroidism due to an accumulation of phosphate in the circulation, resulting in the development of CKD-mineral bone disease(MBD), which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and fracture. Increase of bone fracture in CKD might be explained by phosphate overload, increased oxidative stress, malnutrition, and the increased risk of fall due to sarcopenia. It is recently emphasized that the overtreatment of osteoporosis might induce the development of adynamic bone disease by calcium overload and/or oversuppression of bone turnover, which might stimulate ectopic calcification including vessel wall. Considering for the high prevalence of CKD in elderly osteoporotic women, we should be careful to avoid the induction of calcium/phosphate overload and over-suppression of bone turnover when we treat osteoporosis for such patients. PMID:27561342

  13. Compartment syndrome as a rare complication of iloprost infusion for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory P; Kadam, Sameer; Mohammed, Mohammed; Andrews, Brian T E

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of acute compartment syndrome associated with the use of iloprost in the treatment of Buerger's disease. After a four-compartmental fasciotomy of the affected lower limb, the patient made a complete recovery.

  14. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Hwan; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision.

  15. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  16. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  17. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  18. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood. PMID:26173914

  19. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood.

  20. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Dyslipidemia, Risk for Cardiovascular Complications, and Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Qing; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with several metabolic disorders and diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. In NAFLD, dyslipidemia is manifested as increased serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, all of which are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD patients. Thus, implementation of an aggressive therapeutic strategy for dyslipidemia with hypolipidemic agents may mitigate the risk for CVD among NAFLD patients. Here, we provide a current review of literature regarding NAFLD, with particular emphasis on dyslipidemia and available treatment options. PMID:26357637

  1. Carcinoma of the small intestine and colon as a complication of Crohn disease: radiologic manifestation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, G.W.; Frank, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    Barium examinations of the large and small bowel were analyzed in six of seven patients who had adenocarcinoma in areas of the intestine affected with Crohn disease; radiographic changes were correlated with clinical, surgical, and pathologic findings. Radiographic examinations were available in five of these patients at the time of diagnosis of tumor. Two of the five patients demonstrated classic radiographic changes associated with carcinoma. In the other three cases, the radiographic changes were atypical for carcinoma and demonstrated progression of disease over time to include more portions of the bowel and presence of fistulas, strictures, and obstruction. The most frequent clinical presentation of adenocarcinoma in these patients was a recrudescence of symptoms after a long quiescent period. In patients with long-standing Crohn disease plus these clinical features and the above radiographic findings, the diagnosis of a coexisting carcinoma should be considered.

  2. Complication Rate of Percutaneous Liver Biopsies among Persons with Advanced Chronic Liver Disease in the HALT-C Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seeff, Leonard B.; Everson, Gregory T.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Curto, Teresa M.; Lee, William M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Fontana, Robert J.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Although percutaneous liver biopsy is a standard diagnostic procedure, it has drawbacks, including risk of serious complications. It is not known whether persons with advanced chronic liver disease have a greater risk of complications from liver biopsy than patients with more mild, chronic liver disease. The safety and complications of liver biopsy were examined in patients with hepatitis C-related bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis that were enrolled in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial. Methods Standard case report forms from 2,740 liver biopsies performed at 10 study sites between 2000 and 2006 were reviewed for serious adverse events, along with information from questionnaires completed by investigators about details of biopsy techniques used at each hospital. Results There were 29 serious adverse events (1.1%); the most common was bleeding (16 cases, 0.6%). There were no biopsy-related deaths. The bleeding rate was higher among patients with platelet counts ≤60,000/mm3 and among those with an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥1.3, although none of the patients with an INR >1.5 bled. Excluding subjects with a platelet count ≤60,000/mm3 would have reduced the bleeding rate by 25% (4/16), eliminating only 2.8% (77/2740) of biopsies. Operator experience, the type of needle used, or the performance of the biopsy under ultrasound guidance did not influence the frequencies of adverse events. Conclusions Approximately 0.5% of persons with hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis experienced potentially serious bleeding after liver biopsy; risk increased significantly in patients with platelet counts ≤60,000/mm3.(K2). PMID:20362695

  3. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  4. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

  5. Radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the clavicle complicating Hodgkin's disease. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Aprin, H.; Calandra, J.; Mir, R.; Lee, J.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Review of the literature reveals that postradiation chondrosarcoma is a rare secondary malignant bone tumor. This case report demonstrates a Grade 1 chondrosarcoma of the proximal right clavicle in a 17-year-old boy, eight years after extensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy for a Stage IIB Hodgkin's disease.

  6. Disease management and pharmacoeconomics as tools for mass prevention of hypertensive complications.

    PubMed

    Goldberg Arnold, R J

    2001-01-01

    Hypertension has been identified as a major predictor of cardiovascular disease, which is a worldwide cause of morbidity and premature mortality. Optimal management of hypertension involves finding a balance among the benefits, risks, and costs of disease treatment and prevention of hypertensive sequelae. Cost-effectiveness analysis helps to clarify the trade-offs between the costs and benefits of treatment and also to evaluate the effects on quality of therapy. Disease management programs that incorporate pharmacoeconomic analysis and computerized methods of targeting patients at high risk of hypertensive sequelae are useful and cost-effective tools. Critical to these cost-effectiveness analyses and disease management programs are the expected benefits attributable to blood pressure reduction. The utility of these programs in helping to determine which patients will benefit from intensive intervention depends to a great extent on the assumptions made and the quality of the data used for the analyses--that is, the degree to which the data are evidence based. PMID:11975786

  7. Myositis complicating benzathine penicillin-G injection in a case of rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, Joshua R; Wyber, Rosemary; Remenyi, Bo; Croser, David; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year old boy developed myositis secondary to intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin-G in the context of secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease. Side effects of intramuscular delivery of benzathine penicillin-G are well described and include injection site pain and inflammation, but myositis, as depicted on magnetic resonance imaging in this case, has not previously been described.

  8. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  9. Parental problem-solving abilities and the association of sickle cell disease complications with health-related quality of life for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Lamia P; Daniel, Lauren C; Smith, Kelsey; Renée Robinson, M; Patterson, Chavis A

    2014-03-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The current analysis sought to explore parent problem-solving abilities/skills as a moderator between SCD complications and HRQOL to evaluate applicability to pediatric SCD. At baseline, 83 children ages 6-12 years and their primary caregiver completed measures of child HRQOL. Primary caregivers also completed a measure of social problem-solving. A SCD complications score was computed from medical record review. Parent problem-solving abilities significantly moderated the association of SCD complications with child self-report psychosocial HRQOL (p = .006). SCD complications had a direct effect on parent proxy physical and psychosocial child HRQOL. Enhancing parent problem-solving abilities may be one approach to improve HRQOL for children with high SCD complications; however, modification of parent perceptions of HRQOL may require direct intervention to improve knowledge and skills involved in disease management.

  10. Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; O’Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

  11. Small bowel volvulus as a complication of von Recklinghausen’s disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Thomas Artur; Kröpil, Feride; Schoppe, Martin Olaf; Kröpil, Patric; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Krieg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old male with Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), who presented at the time of admission with clinical findings of an acute abdomen caused by a mechanical obstruction. Computerized tomography showed a volvulus of the terminal ileum with mesenteric swirling as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Consecutive exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis and 70 cm of the small intestine was resected due to an affection of the mesentery by multiple neurofibromas. The gastrointestinal tract is affected in approximately 10% of patients with NF-1, however the mesentery is almost always spared. Here we describe the unique case of a patient with a volvulus caused by mesenteric manifestation of von Recklinghausen’s disease, emphasizing the role of surgery in a team of multidisciplinary specialists to treat this multiorganic disease. PMID:24976735

  12. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  13. Intrapulmonary haematoma complicating mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonmarchand, G; Lefebvre, E; Lerebours-Pigeonnière, G; Genevois, A; Massari, P; Leroy, J

    1988-01-01

    Intrapulmonary haematomas occurred during mechanical ventilation of two patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bullous dystrophy. In both cases, the haematomas were revealed by blood-stained aspirates, a fall in haemoglobin level, and the appearance of radiological opacities. Haematoma occurrence in the area of a bulla which recently has rapidly increased in size, suggests that the haematoma is due to the rupture of stretched vessels embedded in the wall of the bulla. PMID:3379188

  14. Predictive factors for skeletal complications in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Berruti, A; Tucci, M; Mosca, A; Tarabuzzi, R; Gorzegno, G; Terrone, C; Vana, F; Lamanna, G; Tampellini, M; Porpiglia, F; Angeli, A; Scarpa, R M; Dogliotti, L

    2005-01-01

    Factors predictive of skeletal-related events (SREs) in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease were investigated. We evaluated the frequency of SREs in 200 hormone-refractory patients consecutively observed at our Institution and followed until death or the last follow-up. Baseline parameters were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analysis as potential predictive factors of SREs. Skeletal-related events were observed in 86 patients (43.0%), 10 of which (5.0%) occurred before the onset of hormone-refractory disease. In univariate analysis, patient performance status (P=0.002), disease extent (DE) in bone (P=0.0001), bone pain (P=0.0001), serum alkaline phosphatase (P=0.0001) and urinary N-telopeptide of type one collagen (P=0.0001) directly correlated with a greater risk to develop SREs, whereas Gleason score at diagnosis, serum PSA, Hb, serum albumin, serum calcium, types of bone lesions and duration of androgen deprivation therapy did not. Both DE in bone (hazard ratio (HR): 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–1.25, P=0.000) and pain score (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, P=0.000) were independent variables predicting for the onset of SREs in multivariate analysis. In patients with heavy tumour load in bone and great bone pain, the percentage of SREs was almost twice as high as (26 vs 52%, P<0.02) and occurred significantly earlier (P=0.000) than SREs in patients with limited DE in bone and low pain. Bone pain and DE in bone independently predict the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease. These findings could help physicians in tailoring the skeletal follow-up most appropriate to individual patients and may prove useful for stratifying patients enrolled in bisphosphonate clinical trials. PMID:16222309

  15. Second malignant neoplasms complicating Hodgkin's disease: the National Cancer Institute experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, W.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Waller, B.; Makuch, R.W.; Kelley, P.A.; Glatstein, E.; DeVita, V.T.

    1984-07-01

    The medical records of all patients treated for Hodgkin's disease during the years 1964-1981 were reviewed. Four hundred seventy-three previously untreated patients were analyzed. Thirty-four subsequent second malignant neoplasms were observed in 33 patients among those treated for Hodgkin's disease. Eight cases of acute nonlymphocyctic leukemia, one case of chronic myeloid leukemia, three cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, three cases of sarcoma, and 19 other tumors were identified. The ten-year estimated risk of leukemia by treatment was the following: radiotherapy only (0), chemotherapy only (0.02), initial combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.06), and salvage combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.09). The ten-year estimated risk of solid tumors was 0.07 overall, with all treatment groups associated with similar risks. Unlike some other reports, a greater risk of leukemia in patients who began treatment for Hodgkin's disease at age 40 or older was not found. However, a positive association was noted between increasing risk of solid tumors and increasing patient age.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease with Early Motor Complications: A UK Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fundament, Tomasz; Eldridge, Paul R.; Green, Alexander L.; Whone, Alan L.; Taylor, Rod S.; Williams, Adrian C.; Schuepbach, W. M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating illness associated with considerable impairment of quality of life and substantial costs to health care systems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established surgical treatment option for some patients with advanced PD. The EARLYSTIM trial has recently demonstrated its clinical benefit also in patients with early motor complications. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of DBS, compared to best medical therapy (BMT), among PD patients with early onset of motor complications, from a United Kingdom (UK) payer perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to represent the progression of PD as rated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) over time in patients with early PD. Evidence sources were a systematic review of clinical evidence; data from the EARLYSTIM study; and a UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) dataset including DBS patients. A mapping algorithm was developed to generate utility values based on UPDRS data for each intervention. The cost-effectiveness was expressed as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to explore the effect of parameter uncertainty. Results Over a 15-year time horizon, DBS was predicted to lead to additional mean cost per patient of £26,799 compared with BMT (£73,077/patient versus £46,278/patient) and an additional mean 1.35 QALYs (6.69 QALYs versus 5.35 QALYs), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £19,887 per QALY gained with a 99% probability of DBS being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were not significantly impacted by plausible changes in the input parameter values. Conclusion These results indicate that DBS is a cost-effective intervention in PD patients with early motor complications when compared with existing interventions, offering additional health

  17. [Current pattern of anthracosilicosis, its complications and correlation with other diseases (evaluation of 300 legal autopsies 1977-1988)].

    PubMed

    Hartung, W; Moon, J S

    1992-10-01

    The spectrum of silicosis of coal miners has changed during the past decades. The life expectancy of the miners suffering from silicosis has been successfully adapted to that of the non-miners as a result of a consistent therapy. Morphologically, the processes involving large callosities have receded markedly; in their place, there has been an increased incidence of generalised focal dust emphysema that are difficult to differentiate clinically from the common chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Chronic bronchitis and emphysema are the most important concomitant pulmonary diseases; the incidence of tuberculosis is still enhanced and carcinomas of the lung are only rarely to be acknowledged as so-called carcinomas in scar tissue. Other major diseases that coincide with silicosis are seen in p.m. statistics with customary frequency of incidence (cardiovascular diseases almost 50%, malignant tumours including those of the lung about 25%, other major diseases without respiratory organs about 10%). The main problem in expertising is to differentiate the influence of these diseases from those of silicosis; expertising must employ the legally prescribed terminology. In our own investigations based on 300 postmortem expertises, death as a result of a professionally acquired disease was acknowledged in 48% of all cases of silicosis of severity grades I to III, silicosis being the sole major disease in only half of the cases and in the other cases an essential partial contributor to the cause of death. The significance of the extended generalised dust emphysema as a special type of pneumoconioses that must be classified as grave, is emphasised in contrast to previously compiled statistics.

  18. [Legionnaire's disease complicated by acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Labidi, J; Fdhila, W; Battikh, R; Ellouze, S; Ben Abdelhafidh, N; Louzir, B; M'sadek, F; Othmani, S

    2006-09-01

    The infectious origin of non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare (5% of cases). An elevated muscle enzyme level is often reported in the legionnaire's disease. We report the case of a 39-year-old male, with no previous medical history, admitted for renal failure (creatininemia=977 micromol/l) secondary to rhabdomyolysis and a twelve-day history of infectious syndrome with pneumonia in the left base. Legionella pneumophila was considered responsible for these symptoms because of a positive serology. The other microbial assessments were negative. After rehydration and three weeks of antibiotics, the outcome was favorable: the renal failure resolved completely and the muscle enzyme level returned to normal.

  19. Jejunal overexpression of peptide YY in celiac disease complicated with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gurrado, Angela; Giungato, Simone; Catacchio, Ivana; Piscitelli, Domenico; Arborea, Graziana; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Testini, Mario; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year old man with coeliac disease and chronic lack of appetite, malabsorption and weight loss, despite the gluten-free diet, was operated because of a sub-diaphragmatic free air due to a small-bowel pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI). The jejunum showed granulomatous lesions with a honeycombed appearance of air cysts in the submucosa/subserosa. We found overexpression of peptide YY (PYY) into only the jejunum with PCI, while the expression was very weak or absent in the tissue without cysts. One year after surgery, he had no abdominal pain or PCI recurrence. The above chronic symptoms were plausibly attributable to the PYY.

  20. [Pulmonary cystic disease may be a rare complication to recurrent respiratory human papilloma virus infection].

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter Thaysen; Weinreich, Ulla M Øller

    2014-12-01

    A 19-year-old woman with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis (JLP), treated since childhood with multiple resections, was admitted with symptoms of pneumonia. A chest X-ray and CAT-scan revealed multiple lung cysts and a bronchoalveolar lavage detected human papilloma virus 11. The patient responded well to antibiotics. A body plethysmography showed small lung volumes and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, but normal volume diffusion capacity divided by alveolar volume. Pulmonary cystic disease should be considered when patients with JLP have symptoms of pneumonia.

  1. Characteristics, complications, and gaps in evidence-based interventions in rheumatic heart disease: the Global Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry (the REMEDY study)

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Engel, Mark E.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Mackie, Pam; Cupido, Blanche; Mauff, Katya; Islam, Shofiqul; Joachim, Alexia; Daniels, Rezeen; Francis, Veronica; Ogendo, Stephen; Gitura, Bernard; Mondo, Charles; Okello, Emmy; Lwabi, Peter; Al-Kebsi, Mohammed M.; Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Sheta, Sahar S.; Haileamlak, Abraham; Daniel, Wandimu; Goshu, Dejuma Y.; Abdissa, Senbeta G.; Desta, Araya G.; Shasho, Bekele A.; Begna, Dufera M.; ElSayed, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Musuku, John; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Okeahialam, Basil N.; Ige, Olukemi; Sutton, Christopher; Misra, Rajeev; Abul Fadl, Azza; Kennedy, Neil; Damasceno, Albertino; Sani, Mahmoud; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Olunuga, Taiwo; Elhassan, Huda H.M.; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Adeoye, Abiodun M.; Mntla, Phindile; Ojji, Dike; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) accounts for over a million premature deaths annually; however, there is little contemporary information on presentation, complications, and treatment. Methods and results This prospective registry enrolled 3343 patients (median age 28 years, 66.2% female) presenting with RHD at 25 hospitals in 12 African countries, India, and Yemen between January 2010 and November 2012. The majority (63.9%) had moderate-to-severe multivalvular disease complicated by congestive heart failure (33.4%), pulmonary hypertension (28.8%), atrial fibrillation (AF) (21.8%), stroke (7.1%), infective endocarditis (4%), and major bleeding (2.7%). One-quarter of adults and 5.3% of children had decreased left ventricular (LV) systolic function; 23% of adults and 14.1% of children had dilated LVs. Fifty-five percent (n = 1761) of patients were on secondary antibiotic prophylaxis. Oral anti-coagulants were prescribed in 69.5% (n = 946) of patients with mechanical valves (n = 501), AF (n = 397), and high-risk mitral stenosis in sinus rhythm (n = 48). However, only 28.3% (n = 269) had a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Among 1825 women of childbearing age (12–51 years), only 3.6% (n = 65) were on contraception. The utilization of valvuloplasty and valve surgery was higher in upper-middle compared with lower-income countries. Conclusion Rheumatic heart disease patients were young, predominantly female, and had high prevalence of major cardiovascular complications. There is suboptimal utilization of secondary antibiotic prophylaxis, oral anti-coagulation, and contraception, and variations in the use of percutaneous and surgical interventions by country income level. PMID:25425448

  2. Complications of vasectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Awsare, Ninaad S.; Krishnan, Jai; Boustead, Greg B.; Hanbury, Damian C.; McNicholas, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasectomy is a common method of sterilisation. However, it is less popular than tubal ligation world-wide. It is also a frequent cause of litigation relating to its complications. This article reviews the early and late risks associated with the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data collection was done using the internet to search Medline for obtaining evidence-based medicine reviews. Cross-references were obtained from key articles. Websites of government bodies and medical associations were searched for guidelines relating to vasectomy. DISCUSSION: Early complications include haematoma, wound and genito-urinary infections, and traumatic fistulae. Vasectomy failure occurs in 0-2% of patients. Late recanalisation causes failure in 0.2% of vasectomies. Significant chronic orchalgia may occur in up to 15% of men after vasectomy, and may require epididyectomy or vasectomy reversal. Antisperm antibodies develop in a significant proportion of men post-vasectomy, but do not increase the risk of immune-complex or atherosclerotic heart disease. Similarly, vasectomy does not enhance risk of testicular or prostate cancer. Vasectomy has a lower mortality as compared to tubal occlusion, but is still significantly high in non-industrialised countries because of infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomy, though safe and relatively simple, requires a high level of expertise to minimise complications. Adequate pre-operative counselling is essential to increase patient acceptability of this method of permanent contraception. PMID:16263006

  3. A Systems Biology Preview of the Relationships Between Mineral and Metabolic Complications in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary There are emerging data that the skeleton is connected to systemic biological functions through the release of two osteoblast-/osteocyte-derived hormones, fibroblastic growth factor 23 (FGF23) and undercarboxylated osteocalcin (Ocn). FGF23 is important in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, whereas Ocn participates in endocrine networks, coordinating bone and fat mass, energy metabolism, and sex hormone production. Bone remodeling and mineralization per se, along with the hormones leptin, insulin, glucocorticoids, PTH, and 1,25(OH)2D, regulate the release of FGF23 and Ocn, leading to complex cross-talk and coordination between endocrine networks previously thought to be distinct. These pathways are particularly important in chronic kidney disease, in which both FGF23 and Ocn are increased. Although these hormones initially serve an adaptive role, with progressive loss of renal function they show maladaptive effects, particularly on the cardiovascular system, through multiple mechanisms, including possible cross-talk with the renin angiotensin system. The complex interconnections between the various endocrine networks in chronic kidney disease may account for the difficulty in treating the uremic state. PMID:23465500

  4. Complications after total knee replacement in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-09-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increasing age. Osteoarthritis is also a growing problem in the aging population, and total knee replacement (TKR) is a common surgical procedure for this population. An increasing number of COPD patients are receiving TKR, but few studies have examined the complications and outcomes after TKR in COPD patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the complications, including mortality, wound infections, hospitalization readmission, pneumonia (PN), and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) in patients with COPD after receiving TKR.The National Health Insurance operated by the government is a nationwide health care program with universal coverage in Taiwan. It covers approximately 99% of the total Taiwanese population of 23 million people. In this case-control study, we analyzed the longitudinally linked National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees retrospectively followed from 1996 to 2010. This study analyzed patients who underwent TKR surgery between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2009 by identifying the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code. We separated patients into COPD and non-COPD groups. Five study outcomes and complications were measured after TKR, including mortality for 1 and 3 years, wound infections for 1 and 2 years, hospitalization readmission for 30 and 90 days, PN for 30 and 90 days, and CVAs.A total of 3431 patients who underwent TKR surgery were identified, including 358 patients with COPD and 3073 patients without COPD. The COPD group had a higher percentage of 90-day PN (3.7% vs. 1.1%), 30-day readmission (7.0% vs. 4.0%), 30-day CVA (1.7% vs. 0.6%), 90-day CVA (3.9% vs. 2.1%), and 3-year mortality (3.9% vs. 2.1%) than the non-COPD group. COPD was associated with 90-day PN (adjusted hazard ratio[HR)] = 2.12, P = 0.030) after

  5. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  6. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture.

  7. Potential influences of complementary therapy on motor and non-motor complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A; Evatt, Marian L

    2009-10-01

    Nearly two-thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use vitamins or nutritional supplements, and many more may use other complementary therapies, yet <50% of patients have discussed the use of these complementary therapies with a healthcare professional. Physicians should be aware of the complementary therapies their patients with PD are using, and the possible effects of these therapies on motor and non-motor symptoms. Complementary therapies, such as altered diet, dietary supplements, vitamin therapy, herbal supplements, caffeine, nicotine, exercise, physical therapy, massage therapy, melatonin, bright-light therapy and acupuncture, may all influence the symptoms of PD and/or the effectiveness of dopaminergic therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests complementary therapy also may influence non-motor symptoms of PD, such as respiratory disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, mood disorders, sleep and orthostatic hypotension. Whenever possible, clinicians should ensure that complementary therapy is used appropriately in PD patients without reducing the benefits of dopaminergic therapy.

  8. Second malignancies complicating Hodgkin's disease: a Southwest Oncology Group 10-year followup

    SciTech Connect

    Coltman, C.A. Jr.; Dixon, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Thirty-two second malignancies (21 acute leukemias and 11 solid tumors) were identified among 659 patients with all stages of Hodgkin's disease treated by members of the Southwest Oncology Group. There were no leukemias and one solid tumor among 95 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The actuarial risk of developing acute leukemia at 7 years was 6.2% for chemotherapy alone, 6.4% for combined modality, and 7.7% for salvage chemotherapy. The incidence of acute leukemia was higher (P . 0.002) among those whose treatment began at greater than or equal to 40 years of age. The actuarial risk of leukemia in that group was 20.7% at 7 years. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that chemotherapy alone, combined modality, and salvage chemotherapy have an equivalent oncogenic potential and that patients greater than or equal to 40 years of age have an enhanced susceptibility to these oncogenic stimuli.

  9. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  10. Cardiovascular complications of calcium supplementation in chronic kidney disease: are there arrhythmic risks?

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Simonetta; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    Calcium supplements may induce hypercalcaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or patients on hemodialysis. Even in the absence of overt hypercalcaemia, calcium supplementation may be associated with a positive calcium balance and intracellular calcium overload. There is an increased risk of complex supraventricular, ventricular arrhythmias or the risk of suffering a cardiac arrest in the presence of hypercalcaemia and calcium overload in subjects with impaired or absent renal function. A maximum intake of 1000 mg elemental calcium, combining supplements and dietary calcium, together with a 1.5 mmol/l level in the dialysate, may be a safer (opinion based) recommendation in CKD patients. This is especially the case if the patient already shows signs of extra-skeletal calcification or if they present cardiac comorbidities. Lower calcium levels in the dialysis fluid might reduce the positive calcium balance but can increase intradialytic plasma calcium changes and therefore increase the risk of arrhythmias.

  11. Infliximab is a plausible alternative for neurologic complications of Behçet disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeydan, Burcu; Uygunoglu, Ugur; Saip, Sabahattin; Demirci, Onat N.; Seyahi, Emire; Ugurlu, Serdal; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Siva, Aksel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of infliximab in patients with neuro-Behçet syndrome for whom other immunosuppressive medications had failed. Methods: Patients whose common immunosuppressive medications fail in recurrent neuro-Behçet syndrome need an alternative. We report our experience with the tumor necrosis factor α blocker infliximab for long-term treatment of neuro-Behçet syndrome. We recruited patients within a multidisciplinary referral practice of Behçet disease and prospectively followed everyone with a neurologic symptom(s). Patients (n = 16) with ≥2 neurologic bouts (excluding purely progressive disease) while on another immunosuppressive treatment were switched to and successfully sustained on infliximab (5 mg/kg in weeks 0, 2, and 6, then once every 8 weeks; minimum follow-up duration ≥12 months). Infliximab was stopped within 2 months after initiation in one patient because of pulmonary and CNS tuberculosis. Results: Patients had stepwise worsening due to relapses in the Expanded Disability Status Scale modified for neuro-Behçet syndrome before switching to infliximab (median score of 5.0, range 2.0–7.0; median neuro-Behçet syndrome duration 29.1 months, range 5.0–180.7). Median duration of preinfliximab immunosuppressive medication use was 20.0 months (range 3.0–180.7). In all 15 patients, during infliximab treatment (median score 4.0, range 2.0–7.0; median duration 39.0 months, range 16.0–104.9 months), neurologic relapses were completely aborted and there was no further disability accumulation. Conclusion: We observed a significant beneficial effect of infliximab in neuro-Behçet syndrome. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with neuro-Behçet syndrome whose other immunosuppressive medications failed, infliximab prevents further relapses and stabilizes disability. PMID:27458602

  12. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency: Severe placental complications in a pregnant woman with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salahudheen, Sultan M; Begam, Muzibunnisa A

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  13. What do adult patients with congenital heart disease know about their disease, treatment, and prevention of complications? A call for structured patient education

    PubMed Central

    Moons, P; De Volder, E; Budts, W; De Geest, S; Elen, J; Waeytens, K; Gewillig, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess how much adults with congenital heart disease understand about their heart defect, its treatment, and the preventive measures necessary to avoid complications.
DESIGN—Descriptive, cross sectional study.
SETTING—Adult congenital heart disease programme in one tertiary care centre in Belgium.
PATIENTS—62 adults with congenital heart disease (47 men; 15 women), median age 23 years.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Patients' knowledge was assessed during an outpatient visit using the Leuven knowledge questionnaire for congenital heart diseases, a 33 item instrument developed for this study.
RESULTS—Patients had adequate knowledge (> 80% correct answers) about their treatment, frequency of follow up, dental practices, occupational choices, appropriateness of oral contraceptives, and the risks of pregnancy. Knowledge about the name and anatomy of the heart defect, the possibility of recurrent episodes of endocarditis during their lifetime, and the appropriateness of different physical activities was moderate (50-80% correct answers). There was poor understanding (< 50% correct answers) about the reasons for follow up, the symptoms of deterioration of the heart disease, the definition, characteristics, and risk factors of endocarditis, the impact of smoking and alcohol on the heart disease, the hereditary nature of the condition, and the suitability of intrauterine devices as contraceptives.
CONCLUSIONS—Adults with congenital heart disease have important gaps in their knowledge about their condition. The results of this study can be used as a basis for developing or optimising structured educational interventions to enhance patients' health behaviour.


Keywords: patient education; congenital heart disease; health behaviour PMID:11410567

  14. [Infectious complications in patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Bogomolova, N S; Vishnevskaia, G A; Bol'shakov, L V; Oreshkina, T D; Kuznetsova, S M; Chernyĭ, S S

    2010-01-01

    Methods for microbiological monitoring could analyze the microflora isolated in 372 patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus, who were treated at the Department for Surgery of the Lung and Mediastinum, Acad. B. V. Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, in 2003 to 2009. Major groups of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree in patients who had undergone long-term resuscitation, injuries, surgery, etc. and in those who had admitted to the department from other clinics are identified. The main clinically significant microorganisms isolated during the pathological process in this area were Staphylococcus epidermadis (3.9-13.3%), St. aureus (12.4-21.1%), Pseudomonas eruginosa (9.2-17.5%), and Candida fungi (7.8-12.2%). This indicates the greater importance of the fungal microflora and its representatives' resistance to the most commonly used drugs. Rational antibacterial therapy regimens are proposed in relation to the type of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree.

  15. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  16. [Infectious complications in patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Bogomolova, N S; Vishnevskaia, G A; Bol'shakov, L V; Oreshkina, T D; Kuznetsova, S M; Chernyĭ, S S

    2010-01-01

    Methods for microbiological monitoring could analyze the microflora isolated in 372 patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus, who were treated at the Department for Surgery of the Lung and Mediastinum, Acad. B. V. Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, in 2003 to 2009. Major groups of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree in patients who had undergone long-term resuscitation, injuries, surgery, etc. and in those who had admitted to the department from other clinics are identified. The main clinically significant microorganisms isolated during the pathological process in this area were Staphylococcus epidermadis (3.9-13.3%), St. aureus (12.4-21.1%), Pseudomonas eruginosa (9.2-17.5%), and Candida fungi (7.8-12.2%). This indicates the greater importance of the fungal microflora and its representatives' resistance to the most commonly used drugs. Rational antibacterial therapy regimens are proposed in relation to the type of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:21395146

  17. Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: putting together the pieces of a complicated puzzle.

    PubMed

    Michas, George; Micha, Renata; Zampelas, Antonis

    2014-06-01

    Dietary fatty acids play significant roles in the cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have well-established adverse effects and should be eliminated from the human diet. CVD risk can be modestly reduced by decreasing saturated fatty acids (SFA) and replacing it by a combination of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Although the ideal type of unsaturated fat for this replacement is unclear, the benefits of PUFA appear strongest. Both n-6 and n-3 PUFA are essential and reduce CVD risk. However, additional research is needed to better define the optimal amounts of both and to discern the patients and/or general population that would benefit from supplemental n-3 fatty acid intake. Furthermore, consumption of animal products, per se, is not necessarily associated with increased CVD risk, whereas nut and olive oil intake is associated with reduced CVD risk. In conclusion, the total matrix of a food is more important than just its fatty acid content in predicting the effect of a food on CVD risk, and a healthy diet should be the cornerstone of CVD prevention.

  18. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  19. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P = 0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  20. Post-refractive surgery complications and eye disease, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Jason B; Hunt, Devin J; Cost, Angelia A

    2016-05-01

    Refractive surgery (RS) is a common procedure in the U.S. military population. This report provides an estimation of incident RS for vision correction purposes in the active component of the U.S. military from 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014 and the prevalence of post-RS complications and eye disease in the 1-year period after RS. During the surveillance period, a total of 121,571 subjects without a diagnosis of eye disease other than hyperopia, myopia, or astigmatism in the previous year received a single incident RS procedure. In the 1-year period after RS, 5.3% of subjects with preoperative hyperopia or myopia had treatment-persistent (unresolved) hyperopia or myopia; 2.0% of subjects with preoperative astigmatism had treatment-persistent (unresolved) astigmatism; and 3.8% were diagnosed with tear film insufficiency. In general, most outcomes showed higher prevalences in Army and Air Force personnel versus Navy and Marine Corps personnel, in women versus men, in officer versus enlisted personnel, and in aviation and Special Forces personnel. A wide variation in outcome prevalences was noted by procedural military treatment facility. PMID:27255946

  1. Solar still. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.D.

    1983-07-20

    Passive solar heating was used in a still in which a packed column packed with popped popcorn separates the alcohol and water vapors. The still's performance was not satisfactory, and it is concluded that passive solar heating could have been better used to preheat makeup water for the fermentation process and to maintain proper fermentation temperatures during the winter. (LEW)

  2. Associations of high HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and high HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the high HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the high HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the high HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188

  3. Role of Innate Immune Response in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Metabolic Complications and Therapeutic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Rosaria; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Calignano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and children. It is characterized by an aberrant lipid storage in hepatocytes, named hepatic steatosis. Simple steatosis remains a benign process in most affected patients, while some of them develop superimposed necroinflammatory activity with a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate and a progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Deep similarity and interconnections between innate immune cells and those of liver parenchyma have been highlighted and showed to play a key role in the development of chronic liver disease. The liver can be considered as an “immune organ” because it hosts non-lymphoid cells, such as macrophage Kupffer cells, stellate and dendritic cells, and lymphoid cells. Many of these cells are components of the classic innate immune system, enabling the liver to play a major role in response to pathogens. Although the liver provides a “tolerogenic” environment, aberrant activation of innate immune signaling may trigger “harmful” inflammation that contributes to tissue injury, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Pathogen recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors, are responsible for the recognition of immunogenic signals, and represent the major conduit for sensing hepatic and non-hepatic noxious stimuli. A pivotal role in liver inflammation is also played by cytokines, which can initiate or have a part in immune response, triggering hepatic intracellular signaling pathways. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic alteration traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and their compounded combined effects. In this review, we discuss the relevant role of innate immune cell activation in relation to NAFLD, the metabolic complications associated to this pathology, and the

  4. H-ferritin and CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) monocytes/macrophages are increased in the skin of adult-onset Still's disease patients and correlate with the multi-visceral involvement of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Cipriani, P; Ciccia, F; Di Benedetto, P; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Guggino, G; Di Bartolomeo, S; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2016-10-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients may show an evanescent salmon-pink erythema appearing during febrile attacks and reducing without fever. Some patients may experience this eruption for many weeks. During AOSD, exceptionally high serum levels of ferritin may be observed; it is an iron storage protein composed of 24 subunits, heavy (H) subunits and light (L) subunits. The ferritin enriched in L subunits (L-ferritin) and the ferritin enriched in H subunits (H-ferritin) may be observed in different tissues. In this work, we aimed to investigate the skin expression of both H-and L-ferritin and the number of macrophages expressing these molecules from AOSD patients with persistent cutaneous lesions. We observed an increased expression of H-ferritin in the skin, associated with an infiltrate in the biopsies obtained from persistent cutaneous lesions of AOSD patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation between H-ferritin skin levels as well as the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells and the multi-visceral involvement of the disease was observed. Our data showed an increased expression of H-ferritin in the skin of AOSD patients, associated with a strong infiltrate of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells. Furthermore, a correlation between the levels of H-ferritin as well as of the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells and the multi-visceral involvement of the disease was observed. PMID:27317930

  5. Renal biopsy: Still a landmark for the nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Luca; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Lacava, Viviana; Pellicanò, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Buemi, Michele; Santoro, Domenico

    2016-07-01

    Renal biopsy was performed for the first time more than one century ago, but its clinical use was routinely introduced in the 1950s. It is still an essential tool for diagnosis and choice of treatment of several primary or secondary kidney diseases. Moreover, it may help to know the expected time of end stage renal disease. The indications are represented by nephritic and/or nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive acute renal failure of unknown origin. Nowadays, it is performed mainly by nephrologists and radiologists using a 14-18 gauges needle with automated spring-loaded biopsy device, under real-time ultrasound guidance. Bleeding is the major primary complication that in rare cases may lead to retroperitoneal haemorrhage and need for surgical intervention and/or death. For this reason, careful evaluation of risks and benefits must be taken into account, and all procedures to minimize the risk of complications must be observed. After biopsy, an observation time of 12-24 h is necessary, whilst a prolonged observation may be needed rarely. In some cases it could be safer to use different techniques to reduce the risk of complications, such as laparoscopic or transjugular renal biopsy in patients with coagulopathy or alternative approaches in obese patients. Despite progress in medicine over the years with the introduction of more advanced molecular biology techniques, renal biopsy is still an irreplaceable tool for nephrologists.

  6. Renal biopsy: Still a landmark for the nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Luca; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Lacava, Viviana; Pellicanò, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Buemi, Michele; Santoro, Domenico

    2016-07-01

    Renal biopsy was performed for the first time more than one century ago, but its clinical use was routinely introduced in the 1950s. It is still an essential tool for diagnosis and choice of treatment of several primary or secondary kidney diseases. Moreover, it may help to know the expected time of end stage renal disease. The indications are represented by nephritic and/or nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive acute renal failure of unknown origin. Nowadays, it is performed mainly by nephrologists and radiologists using a 14-18 gauges needle with automated spring-loaded biopsy device, under real-time ultrasound guidance. Bleeding is the major primary complication that in rare cases may lead to retroperitoneal haemorrhage and need for surgical intervention and/or death. For this reason, careful evaluation of risks and benefits must be taken into account, and all procedures to minimize the risk of complications must be observed. After biopsy, an observation time of 12-24 h is necessary, whilst a prolonged observation may be needed rarely. In some cases it could be safer to use different techniques to reduce the risk of complications, such as laparoscopic or transjugular renal biopsy in patients with coagulopathy or alternative approaches in obese patients. Despite progress in medicine over the years with the introduction of more advanced molecular biology techniques, renal biopsy is still an irreplaceable tool for nephrologists. PMID:27458561

  7. Renal biopsy: Still a landmark for the nephrologist

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Luca; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Lacava, Viviana; Pellicanò, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Buemi, Michele; Santoro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy was performed for the first time more than one century ago, but its clinical use was routinely introduced in the 1950s. It is still an essential tool for diagnosis and choice of treatment of several primary or secondary kidney diseases. Moreover, it may help to know the expected time of end stage renal disease. The indications are represented by nephritic and/or nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive acute renal failure of unknown origin. Nowadays, it is performed mainly by nephrologists and radiologists using a 14-18 gauges needle with automated spring-loaded biopsy device, under real-time ultrasound guidance. Bleeding is the major primary complication that in rare cases may lead to retroperitoneal haemorrhage and need for surgical intervention and/or death. For this reason, careful evaluation of risks and benefits must be taken into account, and all procedures to minimize the risk of complications must be observed. After biopsy, an observation time of 12-24 h is necessary, whilst a prolonged observation may be needed rarely. In some cases it could be safer to use different techniques to reduce the risk of complications, such as laparoscopic or transjugular renal biopsy in patients with coagulopathy or alternative approaches in obese patients. Despite progress in medicine over the years with the introduction of more advanced molecular biology techniques, renal biopsy is still an irreplaceable tool for nephrologists. PMID:27458561

  8. The clinical and imaging presentation of acute "non complicated" pyelonephritis: A new profile for an ancient disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute pyelonephritis (APN) is differently defined according to imaging or clinical criteria. In adults information on the relationship between imaging and clinical data is lacking. Our study was aimed at analysing the relationship between the clinical and imaging presentation of APN, defined according to imaging criteria (parenchymal involvement at MR or CT scan). Methods All consecutive patients hospitalized for "non-complicated" APN were considered (June 2005-December 2009). Clinical, biochemical and imaging data at hospitalization were analyzed by univariate and logistic regression analysis. Results There were 119 patients, all females, median age 32 years (15-72). At hospitalization, inflammatory markers were elevated (CRP median: 12.1 mg/dL, normal < 0.8). Incomplete presentations were frequent: fever was absent in 6.7%, pain in 17.8%, lower urinary tract symptoms in 52.9%. At CT or MR scan the lesions were bilateral in 12.6%, multiple in 79.8%; abscesses were present in 39.5%. Renal scars were found in 15.1%. Positive cultures were correlated with multiple foci (multivariate OR 4.2; CI 1.139-15.515). No other sign/symptom discriminated between small lesions, abscesses or multifocal involvement. Conclusions APN is a protean disease. In the absence of strict correlation with clinical or biochemical markers, imaging studies are required to assess the severity of kidney involvement. PMID:22171968

  9. Phage Therapy: Combating Infections with Potential for Evolving from Merely a Treatment for Complications to Targeting Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Majewska, Joanna; Borysowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is considered to be one of the greatest challenges of medicine and our civilization. Lack of progress in developing new anti-bacterial agents has greatly revived interest in using phage therapy to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. Although a number of clinical trials are underway and more are planned, the realistic perspective of registration of phage preparations and their entering the health market and significantly contributing to the current antimicrobial crisis is rather remote. Therefore, in addition to planning further clinical trials, our present approach of phage treatment carried out as experimental therapy (compassionate use) should be expanded to address the growing and urgent needs of increasing cohorts of patients for whom no alternative treatment is currently available. During the past 11 years of our phage therapy center’s operation, we have obtained relevant clinical and laboratory data which not only confirm the safety of the therapy but also provide important information shedding more light on many aspects of the therapy, contributing to its optimization and allowing for construction of the most appropriate clinical trials. New data on phage biology and interactions with the immune system suggest that in the future phage therapy may evolve from dealing with complications to targeting diseases. However, further studies are necessary to confirm this promising trend. PMID:27725811

  10. [The biological kinetics of biofilms of clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa separated from patients with bronchopulmonary complications under traumatic disease of spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Ul'ianov, V Iu; Opredelentseva, S V; Shvidenko, I G; Norkin, I A; Korshunov, G V; Gladkova, E V

    2014-08-01

    The capacity and intensity of formation of microbial biofilms was analyzed in 24 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in static conditions of cultivation during 24, 48, 72 and 96 yours. The microorganisms were separated from patients with bronchopulmonary infectious complications in acute and early periods of traumatic disease of spinal cord. PMID:25552053

  11. [The biological kinetics of biofilms of clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa separated from patients with bronchopulmonary complications under traumatic disease of spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Ul'ianov, V Iu; Opredelentseva, S V; Shvidenko, I G; Norkin, I A; Korshunov, G V; Gladkova, E V

    2014-08-01

    The capacity and intensity of formation of microbial biofilms was analyzed in 24 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in static conditions of cultivation during 24, 48, 72 and 96 yours. The microorganisms were separated from patients with bronchopulmonary infectious complications in acute and early periods of traumatic disease of spinal cord.

  12. CARD15/NOD2 gene variants are associated with familially occurring and complicated forms of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Heliö, T; Halme, L; Lappalainen, M; Fodstad, H; Paavola-Sakki, P; Turunen, U; Färkkilä, M; Krusius, T; Kontula, K

    2003-01-01

    Background: Variants of the caspase activating recruitment domain 15/nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (CARD15/NOD2) gene have been associated with susceptibility to Crohn’s disease (CD). Aim: Our aim was to evaluate the allele frequencies of the CARD15 variants R702W, G908R, and 1007fs in Finnish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and to search for possible associations between CARD15 variants and occurrence of familial forms of IBD or complicated forms of CD. Patients and methods: We investigated 198 sporadic CD patients, 46 probands with familial CD, 27 CD probands from mixed IBD families, 99 unrelated patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and 300 control individuals for the occurrence of the CARD15 gene variants R702W, G908R, and 1007fs. Results: In CD patients, the allele frequencies for the rare variants of these polymorphisms were 3.3%, 0.6%, and 4.8% (total 8.7%), and the corresponding frequencies in healthy controls were 1.8%, 0%, and 1.7% (total 3.5%) (8.7% v 3.5%; p<0.01). In UC patients allele frequencies were comparable with those in controls. The frequency of the 1007fs polymorphism variant allele was significantly higher among all CD patients than in controls (4.8% v 1.7%; p<0.01) but there was no significant difference in allele frequencies between the CD and UC groups. The 1007fs allele frequency was higher in familial CD than in non-familial cases with CD (10.9% v 3.5%; p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the allele frequencies of the R702W and G908R polymorphisms between CD patients, UC patients, and controls. We found that 15.5% of CD patients, 9.1% of UC patients, and 6.7% of controls carried at least one of the CARD15 variants. In CD patients carrying at least one of the three NOD2 variants, the ileum was affected more often than in non-carrier CD patients (90% v 73%; p<0.05), they had stricturing or penetrating disease more often than non-carriers (88% v 56%; p<0.01), and they had an increased need for bowel surgery

  13. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  14. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  15. Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

  16. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  17. Association between early Helicobacter pylori eradication and a lower risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers.We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ≦120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers.The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.64-0.91, P = 0.003) in a time lag of ≦120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ≦1 year (HR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19, P = 0.758) and 2 years (HR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.86-1.44, P = 0.433) compared with the late eradication group.We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers.

  18. Should We Still be Performing Vasectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. K. L. Percival

    1981-01-01

    Longterm safety of vasectomy has been questioned, based on the possibility of sperm antigens causing an antibody response. The point at which the antigens enter the circulation is unknown. Animal experiments have shown atherosclerosis as a result of antibody production, but evidence in man is still equivocal. Nonetheless, the family physician is obliged to inform patients of possible postoperative complications, but to avoid overinterpretation of a still controversial problem. PMID:20469361

  19. [Prevention of diabetes mellitus complications and improvement of early diagnosis at a population level, through the implementation of integrated disease management in the Modena region].

    PubMed

    Caroli, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Angela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Daghio, Maria Monica; Guidetti, Patrizia; Borsari, Silvana; Guerzoni, Andrea; Petropulacos, Kyriakoula; Daya, Ghassan; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of diabetes mellitus disease management, implemented in Modena province since ten years, on the prevention of complications and early diagnoses at a population level. Time trends show that diabetic patients had significantly decreasing values over time of age, diabetes duration, and glycated haemoglobin; and increasing percentage over time of new-onset diabetes and optimal glycaemic control. That indicates an improved ability of early diagnosis and care of diabetes mellitus. It indicates at a population level that the Local Health Unit, as health system, promoted diabetes prevention and its complications.

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  1. Life's Still Lifes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Harold V.

    The de Bruijn diagram describing those decompositions of the neighborhoods of a one dimensional cellular automaton which conform to predetermined requirements of periodicity and translational symmetry shows how to construct extended configurations satisfying the same requirements. Similar diagrams, formed by stages, describe higher dimensional automata, although they become more laborious to compute with increasing neighborhood size. The procedure is illustrated by computing some still lifes for Conway's game of Life, a widely known two dimensional cellular automaton. This paper is written in September 10, 1988.

  2. Endometriosis still a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mehedintu, C; Plotogea, MN; Ionescu, S; Antonovici, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endometriosis is a debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis appears to be one of the most common benign gynecological proliferations in premenopausal women since it is estimated that 10–15% of reproductive aged women suffer from pelvic endometriosis. The biology of endometriosis is unclear. Despite its prevalence, this disease remains poorly understood and current studies prove that there is no relationship between the extent of the disease and its symptomatology. There is no blood test available for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Up to this point, there is no single very successful option for the treatment of endometriosis. Due to the relatively poor efficacy of hormonal therapy for endometriosis, several other experimental therapies are currently undergoing clinical trial. PMID:25408753

  3. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

  4. Usefulness of international normalized ratio to predict bleeding complications in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jacob C; Heard, Richard; Powers, Eric R; Reuben, Adrian

    2012-10-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease frequently require invasive cardiac procedures in preparation for liver transplantation. Because of the impaired hepatic function, these patients often have a prolonged prothrombin time and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). To determine whether an abnormal prothrombin time/INR is predictive of bleeding complications from invasive cardiac procedures, we retrospectively reviewed, for bleeding complications, the databases and case records of our series of patients with advanced cirrhosis who underwent cardiac catheterization. A total of 157 patients underwent isolated right-sided heart catheterization, and 83 underwent left-sided heart catheterization or combined left- and right-sided heart catheterization. The INR ranged from 0.93 to 2.35. No major procedure-related complications occurred. Several patients in each group required a blood transfusion for gastrointestinal bleeding but not for procedure-related bleeding. No significant change was found in the hemoglobin after right-sided or left-sided heart catheterization, and no correlation was found between the preprocedure INR and the change in postprocedure hemoglobin. When comparing patients with a normal (≤1.5) and elevated (>1.5) INR, no significant difference in hemoglobin after the procedure was found in either group. In conclusion, despite an elevated INR, patients with end-stage liver disease can safely undergo invasive cardiac procedures. An elevated INR does not predict catheterization-related bleeding complications in this patient population.

  5. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    PubMed

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed.

  6. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    PubMed

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed. PMID:27664746

  7. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  8. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  9. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  10. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  11. Mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy and risk of gastrointestinal complications in infants undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Ilias; Branco, Ricardo G; Brinkhuis, Nadine; Furck, Anke; LaRovere, Joan; Cooper, David S; Pathan, Nazima

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesised that lower mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy values would be associated with a greater incidence of gastrointestinal complications in children weighing <10 kg who were recovering from cardiac surgery. We evaluated mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy, central venous oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases for 48 hours post-operatively. Enteral feeding intake, gastrointestinal complications, and markers of organ dysfunction were monitored for 7 days. A total of 50 children, with median age of 16.7 (3.2-31.6) weeks, were studied. On admission, the average mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy value was 71±18%, and the systemic oxygen saturation was 93±7.5%. Lower admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy correlated with longer time to establish enteral feeds (r=-0.58, p<0.01) and shorter duration of feeds at 7 days (r=0.48, p<0.01). Children with gastrointestinal complications had significantly lower admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy (58±18% versus 73±17%, p=0.01) and higher mesenteric arteriovenous difference of oxygen at admission [39 (23-47) % versus 19 (4-27) %, p=0.02]. Based on multiple logistic regression, admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy was independently associated with gastrointestinal complications (Odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.97; p=0.03). Admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76 to identify children who developed gastrointestinal complications, with a suggested cut-off value of 72% (78% sensitivity, 68% specificity). In this pilot study, we conclude that admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy is associated with gastrointestinal complications and enteral feeding tolerance in children after cardiac surgery.

  12. A case of sporadic medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1) with kidney enlargement complicated by IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taihei; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD) is a progressive tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and it leads to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). It is an autosomal dominant inherited disease, and is categorized into two types according to the localizing chromosome and timing of ESKD onset. Its pathogenesis has not been revealed clearly, thus accumulation of the cases is very valuable. We report here the first reported case of MCKD with kidney enlargement complicated by IgA nephropathy. A 70-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of renal dysfunction and bilateral kidney enlargement. He was diagnosed as having MCKD complicated by IgA nephropathy (IgA-N) by renal biopsy. We speculated that he had MCKD type 1 on the basis of the late onset of renal failure and no significant evidence of mutation in the UMOD gene that is associated with MCKD type 2. Thereafter, his kidney function decreased progressively and he started to receive hemodialysis. This is an interesting case of MCKD1 in terms of its sporadic nature, kidney enlargement, and complication of IgA-N.

  13. Chickenpox complications, incidence and financial burden in previously healthy children and those with an underlying disease in Ankara in the pre-vaccination period.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Halil; Candir, Mehmet Onur; Karbuz, Adem; Belet, Nurşen; Tapisiz, Anil; Ciftçi, Ergin; Ince, Erdal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the complications, financial burden and mortality caused by chickenpox using the data of Ankara, Turkey in the pre-vaccination period. The study was conducted as a retrospective sectional study. Of the 65 patients admitted to our hospital, 34 (52.3%) had been previously healthy, 10 (15.4%) had previous chronic disease and 21 (32.3%) were immunocompromised. The most common complications of chickenpox in those patient groups were skin and soft tissue infections (41.2%), hematological complications (50%) and gastrointestinal complications (38.1%), respectively. We found 10.6/100,000 and 8.7/100,000 rates of hospitalization due to chickenpox in Ankara for all children and for previously healthy children, respectively. The chickenpox-related mortality rate for the 0-17 age group was 3.03/1,000,000 in Ankara. In conclusion, we feel that a national vaccination program for chickenpox will lead to a significant decrease in the overall cost to our country.

  14. Complicated diverticular disease of the colon, do we need to change the classical approach, a retrospective study of 110 patients in southeast England

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abdulzahra; Mahmood, Hind; Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; EL-Hasani, Shamsi

    2008-01-01

    Background Complicated diverticular disease of the colon imposes a serious risk to patient's life, challenge to surgeons and has cost implications for health authority. The aim of this study is to evaluate the management outcome of complicated colonic diverticular disease in a district hospital and to explore the current strategies of treatment. Methods This is a retrospective study of all patients who were admitted to the surgical ward between May 2002 and November 2006 with a diagnosis of complicated diverticular disease. A proforma of patients' details, admission date, ITU admission, management outcomes and the follow up were recorded from the patients case notes and analyzed. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range 6–60 months) Results The mean age of patients was 72.7 years (range 39–87 years). Thirty-one men (28.18 %) and Seventy-nine women (71.81%) were included in this study. Male: female ratio was 1:2.5. Sixty-eight percent of patients had one or more co-morbidities. Forty-one patients (37.27%) had two or more episodes of diverticulitis while 41.8% of them had no history of diverticular disease. Eighty-six percent of patients presented with acute abdominal pain while bleeding per rectum was the main presentation in 14%. Constipation and erratic bowel habit were the commonest chronic symptoms in patients with history of diverticular disease. Generalized tenderness was reported in 64.28% while 35.71% have left iliac fossa tenderness. Leukocytosis was reported in 58 patients (52.72%). The mean time from the admission until the start of operative intervention was 20.57 hours (range 4–96 hours). Perforation was confirmed in 59.52%. Mortality was 10.90%. Another 4 (3.63%) died during follow up for other reasons. Conclusion Complicated diverticular disease carries significant morbidity and mortality. These influenced by patient-related factors. Because of high mortality and morbidities, we suggest the need to target a specific group of patients for

  15. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  16. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  17. Cutaneous and systemic complications associated with tattooing.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Tattooing can result in a wide variety of complications, whose prevalence and incidence remain still unclear. Hypersensitivity reactions (or allergies) to tattoo pigments are currently the most common complication on a tattoo, however they are not predictable. Infections are nowadays directly related to the lack of asepsis and hygiene during the tattooing procedure or during the healing phase. Patients with a known cutaneous disease should be warned of a potential risk of localization of their disease to the tattoo. A skin eruption restricted to a tattoo may reveal sarcoidosis. Patients with chronic conditions and/or impaired immunity should discuss with their physician about the possibility and when to have a tattoo. PMID:27160631

  18. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  19. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  20. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;(1)) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  1. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  2. [Schizophrenia is still a stigmatized disease].

    PubMed

    Flyckt, Lena; Torell, Per

    2015-01-01

    In Sweden like in other countries the mentally ill, especially individuals with schizophrenia, are marginalized and stigmatized by society but also by themselves. Their close families and friends have served as informal care-givers after the closing down of mental hospitals, and open-care units have not sufficiently met the needs of the patients. Non-profit organizations and private initiatives such as the Association of families to persons with schizophrenia (Schizofreniförbundet) have played a crucial role for the well-being of patients and their families. Anti-stigmatizing campaigns and processes have proven successful and are possible to perform on all levels, private, in society, and on the political arena. Both self-stigmatization and marginalization would diminish if individuals with schizophrenia were let in on the open labor market. An equal health care, both psychiatric and somatic, is today a utopia for individuals with schizophrenia and other forms of psychoses. PMID:26461501

  3. [Schizophrenia is still a stigmatized disease].

    PubMed

    Flyckt, Lena; Torell, Per

    2015-01-01

    In Sweden like in other countries the mentally ill, especially individuals with schizophrenia, are marginalized and stigmatized by society but also by themselves. Their close families and friends have served as informal care-givers after the closing down of mental hospitals, and open-care units have not sufficiently met the needs of the patients. Non-profit organizations and private initiatives such as the Association of families to persons with schizophrenia (Schizofreniförbundet) have played a crucial role for the well-being of patients and their families. Anti-stigmatizing campaigns and processes have proven successful and are possible to perform on all levels, private, in society, and on the political arena. Both self-stigmatization and marginalization would diminish if individuals with schizophrenia were let in on the open labor market. An equal health care, both psychiatric and somatic, is today a utopia for individuals with schizophrenia and other forms of psychoses.

  4. Still hope for schistosomiasis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Alessandra; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by helminths belonging to the Schistosoma genus. Approximately 700 million people are at risk of infection and 200 million people are currently infected. Schistosomiasis is the most important helminth infection, and treatment relies solely on the drug praziquantel. Worries of praziquantel resistance as well as high disease burden are only some of the justifications which support the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. To date, only 2 schistosome vaccines have made it into clinical trials: Sh28GST (Bilhvax) and Sm14. However, there are several vaccine candidates, such as TSP-2, sm-p8, and Sm-Cathepsin B, which are generating promising results in pre-clinical studies. Schistosomiasis vaccine development has been an uphill battle, and there are still several hurdles to overcome in the future. Fortunately, the research groups involved in the research for vaccine development have not abandoned their work. Furthermore, in the last few years, schistosomiasis has garnered some additional attention on a global scale due to its significant impact on public health.

  5. A global emerging disease of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: is serotype K1 an important factor for complicated endophthalmitis?

    PubMed Central

    Fung, C-P; Chang, F-Y; Lee, S-C; Hu, B-S; Kuo, B I-T; Liu, C-Y; Ho, M; Siu, L K

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Over the past two decades in Taiwan, pyogenic liver abscess has usually been caused by a single microorganism, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and is frequently associated with the serious complication of endophthalmitis, especially in diabetic patients. However, the relationship between the clinical presentation and bacterial factors remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of patients and the serotype and ribotype of K pneumoniae liver abscess. Methods: From July 1991 to June 1998, a total of 134 cases of K pneumoniae liver abscess with 248 K pneumoniae isolates from the same patients were collected from two large medical centres in northern Taiwan. Clinical data were collected from medical records. Serotyping and ribotyping were performed using the countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis method and automated Riboprinter. Results: Serotyping revealed that the most common serotypes were K1 (63.4%) and K2 (14.2%). K1 isolates occurred at a significantly higher frequency (p<0.01) than all other serotypes. Among 134 patients, 105 (78.4%) had suffered from diabetes mellitus for 3–15 years. Fourteen patients (10.4%) had metastatic infection to the eye causing septic endophthalmitis. Liver aspirates, and blood and vitreous pus cultures yielded the same serotype of K pneumoniae in all patients. Among patients with septic endophthalmitis, 92.3% (13/14) were diabetic, and 85.7% (12/14) of the isolates belonged to serotype K1. For molecular typing, different degrees of genetic polymorphism among isolates with the same K1 serotype suggested no particular prevalence of any one strain in K pneumoniae liver abscess. Conclusion: K pneumoniae serotype K1 was significantly associated with liver abscess and the complication of endophthalmitis, especially in diabetic patients. Physicians should request an immediate report of serotyping and susceptibility test results simultaneously if a diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscess has been

  6. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  7. Blood pressure and complications in individuals with type 2 diabetes and no previous cardiovascular disease: national population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Manhem, Karin; Rosengren, Annika; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Miftaraj, Mervete; Franzén, Stefan; Björck, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the risk associated with systolic blood pressure that meets current recommendations (that is, below 140 mm Hg) with the risk associated with lower levels in patients who have type 2 diabetes and no previous cardiovascular disease. Design Population based cohort study with nationwide clinical registries, 2006-12. The mean follow-up was 5.0 years. Setting 861 Swedish primary care units and hospital outpatient clinics. Participants 187 106 patients registered in the Swedish national diabetes register who had had type 2 diabetes for at least a year, age 75 or younger, and with no previous cardiovascular or other major disease. Main outcome measures Clinical events were obtained from the hospital discharge and death registers with respect to acute myocardial infarction, stroke, a composite of acute myocardial infarction and stroke (cardiovascular disease), coronary heart disease, heart failure, and total mortality. Hazard ratios were estimated for different levels of baseline systolic blood pressure with clinical characteristics and drug prescription data as covariates. Results The group with the lowest systolic blood pressure (110-119 mm Hg) had a significantly lower risk of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.91; P=0.003), total acute myocardial infarction (0.85, 0.72 to 0.99; P=0.04), non-fatal cardiovascular disease (0.82, 0.72 to 0.93; P=0.002), total cardiovascular disease (0.88, 0.79 to 0.99; P=0.04), and non-fatal coronary heart disease (0.88, 0.78 to 0.99; P=0.03) compared with the reference group (130-139 mm Hg). There was no indication of a J shaped relation between systolic blood pressure and the endpoints, with the exception of heart failure and total mortality. Conclusions Lower systolic blood pressure than currently recommended is associated with significantly lower risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. The association between low

  8. [Effect of metabolic therapy on the course of heart failure in patients after myocarditis complicated with systemic connecting tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuriata, A V; Karavanskaia, I L; Pavlichenko, N A

    2010-01-01

    In the course of observation over 40 patients after an old myocarditis against general systemic diseases of connective tissue who had been given a pharmacotherapy regarding main disease and a chronic heart failure, additionally Vazonat (campaign of "Olajnfarm", Latvia), preparation of the myocardial cytoprotection was prescribed in a therapeutic dose of 500 mg per day. Vazonat inclusion in basic therapy during 1 month was accompanied by improvement of a clinical condition of the patients, reduction of heart failure signs, and improvement of life quality. PMID:21488376

  9. [A Case of Wilson's Disease with Psoriasis Vulgaris, Complicated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Successfully Treated with Sorafenib].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tamotsu; Chubachi, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with Wilson's disease and was treated with D-penicillamine 36 years earlier. He also had a 20-year history of psoriasis vulgaris and cyclosporine treatment. In 2012, a he presented with a hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)that was removed via partial hepatic resection. In 2014, multiple HCC and a portal vein tumor thrombus were found in his posterior lobe. Sorafenib treatment was initiated. Cyclosporine treatment was continued. Three months later, abdominal enhanced CT revealed marked tumor reduction and shrinkage of the portal vein tumor thrombus. The therapeutic effect of sorafenib continued for 6 months. We did not observe deterioration in his psoriasis vulgaris and Wilson's disease for 9 months after sorafenib initiation. PMID:26469170

  10. A case of rapid growing colonic NK/T cell lymphoma complicated by Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shumei; Xu, Hui; Xue, Linyun; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Dejun

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old man developed abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea 11 months before admission. The colonoscopy revealed multifocal ulcers in the colon. Histology showed active chronic inflammation. Although anti-tuberculosis medication was effective, his symptoms repeated 2 months later. The subsequent colonoscopy revealed more extensive irregular ulcers than before, and he was clinically suspected with intestinal malignant lymphoma. He underwent subtotal colectomy and was histologically suggested Crohn’s disease, then 5-aminosalicylic and a combination of prednisone and azathioprine were administered in succession postoperatively, but they achieved minimal relief of symptoms for a period of 7 months. The third colonoscopy showed a large irregular ulcer in the ileocolon stomas, and primary colonic NK/T cell lymphoma was diagnosed through histological and immunophenotypic studies. Malignant lymphoma should be taken into consideration when clinically diagnosed Crohn’s disease was refractory to medication or when its clinical course became aggressive. PMID:23372350

  11. [A Case of Wilson's Disease with Psoriasis Vulgaris, Complicated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Successfully Treated with Sorafenib].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tamotsu; Chubachi, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with Wilson's disease and was treated with D-penicillamine 36 years earlier. He also had a 20-year history of psoriasis vulgaris and cyclosporine treatment. In 2012, a he presented with a hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)that was removed via partial hepatic resection. In 2014, multiple HCC and a portal vein tumor thrombus were found in his posterior lobe. Sorafenib treatment was initiated. Cyclosporine treatment was continued. Three months later, abdominal enhanced CT revealed marked tumor reduction and shrinkage of the portal vein tumor thrombus. The therapeutic effect of sorafenib continued for 6 months. We did not observe deterioration in his psoriasis vulgaris and Wilson's disease for 9 months after sorafenib initiation.

  12. High Leptospira Diversity in Animals and Humans Complicates the Search for Common Reservoirs of Human Disease in Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Miller, Erin; Olivas, Sonora; Birdsell, Dawn; Hepp, Crystal; Hornstra, Heidie; Schupp, James M.; Morales, Melba; Gonzalez, Manuel; Reyes, Soraya; de la Cruz, Carmen; Keim, Paul; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Trueba, Gabriel; Pearson, Talima

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease responsible for high morbidity around the world, especially in tropical and low income countries. Rats are thought to be the main vector of human leptospirosis in urban settings. However, differences between urban and low-income rural communities provide additional insights into the epidemiology of the disease. Methodology/Principal findings Our study was conducted in two low-income rural communities near the coast of Ecuador. We detected and characterized infectious leptospira DNA in a wide variety of samples using new real time quantitative PCR assays and amplicon sequencing. We detected infectious leptospira in a high percentage of febrile patients (14.7%). In contrast to previous studies on leptospirosis risk factors, higher positivity was not found in rats (3.0%) but rather in cows (35.8%) and pigs (21.1%). Six leptospira species were identified (L. borgpetersenii, L kirschnerii, L santarosai, L. interrogans, L noguchii, and an intermediate species within the L. licerasiae and L. wolffii clade) and no significant differences in the species of leptospira present in each animal species was detected (χ2 = 9.89, adj.p-value = 0.27). Conclusions/Significance A large portion of the world’s human population lives in low-income, rural communities, however, there is limited information about leptospirosis transmission dynamics in these settings. In these areas, exposure to peridomestic livestock is particularly common and high prevalence of infectious leptospira in cows and pigs suggest that they may be the most important reservoir for human transmission. Genotyping clinical samples show that multiple species of leptospira are involved in human disease. As these genotypes were also detected in samples from a variety of animals, genotype data must be used in conjunction with epidemiological data to provide evidence of transmission and the importance of different potential leptospirosis reservoirs. PMID:27622673

  13. Stilling the waters: Stilling basin design for stepped chutes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy dissipation is a desired feature of stepped chute design because it may lead to a shorter length of stilling basin than that of a traditional smooth chute design. Design parameters for stilling basins include Froude number, clear water flow depth, the sequent flow depth, and tailwater. Rese...

  14. Acute Pre-operative Infarcts and Poor Cerebrovascular Reserve are Independent Risk Factors for Severe Ischemic Complications Following Direct Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulling, T. Michael; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Marks, Michael P.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe ischemic changes are a rare but devastating complication following direct superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA MCA) bypass in Moyamoya patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether pre-operative MR imaging and/or cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) assessment using reference standard stable xenon enhanced computed tomography (xeCT) could predict such complications. Materials and Methods Among all adult patients receiving direct bypass at our institution between 2005 and 2010 who received a clinically interpretable xeCT examination, we identified index cases (patients with >15 ml post-operative infarcts) and control cases (patients without post-operative infarcts and without transient or permanent ischemic symptoms). Differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann Whitney test. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear model regression were employed to test predictors of post-operative infarct. Results Six index cases were identified and compared with 25 controls. Infarct size in the index cases was 95±55 ml. Four of six index cases (67%), but no control patients, had pre-operative acute infarcts. Baseline CBF was similar, but CVR was significantly lower in the index cases compared with control cases. For example, in the anterior circulation, median CVR was 0.4% (range: −38.0% to 16.6%) in index vs. 26.3% (range: −8.2% to 60.5%) in control patients (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a small pre-operative infarct (regardless of location) and impaired CVR were independent, significant predictors of severe post-operative ischemic injury. Conclusion Acute infarcts and impaired CVR on pre operative imaging are independent risk factors for severe ischemic complications following STA MCA bypass in Moyamoya disease. PMID:26564435

  15. [Complications of tick-borne encephalitis in 15-year long experience of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Hermanowska-Szpakowicz, Teresa; Kondrusik, Maciej; Zajkowska, Joanna; Grygorczuk, Sambor; Swierzbińska, Renata; Zielenkiewicz-Madejska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The clinical features of tick-borne encephalitis (tbe) were analyzed in the group of 477 patients hospitalized in the Department of the Infectious Disease and Neuroinfections of the Medical Academy in Białystok. The group included 31.4% women and 68.6% men, aged from 15 to 76 years. Persistent neurological sequelae were noted in 10.9% of patients: paresis or plegia in 5.66%, spinal dysfunction with lower limbs paraparesis in 1.68%, significant paresis of upper extremities in 0.63%, brachial plexus paresis in 2.31%. Cranial nerves involvement was present in 2.93%, including uni- or bilateral facial nerve palsy in 2.73% and trigeminal nerve involvement in 0.21%. Cerebellar dysfunction was present in 2,09% of patients. No fatal cases of tbe occured.

  16. Bordetella pertussis: why is it still circulating?

    PubMed

    Guiso, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causal agent of whooping cough, a highly contagious respiratory disease that is life-threatening in infants under the age of three months and may also be very severe in pregnant women and seniors. This disease can be prevented by vaccination but it remains a public health problem in many developed and developing countries.(1) So, why is B. pertussis still circulating? We need to consider several aspects of this vaccine-preventable disease when answering this question: (i) the history of the disease and the historical context in which the vaccine was developed; (ii) the type of vaccine used; (iii) the vaccination strategy and coverage; (iv) the disease surveillance after the introduction of generalized vaccination and (v) the surveillance for the causal agent of the disease.

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor-activating effect of uremic toxins from tryptophan metabolism: a new concept to understand cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sallée, Marion; Dou, Laetitia; Cerini, Claire; Poitevin, Stéphane; Brunet, Philippe; Burtey, Stéphane

    2014-03-04

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases and suffer from accelerated atherosclerosis. CKD patients are permanently exposed to uremic toxins, making them good candidates as pathogenic agents. We focus here on uremic toxins from tryptophan metabolism because of their potential involvement in cardiovascular toxicity: indolic uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate, indole-3 acetic acid, and indoxyl-β-d-glucuronide) and uremic toxins from the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and quinolinic acid). Uremic toxins derived from tryptophan are endogenous ligands of the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR, also known as the dioxin receptor, interacts with various regulatory and signaling proteins, including protein kinases and phosphatases, and Nuclear Factor-Kappa-B. AhR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and some polychlorinated biphenyls is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease in humans and in mice. In addition, this AhR activation mediates cardiotoxicity, vascular inflammation, and a procoagulant and prooxidant phenotype of vascular cells. Uremic toxins derived from tryptophan have prooxidant, proinflammatory, procoagulant, and pro-apoptotic effects on cells involved in the cardiovascular system, and some of them are related with cardiovascular complications in CKD. We discuss here how the cardiovascular effects of these uremic toxins could be mediated by AhR activation, in a "dioxin-like" effect.

  18. Inhibition of SA Node at Supine Position in Right Atrial Thrombus Complicating Behçet’s Disease – From Cardiac Surgical Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Emad Mohamed; Ibdah, Rasheed Khaled; Rawashdeh, Sukina Ismael; Saadeh, Abdullah Mahmoud; Al-Balas, Hamzeh Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 27 Final Diagnosis: Right atrial thrombus compressing the sinoatrial node Symptoms: Dyspnea • cough and hemoptysis with supine bradycardia reaching 36/min and dizziness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiac surgical intervention removing the mechanical cause if conservative management failed can be done safely Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Behçet’s disease (BD) is a chronic multi-systemic disease of unknown cause. Intra-cardiac thrombus (ICT) complicating BD is extremely rare. In general, cardiac manifestations in BD are associated with poor prognosis. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan and echocardiogram are excellent modalities for diagnosis and patient assessment. Cardiac surgical intervention can be done safely using an on-pump technique when medical management has failed. Case Report: We report on a case of a 27-year-old Jordanian woman diagnosed with BD who presented with dyspnea, cough, and hemoptysis, with supine bradycardia reaching 36 beats/minute and dizziness which disappear on sitting or standing position, and with heart rate reaching 76 beats/minute. Right atrial thrombus was identified using transthoracic echocardiogram and chest CT scan. After medical management failed, cardiac surgical intervention became an option and targeted extraction of the right atrial thrombus compressing the sinoatrial node (SA node). Conclusions: In BD, right atrial thrombus compressing the SA node is rare. If conservative management has failed, cardiac surgical intervention removing the mechanical cause can be done safely, either using on-pump with cross clamp or on-pump with beating heart technique. PMID:27311379

  19. Circulating platelet and erythrocyte microparticles in young children and adolescents with sickle cell disease: Relation to cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza Abdel Gawad; Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Habeeb, Nevin Mamdouh; Farouk, Amal

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a complex vasculopathy, consisting of endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness, with a global effect on cardiovascular function. The hypercoagulable state may result from chronic hemolysis and circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) originating mainly from activated platelets and erythrocytes. We measured the levels of platelet and erythrocyte-derived MPs (PMPs and ErMPs) in 50 young SCD patients compared with 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and assessed their relation to clinicopathological characteristics and aortic elastic properties. Patients were studied stressing on the occurrence of sickling crisis, transfusion history, hydroxyurea therapy, hematological, and coagulation profile as well as flow cytometric expression of PMPs (CD41b(+)) and ErMPs (glycophorin A(+)). Echocardiography was performed to assess aortic stiffness and distensibility, left ventricular function and pulmonary artery pressure. Both PMPs and ErMPs were significantly elevated in SCD patients compared with control group (p < 0.001). SCD patients had significantly elevated d-dimer and von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF Ag) levels with lower antithrombin III compared with controls (p < 0.001). Aortic stiffness index and pulmonary artery pressure were significantly higher in SCD (p < 0.001), whereas aortic strain and aortic distensibility were significantly lower (p < 0.001) compared with controls. MPs levels were significantly increased in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension, acute chest syndrome, and stroke as well as those who had history of thrombosis or splenectomy (p < 0.001). Also, patients in sickling crisis during the study had higher PMPs and ErMPs levels than those in steady state (p < 0.001). Patients on hydroxyurea therapy had lower MPs levels than untreated patients (p < 0.001). PMPs and ErMPs were positively correlated with disease duration, transfusion index, white blood

  20. Ulcerative ileitis after proctocolectomy in children: a complication of ulcerative colitis or a disease in itself after ileoanal pullthrough?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Galán, Alba; Andres, Ane M; Fernández-Caamaño, Beatriz; Vilanova, Alejandra; Dominguez, Eva; Ortiz, Ruben; Prieto, Gerardo; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, J A

    2015-02-01

    Ulcerative ileitis (UI) after restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) and ileoanal pullthrough procedure (IAPP) is a rare condition described as inflammation of the terminal ileum proximal to the anastomosis. It is mostly observed in ulcerative colitis (UC) and is designated as prepouch ileitis; sometimes with pouchitis, but not necessarily all the time. Its incidence in adults is less than 5%, but the information in children is limited. Pathogenesis is unknown, it has been considered as a disease by itself, independently on the underlying disease. It involves additional morbidity and impacts negatively on quality of life because there is no effective treatment so far. This study aims to review the cases of UI in our institution and to summarize their clinical features and management. A descriptive retrospective study of UI patients between 1990 and 2013 was conducted. Children with RPC and IAPP with clinical and pathological diagnosis of UI were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures were collected through medical records. UI was diagnosed in eight patients (six males) after RCP; four had UC, two had total colonic aganglionosis (TCA), and two had complex anorectal malformations (one cloacal exstrophy and one omphalopagus twin with bladder exstrophy). Different surgical techniques were used in each case: UC patients underwent IAPP, 50% with J-reservoir and 50% without it; posterior sagittal pullthrough was performed in those with anorectal malformations; one Soave and one Swenson procedure in those with TCA. In summary, three patients had reservoir and five did not. The median age at the IAPP and ostomy closure was 6 years (range 2 months-8 years) and 7 years (range 6 months-9 years), respectively. UI was found after a median of 23 months (range 1-48 months), all of them after digestive tract continuity was reestablished. The leading symptom was lower GI or gastrointestinal, both of them bleeding with abdominal pain, followed

  1. Wild Beasts of Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project with a transformative approach to color theory and still life. Students' use of an arbitrary color scheme can open their eyes, push their creativity and produce exciting paintings. Ordinary still-life objects will be transformed into dramatic, vibrant visuals. The Fauve style of painting is a great art history…

  2. Atrial Fibrillation Increases the Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease With Relative Complications and Mortality: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), an increasing prevalent cardiac arrhythmia due to aging general population, has many common risk factors with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, it is unclear whether AF is associated with a risk of PAD. We investigated the prevalence of AF and PAD in the general population and the risk of PAD among the AF population. This longitudinal, nationwide, population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2011. In total, 3814 and 15,364 patients were included in the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for examining the effects of AF on the risk of outcomes. The average follow-up periods of PAD were 4.96 ± 3.28 and 5.29 ± 3.35 years for the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Overall, the risk of PAD showed a significantly higher risk in the AF cohort (adjusted HR=1.31, 95% CI=1.19-1.45) compared with the non-AF cohort. Similar results were observed for heart failure and stroke, where the AF cohort had a 1.83-fold and 2.53-fold higher risk of developing heart failure and stroke. The AF cohort also had a significant increased risk for mortality (adjusted HR=1.66, 95% CI=1.49-1.84). The present study indicated that the incidence of PAD, heart failure, stroke, and overall mortality is higher in patients with AF than in those without it. PMID:26945422

  3. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  4. Association Between Long-term Oral Contraceptive Use and Risk of Crohn’s Disease Complications in a Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Hamed; Granath, Fredrik; Smedby, Karin E.; Ekbom, Anders; Neovius, Martin; Chan, Andrew T.; Olen, Ola

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Use of exogenous hormones, in the form of oral contraceptives (OCs), has been linked consistently to risk of Crohn’s disease (CD). Nonetheless, it is not clear how OCs might contribute to the progression of CD. METHODS We conducted a prospective study of female patients with CD (age, 16–51 y), identified from the inpatient and outpatient care components of the Swedish National Patient Register from January 2002 through December 2013. Information on current OC use was obtained from the Prescribed Drug Register starting in July of 2005 and updated until December of 2013. Primary outcomes were defined as first CD-related surgery and first steroid prescription. We used Cox proportional hazard modeling with time-varying covariates to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (MV-adjusted HRs). RESULTS We identified 482 incident cases of surgery among 4036 patients with CD, with a median follow-up period of 58 months. Compared with nonusers, the MV-adjusted HRs for surgery were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80–1.63) for past users and 1.30 (95% CI, 0.89–1.92) for current users. The risk of surgery increased with longer duration of use (Ptrend = .036) and higher prescribed daily dose (Ptrend = .016). Specifically, for women with more than 3 years of OC use, the MV-adjusted HR for surgery was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.06–2.67). The association was confined to the combination type of OC. We estimated that for every 83 patients with CD receiving the combination type of oral contraceptives for at least 1 year, 1 extra surgery is required. The rate of steroid prescriptions did not appear to increase with past or current use of OCs, compared with patients who have not taken OCs (all Pcomparisons > .20). CONCLUSIONS In a nationwide analysis of patients in Sweden, long-term use of OCs, particularly the combination type, was associated with an increased risk of surgery among women with established CD. Clinicians carefully should evaluate and monitor

  5. No-Tech Still Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbian, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Although online training is causing restructuring in some companies, content is still predominant and can be delivered without the Internet, for example, through self-study books. Companies should deliver training in the best format for their employees. (JOW)

  6. A case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type mimicking typical manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome: diagnostic consideration between malignant lymphoma without lymphadenopathy and AOSD.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Tanabe, Juichi; Kanemoto, Motoko; Kobayashi, Chiharu; Morita, Sho; Karahashi, Taro

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was suffering from high fever, sore throat, arthralgia, and macular salmon-pink eruption. The superficial lymph node was not palpable, and computed tomographic scans from the neck to pelvis demonstrated hepatosplenomegaly without apparent lymphadenopathy. Therefore, the possibility of malignant lymphoma was considered to be extremely low. Serology for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus showed a postinfectious state, and blood culture was negative. Serum rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody were negative. Leukocytopenia (2.4 x 10(3)/mul) was observed, and thus a diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) was made. Fifty-five milligrams of prednisolone daily improved his symptoms and leukocytopenia promptly, but high fever with severe and progressive thrombocytopenia occurred 12 days later. Bone marrow aspiration revealed the presence of lymphoma cells and hemophagocytosis, and the CD45 gating analysis showed expanding population of CD2(+), CD3(-), and CD56(+) cells. Further, mucosal ulceration in the nasal cavity was detected. Therefore, a diagnosis of extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, concomitant with HPS was made, and treatment with dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, carboplatin (DeVIC) regimen ameliorated his symptoms and platelet transfusion dependency. Later, a high titer of serum EBV-DNA was detected, which supported the diagnosis. Diagnosing AOSD, extranodal presentation of malignant lymphoma such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, should be carefully considered. PMID:19609486

  7. Complications in colorectal surgery: risk factors and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backround Open or laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises of many different types of procedures for various diseases. Depending upon the operation and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors the intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality rate vary. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Methods A literature search (1980-2009) was carried out, using MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane library. Results This review provides an overview how to identify and minimize intra- and postoperative complications. The improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions in the recent decade has been enormous. This is mainly attributable to the increase in the laparoscopic approach, which is now well accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise and cost effectiveness. In addition, standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. Conclusion This review summarizes the main perioperative complications of colorectal surgery and influencable and non-influencable risk factors which are important to the general surgeon and the relevant specialist as well. In order to minimize or even avoid complications it is crucial to know these risk factors and strategies to prevent, treat or reduce intra- and postoperative complications. PMID:20338045

  8. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  9. Complications of the Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Delaney, Ruth; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure is an operation performed either arthroscopically or open for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, in the setting of glenoid bone loss; with good to excellent functional results. Despite excellent clinical results, the complication rates are reported between 15 and 30 %. Intraoperative complications such as graft malpositioning, neurovascular injury, and graft fracture can all be mitigated with meticulous surgical technique and understanding of the local anatomy. Nonunion and screw breakage are intermediate-term complications that occur in less than 5 % of patients. The long-term complications such as graft osteolysis are still an unsolved problem, and future research is required to understand the etiology and best treatment option. Recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure can be managed with iliac crest bone graft reconstruction of the anterior glenoid. Shoulder arthritis is another complication reported after the Latarjet procedure, which poses additional challenges to both the surgeon and patient.

  10. Secretion of interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor by spindle cell sarcoma complicating Castleman's disease (so-called 'vascular neoplasia').

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Hitoshi; Katano, Harutaka; Ishiko, Tositaka; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Kogi, Mieko; Kasuga, Naoki; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Mori, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    So-called 'vascular neoplasia' (VN) is a rare tumour of unknown origin that complicates hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease (CD). This paper reports a case of VN complicating CD of hyaline vascular type, in which neoplastic cells were shown to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this case, VN first occurred in the retroperitoneum of a 60-year-old male. The lesion showed typical morphology, with three distinct areas: (1) a lymph node-like area with regressively transformed lymph follicles showing hyaline vascular changes and with a hypervascular interfollicular region filled with slit-like vascular channels; (2) an area composed of spindle cell sarcoma; and (3) an area showing angiolipomatous hamartoma. A proportion of the cells in the spindle cell area showed severe pleomorphism. Subcutaneous recurrence after 8 months was composed purely of pleomorphic spindle cells. A karyotypic analysis of the recurrent tumour showed 47, XXY with some instability. Supernatant from primary culture contained high levels of IL-6 and VEGF, suggesting high secretion of these cytokines from neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, p53 overexpression was identified only in the pleomorphic spindle cells of the primary lesion and metastatic tumour. No features suggestive of vascular origin were shown on immunohistochemical or electron microscopic analysis of the neoplastic cells. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected by immunohistochemistry or PCR analysis. High levels of IL-6 and/or VEGF have been reported to play a role in CD. This is the first case report that clarifies the site of such cytokine production, showing the possibility of CD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon.

  11. Comparative Histological Study on the Therapeutic Effect of Green Tea and Stem Cells in Alzheimer’s Disease Complicating Experimentally Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bassiony, Hend Shafik; Zickri, Maha Baligh; Metwally, Hala Gabr; Elsherif, Hala Ahmed; Alghandour, Sarah Mohammed; Sakr, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Increasing evidence implicates diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor for AD. Green tea (GT) has several beneficial effects attributed to its anti-oxidant phenolic compounds. Adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs). This study was designed to evaluate and compare the possible therapeutic effect of green tea extract (GTE) and ADSCs on AD complicating induced DM in male rat. Methods 31 adult male albino rats were divided into 5 groups. Group I (Control), Group II received GTE, 50 mg/kg daily orally for 4 weeks, Group III received a single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin (STZ), 50 mg/kg, Group IV: received STZ followed by GTE and Group V: received STZ followed by human ADSCs (hADSCs) intravenously. Results Multiple acidophilic masses, deformed neurons, Congo red +ve masses and Caspase 3 +ve neurons were seen in group III, became few in group IV and occasional in group V. Multiple Prussian blue +ve cells were detected in group V. Some CD44 +ve cells were noticed in group III, became multiple in groups IV and V. The mean area of neurons exhibiting acidophilic cytoplasm, mean area of amyloid plaques and mean area % of Caspase 3 +ve cells indicated a significant increase in group III. The mean area % of CD44 +ve cells recorded a significant increase in group IV. Conclusions hADSCs exerted a more marked therapeutic effect on the neurodegenerative changes complicating DM and corresponding to AD. PMID:26634066

  12. The effect of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion long-term therapy on motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease: a multicenter Romanian experience.

    PubMed

    Băjenaru, O; Ene, A; Popescu, B O; Szász, J A; Sabău, M; Mureşan, D F; Perju-Dumbrava, L; Popescu, C D; Constantinescu, A; Buraga, I; Simu, M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic treatment with oral levodopa is associated with an increased frequency of motor complications in the late stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Continuous administration of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG-Duodopa(®), Abbott Laboratories), which has been available in Romania since 2009, represents an option for treating patients with advanced PD. Our primary objective was to report changes in motor complications after initiation of LCIG therapy. The secondary objectives were as follows: to determine the impact of LCIG therapy on the daily levodopa dose variation before/and after LCIG, to collect patient self-assessments of quality of life (QoL), and to study the overall tolerability and safety of LCIG administration. A retrospective analysis (2009-2013) of LCIG therapy and the experience in nine neurology centers in Romania was performed. The impact of LCIG therapy was evaluated by analyzing changes in motor fluctuations, dyskinesia and the patients' QoL after initiating therapy. The safety of LCIG therapy was estimated by noting agent-related adverse events (AEs) and medical device-related AEs. In the 113 patients included, we observed a significant improvement in PD symptoms after initiation of LCIG therapy. The "on" period increased, with a mean value of 6.14 h, and the dyskinesia period was reduced, with a mean value of 29.4 %. The quantified non-motor symptoms subsided. The patients exhibited significant improvements in QoL scores. There were few AEs and few cases of LCIG therapy discontinuation. LCIG is an important and available therapeutic option for managing patients with advanced PD. PMID:26699635

  13. Increased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Cardiovascular Complications – A National Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Hung-An; Yeh, Chia-Lun; Chiu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Pin; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives There have been few large population-based studies of the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and glomerulonephritis. This nationwide cohort study investigated the risks of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis in patients with RA, and the associated risks for cardiovascular complications. Methods From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified a study cohort of 12,579 patients with RA and randomly selected 37,737 subjects without RA as a control cohort. Each subject was individually followed for up for 5 years, and the risk of CKD was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results During the follow-up period, after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors RA was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of CKD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.40) and glomerulonephritis (aHR 1.55; 95% CI 1.37–1.76). Increased risk of CKD was also associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclosporine, glucocorticoids, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclophosphamide. Patients with comorbidities had even greater increased risk of CKD. Moreover, RA patients with concurrent CKD had significantly higher likelihood of developing ischemic heart disease and stroke. Conclusions RA patients had higher risk of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Their increased risk of CKD may be attributed to glomerulonephritis, chronic inflammation, comorbidities, and renal toxicity of antirheumatic drugs. Careful monitoring of renal function in RA patients and tight control of their comorbid diseases and cardiovascular risk factors are warranted. PMID:26406879

  14. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  15. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  16. Oral vitamin D, still a viable treatment option for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Koo, John; Heller, Misha; Lee, Eric; Bhutani, Tina

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D as a topical treatment has become one of the mainstays for treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. Oral vitamin D on the other hand has for the most part become a forgotten option. But a review of the literature on oral vitamin D as a treatment for psoriasis reveals that this treatment is efficacious. The main side effect of this therapy is hypercalcemia, which appears to be easily monitored and avoidable with proper dosing and monitoring. The literature also suggests a correlation between low levels of serum vitamin D in this patient population associated with increased severity of disease involvement. In addition, oral vitamin D improves psoriatic arthropathy. Moreover, vitamin D has been proven to have many health benefits such as prevention of cancer, improved cardiovascular health among many others. Psoriatic patients as a population are at increased risk of developing adverse health complications such as cardiovascular disease, and oral vitamin D may prove to be of benefit in this population. Oral vitamin D is inexpensive and easily available. It is still a viable option and should not be forgotten as a possible treatment for psoriasis.

  17. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  18. Sinoatrial block complicating legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Medarov, B; Tongia, S; Rossoff, L

    2003-11-01

    A 59 year old woman presented with acute onset of fever, chills, diaphoresis, vague chest discomfort, and was found to be hypotensive and tachypnoeic. An electrocardiogram demonstrated sinoatrial block with a junctional rhythm between 50 and 80 beats/min. All cultures were negative and imaging studies unrevealing. Her urine tested positive for Legionella pneumophila antigen serotype 1 and she improved with antibiotic therapy.

  19. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  20. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  1. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  2. Why Are Chimps Still Chimps?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norman A.; Smith, James J.; Pobiner, Briana; Schrein, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be posed with such questions as, "If we evolved from chimps, why are there still chimps?" We provide teachers with answers to this and related questions in the context of the latest genetic, fossil, and behavioral evidence. We also provide references they can use to further students' understanding of human evolution and evolution in…

  3. A Beautiful Britto Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Romero Britto is a wonderful artist for young students to study when learning the building blocks of art and design. Colorful, linear, and full of bold patterns, Britto's work blends a contemporary cubist style and pop art commercial appeal. Themes of this contemporary artist's work include animals, flowers, still life, and people in joyful…

  4. Value-Able Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she made a major improvement to her fifth-grade lesson plan by providing a hands-on Internet experience before students worked on their own oil pastel still life. It was a success with beautiful finished products and highly motivated, engaged students. Details of this lesson are described in this article.

  5. Is shared governance still relevant?

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    2001-10-01

    Is shared governance still relevant in this era of significant changes in healthcare? Requisites to support nurses and others are more important now than ever before. Shared decision-making is not only relevant, it is essential. The road to empowerment is not easy. Many patterns of organization and relationship must be changed forever through commitment and leadership today.

  6. Soluble CD163 in young sickle cell disease patients and their trait siblings: a biomarker for pulmonary hypertension and vaso-occlusive complications.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza Abdel Gawad; Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman

    2012-10-01

    CD163 is expressed on cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage and is the main hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor. Inflammation and monocyte activation are predisposing factors to vaso-occlusion and pulmonary hypertension, which are serious complications in sickle cell disease (SCD). Siblings of SCD patients may have the same pathophysiology without displaying symptoms. We assessed soluble CD163 (sCD163) levels in 60 children with SCD and 30 sickle cell trait (SCT) siblings compared with 30 healthy controls as a potential marker for disease severity and treatment response. Patients were studied stressing on the presence of pulmonary hypertension by Dopplar-Echocardiography, sickling crisis, transfusion requirements, hydroxyurea response, hematological profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum sCD163. sCD163 was significantly elevated in SCD patients and SCT siblings compared with controls and the highest levels were in untreated SCD patients (P < 0.001). sCD163 was higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, acute chest syndrome or stroke as well as in patients who developed sickling crisis during the study period (P < 0.05). Hydroxyurea-treated patients had lower sCD163 compared with untreated patients (P < 0.001). sCD163 was positively correlated to leukocyte count, HbS, hs-CRP, pulmonary artery pressure and tricuspid regurgitant velocity whereas inversely correlated to hemoglobin and HbF levels. The cut-off value of sCD163 at 1400 ng/ml could be considered a predictor for vaso-occlusive crisis in SCD with a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 94.1%. sCD163 can be considered a biomarker for pulmonary hypertension, early crisis prediction and monitoring hydroxyurea response in SCD patients. Elevated sCD163 in trait siblings could reflect increased risk of sickling in challenging situations.

  7. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  8. Minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies in the management of complications of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Kang, Kyungmin; Fan, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to inflammation leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. With the progressive epidemics of obesity and diabetes, major risk factors in the development and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the prevalence of NAFLD and its associated complications including liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma is expected to increase by 2030 with an enormous health and economic impact. We present a patient who developed Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis. Due to morbid obesity, she was not an optimal transplant candidate and was not initially listed. After attempts for lifestyle modifications failed to lead to weight reduction, a transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery was performed. This is the sixth such procedure in humans in literature. Subsequently she had a meaningful drop in BMI from 42 to 36 over the following 6 months ultimately leading to her being listed for transplant. During this time, the left hepatic HCC was treated with chemoembolization without evidence of recurrence. In this article, we wish to highlight the use of minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the comprehensive management of the NAFLD spectrum and percutaneous transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA), a novel method, for the management of obesity. PMID:26629307

  9. Complete genome sequence of a new recombinant echovirus 25 strain isolated from a neonatal patient with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated by encephalitis in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Meng, Yixing; Pang, Lin; Liang, Jinqiu; Lu, Hongping; Wang, Qi; Liang, Pu; Cao, Jinfeng; Liu, Shun-Ai; Cheng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Although human echovirus 25 (E-25), a type of the enterovirus B species, is implicated in aseptic meningitis, information on its gene structure, evolution, and virulence are limited. We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel recombinant E-25 strain (E25/2010/CHN/BJ) isolated from a neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated by encephalitis in Beijing, China in 2010. The complete viral genome consists of 7429 nucleotides (nts), including a 6585-nt open reading frame. Phylogenetic dendrogram based on VP1 gene regions revealed that this strain belonged to subgroup D4, which contains the other E-25 strains isolated from China in recent years. The difference in the amino acid sites (P130S, K/T135I) of the VP1 region may affect its immunogenicity. SimPlot and Bootscan analyses suggested that E25/2010/CHN/BJ is a recombination result of E-25 and Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB-3) strains. Our results would facilitate the study of the origin, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of E-25.

  10. Complications of pneumoconiosis: radiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  11. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  12. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio is a reliable indicator for evaluating complications of chronic kidney disease and progression in IgA nephropathy in China

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Lu; Yuezhong, Luo; Chao, Wang; HaiTao, Tu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the correlation between the albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the urine and 24-hour urine proteinuria and whether the ratio can predict chronic kidney disease progression even more reliably than 24-hour proteinuria can, particularly in primary IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 182 patients with primary IgA nephropathy were evaluated. Their mean urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria were determined during hospitalization. Blood samples were also analyzed. Follow-up data were recorded for 44 patients. A cross-sectional study was then conducted to test the correlation between these parameters and their associations with chronic kidney disease complications. Subsequently, a canonical correlation analysis was employed to assess the correlation between baseline proteinuria and parameters of the Oxford classification. Finally, a prospective observational study was performed to evaluate the association between proteinuria and clinical outcomes. Our study is registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, and the registration number is ChiCTR-OCH-14005137. RESULTS: A strong correlation (r=0.81, p<0.001) was found between the ratio and 24-hour proteinuria except in chronic kidney disease stage 5. First-morning urine albumin-to-creatinine ratios of ≥125.15, 154.44 and 760.31 mg/g reliably predicted equivalent 24-hour proteinuria ‘thresholds’ of ≥0.15, 0.3 and 1.0 g/24 h, respectively. In continuous analyses, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with anemia, acidosis, hypoalbuminemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia, hypercholesterolemia and higher serum cystatin C. However, higher 24-hour proteinuria was only associated with hypoalbuminemia and hypercholesterolemia. Higher tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scores were also associated with a greater albumin-to-creatinine ratio, as observed in the canonical correlation analysis. Finally, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour

  13. Comparative Effectiveness of Biosimilar, Reference Product and Other Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents (ESAs) Still Covered by Patent in Chronic Kidney Disease and Cancer Patients: An Italian Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2007 biosimilars of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are available on the Italian market. Very limited post-marketing data exist on the comparative effectiveness of biosimilar and originator ESAs. Aim This population-based study was aimed to compare the effects of biosimilars, reference product and other ESAs still covered by patent on hemoglobinemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cancer patients in a Local Health Unit (LHU) from Northern Italy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted during the years 2009–2014 using data from Treviso LHU administrative database. Incident ESA users (no ESA dispensing within 6 months prior to treatment start, i.e. index date (ID)) with at least one hemoglobin measurement within one month prior to ID (baseline Hb value) and another measurement between 2nd and 3rd month after ID (follow-up Hb value) were identified. The strength of the consumption (as total number of defined daily dose (DDD) dispensed during the follow-up divided by days of follow-up) and the difference between follow-up and baseline Hb values [delta Hb (ΔHb)] were evaluated. Based on Hb changes, ESA users were classified as non-responders (ΔHb≤0 g/dl), responders (0<ΔHb≤2 g/dl), and highly responders (ΔHb>2 g/dl). A multivariate ordinal logistic regression model to identify predictors for responsiveness to treatment was performed. All analyses were stratified by indication for use and type of dispensed ESA at ID. Results Overall, 1,003 incident ESA users (reference product: 252, 25.1%; other ESAs covered by patent: 303, 30.2%; biosimilars: 448, 44.7%) with CKD or cancer were eligible for the study. No statistically significant difference in the amount of dose dispensed during the follow-up among biosimilars, reference product and other ESAs covered by patent was found in both CKD and cancer. After three months from treatment start, all ESAs increased Hb values on average by 2g/dl. No differences in ΔHb as well as in

  14. Solar stills for agricultural purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Tran, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concepts of using desalinated water for agricultural purposes are outlined. A mathematical model describing heat and mass transfer in a system combining a solar still with a greenhouse, its solution, and test results of a small-scale unit built at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, are discussed. The unit was employed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the system. Further development and modifications are necessary for larger-scale operations. The basis of an optimization study which is underway at the Brace Research Institute of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, aimed at finding the best combination of design and operation parameters is also presented.

  15. Endocrine and Bone Complications in β-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), Hb E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly β-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in β-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  16. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  17. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  18. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study

    PubMed Central

    Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Aims We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. Methods For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. Results We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9–38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ2 = 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639–5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391–0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122–0.364) and 0.459 (0.258–0.818), respectively. Conclusions DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27536372

  19. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  20. [Dogs babesiosis--still actually problem].

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Babesiosis (piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease with a symptoms of hemolytic anemia. For the first time babesiosis was described in dogs in United States in 1934. The etiological factor of this disease in Poland is protozoa Babesia canis, and its vector--Dermacentor-tick. The most common symptoms of babesiosis are: icterus, hemoglobinuria, occasionally vomits and diarrhea. The biochemical examination of blood serum from sick animals can reveal the increase of activity of AST, ALT, the increase of total bilirubine, urea and creatynine concentrations. The results of hematological examinations can show anemia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of babesiosis bases on anamnesis, clinical examinations of dogs, microscopical examinations of blood smears from sick animals; IF-assay and PCR can also be helpful for the diagnosis of babesiosis. Till now does not exist the effective immunoprophylaxis against this disease. Babesiosis is well-known disease, however there are still problems with therapy of infected animals. Most effective drug in therapy of dog piroplasmosis is imidocarb, but sometimes can be observed side effects after it application. It is possible that the genetically differences which are detected in subspecies may have an influence on the severity of disease and the effectiveness of therapy.

  1. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  2. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  3. 1996 Budget picture still clouded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Four months and three work stoppages into fiscal 1996, whole departments and agencies of the United States federal government remain in budgetary limbo. Five annual spending bills still await approval, and parts of nine federal departments and several agencies face the possibility of yet another shutdown, as the current continuing resolution for temporary funding expires on March 15.In the wake of the recent three-week shutdown of the federal government, congressional leaders worked in January to ease future political pain by funding a list of “essential services” for the remainder of the fiscal year. Deemed essential were government programs with the most immediate and conspicuous public impact, such as the National Parks Service and the Passport Services Office. Included on that list of essential services was the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which not only received full funding for the entire fiscal year but also got a 5.7% increase over its 1995 budget.

  4. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  5. Risk factors for postoperative respiratory complications and their predictive value. A study in 40-75 year-old men undergoing elective surgery for peptic ulcer or gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Wirén, J E; Janzon, L

    1982-01-01

    Age, body weight, smoking, chronic bronchitis and duration of anaesthesia were assessed as risk factors for respiratory complications following surgery for peptic ulcer or gallbladder disease. The studies were made on 53 men aged 40-75 years. All variables were associated with increased postoperative risk of chest X-ray abnormality or arterial hypoxaemia or clinically overt respiratory complications. In the statistical analysis, however, none of the factors proved to be useful as a predictor of postoperative respiratory complications. The observed high frequencies of X-ray abnormalities (54%) and arterial hypoxaemia (43%) after operation indicate potential dangers. They may be reduced by cessation of smoking before the operation and reduction of weight.

  6. Still moving toward environmental justice.

    PubMed

    Clay, R

    1999-06-01

    Three years in the making, the Institute of Medicine report Toward Environmental Justice was funded by a consortium of agencies, including the NIEHS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The independent review was authored by a 15-member committee that represented academia, public interest, medicine, law, and industry. The committee met with stakeholders, citizens, public officials, and industry representatives around the United States to assess the need for better research, education, and health policy related to environmental justice. The report investigates the situation of groups of individuals suspected of having disproportionately high levels of exposure to environmental stressors such as chemicals, biologics, allergenics, toxicants, light, noise, odors, and particulate matter. The report calls for more research to help identify and verify the environmental etiologies of diseases. It also recommends that citizens be recruited to participate in the design and execution of the research, and that communication during all phases of the research be open and reciprocal.

  7. "Gastric cytoprotection" is still relevant.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor

    2014-12-01

    rapid vascular changes (e.g. increased VP and blood flow), followed by cellular events (e.g. infiltration by acute and chronic inflammatory cells). Thus, PG and histamine, by increasing VP create a perivascular edema that dilutes and delays toxic agents reaching the subepithelial capillaries. Otherwise, damaging chemicals may induce severe early vascular injury resulting in blood flow stasis, hypoxia, and necrosis of surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal cells. In this complex response, increased mucus and/or bicarbonate secretion seem to cause luminal dilution of gastrotoxic chemicals that is further reinforced by a perivascular, histodilutional component. This mechanistic explanation would encompass the protective actions of diverse agents as PG, small doses of histamine, motility stimulants, and dilute irritants (i.e. "adaptive cytoprotection"). Thus, although markedly increased VP is pathologic, slight increase in VP seems to be protective, that is, a key element in the complex pathophysiologic response during acute gastroprotection. Over the years, "gastroprotection" was also applied to accelerated healing of chronic gastroduodenal ulcers without reduction of acid secretion. The likely main mechanism here is the binding of angiogenic growth factors (e.g. basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor) to the heparin-like structures of sucralfate and sofalcone. Thus, despite intensive research of the last 30 years, gastroprotection is incompletely understood, and we are still far away from effectively treating Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers and preventing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-caused erosions and ulcers in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract; hence "gastric cytoprotection" research is still relevant.

  8. Preventing infective complications relating to induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Mary, Nirmala; Mahmood, Tahir A

    2010-08-01

    Infective complications following induced abortions are still a common cause of morbidity and mortality. This review focusses on defining the strategies to improve care of women seeking an induced abortion and to reduce infective complications. We have considered the evidence for screening and cost-effectiveness for antibiotic prophylaxis. Current evidence suggests that treating all women with prophylactic antibiotics in preference to screening and treating is the most cost-effective way of reducing infective complications following induced abortions. The final strategy to prevent infective complications should be individualized for each region/area depending on the prevalence of organisms causing pelvic infections and the resources available.

  9. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  10. Combating oxidative stress in diabetic complications with Nrf2 activators: how much is too much?

    PubMed

    Tan, Sih Min; de Haan, Judy B

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate and, despite anti-hypertensive and insulin therapies, diabetic patients are still at risk of developing complications such as chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and retinopathy. There is therefore an urgent need for more effective therapies to prevent the development and progression of diabetic complications. Oxidative stress is a major player in the aetiology of diabetic complications. However, results from clinical trials thus far using general antioxidants have been disappointing. Mechanism-based antioxidants have gained considerable attention due to their more targeted approach at reducing oxidative stress and associated complications in diabetes. The transcription factor, NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a master regulator of redox homeostasis and the cellular detoxification response. Instead of relying on a single antioxidant, activation of Nrf2 results in the concerted upregulation of several antioxidant enzymes and cytoprotective genes, making it an attractive therapeutic target for diabetic complications. Several Nrf2 activators have been discovered and have proven effective at activating Nrf2 signalling through different mechanisms in both in vitro and in vivo models of diabetes. This review will address some of the most promising and well-known Nrf2 activators and their roles in preventing the development and progression of diabetic complications. Challenges facing the advancement of this drug class into the clinic will be discussed, as will be the future of Nrf2 activation as a therapeutic strategy in preventing the development of diabetic complications.

  11. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  12. Cardiovascular complications in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Vitale, G; Pivonello, R; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2004-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased in acromegaly. In fact, GH and IGF-I excess induces a specific cardiomyopathy. The early stage of acromegaly is characterized by the hyperkinetic syndrome (high heart rate and increased systolic output). Frequently, concentric biventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in acromegaly, leading to an impaired systolic function ending in heart failure if the disease is untreated or unsuccessfully untreated. Besides, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of valves have been also described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes, aggravates the acromegalic cardiomyopathy. The suppression of GH/IGF-I following an efficacious therapy could decrease left ventricular mass and improve cardiac function. In conclusion, a careful evaluation of cardiac function, morphology and activity seems to be mandatory in acromegaly.

  13. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  14. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  15. The CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells colonize the lymph nodes of the patients with adult onset Still's disease and are associated with increased extracellular level of H-ferritin in the same tissue: correlation with disease severity and implication for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Ciccia, F; Cipriani, P; Guggino, G; Di Benedetto, P; Rizzo, A; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we aimed to evaluate the levels of ferritin enriched in H subunits (H-ferritin) and ferritin enriched in L subunits (L-ferritin) and the cells expressing these two molecules in the lymph node (LN) biopsies obtained from adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients, and the possible correlation among these data and the severity of the disease. Ten patients with AOSD underwent LN biopsy. All the samples were stained by immunofluorescence. A statistical analysis was performed to estimate the possible correlation among both H-ferritin and L-ferritin tissue expression and the clinical picture of the disease. Furthermore, the same analysis was performed to evaluate the possible correlation among the number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) or CD68(+)/L-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increased tissue H-ferritin expression in the LNs of AOSD patients. This increased expression correlated with the severity of the disease. An increased number of CD68 macrophages expressing H-ferritin was observed in the LN samples of our patients. Furthermore, we observed that the number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells correlated significantly with the severity of the clinical picture. Our data showed an imbalance between the levels of H- and L-ferritin in LNs of AOSD patients and the evidence of an increased number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells in the same organs. Furthermore, a correlation among both the tissue H-ferritin levels and the CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture was observed.

  16. Community-acquired Pneumonia and its Complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qiang; Shen, Kun-ling

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in developing and developed countries, and its incidence is highest among children less than 5-y-old. Over the last five years, several international and local guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of pediatric CAP, but there are still several major problems that need to be standardised. The aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the termination, epidemiology, microbiology and pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment, and complications of pediatric CAP. There still are many unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the difficulty to identify its etiological agents, the emergence of drug, and the lack of introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens in developing countries. More research is required in various areas (including therapy of atypical agents), and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination in order to reduce the incidence of the disease. PMID:25976616

  17. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot.

  18. Feline infectious peritonitis: still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Meli, M L

    2014-03-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats, the pathogenesis of which has not yet been fully revealed. The present review focuses on the biology of feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection and the pathogenesis and pathological features of FIP. Recent studies have revealed functions of many viral proteins, differing receptor specificity for type I and type II FCoV, and genomic differences between feline enteric coronaviruses (FECVs) and FIP viruses (FIPVs). FECV and FIP also exhibit functional differences, since FECVs replicate mainly in intestinal epithelium and are shed in feces, and FIPVs replicate efficiently in monocytes and induce systemic disease. Thus, key events in the pathogenesis of FIP are systemic infection with FIPV, effective and sustainable viral replication in monocytes, and activation of infected monocytes. The host's genetics and immune system also play important roles. It is the activation of monocytes and macrophages that directly leads to the pathologic features of FIP, including vasculitis, body cavity effusions, and fibrinous and granulomatous inflammatory lesions. Advances have been made in the clinical diagnosis of FIP, based on the clinical pathologic findings, serologic testing, and detection of virus using molecular (polymerase chain reaction) or antibody-based methods. Nevertheless, the clinical diagnosis remains challenging in particular in the dry form of FIP, which is partly due to the incomplete understanding of infection biology and pathogenesis in FIP. So, while much progress has been made, many aspects of FIP pathogenesis still remain an enigma.

  19. Human herpesvirus-6 has no apparent influence on course of HCV hepatitis, but may complicate HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Julieta; Simoes, Patricia; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Humberto, Cruz Ortiz; Ramon, Albert M

    2003-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is a widespread virus with occasional reactivation and a potential hepatotropism. The present study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of HHV-6 reactivation in viral (HCV, HBV) and alcoholic liver diseases and its implication for the course of the primary disease. Serological and immunohistochemical tests were done to document viral activity, hepatocellular apoptosis or proliferation, and autoantibody formation. While the course of HCV remains apparently uninfluenced by HHV-6, HBV hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease show a higher incidence of autoantibody formation if HHV-6 is present. The data of this pilot study warrant more extensive investigations of the clinical pathology of HHV-6 in liver diseases.

  20. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  1. Editorial Commentary: Using a 70° Arthroscope to Evaluate the Biceps Tendon and Rule Out Bicipital Tunnel Disease Is Better Than Using a 30° Arthroscope… but Still Inadequate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel A

    2016-09-01

    In a well-constructed study using both cadaveric and in vivo models, Sheean et al. found that use of a 70° arthroscope significantly improves visualization of the long head of the biceps tendon and zone 1 of the bicipital tunnel compared with a standard 30° arthroscope during shoulder arthroscopy. Enthusiasm for the added visualization afforded by the 70° arthroscope, however, should be tempered by the fact that zone 2 of the bicipital tunnel and the biceps tendon within remain hidden from view along with any pathology it harbors. Clinicians should not over-rely on diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy when assessing for bicipital tunnel disease.

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  3. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  4. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  5. Complications of measles during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Atmar, R L; Englund, J A; Hammill, H

    1992-01-01

    Twelve pregnant women and one woman who had just given birth were hospitalized with measles in Houston between 1988 and 1990. The most common and serious maternal complication was pneumonitis (seven patients). Other maternal complications included hepatitis (seven patients), premature labor (four patients), spontaneous abortion (one patient), and death (one patient). For four of 13 patients, all of whom had severe measles and pneumonitis due to measles virus, an adverse fetal outcome such as abortion or prematurity was associated with their conditions. Historical accounts describing maternal sequelae of measles have suggested more severe disease in pregnant women, although this observation has not always been confirmed by more recent reports in developed countries. The clinical course in our patients suggests that measles during pregnancy may be associated with serious complications.

  6. Complications and their management in endometriosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Yucel; Uslu, Husamettin

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis is a common chronic disease mostly seen in young women. Endometriosis surgery may be considered as rather challenging in gynecology. In this article, we tried to emphasize on basic concepts of endometriosis surgery, the best surgical method that should be applied and the complications and the management of the complications.

  7. Editorial Commentary: Using a 70° Arthroscope to Evaluate the Biceps Tendon and Rule Out Bicipital Tunnel Disease Is Better Than Using a 30° Arthroscope… but Still Inadequate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel A

    2016-09-01

    In a well-constructed study using both cadaveric and in vivo models, Sheean et al. found that use of a 70° arthroscope significantly improves visualization of the long head of the biceps tendon and zone 1 of the bicipital tunnel compared with a standard 30° arthroscope during shoulder arthroscopy. Enthusiasm for the added visualization afforded by the 70° arthroscope, however, should be tempered by the fact that zone 2 of the bicipital tunnel and the biceps tendon within remain hidden from view along with any pathology it harbors. Clinicians should not over-rely on diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy when assessing for bicipital tunnel disease. PMID:27594326

  8. Infectious complications in living related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, S; Tanaka, K; Fujita, S; Sano, K; Shirahase, I; Kato, H; Yamamoto, E; Inomata, Y; Ozawa, K

    1994-04-01

    During the last 31 months, 50 children between 3 months and 15 years of age have undergone living related liver transplantation (LRLT) for end-stage liver diseases (39 biliary atresia, 2 Budd-Chiari syndrome, 2 progressive intrahepatic cholestasis, 3 liver cirrhosis, 1 Wilson disease, 1 protoporphyria, 1 tyrosinemia, and 1 fulminant hepatitis). Combined FK-506 and low-dose steroids were routinely used for immunosuppression. There were seven deaths, two of which were related to infection (Candida pneumonia and Epstein-Barr virus [EBV]-associated lymphoproliferative syndrome [LPS]). Five patients had a bacterial infection, all of which were associated with surgical complications. Three patients had Candida infection, all of which were malnourished, had biliary atresia, and had been managed with prolonged antibiotics against obstinate ascending cholangitis. There were 14 symptomatic viral infections (1 herpes simplex virus, 1 herpes zoster virus, 5 cytomegalovirus [CMV], 6 EBV, and 1 EBV-associated LPS). Three of the five CMV infections appeared in patients whose graft was ABO-incompatible, who were managed with prophylactic OKT-3. Most of the viral infections (except 1 EBV-associated LPS) were minor and were treated successfully. The low incidence and successful treatment of CMV infection are related to the high compatibility and low incidence of allograft rejection in LRLT. Bacterial and fungal infections can be decreased by greater refinement of surgical technique and more aggressive preoperative management. Treatment of EBV infection is still an unsolved problem.

  9. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  10. Infections with gastrointestinal parasitic helminths indigenous to Japan and their treatment historically studied in an attempt to control the diseases in countries where they are still rampant: (1) the Jomon to Edo periods.

    PubMed

    Maki, Jun; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kuwada, Masahiro; Caceres, Armando; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Tamai, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    ) sometimes still carried out in the 21st century in Japan, is binding worms from the anus using chopsticks. This method can be traced back to the Edo period as far as this investigation is concerned. Though the historical studies on anthelmintics are in progress, there seem to be no effective anthelmintics leaving nothing to be desired to the present authors' knowledge.

  11. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  12. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  13. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  14. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  15. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  16. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  17. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  18. Is the incidence of heart attack still decreasing in Australia? Developing reliable methods for monitoring trends in myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (AUS-MOCHA): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nedkoff, Lee; Knuiman, Matthew; Hobbs, Michael S T; Hung, Joseph; Mathur, Sushma; Beilby, John; Reynolds, Anna; Briffa, Tom G; Lopez, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Accurate monitoring of acute coronary heart disease (CHD) is essential for understanding the effects of primary and secondary prevention and for planning of healthcare services. The ability to reliably monitor acute CHD has been affected by new diagnostic tests for myocardial infarction (MI) and changing clinical classifications and management of CHD. Our study will develop new and reliable methods for monitoring population trends in incidence, outcomes and health service usage for acute CHD and chest pain. Methods and analysis The study cohort of all CHD will be identified from the Western Australian Data Linkage System using state-wide data sets for emergency department presentation, hospitalisations and mortality data for 2002–2014. This core linked data set will be supplemented with data from hospital medical record reviews, pathology data and hospital pharmacy dispensing databases. The consistency over time of the coding of the different subgroups of CHD/chest pain (ST-elevation MI, non-ST elevation MI, unstable angina, stable angina, other CHD, non-CHD chest pain) in linked data will be assessed using these data sources, and an algorithm developed detailing groups in which temporal trends can be reliably measured. This algorithm will be used for measurement of trends in incidence and outcomes of acute CHD, and to develop further methods for monitoring acute CHD using unlinked and linked data with varying availability of hospitalisation history. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committees of the WA Department of Health (#2016/23) and The University of Western Australia (RA/4/1/7230). Findings will be disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed journals, and presentation at national and international conferences. There will also be a strong platform for dissemination of new monitoring methods via collaboration with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare which will assist with

  19. Hepatic abscess complicating ulceroglandular tularemia.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Lamothe, F; Ishak, M; Côté, J; Breton, G; Villeneuve, J P; D'Amico, P

    1983-12-15

    In a patient with the clinical features of classic ulceroglandular tularemia a solitary hepatic abscess was found during an ultrasound examination. Hepatic tularemia has rarely been reported since the advent of specific therapy, which prevents the disease from reaching the disseminated state. This case, however, shows that the liver can be involved early in the course of tularemia. Increased serum levels of hepatic enzymes may be the only sign of such a complication.

  20. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  1. Complications of stomas: their aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Watson, Angus J M; Nicol, Laura; Donaldson, Susan; Fraser, Cathie; Silversides, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The formation of a stoma is an essential part of many colorectal operations. Despite the frequency with which these surgeries are performed and the number of specialists involved in stoma care, complications are still common. This article investigates the most common complications, explains the reasons for their occurrence and suggests potential management options. Common stoma complications were identified by the colorectal/ stoma clinical nurse specialist (CSCNS) and a literature search was performed using a variety of online databases, including Medline and CINAHL using the keywords stoma, complications, prolapse, ischaemia, retraction, hernia and stenosis. Articles used were selected on the basis of relevance to the topic. The commonest complications of stomas included skin irritation, prolapse, retraction, ischaemia, hernia and stenosis.

  2. Measles: Still a Significant Health Threat.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Claire; Lanzi, Maria; Lindberg, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Measles (Rubeola), although considered eradicated in the United States, still causes periodic outbreaks. Vaccine refusal leads to vulnerable pockets of individuals who may become infected once the virus is imported from countries where it is endemic. In turn, these individuals may spread the virus to young infants and to other vulnerable individuals. Many healthcare providers are not familiar with this disease or with the factors that contribute to the risk of spread. Measles causes a serious febrile illness that may lead to pneumonia, blindness, deafness, neurological disorders, and even death. Patients with measles need supportive care and administration of oral vitamin A. The measles vaccine is highly effective and considered extremely safe, but misinformation about the safety of this and other vaccines has decreased immunization coverage in some areas of the country. Mandatory immunization laws exist in every state and have been upheld by courts including the United States Supreme Court, but laws and exemptions vary among states. Nurses can play a strong role in care of patients with measles, case identification, and prevention of transmission. Most importantly, because nurses hold positions of trust in their communities, they should be tireless frontline advocates for immunization. The purpose of this article is to provide information on measles, its transmission, signs and symptoms, treatment, prevention, and relevant laws and regulations. PMID:26110575

  3. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  4. An Autopsy Case of Anti-melanoma Differentiation-associated Gene-5 Antibody-positive Clinical Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naomi; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Tomozoe, Kumi; Tajiri, Morihiro; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Okamoto, Masaki; Tominaga, Masaki; Ida, Hiroaki; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man presented with heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, and mild muscle weakness. Both of his lung fields showed interstitial changes that worsened rapidly. He was diagnosed with clinical amyopathic dermatomyositis with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. The patient died of respiratory failure, despite the administration of immunosuppressive therapy. Autopsy revealed diffuse alveolar damage. An antibody analysis, which was performed postmortem, detected the presence of anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene (MDA)-5 antibodies. Clinicians should note the clinical, radiologic, and serologic findings to predict anti-MDA-5 antibody-associated rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. PMID:27301523

  5. Paediatric reduced intensity conditioning: analysis of centre strategies on regimens and definitions by the EBMT Paediatric Diseases and Complications and Quality of Life WP.

    PubMed

    Lawitschka, A; Faraci, M; Yaniv, I; Veys, P; Bader, P; Wachowiak, J; Socie, G; Aljurf, M D; Arat, M; Boelens, J J; Duarte, R; Tichelli, A; Peters, C

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this analysis was to explore the diversity of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in paediatric allo-SCT in daily practice across Europe. Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Promise database from 1994 to 2008 were supplemented by a survey of EBMT centres performing paediatric allo-SCT on the current policy asking for the underlying diseases and for the drug combinations. Records from 161 centres from 30 countries were analysed and 139 various RIC regimens were reported. More centres applied RIC for malignant rather than for non-malignant diseases. In general, fludarabine (FLU)-based regimens predominated except for BU-based regimens in myeloid malignancies and haemoglobinopathies. Treosulfan (TREO) was mainly applied for unspecified malignant diseases and for haemophagocytic diseases. FLU-based regimens revealed the greatest number of different combinations. Correlating the number of regimens with the number of treating centres revealed the lowest variety in FLU and the highest variety in TBI and TREO. FLU/melphalane and FLU/CY were the most frequent combinations. This extreme heterogeneity in RIC may influence both the efficacy and the safety of the procedures, which requires further investigation. Optimization and standardization of RIC is the final goal to provide a platform for future prospective studies.

  6. Crohn's disease of the small bowel, complicated by primary biliary cirrhosis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and Raynaud's phenomenon: favorable response of all disorders to adalimumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Triantafillidis, John K; Durakis, Spyros; Merikas, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a male patient suffering from long-lasting Crohn's disease of the small bowel who developed thyroiditis Hassimoto, Raynaud's phenomenon, and primary biliary cirrhosis, during the course of the underlying bowel disease. It is not clear whether these co-morbidities appeared coincidentally, or because they share some common immunopathogenetic mechanisms. In this patient, Crohn's disease favorably responded to the treatment with an anti-TNF-α agent (adalimumab). The serum titers of antimitochondrial antibodyies and cholestatic enzymes considerably reduced during the 3-year treatment with the biologic agent. Raynaud's phenomenon, also, completely disappeared. Bearing in mind the possible involvement of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis, it could be argued that the clinical and laboratory improvement of liver disease, as well as the reduction in serum titers of antimitochondrial antibodies, might be due to the anti-TNF-α action of adalimumab. We suggest that it would be worth further investigating the role of biologic agents in the treatment of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  7. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  8. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  9. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

    2014-01-01

    A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient's clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this

  10. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

    2014-01-01

    A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient’s clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this

  11. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  12. Craniotomy for cerebellar hemangioblastoma excision in a patient with von Hippel–Lindau disease complicated by uncontrolled hypertension due to pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Tadashi, Yamaguchi; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This report describes a patient with Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) syndrome and uncontrolled hypertension due to pheochromocytoma who underwent craniotomy for the excision of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma combined with a laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Case report A 31-year-old man presented with severe headache. MRI showed areas of abnormal enhancement in the left cerebellum that were determined to be hemangioblastoma with mass effect and obstructive hydrocephalus. His blood pressure rose abruptly and could not be controlled. CT of the abdomen revealed bilateral suprarenal tumors, and the patient was diagnosed as having VHL syndrome.On the third day, he presented with increasing headache, a decreased level of consciousness, and hemiparesis. We were not able to perform an craniotomy because abdominal compression in the prone or sitting position resulted in severe hypertension. We performed ventricular drainage to control his ICP. On the fifth day, we first performed a bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy to control ICP and then moved the patient to the prone position before performing a craniotomy to remove the left cerebellar hemangioblastoma. Discu ssion & conclusion In patients with pheochromocytoma, the effects of catecholamine oversecretion can cause significant perioperative morbidity and mortality, but these can be prevented by appropriate preoperative medical management. When carrying out an excision of cerebellar hemangioblastomas in patients with intracranial hypertension complicated by abnormal hypertension due to pheochromocytoma whose blood pressure is not sufficiently controlled, tumor resection of the pheochromocytoma prior to cerebellar hemangioblastoma excision in the same surgery may prevent increased ICP and reduce perioperative risk. PMID:26595895

  13. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu ZhiYong; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Ji; Zhu Xiaodong; Zhao Jiandong; Lu Haijie; Yang Yunli; Chen Long; Wang Anyu; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang . E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

  14. What Interventional Cardiologists Are Still Leaving to the Surgeons?

    PubMed Central

    Promphan, Worakan; Qureshi, Shakeel A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, development of new technologies is still ongoing with the ultimate goal of maximizing treatment outcomes with less invasiveness and reduced procedural risk. This review is intended to update on when interventionalists need surgical support in common or emerging problems in congenital heart disease. PMID:27379218

  15. Glucose variability before and after treatment of a patient with Graves' disease complicated by diabetes mellitus: assessment by continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Torimoto, Keiichi; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Mori, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Sunao; Narisawa, Manabu; Kurozumi, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was diagnosed and treated for Graves' disease (GD) in 1999 but she discontinued treatment at her own discretion. In 2011, she was admitted to a local hospital for management of thyrotoxic crisis. Treatment with propylthiouracil, iodide potassium (KI), and prednisolone (PSL) was started, which resulted in improvement of the general condition. PSL and KI were discontinued before she was transferred to our hospital. At the local hospital, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 212 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c concentration was 11.2%; intensive insulin therapy had been instituted. Upon admission to our hospital, FPG level was 122 mg/dL, but insulin secretion was compromised, suggesting aggravation of thyroid function and deterioration of glycemic control. The FPG level increased to 173 mg/dL; continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) identified dawn phenomenon at approximately 0400 h. Resumption of KI resulted in improvement of FPG and disappearance of the dawn phenomenon, as assessed by CGM. These results indicate that in patients with compromised insulin secretion, hyperthyroidism can induce elevation of not only postprandial blood glucose, but also FPG level due to the dawn phenomenon and that the dawn phenomenon can be alleviated with improvement in thyroid function. To our knowledge, no studies have assessed glucose variability by CGM before and after treatment of Graves' disease. The observations made in this case shed light on the understanding of abnormal glucose metabolism associated with Graves' disease.

  16. Perioperative thrombotic complications in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Cillo, Umberto; Zanus, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Ori, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although the perioperative bleeding complications and the major side effects of blood transfusion have always been the primary concern in liver transplantation (OLT), the possible cohesion of an underestimated intrinsic hypercoagulative state during and after the transplant procedure may pose a major threat to both patient and graft survival. Thromboembolism during OLT is characterized not only by a complex aetiology, but also by unpredictable onset and evolution of the disease. The initiation of a procoagulant process may be triggered by various factors, such as inflammation, venous stasis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, vascular clamping, anatomical and technical abnormalities, genetic factors, deficiency of profibrinolytic activity, and platelet activation. The involvement of the arterial system, intracardiac thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, portal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis, are among the most serious thrombotic events in the perioperative period. The rapid detection of occlusive vascular events is of paramount importance as it heavily influences the prognosis, particularly when these events occur intraoperatively or early after OLT. Regardless of the lack of studies and guidelines on anticoagulant prophylaxis in this setting, many institutions recommend such an approach especially in the subset of patients at high risk. However, the decision of when, how and in what doses to use the various chemical anticoagulants is still a difficult task, since there is no common consensus, even for high-risk cases. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism causing severe hemodynamic events, or even loss of graft function, must be weighed and compared with the risk of an important bleeding. In this article we briefly review the risk factors and the possible predictors of major thrombotic complications occurring in the perioperative period, as well as their incidence and clinical features. Moreover, the indications to pharmacological prophylaxis and the current

  17. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  18. [Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Ramadan, E; Chaimoff, C

    1992-04-15

    92% of our first 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were successful. Postoperative complications included fever in 10 cases (17%), urinary retention in 5 (8%), intraabdominal abscess in 2 (3%), biliary leakage in 1 (2%) and unexplained abdominal pain in 10 (17%). Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has obvious advantages, it also has major as well as minor complications. PMID:1398315

  19. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  20. Enhanced formation and impaired degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatomyositis and polymyositis: a potential contributor to interstitial lung disease complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Shu, X; Tian, X; Chen, F; Lu, X; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyosits (PM) are systemic autoimmune diseases whose pathogeneses remain unclear. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are reputed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. This study tests the hypothesis that NETs may be pathogenic in DM/PM. Plasma samples from 97 DM/PM patients (72 DM, 25 PM) and 54 healthy controls were tested for the capacities to induce and degrade NETs. Plasma DNase I activity was tested to further explore possible reasons for the incomplete degradation of NETs. Results from 35 DM patients and seven PM patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) were compared with results from DM/PM patients without ILD. Compared with control subjects, DM/PM patients exhibited a significantly enhanced capacity for inducing NETs, which was supported by elevated levels of plasma LL-37 and circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in DM/PM. NETs degradation and DNase I activity were also decreased significantly in DM/PM patients and were correlated positively. Moreover, DM/PM patients with ILD exhibited the lowest NETs degradation in vitro due to the decrease in DNase I activity. DNase I activity in patients with anti-Jo-1 antibodies was significantly lower than in patients without. Glucocorticoid therapy seems to improve DNase I activity. Our findings demonstrate that excessively formed NETs cannot be degraded completely because of decreased DNase I activity in DM/PM patients, especially in patients with ILD, suggesting that abnormal regulation of NETs may be involved in the pathogenesis of DM/PM and could be one of the factors that initiate and aggravate ILD. PMID:24611519

  1. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  2. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  3. Basilar artery dissection: A rare complication of posterior fossa epidermoid cyst resection, and evaluation of the possible effects of cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Margolin, Emil

    2016-10-01

    We report a rare case of a 45-year-old female with an unruptured basilar artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with locked-in syndrome due to brainstem ischemia eleven months following resection of a giant cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst and three months after insertion of ventriculo peritoneal shunt due to hydrocephalus. The etiology of basilar artery dissection and the effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression in this patient are unclear. Our report suggests a possible effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on intracranial arterial dissection progression. PMID:27344090

  4. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    PubMed

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  5. Apprentice Still Photographic Specialist (AFSC 23132).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for apprentice still photographic specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are general subjects (career ladder progression, security, photographic safety, and photographic laboratory administration); still photographic…

  6. Still Life with Fruit and Seashell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojeski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Henri Matisse's painting, "Sideboard," opens the door to the author's first-grade students' lesson on still life. This lesson is about the process of designing, the act of making decisions, and the knowledge of one's own preferences. In this article, the author describes how the students made still life with fruit and seashells.

  7. Helicobacter and disease: still more questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Gabor

    2000-01-01

    Since the causative role of Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer and gastritis was established, a number of advances have been made. Helicobacter virulence factors have been identified, the changes it causes in gastric acid secretion has been elucidated, and the entire genome of H. pylori has been mapped. Multiple lines of evidence indicate a strong link between the bacterium and noncardia gastric cancer. The infection can be confidently diagnosed by noninvasive serologic tests and the urea breath test. Triple therapy is almost always curative, and the infection almost never recurs in Canadian adults, but eradicating the bacteria in the absence of peptic ulcer only rarely leads to resolution of dyspepsia. New studies suggest that treating Helicobacter may increase the risk of peptic esophagitis and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and cardia. PMID:11045091

  8. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Complicated by Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO – Devic’s Disease): Clinic-Pathological Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Adawi, Mohammad; Bisharat, Bishara; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is usually a relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis involving three or more contiguous spinal cord segments, and seropositivity for NMO-IgG antibody. NMO is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis and there are relatively sporadic publications about NMO and overlapping systemic or organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We described a unique case of a 25-year-old Arab young woman who was diagnosed with SLE, depending on clinical, laboratory investigations and after she had fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SLE and had presented the following findings: constitutional findings (fatigue, fever, and arthralgia); dermatologic finding (photosensitivity and butterfly rash); chronic renal failure (proteinuria up to 400 mg in 24 hours); hematologic and antinuclear antibodies (positivity for antinuclear factor (ANF), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, direct Coombs, ANA and anti-DNA, low C4 and C3, aCL by IgG and IgM). Recently, she presented with several episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings especially seropositivity for NMO-IgG were compatible with NMO. Accurate diagnosis is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention. This case illustrates that NMO may be associated with SLE. PMID:24948869

  9. Pediatric Masked Mastoiditis Associated with Multiple Intracranial Complications.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, Charalampos; Psarommatis, Ioannis; Nikas, Ioannis; Kafouris, Dimitrios; Chrysouli, Konstantina

    2015-01-01

    Masked mastoiditis is a distinct form of mastoiditis with little or no symptomatology, characterized by its potential to generate severe otogenic complications. Therefore, suspected masked mastoiditis should be diagnosed and treated without delay. This study reports a rare case of masked mastoiditis, manifested by multiple intracranial complications in an immunocompetent girl. The child exhibited headache and neurological symptomatology. Imaging studies revealed an epidural and a large cerebellar abscess and the patient was immediately treated with a triple antibiotic therapy. Mastoid surgery and drainage of the epidural abscess took place after the stabilization of the patient's neurologic status, on the 3rd hospitalization day. The cerebellar abscess was treated by craniectomy and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in the 3rd week of hospitalization. The girl was finally discharged in excellent condition. Two years later, she is still in good health, without otological or neurological sequelae. Masked mastoiditis is an insidious disease which requires increased clinical awareness and adequate imaging. Should clinical and/or radiological findings be positive, mastoidectomy must follow in order to prevent severe otogenic complications that can be triggered by masked mastoiditis.

  10. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  11. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications.

  12. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances-serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  13. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  14. Graft complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: Role of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Boraschi, Piero; Della Pina, Maria Clotilde; Donati, Francescamaria

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in adult patients with endstage liver disease. Survival of both graft and patient has progressively improved over time due to improvements in surgical and medical treatment. However, post-transplant complications still have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality associated with transplant surgery. The most common adverse events of the graft include vascular (arterial and venous stenosis and thrombosis), biliary (leakage, strictures, stones) and parenchymal complications (hepatitis virus C infection, HCC recurrence, liver abscesses). The diagnosis of these adverse events is often challenging because of the low specificity of clinical and biologic findings. Different diagnostic algorithms have been proposed for the detection of graft complications and, in this setting, radiological evaluation plays a key role in differential diagnosis of graft complications and the exclusion of other adverse events. Ultrasound examination is established the first-line method of identifying adverse events in liver transplant recipients but a normal or a technically unsatisfactory study cannot exclude the presence of biliary, vascular and/or parenchymal complications. In these circumstances, before planning any treatment, multi-detector CT and/or MR imaging and MR cholangiography should be performed for the evaluation of vascular structures, biliary system, liver parenchyma and fluid collections. The aim of this review is to illustrate the role and state-of-the-art of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques in the diagnosis and management of complications which primarily affect the graft in patients after liver transplantation. PMID:27235874

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  16. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  17. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the.

  18. Complications of Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Shikha; Rao, Kavita; Natrajan, Sundaram

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linking of corneal collagen (CXL) is a promising approach for the treatment of keratoconus and secondary ectasia. Several long-term and short-term complications of CXL have been studied and documented. The possibility of a secondary infection after the procedure exists because the patient is subjected to epithelial debridement and the application of a soft contact lens. Formation of temporary corneal haze, permanent scars, endothelial damage, treatment failure, sterile infiltrates, and herpes reactivation are the other reported complications of this procedure. Cross-linking is a low-invasive procedure with low complication and failure rate but it may have direct or primary complications due to incorrect technique application or incorrect patient's inclusion and indirect or secondary complications related to therapeutic soft contact lens, patient's poor hygiene, and undiagnosed concomitant ocular surface diseases. PMID:22254130

  19. Early postoperative complications following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andrea R; Platz, Klaus-Peter; Kremer, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    Liver transplantation is a highly successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, serious postoperative complications can significantly compromise patient survival. Complications can be technical, medical, or immunological in nature. The risk of developing early postoperative complications is associated with the patient's preoperative condition, the quality of the donor liver, the quality of the donor and recipient procedure, initial graft function, and perioperative anaesthesiological and intensive care management. The patient's preoperative condition can include gastrointestinal bleeding, acute renal failure, a requirement for cathecholamines or mechanical ventilation, and prolonged encephalopathy for the most detrimental risk factors for developing early postoperative complications. The necessity for prolonged mechanical ventilation or the requirement for reintubation after transplantation can significantly increase the risk of developing pneumonia, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction. A decrease in infectious and other complications can be achieved by early postoperative enteral nutition, including the application of probiotics. PMID:15494284

  20. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  1. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa - the spectrum of complications.

    PubMed

    Murat-Sušić, Slobodna; Husar, Karmela; Skerlev, Mihael; Marinović, Branka; Babić, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by skin and mucosal fragility and blister formation. A wide variety of extracutaneous manifestations can develop as well as various complications of the disease such as severe anemia, growth retardation, esophageal stenosis, mutilating deformities of hands and feet, glomerulonephritis leading to chronic renal failure, and many others. One of the most important and often occurring complications is the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas that grow and metastasize quickly. The objective of this paper is to give dermatologists a review of major complications encountered in patients with epidermolysis bullosa. Since these complications occur so often and can be considered to be part of the clinical picture, it is mandatory to develop a multidisciplinary well-educated team involved in follow-up and treatment of these patients. PMID:22185926

  2. Orbital complications in functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Corey, J P; Bumsted, R; Panje, W; Namon, A

    1993-11-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery can result in both minor and major complications. Among these, orbital complications--including retroorbital hematoma--are among the most feared. Injuries can be direct or indirect from pulling on diseased structures. A retrospective chart review of 616 endoscopic sinus procedures revealed eight orbital complications in seven patients. These included two medial rectus injuries, five orbital hemorrhages, and one nasolacrimal duct injury. Predisposing factors may include hypertension, lamina papyracia dehiscences, extensive polypoid disease, previous surgery, inability to visualize the maxillary ostia, violent coughing or sneezing, and chronic steroid use. Suggested management in the literature includes lateral canthotomy, steroids, and mannitol with ophthalmologic consultation. Opening of the wound by means of an external ethmoidectomy incision has also been suggested. We suggest that adding orbital decompression by means of multiple incisions into the periorbita should be added for fully effective relief. A "management" tree of decision parameters relevant to orbital complications is presented.

  3. Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

  4. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:26564084

  5. Factors associated with persistence of red blood cell antibodies in woman after pregnancies complicated by fetal alloimmune haemolytic disease treated with intrauterine transfusions.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Esther P; Brand, Anneke; van de Watering, Leo M G; Claas, Frans H J; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Schonewille, Henk

    2015-02-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) antibodies can persist for decades or decrease quickly to undetectable levels. Antibody persistence has not been systematically studied. Women whose children are treated with intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for haemolytic disease of the fetus (HDFN) often produce additional antibodies, which can be evoked by the intrauterine transfusion or by fetomaternal haemorrhage during the procedure. Factors associated with persistence of both the antibodies responsible for HDFN and additional antibodies were studied in 260 women whose children were treated with IUT between 1988 and 2008. They possessed 499 (205 anti-D and 294 non-D) antibodies after the last IUT. After a median follow-up of 8·7 years, all 260 antibodies primarily responsible for HDFN had persisted. Additional antibodies directed against antigens of the children persisted in 70·6%, and in 32·3% if they were not child-specific (P < 0·001). Antibodies induced by irradiated IUT persisted in only 7·1%. Multivariate analyses showed that non-HDFN antibody persistence was dependent on the antibody titre and specificity. In conclusion, persistence of antibodies mainly depends on antibody strength and specificity. Difference between fetal or non-fetal immunogens suggests maintenance of antigenic stimulation possibly by long-term fetomaternal chimerism. PMID:25244566

  6. Esophageal stricture secondary to drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis presenting in an adult: an unusual complication of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Njei, Basile; Schoenfeld, Adam; Vaziri, Haleh

    2013-10-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an idiosyncratic, potentially life-threatening skin disease characterized by widespread inflammation and necrosis of the epidermis and mucous membranes. It may result in narrowing of the esophageal lumen through fibrosis and esophageal stricture in rare situations, mostly encountered in children. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of esophageal stricture secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN in an adult patient. A 70-year-old male presented to our clinic with severe dysphagia secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN involving his mouth and esophagus. At the time of presentation the patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube and was unable to handle his oral secretions. Endoscopy revealed near complete proximal esophageal stricture. A bidirectional esophageal dilatation procedure via the mouth and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy site was successfully performed over a guidewire for treatment of this patient. The patient tolerated the procedure well. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with dilation was performed in a regular anterograde fashion five times over the next three months. Triamcinolone acetonide was injected using Carr-Locke injection needle from ultrasound endoscopy during the last three sessions. He currently tolerates a regular diet without difficulty.

  7. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  8. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  9. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  10. Drinking Water: Health Hazards Still Not Resolved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Nicholas

    1977-01-01

    Despite the suggested link between cancer deaths and drinking obtained from the Mississippi River, New Orleans still treats its water supply in the same manner as before the Environmental Defense Fund's epidemiological study. (BT)

  11. Advanced sialoendoscopy techniques, rare findings, and complications.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-12-01

    This article presents and discusses advanced minimally invasive sialoendoscopy and combined methods: endoscopy, endoscopic-assisted techniques, and external-lithotripsy combined procedures. It also presents rare situations and complications encountered during sialoendoscopic procedures. Sialoendoscopy is a relatively novel technique, which adds significant new dimensions to the surgeon's armamentarium for management of inflammatory salivary gland diseases. Because of the rapid development in minimally invasive surgical techniques, surgeons are capable of more facilely treating complicated inflammatory and obstructive conditions of the salivary glands.

  12. Respiratory complications during artificial barbiturate coma.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Signoroni, G; Meli, M; Lobascio, A E; Massei, R; Infuso, L

    1981-01-01

    Artificial barbiturate coma was induced in 13 patients with disorders of consciousness from traumatic or spontaneous diseases. Early respiratory complications consisting with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) were found in 10 out of these 13 patients; on the contrary, only 2 out of 13 patients, treated with routine intensive care therapy without barbiturate, showed analogous respiratory complications. The literature on the subject and the possible pathophysiological mechanism of respiratory distress are discussed.

  13. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

  14. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  15. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  16. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  17. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  18. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  19. Management of nonocclusive hepatic artery complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A

    2007-09-01

    Nonocclusive arterial disease represents less than 5% of posttransplant arterial complications. Nonocclusive arterial complications are classified into (1) nonocclusive diminished flow in the hepatic artery, (2) arteriovenous fistulae, (3) pseudoaneurysms, and (4) arterial rupture. Due to the rarity of these complications, particularly when considering them individually, many of the opinions and managements of these complications are anecdotal. Transcatheter embolization is the main mode of minimal invasive management of these uncommon complications. Other minimal invasive methods have been described such as stent placement or direct percutaneous embolization/thrombosis. The article discusses the presentation, etiology, types, treatment indications, and various modes of minimal invasive therapy used to manage these complications.

  20. Relationship of lipid and lipoprotein ratios with coronary severity in patients with new on-set coronary artery disease complicated with type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ying; Chen, Juan; Chen, Man-Hua; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Li, Sha; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Rui-Xia; Dong, Qian; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) progression. Although previous studies have demonstrated the association of lipid and lipoprotein ratios with CAD, no data are currently available concerning the relationship between lipid and lipoprotein ratios and the severity of new on-set CAD in diabetics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of lipid and lipoprotein ratios in predicting the severity of CAD in patients with type 2 DM (T2DM). Methods A total of 380 consecutive T2DM patients with new on-set CAD were enrolled in the present study. Then, they were classified into the three groups according to Gensini score (GS) tertiles. The relationship between lipid and lipoprotein ratios currently used and the GS was investigated. Results Positive correlations of natural log-transformed GS (lnGS) with apolipoprotein B to apoA-I ratio (apoB/apoA-I), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to apoA-I ratio (non-HDL-C/apoA-I), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to apoA-I ratio (LDL-C/apoA-I) were found (r = 0.18, 0.13, 0.12, respectively, all P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated apoB/apoA-I as the strongest predictor for high GS (OR = 5.67, 95% CI: 1.45–23.92, P = 0.003). Area under receivers operating characteristic curve of apoB/apoA-I was 0.63 (95% CI: 0.60–0.66, P = 0.001) for predicting high GS. The optimal cutoff value of apoB/apoA-I to predict high GS was 0.72 with the sensitivity of 61.2% and the specificity of 62.1%. Conclusions Lipid and lipoprotein ratios might be useful for predicting the severity of new on-set CAD in T2DM patients, and the apoB/apoA-I appeared as the most significant predictor in this population. PMID:27781059

  1. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-11-16

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient's age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  2. ICD and DSM: neuroplasticity and staging are still missing.

    PubMed

    Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The two main diagnostic systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), have undergone a number of revisions since their first editions: whereas the fifth edition of the DSM has been published in 2013, the eleventh revision of the ICD is expected by 2018. Although the process of harmonization between the 2 systems is still a debated topic, the forthcoming revision of the ICD is seemingly converging toward the DSM approach in regard to the reclassification of a number of disorders. Nevertheless, the 2 systems still exhibit considerable differences, partly due to their different purposes, development and revision processes, and target audiences. Furthermore, while alternative and innovative classification approaches are emerging with the aim of integrating the latest findings from neuroscience and genomics, both the DSM and ICD still fail to incorporate core concepts such as the clinical staging of psychiatric disorders and "neuroprogression," as well as an adequate consideration of endophenotypes. PMID:27503571

  3. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  4. Interstitial lung disease in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Sara R; Castelino, Flavia V

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multiorgan involvement. Interstitial lung disease is a common complication of systemic sclerosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of interstitial lung disease hinges on careful clinical evaluation and pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. Effective therapeutic options are still limited. Several experimental therapies are currently in early-phase clinical trials and show promise.

  5. Four patients with Sillence type I osteogenesis imperfecta and mild bone fragility, complicated by left ventricular cardiac valvular disease and cardiac tissue fragility caused by type I collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, Anthony M; Lund, Allan M; Ferguson, David J P; Sawle, Philip; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Holder, Susan E; Wakeling, Emma; Moat, Neil; Pope, F Michael

    2014-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue (HDCT) characterized by blue or gray sclerae, variable short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and recurrent fractures from infancy. We present four examples of OI type I complicated by valvular heart disease and associated with tissue fragility. The diagnosis of a type I collagen disorder was confirmed by abnormal COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene sequencing. One patient was investigated with electrophoresis of collagens from cultured skin fibroblasts, showing structurally abnormal collagen type I, skin biopsy showed unusual histology and abnormal collagen fibril ultra-structure at electron microscopy. The combined clinical, surgical, histological, ultra-structural, and molecular genetic data suggest the type I collagen defect as contributory to cardiac valvular disease. The degree of tissue fragility experienced at cardiac surgery in these individuals, also reported in a small number of similar case reports, suggests that patients with OI type I need careful pre-operative assessment and consideration of the risks and benefits of cardiac surgery.

  6. Four patients with Sillence type I osteogenesis imperfecta and mild bone fragility, complicated by left ventricular cardiac valvular disease and cardiac tissue fragility caused by type I collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, Anthony M; Lund, Allan M; Ferguson, David J P; Sawle, Philip; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Holder, Susan E; Wakeling, Emma; Moat, Neil; Pope, F Michael

    2014-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue (HDCT) characterized by blue or gray sclerae, variable short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, and recurrent fractures from infancy. We present four examples of OI type I complicated by valvular heart disease and associated with tissue fragility. The diagnosis of a type I collagen disorder was confirmed by abnormal COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene sequencing. One patient was investigated with electrophoresis of collagens from cultured skin fibroblasts, showing structurally abnormal collagen type I, skin biopsy showed unusual histology and abnormal collagen fibril ultra-structure at electron microscopy. The combined clinical, surgical, histological, ultra-structural, and molecular genetic data suggest the type I collagen defect as contributory to cardiac valvular disease. The degree of tissue fragility experienced at cardiac surgery in these individuals, also reported in a small number of similar case reports, suggests that patients with OI type I need careful pre-operative assessment and consideration of the risks and benefits of cardiac surgery. PMID:24311407

  7. Isolated Duodenal Crohn's Disease: A Case Report and a Review of the Surgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Faruk; Menekşe, Ebru; Das, Koray; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirtürk, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease may affect any segment of the gastrointestinal tract; however, isolated duodenal involvement is rather rare. It still remains a complex clinical entity with a controversial management of the disease. Initially, patients with duodenal Crohn' s disease (DCD) are managed with a combination of antiacid and immunosuppressive therapy. However, medical treatment fails in the majority of DCD patients, and surgical intervention is required in case of complicated disease. Options for surgical management of complicated DCD include bypass, resection, or stricturoplasty procedures. In this paper, we reported a 33-year-old male patient, who was diagnosed with isolated duodenal Crohn's diseases, and reviewed the surgical options in the literature. PMID:23781376

  8. Cancer and the kidney: complications of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Fer, M.F.; McKinney, T.D.; Richardson, R.L.; Hande, K.R.; Oldham, R.K.; Greco, F.A.

    1981-10-01

    Various renal complications occur during the course of neoplastic disease. The therapeutic and prognostic implications differ according to the reversibility of both the underlying malignancy and the superimposed complications in the kidney. Since the mechanisms of renal failure vary significantly in patients with different types of malignancy, it is essential to avoid generalizations about etiologic factors or likely outcomes of the disease processes. The pathophysiologic abnormalities should be determined in each patient, and the reversibility of both the neoplastic and problems assessed before therapeutic decisions are made. This often requires a team effort by the internist, oncologist, nephrologist, urologist and, most importantly, the patient.

  9. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  10. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  11. Avian Mycobacteriosis: Still Existing Threat to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ulmann, Vit

    2016-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are typically environmental organisms residing in soil and water. These microorganisms can cause a wide range of clinical diseases; pulmonary disease is most frequent, followed by lymphadenitis in children, skin and soft tissue disease, and rare extra pulmonary or disseminated infections. Mycobacterium avium complex is the second most common cause of pulmonary mycobacterioses after M. tuberculosis. This review covers the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of infection caused by the members of this complex and particularities for the treatment of different disease types and patient populations. PMID:27556033

  12. Avian Mycobacteriosis: Still Existing Threat to Humans.

    PubMed

    Slany, Michal; Ulmann, Vit; Slana, Iva

    2016-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are typically environmental organisms residing in soil and water. These microorganisms can cause a wide range of clinical diseases; pulmonary disease is most frequent, followed by lymphadenitis in children, skin and soft tissue disease, and rare extra pulmonary or disseminated infections. Mycobacterium avium complex is the second most common cause of pulmonary mycobacterioses after M. tuberculosis. This review covers the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of infection caused by the members of this complex and particularities for the treatment of different disease types and patient populations. PMID:27556033

  13. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise.

  14. Why the dirty bomb is still ticking.

    PubMed

    Blair, James D

    2014-01-01

    Many Cesium 137 machines used by hospitals for blood irradiation are still susceptible to theft by terrorists who can convert them to so-called dirty bombs, according to the author, who describes the harm the explosion of one such bomb can do and urges concerned citizens, media, and security professionals to take action before a disaster occurs.

  15. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five trends that…

  16. Landsat still contributing to environmental research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Mark A.; Henebry, Geoffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    Landsat data have enabled continuous global monitoring of both human-caused and other land cover disturbances since 1972. Recently degraded performance and intermittent service of the Landsat 7 and Landsat 5 sensors, respectively, have raised concerns about the condition of global Earth observation programs. However, Landsat imagery is still useful for landscape change detection and this capability should continue into the foreseeable future.

  17. Mathematics from Still and Moving Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye; Ball, Lynda

    2005-01-01

    Digital photos and digital movies offer an excellent way of bringing real world situations into the mathematics classroom. The technologies surveyed here are feasible for everyday classroom use and inexpensive. Examples are drawn from the teaching of Cartesian coordinates, linear functions, ratio and Pythagoras' theorem using still images, and…

  18. Landsat still contributing to environmental research.

    PubMed

    Loveland, Thomas R; Cochrane, Mark A; Henebry, Geoffrey M

    2008-04-01

    Landsat data have enabled continuous global monitoring of both human-caused and other land cover disturbances since 1972. Recently degraded performance and intermittent service of the Landsat 7 and Landsat 5 sensors, respectively, have raised concerns about the condition of global Earth observation programs. However, Landsat imagery is still useful for landscape change detection and this capability should continue into the foreseeable future.

  19. Stilling Basin Performance Analysis by ADV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleyasin, Sobhan; Fathi, Nima; Vorobieff, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The outlet flow from dams, channels, and pipes, as well as the river flow, can cause damage to the bed of the river or channel and cause scouring of structures such as the saddles of bridges, because of the huge amount of the kinetic energy carried by the flow. One of the ways to dissipate this energy is via the use of stilling basins, which are structures that calm the flow. Here we present a study of one type of stilling basins for pipe outlets based on a widely used standard. During the study, splitters and cellular baffles were placed in the stilling basin, and their locations were changed to assess their effect on the flow dissipation. Velocity at several locations in the basin was measured via acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) for different Froude numbers to investigate the effect of flow rate and inlet velocity. Based on the findings of the experiments, we make several suggestions regarding the efficiency and geometry of stilling basins.

  20. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.