Science.gov

Sample records for stimulants central nervous system

  1. Central nervous system stimulants.

    PubMed

    George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Three major types of CNS stimulant are currently abused in sport: amphetamine, cocaine and caffeine. Each drug type has its own characteristic mechanism of action on CNS neurones and their associated receptors and nerve terminals. Amphetamine is widely abused in sports requiring intense anaerobic exercise where it prolongs the tolerance to anaerobic metabolism. It is addictive, and chronic abuse causes marked behavioural change and sometimes psychosis. Major sports abusing amphetamine are cycling, American football, ice-hockey and baseball. Cocaine increases tolerance to intense exercise, yet most of its chronic effects on energy metabolism are negative. Its greatest effects seem to be as a central stimulant and the enhancement of short-term anaerobic exercise. It is highly addictive and can cause cerebral and cardiovascular fatalities. Caffeine enhances fatty acid metabolism leading to glucose conservation, which appears to benefit long-distance endurance events such as skiing. Caffeine is also addictive, and chronic abuse can lead to cardiac damage. Social abuse of each of the three drugs is often difficult to distinguish from their abuse in sport.

  2. Role of radiology in central nervous system stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, E A C; Young, V E L; Hogarth, K M; Quaghebeur, G

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) stimulation is becoming increasingly prevalent. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proven to be an invaluable treatment for movement disorders and is also useful in many other neurological conditions refractory to medical treatment, such as chronic pain and epilepsy. Neuroimaging plays an important role in operative planning, target localization and post-operative follow-up. The use of imaging in determining the underlying mechanisms of DBS is increasing, and the dependence on imaging is likely to expand as deep brain targeting becomes more refined. This article will address the expanding role of radiology and highlight issues, including MRI safety concerns, that radiologists may encounter when confronted with a patient with CNS stimulation equipment in situ. PMID:25715044

  3. Mechanisms of magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Pashut, Tamar; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a stimulation method in which a magnetic coil generates a magnetic field in an area of interest in the brain. This magnetic field induces an electric field that modulates neuronal activity. The spatial distribution of the induced electric field is determined by the geometry and location of the coil relative to the brain. Although TMS has been used for several decades, the biophysical basis underlying the stimulation of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) is still unknown. To address this problem we developed a numerical scheme enabling us to combine realistic magnetic stimulation (MS) with compartmental modeling of neurons with arbitrary morphology. The induced electric field for each location in space was combined with standard compartmental modeling software to calculate the membrane current generated by the electromagnetic field for each segment of the neuron. In agreement with previous studies, the simulations suggested that peripheral axons were excited by the spatial gradients of the induced electric field. In both peripheral and central neurons, MS amplitude required for action potential generation was inversely proportional to the square of the diameter of the stimulated compartment. Due to the importance of the fiber's diameter, magnetic stimulation of CNS neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. Passive dendrites affect this process primarily as current sinks, not sources. The simulations predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Moreover, they suggest that MS does not directly trigger dendritic regenerative mechanisms. These insights into the mechanism of MS may be relevant for the design of multi-intensity TMS protocols, may facilitate the construction of magnetic stimulators, and may aid the interpretation of results of TMS of the CNS. PMID:21455288

  4. Infrared neural stimulation: a new stimulation tool for central nervous system applications

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Mykyta; Roe, Anna Wang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The traditional approach to modulating brain function (in both clinical and basic science applications) is to tap into the neural circuitry using electrical currents applied via implanted electrodes. However, it suffers from a number of problems, including the risk of tissue trauma, poor spatial specificity, and the inability to selectively stimulate neuronal subtypes. About a decade ago, optical alternatives to electrical stimulation started to emerge in order to address the shortcomings of electrical stimulation. We describe the use of one optical stimulation technique, infrared neural stimulation (INS), during which short (of the order of a millisecond) pulses of infrared light are delivered to the neural tissue. Very focal stimulation is achieved via a thermal mechanism and stimulation location can be quickly adjusted by redirecting the light. After describing some of the work done in the peripheral nervous system, we focus on the use of INS in the central nervous system to investigate functional connectivity in the visual and somatosensory areas, target specific functional domains, and influence behavior of an awake nonhuman primate. We conclude with a positive outlook for INS as a tool for safe and precise targeted brain stimulation. PMID:26157967

  5. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  6. In vivo optogenetic stimulation of the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sidor, Michelle M; Davidson, Thomas J; Tye, Kay M; Warden, Melissa R; Diesseroth, Karl; McClung, Colleen A

    2015-01-15

    The ability to probe defined neural circuits in awake, freely-moving animals with cell-type specificity, spatial precision, and high temporal resolution has been a long sought tool for neuroscientists in the systems-level search for the neural circuitry governing complex behavioral states. Optogenetics is a cutting-edge tool that is revolutionizing the field of neuroscience and represents one of the first systematic approaches to enable causal testing regarding the relation between neural signaling events and behavior. By combining optical and genetic approaches, neural signaling can be bi-directionally controlled through expression of light-sensitive ion channels (opsins) in mammalian cells. The current protocol describes delivery of specific wavelengths of light to opsin-expressing cells in deep brain structures of awake, freely-moving rodents for neural circuit modulation. Theoretical principles of light transmission as an experimental consideration are discussed in the context of performing in vivo optogenetic stimulation. The protocol details the design and construction of both simple and complex laser configurations and describes tethering strategies to permit simultaneous stimulation of multiple animals for high-throughput behavioral testing.

  7. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  8. Central Nervous System Device Infections.

    PubMed

    Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-11-01

    Nosocomial meningitis can occur in association with central nervous system (CNS) devices such as cerebrospinal shunts or drains, intrathecal pumps, and deep brain stimulators and carry substantial morbidity and mortality. Diagnosing and treating these infections may be challenging to physicians as cerebrospinal fluid cultures may be negative due to previous antibiotic therapy and cerebrospinal abnormalities may be secondary to the primary neurosurgical issue that prompted the placement of the CNS device (e.g., "chemical meningitis" due to intracranial hemorrhage). Besides antibiotic therapy given intravenously and sometimes intrathecally, removal of the device with repeat cultures prior to re-implantation is key in achieving successful outcomes. PMID:27686676

  9. Activation of the central nervous system induced by micro-magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Kaltenbach, James A.; Machado, Andre G.; Manzoor, Nauman F.; Gale, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation have proven to be therapeutically beneficial for patients suffering from neurological disorders. Moreover, these stimulation technologies have provided invaluable tools for investigating nervous system functions. Despite this success, these technologies have technical and practical limitations impeding the maximization of their full clinical and preclinical potential. Recently, micro-magnetic stimulation, which may offer advantages over electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation, has proven effective in activating the neuronal circuitry of the retina in vitro. Here we demonstrate that this technology is also capable of activating neuronal circuitry on a systems level using an in vivo preparation. Specifically, the application of micro-magnetic fields to the dorsal cochlear nucleus activates inferior colliculus neurons. Additionally, we demonstrate the efficacy and characteristics of activation using different magnetic stimulation parameters. These findings provide a rationale for further exploration of micro-magnetic stimulation as a prospective tool for clinical and preclinical applications. PMID:24030203

  10. Micromachined Silicon Stimulating Probes with CMOS Circuitry for Use in the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanghe, Steven John

    1992-01-01

    Electrical stimulation in the central nervous system is a valuable technique for studying neural systems and is a key element in the development of prostheses for deafness and other disorders. This thesis presents a family of multielectrode probe structures, fulfilling the need for chronic multipoint stimulation tools essential for interfacing to the highly complex neural networks in the brain. These probes are batch-fabricated on silicon wafers, employing photoengraving techniques to precisely control the electrode site and array geometries and to allow the integration of on-chip CMOS circuitry for signal multiplexing and stimulus current generation. Silicon micromachining is used to define the probe shapes, which have typical shank dimensions of 3 mm in length by 100 mu m in width by 15 μm in thickness. Each shank supports up to eight planar iridium oxide electrode sites capable of delivering charge densities in excess of 3 mC/cm^2 during current pulse stimulation. Three active probe circuits have been designed with varied complexity and capability. All three can deliver biphasic stimulus currents through 16 sites using only 5 external leads, and they are all compatible with the same external control system. The most complex design interprets site addresses and stimulus current amplitudes from 16-bit words shifted into the probe at 4 MHz. Sixteen on-chip, biphasic, 8-bit digital-to-analog converters deliver analog stimulus currents in the range of +/- 254 muA to any combination of electrode sites. These DACs exhibit full-scale internal linearity to better than +/-1/2 LSB and can be calibrated by varying the positive power supply voltage. The entire probe circuit dissipates only 80 muW from +/-5 V supplies when not delivering stimulus currents, it includes several safety features, and is testable from the input pads. Test results from the fabricated circuits indicate that they all function properly at clocking frequencies as high as 10 MHz, meeting or exceeding

  11. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signaling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination. PMID:27092058

  12. Immunoglobulins stimulate central nervous system remyelination: electron microscopic and morphometric analysis of proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M

    1991-03-01

    Infection with the Daniel strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in immunemediated primary demyelination in the spinal cords of susceptible SJL/J mice. Treatment of chronically infected mice (3 to 7 months) with purified immunoglobulins directed against spinal cord homogenate resulted in an increase in the number and average size of lesions that were undergoing remyelination by oligodendrocytes. In vivo autoradiography with [3H]thymidine demonstrated labeling of many lymphocytes in areas of demyelination and remyelination. A direct correlation was found between number of labeled lymphocytes infiltrating the lesion and size of demyelinating lesions. Remyelinated areas contained proliferating cells that resembled immature oligodendrocytes or progenitor glial cells morphologically. The number of labeled presumptive glial cells correlated with the area of remyelination. However, central nervous system remyelination occurred even in the presence of proliferating lymphocytes and astrocytic hypertrophy. In addition, treatment of normal uninfected SJL/J mice with antiserum to spinal cord homogenate resulted in increased numbers of proliferating cells in the spinal cord. These experiments suggest that immunoglobulins to a spinal cord antigen may induce proliferation of cells in the central nervous system to promote remyelination.

  13. Postsurgical Pathologies Associated with Intradural Electrical Stimulation in the Central Nervous System: Design Implications for a New Clinical Device

    PubMed Central

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Flouty, Oliver; Oya, Hiroyuki; Gillies, George T.; Howard, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has been utilized for decades in the treatment of numerous conditions such as failed back surgery and phantom limb syndromes, arachnoiditis, cancer pain, and others. The placement of the stimulating electrode array was originally subdural but, to minimize surgical complexity and reduce the risk of certain postsurgical complications, it became exclusively epidural eventually. Here we review the relevant clinical and experimental pathologic findings, including spinal cord compression, infection, hematoma formation, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, chronic fibrosis, and stimulation-induced neurotoxicity, associated with the early approaches to subdural electrical stimulation of the central nervous system, and the spinal cord in particular. These findings may help optimize the safety and efficacy of a new approach to subdural spinal cord stimulation now under development. PMID:24800260

  14. Proteoglycans in the central nervous system: plasticity, regeneration and their stimulation with chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Jessica C F; Afshari, Fardad; García-Alías, Guillermo; Fawcett, James W

    2008-01-01

    After injury to the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons are not able to regenerate their axons and recovery is limited by restricted plasticity. Axon regeneration is inhibited by the presence of the various inhibitory molecules, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) which are upregulated around the injury site. Plasticity after the end of critical periods is restricted by extracellular matrix changes, particularly the formation of CSPG-containing perineuronal nets. Enzymatic removal of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains with chondroitinase ABC promotes axon regeneration and reactivates plasticity. This review details the structures and properties of the different CSPGs in the normal and damaged CNS, the use of the enzyme chondroitinase ABC to promote neural regeneration and plasticity, and discusses mechanisms of action and possible therapeutic uses of this enzyme.

  15. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  16. Gravitational Study of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted at 1G are discussed with reference to the role of calcium ions in information processing by the central nervous system. A technique is described which allows thin sections of a mammalian hippocampus to be isolated while maintaining neural activity. Two experiments carried out in hypergravic fields are also addressed; one investigating altered stimulation in the auditory system, the other determining temperature regulation responses in hypergravic fields.

  17. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  18. Expression of c-fos gene in central nervous system of adult medaka (Oryzias latipes) after hypergravity stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, S.; Ijiri, K.

    The immediate-early genes serve as useful neurobiological tools for mapping brain activity induced by a sensory stimulation. In this study, we have examined brain activity related to gravity perception of medaka (Oryzias latipes) by use of c-fos. The gene, which is homologous to the c-fos genes of other vertebrates, was identified in medaka. Functionally important domains are highly conserved among all the vertebrate species analyzed. Intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid transiently induced the c-fos mRNAs in medaka brain. The results indicate that the expression of c-fos can be utilized as a suitable anatomical marker for the increased neural activities in the central nervous system of medaka. Fish were continuously exposed to 3G hypergravity by centrifugation. Investigation of c-fos mRNA expression showed that c-fos mRNA significantly increased 30 minutes after a start of 3G exposure. The distribution of its transcripts within brains was analyzed by an in situ hybridization method. The 3G-treated medakas displayed c-fos positive cells in their brainstem regions, which are related to vestibular function, such as torus semicircularis, posterior octavu nucleus, nucleus tangentialis and inferior olive. Our results established the method to trace the activated area in the fish brain following gravity stimulation. The method will be a useful tool for understanding gravity perception in the brain.

  19. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  20. Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Watcharakorn, Arvemas; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews the characteristic imaging appearances of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system, including cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, cystic echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, amebiasis, malariasis, sparganosis, paragonimiasis, and American and African trypanosomiases. Routine precontrast and postcontrast MR imaging helps in localization, characterization, delineation of extension, and follow-up of the parasitic lesions. Moreover, recently developed tools, such as diffusion, perfusion, and MR spectroscopy, help to differentiate parasitic diseases of the central nervous system from simulating lesions. Combining imaging findings with geographic prevalence, clinical history, and serologic tests is required for diagnosis of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

  1. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  2. Hydrogels for central nervous system therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Russo, Teresa; Tunesi, Marta; Giordano, Carmen; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The central nervous system shows a limited regenerative capacity, and injuries or diseases, such as those in the spinal, brain and retina, are a great problem since current therapies seem to be unable to achieve good results in terms of significant functional recovery. Different promising therapies have been suggested, the aim being to restore at least some of the lost functions. The current review deals with the use of hydrogels in developing advanced devices for central nervous system therapeutic strategies. Several approaches, involving cell-based therapy, delivery of bioactive molecules and nanoparticle-based drug delivery, will be first reviewed. Finally, some examples of injectable hydrogels for the delivery of bioactive molecules in central nervous system will be reported, and the key features as well as the basic principles in designing multifunctional devices will be described.

  3. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.). PMID:20111855

  4. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  5. Plants and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carlini, E A

    2003-06-01

    This review article draws the attention to the many species of plants possessing activity on the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, they cover the whole spectrum of central activity such as psychoanaleptic, psycholeptic and psychodysleptic effects, and several of these plants are currently used in therapeutics to treat human ailments. Among the psychoanaleptic (stimulant) plants, those utilized by human beings to reduce body weight [Ephedra spp. (Ma Huang), Paullinia spp. (guaraná), Catha edulis Forssk. (khat)] and plants used to improve general health conditions (plant adaptogens) were scrutinized. Many species of hallucinogenic (psychodysleptic) plants are used by humans throughout the world to achieve states of mind distortions; among those, a few have been used for therapeutic purposes, such as Cannabis sativa L., Tabernanthe iboga Baill. and the mixture of Psychotria viridis Ruiz and Pav. and Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) C.V. Morton. Plants showing central psycholeptic activities, such as analgesic or anxiolytic actions (Passiflora incarnata L., Valeriana spp. and Piper methysticum G. Forst.), were also analysed.Finally, the use of crude or semipurified extracts of such plants instead of the active substances seemingly responsible for their therapeutic effect is discussed.

  6. Repair in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J; Fawcett, J

    2007-11-01

    The subject of central nervous system damage includes a wide variety of problems, from the slow selective 'picking off' of characteristic sub-populations of neurons typical of neurodegenerative diseases, to the wholesale destruction of areas of brain and spinal cord seen in traumatic injury and stroke. Experimental repair strategies are diverse and the type of pathology dictates which approach will be appropriate. Damage may be to grey matter (loss of neurons), white matter (cutting of axons, leaving neurons otherwise intact, at least initially) or both. This review will consider four possible forms of treatment for repair of the human central nervous system. PMID:17998174

  7. Vitamin D and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Wrzosek, Michał; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Matsumoto, Halina; Piątkiewicz, Paweł; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Wojnar, Marcin; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is formed in human epithelial cells via photochemical synthesis and is also acquired from dietary sources. The so-called classical effect of this vitamin involves the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Apart from this, non-classical effects of vitamin D have recently gained renewed attention. One important yet little known of the numerous functions of vitamin D is the regulation of nervous system development and function. The neuroprotective effect of vitamin D is associated with its influence on neurotrophin production and release, neuromediator synthesis, intracellular calcium homeostasis, and prevention of oxidative damage to nervous tissue. Clinical studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency may lead to an increased risk of disease of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy and the neonatal period seems to be crucial in terms of prevention of these diseases.

  8. The Role of Central Nervous System Plasticity in Tinnitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus is a vexing disorder of hearing characterized by sound sensations originating in the head without any external stimulation. The specific etiology of these sensations is uncertain but frequently associated with hearing loss. The "neurophysiogical" model of tinnitus has enhanced appreciation of central nervous system (CNS) contributions.…

  9. [Central nervous system tumors in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Podciechowski, Lech; Nowakowska, Dorota; Bielak, Adam; Nowosławska, Emilia; Szymański, Wojciech; Polis, Lech; Krasomski, Grzechorz; Fiks, Tomasz; Wilczyński, Jan

    2003-12-01

    Central nervous system tumour in pregnancy constitutes a serious complication. Considering frequent difficulties in diagnostics and therapy, the aim of the study was to present our experience in management with pregnant women with brain and spinal cord tumours. Between 1988-2000, in The Research Institute Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodzi, 4 pregnant women had been diagnosed with brain and spinal cord tumours. The incidence of tumours complicating pregnancy was 1/11460. Two patients diagnosed at 29 weeks' gestation, underwent craniotomy and tumour resection during pregnancy. Two other women with central nervous system tumours diagnosed at 39 weeks' gestation, were operated in the postpartum period. The analysis of the postoperative period, gestation and/or postpartum period in all women and well-being of their new-borns confirm undertaken medical decisions. PMID:15029742

  10. Imaging the fetal central nervous system.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaecker, B; Claus, F; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of fetal central nervous system anomalies results in a restricted level of exposure and limited experience-- for most of the obstetricians involved in prenatal ultrasound. Sonographic guidelines for screening the fetal brain in a systematic way will probably increase the detection rate and enhance a correct referral to a tertiary care center, offering the patient a multidisciplinary approach of the condition. This paper aims to elaborate on prenatal sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and outcome of various central nervous system malformations. Detailed neurosonographic investigation has become available through high resolution vaginal ultrasound probes and the development of a variety of 3D ultrasound modalities e.g. ultrasound tomographic imaging. In addition, fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the detection of gyration and neurulation-- anomalies and disorders of the gray and white matter. PMID:24753859

  11. [Central nervous system malformations: neurosurgery correlates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-León, Juan C; Betancourt-Fursow, Yaline M; Jiménez-Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-09-01

    Congenital malformations of the central nervous system are related to alterations in neural tube formation, including most of the neurosurgical management entities, dysraphism and craniosynostosis; alterations of neuronal proliferation; megalencefaly and microcephaly; abnormal neuronal migration, lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heterotopia and cortical dysplasia, spinal malformations and spinal dysraphism. We expose the classification of different central nervous system malformations that can be corrected by surgery in the shortest possible time and involving genesis mechanisms of these injuries getting better studied from neurogenic and neuroembryological fields, this involves connecting innovative knowledge areas where alteration mechanisms in dorsal induction (neural tube) and ventral induction (telencephalization) with the current way of correction, as well as the anomalies of cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal migration and finally the complex malformations affecting the posterior fossa and current possibilities of correcting them.

  12. Tuberculoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    DeLance, Arthur R; Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Clark, Aaron J; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sun, Matthew Z; Bollen, Andrew W; Phillips, Joanna J; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis is among the oldest and most devastating infectious diseases worldwide. Nearly one third of the world's population has active or latent disease, resulting in 1.5 million deaths annually. Central nervous system involvement, while rare, is the most severe form of tuberculosis. Manifestations include tuberculoma and tuberculous meningitis, with the majority of cases occurring in children and immunocompromised patients. Despite advancements in imaging and laboratory diagnostics, tuberculomas of the central nervous system remain a diagnostic challenge due to their insidious nature and nonspecific findings. On imaging studies tuberculous meningitis is characterized by diffuse basal enhancement, but tuberculomas may be indistinguishable from neoplasms. Early diagnosis is imperative, since clinical outcomes are largely dependent on timely treatment. Stereotactic biopsy with histopathological analysis can provide a definitive diagnosis, but is only recommended when non-invasive methods are inconclusive. Standard medical treatment includes rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and streptomycin or ethambutol. In cases of drug resistance, revision of the treatment regimen with second-line agents is recommended over the addition of a single drug to the first-line regimen. Advances in genomics have identified virulent strains of tuberculosis and are improving our understanding of host susceptibility. Neurosurgical referral is advised for patients with elevated intracranial pressure, seizures, or brain or spinal cord compression. This review synthesizes pertinent findings in the literature surrounding central nervous system tuberculoma in an effort to highlight recent advances in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

  13. [Plasmapheresis in central nervous system disorders].

    PubMed

    Antozzi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic plasmapheresis (TPE) has an established role in disorders of the peripheral nervous system, but its use in disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) does not rely upon evidence-based data. Nevertheless, TPE is currently used in severe acute forms of demyelinating disease (multiple sclerosis/acute encephalomyelitis) unresponsive to corticosteroids. Recently, antibodies against the water channel aquaporin-4 have been detected in patients affected by neuromyelitis optica (Devic syndrome) and their pathogenetic role has been demonstrated, supporting the use of TPE in this disease. TPE has been reported to be effective in some patients affected by stiff-person syndrome or limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies against voltagegated potassium channels. TPE has also been used in selected patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy or status epilepticus within complex syndromes of various etiologies. The available data still do not support the use of TPE in most paraneoplastic disorders of the CNS. PMID:22388844

  14. Metal toxicity in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-11-01

    The nervous system is the principal target for a number of metals. The alkyl derivatives of certain metals-lead, mercury and tin-are specially neurotoxic. Concern over human exposure and in some cases, outbreaks of poisoning, have stimulated research into the toxic action of these metals. A number of interesting hypotheses have been proposed for the mechanism of lead toxicity on the nervous system. Lead is know to be a potent inhibitor of heme synthesis. A reduction in heme-containing enzymes could compromise energy metabolism. Lead may affect brain function by interference with neurotransmitters such as ..gamma..-amino-isobutyric acid. There is mounting evidence that lead interferes with membrane transport and binding of calcium ions. Methylmercury produces focal damage to specific areas in the adult brain. One hypothesis proposes that certain cells are susceptible because they cannot repair the initial damage to the protein synthesis machinery. The developing nervous system is especially susceptible to damage by methylmercury. It has been discovered that microtubules are destroyed by this form of mercury and this effect may explain the inhibition of cell division and cell migration, processes that occur only in the developmental stages.

  15. The central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole stimulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated current in picrotoxin-resistant GABA(A) receptors in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dibas, M I; Dillon, G H

    2000-05-19

    We tested the ability of the central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) to inhibit gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated current in receptors expressing a mutation that rendered them resistant to picrotoxin. Consistent with previous reports, receptors expressing beta2(T246F), along with alpha3 and gamma2 subunits, resulted in a greatly diminished sensitivity to picrotoxin. Sensitivity to PTZ was completely abolished in the mutant receptor, confirming the hypothesis that PTZ acts at the picrotoxin site. Quite unexpected, however, was our finding that PTZ elicited marked stimulation (up to 400% of control) in the mutated receptors. This stimulatory effect was not mediated via an interaction with the benzodiazepine site, as preincubation with the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil did not block the PTZ-induced stimulation. Our results reveal the existence of a novel stimulatory domain of PTZ in GABA(A) receptors.

  16. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  17. Viral diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Phillip A; McGavern, Dorian B

    2015-04-01

    Virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a significant burden to human health worldwide. The complexity of these diseases is influenced by the sheer number of different neurotropic viruses, the diverse routes of CNS entry, viral tropism, and the immune system. Using a combination of human pathological data and experimental animal models, we have begun to uncover many of the mechanisms that viruses use to enter the CNS and cause disease. This review highlights a selection of neurotropic viruses that infect the CNS and explores the means by which they induce neurological diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis.

  18. Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for pain control.

    PubMed

    Long, D M

    1978-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation appears to be a valid technique for the treatment of many pain states. Its use in chronic pain is limited and it appears to be much more likely to be effective in the relief of acute painful states. Nevertheless, since it provides a simple way to treat a significant number of patients whose pain would otherwise by intractable, it has been a valuable addition to the armamentarium of the physician dealing with chronic pain. Peripheral nerve stimulation is an excellent way to relieve pain of peripheral nerve injury origin and certain painful, poorly understood, vasopastic or reflex sympathetic states. Spinal cord stimulation has been revived by the advent of percutaneous stimulators. The technique is currently the best available for the treatment of the patient suffering from the chronic low back syndrome with severe arachnoiditis, for whom no definitive therapy is available. Brain stimulation has been relegated to therapy for pain of central nervous system origin. It is a most promising technique though its application appears to be limited at this point to a few specific problems. The seriousness of potential complications has kept it from being widely applicable to date. There is little information concerning the mechanism whereby these various techniques are effective. Transcutaneous and peripheral nerve stimulation might have their effect through peripheral mechanisms or through a gating mechanism in the posterior horn (Melzack and Wall 1965; Campbell and Taub 1973). Spinal cord stimulation could act through a retrograde effect upon a dorsal horn gate or have more central actions. Brain stimulation in the opiate receptor system may be effective through activation of this system. The mechanisms of action of stimulation in the sensory system centrally are certainly not well understood (Bloedel 1974).

  19. Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, V; Wilkins, P; Badve, S; Coppen, M; Lucas, S; Hay, R; Schon, F

    1992-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the central nervous system is extremely rare in the United Kingdom partly because the organism is not endemic. However, because the organism can remain quiescent in the lungs or the adrenal glands for over 40 years before dissemination, it increasingly needs to be considered in unexplained neurological disease particularly in people who lived in endemic areas as children. In this paper a rapidly progressive fatal myelopathy in an English man brought up in India was shown at necropsy to be due to histoplasmosis. The neurological features of this infection are reviewed. Images PMID:1640242

  20. Central nervous system involvement in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Dinesh; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2006-12-01

    Diabetic complications result in much morbidity and mortality and considerable consumption of scarce medical resources. Thus, elucidation of the risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying diabetic complications is important. The effects of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) result in cognitive dysfunction and cerebrovascular disease. Treatment-related hypoglycemia also has CNS consequences. Advances in neuroimaging now provide greater insights into the structural and functional impact of diabetes on the CNS. Greater understanding of CNS involvement could lead to new strategies to prevent or reverse the damage caused by diabetes mellitus.

  1. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  2. Vascularisation of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Mathew; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Fantin, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The developing central nervous system (CNS) is vascularised through the angiogenic invasion of blood vessels from a perineural vascular plexus, followed by continued sprouting and remodelling until a hierarchical vascular network is formed. Remarkably, vascularisation occurs without perturbing the intricate architecture of the neurogenic niches or the emerging neural networks. We discuss the mouse hindbrain, forebrain and retina as widely used models to study developmental angiogenesis in the mammalian CNS and provide an overview of key cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the vascularisation of these organs. PMID:26222953

  3. Laboratory Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Taojun; Kaplan, Samuel; Kamboj, Mini; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections are potentially life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. The initial clinical presentations of many CNS infections are non-specific, making a definitive etiologic diagnosis challenging. Nucleic acid in vitro amplification-based molecular methods are increasingly being applied for routine microbial detection. These methods are a vast improvement over conventional techniques with the advantage of rapid turnaround and higher sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, molecular methods performed on cerebrospinal fluid samples are considered the new gold standard for diagnosis of CNS infection caused by pathogens, which are otherwise difficult to detect. Commercial diagnostic platforms offer various monoplex and multiplex PCR assays for convenient testing of targets that cause similar clinical illness. Pan-omic molecular platforms possess potential for use in this area. Although molecular methods are predicted to be widely used in diagnosing and monitoring CNS infections, results generated by these methods need to be carefully interpreted in combination with clinical findings. This review summarizes the currently available armamentarium of molecular assays for diagnosis of central nervous system infections, their application, and future approaches. PMID:27686677

  4. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  5. Circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid retention in white adipose tissue via KATP channel activation in the central nervous system only in insulin-sensitive mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, Claudia P.; Geerling, Janine J.; Guigas, Bruno; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Ouwens, D. Margriet; Pijl, Hanno; Voshol, Peter J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is required for the inhibitory effect of insulin on glucose production. Our aim was to determine whether the CNS is also involved in the stimulatory effect of circulating insulin on the tissue-specific retention of fatty acid (FA) from plasma. In wild-type mice, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions stimulated the retention of both plasma triglyceride-derived FA and plasma albumin-bound FA in the various white adipose tissues (WAT) but not in other tissues, including brown adipose tissue (BAT). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin induced a similar pattern of tissue-specific FA partitioning. This effect of ICV insulin administration was not associated with activation of the insulin signaling pathway in adipose tissue. ICV administration of tolbutamide, a KATP channel blocker, considerably reduced (during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions) and even completely blocked (during ICV administration of insulin) WAT-specific retention of FA from plasma. This central effect of insulin was absent in CD36-deficient mice, indicating that CD36 is the predominant FA transporter in insulin-stimulated FA retention by WAT. In diet-induced insulin-resistant mice, these stimulating effects of insulin (circulating or ICV administered) on FA retention in WAT were lost. In conclusion, in insulin-sensitive mice, circulating insulin stimulates tissue-specific partitioning of plasma-derived FA in WAT in part through activation of KATP channels in the CNS. Apparently, circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in BAT, directly and indirectly through the CNS. PMID:21700834

  6. The central nervous system of ascidian larvae.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clare

    2016-09-01

    Ascidians are marine invertebrate chordates. Their tadpole larvae contain a dorsal tubular nervous system, resulting from the rolling up of a neural plate. Along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis, the central nervous system (CNS) is organized into a sensory vesicle, neck, trunk ganglion, and tail nerve cord and consists of approximately only 330 cells, of which around 100 are thought to be neurons. The organization of distinct neuronal cell types and neurotransmitter gene expression within the CNS has been described. The unique developmental mode of ascidians, with a small number of cells and a fixed cell division pattern, allows individual cells to be traced throughout development. This feature has led to the complete documentation of the cell lineages of certain cell types in the CNS. Thus, a step-by-step understanding of nervous system development from the initial stages of neural induction to the neurogenesis of individual neurons is a feasible goal. The genetic control of neural fate induction and early neural plate patterning are now well understood. The molecular mechanisms specifying the cholinergic neurons of the trunk ganglion as well as the pigment cells of the sensory organs are also well elucidated. In addition, studies have begun on the morphogenetic processes of neurulation. Remaining challenges include building an embryonic atlas integrating gene expression patterns, cell lineage, and neuronal cell types as well as developing the gene regulatory networks of cell fate specification and integrating them with the genetic control of morphogenesis. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:538-561. doi: 10.1002/wdev.239 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27328318

  7. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  8. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients.

  9. [Histopathology of central nervous system cavernomas].

    PubMed

    Mosnier, J-F; Brunon, J; Nuti, C

    2007-06-01

    Central nervous system cavernomas are vascular malformations, which occur in two circumstances: sporadic forms and familial autosomal dominant forms. The lesion consists of enlarged, closely packed vessels without interposition of brain parenchyma, surrounded by hemosiderin and gliosis, calcified in few cases. In 80% of sporadic forms the lesion is unique, multiple lesions are rare (median: 4). In familial forms the lesions are always multiple. Cavernomas are often associated with other vascular malformations, especially with venous developmental anomalies. The size of cavernomas is variable from 1 mm to several centimeters. About 70% of cases are supratentorial and 30% in the posterior fossa, particularly in the brain stem. Macroscopic and histopathological findings are typical and the diagnostic is generally easy. PMID:17498756

  10. Scaffolds for central nervous system tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Spector, Myron; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS) lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits and to date there is no universally accepted treatment. Owing to the profound impact, extensive studies have been carried out aiming at reducing inflammatory responses and overcoming the inhibitory environment in the CNS after injury so as to enhance regeneration. Artificial scaffolds may provide a suitable environment for axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and are of particular importance in cases in which the injury has resulted in a cavitary defect. In this review we discuss development of scaffolds for CNS tissue engineering, focusing on mechanism of CNS injuries, various biomaterials that have been used in studies, and current strategies for designing and fabricating scaffolds.

  11. Nocardiosis of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostou, Theodora; Arvanitis, Marios; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Desalermos, Athanasios; Carneiro, Herman A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system (CNS) nocardiosis is a rare disease entity caused by the filamentous bacteria Nocardia species. We present a case series of 5 patients from our hospital and a review of the cases of CNS nocardiosis reported in the literature from January 2000 to December 2011. Our results indicate that CNS nocardiosis can occur in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals and can be the result of prior pulmonary infection or can exist on its own. The most common predisposing factors are corticosteroid use (54% of patients) and organ transplantation (25%). Presentation of the disease is widely variable, and available diagnostic tests are far from perfect, often leading to delayed detection and initiation of treatment. The optimal therapeutic approach is still undetermined and depends on speciation, but lower mortality and relapse rates have been reported with a combination of targeted antimicrobial treatment including trimethoprim/sulfomethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for more than 6 months and neurosurgical intervention. PMID:24378740

  12. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26475775

  13. Electrical stimuli in the central nervous system microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanna M; Koppes, Abigail N; Hardy, John G; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-07-11

    Electrical stimulation to manipulate the central nervous system (CNS) has been applied as early as the 1750s to produce visual sensations of light. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), cochlear implants, visual prosthetics, and functional electrical stimulation (FES) are being applied in the clinic to treat a wide array of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries. This review describes the history of electrical stimulation of the CNS microenvironment; recent advances in electrical stimulation of the CNS, including DBS to treat essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, and depression; FES for the treatment of spinal cord injuries; and alternative electrical devices to restore vision and hearing via neuroprosthetics (retinal and cochlear implants). It also discusses the role of electrical cues during development and following injury and, importantly, manipulation of these endogenous cues to support regeneration of neural tissue. PMID:25014787

  14. Parasitoses with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2014-10-01

    Most of the parasitoses manifest systemically, including the central nervous system (CNS). Among the most prevalent parasitoses in Central Europe (cysticercosis, toxocarosis, echinococcosis, and toxoplasmosis), cerebral involvement is well recognized and part of the clinical presentation, which cannot be neglected. CNS involvement results from invasion of larvae of these parasites via the blood stream or by direct migration into the CNS. Most frequently larvae reside within the cerebral parenchyma, but sometimes also within the ventricles, in the meningeas within cerebral aneurysms, or in the parenchyma of the spinal cord. Depending on the stage of their development, they cause a local defect or more widespread damage, such as encephalitis, ventriculitis, ependymitis, arachnoiditis, meningitis, myelitis, polyradiculitis, mechanical obstruction of the arterial or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, or vasculitis with appropriate clinical presentations. These include epilepsy, headache, impaired consciousness, orientation, cognition, focal neurological motor, sensory, or vegetative deficits, or visual impairment. CNS involvement is diagnosed on the clinical presentation, the epidemiological background, blood and CSF investigations, imaging studies, and sometimes biopsy. Treatment is based on various antihelminthic agents and, occasionally, surgery. PMID:25297698

  15. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  16. Localized hyperthermia in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, B.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A new localized treatment modality for malignant brain tumors is hyperthermia. Primary brain tumors are ideally suited to localized therapies because they are initially found in a single area of the brain and local recurrence is the general rule, despite aggressive multimodality treatment. The potential of hyperthermia is based on the rationale that these tumors contain a heterogeneous anaplastic cell population. In contrast to radiation and chemotherapy, hyperthermia is equally effective against both hypoxic and oxygenated cells. Moreover, higher temperatures result in tissues that have an inability to cool themselves through perfusion. The feasibility of localized heating in normal and malignant brain tissue was investigated using external ultrasound and microwave applicators and an interstitial microwave antenna array. The ability to generate uniform temperature distributions using these systems was tested in thermal dosimetry studies. Lesion threshold studies were performed to define the acute and chronic histopathological effects of localized hyperthermia in normal brain tissue. Results demonstrated that these techniques can effectively heat clinically relevant volumes of brain tissue to therapeutic temperatures in an extremely controlled and precise manner. Thresholds for cytological damage have been defined over a range of time/temperature parameters. Various physical and physiological factors within the central nervous system as they relate to temperature exposure have also been defined. These feasibility and toxicity studies have led to the initiation of Phase I clinical trials of hyperthermia in combination with radiation therapy at several institutions.

  17. Pathogenesis of central nervous system tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Kim, Kwang Sik; Bishai, William R; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-03-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) tuberculosis is a serious, often fatal form of tuberculosis, predominantly affecting young children. HIV co-infection and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are making the diagnosis and treatment of CNS tuberculosis more complicated. Current concepts about the pathogenesis of CNS tuberculosis are based on necropsy studies done in 1933, which suggest that tuberculous meningitis develops subsequent to the rupture into the cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculomas that form around M. tuberculosis deposited in the brain parenchyma and meninges during the initial hematogenous dissemination. Foreign antigens including pathogens deposited in the brain parenchyma are not detected efficiently by the immune system in the CNS. These experimental data may explain the clinical observation of delayed "paradoxical" enlargement or development of intracranial tuberculomas, observed several weeks to months in patients receiving anti-tuberculous therapy. Since severe sequelae are observed even when CNS tuberculosis is treated effectively, it is important to develop preventive strategies for this disease. Recent data utilizing animal models suggests that, in addition to host factors, M. tuberculosis genes and their encoded proteins may contribute specifically to bacterial invasion and survival in the CNS. Understanding how these microbial factors affect CNS disease would be essential to developing such preventive strategies.

  18. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  19. Induction of central nervous system plasticity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to promote sensorimotor recovery in incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellaway, Peter H.; Vásquez, Natalia; Craggs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cortical and spinal cord plasticity may be induced with non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation to encourage long term potentiation or depression of neuronal circuits. Such plasticity inducing stimulation provides an attractive approach to promote changes in sensorimotor circuits that have been degraded by spinal cord injury (SCI). If residual corticospinal circuits can be conditioned appropriately there should be the possibility that the changes are accompanied by functional recovery. This article reviews the attempts that have been made to restore sensorimotor function and to obtain functional benefits from the application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the cortex following incomplete spinal cord injury. The confounding issues that arise with the application of rTMS, specifically in SCI, are enumerated. Finally, consideration is given to the potential for rTMS to be used in the restoration of bladder and bowel sphincter function and consequent functional recovery of the guarding reflex. PMID:24904326

  20. Histology of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Garman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this article is to assist pathologists inexperienced in examining central nervous system (CNS) sections to recognize normal and abnormal cell types as well as some common artifacts. Dark neurons are the most common histologic artifact but, with experience, can readily be distinguished from degenerating (eosinophilic) neurons. Neuron degeneration stains can be useful in lowering the threshold for detecting neuron degeneration as well as for revealing degeneration within populations of neurons that are too small to show the associated eosinophilic cytoplasmic alteration within H&E-stained sections. Neuron degeneration may also be identified by the presence of associated macroglial and microglial reactions. Knowledge of the distribution of astrocyte cytoplasmic processes is helpful in determining that certain patterns of treatment-related neuropil vacuolation (as well as some artifacts) represent swelling of these processes. On the other hand, vacuoles with different distribution patterns may represent alterations of the myelin sheath. Because brains are typically undersampled for microscopic evaluation, many pathologists are unfamiliar with the circumventricuar organs (CVOs) that represent normal brain structures but are often mistaken for lesions. Therefore, the six CVOs found in the brain are also illustrated in this article.

  1. Hemoglobin potentiates central nervous system damage.

    PubMed Central

    Sadrzadeh, S M; Anderson, D K; Panter, S S; Hallaway, P E; Eaton, J W

    1987-01-01

    Iron and iron compounds--including mammalian hemoglobins--catalyze hydroxyl radical production and lipid peroxidation. To determine whether hemoglobin-mediated lipid peroxidation might be important in hemorrhagic injuries to the central nervous system (CNS), we studied the effects of purified hemoglobin on CNS homogenates and injected hemoglobin into the spinal cords of anesthetized cats. Hemoglobin markedly inhibits Na/K ATPase activity in CNS homogenates and spinal cords of living cats. Hemoglobin also catalyzes substantial peroxidation of CNS lipids. Importantly, the potent iron chelator, desferrioxamine, blocks these adverse effects of hemoglobin, both in vitro and in vivo. Because desferrioxamine is not known to interact with heme iron, these results indicate that free iron, derived from hemoglobin, is the proximate toxic species. Overall, our data suggest that hemoglobin, released from red cells after trauma, can promote tissue injury through iron-dependent mechanisms. Suppression of this damage by desferrioxamine suggests a rational therapeutic approach to management of trauma-induced CNS injury. Images PMID:3027133

  2. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S.; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-01-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  3. Central nervous system tumors in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    De la Torre Mondragón, L; Ridaura Sanz, C; Reyes Mujica, M; Rueda Franco, F

    1993-08-01

    Five hundred and seventy primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors from the Department of Pathology at the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City, collected from 1970 to 1989, were histologically reclassified in order to find out their relative incidence as well as their outstanding features. With this, we could establish a frame of reference for our local population, contributing to the epidemiological analysis of these entities. All the tumors were examined independently by two pathologists (C.R. and M.R.), using the classification of Rorke et al. Histological type, patient age and sex, and tumor location were analyzed. CNS tumors were the secondmost frequently encountered solid tumors, after lymphomas, and were increasing in incidence at a rate of 2.2 annually. Children in the age group 0-9 years were most often affected, and there was a predominance of male patients. Astrocytoma and medulloblastoma were the most common tumor types. The infratentorial region was the most frequent tumor location in the 2- to 9-year age group. By contrast, in the under 2-year-olds a supratentorial location was more frequent, and the incidence of germ cell tumors was proportionally high. In general, some histological types seemed to be associated with particular age groups. Although we found primitive neuroectodermal tumors to be the fifth most common at all ages (except for medulloblastoma), many other authors do not report a similar finding.

  4. Environmental effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, G W

    1977-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is designed to respond to the environment and is peculiarly vulnerable to many of the influences found in the environment. Utilizing an anatomical classification (cortex, cerebellum, peripheral nerves) major toxins and stresses are reviewed with selections from recent references. Selective vulnerability of certain areas to particular toxins is apparent at all levels of the CNS, although the amount of damage produced by any noxious agent depends on the age and genetic substrate of the subject. It is apparent that the effects of certain well known and long respected environmental toxins such as lead, mercury, etc., deserve continued surveillance. In addition, the overwhelming impact on the CNS of social damages such as trauma, alcohol, and tobacco cannot be ignored by environmentalists. The effect of the hospital and therapeutic environment has become apparent in view of increased awareness of iatrogenic disorders. The need for particular laboratory tests, for example, examination of CSF and nerve conduction toxicity studies, is suggested. Epidemics such as the recent solvent neuropathies suggest a need for continued animal studies that are chronic, as well as acute evaluations when predicting the potential toxic effects of industrial compounds. PMID:202447

  5. Epidemiology of central nervous system mycoses.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2007-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) were considered rare until the 1970s. This is no longer true in recent years due to widespread use of corticosteroids, cytotoxic drugs and antibiotics. Immunocompromised patients with underlying malignancy organ transplantations and acquired immune deficiency syndrome are all candidates for acquiring fungal infections either in meninges or brain. A considerable number of cases of CNS fungal infections even in immunocompetent hosts have been reported. A vast array of fungi may cause infection in the CNS, but barring a few, most of them are anecdotal case reports. Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Coccidioides immitis. Histoplasma capsulatum are common causes of fungal meningitis; Aspergillus spp, Candida spp, Zygomycetes and some of the melanized fungi are known to cause mass lesions in brain. Few fungi like C. neoformans, Cladophialophora bantiana, Exophiala dermatitidis, Ramichloridium mackenzie, Ochroconis gallopava are considered as true neurotropic fungi. Most of the fungi causing CNS infection are saprobes with worldwide distribution; a few are geographically restricted like Coccidioides immitis. The infections reach the CNS either by the hematogenous route or by direct extension from colonized sinuses or ear canal or by direct inoculation during neurosurgical procedures. PMID:17921647

  6. Central Nervous System Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Marais, Suzaan; Scriven, James; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) develops in 9 %–47 % of persons with HIV infection and a CNS opportunistic infection who start antiretroviral therapy and is associated with a mortality rate of 13 %–75 %. These rates vary according to the causative pathogen. Common CNS-IRIS events occur in relation to Cryptococcus, tuberculosis (TB), and JC virus, but several other mycobacteria, fungi, and viruses have been associated with IRIS. IRIS symptoms often mimic the original infection, and diagnosis necessitates consideration of treatment failure, microbial resistance, and an additional neurological infection. These diagnostic challenges often delay IRIS diagnosis and treatment. Corticosteroids have been used to treat CNS-IRIS, with variable responses; the best supportive evidence exists for the treatment of TB-IRIS. Pathogenic mechanisms vary: Cryptococcal IRIS is characterized by a paucity of cerebrospinal inflammation prior to antiretroviral therapy, whereas higher levels of inflammatory markers at baseline predispose to TB meningitis IRIS. This review focuses on advances in the understanding of CNS-IRIS over the past 2 years. PMID:24173584

  7. Neurocytopathic effects of beta-amyloid-stimulated monocytes: a potential mechanism for central nervous system damage in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    London, J A; Biegel, D; Pachter, J S

    1996-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage, which includes peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) and tissue macrophages, participate in a variety of neurodestructive events and may play a pivotal role in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer disease. The present study sought to determine whether exposure of PBM to beta-amyloid peptide (A beta), the major protein of the amyloid fibrils that accumulate in the brain in Alzheimer disease, could induce cytopathic activity in these cells upon their subsequent incubation with neural tissue. PBM were incubated with A beta for 3 days, centrifuged and washed to remove traces of cell-free A beta, and then applied to organotypic cultures of rat brain for varying periods of time. By using a cell-viability assay to quantitate neurocytopathic effect, an increase in the ratio of dead to live cells was detected in cultures containing A beta-stimulated PBM versus control PBM (stimulated with either bovine serum albumin or reverse A beta peptide) as early as 3 days after coculture. The ratio of dead to live cells increased further by 10 days of coculture. By 30 days of coculture, the dead to live cell ratio remained elevated, and the intensity of neurocytopathic effect was such that large areas of brain mass dissociated from the cultures. These results indicate that stimulation of PBM with A beta significantly heightens their neurocytopathic activity and highlight the possibility that inflammatory reactions in the brain play a role in the neurodegeneration that accompanies Alzheimer disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8633031

  8. Is central nervous system an immune-privileged site?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R; Millington, O; Brewer, J; Bushell, T

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) was once considered to be an immune-privileged area. However, increasing evidence shows that the central nervous system is not an immune-privileged but is an active surveillance site. There is a bi-directional communication between the central nervous system and immune system. Normally, immune cells migrate into the central nervous system microenvironment through choroid plexus and interact with the central nervous system resident cells through either through neuromediators or immunomediators. This finding has led to a significant interest in neuroimmunological interactions and investigation onto the role of the immune system in the pathology of various neurological disorders and examine whether it can be targeted to produce novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23774427

  9. The renin-angiotensin system and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1977-04-01

    One of several factors affecting the secretion of renin by the kidneys is the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic input is excitatory and is mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the membranes of the juxtaglomerular cells. Stimulation of sympathetic areas in the medulla, midbrain and hypothalamus raises blood pressure and increases renin secretion, whereas stimulation of other parts of the hypothalamus decreases blood pressure and renin output. The centrally active alpha-adrenergic agonist clonidine decreases renin secretion, lowers blood pressure, inhibits ACTH and vasopressin secretion, and increases growth hormone secretion in dogs. The effects on ACTH and growth hormone are abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine into the third ventricle, whereas the effect on blood pressure is abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine in the fourth ventricle without any effect on the ACTH and growth hormone responses. Fourth ventricular phenoxybenzamine decreases but does not abolish the inhibitory effect of clonidine on renin secretion. Circulating angiotensin II acts on the brain via the area postrema to raise blood pressure and via the subfornical organ to increase water intake. Its effect on vasopressin secretion is debated. The brain contains a renin-like enzyme, converting enzyme, renin substrate, and angiotensin. There is debate about the nature and physiological significance of the angiotensin II-generating enzyme in the brain, and about the nature of the angiotensin I and angiotensin II that have been reported to be present in the central nervous system. However, injection of angiotensin II into the cerebral ventricles produces drinking, increased secretion of vasopressin and ACTH, and increased blood pressure. The same responses are produced by intraventricular renin. Angiotensin II also facilitates sympathetic discharge in the periphery, and the possibility that it exerts a similar action on the adrenergic neurons

  10. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders. PMID:25877663

  11. Subcutaneous vaccination with irradiated, cytokine-producing tumor cells stimulates CD8+ cell-mediated immunity against tumors located in the "immunologically privileged" central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, J H; Archer, G E; Ashley, D M; Fuchs, H E; Hale, L P; Dranoff, G; Bigner, D D

    1996-01-01

    Vaccination with cytokine-producing tumor cells generates potent immune responses against tumors outside the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS, however, is a barrier to allograft and xenograft rejection, and established tumors within the CNS have failed to respond to other forms of systemic immunotherapy. To determine what barriers the "immunologically privileged" CNS would pose to cytokine-assisted tumor vaccines and what cytokines would be most efficacious against tumors within the CNS, we irradiated B16 murine melanoma cells producing murine interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, gamma-interferon, or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and used these cells as subcutaneous vaccines against tumors within the brain. Under conditions where untransfected B16 cells had no effect, cells producing IL-3, IL-6, or GM-CSF increased the survival of mice challenged with viable B16 cells in the brain. Vaccination with B16 cells producing IL-4 or gamma-interferon had no effect, and vaccination with B16 cells producing IL-2 decreased survival time. GM-CSF-producing vaccines were also able to increase survival in mice with pre-established tumors. The response elicited by GM-CSF-producing vaccines was found to be specific to tumor type and to be abrogated by depletion of CD8+ cells. Unlike the immunity generated against subcutaneous tumors by GM-CSF, however, the effector responses generated against tumors in the CNS were not dependent on CD4+ cells. These data suggest that cytokine-producing tumor cells are very potent stimulators of immunity against tumors within the CNS, but effector responses in the CNS may be different from those obtained against subcutaneous tumors. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8816812

  12. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders.

  13. Hypersensitivity Responses in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Khorooshi, Reza; Asgari, Nasrin; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Berg, Carsten Tue; Owens, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated tissue damage or hypersensitivity can be mediated by autospecific IgG antibodies. Pathology results from activation of complement, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, mediated by inflammatory effector leukocytes include macrophages, natural killer cells, and granulocytes. Antibodies and complement have been associated to demyelinating pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, where macrophages predominate among infiltrating myeloid cells. Serum-derived autoantibodies with predominant specificity for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are implicated as inducers of pathology in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease where activated neutrophils infiltrate, unlike in MS. The most widely used model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is an autoantigen-immunized disease that can be transferred to naive animals with CD4+ T cells, but not with antibodies. By contrast, NMO-like astrocyte and myelin pathology can be transferred to mice with AQP4–IgG from NMO patients. This is dependent on complement, and does not require T cells. Consistent with clinical observations that interferon-beta is ineffective as a therapy for NMO, NMO-like pathology is significantly reduced in mice lacking the Type I IFN receptor. In MS, there is evidence for intrathecal synthesis of antibodies as well as blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, whereas in NMO, IgG accesses the CNS from blood. Transfer models involve either direct injection of antibody and complement to the CNS, or experimental manipulations to induce BBB breakdown. We here review studies in MS and NMO that elucidate roles for IgG and complement in the induction of BBB breakdown, astrocytopathy, and demyelinating pathology. These studies point to significance of T-independent effector mechanisms in neuroinflammation. PMID:26500654

  14. Radiation response of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E.; Kun, L.E.; Stephens, L.C.

    1995-03-30

    This report reviews the anatomical, pathophysiological, and clinical aspects of radiation injury to the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the lack of pathoGyomonic characteristics for CNS radiation lesions, demyelination and malacia are consistently the dominant morphological features of radiation myelopathy. In addition, cerebral atrophy is commonly observed in patients with neurological deficits related to chemotherapy and radiation, and neurocognitive deficits are associated with diffuse white matter changes. Clinical and experimental dose-response information have been evaluated and summarized into specific recommendations for the spinal cord and brain. The common spinal cord dose limit of 45 Gn in 22 to 25 fractions is conservative and can be relaxed if respecting this limit materially reduces the probability of tumor control. It is suggested that the 5% incidence of radiation myelopathy probably lies between 57 and 61 Gy to the spinal cord in the absence of dose modifying chemotherapy. A clinically detectable length effect for the spinal cord has not been observed. The effects of chemotherapy and altered fractionation are also discussed. Brain necrosis in adults is rarely noted below 60 Gy in conventional fractionation, with imaging and clinical changes being observed generally only above 50 Gy. However, neurocognitive effects are observed at lower doses, especially in children. A more pronounced volume effect is believed to exist in the brain than in the spinal cord. Tumor progression may be hard to distinguish from radiation and chemotherapy effects. Diffuse white matter injury can be attributed to radiation and associated with neurological deficits, but leukoencephalopathy is rarely observed in the absence of chemotherapy. Subjective, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) parameters related to radiation spinal cord and brain injury have been developed and presented on ordinal scales. 140 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. General Information about Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... System Embryonal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors Go ... in patients with a high-risk tumor. The information from tests and procedures done to detect (find) ...

  16. Astrocyte scar formation aids central nervous system axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark A; Burda, Joshua E; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O'Shea, Timothy M; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S; Deming, Timothy J; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2016-04-14

    Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system. Astrocytic scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or ablating chronic astrocytic scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. By contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocytic scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth-supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to the prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents central nervous system axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  17. Disseminated encephalomyelitis-like central nervous system neoplasm in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Bao, Xinhua; Fu, Na; Ye, Jintang; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yun; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2014-08-01

    A malignant neoplasm in the central nervous system with diffuse white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rare in children. It could be misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. This report presents our experience based on 4 patients (3 male, 1 female; aged 7-13 years) whose MRI showed diffuse lesions in white matter and who were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. All of the patients received corticosteroid therapy. After brain biopsy, the patients were diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central nervous system lymphoma. We also provide literature reviews and discuss the differentiation of central nervous system neoplasm from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  18. Ultrasonic Transduction of DNA into Central Nervous System Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manome, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Naoto; Furuhata, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    Many diseases involving the central nervous system are intractable to conventional therapies, thereby requiring an alternative treatment such as gene therapy. Therapy requires safety since the central nervous system is a critical organ. The choice of non-viral vectors, such as naked plasmid DNA, may have merit. However, transduction efficiencies of these vectors are low. We have investigated the use of ultrasound and found that insonation effectively enhanced transduction of naked plasmid DNA into cultured slices of mouse brain. Since ultrasound successfully facilitated the transduction of naked plasmid DNA into the neural tissue, this approach may have a role in gene therapy for the central nervous system.

  19. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  20. [Microglial cells and development of the embryonic central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Legendre, Pascal; Le Corronc, Hervé

    2014-02-01

    Microglia cells are the macrophages of the central nervous system with a crucial function in the homeostasis of the adult brain. However, recent studies showed that microglial cells may also have important functions during early embryonic central nervous system development. In this review we summarize recent works on the extra embryonic origin of microglia, their progenitor niche, the pattern of their invasion of the embryonic central nervous system and on interactions between embryonic microglia and their local environment during invasion. We describe microglial functions during development of embryonic neuronal networks, including their roles in neurogenesis, in angiogenesis and developmental cell death. These recent discoveries open a new field of research on the functions of neural-microglial interactions during the development of the embryonic central nervous system.

  1. Pharmacotherapy for Adults with Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Nina F.

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the adult central nervous system are among the most common and most chemoresistant neoplasms. Malignant tumors of the brain and spinal cord collectively account for approximately 1.3% of all cancers and 2.2% of all cancer-related deaths. Novel pharmacological approaches to nervous system tumors are urgently needed. This review presents the current approaches and challenges to successful pharmacotherapy of adults with malignant tumors of the central nervous system and discusses novel approaches aimed at overcoming these challenges. PMID:19091301

  2. Review: Glial lineages and myelination in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    COMPSTON, ALASTAIR; ZAJICEK, JOHN; SUSSMAN, JON; WEBB, ANNA; HALL, GILLIAN; MUIR, DAVID; SHAW, CHRISTOPHER; WOOD, ANDREW; SCOLDING, NEIL

    1997-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, derived from stem cell precursors which arise in subventricular zones of the developing central nervous system, have as their specialist role the synthesis and maintenance of myelin. Astrocytes contribute to the cellular architecture of the central nervous system and act as a source of growth factors and cytokines; microglia are bone-marrow derived macrophages which function as primary immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system. Myelination depends on the establishment of stable relationships between each differentiated oligodendrocyte and short segments of several neighbouring axons. There is growing evidence, especially from studies of glial cell implantation, that oligodendrocyte precursors persist in the adult nervous system and provide a limited capacity for the restoration of structure and function in myelinated pathways damaged by injury or disease. PMID:9061442

  3. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  4. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Orrea Solano, M

    1993-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of the chronic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are reviewed. SLE-CNS dysfunction is broadly divided into neurologic and psychiatric clinical categories. The distinct clinical entities within these broad categories are fully described. Diagnostic criteria employed to verify the presence of SLE-CNS dysfunction, including laboratory serum and cerebral spinal fluid analyses as well as radiologic and other multimodality diagnostic tools, are compared and contrasted with respect to sensitivity and specificity.

  5. New model to determine the central nervous system reaction to peripheral trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoelund, B.H.W.; Wallstedt, L.

    1988-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of the central nervous system with the /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose method of Sokoloff was utilized to explore the possibility to develop a model for the study of central nervous system reaction to peripheral trauma. Preliminary evidence indicates that the activation caused by tactile stimuli to one hindlimb nerve is that expected from earlier physiologic studies. However, an increase of stimulation intensity to recruit nociceptive (pain) fibers seems to abolish the changes, indicating that inhibitory systems have been activated.

  6. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction.

  7. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  8. A single origin of the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Telford, Maximilian J

    2007-04-20

    As Denes et al. (2007) reveal in this issue, the expression profile and roles of genes that pattern the nervous system in embryos of chordates and annelids are surprisingly similar. This extraordinary conservation suggests that the patterning mechanism has been inherited largely unchanged from the bilaterian common ancestor and that the central nervous system, although dorsal in fish and ventral in worms, is an ancient characteristic of animals. PMID:17448982

  9. Systematic Review of Central Post Stroke Pain: What Is Happening in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Gulseren; Kuru, Pinar

    2016-08-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most common central neuropathic pain syndromes seen after stroke. It is mainly related with vascular damage at certain brain territory and pain related to corresponding body areas. In the past, it was described as one of the definitive symptoms of thalamic lesion. However, recent findings suggest that it is not only seen after thalamic lesions but also seen after vascular lesions in any part of the central nervous system. Although there are certain hypotheses to explain physiopathologic mechanisms of CPSP, further evidence is needed. The majority of the cases are intractable and unresponsive to analgesic treatment. Electrical stimulation such as deep brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation seems to be effective in certain cases. In this systematic review, recent advancements related to CPSP mechanisms have been evaluated. Further investigations are needed in order to reveal the mystery of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CPSP. PMID:27175563

  10. Nongenomic Actions of Adrenal Steroids in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Evanson, Nathan K.; Herman, James P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Krause, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are released by the adrenal cortex in response to stress and hydromineral imbalance. Historically, adrenocorticosteroid actions are attributed to effects on gene transcription. More recently, however, it has become clear that genome-independent pathways represent an important facet of adrenal steroid actions. These hormones exert nongenomic effects throughout the body, but a significant portion of their actions are specific to the central nervous system. These actions are mediated by a variety of signalling pathways, and lead to physiologically meaningful events in vitro and in vivo. Here we review nongenomic effects of adrenal steroids in the central nervous system at the levels of behaviour, neural system activity, individual neurone activity, and subcellular signalling activity. A clearer understanding of adrenal steroid activity in the central nervous system will lead to a better ability both to treat human disease, and to reduce side-effects of steroid treatments already in use. PMID:20367759

  11. [CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT IN GRANULOMATOSIS WITH POLYANGIITIS (GPA)].

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Yuval; Lidar, Merav

    2015-05-01

    We present the case of a 75 year-old female with Wegener's Granulomatosis. The patient arrived intubated to the emergency room, following loss of consciousness and a generalized seizure. A magnetic resonance imaging brain scan revealed a space occupying lesion (SOL) in the right temporal region. Subsequent investigation indicated the SOL to be a primary lymphoma of the central nervous system. The clinical manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis on both the central and peripheral nervous systems are reviewed herein, as well as the appropriated treatment modalities and the link between this disease and various malignancies. PMID:26168637

  12. Central nervous system manifestations of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Yuri C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Kazacos, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Over 20 species of Angiostrongylus have been described from around the world, but only Angiostrongylus cantonensis has been confirmed to cause central nervous system disease in humans. A neurotropic parasite that matures in the pulmonary arteries of rats, A. cantonensis is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in southern Asia and the Pacific and Caribbean islands. The parasite can also cause encephalitis/encephalomyelitis and rarely ocular angiostrongyliasis. The present paper reviews the life cycle, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis of A. cantonesis infection. Emphasis is given on the spectrum of central nervous system manifestations and disease pathogenesis. PMID:25312338

  13. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  14. Non-central nervous system fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Elspeth; Wright, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently offered in a limited number of centers but is predominantly used for suspected fetal central nervous system abnormalities. This article concentrates on the role of the different imaging sequences and their value to clinical practice. It also discusses the future of fetal MRI. PMID:26013057

  15. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Sigmer Y.; Carolina Bonilla, E.; Marcela Bolaños, D.; Carbayo, Fernando; Litvaitis, Marian K.; Brown, Federico D.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS) of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III) based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies. PMID:26500427

  16. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Sigmer Y; Carolina Bonilla, E; Marcela Bolaños, D; Carbayo, Fernando; Litvaitis, Marian K; Brown, Federico D

    2015-01-01

    The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS) of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III) based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies.

  17. Neurotensin: immunohistochemical localization in rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, G R; Kuhar, M J; Snyder, S H

    1977-01-01

    Neurotensin immunofluorescence was examined in the rat central nervous system using a well-characterized antiserum directed against this tridecapeptide. Morphological characteristics of the fluorescence indicate its association with neuronal cell bodies and processes in the brain and with cells of the anterior pituitary. Fluorescence is seen in many brain areas, with notable densities in the substantia gelatinosa zones of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus, central amygdaloid nucleus, anterior pituitary, median eminence, and preoptic and basal hypothalamic areas. Images PMID:333458

  18. Heterotopic ossification after central nervous system trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M. P.; Torres, S. J.; Mehta, S.; Ahn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) is a disorder of aberrant bone formation affecting one in five patients sustaining a spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury. Ectopic bone forms around joints in characteristic patterns, causing pain and limiting movement especially around the hip and elbow. Clinical sequelae of neurogenic heterotopic ossification include urinary tract infection, pressure injuries, pneumonia and poor hygiene, making early diagnosis and treatment clinically compelling. However, diagnosis remains difficult with more investigation needed. Our pathophysiological understanding stems from mechanisms of basic bone formation enhanced by evidence of systemic influences from circulating humor factors and perhaps neurological ones. This increasing understanding guides our implementation of current prophylaxis and treatment including the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and surgery and, importantly, should direct future, more effective ones. PMID:23610702

  19. Imaging of opioid receptors in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Gjermund

    2008-01-01

    In vivo functional imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) is the sole method for providing a quantitative measurement of μ-, κ and δ-opioid receptor-mediated signalling in the central nervous system. During the last two decades, measurements of changes to the regional brain opioidergic neuronal activation—mediated by endogenously produced opioid peptides, or exogenously administered opioid drugs—have been conducted in numerous chronic pain conditions, in epilepsy, as well as by stimulant- and opioidergic drugs. Although several PET-tracers have been used clinically for depiction and quantification of the opioid receptors changes, the underlying mechanisms for regulation of changes to the availability of opioid receptors are still unclear. After a presentation of the general signalling mechanisms of the opioid receptor system relevant for PET, a critical survey of the pharmacological properties of some currently available PET-tracers is presented. Clinical studies performed with different PET ligands are also reviewed and the compound-dependent findings are summarized. An outlook is given concluding with the tailoring of tracer properties, in order to facilitate for a selective addressment of dynamic changes to the availability of a single subclass, in combination with an optimization of the quantification framework are essentials for further progress in the field of in vivo opioid receptor imaging. PMID:18048446

  20. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  1. Immunocytochemical Detection of Acetylcholine in the Rat Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffard, M.; McRae-Degueurce, A.; Souan, Marie Laure

    1985-07-01

    A specific antibody to acetylcholine was raised and used as a marker for cholinergic neurons in the rat central nervous system. The acetylcholine conjugate was obtained by a two-step immunogen synthesis procedure. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to test the specificity and affinity of the antibody in vitro; the results indicated high affinity. A chemical perfusion mixture of allyl alcohol and glutaraldehyde was used to fix the acetylcholine in the nervous tissue. Peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry showed many acetylcholine-immunoreactive cells and fibers in sections from the medial septum region.

  2. The Role of Central Nervous System Plasticity in Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus is a vexing disorder of hearing characterized by sound sensations originating in the head without any external stimulation. The specific etiology of these sensations is uncertain but frequently associated with hearing loss. The “neurophysiogical” model of tinnitus has enhanced appreciation of central nervous system (CNS) contributions. The model assumes that plastic changes in the primary and non-primary auditory pathways contribute to tinnitus with the former perhaps sustaining them, and the latter contributing to perceived severity and emotionality. These plastic changes are triggered by peripheral injury, which results in new patterns of brain activity due to anatomic alterations in the connectivity of CNS neurons. These alterations may change the balance between excitatory and inhibitory brain processes, perhaps producing cascades of new neural activity flowing between brainstem and cortex in a self-sustaining manner that produces persistent perceptions of tinnitus. The bases of this model are explored with an attempt to distinguish phenomenological from mechanistic explanations. Learning outcomes (1) Readers will learn that the variables associated with the behavioral experience of tinnitus are as complex as the biological variables. (2) Readers will understand what the concept of neuroplastic brain change means, and how it is associated with tinnitus. (3) Readers will learn that there may be no one brain location associated with tinnitus, and it may result from interactions between multiple brain areas. (4) Readers will learn how disinhibition, spontaneous activity, neural synchronization, and tonotopic reorganization may contribute to tinnitus. PMID:17418230

  3. Role of Wnt Signaling in Central Nervous System Injury.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Catherine; Cisternas, Pedro; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is highly sensitive to external mechanical damage, presenting a limited capacity for regeneration explained in part by its inability to restore either damaged neurons or the synaptic network. The CNS may suffer different types of external injuries affecting its function and/or structure, including stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury. These pathologies critically affect the quality of life of a large number of patients worldwide and are often fatal because available therapeutics are ineffective and produce limited results. Common effects of the mentioned pathologies involves the triggering of several cellular and metabolic responses against injury, including infiltration of blood cells, inflammation, glial activation, and neuronal death. Although some of the underlying molecular mechanisms of those responses have been elucidated, the mechanisms driving these processes are poorly understood in the context of CNS injury. In the last few years, it has been suggested that the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway could be important in the regenerative response after CNS injury, activating diverse protective mechanisms including the stimulation of neurogenesis, blood brain structure consolidation and the recovery of cognitive brain functions. Because Wnt signaling is involved in several physiological processes, the putative positive role of its activation after injury could be the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to CNS injury.

  4. Role of Wnt Signaling in Central Nervous System Injury.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Catherine; Cisternas, Pedro; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is highly sensitive to external mechanical damage, presenting a limited capacity for regeneration explained in part by its inability to restore either damaged neurons or the synaptic network. The CNS may suffer different types of external injuries affecting its function and/or structure, including stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury. These pathologies critically affect the quality of life of a large number of patients worldwide and are often fatal because available therapeutics are ineffective and produce limited results. Common effects of the mentioned pathologies involves the triggering of several cellular and metabolic responses against injury, including infiltration of blood cells, inflammation, glial activation, and neuronal death. Although some of the underlying molecular mechanisms of those responses have been elucidated, the mechanisms driving these processes are poorly understood in the context of CNS injury. In the last few years, it has been suggested that the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway could be important in the regenerative response after CNS injury, activating diverse protective mechanisms including the stimulation of neurogenesis, blood brain structure consolidation and the recovery of cognitive brain functions. Because Wnt signaling is involved in several physiological processes, the putative positive role of its activation after injury could be the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to CNS injury. PMID:25976365

  5. [VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS AND DISEASES OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VESSELS].

    PubMed

    Kazanova, A S; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Systemized data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of VZV-vasculopathy--a disease, occurring due to damage of arteries of the central nervous system by Varicella Zoster virus, are presented in the review. A special attention in the paper is given to the effect of vaccine prophylaxis of chicken pox and herpes zoster on the frequency of development and course of VZV-vasculopathy.

  6. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-11-24

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells.

  7. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells. PMID:26610549

  8. Central nervous system histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ignacio; Minces, Pablo; De Cristofano, Analía M; Negroni, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Neurohistoplasmosis is a rare disease, most prevalent in immunosuppressed patients, secondary to disseminated disease with a high mortality rate when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. We report a previously healthy 12 year old girl, from a bat infested region of Tucuman Province, Argentine Republic, who developed meningoencephalitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum. Eighteen months prior to admission the patient started with headaches and intermittent fever. The images of the central nervous system showed meningoencephalitis suggestive of tuberculosis. She received antibiotics and tuberculostatic medications without improvement. Liposomal amphotericin B was administered for six weeks. The patient's clinical status improved remarkably. Finally the culture of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for micelial form of Histoplasma capsulatum. The difficulties surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of neurohistoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients are discussed in this manuscript, as it also intends to alert to the presence of a strain of Histoplasma capsulatum with affinity for the central nervous system.

  9. The role of leptin in central nervous system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hai-Jing; Guo, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue and acts in brain centers to control critical physiological functions. Leptin receptors are especially abundant in the hypothalamus and trigger specific neuronal subpopulations, and activate several intracellular signaling events, including the JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and mTOR pathway. Although most studies focus on its role in energy intake and expenditure, leptin also plays a critical role in many central nervous system diseases. PMID:26885866

  10. Simultaneous central nervous system complications of C. neoformans infection

    PubMed Central

    González-Duarte, Alejandra; Higera Calleja, Jesus; Mitre, Vicente Gijón; Ramos, Guillermo Garcia

    2009-01-01

    The most common neurological manifestation of Cryptococcus neoformans infection is meningitis. Other less common manifestations include parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) granulomatous disease, hydrocephalus and stroke. C. neoformans is often suspected in immunodepressed patients, but it can be easily overlooked in otherwise healthy patients. This paper provides a detailed clinical description of a patient without immunosupression who developed multiple simultaneous neurological manifestations after the infection with C. neoformans. PMID:21577360

  11. Central nervous system infection caused by Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Jehad; Saad, Mustafa; Samnani, Imran; Lee, Prescott; Moorman, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection with Morganella morganii is very rare. We describe a 38-year-old female patient with frontal brain abscess caused by M morganii who was unsuccessfully treated. We also review all reported cases of Morganella CNS infections with an emphasis on treatment modalities and outcomes. Aggressive surgical management and appropriate antimicrobial therapy can lead to cure, but the mortality rate for these infections remains high.

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator in central nervous system physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, Jerry P.; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although conventionally associated with fibrin clot degradation, recent work has uncovered new functions for the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasminogen cascade in central nervous system physiology and pathology. This extracellular proteolytic cascade has been shown to have roles in learning and memory, stress, neuronal degeneration, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease. The current review considers the different ways tPA functions in the brain. PMID:15841309

  13. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  14. Centralization of the deuterostome nervous system predates chordates.

    PubMed

    Nomaksteinsky, Marc; Röttinger, Eric; Dufour, Héloïse D; Chettouh, Zoubida; Lowe, Chris J; Martindale, Mark Q; Brunet, Jean-François

    2009-08-11

    The origin of the chordate central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. One theory is that a CNS was present in the first bilaterian and that it gave rise to both the ventral cord of protostomes and the dorsal cord of deuterostomes. Another theory proposes that the chordate CNS arose by a dramatic process of dorsalization and internalization from a diffuse nerve net coextensive with the skin of the animal, such as enteropneust worms (Hemichordata, Ambulacraria) are supposed to have. We show here that juvenile and adult enteropneust worms in fact have a bona fide CNS, i.e., dense agglomerations of neurons associated with a neuropil, forming two cords, ventral and dorsal. The latter is internalized in the collar as a chordate-like neural tube. Contrary to previous assumptions, the greater part of the adult enteropneust skin is nonneural, although elements of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are found there. We use molecular markers to show that several neuronal types are anatomically segregated in the CNS and PNS. These neuroanatomical features, whatever their homologies with the chordate CNS, imply that nervous system centralization predates the evolutionary separation of chordate and hemichordate lineages. PMID:19559615

  15. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  16. Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system in immunocompromised patients

    PubMed Central

    Strank, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesviruses may cause infections of the central nervous system during primary infection or following reactivation from a latent state. Especially in immunosuppressed patients the infection can take a life-threatening course, and therefore early diagnosis of herpesvirus-associated neurological diseases should have high priority. Clinical presentation in these patients is usually without typical features, making diagnosis even more challenging. Therefore general broad testing for different herpesviruses in cerebrospinal fluid samples is highly recommended. In addition, determination of the virus DNA level in the cerebrospinal fluid by quantitative assays seems to be of high importance to determine prognosis. Moreover, it might help to differentiate between specific virus-associated disease and unspecific presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid, especially in immunocompromised patients. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of cerebrospinal fluid has revolutionized the diagnosis of nervous system viral infections, particularly those caused by human herpesviruses. This review summarizes the role human herpesviruses play in central nervous system infections in immunocompromised patients, with a focus on the clinical manifestation of encephalitis. PMID:22973424

  17. Centralization of the deuterostome nervous system predates chordates.

    PubMed

    Nomaksteinsky, Marc; Röttinger, Eric; Dufour, Héloïse D; Chettouh, Zoubida; Lowe, Chris J; Martindale, Mark Q; Brunet, Jean-François

    2009-08-11

    The origin of the chordate central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. One theory is that a CNS was present in the first bilaterian and that it gave rise to both the ventral cord of protostomes and the dorsal cord of deuterostomes. Another theory proposes that the chordate CNS arose by a dramatic process of dorsalization and internalization from a diffuse nerve net coextensive with the skin of the animal, such as enteropneust worms (Hemichordata, Ambulacraria) are supposed to have. We show here that juvenile and adult enteropneust worms in fact have a bona fide CNS, i.e., dense agglomerations of neurons associated with a neuropil, forming two cords, ventral and dorsal. The latter is internalized in the collar as a chordate-like neural tube. Contrary to previous assumptions, the greater part of the adult enteropneust skin is nonneural, although elements of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are found there. We use molecular markers to show that several neuronal types are anatomically segregated in the CNS and PNS. These neuroanatomical features, whatever their homologies with the chordate CNS, imply that nervous system centralization predates the evolutionary separation of chordate and hemichordate lineages.

  18. School reentry for children with acquired central nervous systems injuries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special education is not necessarily a special classroom, but an individualized set of educational needs, determined by a multidisciplinary school team, to promote educational success. The purpose of this article is to inform those pediatricians and pediatric allied health professionals treating children with CNS injury of the systems in place to support successful school reentry and their role in contributing to developing an appropriate educational plan. PMID:19489086

  19. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination.

  20. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  1. Do dental infections really cause central nervous system infections?

    PubMed

    Lazow, Stewart K; Izzo, Steven R; Vazquez, David

    2011-11-01

    In the post-World War I antibiotic era, the prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) infections is estimated to be 1 per 100,000 population. The literature is replete with anecdotal case reports of CNS infections of apparent dental etiology. Conversely, it is widely cited that the incidence of CNS infection of dental etiology is only in the range of 1% to 2%. We seek to answer the question if dental infections really cause CNS infections. In this article, we focus on septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and brain abscess and if it is a diagnosis of exclusion or evidence-based.

  2. West Nile Virus Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Evandro R.; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic single-stranded flavivirus has been the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis worldwide.  Up to 50% of WNV convalescent patients in the United States were reported to have long-term neurological sequelae.  Neither antiviral drugs nor vaccines are available for humans.  Animal models have been used to investigate WNV pathogenesis and host immune response in humans.  In this review, we will discuss recent findings from studies in animal models of WNV infection, and provide new insights on WNV pathogenesis and WNV-induced host immunity in the central nervous system. PMID:26918172

  3. Autoimmune T cell responses in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Goverman, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Autoreactive T cell responses have a crucial role in central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Recent data indicate that CNS autoimmunity can be mediated by two distinct lineages of CD4+ T cells that are defined by the production of either interferon-γ or interleukin-17. The activity of these CD4+ T cell subsets within the CNS influences the pathology and clinical course of disease. New animal models show that myelin-specific CD8+ T cells can also mediate CNS autoimmunity. This Review focuses on recent progress in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms, regulation and interplay between these different T cell subsets in CNS autoimmunity. PMID:19444307

  4. Area 51: How do Acanthamoeba invade the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Emes, Richard; Elsheikha, Hany; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    Acanthamoeba granulomatous encephalitis generally develops as a result of haematogenous spread, but it is unclear how circulating amoebae enter the central nervous system (CNS) and cause inflammation. At present, the mechanisms which Acanthamoeba use to invade this incredibly well-protected area of the CNS and produce infection are not well understood. In this paper, we propose two key virulence factors: mannose-binding protein and extracellular serine proteases as key players in Acanthamoeba traversal of the blood-brain barrier leading to neuronal injury. Both molecules should provide excellent opportunities as potential targets in the rational development of therapeutic interventions against Acanthamoeba encephalitis.

  5. Imaging of cancer therapy-induced central nervous system toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jörg; Klein, Joshua P

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy, including radiation and chemotherapy, can be associated with harmful effects to the central nervous system. Recognition of classical neurotoxic syndromes is critical to appropriately guide and optimize patient management. As a result of cancer therapy-induced toxicity, patients may present with acute, subacute, and chronic neurologic symptoms that can be misinterpreted as tumor recurrence, infection, or paraneoplastic syndromes. In this review the advantages and limitations of various neuroimaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, frequently used in patients with cancer who present with diverse neurotoxic syndromes, are highlighted. PMID:24287388

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor in central nervous system injuries - a vascular growth factor getting nervous?

    PubMed

    Sköld, Mattias K; Kanje, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is recognized as a central factor in growth, survival and permeability of blood vessels in both physiological and pathological conditions. It is as such of importance for vascular responses in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Accumulating evidence suggest that VEGF may also act as a neuroprotective and neurotrophic factor supporting neuronal survival and neuronal regeneration. Findings of neuropilins as shared co-receptors between molecules with such seemingly different functions as the axon guidance molecules semaphorins and VEGF has further boosted the interest in the role of VEGF in neural tissue injury and repair mechanisms. Thus, VEGF most likely act in parallel or concurrent on cells in both the vascular and nervous system. The present review gives a summary of known or potential aspects of the VEGF system in the healthy and diseased nervous system. The potential benefits but also problems and pitfalls in intervening in the actions of such a multifunctional factor as VEGF in the disordered CNS are also covered.

  7. Central nervous system effects of local anaesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Englesson, S; Matousek, M

    1975-02-01

    A review is given of an experimental study on cats where the influence of acid-base changes on central nervous system toxicity of local anaesthetic agents was studied. The conclusion of this study was that a respiratory acidosis increased the central nervous system toxicity of local anaesthetics and that the underlying metabolic conditions modified this increase. Thus a respiratory acidosis increased this toxicity more if it was based on a metabolic acidosis than on a metabolic alkalosis (Englesson, 1974; Englesson and Grevsten, 1974). An extended analysis is presented where automatic frequency analysis was performed on the e.e.g. recordings performed during the i.v. infusion of lignocaine, bupivacaine, L 134, HS 37 and its optical isomers. The preliminary results show that the electrical changes appearing in the e.e.g. from the start of the i.v. infusion until seizure activity were the same if this time interval was as short as 1 min or as long as 8 min. It also revealed remarkable individual differences between agents, for instance lignocaine displaying marked electrical changes already in the first third of this time period where bupivacaine showed no changes until shortly before seizures. PMID:238556

  8. Sequelae of central-nervous-system enterovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Sells, C J; Carpenter, R L; Ray, C G

    1975-07-01

    The long-term effects of central-nervous-system enterovirus infections were examined in a controlled follow-up study of 19 children 2 1/2 to eight years of age who had been hospitalized with documented enterovirus infection 17 to 67 months before evaluation. Assessment included medical history, physical and neurologic examination, psychologic testing, and speech and hearing evaluation. Three children (16 per cent) had definite neurologic impairment, five (26 per cent) had possible impairment, and 11 (58 per cent) were free of detectable abnormalities. Children whose illness occurred during the first year of life, when compared to controls, were found to have significantly smaller mean head circumference (50.6 vs. 51.6 cm, P less than 0.033), significantly lower mean I.Q. (97 vs 115, P less than 0.007), and depressed languange and speech skills. Children whose illness occurred after the first year of life were not different from their controls. Children whith central-nervous-system enterovirus infection may have neurologic impairment when infection occurs in the first year of life.

  9. Neurotrophic effects of neudesin in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Ikuo; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Zhao, Ying; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Neudesin (neuron-derived neurotrophic factor; NENF) was identified as a neurotrophic factor that is involved in neuronal differentiation and survival. It is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system, and its neurotrophic activity is exerted via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Neudesin is also an anorexigenic factor that suppresses food intake in the hypothalamus. It is a member of the membrane-associated progesterone receptor (MAPR) family and shares key structural motifs with the cytochrome b5-like heme/steroid-binding domain. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), the first to be discovered among the MAPR family, binds progesterone to induce “rapid non-genomic effects” in biological responses that are unrelated to the nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs). Hence, neudesin may also be involved in the rapid non-genomic actions of progesterone. In this review, we summarize the identification, structure, and activity of neudesin in the central nervous system, and present an essential overview of the current understanding of its physiological roles and the prospect of elucidating its non-genomic progesterone effects. PMID:23805070

  10. Targeted Temperature Management in Pediatric Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Newmyer, Robert; Mendelson, Jenny; Pang, Diana; Fink, Ericka L.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Acute central nervous system conditions due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), status epilepticus, and central nervous system infection/inflammation, are a leading cause of death and disability in childhood. There is a critical need for effective neuroprotective therapies to improve outcome targeting distinct disease pathology. Fever, defined as patient temperature > 38°C, has been clearly shown to exacerbate brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) is an intervention using targeted temperature management that has multiple mechanisms of action and robust evidence of efficacy in multiple experimental models of brain injury. Prospective clinical evidence for its neuroprotective efficacy exists in narrowly-defined populations with hypoxic-ischemic injury outside of the pediatric age range while trials comparing hypothermia to normothermia after TBI have failed to demonstrate a benefit on outcome but consistently demonstrate potential use in decreasing refractory intracranial pressure. Data in children from prospective, randomized controlled trials using different strategies of targeted temperature management for various outcomes are few but a large study examining HT versus controlled normothermia to improve neurological outcome in cardiac arrest is underway. PMID:26042193

  11. Pathogen-inspired drug delivery to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    McCall, Rebecca L; Cacaccio, Joseph; Wrabel, Eileen; Schwartz, Mary E; Coleman, Timothy P; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2014-01-01

    For as long as the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been evolving to exclude bloodborne agents from the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have adopted a multitude of strategies to bypass it. Some pathogens, notably viruses and certain bacteria, enter the CNS in whole form, achieving direct physical passage through endothelial or neuronal cells to infect the brain. Other pathogens, including bacteria and multicellular eukaryotic organisms, secrete toxins that preferentially interact with specific cell types to exert a broad range of biological effects on peripheral and central neurons. In this review, we will discuss the directed mechanisms that viruses, bacteria, and the toxins secreted by higher order organisms use to enter the CNS. Our goal is to identify ligand-mediated strategies that could be used to improve the brain-specific delivery of engineered nanocarriers, including polymers, lipids, biologically sourced materials, and imaging agents.

  12. Pathogen-inspired drug delivery to the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Rebecca L; Cacaccio, Joseph; Wrabel, Eileen; Schwartz, Mary E; Coleman, Timothy P; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2014-01-01

    For as long as the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been evolving to exclude bloodborne agents from the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have adopted a multitude of strategies to bypass it. Some pathogens, notably viruses and certain bacteria, enter the CNS in whole form, achieving direct physical passage through endothelial or neuronal cells to infect the brain. Other pathogens, including bacteria and multicellular eukaryotic organisms, secrete toxins that preferentially interact with specific cell types to exert a broad range of biological effects on peripheral and central neurons. In this review, we will discuss the directed mechanisms that viruses, bacteria, and the toxins secreted by higher order organisms use to enter the CNS. Our goal is to identify ligand-mediated strategies that could be used to improve the brain-specific delivery of engineered nanocarriers, including polymers, lipids, biologically sourced materials, and imaging agents. PMID:25610755

  13. Characterization of dendritic spines in the Drosophila central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Florian; Koper, Ewa; Hein, Irina; Fouquet, Wernher; Lindner, Jana; Sigrist, Stephan; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2009-03-01

    Dendritic spines are a characteristic feature of a number of neurons in the vertebrate nervous system and have been implicated in processes that include learning and memory. In spite of this, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the presence of spines in a classical genetic system, such as Drosophila, so far. Here, we demonstrate that a subset of processes along the dendrites of visual system interneurons in the adult fly central nervous system, called LPTCs, closely resemble vertebrate spines, based on a number of criteria. First, the morphology, size, and density of these processes are very similar to those of vertebrate spines. Second, they are enriched in actin and devoid of tubulin. Third, they are sites of synaptic connections based on confocal and electron microscopy. Importantly, they represent a preferential site of localization of an acetylcholine receptor subunit, suggesting that they are sites of excitatory synaptic input. Finally, their number is modulated by the level of the small GTPase dRac1. Our results provide a basis to dissect the genetics of dendritic spine formation and maintenance and the functional role of spines.

  14. Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Robert J.; Palmieri, Diane C.; Bronder, Julie L.; Stark, Andreas M.; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2005-01-01

    Clinically symptomatic metastases to the central nervous system (CNS) occur in ∼10 to 15% of patients with metastatic beast cancer. CNS metastases are traditionally viewed as a late complication of systemic disease, for which few effective treatment options exist. Recently, patients with Her-2-positive breast tumors who were treated with trastuzumab have been reported to develop CNS metastases at higher rates, often while responding favorably to treatment. The blood:brain barrier and the unique brain microenvironment are hypothesized to promote distinct molecular features in CNS metastases that may require tailored therapeutic approaches. New research approaches using cell lines that reliably and preferentially metastasize in vivo to the brain have been reported. Using such model systems, as well as in vitro analogs of blood-brain barrier penetration and tissue-based studies, new molecular leads into this disease are unfolding. PMID:16192626

  15. Breast cancer metastasis to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Weil, Robert J; Palmieri, Diane C; Bronder, Julie L; Stark, Andreas M; Steeg, Patricia S

    2005-10-01

    Clinically symptomatic metastases to the central nervous system (CNS) occur in approximately 10 to 15% of patients with metastatic beast cancer. CNS metastases are traditionally viewed as a late complication of systemic disease, for which few effective treatment options exist. Recently, patients with Her-2-positive breast tumors who were treated with trastuzumab have been reported to develop CNS metastases at higher rates, often while responding favorably to treatment. The blood:brain barrier and the unique brain microenvironment are hypothesized to promote distinct molecular features in CNS metastases that may require tailored therapeutic approaches. New research approaches using cell lines that reliably and preferentially metastasize in vivo to the brain have been reported. Using such model systems, as well as in vitro analogs of blood-brain barrier penetration and tissue-based studies, new molecular leads into this disease are unfolding. PMID:16192626

  16. Multifaceted interactions between adaptive immunity and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-08-19

    Neuroimmunologists seek to understand the interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system, both under homeostatic conditions and in diseases. Unanswered questions include those relating to the diversity and specificity of the meningeal T cell repertoire; the routes taken by immune cells that patrol the meninges under healthy conditions and invade the parenchyma during pathology; the opposing effects (beneficial or detrimental) of these cells on CNS function; the role of immune cells after CNS injury; and the evolutionary link between the two systems, resulting in their tight interaction and interdependence. This Review summarizes the current standing of and challenging questions related to interactions between adaptive immunity and the CNS and considers the possible directions in which these aspects of neuroimmunology will be heading over the next decade. PMID:27540163

  17. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  18. Applications of Nanotechnology to the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumling, James P., II

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials, in general, have become prominent areas of academic research. The ability to engineer at the nano scale is critical to the advancement of the physical and medical sciences. In the realm of physical sciences, the applications are clear: smaller circuitry, more powerful computers, higher resolution intruments. However, the potential impact in the fields of biology and medicine are perhaps even grander. The implementation of novel nanodevices is of paramount importance to the advancement of drug delivery, molecular detection, and cellular manipulation. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development of nanotechnology for applications in neuroscience. The nervous system provides unique challenges and opportunities for nanoscale research. This thesis discusses some background in nanotechnological applications to the central nervous system and details: (1) The development of a novel calcium nanosenser for use in neurons and astrocytes. We implemented the calcium responsive component of Dr. Roger Tsien's Cameleon sensor, a calmodulin-M13 fusion, in the first quantum dot-based calcium sensor. (2) The exploration of cell-penetrating peptides as a delivery mechanism for nanoparticles to cells of the nervous system. We investigated the application of polyarginine sequences to rat primary cortical astrocytes in order to assess their efficacy in a terminally differentiated neural cell line. (3) The development of a cheap, biocompatible alternative to quantum dots for nanosensor and imaging applications. We utilized a positively charged co-matrix to promote the encapsulation of free sulforhodamine B in silica nanoparticles, a departure from conventional reactive dye coupling to silica matrices. While other methods have been invoked to trap dye not directly coupled to silica, they rely on positively charged dyes that typically have a low quantum yield and are not extensively tested biologically, or they implement reactive dyes bound

  19. Central Nervous System and its Disease Models on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Yi, YoonYoung; Park, JiSoo; Lim, Jaeho; Lee, C Justin; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Technologies for microfluidics and biological microelectromechanical systems have been rapidly progressing over the past decade, enabling the development of unique microplatforms for in vitro human central nervous system (CNS) and related disease models. Most fundamental techniques include manipulation of axons, synapses, and neuronal networks, and different culture conditions are possible, such as compartmental, co-culturing, and 3D. Various CNS disease models, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, migraine, diffuse axonal injury, and neuronal migration disorders, have been successfully established on microplatforms. In this review, we summarize fundamental technologies and current existing CNS disease models on microplatforms. We also discuss possible future directions, including application of these methods to pathological studies, drug screening, and personalized medicine, with 3D and personalized disease models that could generate more realistic CNS disease models. PMID:26497426

  20. Development-Inspired Reprogramming of the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the exciting demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell-type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their head but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may impact regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired. PMID:24482482

  1. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  2. Interferons, signal transduction pathways, and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nallar, Shreeram C; Kalvakolanu, Dhan V

    2014-08-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS.

  3. Glycosaminoglycans and glycomimetics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dáire; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kwok, Jessica C F

    2015-02-19

    With recent advances in the construction of synthetic glycans, selective targeting of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a potential treatment for a wide range of diseases has become increasingly popular. The use of compounds that mimic the structure or bioactive function of carbohydrate structures has been termed glycomimetics. These compounds are mostly synthetic glycans or glycan-binding constructs which manipulate cellular interactions. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are major components of the ECM and exist as a diverse array of differentially sulphated disaccharide units. In the central nervous system (CNS), they are expressed by both neurons and glia and are crucial for brain development and brain homeostasis. The inherent diversity of GAGs make them an essential biological tool for regulating a complex range of cellular processes such as plasticity, cell interactions and inflammation. They are also involved in the pathologies of various neurological disorders, such as glial scar formation and psychiatric illnesses. It is this diversity of functions and potential for selective interventions which makes GAGs a tempting target. In this review, we shall describe the molecular make-up of GAGs and their incorporation into the ECM of the CNS. We shall highlight the different glycomimetic strategies that are currently being used in the nervous system. Finally, we shall discuss some possible targets in neurological disorders that may be addressed using glycomimetics.

  4. Methanol intoxication: pathological changes of central nervous system (17 cases).

    PubMed

    Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu A; Sav, Aydin; Pakis, Isil; Akyildiz, Elif U; Ersoy, Gokhan

    2010-03-01

    The nervous system has increased susceptibility for methanol intoxication. The aim of this study is to investigate various central nervous system lesions of methanol intoxication in 17 cases autopsied in the mortuary department of the Council of Forensic Medicine in Istanbul, Turkey. The reasons of methanol intoxication in the cases was likely the unwitting ingestion of methanol while drinking illegal alcohol. Survival times ranged from several hours to days. In 8 cases (47%), cerebral edema and in 9 cases (53%) at occipital, temporal and parietal cortex, basal ganglia and pons, petechial bleeding was observed. In addition to these findings, hemorrhagic necrosis were observed in thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus in 5 cases (29.4%) and, in cerebral cortex in another 3 cases (17.6%). In 3 of the cases (17.6%) in which cerebral edema was found, herniation findings accompanied to the situation and in 2 cases (11.7%), pons bleeding was observed. Around the basal ganglia, in 2 of the cases with hemorrhagic necrosis, the situation ended with a ventricular compression. In 7 cases (41%), the associated findings of chronic ischemic changes in cortical neurons, lacunae formation, degeneration of granular cell layer of the cerebellum, and reactive gliosis were considered as the results of chronic alcoholism.

  5. Fine structure of synaptogenesis in the vertebrate central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, J E

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews studies of the formation of synaptic junctions in the vertebrate central nervous system. It is focused on electron microscopic investigations of synaptogenesis, although insights from other disciplines are interwoven where appropriate, as are findings from developing peripheral and invertebrate nervous systems. The first part of the review is concerned with the morphological maturation of synapses as described from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Next, epigenetic influences on synaptogenesis are examined, and later in the article the concept of epigenesis is integrated with that of hierarchy. It is suggested that the formation of synaptic junctions may take place as an ordered progression of epigenetically modulated events wherein each level of cellular affinity becomes subordinate to the one that follows. The ultimate determination of whether a synapse is maintained, modified or dissolved would be made by the changing molecular fabric of its junctional membranes. In closing, a hypothetical model of synaptogenesis is proposed, and an hierarchial order of events is associated with a speculative synaptogenic sequence. Key elements of this hypothesis are 1) epigenetic factors that facilitate generally appropriate interactions between neurites; 2) independent expression of surface specializations that contain sufficient information for establishing threshold recognition between interacting neurites; 3) exchange of molecular information that biases the course of subsequent junctional differentiation and ultimately results in 4) the stabilization of synaptic junctions into functional connectivity patterns. PMID:2655146

  6. Insights into mechanisms of central nervous system myelination using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Czopka, Tim

    2016-03-01

    Myelin is the multi-layered membrane that surrounds most axons and is produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to its important role in enabling rapid nerve conduction, it has become clear in recent years that myelin plays additional vital roles in CNS function. Myelinating oligodendrocytes provide metabolic support to axons and active myelination is even involved in regulating forms of learning and memory formation. However, there are still large gaps in our understanding of how myelination by oligodendrocytes is regulated. The small tropical zebrafish has become an increasingly popular model organism to investigate many aspects of nervous system formation, function, and regeneration. This is mainly due to two approaches for which the zebrafish is an ideally suited vertebrate model--(1) in vivo live cell imaging using vital dyes and genetically encoded reporters, and (2) gene and target discovery using unbiased screens. This review summarizes how the use of zebrafish has helped understand mechanisms of oligodendrocyte behavior and myelination in vivo and discusses the potential use of zebrafish to shed light on important future questions relating to myelination in the context of CNS development, function and repair.

  7. Central nervous system integration of satiety signals”

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual meals are products of a complex interaction of signals related to both short-term and long-term availability of energy stores. In addition to maintaining the metabolic demands of the individual in the short term, levels of energy intake must also maintain and defend body weight over longer periods. To accomplish this, satiety pathways are regulated by a sophisticated network of endocrine and neuroendocrine pathways. Higher brain centers modulate meal-size through descending inputs to caudal brainstem regions responsible for the motor pattern generators associated with ingestion. Gastric and intestinal signals interact with central nervous system pathways to terminate food intake. These inputs can be modified as a function of internal metabolic signals, external environmental influences, and learning to regulate meal-size. PMID:23660361

  8. Generating neuronal diversity in the Drosophila central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Lee, Tzumin

    2012-01-01

    Generating diverse neurons in the central nervous system involves three major steps. First, heterogeneous neural progenitors are specified by positional cues at early embryonic stages. Second, neural progenitors sequentially produce neurons or intermediate precursors that acquire different temporal identities based on their birth-order. Third, sister neurons produced during asymmetrical terminal mitoses are given distinct fates. Determining the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these three steps of cellular diversification will unravel brain development and evolution. Drosophila has a relatively simple and tractable CNS, and previous studies on Drosophila CNS development have greatly advanced our understanding of neuron fate specification. Here we review those studies and discuss how the lessons we have learned from fly teach us the process of neuronal diversification in general.

  9. Central nervous system infections caused by varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Francisco J; Gilarranz, Raúl; Hernández, Melisa; Ramos, Diana; Pena, María José

    2016-08-01

    We carried out a clinical and epidemiological study of adult patients with varicella-zoster virus central nervous system infection diagnosed by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-six patients were included. Twelve (46.2 %) patients were diagnosed with meningitis and fourteen (53.8 %) with meningoencephalitis. Twelve (46.2 %) had cranial nerves involvement (mainly the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) nerves), six (23.1 %) had cerebellar involvement, fourteen (53.8 %) had rash, and four (15.4 %) developed Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Three (11.5 %) patients had sequelae. Length of stay was significantly lower in patients diagnosed with meningitis and treatment with acyclovir was more frequent in patients diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. We believe routine detection of varicella-zoster virus, regardless of the presence of rash, is important because the patient may benefit from a different clinical management.

  10. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  11. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Olivas Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Hakim, Nawar; Palacios, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a threat to especially immunocompromised patients and their development is primarily determined by the immune status of the host. With an increasing number of organ transplants, chemotherapy, and human immunodeficiency virus infections, the number of immunocompromised patients as susceptible hosts is growing and fungal infections of the CNS are more frequently encountered. They may result in meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation, cryptococcoma, and meningeal vasculitis with rapid disease progression and often overlapping symptoms. Although radiological characteristics are often nonspecific, unique imaging patterns can be identified through computer tomography as a first imaging modality and further refined by magnetic resonance imaging. A rapid diagnosis and the institution of the appropriate therapy are crucial in helping prevent an often fatal outcome. PMID:27403402

  12. Central nervous system syndromes in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alissa J; Fishman, Jay A

    2014-10-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have a high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) complications, including both focal and diffuse neurologic deficits. In the immunocompromised host, the initial clinical evaluation must focus on both life-threatening CNS infections and vascular or anatomic lesions. The clinical signs and symptoms of CNS processes are modified by the immunosuppression required to prevent graft rejection. In this population, these etiologies often coexist with drug toxicities and metabolic abnormalities that complicate the development of a specific approach to clinical management. This review assesses the multiple risk factors for CNS processes in solid organ transplant recipients and establishes a timeline to assist in the evaluation and management of these complex patients.

  13. Optimized optical clearing method for imaging central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tingting; Qi, Yisong; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The development of various optical clearing methods provides a great potential for imaging entire central nervous system by combining with multiple-labelling and microscopic imaging techniques. These methods had made certain clearing contributions with respective weaknesses, including tissue deformation, fluorescence quenching, execution complexity and antibody penetration limitation that makes immunostaining of tissue blocks difficult. The passive clarity technique (PACT) bypasses those problems and clears the samples with simple implementation, excellent transparency with fine fluorescence retention, but the passive tissue clearing method needs too long time. In this study, we not only accelerate the clearing speed of brain blocks but also preserve GFP fluorescence well by screening an optimal clearing temperature. The selection of proper temperature will make PACT more applicable, which evidently broaden the application range of this method.

  14. Fungal central nervous system infections: prevalence and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kourbeti, Irene S; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-02-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare but they pose a significant challenge. Their prevalence spans a wide array of hosts including immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals, patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures and those carrying implantable CNS devices. Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus spp. remain the most common pathogens. Magnetic resonance imaging can help localize the lesions, but diagnosis is challenging since invasive procedures may be needed for the retrieval of tissue, especially in cases of fungal abscesses. Antigen and antibody tests are available and approved for use in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PCR-based techniques are promising but they are not validated for use in the CSF. This review provides an overview on the differential diagnosis of the fungal CNS disease based on the host and the clinical syndrome and suggests the optimal use of diagnostic techniques. It also summarizes the emergence of Cryptococcus gatti and an unanticipated outbreak caused by Exserohilum rostratum.

  15. Therapeutic approaches of magnetic nanoparticles for the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent one of the fastest growing areas of concern requiring urgent medical attention. Treatment of CNS ailments is hindered owing to different physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which limits the accessibility of potential drugs. With the assistance of a nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategy, the problems could be overcome. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have proven immensely useful as drug carriers for site-specific delivery and as contrast agents owing to their magnetic susceptibility and biocompatibility. By utilizing MNPs, diagnosis and treatment of CNS diseases have progressed by overcoming the hurdles of the BBB. In this review, the therapeutic aspect and the future prospects related to the theranostic approach of MNPs are discussed.

  16. Epithelioid solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hongying; Bu, Hong; Chen, Huijiao; Yin, Xiangli; Zhang, Zhang; Wei, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Epithelioid solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) has recently been reported and is an extremely rare soft-tissue neoplasm. Herein we present an epithelioid SFT attached to the falx cerebri occurring in a Chinese woman. This patient underwent gross-total tumor resection at the age of 30 years and recurred 68 months following the initial total resection. Histologically, the initial lesion exhibited features of classic spindle cell SFT. In contrast, the recurrent tumor demonstrated exclusively epithelioid morphology with significant atypia. Both the original and recurrent lesions showed positivity for vimentin, CD34, Bcl-2, and CD99, whereas were negative for all the remaining antibodies. The epithelioid feature in SFT seems to be associated with a more aggressive clinical behavior in this case and more cases are awaited to verify this possibility. To the best of authors' knowledge, the present case is the first published example of SFT with epithelioid feature in the central nervous system.

  17. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  18. Zinc in the central nervous system: From molecules to behavior.

    PubMed

    Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Levenson, Cathy W

    2012-01-01

    The trace metal zinc is a biofactor that plays essential roles in the central nervous system across the lifespan from early neonatal brain development through the maintenance of brain function in adults. At the molecular level, zinc regulates gene expression through transcription factor activity and is responsible for the activity of dozens of key enzymes in neuronal metabolism. At the cellular level, zinc is a modulator of synaptic activity and neuronal plasticity in both development and adulthood. Given these key roles, it is not surprising that alterations in brain zinc status have been implicated in a wide array of neurological disorders including impaired brain development, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and mood disorders including depression. Zinc has also been implicated in neuronal damage associated with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and seizure. Understanding the mechanisms that control brain zinc homeostasis is thus critical to the development of preventive and treatment strategies for these and other neurological disorders. PMID:22473811

  19. Developmental and pathological angiogenesis in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Mario; Chang, Junlei; Zhang, Haijing

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, in the central nervous system (CNS) is seen both as a normal physiological response as well as a pathological step in disease progression. Formation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an essential step in physiological CNS angiogenesis. The BBB is regulated by a neurovascular unit (NVU) consisting of endothelial and perivascular cells as well as vascular astrocytes. The NVU plays a critical role in preventing entry of neurotoxic substances and regulation of blood flow in the CNS. In recent years, research on numerous acquired and hereditary disorders of the CNS has increasingly emphasized the role of angiogenesis in disease pathophysiology. Here, we discuss molecular mechanisms of CNS angiogenesis during embryogenesis as well as various pathological states including brain tumor formation, ischemic stroke, arteriovenous malformations, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24760128

  20. Neuroinvasion and Inflammation in Viral Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroten, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses can cause devastating central nervous system (CNS) infections, especially in young children and the elderly. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) have been described as relevant sites of entry for specific viruses as well as for leukocytes, which are recruited during the proinflammatory response in the course of CNS infection. In this review, we illustrate examples of established brain barrier models, in which the specific reaction patterns of different viral families can be analyzed. Furthermore, we highlight the pathogen specific array of cytokines and chemokines involved in immunological responses in viral CNS infections. We discuss in detail the link between specific cytokines and chemokines and leukocyte migration profiles. The thorough understanding of the complex and interrelated inflammatory mechanisms as well as identifying universal mediators promoting CNS inflammation is essential for the development of new diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:27313404

  1. Regenerative Therapies for Central Nervous System Diseases: a Biomaterials Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Roger Y; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a limited capacity to spontaneously regenerate following traumatic injury or disease, requiring innovative strategies to promote tissue and functional repair. Tissue regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, have demonstrated promising results in experimental animal models, but have been difficult to translate clinically. The efficacy of cell therapy, which involves stem cell transplantation into the CNS to replace damaged tissue, has been limited due to low cell survival and integration upon transplantation, while delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS using conventional methods, such as oral and intravenous administration, have been limited by diffusion across the blood–brain/spinal cord-barrier. The use of biomaterials to promote graft survival and integration as well as localized and sustained delivery of biologics to CNS injury sites is actively being pursued. This review will highlight recent advances using biomaterials as cell- and drug-delivery vehicles for CNS repair. PMID:24002187

  2. Emerging Viral Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this review ended with a discussion of new niches for known viruses as illustrated by viral central nervous system (CNS) disease associated with organ transplant and the syndrome of human herpesvirus 6–associated posttransplant acute limbic encephalitis. In this part, we begin with a continuation of this theme, reviewing the association of JC virus–associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) with novel immunomodulatory agents. This part then continues with emerging viral infections associated with importation of infected animals (monkeypox virus), then spread of vectors and enhanced vector competence (chikungunya virus [CHIK]), and novel viruses causing CNS infections including Nipah and Hendra viruses and bat lyssaviruses (BLV). PMID:19752295

  3. Primary central nervous system lymphoma a report of nine cases.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Lokanath, D; Ramesh, C; Babu, K G; Rao, C R; Swamy, K

    1996-06-01

    Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare neoplasm of B cell origin and constitute less than 1% of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Histology is mainly of high grade and intermediate type. Although NHL is known to be highly sensitive to both irradiation and cytotoxic drugs, being a curable malignancy, the therapeutic results remain disappointing. Clinical observations on nine cases of PCNSL seen in one of the major cancer centres in India is presented in this paper. Radiotherapy combined with Chemotherapy although yielded encouraging initial response in these patients, the long term response was unsatisfactory with median survival for these patients being only 19 months. This warrants an alternative therapeutic approach to improve the dismal prognosis of PCNSL. PMID:8979473

  4. Are astrocytes executive cells within the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E; Caccuri, Roberto; Quarracino, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that astrocytes play a crucial role in the physiology of the central nervous system (CNS) by modulating synaptic activity and plasticity. Based on what is currently known we postulate that astrocytes are fundamental, along with neurons, for the information processing that takes place within the CNS. On the other hand, experimental findings and human observations signal that some of the primary degenerative diseases of the CNS, like frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, Huntington's dementia, primary cerebellar ataxias and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, all of which affect the human species exclusively, may be due to astroglial dysfunction. This hypothesis is supported by observations that demonstrated that the killing of neurons by non-neural cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of those diseases, at both their onset and their progression. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that astrocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of some psychiatric disorders as well. PMID:27556379

  5. Cysticercosis of the central nervous system: clinical and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Torrealba, G; Del Villar, S; Tagle, P; Arriagada, P; Kase, C S

    1984-01-01

    In a group of forty cases of cysticercosis of the central nervous system, 59% presented with intracranial hypertension due to obstructive hydrocephalus. Ventricular or cisternal cysts, and chronic cysticercus meningitis were the most common causes of hydrocephalus. Seizures occurred in 40% of the patients, in one-half of them in association with CT-detected parenchymatous cysts. In 20% of the cases progressive mental deterioration was the main clinical feature, at times associated with hydrocephalus. CT scan provided the highest diagnostic yield, being abnormal in 90% of cases. Long term prognosis was poor, with a mortality rate of 38% over a 40-month follow-up period. The most common cause of death (60%) was meningitis. CSF shunting is the treatment of choice for hydrocephalus, irrespective of its mechanism. Surgical resection is indicated in some cases with a single superficial (cortical) or posterior fossa cyst. Supratentorial cysts carry a relatively benign prognosis. Images PMID:6470720

  6. Rosai-Dorfman Disease of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Sus, Jose D.; Sandoval-Leon, Ana C.; Chapman, Jennifer R.; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Borja, Maria J.; Rosenberg, Shai; Lossos, Alexander; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD), also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), is an uncommon benign idiopathic lymphoproliferative disorder. The histologic hallmark of RDD is the finding of emperipolesis displayed by lesional histiocytes. While RDD most commonly affects lymph nodes, extranodal involvement of multiple organs has been reported, including the central nervous system (CNS). However, CNS involvement in RDD is rare and is not well characterized. As a result, therapeutic approaches to CNS involvement in RDD are not well established. Herein we report 6 cases of RDD with isolated CNS involvement and review the literature on RDD with CNS involvement. One of the presented cases exhibited intramedullary involvement of the spinal cord—a very rare form of RDD with CNS involvement. PMID:24797172

  7. [Role of drug transporters in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Temesszentandrási-Ambrus, Csilla; Beéry, Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of blood-brain barrier in the mammalian organisms was discovered in the early 1900s, its precise structure and the drug transporter proteins localized in the blood-brain barrier were identified only in the last decades. Beside the ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins responsible for the protection of the brain, the Solute Carrier transporters play also an important role in the function of the central nervous system by its feeding, energy supply and cleaning function during the metabolism. This review provides an overview on the main types of transporters located in the brain, on their localization in different cell types and the main techniques for their investigation. In the second part of this article various neurodegenerative disorders and the pathology-related transporter proteins are presented. In the light of recent experimental results new therapeutic strategies may come into the focus of research for the treatment of disorders currently without effective therapy. PMID:26920327

  8. Recovery from central nervous system changes following volatile substance misuse.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Kylie M; Cairney, Sheree

    2011-01-01

    This review examines cognitive, neurological, and neuroanatomical recovery associated with abstinence from volatile substance misuse (VSM). Articles describing functional or structural brain changes longitudinally or cross-sectional reports comparing current and abstinent users were identified and reviewed. A significant lack of empirical studies investigating central nervous system recovery following VSM was noted. The few case reports and group studies identified indicated that cognitive and neurological impairments appear to follow a progression of decline and progression of recovery model, with the severity of impairment related to the duration and severity of misuse, blood lead levels among leaded petrol misusers, and the duration of abstinence for recovery. By contrast, severe neurological impairment known as lead encephalopathy from sniffing leaded petrol occurred as more catastrophic or abrupt damage to cerebellar processes that may never fully recover. Neuroanatomical damage may not recover even with prolonged abstinence.

  9. Therapeutics targeting the inflammasome after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is part of the early response of the body to deal with tissue damage and infections. Because of the early nature of the innate immune inflammatory response, this inflammatory reaction represents an attractive option as a therapeutic target. The inflammasome is a component of the innate immune response involved in the activation of caspase 1 and the processing of pro-interleukin 1β. In this article, we discuss the therapeutic potential of the inflammasome after central nervous system (CNS) injury and stroke, as well as the basic knowledge we have gained so far regarding inflammasome activation in the CNS. In addition, we discuss some of the therapies available or under investigation for the treatment of brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. PMID:26024799

  10. Isolated central nervous system relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sang-Hyun; Jang, In-Seok

    2014-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of childhood cancer and may exhibit central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Advances in chemotherapy and effective CNS prophylaxis have significantly decreased the incidence of CNS relapse of ALL to 5-10%. Here, we report the case of a patient with isolated CNS relapse of standard risk group pre-B-cell type ALL in an 11-year-old girl, relapsed 3 years after successful completion of chemotherapy. An 11-year-old girl visited our hospital complaining of headache, dizziness, vomiting, and visual field defects. Neurological examination revealed left-side homonymous hemianopsia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a large irregular dural-based sulcal hematoma in the right parietal and occipital lobes. Surgery to remove the hematoma revealed the existence of hematopoietic malignancy after pathologic evaluation. Bone marrow biopsy was subsequently performed but showed no evidence of malignancy. PMID:25408936

  11. Dendrimer Advances for the Central Nervous System Delivery of Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of noninvasive treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is generally limited by the poor access of therapeutic agents into the CNS. Most CNS drugs cannot permeate into the brain parenchyma because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and overcoming this has become one of the most significant challenges in the development of CNS therapeutics. Rapid advances in nanotechnology have provided promising solutions to this challenge. This review discusses the latest applications of dendrimers in the treatment of CNS diseases with an emphasis on brain tumors. Dendrimer-mediated drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis are also reviewed. The toxicity, biodistribution, and transport mechanisms in dendrimer-mediated delivery of CNS therapeutic agents bypassing or crossing the BBB are also discussed. Future directions and major challenges of dendrimer-mediated delivery of CNS therapeutic agents are included. PMID:24274162

  12. Modulation of Tumor Tolerance in Primary Central Nervous System Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Theodore S.; Munn, David H.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system tumors take advantage of the unique immunology of the CNS and develop exquisitely complex stromal networks that promote growth despite the presence of antigen-presenting cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. It is precisely this immunological paradox that is essential to the survival of the tumor. We review the evidence for functional CNS immune privilege and the impact it has on tumor tolerance. In this paper, we place an emphasis on the role of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells in maintaining stromal and vascular quiescence, and we underscore the importance of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity as a myeloid-driven tumor tolerance mechanism. Much remains to be discovered regarding the tolerogenic mechanisms by which CNS tumors avoid immune clearance. Thus, it is an open question whether tumor tolerance in the brain is fundamentally different from that of peripheral sites of tumorigenesis or whether it simply stands as a particularly strong example of such tolerance. PMID:22312408

  13. D-serine in the developing human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Dorland, Lambertus; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G; Hendriks, Margriet; Klomp, Leo W J; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the role of D-serine in human central nervous system, we analyzed D-serine, L-serine, and glycine concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy children and children with a defective L-serine biosynthesis (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency). Healthy children showed high D-serine concentrations immediately after birth, both absolutely and relative to glycine and L-serine, declining to low values at infancy. D-Serine concentrations were almost undetectable in untreated 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase-deficient patients. In one patient treated prenatally, D-serine concentration was nearly normal at birth and the clinical phenotype was normal. These observations suggest a pivotal role for D-serine in normal and aberrant human brain development. PMID:17068790

  14. Methods for Gene Transfer to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; Bailey, Rachel M.; Wimberly, Keon; Kalburgi, Sahana N.; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene transfer is an increasingly utilized approach for research and clinical applications involving the central nervous system (CNS). Vectors for gene transfer can be as simple as an unmodified plasmid, but more commonly involve complex modifications to viruses to make them suitable gene delivery vehicles. This chapter will explain how tools for CNS gene transfer have been derived from naturally occurring viruses. The current capabilities of plasmid, retroviral, adeno-associated virus, adenovirus, and herpes simplex virus vectors for CNS gene delivery will be described. These include both focal and global CNS gene transfer strategies, with short- or long-term gene expression. As is described in this chapter, an important aspect of any vector is the cis-acting regulatory elements incorporated into the vector genome that control when, where, and how the transgene is expressed. PMID:25311922

  15. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we ‘go pale with fright’. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  16. [Malignant lymphoma in the central nervous system: overview].

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Michito

    2014-08-01

    Malignant lymphoma can affect the central nervous system (CNS) in three different ways: as a consequence (relapse or invasion) of systemic lymphoma, as a primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) without systemic involvement, and through intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL). It is essential to distinguish PCNSL from the others, since the therapeutic strategy for treating this disease differs. FDG-PET/CT fusion imagery is a powerful tool for detecting systemic lesions. If a marked elevation of lactate dehydrogenase and the soluble IL-2 receptor suggests IVL, a random skin biopsy can permit a differential diagnosis. It is not certain why PCNSL occurs solely in the CNS, where there is no lymphatic system. The special environment, so-called "sanctuary site", where is free from attack of the immune system and penetration of chemotherapeutic agents by blood-brain barrier is deeply related to malignant transformation. The prognoses for patients with CNS invasion of systemic lymphoma and those with PCNSL remain bleak in the post-rituximab era. Over half of the patients who received high-dose methotrexate will subsequently relapse. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are earnestly sought.

  17. Central Nervous System Control of Voice and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review of the central nervous control systems for voice and swallowing has suggested that the traditional concepts of a separation between cortical and limbic and brain stem control should be refined and more integrative. For voice production, a separation of the non-human vocalization system from the human learned voice production system has been posited based primarily on studies of non-human primates. However, recent humans studies of emotionally based vocalizations and human volitional voice production has shown more integration between these two systems than previously proposed. Recent human studies have shown that reflexive vocalization as well as learned voice production not involving speech, involve a common integrative system. On the other hand, recent studies of non-human primates have provided evidence of some cortical activity during vocalization and cortical changes with training during vocal behavior. For swallowing, evidence from the macaque and functional brain imaging in humans indicates that the control for the pharyngeal phase of swallowing is not primarily under brain stem mechanisms as previously proposed. Studies suggest that the initiation and patterning of swallowing for the pharyngeal phase is also under active cortical control for both spontaneous as well as volitional swallowing in awake humans and non-human primates. PMID:26241238

  18. Connexin32 expression in central and peripheral nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Deschenes, S.M.; Scherer, S.S.; Fischbeck, K.H.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations have been identified in the gap junction gene, connexin32 (Cx32), in patients affected with the X-linked form of the demyelinating neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX). Gap junctions composed of Cx32 are present and developmentally regulated in a wide variety of tissues. In peripheral nerve, our immunohistochemical analysis localized Cx32 to the noncompacted myelin of the paranodal regions and the Schmidt-Lantermann incisures, where previous studies describe gap junctions. In contrast to the location of Cx32 in peripheral nerve and the usual restriction of clinical manifestations to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (abstract by Paulson describes an exception), preliminary studies show that Cx32 is present in the compacted myelin of the central nervous system (CNS), as demonstrated by radial staining through the myelin sheath of oligodendrocytes in rat spinal cord. Analysis of Cx32 expression in various regions of rat CNS during development shows that the amount of Cx32 mRNA and protein increases as myelination increases, a pattern observed for other myelin genes. Studies in the PNS provide additional evidence that Cx32 and myelin genes are coordinately regulated at the transcriptional level; Cx32 and peripheral myelin gene PMP-22 mRNAs are expressed in parallel following transient or permanent nerve injury. Differences in post-translational regulation of Cx32 in the CNS and PNS may be indicated by the presence of a faster migrating form of Cs32 in cerebrum versus peripheral nerve. Studies are currently underway to determine the unique role of Cx32 in peripheral nerve.

  19. The role of microbiome in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals live in a co-evolutionary association with the plethora of microorganisms that reside at a variety of tissue microenvironments. The microbiome represents the collective genomes of these co-existing microorganisms, which is shaped by host factors such as genetics and nutrients but in turn is able to influence host biology in health and disease. Niche-specific microbiome, prominently the gut microbiome, has the capacity to effect both local and distal sites within the host. The gut microbiome has played a crucial role in the bidirectional gut-brain axis that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities, and thus the concept of microbiome-gut-brain axis is emerging. Studies are revealing how diverse forms of neuro-immune and neuro-psychiatric disorders are correlated with or modulated by variations of microbiome, microbiota-derived products and exogenous antibiotics and probiotics. The microbiome poises the peripheral immune homeostasis and predisposes host susceptibility to CNS autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Neural, endocrine and metabolic mechanisms are also critical mediators of the microbiome-CNS signaling, which are more involved in neuro-psychiatric disorders such as autism, depression, anxiety, stress. Research on the role of microbiome in CNS disorders deepens our academic knowledge about host-microbiome commensalism in central regulation and in practicality, holds conceivable promise for developing novel prognostic and therapeutic avenues for CNS disorders. PMID:24370461

  20. The role of microbiome in central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-05-01

    Mammals live in a co-evolutionary association with the plethora of microorganisms that reside at a variety of tissue microenvironments. The microbiome represents the collective genomes of these co-existing microorganisms, which is shaped by host factors such as genetics and nutrients but in turn is able to influence host biology in health and disease. Niche-specific microbiome, prominently the gut microbiome, has the capacity to effect both local and distal sites within the host. The gut microbiome has played a crucial role in the bidirectional gut-brain axis that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities, and thus the concept of microbiome-gut-brain axis is emerging. Studies are revealing how diverse forms of neuro-immune and neuro-psychiatric disorders are correlated with or modulated by variations of microbiome, microbiota-derived products and exogenous antibiotics and probiotics. The microbiome poises the peripheral immune homeostasis and predisposes host susceptibility to CNS autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Neural, endocrine and metabolic mechanisms are also critical mediators of the microbiome-CNS signaling, which are more involved in neuro-psychiatric disorders such as autism, depression, anxiety, stress. Research on the role of microbiome in CNS disorders deepens our academic knowledge about host-microbiome commensalism in central regulation and in practicality, holds conceivable promise for developing novel prognostic and therapeutic avenues for CNS disorders.

  1. Synthesis, accumulation, and release of D-aspartate in the Aplysia californica central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Scanlan, Cory; Shi, Ting; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an endogenous molecule that is often detected in central nervous system and endocrine tissues. Using capillary electrophoresis and a variety of radionuclide detection techniques, we examine the synthesis, release, and uptake/accumulation of D-Asp in the central nervous system of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. We observe the preferential synthesis and accumulation of D-Asp over L-aspartate (L-Asp) in neuron-containing ganglia compared to surrounding sheath tissues. Little conversion of D-Asp to L-Asp is detected. The Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and elevated extracellular potassium stimulates release of D-Asp from the cerebral ganglia. Lastly, radioactive D-Asp in the extracellular media is efficiently taken up and accumulated by individual F-cluster neurons. These observations point to a role for D-Asp in cell-to-cell signaling with many characteristics similar to classical transmitters. PMID:20874765

  2. 3D in vitro modeling of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Amy M; DeSimone, Elise; Chwalek, Karolina; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-01

    There are currently more than 600 diseases characterized as affecting the central nervous system (CNS) which inflict neural damage. Unfortunately, few of these conditions have effective treatments available. Although significant efforts have been put into developing new therapeutics, drugs which were promising in the developmental phase have high attrition rates in late stage clinical trials. These failures could be circumvented if current 2D in vitro and in vivo models were improved. 3D, tissue-engineered in vitro systems can address this need and enhance clinical translation through two approaches: (1) bottom-up, and (2) top-down (developmental/regenerative) strategies to reproduce the structure and function of human tissues. Critical challenges remain including biomaterials capable of matching the mechanical properties and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of neural tissues, compartmentalized scaffolds that support heterogeneous tissue architectures reflective of brain organization and structure, and robust functional assays for in vitro tissue validation. The unique design parameters defined by the complex physiology of the CNS for construction and validation of 3D in vitro neural systems are reviewed here.

  3. 3D in vitro modeling of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Amy M.; DeSimone, Elise; Chwalek, Karolina; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    There are currently more than 600 diseases characterized as affecting the central nervous system (CNS) which inflict neural damage. Unfortunately, few of these conditions have effective treatments available. Although significant efforts have been put into developing new therapeutics, drugs which were promising in the developmental phase have high attrition rates in late stage clinical trials. These failures could be circumvented if current 2D in vitro and in vivo models were improved. 3D, tissue-engineered in vitro systems can address this need and enhance clinical translation through two approaches: (1) bottom-up, and (2) top-down (developmental/regenerative) strategies to reproduce the structure and function of human tissues. Critical challenges remain including biomaterials capable of matching the mechanical properties and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of neural tissues, compartmentalized scaffolds that support heterogeneous tissue architectures reflective of brain organization and structure, and robust functional assays for in vitro tissue validation. The unique design parameters defined by the complex physiology of the CNS for construction and validation of 3D in vitro neural systems are reviewed here. PMID:25461688

  4. Chemotherapy in newly diagnosed primary central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Sadraei, Nooshin; Peereboom, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) accounts for only 3% of brain tumors. It can involve the brain parenchyma, leptomeninges, eyes and the spinal cord. Unlike systemic lymphoma, durable remissions remain uncommon. Although phase III trials in this rare disease are difficult to perform, many phase II trials have attempted to define standards of care. Treatment modalities for patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL include radiation and/or chemotherapy. While the role of radiation therapy for initial management of PCNSL is controversial, clinical trials will attempt to improve the therapeutic index of this modality. Routes of chemotherapy administration include intravenous, intraocular, intraventricular or intra-arterial. Multiple trials have outlined different methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens and have used local techniques to improve drug delivery. A major challenge in the management of patients with PCNSL remains the delivery of aggressive treatment with preservation of neurocognitive function. Because PCNSL is rare, it is important to perform multicenter clinical trials and to incorporate detailed measurements of long-term toxicities. In this review we focus on different chemotherapeutic approaches for immunocompetent patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL and discuss the role of local drug delivery in addition to systemic therapy. We also address the neurocognitive toxicity of treatment. PMID:21789140

  5. Antiretroviral Therapy and Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Price, Richard W.; Spudich, Serena

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) HIV-1 infection begins during primary viremia and continues throughout the course of untreated systemic infection. While frequently accompanied by local inflammatory reactions detectable in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), CNS HIV-1 infection is not usually clinically apparent. In a minority of patients, CNS HIV-1 infection evolves late in the course of systemic infection into encephalitis, which compromises brain function and presents clinically as AIDS dementia complex (ADC). Combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a major impact on all aspects of HIV-1 CNS infection and disease. In those with asymptomatic infection, HAART usually effectively suppresses CSF HIV-1 and markedly reduces the incidence of symptomatic ADC. In those presenting with ADC, HAART characteristically prevents neurological progression and leads to variable, and at times substantial, recovery. Treatment has similarly reduced CNS opportunistic infections. With better control of these severe disorders, attention has turned to the possible consequences of chronic silent infection, and the issue of whether indolent, low-grade brain injury might require earlier treatment intervention. PMID:18447615

  6. Evolution of bilaterian central nervous systems: a single origin?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether the ancestral bilaterian had a central nervous system (CNS) or a diffuse ectodermal nervous system has been hotly debated. Considerable evidence supports the theory that a CNS evolved just once. However, an alternative view proposes that the chordate CNS evolved from the ectodermal nerve net of a hemichordate-like ancestral deuterostome, implying independent evolution of the CNS in chordates and protostomes. To specify morphological divisions along the anterior/posterior axis, this ancestor used gene networks homologous to those patterning three organizing centers in the vertebrate brain: the anterior neural ridge, the zona limitans intrathalamica and the isthmic organizer, and subsequent evolution of the vertebrate brain involved elaboration of these ancestral signaling centers; however, all or part of these signaling centers were lost from the CNS of invertebrate chordates. The present review analyzes the evidence for and against these theories. The bulk of the evidence indicates that a CNS evolved just once – in the ancestral bilaterian. Importantly, in both protostomes and deuterostomes, the CNS represents a portion of a generally neurogenic ectoderm that is internalized and receives and integrates inputs from sensory cells in the remainder of the ectoderm. The expression patterns of genes involved in medio/lateral (dorso/ventral) patterning of the CNS are similar in protostomes and chordates; however, these genes are not similarly expressed in the ectoderm outside the CNS. Thus, their expression is a better criterion for CNS homologs than the expression of anterior/posterior patterning genes, many of which (for example, Hox genes) are similarly expressed both in the CNS and in the remainder of the ectoderm in many bilaterians. The evidence leaves hemichordates in an ambiguous position – either CNS centralization was lost to some extent at the base of the hemichordates, or even earlier, at the base of the hemichordates

  7. Evolution of centralized nervous systems: two schools of evolutionary thought.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, R Glenn

    2012-06-26

    Understanding the evolution of centralized nervous systems requires an understanding of metazoan phylogenetic interrelationships, their fossil record, the variation in their cephalic neural characters, and the development of these characters. Each of these topics involves comparative approaches, and both cladistic and phenetic methodologies have been applied. Our understanding of metazoan phylogeny has increased greatly with the cladistic analysis of molecular data, and relaxed molecular clocks generally date the origin of bilaterians at 600-700 Mya (during the Ediacaran). Although the taxonomic affinities of the Ediacaran biota remain uncertain, a conservative interpretation suggests that a number of these taxa form clades that are closely related, if not stem clades of bilaterian crown clades. Analysis of brain-body complexity among extant bilaterians indicates that diffuse nerve nets and possibly, ganglionated cephalic neural systems existed in Ediacaran organisms. An outgroup analysis of cephalic neural characters among extant metazoans also indicates that the last common bilaterian ancestor possessed a diffuse nerve plexus and that brains evolved independently at least four times. In contrast, the hypothesis of a tripartite brain, based primarily on phenetic analysis of developmental genetic data, indicates that the brain arose in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Hopefully, this debate will be resolved by cladistic analysis of the genomes of additional taxa and an increased understanding of character identity genetic networks.

  8. Evolution of centralized nervous systems: Two schools of evolutionary thought

    PubMed Central

    Northcutt, R. Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of centralized nervous systems requires an understanding of metazoan phylogenetic interrelationships, their fossil record, the variation in their cephalic neural characters, and the development of these characters. Each of these topics involves comparative approaches, and both cladistic and phenetic methodologies have been applied. Our understanding of metazoan phylogeny has increased greatly with the cladistic analysis of molecular data, and relaxed molecular clocks generally date the origin of bilaterians at 600–700 Mya (during the Ediacaran). Although the taxonomic affinities of the Ediacaran biota remain uncertain, a conservative interpretation suggests that a number of these taxa form clades that are closely related, if not stem clades of bilaterian crown clades. Analysis of brain–body complexity among extant bilaterians indicates that diffuse nerve nets and possibly, ganglionated cephalic neural systems existed in Ediacaran organisms. An outgroup analysis of cephalic neural characters among extant metazoans also indicates that the last common bilaterian ancestor possessed a diffuse nerve plexus and that brains evolved independently at least four times. In contrast, the hypothesis of a tripartite brain, based primarily on phenetic analysis of developmental genetic data, indicates that the brain arose in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Hopefully, this debate will be resolved by cladistic analysis of the genomes of additional taxa and an increased understanding of character identity genetic networks. PMID:22723354

  9. Primary Central Nervous System Anaplastic Large T-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Splavski, Bruno; Muzevic, Dario; Ladenhauser-Palijan, Tatjana; Jr, Brano Splavski

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) of T-cell origin is an exceptionally rare, highly malignant intracranial neoplasm. Although such a tumor typically presents with a focal mass lesion. Case report: Past medical history of a 26-year-old male patient with a PCNS lymphoma of T-cell origin was not suggestive of intracranial pathology or any disorder of other organs and organic systems. To achieve a gross total tumor resection, surgery was performed via osteoplastic craniotomy using the left frontal transcortical transventricular approach. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tissue removed described tumor as anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cells (T-ALCL). Postoperative and neurological recovery was complete, while control imaging of the brain showed no signs of residual tumor at a six-month follow-up. The patient, who did not appear immunocompromized, was referred to a hematologist and an oncologist where corticosteroids, the particular chemotherapeutic protocol and irradiation therapy were applied. Conclusion: Since PCNS lymphoma is a potentially curable brain tumor, we believe that proper selection of the management options, including early radical tumor resection for solitary PCNS lymphoma, may be proposed as a major treatment of such a tumor in selected patients, resulting in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27703297

  10. Equine laryngeal hemiplegia. Part V. Central nervous system pathology.

    PubMed

    Cahill, J I; Goulden, B E

    1986-11-01

    Evidence of long central nerve fibre degeneration (axonal spheroids) in the lateral cuneate nuclei was found in all eight Thoroughbreds affected clinically and subclinically with equine laryngeal hemiplegia, but in only one of six control animals. It was considered that these spheroids may signify a central nervous component of the disease process of laryngeal hemiplegia although until further investigations are performed no firm conclusions regarding the relationship of these findings with laryngeal hemiplegia could be made. Examination of the left and right nucleus ambiguus of clinical and subclinical laryngeal hemiplegic horses revealed no pathological alterations.

  11. Clinical epidemiology for childhood primary central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Palenzuela, Gilles; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Moritz, Jorge; Puget, Stéphanie; Bauchet, Fabienne; Pallusseau, Lorelei; Duffau, Hugues; Coubes, Philippe; Trétarre, Brigitte; Labrousse, François; Dhellemmes, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    This work was conducted by the French Brain Tumor Data Bank (FBTDB) and aims to prospectively record all primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST), in France, for which histological diagnosis is available. Results concerning children are presented. This study analyzes the childhood cases (0-19 years) of newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed PCNST (during the years 2004-2006) which have been recorded by the FBTDB. All French neuropathology and neurosurgery departments participated in this program. Neurosurgeons and neuropathologists completed a data file containing socio-demographic, clinical, radiologic and anatomopathologic information. The Tumor Registry from Herault was authorized to compile the data files with personal identifiers. About 1,017 cases (533 boys and 484 girls) of newly diagnosed childhood PCNST have been recorded (gliomas: 52%, all other neuroepithelial tumors: 31%, craniopharyngioma: 5%, germ cell tumors, meningioma and neurinoma: approximately 3% each, all histological subtypes have been detailed). Tumor resections were performed in 83.3%, and biopsies in 16.7%. The distributions by histology, cryopreservation of the samples, age, sex, tumor site and surgery have been detailed. To our knowledge, this work is the first databank in Europe dedicated to PCNST that includes the collection of clinical, radiological and histological data (including cryopreservation of the specimen). The long term goals of the FBTDB are to create a national registry and a network to perform epidemiological studies, to implement clinical and basic research protocols, and to evaluate and harmonize the healthcare of children and adult patients affected by PCNST. PMID:19020806

  12. Central nervous system bleeding in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Zanon, E; Sottilotta, G; Consonni, D; Castaman, G; Mikovic, D; Biondo, F; Tagliaferri, A; Iorio, A; Mannucci, P M; Peyvandi, F

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) bleeding is one of the most severe and debilitating manifestations occurring in patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs). The aim of this study was to retrospectively collect data on patients affected with RBDs who had CNS bleeding, to establish incidence of recurrence, death rate, neurological sequences, most frequent location, type of bleeding and efficacy of treatments. Results pertained to 36 CNS bleeding episodes in 24 patients with severe deficiency except one with moderate factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Six patients (25%) experienced a recurrence and two had more than one recurrence. Seven patients (29%) had an early onset of CNS bleeding before the first 2 years of life, others (71%) later in life. In 76% of cases, CNS bleeding was spontaneous. CNS bleeding was intracerebral in 19 cases (53%), extracerebral in 10 (28%) and both intracerebral and extracerebral in two cases (6%). Neurosurgery was performed in 11 cases, in association with replacement therapy in seven cases. Seizures were noted in four patients. Residual psychomotor abnormalities were seen in two patients. No death was recorded. To prevent recurrence, 17/24 patients (71%) were put on secondary prophylaxis. In conclusion, recurrence of CNS bleeding was confirmed to be relatively frequent in patients with severe FV, FX, FVII and FXIII deficiencies. Most patients were managed with replacement therapy alone, surgery being reserved for those with worsening neurological conditions. Our results indicate that some RBDs require early prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS bleeding. Optimal dosage and frequency of treatment need further evaluation.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  14. Comprehensive Craniospinal Radiation for Controlling Central Nervous System Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Shihadeh, Ferial; Kantarjian, Hagop; Allen, Pamela; Rondon, Gabriela; Kebriaei, Partow; O'Brien, Susan; Kedir, Aziza; Said, Mustefa; Grant, Jonathan D.; Thomas, Deborah A.; Gidley, Paul W.; Arzu, Isidora; Pinnix, Chelsea; Reed, Valerie; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the benefit of radiation therapy (RT) in resolution of neurologic symptoms and deficits and whether the type of RT fields influences central nervous system (CNS) control in adults with CNS leukemia. Methods and Materials: A total of 163 adults from 1996 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Potential associations between use of radiation and outcome were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The median survival time was 3.8 months after RT. Common presenting symptoms were headache in 79 patients (49%), cranial nerve VII deficit in 46 (28%), and cranial nerve II deficit in 44 (27%). RT was delivered to the base of skull in 48 patients (29%), to the whole brain (WB) in 67 (41%), and to the craniospinal axis (CS) in 48 (29%). Among 149 patients with a total of 233 deficits, resolution was observed in 34 deficits (15%), improvement in 126 deficits (54%), stability in 34 deficits (15%), and progression in 39 deficits (17%). The 12-month CNS progression-free survival was 77% among those receiving CS/WB and 51% among those receiving base of skull RT (P=.02). On multivariate analysis, patients who did not undergo stem cell transplantation after RT and base of skull RT were associated with worse CNS progression-free survival. Conclusions: Improvement or resolution of symptoms occurred in two thirds of deficits after RT. Comprehensive radiation to the WB or CS seems to offer a better outcome, especially in isolated CNS involvement.

  15. Nanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ajetunmobi, A; Prina-Mello, A; Volkov, Y; Corvin, A; Tropea, D

    2014-12-01

    The impact of central nervous system (CNS) disorders on the human population is significant, contributing almost €800 billion in annual European healthcare costs. These disorders not only have a disabling social impact but also a crippling economic drain on resources. Developing novel therapeutic strategies for these disorders requires a better understanding of events that underlie mechanisms of neural circuit physiology. Studying the relationship between genetic expression, synapse development and circuit physiology in CNS function is a challenging task, involving simultaneous analysis of multiple parameters and the convergence of several disciplines and technological approaches. However, current gold-standard techniques used to study the CNS have limitations that pose unique challenges to furthering our understanding of functional CNS development. The recent advancement in nanotechnologies for biomedical applications has seen the emergence of nanoscience as a key enabling technology for delivering a translational bridge between basic and clinical research. In particular, the development of neuroimaging and electrophysiology tools to identify the aetiology and progression of CNS disorders have led to new insights in our understanding of CNS physiology and the development of novel diagnostic modalities for therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the latest applications of these nanotechnologies for investigating CNS function and the improved diagnosis of CNS disorders.

  16. Clinical proton MR spectroscopy in central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Oz, Gülin; Alger, Jeffry R; Barker, Peter B; Bartha, Robert; Bizzi, Alberto; Boesch, Chris; Bolan, Patrick J; Brindle, Kevin M; Cudalbu, Cristina; Dinçer, Alp; Dydak, Ulrike; Emir, Uzay E; Frahm, Jens; González, Ramón Gilberto; Gruber, Stephan; Gruetter, Rolf; Gupta, Rakesh K; Heerschap, Arend; Henning, Anke; Hetherington, Hoby P; Howe, Franklyn A; Hüppi, Petra S; Hurd, Ralph E; Kantarci, Kantarci; Klomp, Dennis W J; Kreis, Roland; Kruiskamp, Marijn J; Leach, Martin O; Lin, Alexander P; Luijten, Peter R; Marjańska, Malgorzata; Maudsley, Andrew A; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Mountford, Carolyn E; Nelson, Sarah J; Pamir, M Necmettin; Pan, Jullie W; Peet, Andrew C; Poptani, Harish; Posse, Stefan; Pouwels, Petra J W; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Ross, Brian D; Scheenen, Tom W; Schuster, Christian; Smith, Ian C P; Soher, Brian J; Tkáč, Ivan; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2014-03-01

    A large body of published work shows that proton (hydrogen 1 [(1)H]) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy has evolved from a research tool into a clinical neuroimaging modality. Herein, the authors present a summary of brain disorders in which MR spectroscopy has an impact on patient management, together with a critical consideration of common data acquisition and processing procedures. The article documents the impact of (1)H MR spectroscopy in the clinical evaluation of disorders of the central nervous system. The clinical usefulness of (1)H MR spectroscopy has been established for brain neoplasms, neonatal and pediatric disorders (hypoxia-ischemia, inherited metabolic diseases, and traumatic brain injury), demyelinating disorders, and infectious brain lesions. The growing list of disorders for which (1)H MR spectroscopy may contribute to patient management extends to neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, and stroke. To facilitate expanded clinical acceptance and standardization of MR spectroscopy methodology, guidelines are provided for data acquisition and analysis, quality assessment, and interpretation. Finally, the authors offer recommendations to expedite the use of robust MR spectroscopy methodology in the clinical setting, including incorporation of technical advances on clinical units.

  17. Central nervous system-specific knockout of steroidogenic factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L

    2009-03-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a nuclear receptor that plays important roles in the hypothalamus-pituitary-steroidogenic organ axis. Global knockout studies in mice revealed the essential in vivo roles of SF-1 in the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus, adrenal glands, and gonads. One limitation of global SF-1 knockout mice is their early postnatal death from adrenocortical insufficiency. To overcome limitations of the global knockout mice and to delineate the roles of SF-1 in the brain, we used Cre/loxP recombination technology to genetically ablate SF-1 specifically in the central nervous system (CNS). Mice with CNS-specific knockout of SF-1 mediated by nestin-Cre showed increased anxiety-like behavior, revealing a crucial role of SF-1 in a complex behavioral phenotype. Our studies with CNS-specific SF-1 KO mice also defined roles of SF-1 in regulating the VMH expression of target genes implicated in anxiety and energy homeostasis. Therefore, this review will focus on our recent studies defining the functional roles of SF-1 in the VMH linked to anxiety and energy homeostasis.

  18. Whole-central nervous system functional imaging in larval Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lemon, William C; Pulver, Stefan R; Höckendorf, Burkhard; McDole, Katie; Branson, Kristin; Freeman, Jeremy; Keller, Philipp J

    2015-08-11

    Understanding how the brain works in tight concert with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) hinges upon knowledge of coordinated activity patterns across the whole CNS. We present a method for measuring activity in an entire, non-transparent CNS with high spatiotemporal resolution. We combine a light-sheet microscope capable of simultaneous multi-view imaging at volumetric speeds 25-fold faster than the state-of-the-art, a whole-CNS imaging assay for the isolated Drosophila larval CNS and a computational framework for analysing multi-view, whole-CNS calcium imaging data. We image both brain and ventral nerve cord, covering the entire CNS at 2 or 5 Hz with two- or one-photon excitation, respectively. By mapping network activity during fictive behaviours and quantitatively comparing high-resolution whole-CNS activity maps across individuals, we predict functional connections between CNS regions and reveal neurons in the brain that identify type and temporal state of motor programs executed in the ventral nerve cord.

  19. Growth Cone Biomechanics in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Koch, Daniel; Rosoff, Will; Geller, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of an axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth-cone mediated guidance. We have investigated neurite outgrowth, traction forces and cytoskeletal substrate coupling on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that the biomechanics of DRG neurons are dramatically different from hippocampal, with DRG neurons displaying relatively large, steady traction forces and maximal outgrowth and forces on substrates of intermediate stiffness, while hippocampal neurons display weak, intermittent forces and limited dependence of outgrowth and forces on substrate stiffness. DRG growth cones have slower rates of retrograde actin flow and higher density of localized paxillin (a protein associated with substrate adhesion complexes) compared to hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate coupling in DRG growth cones.

  20. Decoding transcriptional repressor complexes in the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Megumi; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2014-05-01

    Cells maintain precise gene expression by balancing transcriptional activation and repression. While much work has focused on elucidating transcriptional activation in the central nervous system (CNS), little is known about transcriptional repression. One means to repress gene expression is to initiate binding of transcription factors to DNA, which then recruit co-repressors as well as other accessory proteins, forming a multi-protein repressor complex. These multi-protein repressor complexes include histone modifying enzymes that trigger processes such as histone acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitylation, altering chromatin structures to impact gene expression. Within these complexes transcriptional repressor proteins per se do not exhibit enzymatic reactions to remodel chromatin structure, whereas histone modifying enzymes lack intrinsic DNA binding activity but have an ability to process post-translational modifications on histones. Thus, the mutual association between transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes is essential to sculpt chromatin to favor transcriptional repression and down regulate gene expression. Additionally, co-repressors are integral components in the context of gene repression as they bridge the association of transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes. In this review, we will discuss the roles of some of the major components of these repressor complex in the CNS as well as their cellular functions that may underlie fundamental behavior in animals.

  1. Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Drevets, Douglas A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Greenfield, Ronald A.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is a severe and frequently fatal event during the course of many diseases caused by microbes with predominantly intracellular life cycles. Examples of these include the facultative intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Brucella and Salmonella spp. and obligate intracellular microbes of the Rickettsiaceae family and Tropheryma whipplei. Unfortunately, the mechanisms used by intracellular bacterial pathogens to enter the CNS are less well known than those used by bacterial pathogens with an extracellular life cycle. The goal of this review is to elaborate on the means by which intracellular bacterial pathogens establish infection within the CNS. This review encompasses the clinical and pathological findings that pertain to the CNS infection in humans and includes experimental data from animal models that illuminate how these microbes enter the CNS. Recent experimental data showing that L. monocytogenes can invade the CNS by more than one mechanism make it a useful model for discussing the various routes for neuroinvasion used by intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:15084504

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antiretrovirals in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    HIV-positive patients may be effectively treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and such a strategy is associated with striking immune recovery and viral load reduction to very low levels. Despite undeniable results, the central nervous system (CNS) is commonly affected during the course of HIV infection, with neurocognitive disorders being as prevalent as 20-50 % of treated subjects. This review discusses the pathophysiology of CNS infection by HIV and the barriers to efficacious control of such a mechanism, including the available data on compartmental drug penetration and on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. In the reviewed articles, a high variability in drug transfer to the CNS is highlighted with several mechanisms as well as methodological issues potentially influencing the observed results. Nevirapine and zidovudine showed the highest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to plasma ratios, although target concentrations are currently unknown for the CNS. The use of the composite CSF concentration effectiveness score has been associated with better virological outcomes (lower HIV RNA) but has been inconsistently associated with neurocognitive outcomes. These findings support the CNS effectiveness of commonly used highly antiretroviral therapies. The use of antiretroviral drugs with increased CSF penetration and/or effectiveness in treating or preventing neurocognitive disorders however needs to be assessed in well-designed prospective studies.

  3. Eosinophilic vasculitis in an isolated central nervous system distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, R Brian; Noble, James M; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Delapaz, Robert; Wright, Clinton B

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic vasculitis has been described as part of the Churg–Strauss syndrome, but affects the central nervous system (CNS) in <10% of cases. A 39-year-old woman with a history of migraine without aura presented to an institution in an acute confusional state with concurrent headache and left-sided weakness. Laboratory evaluation showed an increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein level, but otherwise unremarkable serologies. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bifrontal polar gyral-enhancing brain lesions. Her symptoms resolved over two weeks without residual deficits. Eighteen months later the patient presented with similar symptoms and neuroradiological findings showed involvement of territories different from those in her first episode. Brain biopsy showed transmural, predominantly eosinophilic, inflammatory infiltrates and fibrinoid necrosis without granulomas. She improved when treated with corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the first case of non-granulomatous eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. No aetiology for this patient’s primary CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has yet been identified. PMID:21686608

  4. Hydrogels Derived from Central Nervous System Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Medberry, Christopher J.; Crapo, Peter M.; Siu, Bernard F.; Carruthers, Christopher A.; Wolf, Matthew T.; Nagarkar, Shailesh P.; Agrawal, Vineet; Jones, Kristen E.; Kelly, Jeremy; Johnson, Scott A.; Velankar, Sachin S.; Watkins, Simon C.; Modo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) are commonly used repair devices in preclinical and clinical settings; however the use of these scaffolds for peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) repair has been limited. Biologic scaffolds developed from brain and spinal cord tissue have recently been described, yet the conformation of the harvested ECM limits therapeutic utility. An injectable CNS-ECM derived hydrogel capable of in vivo polymerization and conformation to irregular lesion geometries may aid in tissue reconstruction efforts following complex neurologic trauma. The objectives of the present study were to develop hydrogel forms of brain and spinal cord ECM and compare the resulting biochemical composition, mechanical properties, and neurotrophic potential of a brain derived cell line to a non-CNS-ECM hydrogel, urinary bladder matrix. Results showed distinct differences between compositions of brain ECM, spinal cord ECM, and urinary bladder matrix. The rheologic modulus of spinal cord ECM hydrogel was greater than that of brain ECM and urinary bladder matrix. All ECMs increased the number of cells expressing neurites, but only brain ECM increased neurite length, suggesting a possible tissue-specific effect. All hydrogels promoted three-dimensional uni- or bi-polar neurite outgrowth following 7 days in culture. These results suggest that CNS-ECM hydrogels may provide supportive scaffolding to promote in vivo axonal repair. PMID:23158935

  5. [Dementia in Patients with Central Nervous System Mycosis].

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiko; Ishihara, Masaki; Konno, Michiko

    2016-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) mycosis is a potentially life-threatening but treatable neurological emergency. CNS mycoses progress slowly and are sometimes difficult to distinguish from dementia. Though most patients with CNS mycosis have an underlying disease, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and/or use of immunosuppressants, cryptococcosis can occur in non-immunosuppressed persons. One of the major difficulties in accurate diagnosis is to detect the pathogen in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures. Thus, the clinical diagnosis is often made by combining circumstantial evidence, including mononuclear cell-dominant pleocytosis with low glucose and protein elevation in the CSF, as well as positive results from an antigen-based assay and a (1-3)-beta-D-glucan assay using plasma and/or CSF. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostics, which are not performed as routine examinations and are mostly performed as part of academic research in Japan, are sensitive tools for the early diagnosis of CNS mycosis. Mognetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to assess the complications of fungal meningitis, such as abscess, infarction, and hydrocephalus. Clinicians should realize the advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic tools. Early and accurate diagnosis, including identification of the particular fungal species, enables optimal antifungal treatment that produces good outcomes in patients with CNS mycosis.

  6. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of Central Nervous System: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Yang, Kook Hee; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Kie, Jeong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, especially in the central nervous system (CNS). Reported herein is a case of SFT of CNS in a 63-year-old female patient who had confused mentality, without other neurological deficit. The brain MRI showed an ovoid mass in the right frontal lobe. The tumor was surgically removed grossly and totally, and the pathologic diagnosis was SFT. At 55 months after the surgery, the tumor recurred at the primary site and at an adjacent area. A second operation was thus done, and the tumor was again surgically removed grossly and totally. The pathologic diagnosis was the same as the previous, but the Ki-67 index was elevated. Ten months later, two small recurring tumors in the right frontal skull base were found in the follow-up MRI. It was decided that radiation therapy be done, and MRI was done again 3 months later. In the follow-up MRI, the size of the recurring mass was found to have decreased, and the patient did not manifest any significant symptom. Follow-up will again be done 18 months after the second surgery.

  7. Is schizophrenia the price of human central nervous system complexity?

    PubMed

    Dean, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is evidence to support the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a human-specific disorder associated with the need for highly complex central nervous system (CNS) development. A review was therefore undertaken of published literature relevant to the identification of human-specific CNS development. There was no clear evidence found at the macroscopic, microscopic or molecular level that suggests unique changes have occurred in the evolution of the human CNS. Rather, highly significant changes in the size of the frontal lobe, increases in numbers of specific cell types, changes in gene expression and changes in genome sequence all seem to be involved in the evolution of the human CNS. Human-specific changes in CNS development are wide ranging. The modification in CNS structure and function that has resulted from these changes affects many pathways and behaviours that appear to be also affected in subjects with schizophrenia. Therefore there is evidence to support the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a disease that develops because of derangements to human-specific CNS functions that have emerged since our species diverged from non-human primates. PMID:19085524

  8. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of Central Nervous System: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Yang, Kook Hee; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Kie, Jeong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, especially in the central nervous system (CNS). Reported herein is a case of SFT of CNS in a 63-year-old female patient who had confused mentality, without other neurological deficit. The brain MRI showed an ovoid mass in the right frontal lobe. The tumor was surgically removed grossly and totally, and the pathologic diagnosis was SFT. At 55 months after the surgery, the tumor recurred at the primary site and at an adjacent area. A second operation was thus done, and the tumor was again surgically removed grossly and totally. The pathologic diagnosis was the same as the previous, but the Ki-67 index was elevated. Ten months later, two small recurring tumors in the right frontal skull base were found in the follow-up MRI. It was decided that radiation therapy be done, and MRI was done again 3 months later. In the follow-up MRI, the size of the recurring mass was found to have decreased, and the patient did not manifest any significant symptom. Follow-up will again be done 18 months after the second surgery. PMID:26605270

  9. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy. PMID:24937778

  10. Anticholinergics for overactive bladder therapy: central nervous system effects.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael; Boone, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    The mainstay of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is anticholinergic therapy using muscarinic receptor antagonists (tertiary or quaternary amines). Muscarinic receptors in the brain play an important role in cognitive function, and there is growing awareness that antimuscarinic OAB drugs may have adverse central nervous system (CNS) effects, ranging from headache to cognitive impairment and episodes of psychosis. This review discusses the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of OAB antimuscarinics that affect their propensity to cause adverse CNS effects, as observed in phase III clinical trials and in specific investigations on cognitive function and sleep architecture. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for "OAB" plus "muscarinic antagonists" or "anticholinergic drug." Additional relevant literature was identified by examining the reference lists of papers identified through the search. Preclinical and clinical trials in adults were assessed, focusing on the OAB antimuscarinics approved in the United States. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a key role in protecting the CNS, but it is penetrable. The lipophilic tertiary amines, particularly oxybutynin, are more likely to cross the BBB than the hydrophilic quaternary amine trospium chloride, for which there are very few reports of adverse CNS effects. In fact, in 2008 the US product labels for oral oxybutynin were modified to include the potential for anticholinergic CNS events and a warning to monitor patients for adverse CNS effects. Even modest cognitive impairment in the elderly may negatively affect independence; therefore, selection of an antimuscarinic OAB drug with reduced potential for CNS effects is advisable.

  11. Neurological complications of chemotherapy to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Newton, Herbert B

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common complications of chemotherapeutic drugs is toxicity to the central nervous system (CNS). This toxicity can manifest in many ways, including encephalopathy syndromes and confusional states, seizure activity, headache, cerebrovascular complications and stroke, visual loss, cerebellar dysfunction, and spinal cord damage with myelopathy. For many drugs, the toxicity is related to route of administration and cumulative dose, and can vary from brief, transient episodes to more severe, chronic sequelae. However, the neurotoxicity can be idiosyncratic and unpredictable in some cases. Among the antimetabolite drugs, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and cytosine arabinoside are most likely to cause CNS toxicity. Of the alkylating agent chemotherapeutic drugs, the nitrosoureas (e.g., BCNU) and cisplatin most frequently cause toxicity to the CNS, especially when given via the intra-arterial route. Ifosfamide is also likely to cause neurotoxicity at high intravenous doses. Other alkylating agents, such as busulfan, cyclophosphamide, procarbazine, and temozolomide, are better tolerated by the CNS at moderate doses. The retinoid drugs are known to cause severe headaches at high doses. l-Asparaginase can induce an encephalopathy syndrome, as well as cerebrovascular complications such as stroke.

  12. Autoantibody-Associated Central Nervous System Neurologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, Jenny; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune neurology is a rapidly evolving new subspecialty driven by the discovery of novel neural- (neuronal- or glial-) specific autoantibodies and their target antigens. The neurologic manifestations affecting the central nervous system include encephalitis, dementia, epilepsy, and movement and sleep disorders. Laboratory testing is now available for most of these neural-specific autoantibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers, in some instances directing the physician toward specific cancer types (e.g., N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antibodies for teratoma, collapsin response mediator protein 5 for small-cell lung cancer) and assisting in therapeutic decision making. Antibodies targeting intracellular proteins serve as markers of cytotoxic effector T-cell-mediated injury, which is generally poorly responsive to immunotherapy. By contrast, antibodies targeting extracellular plasma membrane proteins may act as pathogenic effectors and often infer good responses to immunotherapy. Diagnosing these conditions and implementing treatment as early into the clinical course as possible ensures the best possible clinical outcomes. An adequate immunotherapy trial to assess maximum reversibility of symptoms, as assessed through objective functional measures, is crucial and can help to determine whether maintenance therapy is needed. PMID:27643908

  13. [Dementia in Patients with Central Nervous System Mycosis].

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiko; Ishihara, Masaki; Konno, Michiko

    2016-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) mycosis is a potentially life-threatening but treatable neurological emergency. CNS mycoses progress slowly and are sometimes difficult to distinguish from dementia. Though most patients with CNS mycosis have an underlying disease, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and/or use of immunosuppressants, cryptococcosis can occur in non-immunosuppressed persons. One of the major difficulties in accurate diagnosis is to detect the pathogen in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures. Thus, the clinical diagnosis is often made by combining circumstantial evidence, including mononuclear cell-dominant pleocytosis with low glucose and protein elevation in the CSF, as well as positive results from an antigen-based assay and a (1-3)-beta-D-glucan assay using plasma and/or CSF. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostics, which are not performed as routine examinations and are mostly performed as part of academic research in Japan, are sensitive tools for the early diagnosis of CNS mycosis. Mognetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to assess the complications of fungal meningitis, such as abscess, infarction, and hydrocephalus. Clinicians should realize the advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic tools. Early and accurate diagnosis, including identification of the particular fungal species, enables optimal antifungal treatment that produces good outcomes in patients with CNS mycosis. PMID:27056851

  14. Microglia in Infectious Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Monica M.; Kielian, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage population in the central nervous system (CNS) parenchyma and, as such, are poised to provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Microglia are endowed with a vast repertoire of pattern recognition receptors that include such family members as Toll-like receptors and phagocytic receptors, which collectively function to sense and eliminate microbes invading the CNS parenchyma. In addition, microglial activation elicits a broad range of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that are involved in the recruitment and subsequent activation of peripheral immune cells infiltrating the infected CNS. Studies from several laboratories have demonstrated the ability of microglia to sense and respond to a wide variety of pathogens capable of colonizing the CNS including bacterial, viral, and fungal species. This review will highlight the role of microglia in microbial recognition and the resultant antipathogen response that ensues in an attempt to clear these infections. Implications as to whether microglial activation is uniformly beneficial to the CNS or in some circumstances may exacerbate pathology will also be discussed. PMID:19728102

  15. Whole-central nervous system functional imaging in larval Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, William C.; Pulver, Stefan R.; Höckendorf, Burkhard; McDole, Katie; Branson, Kristin; Freeman, Jeremy; Keller, Philipp J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the brain works in tight concert with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) hinges upon knowledge of coordinated activity patterns across the whole CNS. We present a method for measuring activity in an entire, non-transparent CNS with high spatiotemporal resolution. We combine a light-sheet microscope capable of simultaneous multi-view imaging at volumetric speeds 25-fold faster than the state-of-the-art, a whole-CNS imaging assay for the isolated Drosophila larval CNS and a computational framework for analysing multi-view, whole-CNS calcium imaging data. We image both brain and ventral nerve cord, covering the entire CNS at 2 or 5 Hz with two- or one-photon excitation, respectively. By mapping network activity during fictive behaviours and quantitatively comparing high-resolution whole-CNS activity maps across individuals, we predict functional connections between CNS regions and reveal neurons in the brain that identify type and temporal state of motor programs executed in the ventral nerve cord. PMID:26263051

  16. Microparticles: A New Perspective in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Stephanie M.; Little, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are a heterogeneous population of small cell-derived vesicles, ranging in size from 0.1 to 1 μm. They contain a variety of bioactive molecules, including proteins, biolipids, and nucleic acids, which can be transferred between cells without direct cell-to-cell contact. Consequently, MPs represent a novel form of intercellular communication, which could play a role in both physiological and pathological processes. Growing evidence indicates that circulating MPs contribute to the development of cancer, inflammation, and autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases. Most cell types of the central nervous system (CNS) have also been shown to release MPs, which could be important for neurodevelopment, CNS maintenance, and pathologies. In disease, levels of certain MPs appear elevated; therefore, they may serve as biomarkers allowing for the development of new diagnostic tools for detecting the early stages of CNS pathologies. Quantification and characterization of MPs could also provide useful information for making decisions on treatment options and for monitoring success of therapies, particularly for such difficult-to-treat diseases as cerebral malaria, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Overall, studies on MPs in the CNS represent a novel area of research, which promises to expand the knowledge on the mechanisms governing some of the physiological and pathophysiological processes of the CNS. PMID:24860829

  17. Evolution of a neuroprotective function of central nervous system myelin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinghua; Baek, Rena C; Kirschner, Daniel A; Peterson, Alan; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Macklin, Wendy B; Trapp, Bruce D

    2006-01-30

    The central nervous system (CNS) of terrestrial vertebrates underwent a prominent molecular change when a tetraspan membrane protein, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), replaced the type I integral membrane protein, P0, as the major protein of myelin. To investigate possible reasons for this molecular switch, we genetically engineered mice to express P0 instead of PLP in CNS myelin. In the absence of PLP, the ancestral P0 provided a periodicity to mouse compact CNS myelin that was identical to mouse PNS myelin, where P0 is the major structural protein today. The PLP-P0 shift resulted in reduced myelin internode length, degeneration of myelinated axons, severe neurological disability, and a 50% reduction in lifespan. Mice with equal amounts of P0 and PLP in CNS myelin had a normal lifespan and no axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that the P0-PLP shift during vertebrate evolution provided a vital neuroprotective function to myelin-forming CNS glia. PMID:16449196

  18. Central Nervous System Tuberculosis: Pathogenesis and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rock, R. Bryan; Olin, Michael; Baker, Cristina A.; Molitor, Thomas W.; Peterson, Phillip K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a highly devastating form of tuberculosis, which, even in the setting of appropriate antitubercular therapy, leads to unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite the development of promising molecular diagnostic techniques, diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis relies largely on microbiological methods that are insensitive, and as such, CNS tuberculosis remains a formidable diagnostic challenge. Insights into the basic neuropathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the development of an appropriate animal model are desperately needed. The optimal regimen and length of treatment are largely unknown, and with the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, the development of well-tolerated and effective antibiotics remains a continued need. While the most widely used vaccine in the world largely targets this manifestation of tuberculosis, the BCG vaccine has not fulfilled the promise of eliminating CNS tuberculosis. We put forth this review to highlight the current understanding of the neuropathogenesis of M. tuberculosis, to discuss certain epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of CNS tuberculosis, and also to underscore the many unmet needs in this important field. PMID:18400795

  19. Severe central nervous system thrombotic events in hemoglobin Sabine patient.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Sonja; Kuzmanovic, Milos; Urosevic, Jelena; Poznanic, Jelena; Zoranovic, Tamara; Djordjevic, Valentina; Rasovic, Nada; Bunjevacki, Gordana; Cvorkov-Drazic, Milica; Colovic, Milica

    2004-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Sabine is a rare, unstable Hb variant resulting from the point mutation in codon 91 (CTG --> CCG) of beta-globin gene. We report a case of Hb Sabine patient with mild hemolytic anemia, unusually high Hb F level and severe central nervous system thrombotic disturbances. We have tried to elucidate possible genetic background of this unusual Hb Sabine phenotype. Extremely high level of Hb F and rather mild anemia in our patient could be partially explained by the presence of G gamma Xmn I polymorphism. This case of Hb Sabine, unlike all other reported to date, shows extremely severe thromboembolic complications. It is our opinion that the hypercoagulable state described in thalassemia is not the only factor responsible for this specific clinical state. The presence of MTHFR C677T mutation in heterozygous state found in our patient and unstable Hb Sabine molecules could contribute to development of thromboembolic phenomena. However, it remains unclear whether other factors participate in pathogenesis of the disease. In this paper we emphasize different genetic background of father and son both affected with Hb Sabine, but with markedly different severity of the disease.

  20. Central Nervous System Agents for Ischemic Stroke: Neuroprotection Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lijuan; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuanhu; Zeng, Jiang; Popp, A. John; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Ischemic stroke constitutes 85% of all stroke cases. However, no effective treatment has been found to prevent damage to the brain in such cases except tissue plasminogen activator with narrow therapeutic window, and there is an unmet need to develop therapeutics for neuroprotection from ischemic stroke. Studies have shown that mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, immune modulation, and oxidative stress and mediators such as excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide, inflammatory mediators, neurotransmitters, reactive oxygen species, and withdrawal of trophic factors may lead to the development of the ischemic cascade. Hence, it is essential to develop neuroprotective agents targeting either the mechanisms or the mediators leading to development of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on central nervous system agents targeting these biochemical pathways and mediators of ischemic stroke, mainly those that counteract apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidation, and well as glutamate inhibitors which have been shown to provide neuroprotection in experimental animals. All these agents have been shown to improve neurological outcome after ischemic insult in experimental animals in vivo, organotypic brain slice/acute slice ex vivo, and cell cultures in vitro and may therefore aid in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:21521165

  1. Mutational analysis of primary central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Aurélie; Boisselier, Blandine; Labreche, Karim; Marie, Yannick; Polivka, Marc; Jouvet, Anne; Adam, Clovis; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Miquel, Catherine; Eimer, Sandrine; Houillier, Caroline; Soussain, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Daveau, Romain; Hoang-Xuan, Khê

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the genomic basis of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) tumorigenesis. To investigate the mutational profile of PCNSL, we analyzed nine paired tumor and germline DNA samples from PCNSL patients by high throughput exome sequencing. Eight genes of interest have been further investigated by focused resequencing in 28 additional PCNSL tumors to better estimate their incidence. Our study identified recurrent somatic mutations in 37 genes, some involved in key signaling pathways such as NFKB, B cell differentiation and cell cycle control. Focused resequencing in the larger cohort revealed high mutation rates for genes already described as mutated in PCNSL such as MYD88 (38%), CD79B (30%), PIM1 (22%) and TBL1XR1 (19%) and for genes not previously reported to be involved in PCNSL tumorigenesis such as ETV6 (16%), IRF4 (14%), IRF2BP2 (11%) and EBF1 (11%). Of note, only 3 somatically acquired SNVs were annotated in the COSMIC database. Our results demonstrate a high genetic heterogeneity of PCNSL and mutational pattern similarities with extracerebral diffuse large B cell lymphomas, particularly of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, suggesting shared underlying biological mechanisms. The present study provides new insights into the mutational profile of PCNSL and potential targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24970810

  2. Central Nervous System Multiparameter Optimization Desirability: Application in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wager, Travis T; Hou, Xinjun; Verhoest, Patrick R; Villalobos, Anabella

    2016-06-15

    Significant progress has been made in prospectively designing molecules using the central nervous system multiparameter optimization (CNS MPO) desirability tool, as evidenced by the analysis reported herein of a second wave of drug candidates that originated after the development and implementation of this tool. This simple-to-use design algorithm has expanded design space for CNS candidates and has further demonstrated the advantages of utilizing a flexible, multiparameter approach in drug discovery rather than individual parameters and hard cutoffs of physicochemical properties. The CNS MPO tool has helped to increase the percentage of compounds nominated for clinical development that exhibit alignment of ADME attributes, cross the blood-brain barrier, and reside in lower-risk safety space (low ClogP and high TPSA). The use of this tool has played a role in reducing the number of compounds submitted to exploratory toxicity studies and increasing the survival of our drug candidates through regulatory toxicology into First in Human studies. Overall, the CNS MPO algorithm has helped to improve the prioritization of design ideas and the quality of the compounds nominated for clinical development.

  3. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  4. Survival of European patients with central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Sant, Milena; Minicozzi, Pamela; Lagorio, Susanna; Børge Johannesen, Tom; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Francisci, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    We present estimates of population-based 5-year relative survival for adult Europeans diagnosed with central nervous system tumors, by morphology (14 categories based on cell lineage and malignancy grade), sex, age at diagnosis and region (UK and Ireland, Northern, Central, Eastern and Southern Europe) for the most recent period with available data (2000-2002). Sources were 39 EUROCARE cancer registries with continuous data from 1996 to 2002. Survival time trends (1988 to 2002) were estimated from 24 cancer registries with continuous data from 1988. Overall 5-year relative survival was 85.0% for benign, 19.9% for malignant tumors. Benign tumor survival ranged from 90.6% (Northern Europe) to 77.4% (UK and Ireland); for malignant tumors the range was 25.1% (Northern Europe) to 15.6% (UK and Ireland). Survival decreased with age at diagnosis and was slightly better for women (malignant tumors only). For glial tumors, survival varied from 83.5% (ependymoma and choroid plexus) to 2.7% (glioblastoma); and for non-glioma tumors from 96.5% (neurinoma) to 44.9% (primitive neuroectoderm tumor/medulloblastoma). Survival differences between regions narrowed after adjustment for morphology and age, and were mainly attributable to differences in morphology mix; however UK and Ireland and Eastern Europe patients still had 40% and 30% higher excess risk of death, respectively, than Northern Europe patients (reference). Survival for benign tumors increased from 69.3% (1988-1990) to 77.1% (2000-2002); but survival for malignant tumors did not improve indicating no useful advances in treatment over the 14-year study period, notwithstanding major improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of other solid cancers.

  5. Cancer stem cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, G J

    2005-12-01

    Malignant tumours intrinsic to the central nervous system (CNS) are among the most difficult of neoplasms to treat effectively. The major biological features of these tumours that preclude successful therapy include their cellular heterogeneity, which renders them highly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the propensity of the component tumour cells to invade, diffusely, the contiguous nervous tissues. The tumours are classified according to perceived cell of origin, gliomas being the most common generic group. In the 1970s transplacental administration of the potent neurocarcinogen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), enabled investigation of the sequential development of brain and spinal neoplasms by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The significance of the primitive cells of the subependymal plate in cellular origin and evolution of a variety of glial tumours was thereby established. Since then, the development of new cell culture methods, including the in vitro growth of neurospheres and multicellular tumour spheroids, and new antigenic markers of stem cells and glial/neuronal cell precursor cells, including nestin, Mushashi-1 and CD133, have led to a reappraisal of the histological classification and origins of CNS tumours. Moreover, neural stem cells may also provide new vectors in exciting novel therapeutic strategies for these tumours. In addition to the gliomas, stem cells may have been identified in paediatric tumours including cerebellar medulloblastoma, thought to be of external granule cell neuronal derivation. Interestingly, while the stem cell marker CD133 is expressed in these primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs), the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan neuronal/glial 2 (NG2), which appears to denote increased proliferative, but reduced migratory activity in adult gliomas, is rarely expressed. This is in contrast to the situation in the histologically similar supratentorial PNETs. A possible functional 'switch' between

  6. 78 FR 63478 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  7. 77 FR 20037 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  8. 75 FR 36428 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  9. 76 FR 3912 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  10. 75 FR 12768 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  11. 78 FR 20328 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  12. 78 FR 63481 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  13. 75 FR 17417 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  14. Effects of Petroleum Ether Extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius Tuber on Central Nervous System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, S. S.; Sen, Malini; Dey, Y. N.; De, S.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The central nervous system activity of the petroleum ether extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber was examined in mice, fed normal as well as healthy conditions. The petroleum ether extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber at the doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg showed significant central nervous system activity in mice. PMID:20376218

  15. ADAMTS expression and function in central nervous system injury and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gottschall, Paul E.; Howell, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The components of the adult extracellular matrix in the central nervous system form a lattice-like structure that is deposited as perineuronal nets, around axon initial segments and as synapse-associated matrix. An abundant component of this matrix is the lecticans, chondroitin sulfate-bearing proteoglycans that are the major substrate for several members of the ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) family. Since lecticans are key regulators of neural plasticity, ADAMTS cleavage of lecticans would likely also contribute to neuroplasticity. Indeed, many studies have examined the neuroplastic contribution of the ADAMTSs to damage and recovery after injury and in central nervous system disease. Much of this data supports a role for the ADAMTSs in recovery and repair following spinal cord injury by stimulating axonal outgrowth after degradation of a glial scar and improving synaptic plasticity following seizure-induced neural damage in the brain. The action of the ADAMTSs in chronic diseases of the central nervous system appears to be more complex and less well-defined. Increasing evidence indicates that lecticans participate in synaptic plasticity in neurodegenerative disease states. It will be interesting to examine how ADAMTS expression and action would affect the progression of these diseases. PMID:25622912

  16. ADAMTS expression and function in central nervous system injury and disorders.

    PubMed

    Gottschall, Paul E; Howell, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The components of the adult extracellular matrix in the central nervous system form a lattice-like structure that is deposited as perineuronal nets, around axon initial segments and as synapse-associated matrix. An abundant component of this matrix is the lecticans, chondroitin sulfate-bearing proteoglycans that are the major substrate for several members of the ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) family. Since lecticans are key regulators of neural plasticity, ADAMTS cleavage of lecticans would likely also contribute to neuroplasticity. Indeed, many studies have examined the neuroplastic contribution of the ADAMTSs to damage and recovery after injury and in central nervous system disease. Much of this data supports a role for the ADAMTSs in recovery and repair following spinal cord injury by stimulating axonal outgrowth after degradation of a glial scar and improving synaptic plasticity following seizure-induced neural damage in the brain. The action of the ADAMTSs in chronic diseases of the central nervous system appears to be more complex and less well-defined. Increasing evidence indicates that lecticans participate in synaptic plasticity in neurodegenerative disease states. It will be interesting to examine how ADAMTS expression and action would affect the progression of these diseases.

  17. New Insights on NOX Enzymes in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nayernia, Zeynab; Jaquet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: There is increasing evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system (CNS) involves the NOX family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases. Controlled ROS generation appears necessary for optimal functioning of the CNS through fine-tuning of redox-sensitive signaling pathways, while overshooting ROS generation will lead to oxidative stress and CNS disease. Recent Advances: NOX enzymes are not only restricted to microglia (i.e. brain phagocytes) but also expressed in neurons, astrocytes, and the neurovascular system. NOX enzymes are involved in CNS development, neural stem cell biology, and the function of mature neurons. While NOX2 appears to be a major source of pathological oxidative stress in the CNS, other NOX isoforms might also be of importance, for example, NOX4 in stroke. Globally speaking, there is now convincing evidence for a role of NOX enzymes in various neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and psychosis-related disorders. Critical Issues: The relative importance of specific ROS sources (e.g., NOX enzymes vs. mitochondria; NOX2 vs. NOX4) in different pathological processes needs further investigation. The absence of specific inhibitors limits the possibility to investigate specific therapeutic strategies. The uncritical use of non-specific inhibitors (e.g., apocynin, diphenylene iodonium) and poorly validated antibodies may lead to misleading conclusions. Future Directions: Physiological and pathophysiological studies with cell-type-specific knock-out mice will be necessary to delineate the precise functions of NOX enzymes and their implications in pathomechanisms. The development of CNS-permeant, specific NOX inhibitors will be necessary to advance toward therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20: 2815–2837. PMID:24206089

  18. Central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma in the era of stem cell transplantation--an International Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Study Group project.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Jacoline E; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Illerhaus, Gerald; Jahnke, Kristoph; Korfel, Agniezka; Fischer, Lars; Fritsch, Kristina; Kuittinen, Outti; Issa, Samar; van Montfort, Cees; van den Bent, Martin J

    2013-05-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation has greatly improved the prognosis of systemic recurrent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, no prospective data are available concerning the feasibility and efficacy of this strategy for systemic lymphoma relapsing in the central nervous system. We, therefore, we performed an international multicenter retrospective study of patients with a central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma to assess the outcome of these patients in the era of stem cell transplantation. We collected clinical and treatment data on patients with a first central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma treated between 2000 and 2010 in one of five centers in four countries. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed and compared descriptively. Primary outcome measures were overall survival and percentage of patients transplanted. We identified 92 patients, with a median age of 59 years and a median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group/World Health Organization performance status of 2, of whom 76% had diffuse large B-cell histology. The majority (79%) of these patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy with or without intravenous rituximab. Twenty-seven patients (29%) were transplanted; age and insufficient response to induction chemotherapy were the main reasons for not being transplanted in the remaining 65 patients. The median overall survival was 7 months (95% confidence interval 2.6-11.4), being 8 months (95% confidence interval 3.8-5.2) for patients ≤ 65 years old. The 1-year survival rate was 34.8%; of the 27 transplanted patients 62% survived more than 1 year. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Prognostic Index for primary central nervous system lymphoma was prognostic for both undergoing transplantation and survival. In conclusion, despite the availability of autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with central nervous system progression or relapse of systemic lymphoma, prognosis is still poor. Long-term survival

  19. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus caused by central nervous system metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Kong, Doo Sik; Seol, Ho Joon; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-09-01

    The development of better diagnostic tools and therapeutic modalities has increased the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastasis in malignant tumor patients. Hydrocephalus can result from CNS metastasis and frustrate cancer treatment. The authors sought to investigate the outcomes and the roles of ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VPS) in patients with CNS metastasis. The medical records of 50 consecutive patients who underwent VPS for hydrocephalus related to CNS metastasis were analyzed retrospectively. Data included features of primary malignancies, CNS involvement, clinical course and surgical outcome. Median patient age was 55.0 years (range 25-77), and 30 female and 20 male patients were included in the study. At the time of VPS, 10 patients had parenchymal metastases only and 40 patients had leptomeningeal seeding (LMS). Symptom improvement was observed postoperatively in 40 patients (80%), mean Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scale change was from 37.8 to 46.0, and median survival from VPS was 3.0 months (2 days to 54 months). A ventricular opening pressure of >30 cmH(2)O (HR 6.44, 95% CI 1.26-32.9, P = 0.02) and further cancer treatment after VPS (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42, P < 0.0001) were found to be independent risk factors of poorer and better survival, respectively. Hydrocephalus in CNS metastasis requiring VPS is commonly associated with LMS. VPS is an effective palliative measure and an adequate cancer treatment after VPS may provide the best means of improving survival.

  20. Eosinophilic vasculitis in an isolated central nervous system distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, R B; Noble, J M; Vonsattel, J P; Delapaz, R; Wright, C B

    2007-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic vasculitis has been described as part of the Churg–Strauss syndrome, but affects the central nervous system (CNS) in <10% of cases; presentation in an isolated CNS distribution is rare. We present a case of eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. Case report A 39‐year‐old woman with a history of migraine without aura presented to an institution (located in the borough of Queens, New York, USA; no academic affiliation) in an acute confusional state with concurrent headache and left‐sided weakness and numbness. Laboratory evaluation showed increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein level, but an otherwise unremarkable serological investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bifrontal polar gyral‐enhancing brain lesions. Her symptoms resolved over 2 weeks without residual deficit. After 18 months, later the patient presented with similar symptoms and neuroradiological findings involving territories different from those in her first episode. Again, the CSF protein level was high. She had a raised C reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Brain biopsy showed transmural, predominantly eosinophilic, inflammatory infiltrates of medium‐sized leptomeningeal arteries without granulomas. She improved, without recurrence, when treated with a prolonged course of corticosteroids. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first case of non‐granulomatous eosinophilic vasculitis isolated to the CNS. No aetiology for this patient's primary CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has yet been identified. Spontaneous resolution and recurrence of her syndrome is an unusual feature of the typical CNS vasculitis and may suggest an environmental epitope with immune reaction as the cause. PMID:16926236

  1. Central Nervous System Effects of Ginkgo Biloba, a Plant Extract.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Eralp, Emin; Tsambis, Elias; Itil, Kurt Z.; Stein, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) are among the most prescribed drugs in France and Germany. EGb is claimed to be effective in peripheral arterial disorders and in "cerebral insufficiency." The mechanism of action is not yet well understood. Three of the ingredients of the extract have been isolated and found to be pharmacologically active, but which one alone or in combination is responsible for clinical effects is unknown. The recommended daily dose (3 x 40 mg extract) is based more on empirical data than on clinical dose-findings studies. However, despite these, according to double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, EGb has therapeutic effects, at least, on the diagnostic entity of "cerebral insufficiency," which is used in Europe as synonymous with early dementia. To determine whether EGb has significant pharmacological effects on the human brain, a pharmacodynamic study was conducted using the Quantitative Pharmacoelectroencephalogram (QPEEG(R)) method. It was established that the pharmacological effects (based on a predetermined 7.5--13.0-Hz alpha frequency band in a computer-analyzed electroencephalogram = CEEG(R)) of EGb on the central nervous system (CNS) are significantly different than placebo, and the high and low doses could be discriminated from each other. The 120-mg, but particularly the 240-mg, single doses showed the most consistent CNS effects with an earlier onset (1 h) and longer duration (7 h). Furthermore, it was established that the electrophysiological effects of EGb in CNS are similar to those of well-known cognitive activators such as "nootropics" as well as tacrine, the only marketed "antidementia" drug currently available in the United States. PMID:11856998

  2. Central Nervous System Effects of Ginkgo Biloba, a Plant Extract.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Eralp, Emin; Tsambis, Elias; Itil, Kurt Z.; Stein, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) are among the most prescribed drugs in France and Germany. EGb is claimed to be effective in peripheral arterial disorders and in "cerebral insufficiency." The mechanism of action is not yet well understood. Three of the ingredients of the extract have been isolated and found to be pharmacologically active, but which one alone or in combination is responsible for clinical effects is unknown. The recommended daily dose (3 x 40 mg extract) is based more on empirical data than on clinical dose-findings studies. However, despite these, according to double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, EGb has therapeutic effects, at least, on the diagnostic entity of "cerebral insufficiency," which is used in Europe as synonymous with early dementia. To determine whether EGb has significant pharmacological effects on the human brain, a pharmacodynamic study was conducted using the Quantitative Pharmacoelectroencephalogram (QPEEG(R)) method. It was established that the pharmacological effects (based on a predetermined 7.5--13.0-Hz alpha frequency band in a computer-analyzed electroencephalogram = CEEG(R)) of EGb on the central nervous system (CNS) are significantly different than placebo, and the high and low doses could be discriminated from each other. The 120-mg, but particularly the 240-mg, single doses showed the most consistent CNS effects with an earlier onset (1 h) and longer duration (7 h). Furthermore, it was established that the electrophysiological effects of EGb in CNS are similar to those of well-known cognitive activators such as "nootropics" as well as tacrine, the only marketed "antidementia" drug currently available in the United States.

  3. Central nervous system regeneration: from leech to opossum.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, M; Muller, K J; Nicholls, J G

    2009-06-15

    A major problem of neurobiology concerns the failure of injured mammalian spinal cord to repair itself. This review summarizes work done on two preparations in which regeneration can occur: the central nervous system of an invertebrate, the leech, and the spinal cord of an immature mammal, the opossum. The aim is to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote and prevent regeneration. In the leech, an individual axon regrows successfully to re-establish connections with its synaptic target, while avoiding other neurons. Functions that were lost are thereby restored. Moreover, pairs of identified neurons become re-connected with appropriate synapses in culture. It has been shown that microglial cells and nitric oxide play key roles in leech CNS regeneration. In the opossum, the neonatal brain and spinal cord are so tiny that they survive well in culture. Fibres grow across spinal cord lesions in neonatal animals and in vitro, but axon regeneration stops abruptly between postnatal days 9 and 12. A comprehensive search has been made in spinal cords that can and cannot regenerate to identify genes and establish their locations. At 9 days, growth-promoting genes, their receptors and key transcription molecules are up-regulated. By contrast at 12 days, growth-inhibitory molecules associated with myelin are prominent. The complete sequence of the opossum genome and new methods for transfecting genes offer ways to determine which molecules promote and which inhibit spinal cord regeneration. These results lead to questions about how basic research on mechanisms of regeneration could be 'translated' into effective therapies for patients with spinal cord injuries. PMID:19525562

  4. Central nervous system regeneration: from leech to opossum.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, M; Muller, K J; Nicholls, J G

    2009-06-15

    A major problem of neurobiology concerns the failure of injured mammalian spinal cord to repair itself. This review summarizes work done on two preparations in which regeneration can occur: the central nervous system of an invertebrate, the leech, and the spinal cord of an immature mammal, the opossum. The aim is to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote and prevent regeneration. In the leech, an individual axon regrows successfully to re-establish connections with its synaptic target, while avoiding other neurons. Functions that were lost are thereby restored. Moreover, pairs of identified neurons become re-connected with appropriate synapses in culture. It has been shown that microglial cells and nitric oxide play key roles in leech CNS regeneration. In the opossum, the neonatal brain and spinal cord are so tiny that they survive well in culture. Fibres grow across spinal cord lesions in neonatal animals and in vitro, but axon regeneration stops abruptly between postnatal days 9 and 12. A comprehensive search has been made in spinal cords that can and cannot regenerate to identify genes and establish their locations. At 9 days, growth-promoting genes, their receptors and key transcription molecules are up-regulated. By contrast at 12 days, growth-inhibitory molecules associated with myelin are prominent. The complete sequence of the opossum genome and new methods for transfecting genes offer ways to determine which molecules promote and which inhibit spinal cord regeneration. These results lead to questions about how basic research on mechanisms of regeneration could be 'translated' into effective therapies for patients with spinal cord injuries.

  5. Space radiation risks to the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Alp, Murat; Sulzman, Frank M.; Wang, Minli

    2014-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) risks which include during space missions and lifetime risks due to space radiation exposure are of concern for long-term exploration missions to Mars or other destinations. Possible CNS risks during a mission are altered cognitive function, including detriments in short-term memory, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, which may affect performance and human health. The late CNS risks are possible neurological disorders such as premature aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other dementia. Radiation safety requirements are intended to prevent all clinically significant acute risks. However the definition of clinically significant CNS risks and their dependences on dose, dose-rate and radiation quality is poorly understood at this time. For late CNS effects such as increased risk of AD, the occurrence of the disease is fatal with mean time from diagnosis of early stage AD to death about 8 years. Therefore if AD risk or other late CNS risks from space radiation occur at mission relevant doses, they would naturally be included in the overall acceptable risk of exposure induced death (REID) probability for space missions. Important progress has been made in understanding CNS risks due to space radiation exposure, however in general the doses used in experimental studies have been much higher than the annual galactic cosmic ray (GCR) dose (∼0.1 Gy/y at solar maximum and ∼0.2 Gy/y at solar minimum with less than 50% from HZE particles). In this report we summarize recent space radiobiology studies of CNS effects from particle accelerators simulating space radiation using experimental models, and make a critical assessment of their relevance relative to doses and dose-rates to be incurred on a Mars mission. Prospects for understanding dose, dose-rate and radiation quality dependencies of CNS effects and extrapolation to human risk assessments are described.

  6. Control of the Cutaneous Circulation by the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Blessing, William; McAllen, Robin; McKinley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS), via its control of sympathetic outflow, regulates blood flow to the acral cutaneous beds (containing arteriovenous anastomoses) as part of the homeostatic thermoregulatory process, as part of the febrile response, and as part of cognitive-emotional processes associated with purposeful interactions with the external environment, including those initiated by salient or threatening events (we go pale with fright). Inputs to the CNS for the thermoregulatory process include cutaneous sensory neurons, and neurons in the preoptic area sensitive to the temperature of the blood in the internal carotid artery. Inputs for cognitive-emotional control from the exteroceptive sense organs (touch, vision, sound, smell, etc.) are integrated in forebrain centers including the amygdala. Psychoactive drugs have major effects on the acral cutaneous circulation. Interoceptors, chemoreceptors more than baroreceptors, also influence cutaneous sympathetic outflow. A major advance has been the discovery of a lower brainstem control center in the rostral medullary raphé, regulating outflow to both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and to the acral cutaneous beds. Neurons in the medullary raphé, via their descending axonal projections, increase the discharge of spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons controlling the cutaneous vasculature, utilizing glutamate, and serotonin as neurotransmitters. Present evidence suggests that both thermoregulatory and cognitive-emotional control of the cutaneous beds from preoptic, hypothalamic, and forebrain centers is channeled via the medullary raphé. Future studies will no doubt further unravel the details of neurotransmitter pathways connecting these rostral control centers with the medullary raphé, and those operative within the raphé itself. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1161-1197, 2016. PMID:27347889

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of the Octopus vulgaris Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Mao, Yong; Huang, Zixia; Qu, Meng; Chen, Jun; Ding, Shaoxiong; Hong, Jingni; Sun, Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    Background Cephalopoda are a class of Mollusca species found in all the world's oceans. They are an important model organism in neurobiology. Unfortunately, the lack of neuronal molecular sequences, such as ESTs, transcriptomic or genomic information, has limited the development of molecular neurobiology research in this unique model organism. Results With high-throughput Illumina Solexa sequencing technology, we have generated 59,859 high quality sequences from 12,918,391 paired-end reads. Using BLASTx/BLASTn, 12,227 contigs have blast hits in the Swissprot, NR protein database and NT nucleotide database with E-value cutoff 1e−5. The comparison between the Octopus vulgaris central nervous system (CNS) library and the Aplysia californica/Lymnaea stagnalis CNS ESTs library yielded 5.93%/13.45% of O. vulgaris sequences with significant matches (1e−5) using BLASTn/tBLASTx. Meanwhile the hit percentage of the recently published Schistocerca gregaria, Tilapia or Hirudo medicinalis CNS library to the O. vulgaris CNS library is 21.03%–46.19%. We constructed the Phylogenetic tree using two genes related to CNS function, Synaptotagmin-7 and Synaptophysin. Lastly, we demonstrated that O. vulgaris may have a vertebrate-like Blood-Brain Barrier based on bioinformatic analysis. Conclusion This study provides a mass of molecular information that will contribute to further molecular biology research on O. vulgaris. In our presentation of the first CNS transcriptome analysis of O. vulgaris, we hope to accelerate the study of functional molecular neurobiology and comparative evolutionary biology. PMID:22768275

  8. Persisting Rickettsia typhi Causes Fatal Central Nervous System Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Stefanie; Moderzynski, Kristin; Kuehl, Svenja; Richardt, Ulricke; Fleischer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsioses are emerging febrile diseases caused by obligate intracellular bacteria belonging to the family Rickettsiaceae. Rickettsia typhi belongs to the typhus group (TG) of this family and is the causative agent of endemic typhus, a disease that can be fatal. In the present study, we analyzed the course of R. typhi infection in C57BL/6 RAG1−/− mice. Although these mice lack adaptive immunity, they developed only mild and temporary symptoms of disease and survived R. typhi infection for a long period of time. To our surprise, 3 to 4 months after infection, C57BL/6 RAG1−/− mice suddenly developed lethal neurological disorders. Analysis of these mice at the time of death revealed high bacterial loads, predominantly in the brain. This was accompanied by a massive expansion of microglia and by neuronal cell death. Furthermore, high numbers of infiltrating CD11b+ macrophages were detectable in the brain. In contrast to the microglia, these cells harbored R. typhi and showed an inflammatory phenotype, as indicated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, which was not observed in the periphery. Having shown that R. typhi persists in immunocompromised mice, we finally asked whether the bacteria are also able to persist in resistant C57BL/6 and BALB/c wild-type mice. Indeed, R. typhi could be recultivated from lung, spleen, and brain tissues from both strains even up to 1 year after infection. This is the first report demonstrating persistence and reappearance of R. typhi, mainly restricted to the central nervous system in immunocompromised mice. PMID:26975992

  9. Immunotherapy for cancer in the central nervous system: Current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Binder, David C.; Davis, Andrew A.; Wainwright, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and still remains incurable. Although immunotherapeutic vaccination against GBM has demonstrated immune-stimulating activity with some promising survival benefits, tumor relapse is common, highlighting the need for additional and/or combinatorial approaches. Recently, antibodies targeting immune checkpoints were demonstrated to generate impressive clinical responses against advanced melanoma and other malignancies, in addition to showing potential for enhancing vaccination and radiotherapy (RT). Here, we summarize the current knowledge of central nervous system (CNS) immunosuppression, evaluate past and current immunotherapeutic trials and discuss promising future immunotherapeutic directions to treat CNS-localized malignancies. PMID:27057463

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene-6 (TSG-6) Is Constitutively Expressed in Adult Central Nervous System (CNS) and Associated with Astrocyte-mediated Glial Scar Formation following Spinal Cord Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Lauer, Mark E.; Soleman, Sara; Zhao, Chao; Hascall, Vincent C.; Day, Anthony J.; Fawcett, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) binds to hyaluronan and can reorganize/stabilize its structure, also enhancing the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to its cell surface receptor, CD44. TSG-6 is rapidly up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines protecting tissues from the damaging effects of inflammation. Despite TSG-6 treatment having been shown to improve outcomes in an experimental model of traumatic brain injury, TSG-6 expression has not been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). We hereby analyzed the expression profile of TSG-6 in the developing CNS and following injury. We show that TSG-6 is expressed in the rat CNS by GFAP+ and CD44+ astrocytes, solely in the mature brain and spinal cord, and is not present during the development of the CNS. TSG-6−/− mice present a reduced number of GFAP+ astrocytes when compared with the littermate TSG-6+/− mice. TSG-6 expression is drastically up-regulated after injury, and the TSG-6 protein is present within the glial scar, potentially coordinating and stabilizing the formation of this hyaluronan-rich matrix. This study shows that TSG-6 is expressed in the CNS, suggesting a role for TSG-6 in astrocyte activation and tissue repair. We hypothesize that within this context TSG-6 could participate in the formation of the glial scar and confer anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of targeting TSG-6 after CNS injury to promote its protective effects while reducing the inhibitory properties of the glial scar in axon regeneration. PMID:27435674

  11. Minimal brain dysfunction, stimulant drugs, and autonomic nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Zahn, T P; Abate, F; Little, B C; Wender, P H

    1975-03-01

    Autonomic base levels and responsivity to stimuli were investigated in normal and minimally brain dysfunctioned (MBD) children. Continuous recordings of skin conductance, heart rate, skin temperature, and respiration rate were made during rest, at presentation of tones, and when performing a reaction time task. No significant differences in base levels were obtained between normal and MBD children when not taking drugs, but stimulant medication increased skin conductance and heart rate and decreased skin temperature and reaction time. The MBD children were less reactive, autonomically, to all types of stimuli. Stimulant drugs decreased electrodermal responsivity, which was predictable from concurrent changes in base line skin conductance and skintemperature. The MBD performance deficits are not related to lower autonomic responsivity or lower absolute base levels of arousal, but MBD children may perform better at relatively high autonomic base levels.

  12. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  13. Role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pknD in the Pathogenesis of central nervous system tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central nervous system disease is the most serious form of tuberculosis, and is associated with high mortality and severe neurological sequelae. Though recent clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with central nervous system disease, the microbial virulence factors required have not been described previously. Results We screened 398 unique M. tuberculosis mutants in guinea pigs to identify genes required for central nervous system tuberculosis. We found M. tuberculosis pknD (Rv0931c) to be required for central nervous system disease. These findings were central nervous system tissue-specific and were not observed in lung tissues. We demonstrated that pknD is required for invasion of brain endothelia (primary components of the blood-brain barrier protecting the central nervous system), but not macrophages, lung epithelia, or other endothelia. M. tuberculosis pknD encodes a "eukaryotic-like" serine-threonine protein kinase, with a predicted intracellular kinase and an extracellular (sensor) domain. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry we demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis PknD sensor is sufficient to trigger invasion of brain endothelia, a process which was neutralized by specific antiserum. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a novel in vivo role for M. tuberculosis pknD and represent an important mechanism for bacterial invasion and virulence in central nervous system tuberculosis, a devastating and understudied disease primarily affecting young children. PMID:22243650

  14. [Metastasis tumors of the central nervous system: molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bello, M Josefa; González-Gómez, P; Rey, J A

    2004-12-01

    Metastases in the nervous system represent an important and growing problem in the clinical practice, being the cause of a great mortality in the developed countries. This article reviews the few data available on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, leading to oncogene activation, inactivation of tumour suppressor genes, not only by the classical mechanisms, but also by the tumour cell epigenetic balance alteration. We conclude that all this knowledge will lead in the future to a better diagnosis, treatment and clinic evolution of these patients.

  15. Novel Indications for Benzodiazepine Antagonist Flumazenil in GABA Mediated Pathological Conditions of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Gary; Kelty, Erin; Hood, Sean; Norman, Amanda; Basso, Maria Rita; Reece, Albert Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This review paper discusses the central role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in diverse physiological systems and functions and the therapeutic potential of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (Ro 15- 1788) for a wide range of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). Our group and others have studied the potential of flumazenil as a treatment for benzodiazepine dependence. A small but growing body of research has indicated that flumazenil may also have clinical application in CNS disorders such as Parkinson's disease, idiopathic hypersomnia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite this body of research the therapeutic potential of flumazenil remains poorly understood and largely unrealized. The purpose of this paper is not to provide an exhaustive review of all possible therapeutic applications for flumazenil but rather to stimulate research interest, and discussion of the exciting therapeutic potential of this drug for a range of chronic debilitating conditions.

  16. An Injectable, Self-Healing Hydrogel to Repair the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Tao, Lei; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Wei, Yen; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-06-17

    An injectable, self-healing hydrogel (≈1.5 kPa) is developed for healing nerve-system deficits. Neurosphere-like progenitors proliferate in the hydrogel and differentiate into neuron-like cells. In the zebrafish injury model, the central nervous system function is partially rescued by injection of the hydrogel and significantly rescued by injection of the neurosphere-laden hydrogel. The self-healing hydrogel may thus potentially repair the central nervous system.

  17. Convection-enhanced delivery to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lonser, Russell R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Morrison, Paul F; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a bulk flow-driven process. Its properties permit direct, homogeneous, targeted perfusion of CNS regions with putative therapeutics while bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Development of surrogate imaging tracers that are co-infused during drug delivery now permit accurate, noninvasive real-time tracking of convective infusate flow in nervous system tissues. The potential advantages of CED in the CNS over other currently available drug delivery techniques, including systemic delivery, intrathecal and/or intraventricular distribution, and polymer implantation, have led to its application in research studies and clinical trials. The authors review the biophysical principles of convective flow and the technology, properties, and clinical applications of convective delivery in the CNS.

  18. General Information about Childhood Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Central Nervous System (CNS) Atypical Teratoid/ ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. Cerebral angiography as a guide for therapy in isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.L.; Martino, C.R.; Weinert, D.M.; Hueftle, M.; Kammer, G.M.

    1987-04-24

    The authors present a case of isolated central nervous system vasculitis documented by cerebral arteriography in which remission, using a treatment regimen of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, was guided by serial arteriography during a 15-month period.

  20. Sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Ho, Che-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    SCALP syndrome is an acronym describing the coincidence of sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus). We present a fourth case of this syndrome.

  1. Associations between Central Nervous System Serotonin, Fasting Glucose and Hostility in African American Females

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Georgiades, Anastasia; Brummett, Beverly H.; Barefoot, John C.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Grichnik, Katherine; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Williams, Redford B.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Surwit, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown an association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Central nervous system serotonin activity is implicated both in metabolic processes and in hostility related traits. Purpose To determine whether central nervous system serotonin influences the association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Methods The study consisted of 119 healthy volunteers (36 African American women, 27 white women, 21 white males, and 35 African American males, mean age 34±8.5 years). Serotonin metabolites were measured in cerebrospinal fluid. Hostility was measured by the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Results Hostility was associated with fasting glucose and central nervous system serotonin metabolites in African American women only. Controlling for the serotonin metabolites significantly reduced the association of hostility to glucose. Conclusions The positive correlation between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women can partly be explained by central nervous system serotonin function. PMID:24806470

  2. Contraindications to Athletic Participation. Cardiac, Respiratory, and Central Nervous System Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses contraindications to athletic participation, examining the cardiac, respiratory, and central nervous system conditions that warrant activity disqualification. Provides guidelines about when it is safe for individuals to participate, and discusses the physician's responsibility. (SM)

  3. Securing the future of drug discovery for central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Peter Høngaard; Moscicki, Richard; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, Ranga; Race, Tim; Phillips, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    Innovative partnerships among researchers, patients, regulators, payors and industry are needed to reinvigorate drug discovery for central nervous system disorders. Here, we summarize plans of the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) to achieve this goal.

  4. Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bovi, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Primary central nervous cell lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon neoplasm of the brain, leptomeninges, and rarely the spinal cord. Initially thought to be characteristically associated with congenital, iatrogenic, or acquired immunosuppression, PCNSL is now recognized with increasing frequency in immunocompetent individuals. The role of surgery is limited to establishing diagnosis, as PCNSL is often multifocal with a propensity to involve the subarachnoid space. A whole-brain radiation volume has empirically been used to adequately address the multifocal tumor frequently encountered at the time of PCNSL diagnosis. Despite high rates of response after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), rapid recurrence is common and long-term survival is the exception. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with WBRT has more recently become the treatment of choice. Most effective regimens contain high-dose methotrexate and or other agents that are capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. High response rates and improved survival with the use of chemotherapy has led to treatment strategies that defer or eliminate WBRT in hopes of lessening the risk of neurotoxicity attributed to WBRT. Unfortunately, elimination of WBRT is also associated with a higher rate of relapse. Combined chemotherapy and WBRT regimens are now being explored that use lower total doses of radiation and altered fractionation schedules with the aim of maintaining high rates of tumor control while minimizing neurotoxicity. Pretreatment, multifactor prognostic indices have recently been described that may allow selection of treatment regimens that strike an appropriate balance of risk and benefit for the individual PCNSL patient.

  5. This Neural Implant is designed to be implanted in the Human Central and Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-29

    A new class of neural implants being developed at the Livermore Lab are the first clinical quality devices capable of two-way conversations with the human nervous systems. Unlike existing interfaces that only sense or only stimulate, these devices are capable of stimulating and sensing using both electric and chemical signals.

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of central nervous system involvement by chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Uhm, Joon H; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Nabhan, Chadi; Parikh, Sameer A; Hanson, Curtis A; Chaffee, Kari G; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2016-04-01

    Abroad array of conditions can lead to neurological symptoms in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and distinguishing between clinically significant involvement of the central nervous system by chronic lymphocytic leukemia and symptoms due to other etiologies can be challenging. Between January 1999 and November 2014, 172 (4%) of the 4174 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia followed at our center had a magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system and/or a lumbar puncture to evaluate neurological symptoms. After comprehensive evaluation, the etiology of neurological symptoms was: central nervous system chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 18 patients (10% evaluated by imaging and/or lumbar puncture, 0.4% overall cohort); central nervous system Richter Syndrome in 15 (9% evaluated, 0.3% overall); infection in 40 (23% evaluated, 1% overall); autoimmune/inflammatory conditions in 28 (16% evaluated, 0.7% overall); other cancer in 8 (5% evaluated, 0.2% overall); and another etiology in 63 (37% evaluated, 1.5% overall). Although the sensitivity of cerebrospinal fluid analysis to detect central nervous system disease was 89%, the specificity was only 42% due to the frequent presence of leukemic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid in other conditions. No parameter on cerebrospinal fluid analysis (e.g. total nucleated cells, total lymphocyte count, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell percentage) were able to offer a reliable discrimination between patients whose neurological symptoms were due to clinically significant central nervous system involvement by chronic lymphocytic leukemia and another etiology. Median overall survival among patients with clinically significant central nervous system chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Richter syndrome was 12 and 11 months, respectively. In conclusion, clinically significant central nervous system involvement by chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a rare condition, and neurological symptoms in patients with chronic lymphocytic

  7. Superficial Siderosis of the Central Nervous System Originating from the Thoracic Spine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sung Mo; Kim, Seung-Kook; Lee, Sun-Ho; Eoh, Whan

    2016-01-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system(SSCNS) is a rare disease characterized by hemosiderin deposition on the surface of the central nervous system. We report a case of SSCNS originating from the thoracic spine, presenting with neurological deficits including, sensorineuronal hearing loss, ataxia, and corticospinal and dorsal column tract signs. The patient underwent dural repair with an artificial dural patch. Clinical findings were elicited by neurological examination, imaging studies, and intraoperative findings, and these were addressed through literature review. PMID:27437021

  8. Superficial Siderosis of the Central Nervous System Originating from the Thoracic Spine: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sung Mo; Kim, Eun-Sang; Kim, Seung-Kook; Lee, Sun-Ho; Eoh, Whan

    2016-06-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system(SSCNS) is a rare disease characterized by hemosiderin deposition on the surface of the central nervous system. We report a case of SSCNS originating from the thoracic spine, presenting with neurological deficits including, sensorineuronal hearing loss, ataxia, and corticospinal and dorsal column tract signs. The patient underwent dural repair with an artificial dural patch. Clinical findings were elicited by neurological examination, imaging studies, and intraoperative findings, and these were addressed through literature review. PMID:27437021

  9. Primary central nervous system lymphoma: is absence of intratumoral hemorrhage a characteristic finding on MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Akihiko; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Dodo, Toshiki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Jun C; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown that intratumoral hemorrhage is a common finding in glioblastoma multi-forme, but is rarely observed in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Our aim was to reevaluate whether intratumoral hemorrhage observed on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) as gross intratumoral hemorrhage and on susceptibility-weighted imaging as intratumoral susceptibility signal can differentiate primary central nervous system lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme. Patients and methods. A retrospective cohort of brain tumors from August 2008 to March 2013 was searched, and 58 patients (19 with primary central nervous system lymphoma, 39 with glioblastoma multiforme) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Absence of gross intratumoral hemorrhage was examined on T2WI, and an intratumoral susceptibility signal was graded using a 3-point scale on susceptibility-weighted imaging. Results were compared between primary central nervous system lymphoma and glioblastoma multiforme, and values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results. Gross intratumoral hemorrhage on T2WI was absent in 15 patients (79%) with primary central nervous system lymphoma and 23 patients (59%) with glioblastoma multiforme. Absence of gross intratumoral hemorrhage could not differentiate between the two disorders (P = 0.20). However, intratumoral susceptibility signal grade 1 or 2 was diagnostic of primary central nervous system lymphoma with 78.9% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity (P < 0.001), irrespective of gross intratumoral hemorrhage. Conclusions. Low intratumoral susceptibility signal grades can differentiate primary central nervous system lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme. However, specificity in this study was relatively low, and primary central nervous system lymphoma cannot be excluded based solely on the presence of an intratumoral susceptibility signal. PMID:26029023

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in four dogs with central nervous system neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Parzefall, Birgit; Driver, Colin J; Benigni, Livia; Davies, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Neosporosis is a polysystemic disease that can affect dogs of any age and can cause inflammation of the central nervous system. Antemortem diagnosis can be challenging, as clinical and conventional laboratory test findings are often nonspecific. A previous report described cerebellar lesions in brain MRI studies of seven dogs and proposed that these may be characteristic for central nervous system Neosporosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe MRI characteristics in another group of dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and compare them with the previous report. The hospital's database was searched for dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and four observers recorded findings from each dog's MRI studies. A total of four dogs met inclusion criteria. Neurologic examination was indicative of a forebrain and cerebellar lesion in dog 2 and multifocal central nervous system disease in dogs 1, 3, and 4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mild bilateral and symmetrical cerebellar atrophy in three of four dogs (dogs 2, 3, 4), intramedullary spinal cord changes in two dogs (dogs 3, 4) and a mesencephalic and metencephalic lesion in one dog (dog 2). Multifocal brain lesions were recognized in two dogs (dogs 1, 4) and were present in the thalamus, lentiform nucleus, centrum semiovale, internal capsule, brainstem and cortical gray matter of the frontal, parietal or temporal lobe. Findings indicated that central nervous system neosporosis may be characterized by multifocal MRI lesions as well as cerebellar involvement in dogs.

  11. Muscle fibers in the central nervous system of nemerteans: spatial organization and functional role.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Zaitseva, O V

    2012-08-01

    The system of muscle fibers associated with the brain and lateral nerve cords is present in all major groups of enoplan nemerteans. Unfortunately, very little is known about the functional role and spatial arrangement of these muscles of the central nervous system. This article examines the architecture of the musculature of the central nervous system in two species of monostiliferous nemerteans (Emplectonema gracile and Tetrastemma cf. candidum) using phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy. The article also briefly discusses the body-wall musculature and the muscles of the cephalic region. In both species, the lateral nerve cords possess two pairs of cardinal muscles that run the length of the nerve cords and pass through the ventral cerebral ganglia. A system of peripheral muscles forms a meshwork around the lateral nerve cords in E. gracile. The actin-rich processes that ramify within the nerve cords in E. gracile (transverse fibers) might represent a separate population of glia-like cells or sarcoplasmic projections of the peripheral muscles of the central nervous system. The lateral nerve cords in T. cf. candidum lack peripheral muscles but have muscles similar in their position and orientation to the transverse fibers. The musculature of the central nervous system is hypothesized to function as a support system for the lateral nerve cords and brain, preventing rupturing and herniation of the nervous tissue during locomotion. The occurrence of muscles of the central nervous system in nemerteans and other groups and their possible relevance in taxonomy are discussed.

  12. Interleukin-6, a Major Cytokine in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Erta, María; Quintana, Albert; Hidalgo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine originally identified almost 30 years ago as a B-cell differentiation factor, capable of inducing the maturation of B cells into antibody-producing cells. As with many other cytokines, it was soon realized that IL-6 was not a factor only involved in the immune response, but with many critical roles in major physiological systems including the nervous system. IL-6 is now known to participate in neurogenesis (influencing both neurons and glial cells), and in the response of mature neurons and glial cells in normal conditions and following a wide arrange of injury models. In many respects, IL-6 behaves in a neurotrophin-like fashion, and seemingly makes understandable why the cytokine family that it belongs to is known as neuropoietins. Its expression is affected in several of the main brain diseases, and animal models strongly suggest that IL-6 could have a role in the observed neuropathology and that therefore it is a clear target of strategic therapies. PMID:23136554

  13. Central nervous system control of the laryngeal muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2005-01-01

    Laryngeal muscle control may vary for different functions such as: voice for speech communication, emotional expression during laughter and cry, breathing, swallowing, and cough. This review discusses the control of the human laryngeal muscles for some of these different functions. Sensori-motor aspects of laryngeal control have been studied by eliciting various laryngeal reflexes. The role of audition in learning and monitoring ongoing voice production for speech is well known; while the role of somatosensory feedback is less well understood. Reflexive control systems involving central pattern generators may contribute to swallowing, breathing and cough with greater cortical control during volitional tasks such as voice production for speech. Volitional control is much less well understood for each of these functions and likely involves the integration of cortical and subcortical circuits. The new frontier is the study of the central control of the laryngeal musculature for voice, swallowing and breathing and how volitional and reflexive control systems may interact in humans. PMID:15927543

  14. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771.

  15. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771. PMID:27228454

  16. PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in the central nervous system of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Raina, Ashok; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2009-02-01

    The pyrokinin/pheromone-biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) family of peptides found in insects is characterized by a 5-amino-acid C-terminal sequence, FXPRLamide. The pentapeptide is the active core required for diverse physiological functions, including the stimulation of pheromone biosynthesis in female moths, muscle contraction, induction of embryonic diapause, melanization, acceleration of puparium formation, and termination of pupal diapause. We have used immunocytochemical techniques to demonstrate the presence of pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides in the central nervous system of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Polyclonal antisera against the C-terminal end of PBAN have revealed the location of the peptide-producing cell bodies and axons in the central nervous system. Immunoreactive material is detectable in at least three groups of neurons in the subesophageal ganglion and corpora cardiaca of all adult sexual forms. The ventral nerve cord of adults consists of two segmented thoracic ganglia and four segmented abdominal ganglia. Two immunoreactive pairs of neurons are present in the thoracic ganglia, and three neuron pairs in each of the first three abdominal ganglia. The terminal abdominal ganglion has no immunoreactive neurons. PBAN immunoreactive material found in abdominal neurons appears to be projected to perisympathetic organs connected to the abdominal ganglia. These results indicate that the fire ant nervous system contains pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides, and that these peptides are released into the hemolymph. In support of our immunocytochemical results, significant pheromonotropic activity is found in fire ant brain-subesophageal ganglion extracts from all adult fire ant forms (queens, female and male alates, and workers) when extracts are injected into decapitated females of Helicoverpa zea. This is the first demonstration of the presence of pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides and pheromonotropic activity in an ant species.

  17. PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in the central nervous system of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Raina, Ashok; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2009-02-01

    The pyrokinin/pheromone-biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) family of peptides found in insects is characterized by a 5-amino-acid C-terminal sequence, FXPRLamide. The pentapeptide is the active core required for diverse physiological functions, including the stimulation of pheromone biosynthesis in female moths, muscle contraction, induction of embryonic diapause, melanization, acceleration of puparium formation, and termination of pupal diapause. We have used immunocytochemical techniques to demonstrate the presence of pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides in the central nervous system of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Polyclonal antisera against the C-terminal end of PBAN have revealed the location of the peptide-producing cell bodies and axons in the central nervous system. Immunoreactive material is detectable in at least three groups of neurons in the subesophageal ganglion and corpora cardiaca of all adult sexual forms. The ventral nerve cord of adults consists of two segmented thoracic ganglia and four segmented abdominal ganglia. Two immunoreactive pairs of neurons are present in the thoracic ganglia, and three neuron pairs in each of the first three abdominal ganglia. The terminal abdominal ganglion has no immunoreactive neurons. PBAN immunoreactive material found in abdominal neurons appears to be projected to perisympathetic organs connected to the abdominal ganglia. These results indicate that the fire ant nervous system contains pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides, and that these peptides are released into the hemolymph. In support of our immunocytochemical results, significant pheromonotropic activity is found in fire ant brain-subesophageal ganglion extracts from all adult fire ant forms (queens, female and male alates, and workers) when extracts are injected into decapitated females of Helicoverpa zea. This is the first demonstration of the presence of pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides and pheromonotropic activity in an ant species. PMID:19002499

  18. The mast cells of the mammalian central nervous system. VI. Uptake of tritiated thymidine by mast cells, neurolipomastocytoid cells and other elements of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M Z; Koshayan, D S; Khreis, Y M

    1980-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of two mammalian species was studied autoradiographically using tritium-labeled thymidine; the rat, whose brain contains few localized mast cells (MCs) but many ubiquitous neurolipomastocytoid cells (NLMs), and the guinea pig, whose brain contains only ubiquitous NLMs. A few guinea pigs were also injected with an MC discharger compound 48/80 and the response of the NLMs, which are thought to be allied to MCs, as well as of neuroglial and vascular endothelial cells, was noted. The rats were 3 days to 6 weeks old whereas all the guinea pigs were young adults. Both MCs and NLMs took up the label, and much more so in the babies, paralleling similar uptakes in only very small immature MCs outside the CNS. Neuroglial elements, especially subependymal and oligodendroglial, as well as endothelial, perivascular, leptomeningeal and ependymal cells demonstrated some uptake. This was considerably increased upon receipt of compound 48/80, especially in the case of the subependymal glia, the NLMs and the endothelial cells; capillary neoformations were seen in the spinal cords of guinea pigs that had shown signs of paralysis. The cause of this increase is discussed in terms of mild stress induced by that compound. The subependymal response is also discussed with reference to periventricular plaques seen in multiple sclerosis and lymphoreticular and glial tumors seen in that region. It is concluded that both MCs and NLMs are capable of DNA replication and mitosis in immature animals. The NLMs can also divide upon stimulation in adult CNS.

  19. Current Proteomic Methods to Investigate the Dynamics of Histone Turnover in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, L A; Dill, B D; Molina, H; Birtwistle, M R; Maze, I

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the dynamic behavior of nucleosomes in the central nervous system is vital to our understanding of brain-specific chromatin-templated processes and their roles in transcriptional plasticity. Histone turnover-the complete loss of old, and replacement by new, nucleosomal histones-is one such phenomenon that has recently been shown to be critical for cell-type-specific transcription in brain, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. Such revelations that histones, long believed to static proteins in postmitotic cells, are highly dynamic in neurons were only possible owing to significant advances in analytical chemistry-based techniques, which now provide a platform for investigations of histone dynamics in both healthy and diseased tissues. Here, we discuss both past and present proteomic methods (eg, mass spectrometry, human "bomb pulse labeling") for investigating histone turnover in brain with the hope that such information may stimulate future investigations of both adaptive and aberrant forms of "neuroepigenetic" plasticity. PMID:27423867

  20. Current Proteomic Methods to Investigate the Dynamics of Histone Turnover in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Farrelly, L.A.; Dill, B.D.; Molina, H.; Birtwistle, M.R.; Maze, I.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the dynamic behavior of nucleosomes in the central nervous system is vital to our understanding of brain-specific chromatin-templated processes and their roles in transcriptional plasticity. Histone turnover—the complete loss of old, and replacement by new, nucleosomal histones—is one such phenomenon that has recently been shown to be critical for cell-type-specific transcription in brain, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. Such revelations that histones, long believed to static proteins in postmitotic cells, are highly dynamic in neurons were only possible owing to significant advances in analytical chemistry-based techniques, which now provide a platform for investigations of histone dynamics in both healthy and diseased tissues. Here, we discuss both past and present proteomic methods (eg, mass spectrometry, human “bomb pulse labeling”) for investigating histone turnover in brain with the hope that such information may stimulate future investigations of both adaptive and aberrant forms of “neuroepigenetic” plasticity. PMID:27423867

  1. Neuronal Expression of Glucosylceramide Synthase in Central Nervous System Regulates Body Weight and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Viola; Willershäuser, Monja; Herzer, Silke; Rozman, Jan; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver; Meldner, Sascha; Rothermel, Ulrike; Kaden, Sylvia; Roth, Fabian C.; Waldeck, Clemens; Gretz, Norbert; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Draguhn, Andreas; Klingenspor, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons are main regulators of energy homeostasis. Neuronal function essentially depends on plasma membrane-located gangliosides. The present work demonstrates that hypothalamic integration of metabolic signals requires neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS; UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase). As a major mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) metabolic control, we demonstrate that GCS-derived gangliosides interacting with leptin receptors (ObR) in the neuronal membrane modulate leptin-stimulated formation of signaling metabolites in hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, ganglioside-depleted hypothalamic neurons fail to adapt their activity (c-Fos) in response to alterations in peripheral energy signals. Consequently, mice with inducible forebrain neuron-specific deletion of the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase gene (Ugcg) display obesity, hypothermia, and lower sympathetic activity. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated Ugcg delivery to the arcuate nucleus (Arc) significantly ameliorated obesity, specifying gangliosides as seminal components for hypothalamic regulation of body energy homeostasis. PMID:23554574

  2. Nanoparticles and blood-brain barrier: the key to central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alazne; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Major central nervous system disorders represent a significant and worldwide public health problem. In fact, the therapeutic success of many pharmaceuticals developed to treat central nervous system diseases is still moderate, since the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the access of systemically administered compounds to the brain. Therefore, they require the application of a large total dose of a drug, and cause numerous toxic effects. The development of nanotechnological systems are useful tools to deliver therapeutics and/or diagnostic probes to the brain due to nanocarriers having the potential to improve the therapeutic effect of drugs and to reduce their side effects. This review provides a brief overview of the variety of carriers employed for central nervous system drug and diagnostic probes delivery. Further, this paper focuses on the novel nanocarriers developed to enhance brain delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Special attention is paid to liposomes, micelles, polymeric and lipid-based nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes. The recent developments in nanocarrier implementation through size/charge optimization and surface modifications (PEGylation, targeting delivery, and coating with surfactants) have been discussed. And a detailed description of the nanoscaled pharmaceutical delivery devices employed for the treatment of central nervous system disorders have also been defined. The aim of the review is to evaluate the nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategies to treat different central nervous system disorders.

  3. Central nervous system tumors and related intracranial pathologies in radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Semkiw, W.

    1988-01-01

    Among the female radiation workers in the radium dial industry there is no overall excess of brain or central nervous system tumors. A significant excess did appear, however, in one of three major cohorts; the excess was not due to an excess of gliomas and cannot be ascribed with certainty to radium or external radiation. A significant proportional excess of tumors outside the brain was observed, and is consistent with irradiation of nervous system tissue from adjacent bone. Early deaths from brain abscess or mastoiditis, which are coded as diseases of the nervous system and sense organs, were observed. 12 refs., 11 tabs.

  4. Characterization of D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an association of central nervous system dopaminergic systems in the etiology of the schizophrenia. Interest in the role of D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors has revived with the advent of selective drugs for this dopamine receptor, particularly the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor antagonists, SCH23390. (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 represents a superior radioligand for labeling the two-state striatal D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor in that its high percent specific binding makes it especially suitable for detailed mechanistic studies of this receptor. Striatal D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors have been shown to mediate the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity via a guanine nucleotide regulatory subunit. Forskolin acts in a synergistic manner with dopamine agonists, guanine nucleotides or sodium fluoride to potentiate the stimulation of rat striatal adenylate cyclase activity mediated by these reagents. By using the aforementioned reagents and the irreversible receptor modifying reagent N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2,-dihydroquinoline, we demonstrated that the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor population in rat striatum is not a stoichiometrically-limiting factor in agonist stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity.

  5. Conductive polymers for controlled release and treatment of central nervous system injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigal, Rajiv

    As one of the most devastating forms of neurotrauma, spinal cord injury remains a challenging clinical problem. The difficulties in treatment could potentially be resolved by better technologies for therapeutic delivery. In order to develop new approaches to treating central nervous system injury, this dissertation focused on using electrically-conductive polymers, controlled drug release, and stem cell transplantation. We first sought to enhance the therapeutic potential of neural stem cells by electrically increasing their production of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), important molecules for neuronal cell survival, differentiation, synaptic development, plasticity, and growth. We fabricated a new cell culture device for growing neural stem cells on a biocompatible, conductive polymer. Electrical stimulation via the polymer led to upregulation of NTF production by neural stem cells. This approach has the potential to enhance stem cell function while avoiding the pitfalls of genetic manipulation, possibly making stem cells more viable as a clinical therapy. Seeing the therapeutic potential of conductive polymers, we extended our studies to an in vivo model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using a novel fabrication and extraction technique, a conductive polymer was fabricated to fit to the characteristic pathology that follows contusive SCI. Assessed via quantitative analysis of MR images, the conductive polymer significantly reduced compression of the injured spinal cord. Further characterizing astroglial and neuronal response of injured host tissue, we found significant neuronal sparing as a result of this treatment. The in vivo studies also demonstrated improved locomotor recovery mediated by a conductive polymer scaffold over a non-conductive control. We next sought to take advantage of conductive polymers for local, electronically-controlled release of drugs. Seeking to overcome reported limitations in drug delivery via polypyrrole, we first embedded drugs in poly

  6. Invasive fungal infection of the central nervous system in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Janik-Moszant, Anna; Matyl, Aleksander; Rurańska, Iwona; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka; Kluczewska, Ewa; Szczepański, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Although the new intensive chemotherapeutic programs introduced recently into hematooncological therapies have led to a higher number of recoveries, persistent neutropenia favours the spread of severe infections, frequently fungal infections. Systemic fungal infections in patients treated for proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system are characterised by a severe, progressing course and high morbidity. Case Reports: We present a case report that demonstrates the diagnostic problem of lesions in the central nervous system which developed following the fourth block of chemotherapy in an eight-year-old boy treated for acute myeloid leukaemia. The risk factors, high values of the inflammatory parameters and imaging results enabled us to diagnose a fungal infection of the central nervous system. Results: A fast improvement in the clinical condition of the patient after the applied antifungal therapy and the regression of lesions in the central nervous system shown in the imaging studies confirmed our final diagnosis. PMID:22802867

  7. Exercise Strengthens Central Nervous System Modulation of Pain in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Laura D.; Stegner, Aaron J.; Schwabacher, Isaac J.; Koltyn, Kelli F.; Cook, Dane B.

    2016-01-01

    To begin to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the benefits of exercise for chronic pain, we assessed the influence of exercise on brain responses to pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Complete data were collected for nine female FM patients and nine pain-free controls (CO) who underwent two functional neuroimaging scans, following exercise (EX) and following quiet rest (QR). Brain responses and pain ratings to noxious heat stimuli were compared within and between groups. For pain ratings, there was a significant (p < 0.05) Condition by Run interaction characterized by moderately lower pain ratings post EX compared to QR (d = 0.39–0.41) for FM but similar to ratings in CO (d = 0.10–0.26), thereby demonstrating that exercise decreased pain sensitivity in FM patients to a level that was analogous to pain-free controls. Brain responses demonstrated a significant within-group difference in FM patients, characterized by less brain activity bilaterally in the anterior insula following QR as compared to EX. There was also a significant Group by Condition interaction with FM patients showing less activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex following QR as compared to post-EX and CO following both conditions. These results suggest that exercise appeared to stimulate brain regions involved in descending pain inhibition in FM patients, decreasing their sensitivity to pain. Thus, exercise may benefit patients with FM via improving the functional capacity of the pain modulatory system. PMID:26927193

  8. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing‐induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during “ON” and “OFF” condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients. PMID:17371906

  9. Case report of a patient with primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jatin J; Meredith, Ruby; Shen, Sui; Nabors, Burt; Lobuglio, Albert; Yester, Michael; Forero, Andres

    2006-11-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma arising within and confined to the central nervous system and, unlike other primary brain tumors, is very responsive to treatment. Aggressive management can lead to prolonged remissions or cures. However, the prognosis at relapse is generally poor with limited therapeutic options; clearly, new strategies are needed for these patients. Radioimmunotherapy has a growing role in the management of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma but has not been evaluated in PCNSL. We report here the first patient with PCNSL treated with radioimmunotherapy.

  10. Endothelial cells are a replicative niche for entry of Toxoplasma gondii to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Christoph; Ueno, Norikiyo; Christian, David A; Delong, Jonathan H; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Herz, Jasmin; Bzik, David J; Koshy, Anita A; McGavern, Dorian B; Lodoen, Melissa B; Hunter, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    An important function of the blood-brain barrier is to exclude pathogens from the central nervous system, but some microorganisms benefit from the ability to enter this site. It has been proposed that Toxoplasma gondii can cross biological barriers as a motile extracellular form that uses transcellular or paracellular migration, or by infecting a host cell that then crosses the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, analysis of acutely infected mice revealed significant numbers of free parasites in the blood and the presence of infected endothelial cells in the brain vasculature. The use of diverse transgenic parasites combined with reporter mice and intravital imaging demonstrated that replication in and lysis of endothelial cells precedes invasion of the central nervous system, and highlight a novel mechanism for parasite entry to the central nervous system. PMID:27572166

  11. Local Nitric Oxide Production in Viral and Autoimmune Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, D. Craig; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.; Kean, Rhonda; Numagami, Yoshihiro; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Koprowski, Hilary

    1995-06-01

    Because of the short half-life of NO, previous studies implicating NO in central nervous system pathology during infection had to rely on the demonstration of elevated levels of NO synthase mRNA or enzyme expression or NO metabolites such as nitrate and nitrite in the infected brain. To more definitively investigate the potential causative role of NO in lesions of the central nervous system in animals infected with neurotropic viruses or suffering from experimental allergic encephalitis, we have determined directly the levels of NO present in the central nervous system of such animals. Using spin trapping of NO and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we confirm here that copious amounts of NO (up to 30-fold more than control) are elaborated in the brains of rats infected with rabies virus or borna disease virus, as well as in the spinal cords of rats that had received myelin basic protein-specific T cells.

  12. THE RESUSCITATION OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G N; Guthrie, C C; Burns, R L; Pike, F H

    1906-03-26

    the same side as the stimulus, crossing of reflexes, to involve the other side, not occurring till later. As a rule, all reflexes return, and a short period of quiet follows. The anterior part of the cord again becomes irritable to strychnine, but succumbs to its action before the normal part. Spasms, of tonic, clonic, or mixed type, then appear, terminating in (a) death, (b) partial or (c) complete recovery. In partial recovery, disturbances of locomotion, such as walking in a circle, paralysis, dementia, loss of sight, hearing, and general intelligence, characterize the post-convulsive period. After complete recovery, there is a return to normal deportment. No gross lesions of the nervous system, other than a congested appearance of the previously anaemic area, were observed. Transection of the spinal cord stops the spasms below the level of section. Hemisection of the cord stops the spasms on the same side, below the level of section. Death, without any return of the reflexes after release of the cerebral arteries, has followed an occlusion of seven and one-half minutes. Respiration has returned after an occlusion of one hour. Five animals have recovered completely after an occlusion of seven minutes or more. Only one animal has recovered completely after an occlusion of fifteen minutes. No animal has recovered completely after an occlusion of twenty minutes. In Herzen's (26) resuscitation of an animal after several hours of cerebral anaemia, there must have been some anastomotic channels to the brain. Mayer's (27) limit of ten to fifteen minutes of cerebral anaemia, beyond which resuscitation is not practicable, is close to the correct one. It appears to us that, in cases of resuscitation two hours after cessation of the heart-beat, (Prus., loc.cit.) the auricles must have kept up a slow but, in some degree, an efficient movement of the blood through the brain. The truth of this suggestion might be tested by introducing some easily recognized, non

  13. THE RESUSCITATION OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G N; Guthrie, C C; Burns, R L; Pike, F H

    1906-03-26

    the same side as the stimulus, crossing of reflexes, to involve the other side, not occurring till later. As a rule, all reflexes return, and a short period of quiet follows. The anterior part of the cord again becomes irritable to strychnine, but succumbs to its action before the normal part. Spasms, of tonic, clonic, or mixed type, then appear, terminating in (a) death, (b) partial or (c) complete recovery. In partial recovery, disturbances of locomotion, such as walking in a circle, paralysis, dementia, loss of sight, hearing, and general intelligence, characterize the post-convulsive period. After complete recovery, there is a return to normal deportment. No gross lesions of the nervous system, other than a congested appearance of the previously anaemic area, were observed. Transection of the spinal cord stops the spasms below the level of section. Hemisection of the cord stops the spasms on the same side, below the level of section. Death, without any return of the reflexes after release of the cerebral arteries, has followed an occlusion of seven and one-half minutes. Respiration has returned after an occlusion of one hour. Five animals have recovered completely after an occlusion of seven minutes or more. Only one animal has recovered completely after an occlusion of fifteen minutes. No animal has recovered completely after an occlusion of twenty minutes. In Herzen's (26) resuscitation of an animal after several hours of cerebral anaemia, there must have been some anastomotic channels to the brain. Mayer's (27) limit of ten to fifteen minutes of cerebral anaemia, beyond which resuscitation is not practicable, is close to the correct one. It appears to us that, in cases of resuscitation two hours after cessation of the heart-beat, (Prus., loc.cit.) the auricles must have kept up a slow but, in some degree, an efficient movement of the blood through the brain. The truth of this suggestion might be tested by introducing some easily recognized, non

  14. [Architectonics of the central nervous system in Acoela, Plathelminthes, and Rotifera].

    PubMed

    Kotikova, E A; Raĭĭkova, O I

    2008-01-01

    Based on the literature and own data, consecutive stages of development of the central nervous system (CNS) in the lower Bilateria are considered - separation of brain from parenchyma, formation of its own envelopes, and development of the stem and orthogonal nervous system. Results of histochemical (cholinergic and catecholaminergic) and immunocytochemical (5-HT- and FMRFamid immunoreactive) studies of the CNS in representatives of Acoela, free living and parasitizing Plathelminthes and Rotifera are considered. The comparative analysis makes it possible to describe development and complication of the initially primitive Bilateria plexus nervous system. A special attention will be paid to the Acoela phylogenesis, based on molecular-biology data and results of study of their nervous system.

  15. Gross anatomy of central nervous system in firefly, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudawiyah, Nur; Wahida, O. Nurul; Norela, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes for the first time the organization and fine structure of the central nervous system (CNS) in the fireflies, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae). The morphology of the CNS was examined by using Carl Zeiss AxioScope A1 photomicroscope with iSolution Lite software. Some specific structural features such as the localization of protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum in the brain region were analyzed. Other than that, the nerve cord and its peripheral structure were also analyzed. This study suggests that, there is a very obvious difference between male and female central nervous system which illustrates that they may differ in function in controlling physiological and behavioral activities.

  16. Video Views and Reviews: Neurulation and the Fashioning of the Vertebrate Central Nervous System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the first adult organ system to appear during vertebrate development, and the process of its emergence is commonly called neurulation. Such biological "urgency" is perhaps not surprising given the structural and functional complexity of the CNS and the importance of neural function to adaptive behavior and…

  17. Involvement of central nervous system in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Verma, A; Bisht, M S; Ahuja, G K

    1984-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked responses were recorded in 22 diabetic patients with a variable duration of illness (mean 5.8 years) and 14 normal healthy controls of comparable age. The initial 10 millisecond components, found to be most consistent and reproducible, were analysed. Variations in the form of individual wave latency, interpeak latencies and V wave amplitude were compared in both the groups. No difference was found in any of the parameters. It was concluded that central neural pathways are not involved at least initially in diabetes mellitus. PMID:6726270

  18. Similar chemokine receptor profiles in lymphomas with central nervous system involvement - possible biomarkers for patient selection for central nervous system prophylaxis, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Siria A; Pasanen, Anna Kaisa; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Sippola, Antti; Sormunen, Raija; Soini, Ylermi; Jantunen, Esa; Koivunen, Petri; Salokorpi, Niina; Bloigu, Risto; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Kuittinen, Outi

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse occurs in around 5% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. No biomarkers to identify high-risk patients have been discovered. We evaluated the expression of lymphocyte-guiding chemokine receptors in systemic and CNS lymphomas. Immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR7, CXCL12, and CXCL13 was performed on 89 tissue samples, including cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), secondary CNS lymphoma (sCNSL), and systemic DLBCL. Also, 10 reactive lymph node samples were included. Immunoelectron microscopy was performed on two PCNSLs, one sCNSL, one systemic DLBCL, and one reactive lymph node samples, and staining was performed for CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCL12, and CXCL13. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between clinical parameters, diagnostic groups, and chemokine receptor expression. Strong nuclear CXCR4 positivity correlated with systemic DLBCL, whereas strong cytoplasmic CXCR5 positivity correlated with CNS involvement (P = 0.003 and P = 0.039). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a nuclear CXCR4 staining in reactive lymph node, compared with cytoplasmic and membranous localization seen in CNS lymphomas. We found that CNS lymphoma presented a chemokine receptor profile different from systemic disease. Our findings give new information on the CNS tropism of DLBCL and, if confirmed, may contribute to more effective targeting of CNS prophylaxis among patients with DLBCL.

  19. Potential central nervous system antitumor agents. Hydantoin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peng, G W; Marquez, V E; Driscoll, J S

    1975-08-01

    Hydantoin derivatives of varying lipophilic character were prepared as nitrogen mustard carriers for CNS antitumor evaluation. Activity was studied in the murine ependymoblastoma brain tumor system. Multiple cures were observed for three of the four analogs examined. The compounds were also active in the intraperitoneal leukemia L1210 and P388 systems as well as in B16 melanoma and Lewis lung carcinoma.

  20. Baroreflex failure in a patient with central nervous system lesions involving the nucleus tractus solitarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Whetsell, W. O.; Jobe, J.; Nadeau, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Animal studies have shown the importance of the nucleus tractus solitarii, a collection of neurons in the brain stem, in the acute regulation of blood pressure. Impulses arising from the carotid and aortic baroreceptors converge in this center, where the first synapse of the baroreflex is located. Stimulation of the nucleus tractus solitarii provides an inhibitory signal to other brain stem structures, particularly the rostral ventrolateral medulla, resulting in a reduction in sympathetic outflow and a decrease in blood pressure. Conversely, experimental lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii lead to loss of baroreflex control of blood pressure, sympathetic activation, and severe hypertension in animals. In humans, baroreflex failure due to deafferentation of baroreceptors has been previously reported and is characterized by episodes of severe hypertension and tachycardia. We present a patient with an undetermined process of the central nervous system characterized pathologically by ubiquitous infarctions that were particularly prominent in the nucleus tractus solitarii bilaterally but spared the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Absence of a functioning baroreflex was evidenced by the lack of reflex tachycardia to the hypotensive effects of sodium nitroprusside, exaggerated pressor responses to handgrip and cold pressor test, and exaggerated depressor responses to meals and centrally acting alpha 2-agonists. This clinicopathological correlate suggests that the patient's baroreflex failure can be explained by the unique combination of the destruction of sympathetic inhibitory centers (ie, the nucleus tractus solitarii) and preservation of centers that exert a positive modulation on sympathetic tone (ie, the rostral ventrolateral medulla).

  1. Multifunctionalized electrospun silk fibers promote axon regeneration in central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Wittmer, Corinne R.; Claudepierre, Thomas; Reber, Michael; Wiedemann, Peter; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kaplan, David

    2012-01-01

    The repair of central nerves remains a major challenge in regenerative neurobiology. Regenerative guides possessing critical features such as cell adhesion, physical guiding and topical stimulation are needed. To generate such a guide, silk protein materials are prepared using electrospinning. The silk is selected for this study due to its biocompatibility and ability to be electrospun for the formation of aligned biofunctional nanofibers. The addition of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) or both to the electrospun fibers enable enhanced function without impact to the structure or the surface morphology. Only a small fraction of the loaded growth factors is released over time allowing the fibers to continue to provide these factors to the cells for extended periods of time. The entrapped factors remain active and available to the cells as rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exhibit longer axonal growth when in contact with the biofunctionalized fibers. Compare to non-functionalized fibers, the growth of neurites increased 2 fold on fibers containing BDNF, 2.5 fold with fibers containing CNTF and by almost 3-fold on fibers containing both factors. The results demonstrate the potential of aligned and functionalized electrospun silk fibers to promote nerve growth in the central nervous system, underlying the great potential of complex biomaterials in neuroregenerative strategies following axotomy and nerve crush traumas. PMID:22844266

  2. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  3. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VII. Central Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the central nervous system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians. Four units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology; (2) assessment of patients with neurological problems; (3) pathophysiology and management of neurological problems; (4)…

  4. Assessment of Visual Acuity in Relation to Central Nervous System Activation in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Karl; Grottland, Havar; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity, using Teller Acuity Cards, was combined with observations of behavioral state to indicate central nervous system activation in 24 individuals with mental retardation. Results indicate that forced-choice preferential-looking technique can be used to test visual acuity in this population unless the participant is drowsy.…

  5. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. 882.5550 Section 882.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... shunt is a device or combination of devices used to divert fluid from the brain or other part of...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. 882.5550 Section 882.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... shunt is a device or combination of devices used to divert fluid from the brain or other part of...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. 882.5550 Section 882.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... shunt is a device or combination of devices used to divert fluid from the brain or other part of...

  8. Central nervous system infection due to Mycobacterium haemophilum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buppajarntham, Aubonphan; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rutjanawech, Sasinuj; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is an environmental organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who had central nervous system infection due to M. haemophilum. The diagnosis required brain tissue procurement and molecular identification method while the treatment outcome was unfavourable.

  9. Analyzing cell fusion events within the central nervous system using bone marrow chimerism.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    It has emerged that cells which typically reside in the bone marrow have the capacity to cross the blood brain barrier and contribute genetic material to a range of neuronal cell types within the central nervous system. One such mechanism to account for this phenomenon is cellular fusion, occurring between migrating bone marrow-derived stem cells and neuronal cells in-situ. Biologically, the significance as to why cells from distinct lineages fuse with cells of the central nervous system is, as yet, unclear. Growing evidence however suggests that these cell fusion events could provide an efficient means of rescuing the highly complex and differentiated neuronal cell types that cannot be replaced in adulthood. To facilitate further understanding of cell fusion within the central nervous system, we describe here a technique to establish chimeric mice that are stably reconstituted with green fluorescent protein expressing sex-mismatched bone marrow. These chimeric mice are known to represent an excellent model for studying bone marrow cell migration and infiltration throughout the body, while in parallel, as will be described here, also provide a means to neatly analyze both bone marrow-derived cell fusion and trans-differentiation events within the central nervous system.

  10. Association of perinatal events, epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency.

    PubMed Central

    Rantakallio, P; Koiranen, M; Möttönen, J

    1992-01-01

    The association of perinatal events, childhood epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency was studied prospectively in a geographically defined population of 5966 males in northern Finland. Those who had obtained a criminal record up to the age of 22 years, totalling 355, or 6.0%, were defined as delinquents. The incidence of delinquency was not increased in males with a birth weight less than 2500 g or greater than 4000 g, preterm births < 37 weeks' gestation, or those with perinatal brain damage or having epileptic seizures before 14 years of age. The incidence was increased by 6.8% in the group of males with birth weights less than 3500 g, but not significantly increased after standardisation for a number of social and demographic background variables. The incidence was increased by 10.3% among the males who had had a central nervous system trauma by the age of 14 years, however, and this factor remained significant when social and demographic factors were standardised by regression analysis, with an odds ratio of 1.9 for all males with a criminal record and an odds ratio of 3.15 for those who had committed a violent crime. Previous central nervous system trauma may be a cause of delinquency, or another possibility is that the type of behaviour pursued by males who are likely to commit a violent crime will expose them more often to accidents which can result in central nervous system trauma. PMID:1489225

  11. Maturation of the Central Nervous System as Related to Communication and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Terry; Proctor, Adele

    1996-01-01

    Major events in the maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) are reviewed relative to milestones for communication, speech, language, and cognition. Early insults to the CNS and their neuropsychological consequences are discussed. The role of patterns of myelination and dendritic branching to evolving stages of language and cognition are…

  12. Hemichorea in a patient with HIV-associated central nervous system histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Bellmann, Ingrid; Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Flores-Cantu, Hazael; Calderon-Hernandez, Hector J; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system histoplasmosis is a rare opportunistic infection with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. We describe the first case of human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral histoplasmosis presenting with hemichorea. The patient recovered after treatment with conventional amphotericin B and itraconazole. PMID:25505048

  13. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. 882.5550 Section 882.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... shunt is a device or combination of devices used to divert fluid from the brain or other part of...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. 882.5550 Section 882.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... shunt is a device or combination of devices used to divert fluid from the brain or other part of...

  15. Central Nervous System Regulation of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Madden, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermogenesis, the production of heat energy, in brown adipose tissue is a significant component of the homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during the challenge of low environmental temperature in many species from mouse to man and plays a key role in elevating body temperature during the febrile response to infection. The sympathetic neural outflow determining brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is regulated by neural networks in the CNS which increase BAT sympathetic nerve activity in response to cutaneous and deep body thermoreceptor signals. Many behavioral states, including wakefulness, immunologic responses, and stress, are characterized by elevations in core body temperature to which central command-driven BAT activation makes a significant contribution. Since energy consumption during BAT thermogenesis involves oxidation of lipid and glucose fuel molecules, the CNS network driving cold-defensive and behavioral state-related BAT activation is strongly influenced by signals reflecting the short and long-term availability of the fuel molecules essential for BAT metabolism and, in turn, the regulation of BAT thermogenesis in response to metabolic signals can contribute to energy balance, regulation of body adipose stores and glucose utilization. This review summarizes our understanding of the functional organization and neurochemical influences within the CNS networks that modulate the level of BAT sympathetic nerve activity to produce the thermoregulatory and metabolic alterations in BAT thermogenesis and BAT energy expenditure that contribute to overall energy homeostasis and the autonomic support of behavior. PMID:25428857

  16. Potential central nervous system antitumor agents. Aziridinylbenzoquinones. 1.

    PubMed

    Khan, A H; Driscoll, J S

    1976-02-01

    A series of 3,6-substituted 2,5-diaziridinyl-1,4-benzoquinones was prepared as potential CNS antitumor agents. Activity was evaluated in the murine leukemia L1210 system. The diurethane derivative 9 was found to have significant activity in that system as well as in the intraperitoneal P388 and B16 tumor models. Marginal Lewis lung activity was observed. Reproducible activity was seen in the intracerebral L1210 and P388 systems. Multiple cures were observed in the murine ependymoblastoma brain tumor model. The effect of substituent type on aziridinylquinone activity is discussed.

  17. Androgen-activating enzymes in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Poletti, A; Martini, L

    1999-01-01

    In the rat brain, several steroids can be converted by specific enzymes to either more potent compounds or to derivatives showing new biological effects. One of the most studied enzyme is the 5alpha-reductase (5alpha-R), which acts on 3keto-delta4 steroids. In males, testosterone is the main substrate and gives rise to the most potent natural androgen dihydrotestosterone. In females, progesterone is reduced to dihydroprogesterone, a precursor of allopregnanolone, a natural anxiolytic/anesthetic steroid. Other substrates are some gluco- and minero-corticoids. Two isoforms of the 5alpha-R, with limited degree of homology, have been cloned: 5alpha-R type 1 and type 2. The 5alpha-R type 1 possesses low affinity for the various substrates and is widely distributed in the body, with the highest levels in the liver; in the brain, this isoform is expressed throughout life and does not appear to be controlled by androgens. 5Alpha-R type 1 in the rat brain is mainly concentrated in myelin membranes, where it might be involved in the catabolism of potentially neurotoxic steroids. The 5alpha-R type 2 shows high affinity for the various substrates, a peculiar pH optimum at acidic values and is localized in androgen-dependent structures. In the rat brain, the type 2 isoform is expressed at high levels only in the perinatal period and is controlled by androgens, at least in males. In adulthood, the type 2 gene appears to be specifically expressed in localised brain regions, like the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. The 5alpha-R type 2 is present in the GT1 cells, a model of LHRH-secreting neurons. These cells also contain the androgen receptor, which is probably involved in the central negative feedback effect exerted by androgens on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The physiological significance of these and additional data will be discussed.

  18. Tuberculous ventriculitis: A rare complication of central nervous system tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Siavash; Soleiman-Meigooni, Saeed; Rajabi, Jalil; Asgari, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculous ventriculitis is an inflammatory infection of the ventricular system of the brain, and is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We herein present the case of an immunocompromised patient with brain tuberculomas who developed ventriculitis during treatment. The patient was successfully treated with a high dose of steroid, long-term antituberculosis drugs, and aggressive supportive care. PMID:27242238

  19. Injuries of the central nervous system - mobile phone consultations.

    PubMed

    Filip, Michal; Linzer, Petr; Sámal, Filip; Jurek, Patrik; Tesař, Jiří

    2010-10-01

    Transmission of visual documentation between a neurosurgery center and a regional hospital, with a mobile phone, significantly improves consultation on a craniocerebral injury. This is one of the methods of fast consultation on image documentation (CT). We reported on one year of experience (September 2007 to September 2008) of our department with this method of image transmission in 16 patients with craniocerebral injury. The images were exported, via the Internet, from local hospitals through the PACS system [Picture Archiving and Communication System], in DICOM III format, to the server of the Regional Hospital of T. Ba̕a, (KNTB). Browsing of the acquired image documentation at particular stations was possible with the xVision browser. The data were exported to a secure hospital Web server, IIS60, to enable consultation on the images, which were changed to JPEG format. The consulting physician was connected to this server with his/her mobile phone by means of the Internet browser. After establishing the connection, it downloads and gradually displays the images on the screen of the mobile phone. The whole process takes approximately 10 minutes. After comparing the images on the screen of the mobile phone and on the workstation using the xVision browser, we verified that there was no difference in the quality of imaging of the pathological lesions recorded with CT.

  20. Injuries of the central nervous system – mobile phone consultations

    PubMed Central

    Filip, Michal; Linzer, Petr; Šámal, Filip; Jurek, Patrik; Tesař, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Summary Transmission of visual documentation between a neurosurgery center and a regional hospital, with a mobile phone, significantly improves consultation on a craniocerebral injury. This is one of the methods of fast consultation on image documentation (CT). We reported on one year of experience (September 2007 to September 2008) of our department with this method of image transmission in 16 patients with craniocerebral injury. The images were exported, via the Internet, from local hospitals through the PACS system [Picture Archiving and Communication System], in DICOM III format, to the server of the Regional Hospital of T. Ba̕a, (KNTB). Browsing of the acquired image documentation at particular stations was possible with the xVision browser. The data were exported to a secure hospital Web server, IIS60, to enable consultation on the images, which were changed to JPEG format. The consulting physician was connected to this server with his/her mobile phone by means of the Internet browser. After establishing the connection, it downloads and gradually displays the images on the screen of the mobile phone. The whole process takes approximately 10 minutes. After comparing the images on the screen of the mobile phone and on the workstation using the xVision browser, we verified that there was no difference in the quality of imaging of the pathological lesions recorded with CT. PMID:22802801

  1. Analytical challenges for measuring steroid responses to stress, neurodegeneration and injury in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Michael; Guennoun, Rachida; Mattern, Claudia; Oudinet, Jean-Paul; Labombarda, Florencia; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Liere, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Levels of steroids in the adult central nervous system (CNS) show marked changes in response to stress, degenerative disorders and injury. However, their analysis in complex matrices such as fatty brain and spinal cord tissues, and even in plasma, requires accurate and precise analytical methods. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, even with prepurification steps, do not provide sufficient specificity, and they are at the origin of many inconsistent results in the literature. The analysis of steroids by mass spectrometric methods has become the gold standard for accurate and sensitive steroid analysis. However, these technologies involve multiple purification steps prone to errors, and they only provide accurate reference values when combined with careful sample workup. In addition, the interpretation of changes in CNS steroid levels is not an easy task because of their multiple sources: the endocrine glands and the local synthesis by neural cells. In the CNS, decreased steroid levels may reflect alterations of their biosynthesis, as observed in the case of chronic stress, post-traumatic stress disorders or depressive episodes. In such cases, return to normalization by administering exogenous hormones or by stimulating their endogenous production may have beneficial effects. On the other hand, increases in CNS steroids in response to acute stress, degenerative processes or injury may be part of endogenous protective or rescue programs, contributing to the resistance of neural cells to stress and insults. The aim of this review is to encourage a more critical reading of the literature reporting steroid measures, and to draw attention to the absolute need for well-validated methods. We discuss reported findings concerning changing steroid levels in the nervous system by insisting on methodological issues. An important message is that even recent mass spectrometric methods have their limits, and they only become reliable tools if combined

  2. Intranasal drug delivery to the central nervous system: present status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex task. Different parameters may negatively influence effective targeting of the CNS and drug compliance, for example, poor brain-blood barrier (BBB) permeability, patient forgetfulness or neglect, and lack of collaboration between caregivers and patients. Pharmaceutical science is constantly looking for new administration strategies for efficient drug delivery to the CNS that could obviate these problems. Drugs can reach the brain through the skin, nasal cavity and oral cavity, and while effective transport of drugs from skin and nasal cavity to the CNS has been documented, these studies did not stimulate the introduction of a substantial number of new drug formulations to treat CNS disorders. Nasal drug delivery, generally used to administer locally acting molecules, is not common for systemic administration, although the possibility and importance of such systemic administration is suggested by several studies. This paper reviewed different anatomical and pharmaceutical factors related to drug administration through the nasal route, and explored whether nasal delivery of selected CNS drugs could improve their pharmacokinetics and patient compliance. This route offers attractive advantages, and pharmaceutical scientists and anatomists should collaborate to improve CNS drug compliance and to increase the number of compounds that can be administered intranasally.

  3. The Impact of Nandrolone Decanoate on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Busardò, Francesco P.; Frati, Paola; Sanzo, Mariantonia Di; Napoletano, Simona; Pinchi, Enrica; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Nandrolone is included in the class II of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) which is composed of 19-nor-testosterone-derivates. In general, AAS is a broad and rapidly increasing group of synthetic androgens used both clinically and illicitly. AAS in general and nandrolone decanoate (ND) in particular have been associated with several behavioral disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature concerning studies dealing with ND exposure on animal models, mostly rats that mimic human abuse systems (i.e. supraphysiological doses). We have focused in particular on researches that have investigated how ND alters the function and expression of neuronal signaling molecules that underlie behavior, anxiety, aggression, learning and memory, reproductive behaviors, locomotion and reward. PMID:26074747

  4. The impact of nandrolone decanoate on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco P; Frati, Paola; Sanzo, Mariantonia Di; Napoletano, Simona; Pinchi, Enrica; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Nandrolone is included in the class II of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) which is composed of 19-nor-testosterone-derivates. In general, AAS is a broad and rapidly increasing group of synthetic androgens used both clinically and illicitly. AAS in general and nandrolone decanoate (ND) in particular have been associated with several behavioral disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature concerning studies dealing with ND exposure on animal models, mostly rats that mimic human abuse systems (i.e. supraphysiological doses). We have focused in particular on researches that have investigated how ND alters the function and expression of neuronal signaling molecules that underlie behavior, anxiety, aggression, learning and memory, reproductive behaviors, locomotion and reward. PMID:26074747

  5. [Pharmacological correction of central nervous system function in exposure to Coriolis acceleration].

    PubMed

    Karkishchenko, N N; Dimitriadi, N A; Molchanovskiĭ, V V

    1986-01-01

    Healthy volunteers with a low vestibular tolerance were exposed to Coriolis acceleration. Potassium orotate, pyracetame and riboxine were used as prophylactic measures against disorders in the function of the vestibular apparatus and higher compartments of the higher nervous system. The central nervous function was assessed with respect to the spectral power of electroencephalograms, short-term memory and mental performance. Potassium orotate given at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight/day during 12-14 days as well as pyracetame given at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight/day during 3 or 7 days increased significantly statokinetic tolerance and produced a protective effect on the central nervous function against Coriolis acceleration.

  6. The E. coli CNF1 as a Pioneering Therapy for the Central Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Travaglione, Sara; Loizzo, Stefano; Ballan, Giulia; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), a protein toxin from pathogenic E. coli, modulates the Rho GTPases, thus, directing the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In the nervous system, the Rho GTPases play a key role in several processes, controlling the morphogenesis of dendritic spines and synaptic plasticity in brain tissues. This review is focused on the peculiar property of CNF1 to enhance brain plasticity in in vivo animal models of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and on its possible application in therapy. PMID:24402235

  7. Viral Vectors for Gene Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Thomas B.; Gray, Steven J.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2011-01-01

    The potential benefits of gene therapy for neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s are enormous. Even a delay in the onset of severe symptoms would be invaluable to patients suffering from these and other diseases. Significant effort has been placed in developing vectors capable of delivering therapeutic genes to the CNS in order to treat neurological disorders. At the forefront of potential vectors, viral systems have evolved to efficiently deliver their genetic material to a cell. The biology of different viruses offers unique solutions to the challenges of gene therapy, such as cell targeting, transgene expression and vector production. It is important to consider the natural biology of a vector when deciding whether it will be the most effective for a specific therapeutic function. In this review, we outline desired features of the ideal vector for gene delivery to the CNS and discuss how well available viral vectors compare to this model. Adeno-associated virus, retrovirus, adenovirus and herpesvirus vectors are covered. Focus is placed on features of the natural biology that have made these viruses effective tools for gene delivery with emphasis on their application in the CNS. Our goal is to provide insight into features of the optimal vector and which viral vectors can provide these features. PMID:22001604

  8. Central nervous system circuits modified in heart failure: pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Pinto, Bernardo; Ferreira-Pinto, Manuel J; Santos, Mário; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2014-11-01

    The pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) is characterized by an abnormal activation of neurohumoral systems, including the sympathetic nervous and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, which have long-term deleterious effects on the disease progression. Perpetuation of this neurohumoral activation is partially dependent of central nervous system (CNS) pathways, mainly involving the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and some regions of the brainstem. Modifications in these integrative CNS circuits result in the attenuation of sympathoinhibitory and exacerbation of sympathoexcitatory pathways. In addition to the regulation of sympathetic outflow, these central pathways coordinate a complex network of agents with an established pathophysiological relevance in HF such as angiotensin, aldosterone, and proinflammatory cytokines. Central pathways could be potential targets in HF therapy since the current mainstay of HF pharmacotherapy aims primarily at antagonizing the peripheral mechanisms. Thus, in the present review, we describe the role of CNS pathways in HF pathophysiology and as potential novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels as Potential Pharmacological Targets in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Diseases.

    PubMed

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely expressed in the body and represent good sensors for detecting protons. The pH drop in the nervous system is equivalent to ischemia and acidosis, and ASICs are very good detectors in discriminating slight changes in acidity. ASICs are important pharmacological targets being involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes affecting both the peripheral nervous system (e.g., peripheral pain, diabetic neuropathy) and the central nervous system (e.g., stroke, epilepsy, migraine, anxiety, fear, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.). This review discusses the role played by ASICs in different pathologies and the pharmacological agents acting on ASICs that might represent promising drugs. As the majority of above-mentioned pathologies involve not only neuronal dysfunctions but also microvascular alterations, in the next future, ASICs may be also considered as potential pharmacological targets at the vasculature level. Perspectives and limitations in the use of ASICs antagonists and modulators as pharmaceutical agents are also discussed.

  10. [Molecular genetics of familial tumour syndromes of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Szepesi, Rita; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-02-01

    Although most of the central nervous system tumours are sporadic, rarely they are associated with familial tumour syndromes. These disorders usually present with an autosomal dominant inheritance and neoplasia develops at younger age than in sporadic cases. Most of these tumours are bilateral, multiplex or multifocal. The causative mutations occur in genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell growth, differentiation and DNA repair. Studying these hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes associated with nervous system tumours can facilitate the deeper understanding of the molecular background of sporadic tumours and the development of novel therapeutic agents. This review is an update on hereditary tumour syndromes with nervous system involvement with emphasis on molecular genetic characteristics and their clinical implications.

  11. 75 FR 56548 - Joint Meeting of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System... the public. Name of Committees: Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee and...

  12. IL-10-dependent Tr1 cells attenuate astrocyte activation and ameliorate chronic central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Cunha, Andre Pires Da; Madi, Asaf; Beynon, Vanessa; Yang, Zhiping; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Prat, Alexandre; Sobel, Raymond A.; Kobzik, Lester; Lassmann, Hans; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    See Winger and Zamvil (doi:10.1093/brain/aww121) for a scientific commentary on this article. The innate immune system plays a central role in the chronic central nervous system inflammation that drives neurological disability in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, for which there are no effective treatments. The mucosal immune system is a unique tolerogenic organ that provides a physiological approach for the induction of regulatory T cells. Here we report that nasal administration of CD3-specific antibody ameliorates disease in a progressive animal model of multiple sclerosis. This effect is IL-10-dependent and is mediated by the induction of regulatory T cells that share a similar transcriptional profile to Tr1 regulatory cells and that suppress the astrocyte inflammatory transcriptional program. Treatment results in an attenuated inflammatory milieu in the central nervous system, decreased microglia activation, reduced recruitment of peripheral monocytes, stabilization of the blood–brain barrier and less neurodegeneration. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis and potentially other types of chronic central nervous system inflammation. PMID:27246324

  13. Thioredoxin System Regulation in the Central Nervous System: Experimental Models and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Gonsebatt, María E.; Guevara, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species produced continuously during oxidative metabolism are generated at very high rates in the brain. Therefore, defending against oxidative stress is an essential task within the brain. An important cellular system against oxidative stress is the thioredoxin system (TS). TS is composed of thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, and NADPH. This review focuses on the evidence gathered in recent investigations into the central nervous system, specifically the different brain regions in which the TS is expressed. Furthermore, we address the conditions that modulate the thioredoxin system in both, animal models and the postmortem brains of human patients associated with the most common neurodegenerative disorders, in which the thioredoxin system could play an important part. PMID:24723994

  14. [Effects of Bioactive Substances from Citrus on the Central Nervous System and Utilization as Food Material].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that 3,5,6,7,8,3',4'-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF) and auraptene (AUR) have neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system. HMF, a citrus flavonoid, altered NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801-induced memory dysfunction and schizophrenia-positive symptom-like behavior. HMF also showed a protective effect against ischemia-induced short-term memory dysfunction. In the ischemic brain, HMF induced the following protective effects against brain dysfunction: 1) rescue of neuronal cell death in the hippocampus; 2) increased production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor; 3) stimulation of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone; 4) activation of the autophosphorylation of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II; and 5) suppression of microglial activation. On the other hand, AUR, a citrus coumarin, ameliorated lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in the brain as shown by inhibition of microglial activation and inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the hippocampus. AUR also showed antiinflammatory effects on the ischemic brain by inhibiting microglial activation, COX-2 expression, and neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The peel of kawachibankan (Citrus kawachiensis), a noted citrus product of Ehime prefecture, Japan, contains AUR, HMF, naringin, and narirutin. The dried powder of both the peel and juice had antiinflammatory effects in the mouse hippocampus, suggesting that citrus compounds may be beneficial as neuroprotective agents in the treatment of neurological disorders.

  15. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  16. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27555221

  17. Kynurenines and Multiple Sclerosis: The Dialogue between the Immune System and the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Rajda, Cecilia; Majláth, Zsófia; Pukoli, Dániel; Vécsei, László

    2015-08-06

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which axonal transection takes place in parallel with acute inflammation to various, individual extents. The importance of the kynurenine pathway in the physiological functions and pathological processes of the nervous system has been extensively investigated, but it has additionally been implicated as having a regulatory function in the immune system. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway have been described in both preclinical and clinical investigations of multiple sclerosis. These observations led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets in multiple sclerosis, such as synthetic tryptophan analogs, endogenous tryptophan metabolites (e.g., cinnabarinic acid), structural analogs (laquinimod, teriflunomid, leflunomid and tranilast), indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors (1MT and berberine) and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibitors (nicotinylalanine and Ro 61-8048). The kynurenine pathway is a promising novel target via which to influence the immune system and to achieve neuroprotection, and further research is therefore needed with the aim of developing novel drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases.

  18. Naeglaeria infection of the central nervous system, CT scan findings: a case series.

    PubMed

    Naqi, Rohana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    The imaging findings in four cases of a rare infection of the central nervous system caused by amoebae, Naeglaeria fowleri are presented. Naeglaeria fowleri are pathogenic free-living amoebae. They cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system. The computed tomography brain findings in 3 (75%) of our cases of pan amoebic meningoencephalitis showed non-specific brain oedema; 2 (66%) of these cases also had moderate hydrocephalus and among that 1 (50%) case showed an old lacunar infarction in peri-ventricular region. In the remaining 1 (25%) case the scan was normal with no evidence of oedema or abnormal lesion. Out of three cases with diffuse brain oedema, postcontrast images showed abnormal meningeal enhancement throughout the brain parenchyma in 1 (33%) case. However, no definite focal enhancing lesion was noted. In the rest of the cases, no abnormal parenchymal or meningeal enhancement was seen on post-contrast images. PMID:23914650

  19. Detection of Theiler's virus RNA in mouse central nervous system by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Stroop, W G; Baringer, J R; Brahic, M

    1981-12-01

    The location and distribution of viral RNA were examined in the central nervous system tissues of weanling mice acutely infected with the GDVII strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. Viral RNA was detected by autoradiography following in situ hybridization of a 3H-labeled DNA synthesized in vitro complementary to purified viral RNA. Viral RNA was detected in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, brainstem nuclei, thalamus, basal ganglia, and spinal cord. Autoradiographic grains could be detected in the axonal and dendritic processes of many infected neurons. No viral RNA was detected in any cell of the cerebellum or white matter. In addition to demonstrating the location of viral RNA in infected central nervous system tissues, and hence the sites of viral replication during this acute polioencephalomyelitis, they indicate that necrosis of hippocampal neurons is due to lytic infection, rather than to hypoxia.

  20. Neural Stem Cells: Implications for the Conventional Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Barani, Igor J.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lin, Peck-Sun . E-mail: plin@vcu.edu

    2007-06-01

    Advances in basic neuroscience related to neural stem cells and their malignant counterparts are challenging traditional models of central nervous system tumorigenesis and intrinsic brain repair. Neurogenesis persists into adulthood predominantly in two neurogenic centers: subventricular zone and subgranular zone. Subventricular zone is situated adjacent to lateral ventricles and subgranular zone is confined to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Neural stem cells not only self-renew and differentiate along multiple lineages in these regions, but also contribute to intrinsic brain plasticity and repair. Ionizing radiation can depopulate these exquisitely sensitive regions directly or impair in situ neurogenesis by indirect, dose-dependent and inflammation-mediated mechanisms, even at doses <2 Gy. This review discusses the fundamental neural stem cell concepts within the framework of cumulative clinical experience with the treatment of central nervous system malignancies using conventional radiotherapy.

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Amelia J; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S; Grant, Gary D; McDermott, Catherine M; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K

    2014-11-10

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins' effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins' effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins' possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  2. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system secondary to spinal ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Vargas, Andres A; Gomori, J Moshe; Harnof, Sagi; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-11-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system is a syndrome caused by deposition of hemosiderin in the subpial layers of the central nervous system, occurring as a result of recurrent asymptomatic or symptomatic bleeding into the subarachnoid space. We report a rare case of superficial siderosis in a 33-year-old man who presented with sensorineural hearing loss. The diagnosis of superficial siderosis on MRI brain studies led to further investigations with detection of a spinal ependymoma at L1-L2, compressing the cauda equina. Gross total resection of the tumor arrested the progression of the neurological deterioration. Our report underlies the importance of early diagnosis and surgical management, with imaging examination of the full neuroaxis to identify the source of bleeding, to halt disease progression and improve prognosis.

  3. A Role of Ginseng and Its Constituents in the Treatment of Central Nervous System Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rokot, Natasya Trivena; Kairupan, Timothy Sean; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Runtuwene, Joshua; Kapantow, Nova Hellen; Amitani, Marie; Morinaga, Akinori; Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng, a perennial plant belonging to the Panax genus of the Araliaceae family, has been used in China, Korea, and Japan as a traditional herbal medicine for thousands of years. Ginseng is recorded to have exhibited a wide variety of beneficial pharmacological effects and has become a popular and worldwide known health supplement and drug. The protective effects of ginseng on central nervous system are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are concisely introduced. The molecular mechanisms of the effects of ginseng on central nervous system, mainly focused on the neuroprotection properties of ginseng, memory, and learning enhanced properties, and the effects on neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Thus, ginseng and its constituents are of potential merits in the treatment of cerebral disorders. PMID:27630732

  4. Effects of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra on the central nervous system in mice.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Nilgün; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Aydin, Süleyman; Oztürk, Yusuf; Caliş, Ihsan

    2002-11-01

    A methanolic extact of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra roots has been investigated for its possible effects on the central nervous system of mice. At doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg (i.p.), the methanol extract of Gentiana roots caused a significant increase in the swimming endurance test and exhibited slight analgesic activity, but no lethality in mice suggesting some activity on the central nervous system. However, there was no indication of sedation or muscular fatigue at the doses employed. HPLC analysis showed that three secoiridoid compounds, gentiopicroside, swertiamarine and sweroside were present and may have been responsible for the CNS effects of the methanol extract of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra roots.

  5. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tommy L. H.; Cartagena, Ana M.; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M.

    2016-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated. PMID:27366189

  6. Central nervous system disorders and possible brain type carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Y; Tomoda, A; Miike, T; Matsukura, M; Miyatake, M; Narazaki, O

    1994-01-01

    We describe two male infants with central nervous system disorders, i.e. infantile spasms in one and athetotic quadriplegia in the other, and with recurrent attacks of high plasma creatine kinase levels induced by viral infections. Although carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) activity in biopsied muscle was normal in both cases, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) was decreased to 37% and 25% of the control value, respectively. Meanwhile, to determine whether or not and how CPT exists in the central nervous system (CNS), we studied animal brain tissues. CPT activity was demonstrated in almost all regions, especially in the brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord. Although CPT deficiency can be classified into hepatic (CPT I) and muscular (CPT II) presentations, these data suggest that another symptomatology of CPT II deficiency with CNS involvement (brain type?) might exist. PMID:8048703

  7. A Role of Ginseng and Its Constituents in the Treatment of Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rokot, Natasya Trivena; Kairupan, Timothy Sean; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Runtuwene, Joshua; Kapantow, Nova Hellen; Amitani, Marie; Morinaga, Akinori; Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng, a perennial plant belonging to the Panax genus of the Araliaceae family, has been used in China, Korea, and Japan as a traditional herbal medicine for thousands of years. Ginseng is recorded to have exhibited a wide variety of beneficial pharmacological effects and has become a popular and worldwide known health supplement and drug. The protective effects of ginseng on central nervous system are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are concisely introduced. The molecular mechanisms of the effects of ginseng on central nervous system, mainly focused on the neuroprotection properties of ginseng, memory, and learning enhanced properties, and the effects on neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Thus, ginseng and its constituents are of potential merits in the treatment of cerebral disorders. PMID:27630732

  8. Physiological, pathological, and engineered cell identity reprogramming in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek K; Wang, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-07-01

    Multipotent neural stem cells persist in restricted regions of the adult mammalian central nervous system. These proliferative cells differentiate into diverse neuron subtypes to maintain neural homeostasis. This endogenous process can be reprogrammed as a compensatory response to physiological cues, traumatic injury, and neurodegeneration. In addition to innate neurogenesis, recent research has demonstrated that new neurons can be engineered via cell identity reprogramming in non-neurogenic regions of the adult central nervous system. A comprehensive understanding of these reprogramming mechanisms will be essential to the development of therapeutic neural regeneration strategies that aim to improve functional recovery after injury and neurodegeneration. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:499-517. doi: 10.1002/wdev.234 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27258392

  9. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy L H; Cartagena, Ana M; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2016-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated. PMID:27366189

  10. Central nervous system malformations in relation to two polyvinyl chloride production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenman, K.D.; Rizzo, J.E.; Conomos, M.G.; Halpin, G.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A modified case-control study was conducted for selected birth defects that occurred among residents who lived in areas that surrounded two vinyl chloride polymerization facilities in New Jersey. Odds ratios for central nervous system defects (ICD 9, 740-742) decreased as the distance the mothers' residences were located from the facilities increased. Higher odds ratios for central nervous system birth defects were found in the areas around the plant that had higher vinyl chloride emissions. None of the odds ratios, however, were statistically significant. The differences in concentrations of emissions from the different plants may contribute to the discrepancies reported in previous studies wherein the risk of environmental exposure to vinyl chloride was assessed.

  11. Diffuse periventricular calcification and brain atrophy: A case of neonatal central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas R; Datlow, Mitchell D; Nidecker, Anna E

    2016-10-01

    TORCH refers to the most common congenitally acquired infections: toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus. Neonatal cytomegalovirus infection remains a common cause of congenital infection worldwide with effects ranging from hearing impairment to significant neurological morbidity. We report a case of a term neonate with ventriculomegaly on prenatal ultrasound who presented with low birth weight, small head circumference, hepatosplenomegaly, and purpuric rash on physical exam. Central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection typically shows periventricular calcifications and associated deep white matter damage and ventriculomegaly. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have different roles in the diagnosis of congenital central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection. Many imaging features of congenital cytomegalovirus are distinctive, and can spur a diagnostic work-up as well as help provide a prognosis. PMID:27531861

  12. Primary central nervous system peripheral T-cell lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Wludarski, Sheila; Hayashi-Silva, Luciana; Medeiros Filho, Plinio; Veras, Geni; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    A 10-year-old Caucasian boy was admitted to the hospital with a 3-month history of headache, vomiting, ataxia, and right amaurosis. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a solid, expansive, parasagittal mass in the right parietal hemisphere that extended sagitally to include the optical chiasm. The lesion was considered unresectable. Histology and immunophenotyping of biopsy tissue revealed characteristics of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. No other anatomical region, including bone marrow, was compromised. Primary T-cell lymphomas of the central nervous system are rare, especially in childhood. Here, we describe the rapidly deteriorating and fatal clinical course of a boy with a primary T-cell lymphoma in the central nervous system.

  13. A Role of Ginseng and Its Constituents in the Treatment of Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rokot, Natasya Trivena; Kairupan, Timothy Sean; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Runtuwene, Joshua; Kapantow, Nova Hellen; Amitani, Marie; Morinaga, Akinori; Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng, a perennial plant belonging to the Panax genus of the Araliaceae family, has been used in China, Korea, and Japan as a traditional herbal medicine for thousands of years. Ginseng is recorded to have exhibited a wide variety of beneficial pharmacological effects and has become a popular and worldwide known health supplement and drug. The protective effects of ginseng on central nervous system are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are concisely introduced. The molecular mechanisms of the effects of ginseng on central nervous system, mainly focused on the neuroprotection properties of ginseng, memory, and learning enhanced properties, and the effects on neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Thus, ginseng and its constituents are of potential merits in the treatment of cerebral disorders.

  14. [A case of central nervous system myelomatosis with complex chromosome aberrations].

    PubMed

    Bang, Hae In; Yoo, Jin Young; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Park, Rojin; Shin, Jeong Won; Choi, Tae Youn; Lee, Sang Cheol; Park, Hee Sook; Won, Jong Ho

    2010-08-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is very uncommon in multiple myeloma, observed in approximately 1% of the multiple myeloma patients. We report a case of central nervous system myelomatosis with complex chromosome aberrations in a 62-yr-old female patient, who had previously been diagnosed as multiple myeloma. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed 13q deletion, p53 gene deletion and IGH/FGFR3 rearrangement and chromosomal study showed complex chromosome aberrations. After four cycles of chemotherapy, the patient was admitted to the hematology department with severe headache. Plasma cells were found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and CSF immunoelectrophoresis revealed abnormal precipitin arcs against anti-IgG and anti-lambda antisera. She was given systemic chemotherapy and eight courses of intrathecal chemotherapy, which cleared plasma cells in the CSF. Two months later, she was given autologous stem cell transplantation. Three months after stem cell transplantation, central nervous system myelomatosis progressed to plasma cell leukemia and two months later, the patient expired.

  15. Metabolic Profiling and Phenotyping of Central Nervous System Diseases: Metabolites Bring Insights into Brain Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic phenotyping corresponds to the large-scale quantitative and qualitative analysis of the metabolome i.e., the low-molecular weight <1 KDa fraction in biological samples, and provides a key opportunity to advance neurosciences. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are the main analytical platforms used for metabolic profiling, enabling detection and quantitation of a wide range of compounds of particular neuro-pharmacological and physiological relevance, including neurotransmitters, secondary messengers, structural lipids, as well as their precursors, intermediates and degradation products. Metabolic profiling is therefore particularly indicated for the study of central nervous system by probing metabolic and neurochemical profiles of the healthy or diseased brain, in preclinical models or in human samples. In this review, we introduce the analytical and statistical requirements for metabolic profiling. Then, we focus on key studies in the field of metabolic profiling applied to the characterization of animal models and human samples of central nervous system disorders. We highlight the potential of metabolic profiling for pharmacological and physiological evaluation, diagnosis and drug therapy monitoring of patients affected by brain disorders. Finally, we discuss the current challenges in the field, including the development of systems biology and pharmacology strategies improving our understanding of metabolic signatures and mechanisms of central nervous system diseases. PMID:25616565

  16. Review: apoptotic mechanisms in bacterial infections of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Philipp, Mario T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we review the apoptotic mechanisms most frequently encountered in bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). We focus specifically on apoptosis of neural cells (neurons and glia), and provide first an overview of the phenomenon of apoptosis itself and its extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. We then describe apoptosis in the context of infectious diseases and inflammation caused by bacteria, and review its role in the pathogenesis of the most relevant bacterial infections of the CNS. PMID:23060884

  17. Differential diagnosis of central nervous system involvement in a patient treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    von Euler, Mia; Axelsson, Gudmundur; Helldén, Anders

    2013-08-01

    Acyclovir-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms (AINSs) may resemble several diseases of the central nervous system. Laboratory testing of acyclovir may be critical in supporting the diagnosis of AINSs when there is doubt. We present a case of suspected herpes encephalitis in which the diagnosis of AINSs was supported by therapeutic drug monitoring of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of acyclovir and its main metabolite 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine.

  18. Immunosenescence of microglia and macrophages: impact on the ageing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rawji, Khalil S; Mishra, Manoj K; Michaels, Nathan J; Rivest, Serge; Stys, Peter K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-03-01

    Ageing of the central nervous system results in a loss of both grey and white matter, leading to cognitive decline. Additional injury to both the grey and white matter is documented in many neurological disorders with ageing, including Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Accompanying neuronal and glial damage is an inflammatory response consisting of activated macrophages and microglia, innate immune cells demonstrated to be both beneficial and detrimental in neurological repair. This article will propose the following: (i) infiltrating macrophages age differently from central nervous system-intrinsic microglia; (ii) several mechanisms underlie the differential ageing process of these two distinct cell types; and (iii) therapeutic strategies that selectively target these diverse mechanisms may rejuvenate macrophages and microglia for repair in the ageing central nervous system. Most responses of macrophages are diminished with senescence, but activated microglia increase their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines while diminishing chemotactic and phagocytic activities. The senescence of macrophages and microglia has a negative impact on several neurological diseases, and the mechanisms underlying their age-dependent phenotypic changes vary from extrinsic microenvironmental changes to intrinsic changes in genomic integrity. We discuss the negative effects of age on neurological diseases, examine the response of senescent macrophages and microglia in these conditions, and propose a theoretical framework of therapeutic strategies that target the different mechanisms contributing to the ageing phenotype in these two distinct cell types. Rejuvenation of ageing macrophage/microglia may preserve neurological integrity and promote regeneration in the ageing central nervous system.

  19. Immunosenescence of microglia and macrophages: impact on the ageing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rawji, Khalil S; Mishra, Manoj K; Michaels, Nathan J; Rivest, Serge; Stys, Peter K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-03-01

    Ageing of the central nervous system results in a loss of both grey and white matter, leading to cognitive decline. Additional injury to both the grey and white matter is documented in many neurological disorders with ageing, including Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Accompanying neuronal and glial damage is an inflammatory response consisting of activated macrophages and microglia, innate immune cells demonstrated to be both beneficial and detrimental in neurological repair. This article will propose the following: (i) infiltrating macrophages age differently from central nervous system-intrinsic microglia; (ii) several mechanisms underlie the differential ageing process of these two distinct cell types; and (iii) therapeutic strategies that selectively target these diverse mechanisms may rejuvenate macrophages and microglia for repair in the ageing central nervous system. Most responses of macrophages are diminished with senescence, but activated microglia increase their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines while diminishing chemotactic and phagocytic activities. The senescence of macrophages and microglia has a negative impact on several neurological diseases, and the mechanisms underlying their age-dependent phenotypic changes vary from extrinsic microenvironmental changes to intrinsic changes in genomic integrity. We discuss the negative effects of age on neurological diseases, examine the response of senescent macrophages and microglia in these conditions, and propose a theoretical framework of therapeutic strategies that target the different mechanisms contributing to the ageing phenotype in these two distinct cell types. Rejuvenation of ageing macrophage/microglia may preserve neurological integrity and promote regeneration in the ageing central nervous system. PMID:26912633

  20. [Case of superficial hemosiderosis of the central nervous system treated with trientine].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, A; Hermosilla, E; Ferrer, X; Devoize, J L; Rajabally, Y; Lagueny, A

    1998-04-01

    A 58-year-old woman, with recurrent headaches, exhibited cerebellar alaxic gait, anosmia, deafness and a pyramidal syndrome, with a progressive onset. In cerebrospinal fluid there was erythrocytes and siderophages. MRI on T2-weighted images revealed a marginal hypo-intensity, leading to the diagnostic of superficial siderosis of the central nervous system. None haemorragic lesion was found. The patient was given Trientine. Unfortunately she worsened on later examinations.

  1. Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System in Immunocompromised Patients: HIV Infection and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating infection with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide and may manifest as meningitis, tuberculoma, abscess, or other forms of disease. Immunosuppression, due to either human immunodeficiency virus infection or solid organ transplantation, increases susceptibility for acquiring or reactivating TB and complicates the management of underlying immunosuppression and CNS TB infection. This article reviews how immunosuppression alters the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of TB infections of the CNS. PMID:21960714

  2. Enhancement of the white matter following prophylactic therapy of the central nervous system for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shalen, P.R.; Ostrow; P.T.; Glass, P.J.

    1981-08-01

    A case of fatal necrotizing leukoencephalopathy following prophylactic therapy of the central nervous system for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is reported. The clinical, CT, and neuropathological findings are described. The CT scan demonstrated symmetrical white-matter enhancement. Histological analysis was consistent with the effects of irradiation and methotrexate. The differential diagnosis of the clinical and CT findings is discussed. Brain biopsy is the diagnostic procedure of choice.

  3. Circulatory and central nervous system responses to different types of mental stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Iwanaga, Koichi; Koda, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the physiological responses to different types of mental stress encountered in the workplace. Circulatory and central nervous system responses were examined in 8 healthy males by exposing them to 20-min of white noise (80 dB(A)) and 20-min of computer-based mental arithmetic tasks as models of vascular and cardiac stress, respectively. The results indicated that both cardiac and vascular stresses increased blood pressure and showed a cumulative effect as exposure period was extended. Heart rate and prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin levels (measured by NIRS) increased in the face of cardiac stress but were not clearly altered by vascular stress and indicated that cardiac stress higher cardiac response and requires more oxygen supply to the brain. As the central nervous system responded, an event-related potential P300 component was elicited by an auditory oddball task presented before and after each stress. The P300 amplitude increased for both stresses. However, P300 latency increased in response to cardiac stress but decreased with vascular stress in the left prefrontal. Thus, the circulatory and central nervous system responses to cardiac stress and to vascular stress may have different underlying mechanisms, and measuring physiological indices appears to be an effective method by which to evaluate the influence of mental stress.

  4. Trigonelline: a plant alkaloid with therapeutic potential for diabetes and central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Chan, L; Zhou, S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (fenugreek), a traditional Chinese herb, and its components are beneficial in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and central nervous system disease. The pharmacological activities of trigonelline, a major alkaloid component of fenugreek, have been more thoroughly evaluated than fenugreek's other components, especially with regard to diabetes and central nervous system disease. Trigonelline has hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, antimigraine, sedative, memory-improving, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-tumor activities, and it has been shown to reduce diabetic auditory neuropathy and platelet aggregation. It acts by affecting β cell regeneration, insulin secretion, activities of enzymes related to glucose metabolism, reactive oxygen species, axonal extension, and neuron excitability. However, further study of trigonelline's pharmacological activities and exact mechanism is warranted, along with application of this knowledge to its clinical usage. This review aims to give readers a survey of the pharmacological effects of trigonelline, especially in diabetes, diabetic complications and central nervous system disease. In addition, because of its pharmacological value and low toxicity, the reported adverse effects of trigonelline in experimental animal models and humans are briefly reviewed, and the pharmacokinetics of trigonelline are also discussed.

  5. Complement and the central nervous system: emerging roles in development, protection and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Martin J; Sughrue, Michael E; Kane, Ari J; Mills, Steven A; Fang, Shanna; Parsa, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    As expanding research reveals the novel ability of complement proteins to promote proliferation and regeneration of tissues throughout the body, the concept of the complement cascade as an innate immune effector has changed rapidly. In particular, its interactions with the central nervous system have provided a wealth of information regarding the ability of complement proteins to mediate neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, cell migration, neuroprotection, proliferation and regeneration. At numerous phases of the neuronal and glial cell cycle, complement proteins exert direct or indirect influence over their behavior and fate. Neuronal stem cells differentiate and migrate in response to complement, and it prevents injury and death in adult cells in response to toxic agents. Furthermore, complement proteins promote survival via anti-apoptotic actions, and can facilitate clearance and regeneration of injured tissues in various models of CNS disease. In summary, we highlight the protean abilities of complement proteins in the central nervous system, underscoring an exciting avenue of research that has yielded greater understanding of complement's role in central nervous system health and disease.

  6. [Polyneuropathy and central nervous system diseases before and after heart transplantation. Is cyclosporin neurotoxic?].

    PubMed

    Porschke, H; Strenge, H; Stauch, C

    1991-10-18

    In a cross-sectional study, 52 patients (44 men, 8 women, mean age 50.6 [19-68] years) were investigated clinically and electrophysiologically for evidence of peripheral and central nervous system damage before and after heart transplantation. 20 patients were investigated before heart transplantation (group 1), 16 at 7 days to 5 months after transplantation (early post-operative group; group 2) and 16 at 6 to 32 months after transplantation (late post-operative group; group 3). Nerve conduction studies (median, peroneal and sural nerves) revealed polyneuropathy in 14 out of 16 patients in group 2, significantly more than in group 1 (11 out of 19) and group 3 (9 out of 16). The mean blood cyclosporin concentration was 656 ng/ml in group 2 and 409 ng/ml in group 3 (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3 with polyneuropathy had significantly higher cyclosporin concentrations than patients without polyneuropathy (505 vs 284 ng/ml; P less than 0.01). Among patients who had undergone operations, there were no noteworthy differences between the mean cyclosporin concentrations and clinical data in those with or without central nervous system lesions. There is preliminary evidence of a neurotoxic effect of cyclosporin on the peripheral but not the central nervous system. PMID:1935623

  7. KCC3 axonopathy: neuropathological features in the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Auer, Roland N; Laganière, Janet L; Robitaille, Yves O; Richardson, John; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Shekarabi, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC) is an autosomal recessive disease of the central and peripheral nervous system that presents as early-onset polyneuropathy. Patients are hypotonic and areflexic from birth, with abnormal facial features and atrophic muscles. Progressive peripheral neuropathy eventually confines them to a wheelchair in the second decade of life, and death occurs by the fourth decade. We here define the neuropathologic features of the disease in autopsy tissues from eight cases. Both developmental and neurodegenerative features were found. Hypoplasia or absence of the major telencephalic commissures and a hypoplasia of corticospinal tracts to half the normal size, were the major neurodevelopmental defects we observed. Despite being a neurodegenerative disease, preservation of brain weight and a conspicuous absence of neuronal or glial cell death were signal features of this disease. Small tumor-like overgrowths of axons, termed axonomas, were found in the central and peripheral nervous system, indicating attempted axonal regeneration. We conclude that the neurodegenerative deficits in HMSN/ACC are primarily caused by an axonopathy superimposed upon abnormal development, affecting peripheral but also central nervous system axons, all ultimately because of a genetic defect in the axonal cotransporter KCC3. PMID:27230413

  8. Axogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous system of the amphipod crustacean Orchestia cavimana.

    PubMed

    Ungerer, Petra; Geppert, Maria; Wolff, Carsten

    2011-03-01

    We describe the formation of the major axon pathways in the embryonic central and peripheral nervous systems of the amphipod crustacean Orchestia cavimana Heller, 1865 by means of antibody staining against acetylated alpha-tubulin. The data add to a long list of previous studies of various other aspects of development in Orchestia and provide a basis for future studies of neurogenesis on a deeper cellular and molecular level. Orchestia exhibits a tripartite dorsal brain, which is a characteristic feature of euarthropods. Its anlagen are the first detectable structures in the developing nervous system and can be traced back to distinct neuronal cell clusters in the early embryo. The development of the ventral nervous system proceeds with an anteroposterior gradient of development. In each trunk segment, the longitudinal connectives and the anterior commissure form first, followed by the intersegmental nerve, the posterior commissure and segmental nerves, respectively. A single commissure of a vestigial seventh pleonal segment is found. In the peripheral nervous system we observe a spatial and temporal pattern of leg innervation, which is strikingly similar in both limb types, the uniramous pereopods and the biramous pleopods. A proximal leg nerve splitting distally into two separated nerves probably reflects a general feature of crustaceans.

  9. Central Nervous System Control of Gastrointestinal Motility and Secretion and Modulation of Gastrointestinal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.; Travagli, R. Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Although the gastrointestinal (GI) tract possesses intrinsic neural plexuses that allow a significant degree of autonomy over GI functions, the central nervous system (CNS) provides extrinsic neural inputs that regulate, modulate, and control these functions. While the intestines are capable of functioning in the absence of extrinsic inputs, the stomach and esophagus are much more dependent upon extrinsic neural inputs, particularly from parasympathetic and sympathetic pathways. The sympathetic nervous system exerts a predominantly inhibitory effect upon GI muscle and provides a tonic inhibitory influence over mucosal secretion while, at the same time, regulates GI blood flow via neurally mediated vasoconstriction. The parasympathetic nervous system, in contrast, exerts both excitatory and inhibitory control over gastric and intestinal tone and motility. Although GI functions are controlled by the autonomic nervous system and occur, by and large, independently of conscious perception, it is clear that the higher CNS centers influence homeostatic control as well as cognitive and behavioral functions. This review will describe the basic neural circuitry of extrinsic inputs to the GI tract as well as the major CNS nuclei that innervate and modulate the activity of these pathways. The role of CNS-centered reflexes in the regulation of GI functions will be discussed as will modulation of these reflexes under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Finally, future directions within the field will be discussed in terms of important questions that remain to be resolved and advances in technology that may help provide these answers. PMID:25428846

  10. An altered form of pp60/sup c-src/ is expressed primarily in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, J.M.; Wiestler, O.D.; Walter, G.

    1987-11-01

    The expression of two forms of pp60/sup c-scr/, pp60 and pp60/sup +/, was measured in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system. Both forms were expressed in the CNS, whereas only pp60 was primarily detected in the peripheral nervous system. Our findings suggest that pp60/sup +/ may play a role in events important to the CNS.

  11. Vorinostat and Bortezomib in Treating Young Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Meningioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. [The central nervous system and appetite: possible sites of activity for food intake therapy].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C; Govoni, S; Trabucchi, M

    1984-07-31

    Recent progress in the field of neurochemical and neuropharmacological research into food intake control by the central nervous system is discussed. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamental role played by the hypothalamus as the integration centre for the various afferent impulses and the processor of behavioural patterns aimed at the quest for, and ingestion of food. Physiopathological knowledge of central appetite regulation mechanisms is essential for the understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of many clinical forms of human obesity and is the best basis for decisions on the pharmacological and behavioural approach to the treatment of this disease.

  13. Receptive fields, geometry and conduction block of sensory neurones in the central nervous system of the leech.

    PubMed Central

    Yau, K W

    1976-01-01

    1. In segmental ganglia of the leech, the cutaneous mechanosensory neurones responding to to touch innervated the skin of their own segment and of part of the anterior and posterior adjacent segments. Each touch receptive field could be divided into three non-overlapping areas: a central part innervated by the branches of the cell which ran in the nerve roots of the ganglion containing the cell body, and anterior and posterior parts innervated by its branches which ran in the nerve roots of the anterior and posterior adjacent ganglia. 2. Impulses originating from the anterior and posterior parts of the receptive fields were susceptible to conduction block within the central nervous system when the touch cells fired repetitively at frequencies that could readily be elicited with weak mechanical stimulation. In contrast, impulses originating from the central part of the receptive fields were less susceptible to block. 3. The morphology of touch cells revealed by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase suggested that conduction block occurred at specific bifurcation points where small cell processes joined the main process. Different physiological experiments supported this conclusion. 4. In some touch cells, bifurcation points with particularly low safety margins of conduction operated as low-pass filters, limiting the frequency of impulses capable of invading certain branches. 5. The results suggest that mechanical stimuli which would likely be encountered by the animal can lead to conduction block within its central nervous system and as a result modify its integrative activities. PMID:1018277

  14. Frequent involvement of central nervous system in primary Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Isabel; Teixeira, Filipa; Martins Silva, Ana; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Farinha, Fátima; Santos, Ernestina

    2015-02-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the salivary and tear glands, and autoantibody secretion, in the absence of other systemic autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune diseases, it is a relatively common disease, but the burden of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is controversial. This retrospective study evaluates the prevalence, clinical patterns and outcomes of CNS involvement in a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. We evaluated 93 patients with pSS diagnosed according to American-European Consensus Group criteria. Fourteen patients (15.1 %) had CNS involvement. All were women with an average age of onset of the disease of 42.1 ± 14.7 years (average ± SD) and an average age of onset of neurological involvement of 47.29 ± 16 years. Three had parkinsonian syndrome, two epilepsy, two motor and sensory deficits, two headache with brain magnetic resonance abnormalities, two neuromyelitis optica, two chronic progressive myelitis and one aseptic meningitis. Neurological involvement preceded Sjögren syndrome diagnosis in nine of the patients (64 %), and neurological outcome was good in 11 patients (78.6 %). Central nervous involvement was not as rare as expected, and the frequency was similar to the frequency of peripheral nervous system involvement. In half of the patients, this was the first symptom of the disease, emphasizing the importance of considering this diagnosis, especially in young female with neurological symptoms without other evident cause.

  15. The role of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in inhibiting axonal regeneration in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Hong-yan; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (Rho/ROCK) pathway is a major signaling pathway in the central nervous system, transducing inhibitory signals to block regeneration. After central nervous system damage, the main cause of impaired regeneration is the presence of factors that strongly inhibit regeneration in the surrounding microenvironment. These factors signal through the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to inhibit regeneration. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway is crucial for advancing studies on regeneration and repair of the injured central nervous system. PMID:26807132

  16. Stimulation of the autonomic nervous system in colorectal surgery: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postoperative ileus (POI) is a well-known complication of abdominal surgery and is considered to be caused by a local inflammation in the gut. Previously it has been shown that both local and systemic inflammation can be reduced by stimulation of the autonomic nervous system via lipid rich nutrition. Stimulation of the autonomic nervous system releases acetylcholine from efferent vagal nerve endings that binds to nicotinic receptors located on the inflammatory cells leading to a decrease of pro-inflammatory mediators. Besides administration of nutrition there are other ways of stimulating the autonomic nervous system such as gum chewing. Methods/design This prospective, placebo-controlled randomized trial will include 120 patients undergoing colorectal surgery which are randomized for gum chewing preoperatively and in the direct postoperative phase or a placebo. Postoperative ileus will be assessed both clinically by time to first flatus and time to first defecation and by determination of gastric motility using ultrasound to measure dimensions of the antrum. Furthermore the inflammatory response is quantified by analyzing pro-inflammatory mediators. Finally, markers of gut barrier integrity will be measured as well as occurrence of postoperative complications. Discussion We hypothesize that chewing gum preoperatively and in the direct postoperative phase in patients undergoing colorectal surgery dampens local and systematic inflammation, via activation of the autonomic nervous system. Down-regulation of the inflammatory cascade via stimulation of the vagus nerve will ameleriote POI and enhance postoperative recovery. Trial registration NTR2867 PMID:22738023

  17. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  18. A tunable protein-based scaffold for the study of central nervous system regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straley, Karin

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries pose a significant and potentially debilitating health problem in society today and, to date, no successful clinical repair strategies have been advanced. The development of effective treatments is severely hindered by the quick formation of a complex, inhibitory scar at the site of CNS injury. This scar both physically blocks and chemically suppresses nerve regeneration. It has been hypothesized that combinatorial approaches involving biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and pro-survival factors, which provide a more permissive growth environment, have the highest chance of stimulating regeneration. The work completed in this thesis focuses on the design and characterization of a biomimetic hydrogel scaffold constructed from chemically crosslinked recombinant proteins. This protein-based scaffold has been designed to offer a flexible platform for the systematic optimization of key scaffold design parameters, such as mechanical strength, degradation, cellular interaction, molecule delivery, and topography. Specifically, a collection of proteins containing sequences previously shown to enhance cell adhesion, to promote neurite extension, and to exhibit varying susceptibility to cleavage by neurite-secreted proteases were synthesized to serve as the polymer backbone for the scaffold. Experiments were conducted to analyze the capacity of scaffolds, constructed from single proteins or mixtures of proteins, to independently control cell behavior, scaffold degradation properties, and scaffold mechanical properties based upon differences in the primary protein sequence and crosslinking conditions. In addition, composite scaffolds constructed by layered spatial deposition of chemically crosslinked, protease-degradable proteins were applied to the formation of dynamic internal, three-dimensional scaffold patterns that can be directly coupled to molecule delivery. Overall, this work demonstrates the tunable and bio

  19. Nervous System Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Nervous system involvement occurs in 10% to 15% of patients infected with the tick-borne spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B afzelii, and B garinii. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, most commonly presenting with lymphocytic meningitis, causes modest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Parenchymal CNS infection is rare. If the CNS is invaded, however, measuring local production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies in the CSF provides a useful marker of infection. Most cases of neuroborreliosis can be cured with oral doxycycline; parenteral regimens should be reserved for patients with particularly severe disease.

  20. Expression of Hepatoma-derived growth factor family members in the adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    El-Tahir, Heba M; Dietz, Frank; Dringen, Ralf; Schwabe, Kerstin; Strenge, Karen; Kelm, Sørge; Abouzied, Mekky M; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Franken, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Background Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) belongs to a polypeptide family containing five additional members called HDGF related proteins 1–4 (HRP-1 to -4) and Lens epithelial derived growth factor. Whereas some family members such as HDGF and HRP-2 are expressed in a wide range of tissues, the expression of others is very restricted. HRP-1 and -4 are only expressed in testis, HRP-3 only in the nervous system. Here we investigated the expression of HDGF, HRP-2 and HRP-3 in the central nervous system of adult mice on the cellular level by immunohistochemistry. In addition we performed Western blot analysis of various brain regions as well as neuronal and glial cell cultures. Results HDGF was rather evenly expressed throughout all brain regions tested with the lowest expression in the substantia nigra. HRP-2 was strongly expressed in the thalamus, prefrontal and parietal cortex, neurohypophysis, and the cerebellum, HRP-3 in the bulbus olfactorius, piriform cortex and amygdala complex. HDGF and HRP-2 were found to be expressed by neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In contrast, strong expression of HRP-3 in the adult nervous system is restricted to neurons, except for very weak expression in oligodendrocytes in the brain stem. Although the majority of neurons are HRP-3 positive, some like cerebellar granule cells are negative. Conclusion The coexpression of HDGF and HRP-2 in glia and neurons as well as the coexpression of all three proteins in many neurons suggests different functions of members of the HDGF protein family in cells of the central nervous system that might include proliferation as well as cell survival. In addition the restricted expression of HRP-3 point to a special function of this family member for neuronal cells. PMID:16430771

  1. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Badhan, Raj K. Singh; Chenel, Marylore; Penny, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF), choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain) and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau) using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways. PMID:24647103

  2. Potential involvement of the extracranial venous system in central nervous system disorders and aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of the extracranial venous system in the pathology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders and aging is largely unknown. It is acknowledged that the development of the venous system is subject to many variations and that these variations do not necessarily represent pathological findings. The idea has been changing with regards to the extracranial venous system. Discussion A range of extracranial venous abnormalities have recently been reported, which could be classified as structural/morphological, hemodynamic/functional and those determined only by the composite criteria and use of multimodal imaging. The presence of these abnormalities usually disrupts normal blood flow and is associated with the development of prominent collateral circulation. The etiology of these abnormalities may be related to embryologic developmental arrest, aging or other comorbidities. Several CNS disorders have been linked to the presence and severity of jugular venous reflux. Another composite criteria-based vascular condition named chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) was recently introduced. CCSVI is characterized by abnormalities of the main extracranial cerebrospinal venous outflow routes that may interfere with normal venous outflow. Summary Additional research is needed to better define the role of the extracranial venous system in relation to CNS disorders and aging. The use of endovascular treatment for the correction of these extracranial venous abnormalities should be discouraged, until potential benefit is demonstrated in properly-designed, blinded, randomized and controlled clinical trials. Please see related editorial: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/259. PMID:24344742

  3. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  4. Central command neurons of the sympathetic nervous system: basis of the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Jansen, A S; Nguyen, X V; Karpitskiy, V; Mettenleiter, T C; Loewy, A D

    1995-10-27

    During stress, the activity of the sympathetic nervous system is changed in a global fashion, leading to an increase in cardiovascular function and a release of adrenal catecholamines. This response is thought to be regulated by a common set of brain neurons that provide a dual input to the sympathetic preganglionic neurons regulating cardiac and adrenal medullary functions. By using a double-virus transneuronal labeling technique, the existence of such a set of central autonomic neurons in the hypothalamus and brainstem was demonstrated. These neurons innervate both of the sympathetic outflow systems and likely function in circumstances where parallel sympathetic processing occurs, such as in the fight-or-flight response.

  5. Localization of Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nyland, H; Nilsen, R

    1982-08-01

    Immune complexes of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and rabbit IgG antibodies to HRP were used to study the Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system (CNS). The peroxidase activity was demonstrated with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride and H2O2. The majority of the pia and arachnoid cells of the leptomeninges, the stroma cells of the arachnoid granulations and the adventitial cells in the perivascular spaces of the nervous tissue were stained. The villi of the choroid plexus were also stained. By electron microscopy the reaction products were localized to the plasma membranes of the stroma cells and at the basal aspects of the epithelial cells in the choroid villi. In addition, reaction product was demonstrated on pericytes of some of the brain capillaries. The immune complexes did not bind to the brain parenchyma.

  6. Retinal Electrophysiology Is a Viable Preclinical Biomarker for Drug Penetrance into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Charng, Jason; He, Zheng; Vingrys, Algis J.; Fish, Rebecca L.; Gurrell, Rachel; Bui, Bang V.; Nguyen, Christine T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether retinal electrophysiology is a useful surrogate marker of drug penetrance into the central nervous system (CNS). Materials and Methods. Brain and retinal electrophysiology were assessed with full-field visually evoked potentials and electroretinograms in conscious and anaesthetised rats following systemic or local administrations of centrally penetrant (muscimol) or nonpenetrant (isoguvacine) compounds. Results. Local injections into the eye/brain bypassed the blood neural barriers and produced changes in retinal/brain responses for both drugs. In conscious animals, systemic administration of muscimol resulted in retinal and brain biopotential changes, whereas systemic delivery of isoguvacine did not. General anaesthesia confounded these outcomes. Conclusions. Retinal electrophysiology, when recorded in conscious animals, shows promise as a viable biomarker of drug penetration into the CNS. In contrast, when conducted under anaesthetised conditions confounds can be induced in both cortical and retinal electrophysiological recordings. PMID:27239335

  7. Systemic and Central Nervous System Correction of Lysosomal Storage in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Colleen S.; Ghodsi, Abdi; Derksen, Todd; Davidson, Beverly L.

    1999-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII patients lack functional β-glucuronidase, leading to systemic and central nervous system dysfunction. In this study we tested whether recombinant adenovirus that encodes β-glucuronidase (Adβgluc), delivered intravenously and into the brain parenchyma of MPS type VII mice, could provide long-term transgene expression and correction of lysosomal distension. We also tested whether systemic treatment with the immunosuppressive anti-CD40 ligand antibody, MR-1, affected transgene expression. We found substantial plasma β-glucuronidase activity for over 9 weeks after gene transfer in the MR-1- treated group, with subsequent decline in activity corresponding to a delayed anti-β-glucuronidase antibody response. At 16 weeks, near wild-type amounts of β-glucuronidase activity and striking reduction of lysosomal pathology were detected in livers from mice that had received either MR-1 cotreatment or control antibody. In the lung and kidney, β-glucuronidase activity was markedly higher for the MR-1-treated group. β-Glucuronidase activity in the brain persisted independently of MR-1 treatment. Activity was intense in the injected hemisphere and was also evident in the noninjected cortex and striatum, with dramatic improvements in storage deposits in areas of both hemispheres. These results indicate that prolonged enzyme expression from transgenes delivered to deficient liver and brain can mediate pervasive correction and illustrate the potential for gene therapy of MPS and other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:10074197

  8. Integration of mass spectrometry into early-phase discovery and development of central nervous system agents.

    PubMed

    Prokai, L; Zharikova, A; Janáky, T; Li, X; Braddy, A C; Perjési, P; Matveeva, L; Powell, D H; Prokai-Tatrai, K

    2001-11-01

    The early-phase discovery and development of useful central nervous system (CNS) agents present ample opportunities to exploit mass spectrometry and provide detailed compound/mixture characterization, or to make the process faster and/or more economic. Neuropeptide FF antagonists and centrally active thyrotropin-releasing hormone analogues were used as specific examples in this work. We evaluated the characterization of focused libraries of peptide derivatives by electrospray ionization, tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry on a quadrupole ion trap and nanoelectrospray on a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Immobilized artificial-membrane chromatography was employed as a model to predict/rank new agents against lead compounds for their potential to reach the central nervous system in pharmacologically significant amounts. Measuring brain concentrations in rodents after the intravenous administration of test compounds was used as an in vivo approach, and we took advantage of microdialysis sampling that furnished samples without interfering tissue matrix and afforded the estimation of extracellular concentrations in a localized part of the brain. Overall, making atmospheric-pressure ionization mass spectrometry an integral part of the process has played a major role in increasing throughput, selectivity, specificity and detection sensitivity and thereby providing useful information about the extent or mechanism of transport and metabolic activation/inactivation in early-phase discovery and development of CNS agents.

  9. Mechanisms of spreading depolarization in vertebrate and insect central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Andrew, R David; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-09-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is generated in the central nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates. SD manifests as a propagating wave of electrical depression caused by a massive redistribution of ions. Mammalian SD underlies a continuum of human pathologies from migraine to stroke damage, whereas insect SD is associated with environmental stress-induced neural shutdown. The general cellular mechanisms underlying SD seem to be evolutionarily conserved throughout the animal kingdom. In particular, SD in the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria and Drosophila melanogaster has all the hallmarks of mammalian SD. Locust SD is easily induced and monitored within the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) and can be modulated both pharmacologically and by preconditioning treatments. The finding that the fly brain supports repetitive waves of SD is relatively recent but noteworthy, since it provides a genetically tractable model system. Due to the human suffering caused by SD manifestations, elucidating control mechanisms that could ultimately attenuate brain susceptibility is essential. Here we review mechanisms of SD focusing on the similarities between mammalian and insect systems. Additionally we discuss advantages of using invertebrate model systems and propose insect SD as a valuable model for providing new insights to mammalian SD. PMID:27334953

  10. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  11. Relationship between host age and persistence of Theiler's virus in the central nervous system of mice.

    PubMed

    Steiner, C M; Rozhon, E J; Lipton, H L

    1984-01-01

    This study has demonstrated that the ability of BeAn 8386 virus to persist in the central nervous system of mice declines with the increasing age of the host at the time of inoculation. Although persistent infection was established in 1-, 3-, 9-, and 40-week-old mice, there was a significant reduction in both the frequency of virus isolations and the mean virus titers in mice inoculated after 3 weeks of age. The incidence of clinical demyelinating disease (late disease) also decreased in animals infected after 3 weeks of age in parallel with the decline in virus persistence.

  12. Femoral-facial syndrome with malformations in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leal, Evelia; Macías-Gómez, Nelly; Rodríguez, Lisa; Mercado, F Miguel; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    The femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FFS) is a very rare association of femoral and facial abnormalities. Maternal diabetes mellitus has been mainly involved as the causal agent. We report the second case of FFS with anomalies in the central nervous system (CNS) including corticosubcortical atrophy, colpocephaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri and absent septum pellucidum. The psychomotor development has been normal. We propose that the CNS defects observed in these patients are part of the spectrum of abnormalities in the FFS.

  13. Culturing and expansion of "clinical grade" precursors cells from the fetal human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gelati, Maurizio; Profico, Daniela; Projetti-Pensi, Massimo; Muzi, Gianmarco; Sgaravizzi, Giada; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi

    2013-01-01

    NSCs have been demonstrated to be very useful in grafts into the mammalian central nervous system to investigate the exploitation of NSC for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. To push cell therapy in CNS on stage of clinical application, it is necessary to establish a continuous and standardized, clinical grade (i.e., produced following the good manufacturing practice guidelines) human neural stem cell lines. In this chapter, we illustrate some of the protocols routinely used into our GMP cell bank for the production of "clinical grade" human neural stem cell lines.

  14. Central nervous system involvement in primary Sjogren`s syndrome manifesting as multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Yao; Zhao, Teng; Zhou, Chun-Kui

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system symptoms in patients with primary Sjogren`s syndrome are rare. They can present as extraglandular manifestations and require a differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis. Due to a variety of presentations, Sjogren`s syndrome with neurologic involvement may be difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2010, but who was subsequently diagnosed with primary Sjogren`s syndrome 2 years later after showing signs of atypical neurologic manifestations. Therefore, primary Sjogren`s syndrome should be suspected in patients who present with atypical clinical and radiologic neurologic manifestations.

  15. [Differential diagnosis of late-stage neuroborreliosis with affection of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Spirin, N N; Baranova, N S; Fadeeva, O A; Pakhomova, Iu A; Stepanov, I O; Shipova, E G; Kasatkin, D S; Spirina, N N

    2012-01-01

    Chronic neuroborreliosis is an actual problem in neurology due to its under-investigation in Russia, variety of clinical forms, and the absence of well established diagnostic criteria. We present clinical and laboratory differential diagnostic criteria of chronic borrelial encephalomyelitis in comparison with multiple sclerosis. Distinguishing characteristics of Lyme encephalopathy versus vascular encephalopathy are considered. Problems and possibilities of immunological methods for identification of B. burgdorferi are discussed. The results of the antibiotic treatment of different clinical forms of neuroborreliosis with affection of the central nervous system are described.

  16. Solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system: report of 2 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ge; Li, Meifang; Xu, Lijun; Hu, Peiqian; Liao, Xin; Lin, Chuang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) rarely occur in the central nervous system (CNS). Involvement of the brainstem and pineal gland is rarely recorded. Herein, we represent 2 cases of SFTs and firstly report SFT of the pineal gland. Cranial MR imaging showed isointense to hypointense signal intensity, and marked enhancement. Microscopically, the tumors showed characteristic "patternless-pattern" architecture. Elongated tumour cells formed fascicles alternating with hypocellular densely collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemistry for CD34, BCL2, and CD99 favors the definitive diagnosis of SFT. It is difficult to predict prognosis in patients with intraventricular SFT. In general, complete surgical resection may offer the best chance of a favorable clinical outcome.

  17. Primary central nervous system T-cell lymphoma in a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis).

    PubMed

    Arbelo, M; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Herráez, P; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Andrada, M; Rivero, M; Grau-Bassas, E R; Fernández, A

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the pathological findings in an adult female short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) stranded alive in the Canary Islands. Necropsy examination revealed the presence of a nodular neoplastic growth in the central nervous system (CNS) at the level of the thalamus. Microscopical examination revealed the mass to be a lymphoma and immunohistochemical labelling demonstrated a T-cell origin. No significant lesions were observed in other organs, including lymphoid organs. This is the first report of a primary T-cell lymphoma in the CNS in cetaceans. PMID:24650893

  18. Atypical clinical features of children with central nervous system tumor: Delayed diagnosis and switch in handedness.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Kentaro; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Miyata, Ichiro; Nonaka, Yuichiro; Yuza, Yuki; Kawata, Shoko; Akiyama, Masaharu; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Herein is described the cases of three children with central nervous system (CNS) tumor, who had switch in handedness occurring before diagnostic confirmation. Although the onset, age, tumor location, and histology were heterogeneous, the diagnosis of CNS tumor was delayed in all three patients. The present experience indicates that switch in handedness should be recognized as a sign of CNS tumor in pediatric patients, and which might prevent delay in diagnosis. Pediatricians should carefully examine such patients who present with some suggestive symptoms of CNS tumor, even when they are unusual, in order to make a timely and appropriate diagnosis.

  19. Salvage therapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma with (90)Y-Ibritumomab and Temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Pitini, Vincenzo; Baldari, Sergio; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Arrigo, Carmela; Naro, Claudia; Perniciaro, Francesca

    2007-07-01

    Aggressive initial treatment of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) has achieved prolonged survival and occasional cures. However, some patients do not respond to initial therapy and others relapse after an initial remission. The optimal salvage regimen is not known and many different strategies have been proposed. In this report we describe the efficacy of a combination of (90)Y-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (Zevalin) and Temozolamide as a maintenance therapy for recurrent PCNS Lymphoma in two patients that are both alive and in complete remission after 9 and 10 months respectively. This combination merits further study and provides a reasonable therapeutic alternative for older patients with progressive PCNSL.

  20. [Primary Central Nervous System Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yoshiko; Nakaya, Aya; Fujita, Shinya; Hotta, Masaaki; Fujita, Yukie; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with acute lymphocytic leukemia, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complained of nausea and blurred vision 288 days after the transplantation. Intracranial tumors were identified on brain MRI. She received whole brain radiation after open biopsy, but she died. The tumors had characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and she was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This disease is rare and has a poor outcome. Therefore, accumulation of cases and establishment of treatments for this condition are urgently needed.

  1. [Disturbances of water metabolism in two dogs and one cat with central nervous system disorders].

    PubMed

    Weingart, A; Gruber, A D; Kershaw, O; Kohn, B

    2013-08-01

    Hypernatremia due to different pathophysiological mechanisms results in a rise in plasma osmolality. Dependent on its severity and on the speed of its development hyperosmolality can be life-threatening. This article describes 2 dogs and 1 cat with central nervous system disorders (adenoma of the pituitary gland, cerebral trauma). All patients developed normovolemic hypernatremia due to pituitary gland and hypothalamus dysfunction, respectively. Plasma sodium concentrations ranged from 163 to 185 mmol/l. Neurological examinations revealed lethargy, disturbances of consciousness, and ataxia, respectively. The dogs had to be euthanased due to the grave prognosis, the cat with cerebral trauma survived.

  2. Amoeba angeitic lesions of the central nervous system in Balamuthia mandrilaris amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Recavarren-Arce, S; Velarde, C; Gotuzzo, E; Cabrera, J

    1999-03-01

    Balamuthia mandrilaris amoebiasis is a fatal disease. It primarily affects the nasal pyramid or the skin, producing granulomatous amoebic lesions. The amoeba spread from the primary nasal lesion to the meninges where they infiltrate vessels. Thrombotic amoebic angitis produce infarcts of the central nervous system substance which then become infiltrated by amoeba. The primary cutaneous lesion can be present for weeks or even months. However, the appearance of neurological disease predicts a poor prognosis, in which death usually occurs within a few days or weeks. PMID:10088544

  3. Social competence among children with central nervous system-related chronic health conditions: a review.

    PubMed

    Nassau, J H; Drotar, D

    1997-12-01

    Reviewed empirical studies of social competence among children with central nervous system (CNS)-related chronic health conditions published since 1975. The overwhelming majority of studies evaluated social competence at the level of social adjustment; the domains of children's social performance and social skills were relatively neglected (Cavell, 1990). Findings are critiqued with respect to conceptualization of social competence among children with CNS conditions and methodological considerations. Directions for future research include expanding the conceptualization of social competence in this population to include social demands and competencies specific to children with CNS conditions and utilizing explicit theoretical frameworks that allow for competing hypotheses to be tested. PMID:9494317

  4. IL-21 optimizes T cell and humoral responses in the central nervous system during viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Phares, Timothy W.; DiSano, Krista D.; Hinton, David R.; Hwang, Mihyun; Zajac, Allan J.; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute coronavirus encephalomyelitis is controlled by T cells while humoral responses suppress virus persistence. This study defines the contribution of interleukin (IL)-21, a regulator of T and B cell function, to central nervous system (CNS) immunity. IL-21 receptor deficiency did not affect peripheral T cell activation or trafficking, but dampened granzyme B, gamma interferon and IL-10 expression by CNS T cells and reduced serum and intrathecal humoral responses. Viral control was already lost prior to humoral CNS responses, but demyelination remained comparable. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-21 in regulating CNS immunity, sustaining viral persistence and preventing mortality. PMID:23992866

  5. Visual loss with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: multifocal central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Job, O M; Schatz, N J; Glaser, J S

    1999-03-01

    A 42-year-old woman with a 6-year history of diabetes insipidus and progressive hypersomnolence presented with visual loss. Neuroimaging showed infiltration in the hypothalamus, the optic nerve, and the chiasm, as well as multiple lesions in other areas of the brain parenchyma. Biopsy showed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. This is an unusual presentation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, involving the visual pathways without manifestations outside of the central nervous system. The differential diagnosis and the magnetic resonance imaging findings will be discussed. PMID:10098549

  6. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-04-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS.

  7. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-01-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS. PMID:24712987

  8. L-serine synthesis in the central nervous system: a review on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; Klomp, L W; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2010-03-01

    The de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-serine plays an essential role in the development and functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). L-serine displays many metabolic functions during different developmental stages; among its functions providing precursors for amino acids, protein synthesis, nucleotide synthesis, neurotransmitter synthesis and L-serine derived lipids. Patients with congenital defects in the L-serine synthesizing enzymes present with severe neurological abnormalities and underscore the importance of this synthetic pathway. In this review, we will discuss the cellular functions of the L-serine pathway, structure and enzymatic properties of the enzymes involved and genetic defects associated with this pathway. PMID:19963421

  9. Anatomy of the Hesse photoreceptor cell axonal system in the central nervous system of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio; Becerra, Manuela; Manso, María Jesús; Sherwood, Nancy M; Anadón, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    The present study reports the organization of the Hesse cell axonal system in the central nervous system of the amphioxus, with the use of a polyclonal antiserum raised against lamprey gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I). In the spinal cord, the rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells of the bicellular organs were well labeled with this antibody. These cells sent smooth, straight, lateral processes that bent and became beaded as they passed ventrally and crossed to the contralateral side of the cord. There, the processes of several cells aggregated to give rise to a longitudinal fiber bundle. Beaded collaterals of these processes were directed to ventral neuropil and did not appear to contact giant Rohde cell axons. The crossed projections of the Hesse photoreceptors are compared with those of vertebrate retinal ganglion cells. Other antisera raised against GnRH weakly labeled rhabdomeric photoreceptors located dorsally in the brain, the Joseph cells. The finding that GnRH antibodies label amphioxus photoreceptor cells and axons is not definitive proof that the photoreceptors contain GnRH. Regardless of whether the antibody recognizes amphioxus GnRH, which has not yet been identified by structure, the antibody has revealed the processes of the Hesse photoreceptor cells.

  10. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogels for central nervous system regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Pi, Bin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Xiu-Mei

    2015-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) presents a complex regeneration problem due to the inability of central neurons to regenerate correct axonal and dendritic connections. However, recent advances in developmental neurobiology, cell signaling, cell-matrix interaction, and biomaterials technologies have forced a reconsideration of CNS regeneration potentials from the viewpoint of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The applications of a novel tissue regeneration-inducing biomaterial and stem cells are thought to be critical for the mission. The use of peptide nanofiber hydrogels in cell therapy and tissue engineering offers promising perspectives for CNS regeneration. Self-assembling peptide undergo a rapid transformation from liquid to gel upon addition of counterions or pH adjustment, directly integrating with the host tissue. The peptide nanofiber hydrogels have mechanical properties that closely match the native central nervous extracellular matrix, which could enhance axonal growth. Such materials can provide an optimal three dimensional microenvironment for encapsulated cells. These materials can also be tailored with bioactive motifs to modulate the wound environment and enhance regeneration. This review intends to detail the recent status of self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogels for CNS regeneration.

  11. The Intrinsic Electrophysiological Properties of Mammalian Neurons: Insights into Central Nervous System Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.

    1988-12-01

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhytmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  12. Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and prolonged use of immunosuppressant.

    PubMed

    Tse, Teresa P K; Chan, Allan N L; Chan, Tony K T; Po, Y C

    2014-12-01

    Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma is an uncommon and fatal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Such lymphomas have been described in only a few case series in the literature. The incidence of this condition is rising with improved survival after organ transplantation. A case of post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma in a young Chinese woman with systemic lupus erythematosus is described here. She presented with right-sided weakness and memory loss after tooth extraction 2 weeks before admission. Contrast computed tomography of the brain demonstrated a contrast rim-enhancing lesion over the left frontal lobe. With a history of recent dental procedure, long-term immunosuppressive therapy and computed tomography findings, cerebral abscess was highly suspected. Emergency operation was performed. Histopathology showed post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma, with cells positive for B-cell marker CD20. Immunosuppressant was stopped and she was treated with radiotherapy and rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody). She remained disease-free at 16 months. Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma is rare with variable presentation and radiological features. We believe rituximab may have a role in the treatment of such lymphomas. PMID:25488034

  13. Guideline on the prevention of secondary central nervous system lymphoma: British Committee for Standards in Haematology.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Andrew; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cwynarski, Kate; Lyttelton, Matthew; McKay, Pam; Montoto, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    The guideline group was selected to be representative of UK-based medical experts. Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and NCBI Pubmed were searched systematically for publications in English from 1980 to 2012 using the MeSH subheading 'lymphoma, CNS', 'lymphoma, central nervous system', 'lymphoma, high grade', 'lymphoma, Burkitt's', 'lymphoma, lymphoblastic' and 'lymphoma, diffuse large B cell' as keywords, as well as all subheadings. The writing group produced the draft guideline, which was subsequently revised by consensus by members of the Haemato-oncology Task Force of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH). The guideline was then reviewed by a sounding board of ~50 UK haematologists, the BCSH and the British Society for Haematology (BSH) Committee and comments incorporated where appropriate. The 'GRADE' system was used to quote levels and grades of evidence, details of which can be found in Appendix I. The objective of this guideline is to provide healthcare professionals with clear guidance on the optimal prevention of secondary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. The guidance may not be appropriate to patients of all lymphoma sub-types and in all cases individual patient circumstances may dictate an alternative approach. Acronyms are defined at time of first use.

  14. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Barber, Glen N; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2011-02-01

    Lymphomas involving the central nervous system are recognized increasingly in immunocompetent as well as immunosuppressed individuals, and the majority of the cases are diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The aim of this study was to compare the immunophenotype, clinicopathological features, and association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) of DLBCL of the central nervous system (CNS) in 3 different clinical situations: primary, in immunocompetent patients; "primary," in immunosuppressed patients; and in patients with secondary involvement by systemic lymphoma. The authors reviewed the clinicopathological features, morphology, immunophenotype (according to germinal-center B-cell-like and nongerminal B-cell-like subtypes), and association with EBV in 36 cases of DLBCL of the CNS, including 25 primary cases, 5 associated with immunosuppression, and 6 cases with secondary involvement. Survival was evaluated in 15 cases of primary CNS lymphomas. Of the 36 patients, 19 were male and 18 female. Only 2 cases of lymphomas were EBV-positive; both occurred in immunosuppressed patients. Separation into germinal-center and non-germinal center subtypes by an immunohistochemistry panel showed that 68% of primary, 80% of secondary, and 83% of the cases associated with immunosuppression were of non-germinal-center subtype, respectively. Patients with non-germinal-center immunophenotype showed significantly worse survival than those with CNS lymphomas of the germinal-center subtype.

  15. Methamphetamine alters blood brain barrier protein expression in mice, facilitating central nervous system infection by neurotropic Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Eugenin, Eliseo A; Greco, Jade M; Frases, Susana; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-08-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse that is a potent and highly addictive central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a unique interface that in part functions to prevent microbial invasion of the CNS. The effects of METH on brain vasculature have not been studied extensively. We hypothesized that METH alters the BBB integrity, increasing susceptibility to CNS infection. Using a murine model of METH administration, we demonstrated that METH alters BBB integrity and modifies the expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules. Additionally, we showed that BBB disruption accelerates transmigration of the neurotropic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans into the brain parenchyma after systemic infection. Furthermore, METH-treated mice displayed increased mortality as compared to untreated animals. Our findings provide novel evidence of the impact of METH abuse on the integrity of the cells that comprise the BBB and protect the brain from infection.

  16. Methamphetamine Alters Blood Brain Barrier Protein Expression in Mice, Facilitating Central Nervous System Infection by Neurotropic Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Greco, Jade M.; Frases, Susana; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Martinez, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse that is a potent and highly addictive central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a unique interface that in part functions to prevent microbial invasion of the CNS. The effects of METH on brain vasculature have not been studied extensively. We hypothesized that METH alters the BBB integrity, increasing susceptibility to CNS infection. Using a murine model of METH administration, we demonstrated that METH alters BBB integrity and modifies the expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules. Additionally, we showed that BBB disruption accelerates transmigration of the neurotropic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans into the brain parenchyma after systemic infection. Furthermore, METH-treated mice displayed increased mortality as compared to untreated animals. Our findings provide novel evidence of the impact of METH abuse on the integrity of the cells that comprise the BBB and protect the brain from infection. PMID:23532099

  17. Neural Stem Cell Therapy and Rehabilitation in the Central Nervous System: Emerging Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Ross, Heather H; Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Trumbower, Randy D; Reier, Paul J; Behrman, Andrea L; Wolf, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore function through therapy at levels such as the gene, cell, tissue, or organ. For many disorders, however, regenerative medicine approaches in isolation may not be optimally effective. Rehabilitation is a promising adjunct therapy given the beneficial impact that physical activity and other training modalities can offer. Accordingly, "regenerative rehabilitation" is an emerging concentration of study, with the specific goal of improving positive functional outcomes by enhancing tissue restoration following injury. This article focuses on one emerging example of regenerative rehabilitation-namely, the integration of clinically based protocols with stem cell technologies following central nervous system injury. For the purposes of this review, the state of stem cell technologies for the central nervous system is summarized, and a rationale for a synergistic benefit of carefully orchestrated rehabilitation protocols in conjunction with cellular therapies is provided. An overview of practical steps to increase the involvement of physical therapy in regenerative rehabilitation research also is provided. PMID:26847015

  18. Effect of Probiotics on Central Nervous System Functions in Animals and Humans: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiying; Lee, In-Seon; Braun, Christoph; Enck, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the effects of probiotics on central nervous system function in animals and humans, to summarize effective interventions (species of probiotic, dose, duration), and to analyze the possibility of translating preclinical studies. Literature searches were conducted in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trials were included. In total, 38 studies were included: 25 in animals and 15 in humans (2 studies were conducted in both). Most studies used Bifidobacterium (eg, B. longum, B. breve, and B. infantis) and Lactobacillus (eg, L. helveticus, and L. rhamnosus), with doses between 109 and 1010 colony-forming units for 2 weeks in animals and 4 weeks in humans. These probiotics showed efficacy in improving psychiatric disorder-related behaviors including anxiety, depression, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, and memory abilities, including spatial and non-spatial memory. Because many of the basic science studies showed some efficacy of probiotics on central nervous system function, this background may guide and promote further preclinical and clinical studies. Translating animal studies to human studies has obvious limitations but also suggests possibilities. Here, we provide several suggestions for the translation of animal studies. More experimental designs with both behavioral and neuroimaging measures in healthy volunteers and patients are needed in the future. PMID:27413138

  19. Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn) fruit causes central nervous system damage during chronic intoxication in the rat.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Verdin, Eduardo M; Bermúdez-Barba, M V; Salazar-Leal, Martha E; Ancer Rodríguez, J; Romero-Diaz, Víktor; Soto-Domínguez, Adolfo; Ballesteros-Eliozondo, Raquel G; Saucedo-Cardenas, Odila; Piñeyro Lopez, Alfredo; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio

    2009-05-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana fruit (Kh) causes a neurological disorder 3-4 weeks after ingestion, characterized by flaccid, symmetrical, ascending paralysis, similar to the Guillain-Barre syndrome. In this polyneuropathy the lesion (demyelization) in peripheral nerves has been described in several animal species, both in acute and in chronic intoxication. However, no reports exist about the presence of lesions in the Central Nervous System (CNS), in chronic intoxication. We considered it important to evaluate, with histological techniques, the possible presence of lesions in the brain, by using a model of chronic intoxication that reproduces the same stages present in the human intoxication, to better understanding of this pathological process. In our present work we fed the ground Kh fruit to Wistar rats and samples of brain, cerebellum, and pons were embedded in paraffin. Sections were stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin (HE) and special stains for nerve tissue. Histopathological changes were evaluated in the CNS through the different stages of the polyneuropathy and comparison to a control group. With this methodology, we found lesions in the motor pathway. This is the first report about the presence of neuronal damage caused by Kh in the Central Nervous System in chronic intoxication.

  20. Susceptibility of inbred mice to chronic central nervous system infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Dal Canto, M C

    1979-10-01

    The present study demonstrated that the clinicopathological expression of the late demyelinating disease due to chronic central nervous system infection by Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus was dependent, at least in part, on the strain of mouse used as host. A range of involvement was observed, with late disease being most severe in the SJL strain, intermediate in the CBA and C3H/He strains, and least in C57BL/6 mice. The lack of clinical signs in seven other inbred strains of mice indicates that their response to chronic infection was similar to C57BL/6 mice. SJL, CBA, C3H/He, and C57BL/6 mice all generated similar levels of neutralizing antibody. A correlation between the severity of late disease and central nervous system virus content was not demonstrated, which indirectly suggests an immunopathological rather than a cytolytic mechanism of myelin injury during the late disease period. Finally, in addition to being more extensive, SJL demyelinating lesions contained a disproportionately large number of macrophages compared with those of similar lesions in CBA and C3H/He mice.

  1. Enhanced Histochemical Detection of Iron in Paraffin Sections of Mouse Central Nervous System Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Scott A.; Leung-Toung, Regis; Wang, Yingsheng; Connelly, John

    2016-01-01

    Histochemical methods of detecting iron in the rodent brain result mainly in the labeling of oligodendrocytes, but as all cells utilize iron, this observation suggests that much of the iron in the central nervous system goes undetected. Paraffin embedding of tissue is a standard procedure that is used to prepare sections for microscopic analysis. In the present study, we questioned whether we could modify the iron histochemical procedure to enable a greater detection of iron in paraffin sections. Indeed, various modifications led to the widespread labeling of iron in mouse brain tissue (for instance, labeling of neurons and neuropil). Sites of focal concentrations, such as cytoplasmic punctate or nucleolar staining, were also observed. The modified procedures were applied to paraffin sections of a mouse model (APP/PS1) of Alzheimer’s disease. Iron was revealed in the plaque core and rim. The plaque rim had a fibrillary or granular appearance, and it frequently contained iron-labeled cells. Further analysis indicated that the iron was tightly associated with the core of the plaque, but less so with the rim. In conclusion, modifications to the histochemical staining revealed new insights into the deposition of iron in the central nervous system. In theory, the approach should be transferrable to organs besides the brain and to other species, and the underlying principles should be incorporable into a variety of staining methods. PMID:27683879

  2. Neonatal head ultrasound: systematic approach to congenital Central Nervous System anomalies. A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Seong Whi

    2016-09-01

    Brain ultrasound is widely used for the screening of prematurely born babies. Although the best imaging modality for the central nervous system anomaly is brain MRI, the first imaging study in the post-natal period is brain ultrasonography in most cases. Anomalies could be found incidentally on screening ultrasound, or in those cases already suspected on prenatal ultrasound. In order not to miss congenital structural abnormalities of the brain on screening ultrasound, systematic approaches would be very helpful. The ventricles and sylvian fissures are very important structures to suspect central nervous system anomalies: they are symmetric structures so we should look for any asymmetry or maldevelopment. And then, on sagittal images, the midline structures including the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis should be observed carefully. Finally, we should look for any abnormality in gyration or cortical development. Skull defect with herniation of intracranial contents, a spectrum of encephalo-meningocele, could be also identified on ultrasound. Congenital infections such as cytomegalovirus infection may show ventriculomegaly and malformation of the cortical development on imaging studies.

  3. Application of Targeted Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Sirtuins in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, T.; Poljak, A.; Braidy, N.; Zhong, L.; Rowlands, B.; Muenchhoff, J.; Grant, R.; Smythe, G.; Teo, C.; Raftery, M.; Sachdev, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin proteins have a variety of intracellular targets, thereby regulating multiple biological pathways including neurodegeneration. However, relatively little is currently known about the role or expression of the 7 mammalian sirtuins in the central nervous system. Western blotting, PCR and ELISA are the main techniques currently used to measure sirtuin levels. To achieve sufficient sensitivity and selectivity in a multiplex-format, a targeted mass spectrometric assay was developed and validated for the quantification of all seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Quantification of all peptides was by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using three mass transitions per protein-specific peptide, two specific peptides for each sirtuin and a stable isotope labelled internal standard. The assay was applied to a variety of samples including cultured brain cells, mammalian brain tissue, CSF and plasma. All sirtuin peptides were detected in the human brain, with SIRT2 being the most abundant. Sirtuins were also detected in human CSF and plasma, and guinea pig and mouse tissues. In conclusion, we have successfully applied MRM mass spectrometry for the detection and quantification of sirtuin proteins in the central nervous system, paving the way for more quantitative and functional studies. PMID:27762282

  4. Proposal for research and education: joint lectures and practicals on central nervous system anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Ken; Satoh, Yoshihide; Nanayakkara, Chinthani D; Pallegama, Ranjith W; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    We coordinated anatomy and physiology lectures and practicals to facilitate an integrated understanding of morphology and function in a basic medical science program for dental students and to reduce the time spent on basic science education. This method is a means to provide the essential information and skills in less time. The overall impression was that the practice of joint central nervous system lectures and practicals was an efficient method for students, which suggests that joint lectures might also be useful for clinical subjects. About two-thirds of students felt that the joint anatomy and physiology lecture on the central nervous system was useful and necessary in understanding the relationship between morphology and function, at least for this subject. One-third of students were neutral on the effectiveness of this method. However, the survey results suggest that improvements are needed in the method and timing of joint lectures and practicals. The present teaching approach can be further improved by conducting combined lectures in which the form and function of anatomic structures are presented by the relevant departments during the same lecture. Finally, joint lecturers and practicals offer an opportunity to increase student understanding of the importance of new research findings by the present authors and other researchers.

  5. Central nervous system tumours in children in Ibadan, Nigeria: a histopathologic study

    PubMed Central

    Ogun, Gabriel Olabiyi; Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Babatunde, Taiwo Olabimpe; Ogun, Olufunmilola Abimbola; Salami, Ayodeji; Brown, Biobele Jotham; Akang, Effiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Contrary to some earlier teachings that central nervous system (CNS) tumours are uncommon in black children, these neoplasms are the fourth most common paediatric tumours in Ibadan. Our centre is the major referral centre for CNS tumours in Nigeria. The last major study of paediatric CNS neoplasms from Ibadan was in 1985. An update of the data on paediatric CNS neoplasms at our centre is presented. Methods A retrospective review of all histologically diagnosed CNS tumours in children (0-14 years) from January 2001 to December 2010 from the database of the Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria was done. The cases were classified using the 2007 WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System and were also based on their supratentorial and infratentorial locations. Results Seventy-seven tumours, 44 in males, were included in the study. Astrocytic tumour comprised 20 cases, embryonal tumours 15, ependymal tumours 15, germ cell tumours 6, sellar tumours (all craniopharyngiomas) 9 and other histological types- 12 cases. Thirty-seven were WHO Grade 1, eleven Grade 2, ten Grade 3 and nineteen Grade 4 neoplasms. Thirty-six cases were supratentorial and thirty-eight were infratentorial in location. The most common tumours in this series were pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas in that order. Conclusion Childhood CNS tumours are being increasingly diagnosed in our centre. This is largely explained by the recent expansion of the available neurosurgical services. PMID:27583098

  6. Application value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanhua; Li, Hongjun; Zhu, Rongguang; Zhang, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of central nervous system lymphoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI images of 40 patients who had pathologically proven primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and received treatment in Binzhou People’s Hospital, Shandong, China from January to December in 2014. Location, size and form of tumor was observed and relevant data were recorded for analysis. Results: Foci of 40 cases of PCNSL all located in brain, among which. 18 cases were single (45.0%) and 22 cases were multiple (55.5%). Of 96 Foci, 84 were supratentorial, 12 were subtentorial. Enhanced MRI scanning showed that, most Foci had significant homogenous enhancement, shaping as multiple nodular or lumpy, and few had ring-enhancement. MRI suggested that, T1 signal of most Foci concentrated on low signal segment and T2 signal gathered on high signal segment, suggesting a significant homogeneous enhancement; moreover, mild and medium edema surrounded the tumor. They were pathologically confirmed as B cell derived non-hodgkin lymphoma. Except one case of Burkitt lymphoma, the others were all diffuse large B cell lymphoma which was observed with diffuse distribution of cancer cells (little cytoplasm, large nucleus, rough perichromatin granule) in same size. Fifteen cases were observed with sleeve-like infiltration of cancer cells around blood vessels. No case was found with hemorrhage, necrosis or calcification. Conclusion: Pathological foundation of PCNSL determines its characteristic MRI performance. Typical case of PCNSL can be diagnosed accurately by MRI. PMID:27182246

  7. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tortosa, Raül; Castells, Xavier; Vidal, Enric; Costa, Carme; Ruiz de Villa, María del Carmen; Sánchez, Alex; Barceló, Anna; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Ariño, Joaquín

    2011-10-28

    Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations.

  8. Involvement of the central nervous system in patients with dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan B; Kuster, Gustavo W; Onuki-Castro, Fábio L; Souza, Vanda A; Levi, José E; Pannuti, Cláudio S

    2008-04-15

    The findings of a neurological evaluation in 85 patients with confirmed, acute, dengue virus infection are described. Signs of central nervous system involvement were present in 18 patients (21.2%). The most frequent neurological symptom was mental confusion. The frequency of neurological involvement did not differ between patients with primary and secondary dengue infection, and the prevalence of central nervous system involvement in dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever also did not differ significantly. The presence of CNS involvement did not influence the prognosis of dengue infection. Dengue viral CSF RNA was found in 7 of 13 patients submitted to a spinal tap, the CSF viral load being less than 1000 copies/ml. PCR was negative in serum samples obtained from three patients on the same day as the CSF samples, suggesting that the dengue virus actively enters the CNS and that the presence of the virus in the CNS does not result from passive crossing of the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Central nervous system transplantation benefited by low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochkind, S.; Lubart, Rachel; Wollman, Yoram; Simantov, Rabi; Nissan, Moshe; Barr-Nea, Lilian

    1990-06-01

    Effect of low-level laser irradiation on the central nervous system transplantation is reported. Ernbryonal brain allografts were transplanted into the brain of 20 adult rats and peripheral nerve graft transplanted into the severely injured spinal cord of 16 dogs. The operated wound of 10 rats and 8 dogs were exposed daily for 21 days to lowpower laser irradiation CW HeNe laser (35 mW, 632.8 run, energy density of 30 J/cm2 at each point for rats and 70 J/cm2 at each point for dogs). This study shows that (i) the low-level laser irradiation prevents extensive glial scar formation (a limiting factor in CNS regeneration) between embryonal transplants and host brain; (ii) Dogs made paraplegic by spinal cord injury were able to walk 3-6 months later. Recovery of these dogs was effected by the implantation of a fragment of autologous sciatic nerve at the site of injury and subsequently exposing the dogs to low-level laser irradiation. The effect of laser irradiation on the embryonal nerve cells grown in tissue culture was also observed. We found that low-level laser irradiation induced intensive migration of neurites outward of the aggregates 15-22 The results of the present study and our previous investigations suggest that low-level laser irradiation is a novel tool for treatment of peripheral and central nervous system injuries.

  10. Neonatal head ultrasound: systematic approach to congenital Central Nervous System anomalies. A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Seong Whi

    2016-09-01

    Brain ultrasound is widely used for the screening of prematurely born babies. Although the best imaging modality for the central nervous system anomaly is brain MRI, the first imaging study in the post-natal period is brain ultrasonography in most cases. Anomalies could be found incidentally on screening ultrasound, or in those cases already suspected on prenatal ultrasound. In order not to miss congenital structural abnormalities of the brain on screening ultrasound, systematic approaches would be very helpful. The ventricles and sylvian fissures are very important structures to suspect central nervous system anomalies: they are symmetric structures so we should look for any asymmetry or maldevelopment. And then, on sagittal images, the midline structures including the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis should be observed carefully. Finally, we should look for any abnormality in gyration or cortical development. Skull defect with herniation of intracranial contents, a spectrum of encephalo-meningocele, could be also identified on ultrasound. Congenital infections such as cytomegalovirus infection may show ventriculomegaly and malformation of the cortical development on imaging studies. PMID:27622417

  11. Observations on vascular accidents in the central nervous system of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, I G

    1982-01-01

    A technique for the subarachnoid perfusion-fixation of the central nervous system was developed to help identify various significant vascular accidents (SVAs) in the central nervous system (CNS) of 24 neonatal foals submitted for necropsy. SVAs, comprising subarachnoid, parenchymal and nerve root haemorrhages, and oedema and necrosis, occurred in 17 foals, more frequently in the spinal cord than the brain. They occurred as frequently in premature foals as in those born at full term, in foals born dead as in foals born alive, and in foals born following dystocia with an assisted delivery as in foals born unassisted. Eight of the live foals showed neurological signs. Those with syndromes of cerebral disease tended to have brain SVAs, whilst all 3 with signs of spinal cord disease had SVAs restricted to the spinal cord. No association between the SVAs and other specific disease processes was detected in these foals although 2 premature foals born dead with equine herpesvirus-1 infection did have spinal cord SVAs only. A similar distribution of brain and/or spinal cord SVAs was detected in the foals born dead as in the live foals, but the lesions were more severe. It is concluded that the birth process itself may be a major factor in the development of SVAs and that some affected foals may exhibit a syndrome referable to spinal cord involvement.

  12. Synaptic Targets of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of potent synthetic agonists for cannabinoid receptors has facilitated our understanding of cannabinoid actions on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Moreover, the ability of these compounds to inhibit neurotransmitter release at many central synapses is thought to underlie most of the behavioral effects of cannabinoid agonists. However, despite the widespread use and misuse of marijuana, and recognition of its potential adverse psychological effects in humans, comparatively few studies have examined the actions of its primary psychoactive constituent, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), at well-defined synaptic pathways. Here we examine the recent literature describing the effects of acute and repeated THC exposure on synaptic function in several brain regions and explore the importance of these neurobiological actions of THC in drug addiction. PMID:23209160

  13. Structure of the central nervous system of a juvenile acoel, Symsagittifera roscoffensis.

    PubMed

    Bery, Amandine; Cardona, Albert; Martinez, Pedro; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-09-01

    The neuroarchitecture of Acoela has been at the center of morphological debates. Some authors, using immunochemical tools, suggest that the nervous system in Acoela is organized as a commissural brain that bears little resemblance to the central, ganglionic type brain of other flatworms, and bilaterians in general. Others, who used histological staining on paraffin sections, conclude that it is a compact structure (an endonal brain; e.g., Raikova 2004; von Graff 1891; Delage Arch Zool Exp Gén 4:109-144, 1886). To address this question with modern tools, we have obtained images from serial transmission electron microscopic sections of the entire hatchling of Symsagittifera roscoffensis. In addition, we obtained data from wholemounts of hatchlings labeled with markers for serotonin and tyrosinated tubulin. Our data show that the central nervous system of a juvenile S. roscoffensis consists of an anterior compact brain, formed by a dense, bilobed mass of neuronal cell bodies surrounding a central neuropile. The neuropile flanks the median statocyst and contains several types of neurites, classified according to their types of synaptic vesicles. The neuropile issues three pairs of nerve cords that run at different dorso-ventral positions along the whole length of the body. Neuronal cell bodies flank the cords, and neuromuscular synapses are abundant. The TEM analysis also reveals different classes of peripheral sensory neurons and provides valuable information about the spatial relationships between neurites and other cell types within the brain and nerve cords. We conclude that the acoel S. roscoffensis has a central brain that is comparable in size and architecture to the brain of other (rhabditophoran) flatworms.

  14. Structure of the central nervous system of a juvenile acoel, Symsagittifera roscoffensis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Albert; Martinez, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    The neuroarchitecture of Acoela has been at the center of morphological debates. Some authors, using immunochemical tools, suggest that the nervous system in Acoela is organized as a commissural brain that bears little resemblance to the central, ganglionic type brain of other flatworms, and bilaterians in general. Others, who used histological staining on paraffin sections, conclude that it is a compact structure (an endonal brain; e.g., Raikova 2004; von Graff 1891; Delage Arch Zool Exp Gén 4:109-144, 1886). To address this question with modern tools, we have obtained images from serial transmission electron microscopic sections of the entire hatchling of Symsagittifera roscoffensis. In addition, we obtained data from wholemounts of hatchlings labeled with markers for serotonin and tyrosinated tubulin. Our data show that the central nervous system of a juvenile S. roscoffensis consists of an anterior compact brain, formed by a dense, bilobed mass of neuronal cell bodies surrounding a central neuropile. The neuropile flanks the median statocyst and contains several types of neurites, classified according to their types of synaptic vesicles. The neuropile issues three pairs of nerve cords that run at different dorso-ventral positions along the whole length of the body. Neuronal cell bodies flank the cords, and neuromuscular synapses are abundant. The TEM analysis also reveals different classes of peripheral sensory neurons and provides valuable information about the spatial relationships between neurites and other cell types within the brain and nerve cords. We conclude that the acoel S. roscoffensis has a central brain that is comparable in size and architecture to the brain of other (rhabditophoran) flatworms. PMID:20549514

  15. On the morphology of the central nervous system in larval stages of Carcinus maenas L. (Decapoda, Brachyura)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzsch, S.; Dawirs, R. R.

    1993-02-01

    We investigated the morphology of the central nervous system throughout the larval development of Carcinus maenas. For that purpose single larvae were reared in the laboratory from hatching through metamorphosis. Complete series of whole mout semithin sections were obtained from individuals of all successive larval stages and analysed with a light microscope. Morphological feature and spatial arrangement of discernable neural cell clusters, fibre tracts and neuropile are described and compared with the adult pattern. We found that most of the morphological features characterizing the adult nervous system are already present in the zoea-1. Nevertheless, there are marked differences with respect to the arrangement of nerve cell bodies, organization of cerebral neuropile, and disposition of ganglia in the ventral nerve cord. It appears that complexity of the central nervous neuropile is selectively altered during postmetamorphotic development, probably reflecting adaptive changes of sensory-motor integration in response to behavioural maturation. In contrast, during larval development there was little change in the overall structural organization of the central nervous system despite some considerable growth. However, the transition from zoea-4 to megalopa brings about multiple fundamental changes in larval morphology and behavioural pattern. Since central nervous integration should properly adapt to the altered behavioural repertoire of the megalopa, it seems necessary to ask in which respect synaptic rearrangement might characterize development of the central nervous system.

  16. Behavioral consequences of dopamine deficiency in the Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Isabel, Guillaume; Coulom, Hélène; Neuser, Kirsa; Seugnet, Laurent; Kume, Kazuhiko; Iché-Torres, Magali; Cassar, Marlène; Strauss, Roland; Preat, Thomas; Hirsh, Jay; Birman, Serge

    2011-01-01

    The neuromodulatory function of dopamine (DA) is an inherent feature of nervous systems of all animals. To learn more about the function of neural DA in Drosophila, we generated mutant flies that lack tyrosine hydroxylase, and thus DA biosynthesis, selectively in the nervous system. We found that DA is absent or below detection limits in the adult brain of these flies. Despite this, they have a lifespan similar to WT flies. These mutants show reduced activity, extended sleep time, locomotor deficits that increase with age, and they are hypophagic. Whereas odor and electrical shock avoidance are not affected, aversive olfactory learning is abolished. Instead, DA-deficient flies have an apparently “masochistic” tendency to prefer the shock-associated odor 2 h after conditioning. Similarly, sugar preference is absent, whereas sugar stimulation of foreleg taste neurons induces normal proboscis extension. Feeding the DA precursor l-DOPA to adults substantially rescues the learning deficit as well as other impaired behaviors that were tested. DA-deficient flies are also defective in positive phototaxis, without alteration in visual perception and optomotor response. Surprisingly, visual tracking is largely maintained, and these mutants still possess an efficient spatial orientation memory. Our findings show that flies can perform complex brain functions in the absence of neural DA, whereas specific behaviors involving, in particular, arousal and choice require normal levels of this neuromodulator. PMID:21187381

  17. Two myomodulins isolated from central nervous system of Northwest Pacific Sea Hare, Aplysia kurodai, and their activities on other mollusks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Hee; Go, Hye-Jin; Park, Nam Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of Aplysia is a fascinating source to identify and characterize neuropeptides and neurotransmitters because of offering many useful divergent and convergent neuronal aggregates. Here, two neuropeptides were isolated from the extract of CNS of the northwest pacific sea hare, Aplysia kurodai, using HPLC system for fractionation and the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of the Mytilis edulis as the bioassay system. Purified peptides, myomodulin A (MMA) and E (MME), were determined by amino acid sequencing and molecular mass analysis. MMA showed a potentiating effect at 100 nM or lower, on the contrary, an inhibitory effect at higher doses from 100 nM on phasic contraction elicited by repetitive electrical stimulation on the ABRM of Mytilus. However, MME only inhibited phasic contraction with all examined concentrations. MME revealed 100 times more potent activity than that of MMA on the relaxing catch-tension of ABRM stimulated by acetylcholine. Both MMA and MME potently stimulated a response on the crop and penial retractor muscle of the African giant snail, Achatina fulica, compared with other known mollusks neuropeptides. These results suggest that MMA and MME may be broadly distributed in CNS of Aplysia to function a neuromodulatory role controlled via excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and may be involved in the digestive and reproductive activity in other mollusk.

  18. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  19. Antennal pathways in the central nervous system of a blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Barrozo, Romina B; Couton, Louise; Lazzari, Claudio R; Insausti, Teresita C; Minoli, Sebastian A; Fresquet, Nadine; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Anton, Sylvia

    2009-03-01

    The haematophagous bug Rhodnius prolixus has been a model system in insect physiology for a long time. Recently, several studies have been devoted to its sensory systems, including olfaction. However, few data are available on the basic organisation of the nervous system in this species. By means of neuronal backfills, histology, confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction methods, we have characterized the projection patterns of antennal sensory neurons within the central nervous system of this disease-vector insect. We established the first partial three-dimensional map of the antennal lobe (AL) of a hemipteran insect. The ALs of this species are relatively diffuse structures, which nevertheless show a glomerular organisation. Based on computer reconstruction of the AL, 22 glomeruli with a radius of 8-25 microm could be identified. No obvious sexual dimorphism of the glomerular architecture was observed. Antennal afferents project not only into the deutocerebrum, but also some fibres descend through the ventral nerve cord to ganglia belonging to the abdominal segments.

  20. [Studies of the mechanisms of spreading of epileptic discharges in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Trabka, W

    1989-01-01

    The process of spreading of epileptic discharges in central nervous system has to be discussed in two points of view; as a propagation of signals in neuronal networks and as a process of dynamics changes in neuronal circuits and nets. On the base of the spreading of afterdischarges between entorhinal cortex and both hippocampi we discussed time and space relations in spreading of epileptic discharges, and automatic analytical methods in localization of epileptic focus. Spreading epileptic discharge is not only the symptom of pathologic function of system but it simultaneously changes the dynamics of system in which it spreads and causes epileptic destabilization of neuronal circuits and nets. The above mechanisms after theoretical investigations play also important role in evaluation of secondary epileptic foci and posttraumatic epilepsy.

  1. Blood to brain transport of interleukin links the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J. Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA )

    1991-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are naturally occurring proteins that regulate, and thus link, both the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Since proteins are assumed not to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), it is controversial how this linkage could occur. The authors show here that after iv injection of {sup 125}I-hIL-1{alpha}, radioactivity in the brain eluted on HPLC in the position of the labeled cytokine. In addition, entry was inhibited by unlabeled hIL-1{alpha}. The authors demonstration of a saturable, carrier-mediated system that transports recombinant human IL-1{alpha} in intact form from the blood into the CNS indicates a direct immune-CNS connection.

  2. Comparative mapping of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous systems of nudibranch molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    The relative simplicity of certain invertebrate nervous systems, such as those of gastropod molluscs, allows behaviors to be dissected at the level of small neural circuits composed of individually identifiable neurons. Elucidating the neurotransmitter phenotype of neurons in neural circuits is important for understanding how those neural circuits function. In this study, we examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric-acid;-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in four species of sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Nudibranchia): Tritonia diomedea, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, and Hermissenda crassicornis. We found consistent patterns of GABA immunoreactivity in the pedal and cerebral-pleural ganglia across species. In particular, there were bilateral clusters in the lateral and medial regions of the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglia as well as a cluster on the ventral surface of the pedal ganglia. There were also individual GABA-ir neurons that were recognizable across species. The invariant presence of these individual neurons and clusters suggests that they are homologous, although there were interspecies differences in the numbers of neurons in the clusters. The GABAergic system was largely restricted to the central nervous system, with the majority of axons confined to ganglionic connectives and commissures, suggesting a central, integrative role for GABA. GABA was a candidate inhibitory neurotransmitter for neurons in central pattern generator (CPG) circuits underlying swimming behaviors in these species, however none of the known swim CPG neurons were GABA-ir. Although the functions of these GABA-ir neurons are not known, it is clear that their presence has been strongly conserved across nudibranchs. PMID:24638845

  3. Comparative mapping of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous systems of nudibranch molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    The relative simplicity of certain invertebrate nervous systems, such as those of gastropod molluscs, allows behaviors to be dissected at the level of small neural circuits composed of individually identifiable neurons. Elucidating the neurotransmitter phenotype of neurons in neural circuits is important for understanding how those neural circuits function. In this study, we examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric-acid;-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in four species of sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Nudibranchia): Tritonia diomedea, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, and Hermissenda crassicornis. We found consistent patterns of GABA immunoreactivity in the pedal and cerebral-pleural ganglia across species. In particular, there were bilateral clusters in the lateral and medial regions of the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglia as well as a cluster on the ventral surface of the pedal ganglia. There were also individual GABA-ir neurons that were recognizable across species. The invariant presence of these individual neurons and clusters suggests that they are homologous, although there were interspecies differences in the numbers of neurons in the clusters. The GABAergic system was largely restricted to the central nervous system, with the majority of axons confined to ganglionic connectives and commissures, suggesting a central, integrative role for GABA. GABA was a candidate inhibitory neurotransmitter for neurons in central pattern generator (CPG) circuits underlying swimming behaviors in these species, however none of the known swim CPG neurons were GABA-ir. Although the functions of these GABA-ir neurons are not known, it is clear that their presence has been strongly conserved across nudibranchs.

  4. Leptin acts in the central nervous system to produce dose-dependent changes in arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Correia, M L; Morgan, D A; Sivitz, W I; Mark, A L; Haynes, W G

    2001-03-01

    Systemic leptin increases energy expenditure through sympathetic mechanisms, decreases appetite, and increases arterial pressure. We tested the hypothesis that the pressor action of leptin is mediated by the central nervous system. The interaction of dietary salt with leptin was also studied. Leptin was infused for 2 to 4 weeks into the third cerebral ventricle of Sprague-Dawley rats. Arterial pressure was measured by radiotelemetry. To control for the effects of leptin on body weight, vehicle-treated rats were pair-fed to the leptin group. Intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin at 200 ng/h in salt-depleted rats caused a reduction in food intake, weight loss, tachycardia, and decreased arterial pressure. Leptin at 1000 ng/h caused further reduction in food intake, weight loss, and tachycardia and prevented the hypotensive effect of weight loss observed in pair-fed, vehicle-treated animals. Intracerebroventricular leptin at 1000 ng/h in high-salt-fed rats also caused a sustained pressor response (+3+/-1 mm Hg), but high-salt intake did not potentiate the pressor effect of leptin. Intracerebroventricular leptin potentiated the pressor effect of air-jet stress. Intravenous administration of the same dose of leptin (1000 ng/h) did not change weight or arterial pressure, suggesting a direct central nervous system action. In contrast, a high dose of intravenous leptin (18 000 ng/h) caused weight loss and prevented the depressor effect of weight loss. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that high-dose leptin increases arterial pressure and heart rate through central neural mechanisms but leptin does not enhance salt sensitivity of arterial pressure. Leptin appears to oppose the depressor effect of weight loss.

  5. Structural characterization of a diuretic peptide from the central nervous system of the leech Erpobdella octoculata. Angiotensin II Amide.

    PubMed

    Salzet, M; Bulet, P; Wattez, C; Verger-Bocquet, M; Malecha, J

    1995-01-27

    Purification of a material immunoreactive to an antiserum against angiotensin II and present in the central nervous system of the pharyngobdellid leech Erpobdella octoculata was performed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography combined with both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dot immunobinding assays for angiotensin II. Establishment of the amino acid sequence by Edman degradation, electrospray, and fast atom bombardement mass spectrometry measurements and enzymatic treatment by carboxypeptidase A indicated that this "central" angiotensin II-like material, the first one fully characterized in the animal kingdom, is an angiotensin II amide. This finding constitutes also the first biochemical characterization of a peptide of the angiotensin family in an invertebrate. Synthetic angiotensin II amide exerts, when injected in leeches, a diuretic effect and is, 1 and 2 h postinjection, 100-fold more potent than vertebrate angiotensin II. An identification of the proteins immunoreactive to an antiserum against angiotensin II performed at the level of both central nervous system extracts and in vitro central nervous system-translated RNA products indicated that in the two cases, two proteins were detected. Their molecular masses, which were, respectively, approximately 14 and approximately 18 kDa for the central nervous system extracts and approximately 15 and approximately 19 kDa for in vitro central nervous system-translated RNA products, differ from that of angiotensinogen (approximately 60 kDa), the precursor of vertebrate angiotensin II.

  6. [Successful treatment with total cranial irradiation for central nervous system involvement of Langerhans cell sarcoma during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Noriharu; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Yamashita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukio; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is an extremely rare neoplasm of Langerhans cell origin characterized by systemic involvement and a poor prognosis. There are, however, few reports of LCS with central nervous system involvement. We experienced a patient with LCS recurrence in the brain that appeared during systemic chemotherapy. The brains lesions eventually responded to total cranial irradiation. A 60-year-old female presented with systemic lymphadenopathy. LCS was diagnosed based on neck lymph node biopsy findings. Two cycles of ESHAP induced marked regression of her lymphadenopathy, but FDG-PET/CT scan revealed new lesions in the central nervous system and her disorientation gradually worsened. We administered 37.5 Gy of total cranial irradiation which improved her consciousness and shrank the brain tumors as demonstrated by MRI. The patient's clinical course indicates that radiation therapy may be effective for central nervous system involvement of LCS even if the lesion is resistant to systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26861100

  7. Emerging roles of the acute phase protein pentraxin-3 during central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, Ivana; Denes, Adam; Allan, Stuart M; Pinteaux, Emmanuel

    2016-03-15

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is an acute phase protein (APP) and a member of the long pentraxin family that is recognised for its role in peripheral immunity and vascular inflammation in response to injury, infection and diseases such as atherosclerosis, cancer and respiratory disease. Systemic levels of PTX3 are highly elevated in these conditions, and PTX3 is now recognised as a new biomarker of disease risk and progression. There is extensive evidence demonstrating that central nervous system (CNS) disorders are primarily characterised by central activation of innate immunity, as well as activation of a potent peripheral acute phase response (APR) that influences central inflammation and contributes to poor outcome. PTX3 has been recently recognised to play important roles in CNS disorders, having both detrimental and neuroprotective effects. The present review aims to give an up-to-date account of the emerging roles of PTX3 in CNS disorders, and to provide a critical comparison between peripheral and central actions of PTX3 in inflammatory diseases.

  8. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke. PMID:26238742

  9. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ana Maria; Moreno-Ramos, Oscar Andrés; Haider, Neena B.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration. PMID:27168725

  10. Hazard effects of nanoparticles in central nervous system: Searching for biocompatible nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured materials are widely used in many applications of industry and biomedical fields. Nanoparticles emerges as potential pharmacological carriers that can be applied in the regenerative medicine, diagnosis and drug delivery. Different types of nanoparticles exhibit ability to cross the brain blood barrier (BBB) and accumulate in several brain areas. Then, efforts have been done to develop safer nanocarrier systems to treat disorders of central nervous system (CNS). However, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that nanoparticles of different materials exhibit a wide range of neurotoxic effects inducing neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment. For this reason, polymeric nanoparticles arise as a promisor alternative due to their biocompatible and biodegradable properties. After an overview of CNS location and neurotoxic effects of translocated nanoparticles, this review addresses the use of polymeric nanoparticles to the treatment of neuroinfectious diseases, as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and meningitis. PMID:26116398

  11. Hazard effects of nanoparticles in central nervous system: Searching for biocompatible nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured materials are widely used in many applications of industry and biomedical fields. Nanoparticles emerges as potential pharmacological carriers that can be applied in the regenerative medicine, diagnosis and drug delivery. Different types of nanoparticles exhibit ability to cross the brain blood barrier (BBB) and accumulate in several brain areas. Then, efforts have been done to develop safer nanocarrier systems to treat disorders of central nervous system (CNS). However, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that nanoparticles of different materials exhibit a wide range of neurotoxic effects inducing neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment. For this reason, polymeric nanoparticles arise as a promisor alternative due to their biocompatible and biodegradable properties. After an overview of CNS location and neurotoxic effects of translocated nanoparticles, this review addresses the use of polymeric nanoparticles to the treatment of neuroinfectious diseases, as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and meningitis.

  12. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse Presenting With Central Nervous System Blast Crisis and Bilateral Optic Nerve Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Abdel Fattah, Maaly; Al Nounou, Randa M; Chebbo, Wahiba; Dogar, Mohammed Asif

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral, simultaneous optic nerve sheath infiltration as a manifestation of leukemia relapse is very rare. A 45-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia was successfully treated to cytogenetic bone marrow remission 1 year previously and maintained on imatinib. She developed total bilateral blindness with marked, bilateral optic disc edema and evidence of bilateral optic nerve infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology confirmed central nervous system (CNS) blast crisis. She recovered visual acuity of 20/20 in the right eye, and 20/25 in the left eye with salvage systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Our report underscores the importance of timely and aggressive intervention of blast crisis of the CNS and the need for CNS penetrating induction and maintenance therapy. PMID:26628337

  13. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Azevedo, Bruna; Barros Furieri, Lorena; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Frizera Vassallo, Paula; Ronacher Simões, Maylla; Fiorim, Jonaina; Rossi de Batista, Priscila; Fioresi, Mirian; Rossoni, Luciana; Stefanon, Ivanita; Alonso, María Jesus; Salaices, Mercedes; Valentim Vassallo, Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced. PMID:22811600

  14. A case of Erdheim Chester disease with central nervous system involvement

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anil Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthik; Aaron, Sanjith; Alexander, Mathew; Kachare, Nanda; Mani, Sunithi; Sniya, Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    Erdheim Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, commonly involving the musculoskeletal system. Other tissue can also be involved, including the central nervous system with wide spectrum of clinical features, at times being nonspecific. This can cause diagnostic dilemmas with delay in diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Here we describe a 63-year-old man who had presented with ataxia and behavioral changes, bony pains, weight loss, and fatigue. His computed tomography (CT), 99Tc scintigraphy and histopathological features on bone biopsy were consistent with ECD. Thus, ECD should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with bony pain and nonspecific features of multiorgan involvement. PMID:26425015

  15. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse Presenting With Central Nervous System Blast Crisis and Bilateral Optic Nerve Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Abdel Fattah, Maaly; Al Nounou, Randa M; Chebbo, Wahiba; Dogar, Mohammed Asif

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral, simultaneous optic nerve sheath infiltration as a manifestation of leukemia relapse is very rare. A 45-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia was successfully treated to cytogenetic bone marrow remission 1 year previously and maintained on imatinib. She developed total bilateral blindness with marked, bilateral optic disc edema and evidence of bilateral optic nerve infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology confirmed central nervous system (CNS) blast crisis. She recovered visual acuity of 20/20 in the right eye, and 20/25 in the left eye with salvage systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Our report underscores the importance of timely and aggressive intervention of blast crisis of the CNS and the need for CNS penetrating induction and maintenance therapy.

  16. Commentary on the interactions of HIV and alcohol in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nair, Madhavan P; Agudelo, Marisela

    2014-03-01

    This commentary is to highlight the relevance and public interest of the review published by Silverstein and Kumar, which focuses on the mechanisms by which alcohol and HIV-1 infection cause increased in central nervous system (CNS) damage. The overall review is based on previous literature with cell culture systems and animal models that have demonstrated that exposure to alcohol and HIV infection or HIV viral proteins result in synergistic up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. The authors discuss the effects of alcohol on cells in the CNS, followed by a brief discussion on the impact of HIV-1 and HIV proteins on the CNS, and the final section focuses on the combined effects of HIV and alcohol on the CNS as determined by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies.

  17. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  18. Role of microRNAs in primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2016-04-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) are extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas arising exclusively inside the CNS, and account for about 3% of primary intracranial tumours. This tumour lacks systemic manifestations and prognosis of patients with PCNSL remains poor despite recent advancement of chemoradiotherapy. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally downregulate gene expression by binding to target mRNAs, inducing their degradation or translational repression. MicroRNAs play significant roles in almost all malignancy-related biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metabolism. Many deregulated miRNAs has been identified in PCNSL but their biological significance remains to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the pathogenic role of PCNSL-associated microRNAs and their potential applications for diagnosis and prognostication of this deadly disease. PMID:26990358

  19. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke.

  20. Associations among central nervous system serotonergic function and neuroticism are moderated by gender

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Beverly H.; Boyle, Stephen H.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Williams, Redford B.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonergic dysregulation is associated with negative affect. Plasma prolactin responses to a tryptophan enhancement challenge are used as a measure of central nervous system serotonergic activity. We examined prolactin responses to a tryptophan challenge as they relate to the personality domains of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. Participants were 67 volunteers. Regression models assessed peak prolactin response to intravenous tryptophan infusion as a predictor of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Prolactin X gender product terms included to examine moderation by gender. Models were adjusted for baseline levels of prolactin, age, and race. Gender moderated the association between N and prolactin level (p<.03). Higher levels of N were associated with decreased levels of prolactin responses in females, whereas the opposite was true for males. Remaining personality domains were not related to prolactin levels. Findings add to literature suggesting the serotonin system functions differently, in important ways, in males and females. PMID:18417268

  1. Phase I Trial Using Patupilone (Epothilone B) and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Curran, Walter J.; Bonanni, Roseann; Axelrod, Rita; Andrews, David; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Based on preclinical data indicating the radiosensitizing potential of epothilone B, the present study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and response rate of patupilone, an epothilone B, with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of central nervous system malignancies. Methods and Materials: The present Phase I study evaluated the toxicities associated with patupilone combined with RT to establish the maximal tolerated dose. Eligible patients had recurrent gliomas (n = 10) primary (n = 5) or metastatic (n = 17) brain tumors. Dose escalation occurred if no dose-limiting toxicities, defined as any Grade 4-5 toxicity or Grade 3 toxicity requiring hospitalization, occurred during treatment. Results: Of 14 patients, 5 were treated with weekly patupilone at 1.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.5 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1 at 4 mg/m{sup 2}. Of 18 patients, 7 were treated in the 6-mg/m{sup 2} group, 6 in the 8-mg/m{sup 2} group, and 5 in the 10-mg/m{sup 2} group. Primary central nervous system malignancies received RT to a median dose of 60 Gy. Central nervous system metastases received whole brain RT to a median dose of 37.4 Gy, and patients with recurrent gliomas underwent stereotactic RT to a median dose of 37.5 Gy. One dose-limiting toxicity (pneumonia) was observed in group receiving 8-mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks. At the subsequent dose level (10 mg/m{sup 2}), two Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities occurred (renal failure and pulmonary hemorrhage); thus, 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks was the maximal tolerated dose and the recommended Phase II dose. Conclusion: Combined with a variety of radiation doses and fractionation schedules, concurrent patupilone was well tolerated and safe, with a maximal tolerated dose of 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks.

  2. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important CNS functions have yet to be clarified. Here we review murine evidence about the effects of exercise on discrete brain regions involved in important CNS functions. Exercise effects on circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, stress responses in the brain stem and hypothalamic pituitary axis, and movement are examined. The databases Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for articles investigating regional brain adaptations to exercise. Brain regions examined included the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. We found evidence of multiple regional adaptations to both forced and voluntary exercise. Exercise can induce molecular adaptations in neuronal function in many instances. Taken together, these findings suggest that the regional physiological adaptations that occur with exercise could constitute a promising field for elucidating molecular and cellular mechanisms of recovery in psychiatric and neurological health conditions.

  3. Pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides in the central nervous system of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Erica; Nusawardani, Tyasning; Bartholomay, Lyric; Jurenka, Russell

    2014-04-01

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) family of peptides is characterized by a common C-terminal pentapeptide, FXPRLamide, which is required for diverse physiological functions in various insects. Polyclonal antisera against the C-terminus was utilized to determine the location of cell bodies and axons in the central nervous systems of larval and adult mosquitoes. Immunoreactive material was detected in three groups of neurons in the subesophageal ganglion of larvae and adults. The corpora cardiaca of both larvae and adults contained immunoreactivity indicating potential release into circulation. The adult and larval brains had at least one pair of immunoreactive neurons in the protocerebrum with the adult brain having additional immunoreactive neurons in the dorsal medial part of the protocerebrum. The ventral ganglia of both larvae and adults each contained one pair of neurons that sent their axons to a perisympathetic organ associated with each abdominal ganglion. These results indicate that the mosquito nervous system contains pyrokinin/PBAN-like peptides and that these peptides could be released into the hemolymph. The peptides in insects and mosquitoes are produced by two genes, capa and pk/pban. Utilizing PCR protocols, we demonstrate that products of the capa gene could be produced in the abdominal ventral ganglia and the products of the pk/pban gene could be produced in the subesophageal ganglion. Two receptors for pyrokinin peptides were differentially localized to various tissues.

  4. Peripheral Nervous System Genes Expressed in Central Neurons Induce Growth on Inhibitory Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Smith, Robin P.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Haddox, Candace L.; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS’s enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons. PMID:22701605

  5. The role of repulsive guidance molecules in the embryonic and adult vertebrate central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bernhard K; Yamashita, Toshihide; Schaffar, Gregor; Mueller, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    During the development of the nervous system, outgrowing axons often have to travel long distances to reach their target neurons. In this process, outgrowing neurites tipped with motile growth cones rely on guidance cues present in their local environment. These cues are detected by specific receptors expressed on growth cones and neurites and influence the trajectory of the growing fibres. Neurite growth, guidance, target innervation and synapse formation and maturation are the processes that occur predominantly but not exclusively during embryonic or early post-natal development in vertebrates. As a result, a functional neural network is established, which is usually remarkably stable. However, the stability of the neural network in higher vertebrates comes at an expensive price, i.e. the loss of any significant ability to regenerate injured or damaged neuronal connections in their central nervous system (CNS). Most importantly, neurite growth inhibitors prevent any regenerative growth of injured nerve fibres. Some of these inhibitors are associated with CNS myelin, others are found at the lesion site and in the scar tissue. Traumatic injuries in brain and spinal cord of mammals induce upregulation of embryonic inhibitory or repulsive guidance cues and their receptors on the neurites. An example for embryonic repulsive directional cues re-expressed at lesion sites in both the rat and human CNS is provided with repulsive guidance molecules, a new family of directional guidance cues. PMID:16939972

  6. The 2007 WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Wiestler, Otmar D.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Burger, Peter C.; Jouvet, Anne; Scheithauer, Bernd W.

    2007-01-01

    The fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system, published in 2007, lists several new entities, including angiocentric glioma, papillary glioneuronal tumour, rosette-forming glioneuronal tumour of the fourth ventricle, papillary tumour of the pineal region, pituicytoma and spindle cell oncocytoma of the adenohypophysis. Histological variants were added if there was evidence of a different age distribution, location, genetic profile or clinical behaviour; these included pilomyxoid astrocytoma, anaplastic medulloblastoma and medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity. The WHO grading scheme and the sections on genetic profiles were updated and the rhabdoid tumour predisposition syndrome was added to the list of familial tumour syndromes typically involving the nervous system. As in the previous, 2000 edition of the WHO ‘Blue Book’, the classification is accompanied by a concise commentary on clinico-pathological characteristics of each tumour type. The 2007 WHO classification is based on the consensus of an international Working Group of 25 pathologists and geneticists, as well as contributions from more than 70 international experts overall, and is presented as the standard for the definition of brain tumours to the clinical oncology and cancer research communities world-wide. PMID:17618441

  7. Gender affects rats' central nervous system histaminergic responses to dietary manipulation.

    PubMed

    Mercer, L P; Kelley, D S; Bundrant, H M; Haq, A U; Humphries, L L

    1996-12-01

    The histaminergic system (histamine and its H1-receptor) of the central nervous system has been implicated in control of food intake. The reported studies were designed to examine the effects of food restriction and very low (1%) protein diets on central nervous system H1-receptors in male and female rats. In a series of experiments, groups of rats were freely fed a 25% protein diet, a 1% protein diet, or fed the 25% protein diet at 4 g/100 g body weight for 14-20 d. When freely fed 25% protein diets, females had higher whole-brain H1-receptor binding than males on d 1 (female 122.36 +/- 4.53 and male 65.78 +/- 3.82 pmol/g protein; P < 0.001). Changing diets affected central H1-receptor binding in both males and females (P < 0.003). When rats were fed both restricted levels of food and 1% protein diets, the receptor binding of males increased by d 5 whereas that of females decreased by d 5 (P < 0.001). When fed 1% protein diets, females had decreased H1-receptor binding (98.4 +/- 2.38 pmol/g protein) and that in males increased to 119.81 +/- 5.09 pmol/g protein. After 15 d, females had eaten significantly more food than males: females 166 +/- 4.9 g, males 124 +/- 1.9 g (P< 0.0007). Males had a significantly greater weight loss than females: males -28.8 +/- 2.6 g, females -17.08 +/- 0.97 g (P < 0.0007). When fed restricted diets, females had decreased H1-receptor binding (93.81 +/- 5.58 pmol/g) whereas binding in males increased to 111.27 +/- 8.55 pmol/g. Preliminary saturation binding studies indicated that restricted food intake lowered receptor density (females consuming 25% protein: 715 +/- 30 pmol/g protein; female restricted: 467 +/- 28 pmol/g protein, P < 0.05), while 1% protein increased receptor sensitivity, i.e., lowered KD (males consuming 25% protein: 15.3 +/- 1.8 nmol; males fed low protein: 2.8 +/- 0.27 nmol). This study suggests that dietary manipulation affects central H1-receptor binding in a gender-specific manner, thereby modulating central

  8. Society for Neuro-Oncology 2014 annual meeting updates on central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Rimas V.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) took place in November of 2014. The focus of many abstracts, as well as the Education Day, was on recent advances in the study of central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Tumor Biology Key studies evaluating the factors in tumors and their microenvironment associated with the development and growth of brain metastases are reviewed. Prognostication Studies investigating the factors that independently influence survival in participants with brain metastases are presented. Response Assessment The Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology criteria for brain metastases (RANO-BM) and the Neurological Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) criteria, which were both presented, are recapped. Radiotherapy Studies are reviewed evaluating factors that influence survival outcomes in participants with brain metastases who were treated with radiotherapy. Studies investigating the potential risk of radiation necrosis with the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapies are presented. Systemic Therapies Brain metastases-focused subset analyses from the ASCEND-1 trial for ALK-translocated non–small cell lung cancer are presented. Preclinical and clinical work on solid tumor leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is also covered. Sequelae of Central Nervous System Metastases and Their Treatments An overview is provided of treatment- related toxicities as well as important concepts that may influence strategies to protect against these toxicities. Conclusions Key concepts regarding tumor biology, prognostication, response assessment, therapeutic management, and sequelae of treatment for CNS metastases are summarized. Advances in our understanding of the basic and clinical science of CNS metastases have the potential to improve outcomes for patients.

  9. Society for Neuro-Oncology 2014 annual meeting updates on central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Rimas V.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) took place in November of 2014. The focus of many abstracts, as well as the Education Day, was on recent advances in the study of central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Tumor Biology Key studies evaluating the factors in tumors and their microenvironment associated with the development and growth of brain metastases are reviewed. Prognostication Studies investigating the factors that independently influence survival in participants with brain metastases are presented. Response Assessment The Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology criteria for brain metastases (RANO-BM) and the Neurological Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) criteria, which were both presented, are recapped. Radiotherapy Studies are reviewed evaluating factors that influence survival outcomes in participants with brain metastases who were treated with radiotherapy. Studies investigating the potential risk of radiation necrosis with the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapies are presented. Systemic Therapies Brain metastases-focused subset analyses from the ASCEND-1 trial for ALK-translocated non–small cell lung cancer are presented. Preclinical and clinical work on solid tumor leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is also covered. Sequelae of Central Nervous System Metastases and Their Treatments An overview is provided of treatment- related toxicities as well as important concepts that may influence strategies to protect against these toxicities. Conclusions Key concepts regarding tumor biology, prognostication, response assessment, therapeutic management, and sequelae of treatment for CNS metastases are summarized. Advances in our understanding of the basic and clinical science of CNS metastases have the potential to improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27621837

  10. Pharmacological prion protein silencing accelerates central nervous system autoimmune disease via T cell receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Nessler, Stefan; Hemmer, Bernhard; Eagar, Todd N.; Kane, Lawrence P.; Leliveld, S. Rutger; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Gocke, Anne R.; Lovett-Racke, Amy; Ben, Li-Hong; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Breil, Andreas; Elliott, Jeffrey L.; Puttaparthi, Krishna; Cravens, Petra D.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Petsch, Benjamin; Stitz, Lothar; Racke, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary biological function of the endogenous cellular prion protein has remained unclear. We investigated its biological function in the generation of cellular immune responses using cellular prion protein gene-specific small interfering ribonucleic acid in vivo and in vitro. Our results were confirmed by blocking cellular prion protein with monovalent antibodies and by using cellular prion protein-deficient and -transgenic mice. In vivo prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid treatment effects were of limited duration, restricted to secondary lymphoid organs and resulted in a 70% reduction of cellular prion protein expression in leukocytes. Disruption of cellular prion protein signalling augmented antigen-specific activation and proliferation, and enhanced T cell receptor signalling, resulting in zeta-chain-associated protein-70 phosphorylation and nuclear factor of activated T cells/activator protein 1 transcriptional activity. In vivo prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid treatment promoted T cell differentiation towards pro-inflammatory phenotypes and increased survival of antigen-specific T cells. Cellular prion protein silencing with small interfering ribonucleic acid also resulted in the worsening of actively induced and adoptively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, treatment of myelin basic protein1–11 T cell receptor transgenic mice with prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid resulted in spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, central nervous system autoimmune disease was modulated at all stages of disease: the generation of the T cell effector response, the elicitation of T effector function and the perpetuation of cellular immune responses. Our findings indicate that cellular prion protein regulates T cell receptor-mediated T cell activation, differentiation and survival. Defects in autoimmunity are restricted to the immune system and not the central

  11. TASK1 modulates inflammation and neurodegeneration in autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Stefan; Göbel, Kerstin; Melzer, Nico; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Simon, Ole J.; Weishaupt, Andreas; Budde, Thomas; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Bendszus, Martin; Wiendl, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    We provide evidence that TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channel 1 (TASK1), a member of the family of two-pore domain potassium channels relevant for setting the resting membrane potential and balancing neuronal excitability that is expressed on T cells and neurons, is a key modulator of T cell immunity and neurodegeneration in autoimmune central nervous system inflammation. After induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an experimental model mimicking multiple sclerosis, TASK1−/− mice showed a significantly reduced clinical severity and markedly reduced axonal degeneration compared with wild-type controls. T cells from TASK1−/− mice displayed impaired T cell proliferation and cytokine production, while the immune repertoire is otherwise normal. In addition to these effects on systemic T cell responses, TASK1 exhibits an independent neuroprotective effect which was demonstrated using both a model of acutely prepared brain slices cocultured with activated T cells as well as in vitro cultivation experiments with isolated optic nerves. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid and inhibitor of TASK channels, reduced outward currents and inhibited effector functions of T cells (IFN-γ production and proliferation); an effect completely abrogated in TASK1−/− mice. Accordingly, preventive blockade of TASK1 significantly ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after immunization. Therapeutic application of anandamide significantly reduced disease severity and was capable of lowering progressive loss of brain parenchymal volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. These data support the identification and characterization of TASK1 as potential molecular target for the therapy of inflammatory and degenerative central nervous system disorders. PMID:19570851

  12. Characterization of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in the central nervous system of African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Kreider, M S; Winokur, A; Manaker, S; Pack, A I; Fishman, A P

    1988-10-01

    Central administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) produces potent effects on various physiological parameters, such as arousal, respiration, and cardiovascular function, in several species. As part of an investigation into the evolution of this tripeptide as a central modulator of these parameters, we examined its distribution in the central nervous system of the African lungfish (Protopterus). Lungfish brains were dissected into three regions: telencephalon, diencephalon, and medulla. Each region was assayed for TRH by radioimmunoassay and for norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin by HPLC/electrochemical methods. TRH immunoreactivity (IR-TRH) was present in all regions of lungfish brain examined. The telencephalon contained the highest concentrations of TRH, the diencephalon also contained a high concentration of TRH, and the medulla contained a markedly lower concentration. Similar concentration gradients (telencephalon greater than diencephalon greater than medulla) were observed for norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. The identity of IR-TRH as authentic TRH was confirmed by elution profiles on HPLC. The results of this investigation demonstrated that TRH and the monoamine neurotransmitters are present in high concentrations in various regions of lungfish brain. The lungfish may represent a promising model for further studies of the interactions of TRH with these neurotransmitter systems.

  13. Potential Roles of Adropin in Central Nervous System: Review of Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Shahjouei, Shima; Ansari, Saeed; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh; Zand, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Adropin is a 4.9 kDa peptide that is important for maintenance of metabolic and non-metabolic homeostasis. It regulates glucose and fatty acid metabolism and is involved in endothelial cell function and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase bioactivity as well as physical activity and motor coordination. Adropin is expressed in many tissues and organs including central nervous system (CNS). This peptide plays a crucial role in the development of various CNS disorders such as stroke, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder as well as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. In this comprehensive review, the potential roles of adropin in cellular signaling pathways that lead to pathogenesis and/or treatment of CNS disorders will be discussed. PMID:27446928

  14. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy and Applications to Central Nervous System Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huff, Terry B; Shi, Yunzhou; Fu, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging is poised to become a powerful tool in bioimaging given its ability to capitalize on the unique advantages possessed by different NLO imaging modalities. The integration of different imaging modalities such as two-photon-excited fluorescence, sum frequency generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering on the same platform can facilitate simultaneous imaging of different biological structures. Parameters to be considered in constructing a multimodal NLO microscope are discussed with emphasis on achieving a compromise in these parameters for efficient signal generation with each imaging modality. As an example of biomedical applications, multimodal NLO imaging is utilized to investigate the central nervous system in healthy and diseased states.

  15. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy and Applications to Central Nervous System Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Terry B.; Shi, Yunzhou; Fu, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging is poised to become a powerful tool in bioimaging given its ability to capitalize on the unique advantages possessed by different NLO imaging modalities. The integration of different imaging modalities such as two-photon-excited fluorescence, sum frequency generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering on the same platform can facilitate simultaneous imaging of different biological structures. Parameters to be considered in constructing a multimodal NLO microscope are discussed with emphasis on achieving a compromise in these parameters for efficient signal generation with each imaging modality. As an example of biomedical applications, multimodal NLO imaging is utilized to investigate the central nervous system in healthy and diseased states. PMID:19829746

  16. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  17. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse central and peripheral nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Bolon, Brad; Bradley, Alys; Butt, Mark; Czasch, Stephanie; Garman, Robert H; George, Catherine; Gröters, Sibylle; Krinke, Georg; Little, Peter; McKay, Jenny; Narama, Isao; Rao, Deepa; Shibutani, Makoto; Sills, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Harmonization of diagnostic nomenclature used in the pathology analysis of tissues from rodent toxicity studies will enhance the comparability and consistency of data sets from different laboratories worldwide. The INHAND Project (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) is a joint initiative of four major societies of toxicologic pathology to develop a globally recognized nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions in rodents. This article recommends standardized terms for classifying changes observed in tissues of the mouse and rat central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous systems. Sources of material include academic, government, and industrial histopathology databases from around the world. Covered lesions include frequent, spontaneous, and aging-related changes as well as principal toxicant-induced findings. Common artifacts that might be confused with genuine lesions are also illustrated. The neural nomenclature presented in this document is also available electronically on the Internet at the goRENI website (http://www.goreni.org/).

  18. Phenotyping the central nervous system of the embryonic mouse by magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, M A; Pacheco-Torres, J; Borrell, V; Canals, S

    2014-08-15

    Genetic mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders are being massively generated, but technologies for their high-throughput phenotyping are missing. The potential of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for structural phenotyping has been demonstrated before. However, application to the embryonic mouse central nervous system has been limited by the insufficient anatomical detail. Here we present a method that combines staining of live embryos with a contrast agent together with MR microscopy after fixation, to provide unprecedented anatomical detail at relevant embryonic stages. By using this method we have phenotyped the embryonic forebrain of Robo1/2(-/-) double mutant mice enabling us to identify most of the well-known anatomical defects in these mutants, as well as novel more subtle alterations. We thus demonstrate the potential of this methodology for a fast and reliable screening of subtle structural abnormalities in the developing mouse brain, as those associated to defects in disease-susceptibility genes of neurologic and psychiatric relevance.

  19. The anatomical and cellular basis of immune surveillance in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, Richard M; Engelhardt, Britta

    2012-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) comprises the brain, spinal cord, optic nerves and retina, and contains post-mitotic, delicate cells. As the rigid coverings of the CNS render swelling dangerous and destructive, inflammatory reactions must be carefully controlled in CNS tissues. Nevertheless, effector immune responses that protect the host during CNS infection still occur in the CNS. Here, we describe the anatomical and cellular basis of immune surveillance in the CNS, and explain how this shapes the unique immunology of these tissues. The Review focuses principally on insights gained from the study of autoimmune responses in the CNS and to a lesser extent on models of infectious disease. Furthermore, we propose a new model to explain how antigen-specific T cell responses occur in the CNS.

  20. [Molecular biology and childhood leukemia: E2A-PBX1 and central nervous system relapse].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. The inclusion of molecular biology techniques in the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of these patients has allowed major treatment achievements in developed countries. One of the best studied gene rearrangements is E2A-PBX1, which predicts isolated central nervous system relapse in patients with ALL. However, further research on the search for new molecular markers related to prognosis of patients with childhood leukemia is required. Such studies need the integration of different disciplines, including epidemiology. Epidemiological studies are needed not only to accelerate the discovery of new molecular markers and new biological signals as to the etiology and pathophysiology of cancer, but also to evaluate the clinical impact of these findings in well-defined populations.

  1. Overview of the Effect and Epidemiology of Parasitic Central Nervous System Infections in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Mallewa, Macpherson; Wilmshurst, Jo M.

    2014-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system are a significant cause of neurologic dysfunction in resource-limited countries, especially in Africa. The prevalence is not known and is most likely underestimated because of the lack of access to accurate diagnostic screens. For children, the legacy of subsequent neurodisability, which affects those who survive, is a major cause of the burden of disease in Africa. Of the parasitic infections with unique effect in Africa, cerebral malaria, neurocysticercosis, human African trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, and schistosomiasis are largely preventable conditions, which are rarely seen in resource-equipped settings. This article reviews the current understandings of these parasitic and other rarer infections, highlighting the specific challenges in relation to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and the complications of coinfection. PMID:24655400

  2. Neuritogenesis: A model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, M. E.; Broglio, T. M.; Worgul, B. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed.

  3. Planar induction of anteroposterior pattern in the developing central nervous system of Xenopus laevis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doniach, T.; Phillips, C. R.; Gerhart, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    It has long been thought that anteroposterior (A-P) pattern in the vertebrate central nervous system is induced in the embryo's dorsal ectoderm exclusively by signals passing vertically from underlying, patterned dorsal mesoderm. Explants from early gastrulae of the frog Xenopus laevis were prepared in which vertical contact between dorsal ectoderm and mesoderm was prevented but planar contact was maintained. In these, four position-specific neural markers (engrailed-2, Krox-20, XlHbox 1, and XlHbox 6) were expressed in the ectoderm in the same A-P order as in the embryo. Thus, planar signals alone, following a path available in the normal embryo, can induce A-P neural pattern.

  4. [Molecular biology and childhood leukemia: E2A-PBX1 and central nervous system relapse].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. The inclusion of molecular biology techniques in the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of these patients has allowed major treatment achievements in developed countries. One of the best studied gene rearrangements is E2A-PBX1, which predicts isolated central nervous system relapse in patients with ALL. However, further research on the search for new molecular markers related to prognosis of patients with childhood leukemia is required. Such studies need the integration of different disciplines, including epidemiology. Epidemiological studies are needed not only to accelerate the discovery of new molecular markers and new biological signals as to the etiology and pathophysiology of cancer, but also to evaluate the clinical impact of these findings in well-defined populations. PMID:26509298

  5. Congenital central nervous system malformations and vinyl chloride monomer exposure: a community study.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, L D; Anderson, C E; Flynt, J W; James, L M

    1978-04-01

    Incidence rates for central nervous system (CNS) malformations in infants born to residents of Kanawha County, West Virginia, 1970-1974, were significantly higher than comparable United States rates during those years. Since Kanawha County contains a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymerization plant, a case-control study was conducted on the possible relationship between the occurrence of CNS defects and parental occupational or residential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer emissions from this plant. No relationship with parental occupation was found. While a tendency was noted for residences of case families to be located in an area northeast of the plant, this observation did not entirely correlate with existing data on local patterns of wind direction and air pollution.

  6. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system due to chronic hemorrhage from a giant invasive prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Jacob; Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Fraifeld, Shifra; Moscovici, Samuel; Rosenthal, Guy; Shoshan, Yigal; Itshayek, Eyal

    2013-07-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare disorder caused by deposition of hemosiderin in neuronal tissue in the subpial layer of the CNS due to slow subarachnoid or intraventricular hemorrhage. The most common neurologic manifestations include progressive gait ataxia, sensorineural hearing loss, and corticospinal tract signs. We present a case of superficial siderosis in a 43-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department with sudden onset bilateral visual deterioration and a loss of consciousness. A hemorrhagic giant prolactinoma was diagnosed based on brain CT scan, T1-weighted MRI, and an endocrine blood examination. Susceptibility-weighted non-contrast MRI showed pathognomonic signs of superficial siderosis in the form of a hypointensity rim surrounding the brainstem, cerebellar fissures, and cranial nerves VII and VIII. This report demonstrates that superficial siderosis can be caused by pituitary apoplexy.

  7. Insulin, C-peptide, hyperglycemia, and central nervous system complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sima, Anders A F; Kamiya, Hideki; Kamiya, Hideke; Li, Zhen Guo

    2004-04-19

    Diabetes is an increasingly common disorder which causes and contributes to a variety of central nervous system (CNS) complications which are often associated with cognitive deficits. There appear to be two types of diabetic encephalopathy. Primary diabetic encephalopathy is caused by hyperglycemia and impaired insulin action, which evolves in a diabetes duration-related fashion and is associated with apoptotic neuronal loss and cognitive decline. This appears to be particularly associated with insulin-deficient diabetes. Secondary diabetic encephalopathy appears to arise from hypoxic-ischemic insults due to underlying microvascular disease or as a consequence of hypoglycemia. This type of cerebral diabetic complication is more common in the type 2 diabetic population. Here, we will review the clinical and experimental data supporting this conceptual division of diabetic CNS complications and discuss the underlying metabolic, molecular, and functional aberrations.

  8. Pleiotrophin as a central nervous system neuromodulator, evidences from the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    González-Castillo, Celia; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Pallàs, Mercè; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor, and also a cytokine, associated with the extracellular matrix, which has recently starting to attract attention as a significant neuromodulator with multiple neuronal functions during development. PTN is expressed in several tissues, where its signals are generally related with cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation by acting through different receptors. In Central Nervous System (CNS), PTN exerts post-developmental neurotrophic and -protective effects, and additionally has been involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neural disorders. Studies in Drosophila shed light on some aspects of the different levels of regulatory control of PTN invertebrate homologs. Specifically in hippocampus, recent evidence from PTN Knock-out (KO) mice involves PTN functioning in learning and memory. In this paper, we summarize, discuss, and contrast the most recent advances and results that lead to proposing a PTN as a neuromodulatory molecule in the CNS, particularly in hippocampus. PMID:25620911

  9. Potential use of microarray technology for rapid identification of central nervous system pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Eric H; Niemeyer, Debra M; Folio, Les; Agan, Brian K; Rowley, Robb K

    2004-08-01

    Outbreaks of central nervous system (CNS) diseases result in significant productivity and financial losses, threatening peace and wartime readiness capabilities. To meet this threat, rapid clinical diagnostic tools for detecting and identifying CNS pathogens are needed. Current tools and techniques cannot efficiently deal with CNS pathogen diversity; they cannot provide real-time identification of pathogen serogroups and strains, and they require days, sometimes weeks, for examination of tissue culture. Rapid and precise CNS pathogen diagnostics are needed to provide the opportunity for tailored therapeutic regimens and focused preventive efforts to decrease morbidity and mortality. Such diagnostics are available through genetic and genomic technologies, which have the potential for reducing the time required in serogroup or strain identification from 500+ hours for some viral cultures to less than 3 hours for all pathogens. In the near future, microarray diagnostics and future derivations of these technologies will change the paradigm used for outbreak investigations and will improve health care for all. PMID:15379069

  10. Helminth parasitic infections of the central nervous system: a diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmad A; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Ganna, Ahmed A

    2014-04-01

    Helminth parasitic infections of the central nervous system (CNS) occur worldwide with high prevalence in tropical and subtropical countries. Clinical evaluation of patients is mandatory, and it is convenient to group the clinical manifestations into syndromes: for example space-occupying lesions, meningitis, and encephalitis. The history should focus on residence or travel to endemic areas, diet, activities, intercurrent medical conditions, and associated clinical clues. Direct parasitological diagnosis can be reached by cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral tissue examination either by microscopy, culture, or immunological techniques. Immunodiagnosis by detection of parasite antibodies or antigens in serum could provide indirect evidence of parasitic infections. In addition, various imaging and radiological techniques e.g., computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) complement the diagnostic work-up of CNS diseases. Finally, the helminthic CNS infections of global impact, such as schistosomiasis, neurotoxocariasis, Strongyloides infection, neurotrichinosis, neurocysticercosis, and echinococcosis will be briefly discussed as regards the principal clinical and diagnostic features.

  11. Pharmacological evaluation of Pachyrrhizus erosus (L) seeds for central nervous system depressant activity.

    PubMed

    Abid, Mohd; Hrishikeshavan, H J; Asad, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    The research work deals with the screening of ethanol and chloroform extracts of Pachyrrhizus erosus seeds for central nervous system (CNS) depressant activity. The Pachyrrhizus erosus seed is known to contain rotinoids, flavonoids and phenylfuranocoumarin derivatives as chemical components and is reported to have antifungal, antisecretory, insecticides, antibacterial and spasmolytic activity. Since seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus is used as folk medicine in treatment of insomnia, we made an attempt to study its CNS depressant effect. The different activities studied were potentiation of pentobarbitone-induced sleep, test for locomotor activity, effect on muscle co-ordination, antiaggressive and antianxiety activities. The result of the study reflected that ethanol extract of the seeds (150 mg/kg, p.o) decreased locomotor activity, produced muscle relaxation and showed antianxiety and antiaggressive activity. PMID:17051733

  12. Use of Angong Niuhuang in Treating Central Nervous System Diseases and Related Research

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Yan, Shaohua; Xu, Lipeng; Zhu, Gexin; Yu, Xiaotong; Tong, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    In Chinese medicine-based therapeutics, Angong Niuhuang pill (ANP) is one of the three most effective formulas for febrile diseases, and it is also used to treat other diseases. This paper reviews current knowledge regarding the clinical and pharmacological effects of ANP for treating different central nervous system (CNS) diseases to confirm its validity and efficacy. These diseases are like centric fever, coma, stroke, and viral encephalitis. This review reveals that various diseases could be treated using the same agent, which is one of the most important principles of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). According to the “Same Treatment for Different Diseases” principle, ANP might be efficacious in other CNS diseases. PMID:25587341

  13. Ephrins as negative regulators of adult neurogenesis in diverse regions of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian-wei; Feldheim, David A.; Chen, Dong Feng

    2008-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals, neurogenesis occurs in only two restricted areas, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from other CNS regions suggests that their neurogenic potential is dictated by local environmental cues. Here, we report that astrocytes in areas outside of the SGZ and SVZ of adult mice express high levels of ephrin-A2 and -A3, which present an inhibitory niche, negatively regulating neural progenitor cell growth. Adult mice lacking both ephrin-A2 and -A3 display active ongoing neurogenesis throughout the CNS. These findings suggest that neural cell replacement therapies for neurodegeneration or injury in the adult CNS may be achieved by manipulating ephrin signaling pathways. PMID:18562299

  14. Molecular imaging as a guide for the treatment of central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euitae; Howes, Oliver D; Kapur, Shitij

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging techniques have a number of advantages for research into the pathophysiology and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Firstly, they provide a noninvasive means of characterizing physiological processes in the living brain, enabling molecular alterations to be linked to clinical changes. Secondly, the pathophysiological target in a given CNS disorder can be measured in animal models and in experimental human models in the same way, which enables translational research. Moreover, as molecular imaging facilitates the detection of functional change which precedes gross pathology, it is particularly useful for the early diagnosis and treatment of CNS disorders. This review considers the application of molecular imaging to CNS disorders focusing on its potential to inform the development and evaluation of treatments. We focus on schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, depression, and dementia as major CNS disorders. We also review the potential of molecular imaging to guide new drug development for CNS disorders.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  16. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS.

  17. Neuritogenesis: a model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, M E; Broglio, T M; Worgul, B V; Benton, E V

    1994-01-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed. PMID:11538028

  18. International Central Nervous System and Ocular Lymphoma Workshop: Recommendations for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Hochman, Jacob; Gottesman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To bring together multidisciplinary experts to discuss primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL). Methods NIH campus workshop discussion focusing on future work in both clinical and basic lymphoma research. Results The discussion lead to recommendations on elucidating disease pathobiology, improving diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity, and novel therapeutic strategies. Conclusions Approaches which have been successfully applied to other neoplasms, such as microarray, may be applied to improve diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of PCNSL and PIOL and should be systematically incorporated into clinical trials of both. Development of animal models of PCNSL and PIOL may be useful in understanding the unique ocular and CNS milieu. Disease detection by radiological, nuclear medicine, molecular and flow cytometric approaches should be systematically studied to improve early diagnosis, accurate staging, and response evaluation. Improved therapy remains the ultimate goal. Efforts in these arenas should be coordinated on a national and international level. PMID:16827214

  19. Pleiotrophin as a central nervous system neuromodulator, evidences from the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Celia; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Pallàs, Mercè; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor, and also a cytokine, associated with the extracellular matrix, which has recently starting to attract attention as a significant neuromodulator with multiple neuronal functions during development. PTN is expressed in several tissues, where its signals are generally related with cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation by acting through different receptors. In Central Nervous System (CNS), PTN exerts post-developmental neurotrophic and -protective effects, and additionally has been involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neural disorders. Studies in Drosophila shed light on some aspects of the different levels of regulatory control of PTN invertebrate homologs. Specifically in hippocampus, recent evidence from PTN Knock-out (KO) mice involves PTN functioning in learning and memory. In this paper, we summarize, discuss, and contrast the most recent advances and results that lead to proposing a PTN as a neuromodulatory molecule in the CNS, particularly in hippocampus.

  20. Recent Advances of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ligen; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that trigger the activation of caspases-1 and subsequently the maturation of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. These cytokines play a critical role in mediating inflammation and innate immunity response. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is the best characterized, which has been demonstrated as a crucial role in various diseases. Here, we review recently described mechanisms that are involved in the activation and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, we summarize the recent researches on the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including traumatic brain injury, ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke, brain tumor, neurodegenerative diseases, and other CNS diseases. In conclusion, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising therapeutic target for these CNS diseases.